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Tell us about your Geisha art, and how your time in the far east impacted you as a person and an artist.

Living in Japan and traveling in China, Korea and Thailand changed me in so many ways. There is an entire body of creative research that discusses the way a person living in a foreign culture becomes highly charged in terms of their creative thinking and output. The way the brain takes in a whole different way of being: a new language, a different system of transportation, unusual food enables new ways of being creative because the brain is synthesizing so much information, one’s comprehension expands in a very unique way. My time in Asia was the most prolific in terms of output. Not to mention the added inspiration that comes from being in a place where such care is taken to make everything beautiful. The end of my time in Japan coincided with some devastating events in my personal life which made me not even want to think about my life there for a quite some time. I made the Geisha art a couple of years later as a way of reintegrating the experience of living in Japan into my life. Once again, a meditation. You’ve had periods where you lost all interest in creating art. Can you tell us more about how these little deaths and rebirths reflect your life and/or shape your art?

At the risk of sounding dramatic, I have always felt that making art was a spiritual act, inasmuch as it is the thing that connects me most to my source. I had only one long period where I made no art at all and it was like death. I felt that I was completely off track, that I had lost the thread of my life, that I had lost touch with the divine. It was terrifying. After that period ended, I think I realized what art really had been

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Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

Splat Art Magazine May/June 2011  

underground art magazine

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