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Red&Black The

The Miss UGA contestants are more than pretty faces. See why on page 3.

An independent student newspaper serving the University of Georgia community ESTABLISHED 1893, INDEPENDENT 1980

Friday, January 15, 2010

www.redandblack.com

Vol. 117, No. 84 | Athens, Georgia

Student held down, assaulted in dorm By JACOB DEMMITT THE RED & BLACK A University student told police he was held against his will and assaulted Tuesday night in his Reed Hall dorm room by three individuals, according to University Police. At 9:39 p.m., three unknown individuals knocked on a 19-yearold male student’s door. The student told police that after he opened the door, he was assault-

ed and held down as the alleged assailants appeared to search his room. The assailants eventually left without taking anything. University Police Lt. Eric Dellinger said investigators were still looking into the identities of the alleged assailants. “There was nothing to indicate they were students,” he said. Dellinger said the student’s injuries were not serious. “As far as I know, the victim’s injuries were not that severe and

Lady Dogs’ streak ends

he was not transported to the hospital,” he said. With hand scanners, security cameras and 24-hour desk assistants, Reed Hall “has the same type of security as any other building,” Rich Gibson, Director of Residence Hall Education and Services, said. “Students are supposed to go through hand scanners, but if someone finds another way in, that would be a breach in security. We don’t encourage that and try to teach students

not to allow it.” When asked how the residence halls plan to keep such an incident from happening again, Gibson said, “I don’t know how to respond to that. We don’t know how they got in.” Gibson said it is important for students to help keep future incidents from occurring by following security guidelines. “I hope residents feel safe, and I believe we have systems in place to help them be safe, but [students]

share in the responsibility,” he said. “It’s a community policing concept, and it only works as well as the people living in the community.” However, Reed Hall resident Shauna Taylor, a sophomore from Atlanta, said security may not be as effective as it appears. “It would be really easy to sneak in,” she said. “We have handicap doors outside, so they stay open for a good 30 seconds before they close. Anyone could easily slip in behind you.”

HOMELESS SHELTERS STRUGGLE LIKE THOSE THEY SERVE

By BEN BUSSARD THE RED & BLACK The Georgia women’s basketball team’s 16-game winning streak and the best start in program history came to an end in very unimpressive fashion on Thursday night in Nashville, Tenn., as the Lady Dogs lost to the 24th-ranked Vanderbilt Commodores by a score of 66-44. Georgia (16-1, 3-1) scored a season-low 44 points on 37 percent shooting, and allowed five Vanderbilt (13-4, 2-2) players to reach double figures while allowing 26 points in the paint. “My concern is with the fundamental things, the simple things that we talk about and our lack of follow through and executing those things,” head coach Andy Landers said. “Our post players didn’t take advantage of the game. We got kicked on the boards, we didn’t score inside, we didn’t attack inside.” LANDERS Georgia’s offense struggled as the Lady Dogs shot just 37 percent from the field and was out rebounded 39-24. With the score in Vandy’s favor at 46-40 at the 10:18 mark of the second half, the Lady Dogs would go on a six minute scoring drought as the Commodores scored 16 unanswered points. Sloppy offensive play plagued Georgia as the Lady Dogs coughed up 19 turnovers leading to a 62-40 deficit with just over five minutes to go. Two free throws from freshman Jasmine James ended the scoreless streak for the Lady Dogs but the points proved to be moot as Vanderbilt would score 22 points off of Georgia turnovers and seal the 22-point victory. The Lady Dogs will have to regroup as they head to Fayetteville, Ark., to take on the Arkansas Razorbacks (8-9, 0-4) Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m.

Beds, meals more scarce in winter By ASHLEY HIEB THE RED & BLACK Barbara Andersen does not always answer her phone. Andersen, the co-director of Bigger Vision of Athens, which provides an emergency homeless shelter for the community, said she has to stop taking calls when the 16 spaces available at the shelter are full — the shelter is also in a state of need. “Tonight, I’m the only overnight staff member,” Andersen said Monday. Bigger Vision’s shelter — which operates from Oct. 15 to April 15 — must have at least two evening staff members and two overnight staff members to function properly.

Athens volunteers ready for MLK Day By RAISA HABERSHAM THE RED & BLACK Disney is offering free tickets in exchange for a day of service — something one student called “a pleasant surprise.” Josh Delaney, president of the Black Student Union, said he had no idea his organization would receive free tickets for their Martin Luther King Jr. Day volunteer work when they signed up to help Hands On Northeast Georgia, a service organization which creates a variety of volunteer opportunities in the region. “We started actively getting prepared to do the event in the beginning of October and planning started in November,” he said. “We met with Vanessa Smith in the Office of Institutional Diversity, and she got us connected with Hands On Northeast Georgia. We didn’t find out about the Disney pass until after the fact.” Delaney said his organization will be volunteering at three sites, including the Northeast Georgia Food Bank. “The Hands On network and Disney Parks partnered together to promote the project,” said Art Ordoqui-Payton, program director for Hands On Northeast See MLK, Page 3

PHOTOS BY DANIEL SHIREY | The Red & Black

S (Top) Volunteers at the Bigger Vision of Athens emergency homeless shelter dish out hot food. (Middle) A chili and cracker dinner keeps a shelter visitor from going hungry. (Bottom) Two patrons share a meal.

ON THE WEB A new farmers market now offers fresh milk, meats and produce to Athens year-round. Page 5

partly cloudy. High 62| Low 36

Index

ON THE WEB

464 77 37 4

See SHELTER, Page 2

The estimated number of homeless persons in Athens-Clarke County. The number of beds available in AthensClarke County homeless shelters. The average low temperature in degrees Farenheit for Athens-Clarke County for the next seven days. The number of homeless shelters in AthensClarke County.

*Source: Keith McNeely, director of Athens Clarke-County Department of Human and Economic Development.

BACK IN THE SWING OF THINGS

Freshman defensive end Montez Robinson felt the wrath of the University’s Office of Judicial Programs. Go to redandblack.com for more. News ........................ 2 Opinions .................. 4

“We need more help,” she said. University student groups like Athens PBJs work closely with Bigger Vision and other homeless shelters in Athens to improve conditions for homeless people. Athens PBJs, which started in January of 2008, is a student-run group that focuses on building relations between homeless citizens and students. “There’s a need for students to reach out to [homeless people],” said Robert Thrasher, co-founder and director of Athens PBJs. The organization is open to anyone interested, and as many as 80 people have

Variety .....................3 Sports ...................... 5

Freshman tennis player Bo Seal is finally settled after years of traveling for tournaments. See how he got here on page 6. Crossword ...............2 Sudoku .................... 5


NEWS

2 | Friday, January 15, 2010 | The Red & Black

Georgia House Bill seeks legalization of raw milk sales By DALLAS DUNCAN THE RED & BLACK

tion. In October, 110 gallons of raw, unpasteurized milk were dumped in Athens after a South Carolina dairy transported them across state lines for distribution at a local farmer’s market. Eric Wagoner, head of Athens Locally Grown, commented on the October dump. “A lot of people were depending on that milk,” he said. He said he was pleased when he found out about MCKILLIP the proposed bill. “I was glad it was introduced, that there are legislators out there that care about what’s going on,” he said. Wagoner said he is in favor of a raw milk law similar to the one in South Carolina. He said the bill going through

It’s not straight from a cow, but if a Georgia House Bill passes, students who see raw milk on grocery store shelves won’t have to worry about getting arrested for buying it. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Bobby Franklin (R-Marietta), sets out to legalize the sale of raw milk in Georgia for human consumption — without any regulation. “I believe that raw milk should be made available to consumers in the state if they want it,” Rep. Doug McKillip, (D-Athens), said. But he added raw milk should have some safety regulations. “Raw milk contains some things that can be bad for you,” he said. McKillip said governmental regulations come into effect for milk when it is bottled and shipped out for human consump-

the Georgia legislature was wide open and producers could sell with no restrictions whatsoever. McKillip said the bill was read on the floor of the Georgia House of Representatives and referred to the House Committee on Agriculture and Consumer Affairs this week. However, the committee will not meet to discuss the bill for two to three weeks. He said if Franklin will not amend the bill, he will introduce his own bill providing for safety regulations. “I haven’t had an opportunity to talk to [Franklin] about it,” McKillip said. Franklin declined to comment about the bill. Steve Nickerson, a professor in the animal and dairy science department, said passing this bill would be a step backwards and could lead to more bacteria outbreaks — including E. coli. According to documents

Nickerson provided to The Red & Black, at least one 2007 bacteria outbreak in Georgia was reportedly caused by raw milk, though there may have been other causes for the disease. In 2008, a family became ill with the same bacterial infection after drinking raw milk from their farm, the documents state. The cause of the illness is still unconfirmed because the family refused to submit samples of the raw milk they consumed to the state so that it could be tested for evidence of bacteria. “Unfortunately, people for some reason believe pasteurized milk is less healthy than raw milk,” Nickerson said. He said if the bill was passed, it would not affect production at the University’s Teaching Dairy. “We don’t pasteurize our own milk but we’ll only sell to facilities that do pasteurize it,” he said. Technically, raw milk is already

SHELTER: Beds fill as temperatures drop ¢From Page 1 volunteered at one time. “[Sunday] we had 60 people or more,” Thrasher, a senior from Atlanta, said. Four hundred and sixty four individuals in the Athens area are homeless, said Keith McNeely, director of the Athens-Clarke County Human and Economic Development Department. “There’s a great need for bridging the two communities into one,” Thrasher said, referring to the homeless population and the student population in Athens. And though students walking downtown see meters on sidewalks asking for spare change for the homeless, they may not understand the many shelters’ needs. “Students may not be fully aware of the homeless shelter situations,” Thrasher said. 58 percent of homeless people in Georgia couldn’t

get into a shelter in 2007, according to the National Alliance to End Homelessness. This was well over the national average of 42 percent. Students from the University’s School of Social Work intern at Athens Area Homeless Shelter, where they act as administrative staff members. Shelter representatives said it is doing well but is always full. Representatives from the Salvation Army, which is located on Hawthorne Avenue, said it also has a large number of students and student groups who volunteer. “The more the community provides, the more we can provide,” said Robert Parker, corps officer for the Athens Salvation Army. With 55 beds, the Salvation Army is one of the largest shelters in Athens. “We haven’t had to turn

Forum feeds dialogue By TIFFANY STEVENS THE RED & BLACK

DANIEL SHIREY | The Red & Black

S A patron of the Bigger Vision of Athens homeless shelter eats a warm meal while temperatures skirt freezing outside. anyone away yet because of lack of space,” Parker said. Though representatives from other shelters said they think the shelters operate effectively, Andersen said there’s always room to improve. “We still could do better,” she said. When Andersen’s 16 beds at Bigger Vision are full, Walk on Water Ministries helps with the overflow of adults each

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available for sale in the state — but not legally for human consumption, Nickerson said. “People sell it — basically illegally — for people to drink because they sell it as pet food,” he said. Nickerson said he didn’t think making the sale of raw milk legal would have much effect on Georgia’s dairy industry. “What it could do is give milk a bad name [because of potential disease outbreaks],” he said. He said if an outbreak occurred, liability would remain with the dairy that produced the milk. McKillip, however, said he thinks the dairy industry will grow and provide economic benefits to the state if the bill passes. “Allowing raw milk sales actually greatly encourages small dairy farmers,” he said. “Properly regulated, I don’t see why we shouldn’t sell raw milk.”

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Students at the University will have the opportunity to discuss immigration in the U.S. at today’s Russell Library Informal Forum. Jan Levinson, coordinator for the Russell Forum for Civic Life, said the forums are a place where the community can discuss tough issues in a civil manner. “It’s a deliberative forum where we’ll look at three different solutions that people feel will help in solving the immigration problem,” she said. “So it’s just a calm...way of looking at an issue that is very controversial.” Jill Severn, head of access and outreach at the Russell Library, said they chose an immigration theme because of its relevance to the state. “Georgia has really high percentages of people who have immigrated from all over and that are reshaping how the state is and how the University is,” Severn said. “We’re a public institution, and should be offering education to everyone.” The discussion will focus

IMMIGRATION FORUM When: Today from 3-4:30 p.m. Where: Russell Library (located on the right side of the main library) on immigration from a social, cultural and economic standpoint. “We’re not pitting one against another,” Levinson said. “There’s no winner or loser, and people can walk away saying, ‘Well, I liked something from the first approach, and the second approach.’” Diversity in approaches and perspectives make the forums interesting, Severn said. “What’s really important at a deliberative forum is whether we have a wide variety of voices represented, and whether everyone feels comfortable enough to speak,” she said. Severn said students who attend will be able to learn more about an important issue and exchange ideas. “They’ll get a chance to talk about it in an atmosphere that moves beyond ‘I’m right and you’re wrong,’” she said.


NEWS & VARIETY

The Red & Black | Friday, January 15, 2010 | 3

Movie follows vets post-Iraq Ben Foster and Woody Harrelson star in this heartbreaking, yet unique and relevant film. After Army Staff Sergeant Will Montgomery (Ben Foster) is injured in Iraq he returns home, but the re-adjustment is a little more difficult than he planned. Physically he has an eye and leg injured, but it is obvious that his internal, emotional wounds run far deeper. The girl he grew up with and left behind (Jena Malone) has moved on, though not entirely. She keeps one hand in his life even when she’s planning her wedding to one of his former hometown friends. Will’s direction and what he wants out of life isn’t clear. He struggles throughout the movie to get anywhere emotionally concrete. It’s the struggle of the healing process that makes this film so bittersweet. With three months left of service in the Army, Will is assigned to the Army’s Casualty Notification Service. His trainer and partner, Captain Tony Stone (Woody Harrelson, who has been nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor for this film), is a recovering alcoholic who is emotionally unavailable

THE VERDICT: While I think a bit more editing would have brought the film down to a more reasonable length, its run time would not deter me from recommending it. At the bottom line, it’s nothing if not moving. and completely detached from the suffering and pain his job forces him to deliver to families. Will feels his own heroic status is undeserved while simultaneously resenting Tony’s lack of combat experience and jealousy over his ability to deliver the news of loss seemingly without it affecting him. In truth, it is heartbreakingly obvious that the effects of his forced detachment have warped Tony’s life into an empty existence. While telling a young wife named Olivia (Samantha Morton) she’s now a widow, Will finds something unsettling about her reaction. To Olivia, her husband’s return from his first tour in Iraq brought home a man entirely different from the one who left her. She has been mourning the death of the man she fell in love

with for a while before he died. We’ve all heard how the “war on terrorism� has affected the men and women in combat, but it’s bracing and horrifying to see a portrayal of how it affects the families that lose a loved one. Something in the regret and guilt both Olivia and Will feel brings them together, though it’s a far cry from a love story. It feels almost intrusive watching the way the two struggle with their own demons, while trying to justify their feelings for each other. Malone was sorely miscast as the old flame, while in my opinion, Harrelson earned his Golden Globe nod. Ben Foster is wonderful in his role, and perhaps his most moving scene is his first encounter with a grieving father, played by Steve Buscemi. No matter how much I tried to not let my emotions get the best of me during that scene, I cried. Three days later it still sticks in my mind. While the film might be an amazing anti-war message, that’s not the primary intention. Above all, it shows that, emotionally, we can heal. —Paige Parker is a contributor for the Red & Black

Courtesy George Schmalz

S ‘The Messenger’ poignantly captures the lives of two members of the Army’s Casualty Notification Service.

Iranian students fear Miss UGA more passion than pageant for rights back home By WYNN SAMMONS THE RED & BLACK

By DIANA PEREZ THE RED & BLACK The re-election of Iranian P resident Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has had massive implications in Iran — and some University students are worried about how the elections may affect their own lives. Raha Sabet, a junior and president of the Persian Student Union, is a firstgeneration IranianAmerican. She said she has been paying close attention to the events in Iran. “The protests going on right now essentially go back to June, when the presidential elections were announced,� Sabet said. “Everyone thought [MirHossein] Mousavi should have won, but he didn’t. So people thought the election was rigged.� Sabet said both her parents immigrated to the U.S. from Iran. “My father immigrated before the Islamic revolution in 1979, and my mom came after the revolution,� she said. “Before the Islamic revolution, Iran was a free state. It wasn’t a theocracy, so people had more freedom to do what they wanted and to wear whatever they wanted.� Amir Asiai, a doctoral student from Tehran, Iran,

said news from outside Iran usually does not reach Iranians. “We [Iranians] would like to be free, have freedom of speech and elect our own president. Since June, people have not rested,� he said. “Now that I am outside the country, I feel like I cannot do much for the people inside, except to tell people of what is going on in Iran.� Asiai said Iranians have been protesting since June in all of the major cities of Iran. “Violence went back up in December when there were protests during the holy day of Ashura,� Raha said. Ashura is a holiday celebrated by Shia Muslims commemorating the death of Husayn ibn Ali, a grandson of the prophet Muhammad. “I think it’s our duty as citizens of the world to care about inhumane acts anywhere they happen,� Sabet said. “People should know that others are sacrificing their lives for democracy and the U.S. has a huge role to play.� For Asiai, it’s more about the people of Iran. “I just want to help Iranian people gain their human rights,� Asiai said. “That is all I care about.�

MLK: Service spots fill ¢From Page 1 Georgia. “Any Hands On agency can participate.â€? Ordoqui-Payton said Disney Parks is doing its own promotions that are not connected with the service day event his organization sponsors. “Disney’s [event] is a year-long event. The MLK Day of Service is something that is our organized project,â€? he said. “We’ve been doing this for eight years and it’s grown significantly every year.â€? All 29 of Hands On Northeast Georgia’s project sites are full, but potential volunteers can find more opportunities to help out on Disney’s Web site. Ordoqui-Payton said those unable to volunteer can make monetary donations through AthensMLKDay.org. Last year, there were 800 volunteers from the Athens community alone, Ordoqui-Payton added. Delaney said he thinks volunteer opportunities filled quickly because of Disney’s incentive. “We had 60 slots to fill and they filled up in two days,â€? he said. “I guess the Disney passes were pretty motivating.â€? He said the most important reason to volunteer is to do his part to be a citizen in Athens.

We’ve all seen and heard the vomit-inducing speeches, the banal platitudes, the fake tans and scandal that can mar your typical American beauty pageant. It’s undeniable. Yet, at the same time, in a society where we’re quicker to be cynical than sentimental all too often, there are pageants where contestants truly mean what they say and, more importantly, practice what they preach. The contestants participating in the Miss UGA 2010 Pageant are such human beings, not your typical beauty obsessed cutthroats we’ve become accustomed to. In fact, one contestant isn’t even comfortable wearing heels. “I just bought a pair of heels that I haven’t broken in yet,� Natasha Lee, a junior from Peachtree City, said. “I don’t usually wear make-up or heels. Pageants are something completely new to me.� Lee plans to use her pageant experience to promote her affiliation with TOMS Shoes, an organization that donates shoes to countries in poverty.

Lee herself has participated with the company on a trip to Argentina to donate shoes. “I’ve seen first hand how TOMS shoes can make a difference. It’s not like I just went to the Web site and looked at it. I actually did it,� Lee said. “People, I think, sometimes aren’t sure how to make a change, but there are so many organizations out that you can join to help make a change.� In fact, just by joining the competition each contestant makes a change, because every candi- RACANELLI date is required to raise $100 for the Children’s Miracle Network just to get their foot in the door. So it is no wonder that most of the contestants balk at the notion that the pageant is a shallow vanity contest. “I would tell people to educate themselves more about the competition and how the past winners are involved,� Lia Racanelli, a junior pre-journalism, graphic design and

printmaking major from Lynchburg, Virginia, said. Racanelli is involved with Prevent Child Abuse. “To win the competition would be great for me because it would be a great way to advocate my work with PCA,� she said. You won’t find one contestant in this pageant who isn’t passionate about a certain cause. Morgan Pawl, a junior from Chicago, sees the pageant as an opportunity to raise money for cancer research, a cause she knows all too well. Pawl’s mother passed away from breast cancer her freshman year, and her father now is suffering from cancer. “I haven’t been on the same track these last few years, so I want to use this pageant as an opportunity to step out of my comfort zone and get back to being involved,� Pawl said. There’s a lot more at stake in this competition than meets the eye for a lot of these contestants, including Pawl. The crown seems secondary to the cause each of these contestants stands for.

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4| Friday, January 15, 2010 | The Red & Black

Chelsea Cook | Editor in Chief editor@randb.com Daniel Burnett | Managing Editor me@randb.com Yasmin Yonis | Opinions Editor opinions@randb.com

Opinions

Phone (706) 433-3002 | Fax (706) 433-3033 opinions@randb.com | www.redandblack.com 540 Baxter Street, Athens, Ga. 30605

Courtesy UGA Admissions

S Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes became the first African-American students to attend the University of Georgia in 1961.

Our Take

Majority opinions of The Red & Black’s editorial board

A long way coming The University has changed greatly since the days of racial segregation

Look around you. The campus you see stands in stark contrast to the campus of 1960. Back then, there was no MLC. There were no computers. And there were no African-American students. We have come far in those five decades. Since Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter first stepped onto campus in 1961 as the first African-American students, our campus has drastically changed. MLK Day celebrates not just one man, but an entire movement toward racial and economic equality. But there is more work to be done. There are 464 homeless people in Athens, said Keith McNeely, the director of the AthensClarke County Human and Economic Development Department. A report on the ACC Web site lists the poverty rate in the county as 28 percent. The Georgia Department of Education lists Athens’ high school graduation rates as some of the lowest in the state, with Clarke Central’s graduation rate at 68.7 percent and Cedar Shoals High School coming in at 62.2 percent. In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. and the movement he and so many others championed, consider volunteering this weekend and in the future. Volunteer for Athens PBJ — a group that distributes food to Athens’ homeless. Mentor a child. Drop a few coins in the parking meter that collects money for the homeless. We’ve changed the racial makeup of campus. Now let’s help change the economic makeup of Athens. —Daniel Burnett for the editorial board.

Mailbox

E-mail and letters from our readers

Georgia’s students strive hard to keep scholarship In response to Fitzpatrick’s letter “Tuition must increase to keep quality,” I find it ridiculous to assume that the burden of raising more money for the University should be placed solely on in-state students. Yes, 79 percent of the University is made up of in-state students and a large number of us have HOPE, but why should we be punished for working hard in high school and college to earn and keep the scholarship? Furthermore, he mentions how the University lacks diversity of out-ofstate students. I ask Fitzpatrick to ask around about his fellow students. He will find that it is much more competitive to be admitted to UGA for in-state students than out-of-state. UGA is hardly discriminating the out-of-state students like he claims. He also mentions how SGA President Barlow claimed our University’s ranking could be associated with the belief that tuition is too low. Is it

impossible to believe that the education we receive here is better than most colleges who charge similar prices? Fitzpatrick’s solution to charge in-state student more tuition but not let it be covered by HOPE is in no way an answer to the problem of UGA’s strained budget. We may be in a time when funds are little and UGA does not have as much money as it has in the past, but attacking and overcharging in-state students is not the answer. DREXEL NEUMANN Freshman, Marietta Biochemistry and molecular biology

LETTERS POLICY Letters must include name, year in school, hometown, phone number, major or job title or other appropriate identification. Letters are edited for spelling or grammar and can be subject to editing for length, style and libelous material. All letters will be published — either in print or online.

Make a difference in the Classic City W e rush past them as we walk around downtown, we wait behind them in the grocery line and drive past their homes on Baxter Street. But we barely afford them a glance. We are consumed by our own lives. Meetings on Monday. Paper due Tuesday. Test on Wednesday. Date night for Thursday. Thank God it’s Friday. Between the hedges on Saturday. Studying on Sunday. So, we must not have had a chance to notice that we live in the fifth-poorest county of its size in the nation. We didn’t know that was a housing project across from Bolton Dining Hall. And hungry children? They only exist in depressing latenight infomercials. I barely left campus freshman year. I was too focused on my grades, friends, student organization work and pursuing the complete “college experience” to notice the poverty right outside the Arch. Like many of you, I thought I would come to Athens for four years packed with classes, football games and memories with friends. I thought I would graduate with my degree and say adios to Athens. I didn’t expect to fall in love with the Classic City. And I sure didn’t think there was any substantial difference I could make during the short period of time I would be here. Judge Steve Jones changed all that. He spoke to my policy class two years ago about teen pregnancy issues, single-mother

News Editor: Carey O’Neil Associate News Editor: Mimi Ensley Sports Editor: Rachel Bowers Variety Editor: Courtney Smith Photo Editor: Katherine Poss Design Editors: Lauren Bellamy, Haley Temple Copy Editor: Beth Pollak Recruitment Editor: Brittany Binowski Editorial Cartoonist: Bill Richards Editorial Adviser: Ed Morales Editorial Assistant: Casey Bridgeman

households, overburdened schools and the countless homeless people in Athens he has confronted as a superior court judge for AthensClarke and Oconee Counties. At first it all sounded like the same old song. Communities around the nation faced the same problem. What made Athens any different? Athens is different because twothirds of poor families work. Athens is different because one in four of those kids I see when I drive around Athens live in poverty. Athens is different because so few Clarke Central High School students make it down past Baxter Street’s strip clubs, liquor stores and housing projects to attend this great University. Outside our beautiful campus lies a community where many people struggle to keep a roof over their heads, food on the table and their families intact for one more day. He made their reality real for me. As chairman of OneAthens, a local organization that is working to pull 30,000 Athens residents out of poverty, Jones has helped make a difference in changing Athens’s failing schools by creating mentoring and job programs, extending

— Yasmin Yonis is the opinions editor for The Red & Black.

Experience the real pleasure of meals T hough you will rarely find me dining at fast food establishments, I do happen to seek sustenance there on occasion. I typically join the company of at least a few overweight customers bearing trays piled high with jawdropping amounts of fried, greasesodden food. Generally, the first comment most observers would offer at such a display is, “Wow, this person really loves food.” I can think of no statement further from the truth. There is a vast discrepancy between love and lust as in any form of relationship. A person who truly loves food does not inhale gluttonous quantities in a matter of seconds without the slightest thought as to what they are shoving in their face. This behavior signifies adoring the idea of food and eating with lust, rather than true affection for the actual meal. A healthy and loving relationship with your food is quite similar to a healthy and loving relationship with someone in your life. Nurturing this relationship requires time, sensitivity and a dedication to thoroughly understanding your food. And of course, a moderate taste of gastronomic lust is beneficial in maintaining a passion for the eating experience. I possess a most epic sweet tooth and do intermittently partake in consuming more dessert than I perhaps need to satisfy myself. However, I would enjoy these

Opinions expressed in The Red & Black are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily those of The Red and Black Publishing Company Inc. All rights reserved. Reprints by permission of the editors.

NEWS: 706-433-3002

YASMIN YONIS

Athens bus hours to reduce transportation difficulties for the working poor, creating child-care opportunities and so much more. He inspired me to make a difference. He put me in contact with his wife, Lillian Kincey, at Gaines Elementary School, and I helped her set up a mentoring program pairing UGA students with Gaines Elementary School students. I sometimes joke I want to save the world, but I am only half joking. I know I can’t change the world all by myself but between pursuing my education, working and the rest of my hectic life, I know I am making a difference in one young girl’s life. The girl I mentor is beautiful, smart and confident. She reads books under her desk during class just like I did when I was her age and she dreams of going to Princeton. I am going to do everything I can to help her reach her goals. There are a lot of kids in Athens who have big challenges in their lives but even bigger dreams and that is something worth believing in. Whatever your major, your interests and your skills, you have something to offer this city. No matter how cliché, you can make a difference. I believe we have the numbers and the brainpower to change the world. How about we start with this Classic City we all call home?

Senior Reporter: Carolyn Crist News Writers: Sara Caldwell, Julia Carpenter, Jacob Demmitt, Dallas Duncan, Raisa Habersham, Ashley Hieb, Brittney Holmes, Jacob Lovell, Polina Marinova, Stephanie Moodie, Diana Perez, Michael Prochaska, Adina Solomon, Tiffany Stevens, Paige Varner, Katie Weise Sports Writers: Benjamin Bussard, Zach Dillard, Michael Fitzpatrick, Drew Kann Variety Writers: Katie Andrew, Becky Atkinson, John Barrett, Adam Carlson, Kathleen Dailey, Matt Evans, Briana Gerdeman, Anna Krakovski, Sophie Loghman, Cyndyl McCutcheon, Rachael Mirabella, Tyrone Rivers,

DARCY LENZ

splurges far less if I were overly stuffed from what I had eaten prior to the treat or if I ate dessert on a daily basis. I’m aware that many readers probably find describing what’s on their plates in such an intimate manner somewhat odd, but take a moment to consider how imperative the bond between humans and what they consume is. I’m not saying you should love a cheesecake in the way you love your significant other, but to simply develop a sincere appreciation for your dinner. Unlike the sweet nothings your lover may whisper in your ear, you actually can’t survive without food. Since food is such a crucial pillar of our lives, why is it that so many choose to grossly disrespect it? I cannot begin to describe the mealtime massacres I witness everyday in the dining halls. Don’t tell me that anyone who engulfs a bowl full of Lucky Charms cereal topped with at least seven slices of bacon (yes, the bacon was actually on the cereal) in under four minutes honestly enjoyed a single bite of their peculiar breakfast selection. I know both words start with an “s,” but “spoon” and “shovel” do not have identical definitions. Speedy and mindless eating has

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ADVERTISING: 706-433-3001 Advertising Director: Natalie McClure

become the norm in our fast-paced society. Not only is this habit highly unhealthy, but it severely detracts from the delights food has to offer. At your next meal, I implore you to take a few simple steps toward genuinely savoring your food. Most importantly, take your time. Really look at the various colors on your dish and take in the aromas of the contents before ever experiencing that first glorious bite. Take small bites and actually chew them, noting individual flavors that compose the particular food. Sip water in between bites to cleanse the palate and be mindful of what specifically makes the food enjoyable or not. I promise a twenty to thirty minute meal consumed in this manner will far outweigh a five minute session of wolfing mouthfuls of food at a time. Not to mention, you will more than likely find yourself satisfied with eating less food and soon develop an admiration for tastes you never imagined possible. Eating can be a highly pleasurable experience, so appreciate it. Developing a loving and respectful relationship with food will lead to a happier and healthier person. At the end of the day, the only sensations being a lusty food whore will provide are the kind requiring a hefty dose of Pepto-Bismol. — Darcy Lenz is a freshman from Valdosta majoring in English and consumer foods.

Editorial board members include Daniel Burnett, Chelsea Cook, Michael Fitzpatrick and Yasmin Yonis.

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VARIETY & SPORTS

The Red & Black | Friday, January 15, 2010 | 5

New farmers market champions affordable prices By MICHAEL PROCHASKA THE RED & BLACK Meat processing and vegetable growth can be a slow and delicate process, but running into a supermarket to grab a quick dinner doesn’t usually reflect that mentality. However, there are ways to go about shopping for food with fiscal conservation and nutritious consideration. James Hollis, owner of Flora Hydroponics, considers his new farmers market a great substitute to commercialized grocery stores. “It doesn’t take too much to be competitive with your supermarkets.” Hollis said. “To be honest with you, most people are not competitive with supermarkets because they are awfully proud of their food.” To Hollis, independent businesses such as his can easily trump the quality of food found in a common chain. As far as the stereotype that farmers markets sell items at a higher price, Hollis jokingly agreed that this notion usually holds up. But, with Flora Hydroponics’ new farmers market, most food will have price tags that match those at Kroger or Publix. “Farmers markets are usually expensive. We’re not, though,” Hollis said. “The number one

EMILY KAROL | The Red & Black

SThe produce, meats and milk for purchase at the Flora Hydroponics farmers market are all produced within a 100 mile radius of Athens by local farmers and ranchers. reason most co-ops or farmers markets don’t succeed is because they can’t offer [diversity in food].” Diversity is only one of the secrets of his success. Hollis said consistency is a close second as

the most important tenet of running a profitable market. “We need to have diverse offerings in terms of produce, meat and dairy, and we need to be consistent twelve months of the year,” he said.

Though only open on Fridays and Saturdays in the afternoon, Flora Hydroponics’ availability spreads throughout the entire year. Hollis ensures business during the winter months by pur-

chasing food from farms and cattle ranches within a short distance. Flora Hydroponics has six produce and two meat providers located in Watkinsville, south Georgia and north Florida. The produce, all fresh, is harvested on Thursdays to be sold during the weekend. But the benefits of yearlong business are not met without sacrifice. Hollis works through every type of weather, and says snow is the only deterrent of business. Hollis sells not only to individual organic food lovers ,but also to local restaurants such as Kelly’s Authentic Jamaican Food and Taqueria El Sol de Zacatecas. According to Salchiel Salvana, manager of Taqueria El Sol De Zacatecas, the new farmers market’s produce and meat selection helps enhance the quality of his authentic Mexican food. Hollis, a once successful elementary music teacher, began growing his own food seven years ago due to an inflammatory disorder of the intestine called Crohn’s disease. “The deeper I got involved with organic food, the more I found there was the opportunity to have a career in that direction,” he said.

Gym Dogs to take on Alabama, ‘really want to do it for Georgia’ By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK Suzanne Yoculan may have retired, but don’t confuse her retirement with the end of the bitter rivalry between the No. 10 Gym Dogs and No. 4 Alabama. That rivalry is still alive and well, according to the Gym Dogs, even if the longtime feud between Alabama head coach Sarah Patterson and Yoculan will no longer be a part of it. “I think the rivalry is still strong,” head coach Jay Clark said. “I think it may have lost one of its dimensions in that the two head coaches before, the rivalry was just as much between them as it was between the programs.” It’s no secret in college gymnastics that Yoculan and Patterson didn’t care

for each other, clashing frequently over the years, but Friday’s meet is still doused with excitement. “I think they had a rivalry with themselves — the coaches did — but I think we’re really going to feel it just between the two schools [this time], which is really exciting,” Courtney McCool said. “Its just both states going at each other, and you really want to do it for Georgia.” Shayla Worley may be just a freshman, but the importance of beating Alabama has already been made abundantly clear. “It has been a known rivalry since I stepped into this gym, from day one,” Worley said. The contest against Alabama will be a bitter reminder for both teams of their two postseason clash-

The Red & Black publishes daily during each semester according to the University schedule. Ads may be placed Monday - Friday 9 a.m. 5 p.m. in our office at 540 Baxter St. or call 433-3011 and charge it to your MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Prepayment is required. Ads can also be faxed via form to 433-3033 or e-mailed to classifieds@randb.com .

1BR 1BA IN a 3BR 3BA in a large house in Bridgewater. $400 Rent. Lease for August 2010-July 2011. Call Amie for details 404-803-2528 AVAILABLE NOW! SPACIOUS room for rent in 3BR 2.5BA house. Great location on East Side! $350/ mo. + 1/2 utils. Extras! tyler_brabson@yahoo.com or 706-254-7889 ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP for 2BR 2BA apartment. Furnished except extra BR/BA. Barnett Ridge apartments, walking distance from Publix, Kroger, Kmart. $285 + ? utilities. No pets. ipower@uga.edu. ROOMMATE NEEDED. 2BR 2.5BA townhome off church street! Solid location! $500/mo total. Email ticos@uga.edu ROOMMATE WANTED FOR a 2BR 2.5BA townhome in Arbor Creek. Rent and utilities combined are $400/person. Call or Email Amanda @ 770-314-6045 or amac0203@yahoo.com or Anna at 770-815-3387 STONES CREEK BARNETT Shoals Rd. 2BR 2.5BA, pool, W/D. 706-5484547 or 423-710-5606.

$450/ MO ALEXI Apartments 1 lg. BR 1BA. w/ lg living room. Laundry facilities. Picnic tables and grill. block off Milledge w/ bus. 706-207-9902, 706-8358401. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 Bedroom. Awesome Walk and Bike to downtown and campus Houses Pre-leasing for Fall! Many historical houses with old world charm, modern amenities. Porches, yards. Pet friendly. $350-$1800 mo. These go fast! Email for list: luckydawg96@hotmail.com 1BR 1BA APT, Close to campus. Recently refurbished. Includes water, garbage. Avail now. $390/mo. Call John 404368-1741 john.chandler@legplatt.com

1BR APTS CLOSE to campus, downtown and shopping. Starting at $380. ONE MONTH FREE ON SELECT UNITS! Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500 2BR 1BA IN 5Pts. Great for Grad Students. Close to campus. W/D, DW, CHAC, Pets OK. Avail. 8/1 $700/mo. 706-396-2908. 2BR 2BA DUPLEX. One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit! 2 miles from the arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, pest control, and free security system. Large yard, no pet fee. $650/mo. Security deposit of $400 fully refundable. Owner/Agent 706-549-2500 2BR 2BA ON College Station. Huge apartment, FP, deck, lots of closets, DW, W/D, CHAC. Avail. now. Pets OK. $575/mo. 706-369-2908. 2BR APTS STARTING at $550. ONE MONTH FREE! Close to campus, downtown and shopping. W/D included in unit. Pets Welcome! 706-549-2500. 3BR 1BA HOUSE, newly remodeled, all hardwood flrs, ceiling fans, HVAC, W/D. Located along bus line, walking distance to Kroger, movies, library, drugstore, shopping. Approx. 20 minute walk to UGA! $800/mo. Available Jan 1, can move in sooner. 706-248-7100. 3BR 2BA AWESOME Victorian. Price reduced. Close to campus. High ceilings, HWflrs, big yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. $1200/mo. Available 7/27/10. Call 706-3692908. 3BR 2BA DUPLEX One month free rent and no security deposit with acceptable credit. 2 miles from the Arch, W/D, DW, Microwave, ceiling fans, & alarm system. Large yard, no pet fee, $750. S/D $600 fully refundable. Owner/ Agent 706-549-2500 3BR 2BA HOUSE renovated Victorian. 1/2 mi. to UGA. Lg. rms., high ceilings, HWflrs, front porch, back deck, nice yd. lots of parking. W/D, DW, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1250/mo. 706-369-2908.

es last season. The first came in the SEC Championships when a fall on the balance beam by Georgia gave Alabama the conference championship. Georgia got revenge a month later, beating them to win the 2009 NCAA Championships. “Something about losing to them makes you want to go out there and beat them twice as much,” McCool said. The revenge factor combined with a lackluster opening meet against Stanford has Clark thinking his team is primed to KATHERINE POSS | The Red & Black return to the form that earned them the preseason S Senior gymnast Courtney McCool and her fellow Gym Dogs look to go No. 1 ranking. into Tuscaloosa, Ala., Friday, and take out archrival Alabama. “All the signs and indicators say we’re going to in this group. It’s not a week, they will have to do she’s going to handle her have a good meet,” Clark matter of ‘if’ but ‘when’ it so in the face of 15,000 first road meet: “I’m just said. “So there are no guar- is going to get going.” Crimson-laden fans. But going to pretend like antees, but I’m confident If they get going this Worley knows exactly how they’re screaming for me.”

Classifieds 4BR 2BA VICTORIAN home. 1/2 mi. from campus. New kitchen, W/D, DW, fenced yd., HWflrs, $1600/mo. Huge rooms! Lots of character. Avail. 8/1. Pets OK. 706-3692908. 5BR 3BA, PLUS study downtown All hardwood floors, concrete countertops, full tile baths. Avail Aug 10th. Pets ok. $2000/mo. 706-540-2432 ADORABLE 3BR 2BA House, close to campus. New master BA w/ double sink. HWflrs., fenced backyd, W/D, DW, CHAC. Avail. 8/1. $1250/mo. 706369-2908. AMAZING RENOVATED 5BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. from campus. 2 LRs, 2 kitchens, big BRs, huge deck, plenty of parking. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $2100/mo. 706-369-2908. BEAUTIFUL 2BR 2.5BA, 2 story, hardwood floors, gated community, pool, great area 1 mile from campus. Available Now $900/ mo. + utilities. Call Peter 404-625-8627 or pmicciche@wasteindustryleasing.com CONDO OFF MILLEDGE, on UGA busline. Available June 1st. 2BR 2.5BA. Remodeled. Tile Floors. Private Parking. 425 Peabody St. $999/month. Call Billy 770-851-0263. EXCELLENT RENOVATED 4BR 3BA House. 1/2 mi. to campus. Lots of character! Big rms. New Kitchen, DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1650/mo. Call 706369-2908.

GRAD STUDENT/ YOUNG professionals. 3BR 1BA House. Quiet family n’hood. HWflrs. Separate garage/ workshop. Huge fenced dog pen. Avail. 8/1. $750/mo. Call 706-3692908. GREAT 4BR 4BA house. 1/2 mi. from campus. Front porch, back deck, nice yd., DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. Special! $1500/mo. 706-369-2908. MOBILE HOME 2BR 2BA located 2.5 miles from UGA campus. $15,000 or best offer call Matt 706-215-1507 or email mpenix@hotmail.com. NEW HOUSES DOWNTOWN and 5 Points. Available for Fall. 1 to 4BR. Private baths. Upgrades galore. Great locations. Reserve yours today! Aaron 706-207-2957 NOW PRE-LEASING 2, 3, 4 & 5+ Bedroom properties for Fall 2010. Downtown, next to campus and in five points. 706-2969546 www.CityBlock.biz NOW PRE-LEASING for Fall! 1 to 4 bedroom houses. $350-$1,500. Close to downtown and Pet Friendly. These lease up fast! www.deklerealty.com 706-548-0580

PRE-LEASING HOUSES, DUPLEXES, TOWNHOMES 2, 3 & 4 BR, W/D, alarm system, pets welcome. 24 hr. maint. response * SPECIAL $900 4BR/4BA HOUSE * 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com

FALL PRELEASES. BEST rentals in Athens! 1-5BR houses, apts, condos, In the heart of UGA/Dwntn/5pts. Avail Aug! Call 706-369-2908 for more info.

S. MILLEDGE, CLOSE to campus Hunter’s Run. 2, 3, & 4BRs. Alarm systems, W/D, no pets 706-552-3500 hancockpropertiesinc.com

GIGANTIC 5BR 3BA condo. End of Lumpkin St. 2500 sq. ft. 2 LRs, huge laundry rm., DR, FP, big deck. DW, W/D, CHAC. Pets OK. Avail. 8/1. $1500/mo. 706-3692908.

STUDENT LIVING BLACKMON Shoals off Milledge Ave. Adorable cottages within 1.5 miles of UGA. Brand new 2, 3 & 4BR homes, ready to move in. Lease options available. Call Greg for more information 770-827-7492.

COED LOOKING TO Sublease, University Apartments. 2BR 1BA, 1st Floor. M/F, $445/mo. includes utilities! Call 912596-7366 or 912-3519166. FREE RENT 1BR in a 2BR 2.5BA Townhouse. Sublease $385 + 1/2 utilities. Female Subleaser needed ASAP. Large bedroom, 2 closets, personal bathroom, furnished large living room, fully equipped kitchen, furnished dining room w/ laundry closet, on UGA bus and Athens transit route. Great roommate! Lease runs through August with the option to renew lease. Call Leah @ 678-787-8290 JAMESTOWN NORTH CONDO. Sublease. Ends mid-July. No Deposit required. Wood burning FP. 2 large BR 2.5BA $675/mo. Please call 706-549-3096 or 706-296-1751. ROOMMATE NEEDED TO sublease through July! 4BR 2BA house near campus on University Cir. $300/ mo. + 1/4 utilities. Contact Caitlin: cooper13@uga.edu or Niki: 912-293-4874

RIVERWALK, TOWNHOMES, TIMOTHY Rd, furnished, available now (end of sublease negotiable), $319/mth (reg $359), prvt BR w/ windows on two walls, prvt bath. On bus line. 3 male roommates. 770-310-1121 SUBLEASING APARTMENT, ORIGINAL price is $505, subleasing for $353/mo. 1 great roommate. 2BR 2BA apt, Rivermill, 5 min walk to campus and downtown. 703-3388042 kmac11@uga.edu

2002 RAV-4 Toyota for sale. Excellent condition. Pearl white. $7000. Contact 706-340-9091

RIDING LESSONS STARTING at only $25! Experienced instructor, great school horses, wonderful facility. Lessons offered in hunter/jumper, dressage, and eventing. Horse Boarding avail. as well. Call Beth at 706-207-1722.

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The Japanese puzzle Sudoku relies on reasoning and logic. To solve it, fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 by 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. Nothing has to add up to anything else.

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THE RED & BLACK NEWSPAPER is looking for a classified representative. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 10:00 am - 3:30 pm. Must be a registered UGA student. Please send inquiries to Natalie McClure, Advertising Director: nataliem@randb.com.

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SPORTS

6 | Friday, January 15, 2010 | The Red & Black

Bulldogs ‘need Ricky’ to drain shots By NICK PARKER THE RED & BLACK

“MCTHREE” MCPHEE The senior from Lawrenceville is a whopping 41 percent from beyond the arch on the season — with his sweet spot being the wings — and manages to swing momentum the Bulldogs’ way when he drains a 3-pointer from downtown. Upside — McPhee is the Bulldogs’ best perimeter shooter. He stretches defenses, as they must constantly be aware of where he is. He leads the team in steals and has proven clutch at the end of games with timely baskets. Downside — McPhee has point guard size at only 6-foot-1 and can struggle to defend opposing teams with bigger guards. He is averaging fewer than two assists per game and has struggled to create for his teammates and himself off the dribble at times this season.

Senior shooting guard Ricky McPhee is averaging 9.9 points per game for the Bulldogs so far this season. S

Georgia was unanimously projected to finish last in the conference. That’s why, despite an 0-2 SEC start, they have certainly opened the pundits’ eyes to start league play. Facing three consecutive ranked opponents, they emerged with a win over No. 20 Georgia Tech and losses to No. 2 Kentucky and No. 21 Ole Miss. These were all games where nobody expected Georgia to be competitive — much less win. But head coach Mark Fox’s team stunned their instate rival, and gave Kentucky and Ole Miss a scare too. Much of the recent progress can be credited to the increased production from senior guard Ricky McPhee. He came into the stretch averaging 8.7 points an outing. But McPhee has flourished against the ranked opponents, scoring 14.6 points per game, shooting 45.5 percent from behind the three-point line, and alleviating some of the scoring burden for forward Trey Thompkins and fellow guard Travis Leslie. “Ricky’s a great shooter,” Thompkins said. “We need

Ricky, and Ricky under- GEORGIA VS. MISSISSIPPI stands that. When Ricky’s STATE knocking shots down and becoming a threat, he makes it so much harder for us to When: 3 p.m. Saturday Where: Starkville, Miss. be guarded.” As McPhee becomes more More Information: Airing on ESPN2 potent from the perimeter, so does the Bulldog offense. Jackson: “Ricky’s stepped up The defense is forced to and made plays. He is defiexpand, freeing up space for nitely the best shooter I’ve Thompkins to operate inside played with.” and Leslie to drive and utiIn no game was this more lize his athleticism. evident than against Georgia “I’m just trying to get Tech, when he hit two pivotal shots within our offense and shots down the stretch — a help our team out on the three and a runner in the perimeter,” McPhee said. lane — to seal the win for the “And I’m just trying to take Dogs. He made more threes open shots, and run the plays in the Tech game by himself right and just execute on the (four) than Tech made as a offensive end. Not being team (three). aggressive, just being smart, “Well, we shot it well and taking the shot when it’s because Ricky McPhee is a there and passing it when it’s great shooter,” Fox said after not.” that game. McPhee also gives opposMcPhee, who is shooting ing coaches second thoughts 41 percent from three on the on whether or not they want season, will need to continue to pack in a zone and clog up to live up to that sharpthe lane for Thompkins, as shooter reputation if his he can burn a zone in a hurry Dogs are going to live up to if they aren’t aware of where the goals they have set for he is at all times. themselves. Because despite “If our perimeter players the obvious progress on eviand me are knocking down dence in their two SEC lossshots from the outside, it is es thus far, they aren’t into definitely going to help our moral victories this year. post players getting the ball “We’re not going to be into inside better and help us get moral victories, and that’s good looks at the basket,” just a dangerous way of McPhee said. thinking, in my opinion,” Fox Added senior Albert said.

ASHLEY STRICKLAND | The Red & Black

Well-traveled freshman has heart Baptist

Methodist

Non-Denominational

Ebenezer Baptist Church, West Rev., Dr. W. M. Hope, Pastor 205 North Chase Street Sunday Church School- 8:30 am Sunday Worship - 10:00am For transportation call: 706-543-9644 www.ebcw.org

First United Methodist Traditional Sanctuary Service at 8:30, 9:45, 11:00 Sunday School at 9:45 www.athensfirstumc.org 327 N. Lumpkin St. 706-543-1442

Campus View church of Christ Sunday Bible Study: 9-10am Morning Assembly: 10-11:15am Evening Small Groups Ministries - Youth, Family, Campus & Hispanic www.campusviewchurch.org 1360 S. Lumpkin St. 706-353-1556

Tuckson United Methodist Services: 8:20, 9:30, 11 Sunday School 9:30 & 11 Dinner Wed. 5:30 & Var. Classes 4175 Lexington Rd. 706-353-1311 www.Tuckston.org

Georgia Christian Student Center (GCSC) Family Time Gathering, Wed. 7:30-8:45 A time of spirtitual conversation, praise and worship www.gcsc4jesus.org 1360 S. Lumpkin St. 706-549-2827

Lutheran Christus Victor Lutheran Church and Student Center Sunday Worship 10:30am Sunday Student Fellowship 6:30 pm Wednesday Bible Study 7pm 1010 South Lumpkin Street www.christusvictor.net 706-543-3801

To advertise your worship services, call: 706-433-3011

Bo Seal joins Dogs on courts By LISA GLASER THE RED & BLACK At 5-foot-8, freshman Bo Seal is not the biggest guy on the tennis court, but his teammates would disagree that he is anything less than a huge competitor. “He’s a little crazy. That’s the kind of guy we want on our team and not on anyone else’s because he’s going to die on the court before he loses,” Georgia men’s tennis captain Nate Schnugg said. “He sets up behind the baseline, just wearing guys down, banking on that he’s got more heart than the other guy.” Seal models himself after one of his favorite players — Andre Agassi — by playing aggressively from the baseline and being comfortable playing long points. “Usually I win by making people hit a lot of balls and wearing them down. I’m not the type of person to go out there and hit a

serve like 130 miles per hour and then bomb a forehand,” Seal said. “I can’t do that because I’m not like 6-foot-4. I have to be willing to get out there a hit a lot of balls.” Seal’s high school tennis coach helped him to develop this playing style while a freshman and sophomore at Baylor School, a college prep school in Chattanooga, Tenn. His coach was Philip Johnson, the captain of the National Championshipwinning 1987 Georgia team. While competing under Johnson, he was the state singles individual champion for two years in a row. He won those matches as a freshman and sophomore, before leaving to train more extensively. Since the fall of 2007, Seal trained at the IMG Bollettieri Tennis Academy in Bradenton, Fla., SEAL while taking classes online through Ashworth University. The facility’s notable alumni include Agassi, Maria Sharapova and Venus and Serena Williams. “We would practice five hours a day, one hour of conditioning, and then during free time, we’d try to do as much schoolwork as possible,” Seal said. “It wasn’t so bad because I would only be in there for a week and half or two weeks and then I’d be off to a tournament.” He would go on tournament stints for over a month, while gallivanting across the world and brushing shoulders with other elite tennis protégés. Competing in places like Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Italy, Japan, Peru and Spain, Seal’s travels extend to every corner of the world and back. “I remember when I went to Japan, I had just gone to Italy and played in the Davis Cup for the United States and I came back and I was in the United States for 17 hours and then I was off to Japan. [Traveling] could be very tiring, but it was fun, though. I enjoyed it,” Seal said. Seal finished at the Bollettieri Academy in August of last year and concentrated on finishing up school while giving himself a much needed break from the plane-hopping and transatlantic trips. “I didn’t practice for like five weeks after that. I didn’t play a tournament until I played that one two weeks ago, so that was my first tournament in four and a half months,” Seal said. That first tournament in months was an individual holiday tournament with 64 players. Seal made it to the final four, after beating then-No. 10 ranked Jarmere Jenkins from the University of Virginia. His transition back into tennis then became less of a worry than his transition back into traditional school. “I was nervous coming

SEC COACHES INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS When: All weekend Where: Norcross, Ga. More Information: The Bulldogs first home match is Jan. 23 against USC-Upstate at the Dan Magill Tennis Complex at 1 p.m. in because I hadn’t been in a classroom in about two years. So the tennis and all that wasn’t worrying me, but the school part, that’s probably what I was most nervous about,” said Seal. Seal began classes this semester and formal practice with his new team Monday. His teammates were not strangers though, as he played with most of them on the junior tennis circuit. Now, both his longstanding and fairly new relationships on the court prove beneficial. “[My teammates have] helped me a bunch, not just on the court but also off the court. I still don’t know my way around campus really well, so they’ve been helping me if I have any questions, they’ve all been great,” Seal said. Even as a freshman, there is mutual respect between himself and his teammates. Senior Christian Vitulli already sees Seal’s potential after only practicing with him for a few days. “He has great ground strokes. He’s also a small guy, but can move really well. He can hang with anyone, pace-for-pace,” said Vitulli. Head coach Manuel Diaz recruited Seal for those reasons and because of the way he fits in with the rest of the team. Diaz looks for Seal to play a key role throughout the spring season. “I think he has tremendous talent and gives us additional depth to our lineup, both singles and doubles. He has good racket speed and power for his size. He’s not a giant, but he certainly can hit the ball just as hard as anybody else on the team,” Diaz said. With the season just starting, Seal looks to this weekend’s SEC Coaches’ Indoor Championships in Norcross, Ga., as his first challenge as a Bulldog. The competition will be a chance to debut his skills on the court in his first collegiate tournament as both a singles and doubles player. In the first doubles round, Seal will partner with Vitulli. “It’s going to be tough. There’s not going to be any easy matches. The SEC conference is the toughest conference for tennis. I’m going to have to be willing to come in there and fight from the first point from the very first match, and we’ll see how it goes from there,” Seal said. “Our guys are confident. We’re looking forward to it. It’s our first big test of the year.”

1-15-10 Issue  

1-15-10 Issue