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H Y PERLOC AL

DON E DI F F E R E N TLY

FISHTOWN + KENSINGTON + NORTHERN LIBERTIES + PORT RICHMOND + BRIDESBURG

THIS

WEEK DECEMBER 23, 2015 VOL. 12 NO. 51

MUSIC ROW Reviewing local bands and shows. 8

KENSINGTON CHRISTMAS Local group helps support their neighbors. 11

OPERATION WARM Bringing winter coats to kids in need. 4-5

ACCU REGGIE Seven day forecast for the Riverwards. 3

THE LOCAL LENS Thom talks about political correctness. 2

CLEAN PLATE Recipe for Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies. 13

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Events and happenings in the Riverwards 12-13

HOT OFF THE

PRESS


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015

THE

local lens

W

hen soon-to-be ex-Mayor Michael Nutter announced his desire to ban Donald Trump from the City of Philadelphia, he was jumping on a bandwagon. This “stoning” brigade of numerous mayors and prominent citizens are saying that Trump’s views are “dangerous” and that he should be silenced. Nowhere was this boisterous campaign more evident than on Facebook where many users announced that they would “unfriend” anyone who find something about the man to admire. Whether Mayor Nutter’s wish to ban Trump from the city was just a wicked fantasy or his last hurrah in terms of getting national attention, cities, after all, are not medieval fortresses with walls: You can’t keep out people with unpopular or outrageous views out. Keeping Trump out of the city would only draw attention to his policies and win him more supporters. Do I like Donald Trump? No, but that’s not the point. I would mock any mayor who made similar announcements about banning Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton or filmmaker Michael Moore from their cities. Banning people, ideas and books has never been a good idea, not by right wingers nor by the left wing “empathetically correct” crowd. “Empathetically correct,” in case you don’t know, is the new buzzword for the old term “politically correct,” meaning the Nanny State folks who want to protect us from ourselves. The Nannies want to ban horse and buggies from New York’s Central Park, Big Gulp sodas from NYC and prohibit tobacco sales to military personnel. They have even combed the English language for unacceptable words and titles. For example, a jailer is now a custodial artist; a housewife is a domestic engineer; a jungle is a rain forest; a trailer park is a mobile home community; a broken home has become a dysfunctional family and a shy person is now conversationally selective. The list goes on and on. The growing polarization of American society based on politics is a worrisome development. Polarization based on political beliefs is ultimately artificial because status quo politics never lasts, but is always replaced by new politics and ideas. Politicians, however loved or hated, come and go like a flashing meteorite racing across the sky. Furthermore, no one candidate ever has all the right answers to the issues of the day. Political candidates are like sloppily made BLT sandwiches with different parts falling out during the eating process. One can love some of Hilary Clinton (the lettuce?), parts of Bernie Sanders (the tomatoe?) and yes — shockingly enough — even a small segment of Donald Trump (the bacon?), but rarely is the entire, sloppy sandwich any good. For how many decades have most Americans been voting for “the lesser of two evils” come election season? Today’s polarized political environment encourages us to vilify a candidate if one or two of their ideas impress most people as “obnoxious.” Trump is not necessarily “evil” because he questions President Obama’s policies on immigration or because some in the media accuse him of Islamophobia. Because Trump may be clueless about certain issues doesn’t mean that he is evil, just as the shameless lengths that Hilary Clinton will go to acquire votes doesn’t make her evil either. Republican candidate Marco Rubio may be “obnoxious” when he promises to roll back all Obama-generated pro LGBT legislation if elected, but calling him “Satan” or wishing him dead because of this one position is beyond the pale. This is not the way we do “business” in America. In many ways, we have become a nation of screaming hysterics and in a war of orthodoxies, nobody ever wins. Some Facebook posts depict Trump as a pig or as a men’s room urinal. Others liken him to Hitler. These postings have a virtual village stoning aspect to them in which Facebook friends can pick up rocks and have a whack. This fever “conspiracy” to vilify assumes the frenzy of a group orgy or witch burning, but in the end these attacks

are boring and repetitive. It’s the same way with the hyper obsessive anti-Obama folks whose hatred of the President borders on the pathological. It doesn’t matter what the president says or does, for these people he’s always wrong, always evil and always anti-American. The personal attacks even include the First Lady and the Obama children. How whole groups of people can live and breathe hatred like this, day in and day out, is a mystery to me. In the last mayoral election — a shocking admission! — I voted for the Republican candidate because I resented the Democratic machine’s control of Philadelphia. Municipal elections in the Quaker City tend to be farcical because Democrats always win, whether the Democrat’s name is Jim Kenney, Ira Einhorn, sex columnist Dan Savage, Jihad Jane or Mr. Corrupt Parking Authority. The automatic canceling out of any Philadelphia Republican, no matter how honorable he or she may be, decade after decade, cannot be good for the city. Obsessive one party voting gives one political group too much power. I voted for the GOP candidate as a symbolic protest even though I like many of Kenney’s ideas. My one big left wing reservation is the rising tendency in that camp to be intolerant of opposing views, which brings us back to the banning question. Conservatives on Facebook rarely (if ever) call for unfriending “friends” who advocate liberal positions or who support candidates that inspire conservative wrath. Today the big censors of public thought and language are liberals. Witness how once common (and acceptable) terms like “illegal immigrant” and “illegal aliens” have been replaced by benign (and soft) labels terms like “undocumented worker” or in some cases just “immigrant,” which leaves out the most important part: legal or illegal. Similar groups also banned Henry Miller’s “Tropic of Cancer”, published by Grove Press in 1961, which is the story of Miller’s life in Paris as a struggling scribe. Miller wrote about sex in explicit terms and this led to obscenity trials and police raids on bookstores. William Burroughs’ “Naked Lunch” caused a sensation when it was published by Olympia Press in 1959. The novel, about drug use and homosexuality, was banned in Boston and Los Angeles. Right wingers even challenged Anne Frank’s “The Diary of a Young Girl”, about a Jewish family hiding from Nazis in the Netherlands, because of the book included some sexually explicit passages. Conservatives in Culver City, California banned “Little Red Riding Hood” from schools because some officials were irked that Mrs. Hood was shown carrying around a bottle of wine in her basket. As one Culver City educator complained, “Showing the grandmother who has consumed half a bottle of wine with a red nose is not a lesson we want to teach.” In New Hampshire, William Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” was banned because it was about a girl who disguises herself as a boy and then falls in love with her male employer. The cross-dressing and the faux same sex romance in the story made school officials uneasy. Right wing ideologue puritans in a small California town banned Edgar Rice Burroughs’ “Tarzan of the Apes” series because Jane and Tarzan were not married. Imagine that! Conservatives in one North Carolina county banned Ralph Ellison’s “Invisible Man”, which deals with the ugliness of racial discrimination because one parent of a student in the county wrote a 12-page protest. The parent hated the book because of its sexual content, its “lack of innocence” and because it was written in the first person and seemed “too real.” Meanwhile, liberals banned Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”, published in 1885, at a Quaker school in Montgomery County because a small handful of students complained that the use racial slurs throughout the text made them feel “uncomfortable.” The book is about the friendship of a young white boy with an older black man. The use of the word “uncomfortable” is in-

THOM NICKELS IS A PHILADELPHIA BASED AUTHOR, JOURNALIST, POET, FILM CRITIC & FEATURE WRITER FOR SPIRIT NEWS.

teresting here: Education and learning are supposed to make students feel uncomfortable because that’s what mental growth involves. To be comfortable is to stagnate. If education and learning is too comfortable, it’s not doing its job. The “empathetically correct” go to great lengths to protect students from their own individual sensitivities. This is why speakers with controversial views can be banned from college campuses, as if the students were not mentally equipped to challenge these ideas or “process” them. Sometimes when students threaten violence at these speaking events the college cancels the speaker out of fear and intimidation. Ann Coulter, author of “Adios America: The Left’s Plan to Turn America into a Third World Hellhole”, was banned from speaking at the University of Toronto because of angry student protests that started to form. So much for engaging dialogue and an intelligent exchange of ideas! Novels like JD Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye” and Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” are being replaced in schools by so called “informational texts.” Additionally, 70 percent of the books prescribed to students now tend to be non-fiction. One educator complained that “Imaginative reading and creativity is going out of English classes.” Neil Postman, in citing George Orwell’s 1984, wrote, Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think. If we lose the capacity to think, we’re through as a culture and a nation. ·

OBITUARIES OPALKA, GEORGE, SR., Suddenly on December 12, 2105 at the age of 73. Beloved husband of Sue; devoted father of Donna M., George , Jr, David, Sr. and the late Debra, Tony and Candy. Loving grandfather of 11 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren. Dear brother of John, Frank and Joe. Family prefers donations to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 S E V E N D AY F O R E C A S T F O R T H E R I V E R WA R D S

accu reggie TWITTER: @ACCUREGGIE • FACEBOOK: ACCU-REGGIE

L

ast week, winter paid us a very brief visit. But just as quickly as the cold came in, it left. Winter has been practically non-existent from Chicago to the East Coast so far this season. This week we return to the “tropical surge” of record breaking summer warmth! Temperatures will be 25-30 degrees above normal at times. Forget snow for Christmas, think borderline beach weather! Along with the warmth will come rain; it’s just the price we have to pay! Now, we are not talking about soaking in all-day rain, but rather days where there’s a one hour shower in the morning, a peak of sunshine in the afternoon and 2 hours of light rain in the evening. Much of the week will

be cloudy. Just keep the umbrella handy and you’ll be fine. Wednesday is the wettest day of the week with a couple rounds of rain, especially in the afternoon and evening. Temperatures will be rising through the 60s so it will be a warm rain. Christmas Eve (Thursday) is the warmest day of the week. Temperatures surge into the lower 70s with clouds and showers around. It’s not a terrible travel day, but we’ve seen better. I hope you’re not dreaming of a white Christmas (Friday). This year, it will be the exact opposite of the “ones we used to know.” Expect crazy warmth with temperatures in the 60s (near 70!) all day.

Saturday features a brief “cool down.” I hate calling it “cool” because it will still be warm for this time of year. Sunday is a warm, cloudy day with showers possible as a frontal boundary hangs to our North. On Monday we cool down again after the Sunday showers, but rain and warmth come back Monday night and Tuesday. The Saturday to Tuesday time frame is what we call the weather yo-yo. Temperatures will go up and down and every time they go up it will be accompanied by rain.

The weather winner of the week is Friday; the weather loser is Wednesday. ·

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

INCREASING CLOUDS WITH RAIN.

SUMMER, CHANCE FOR SHOWERS.

CLOUDS AROUND WITH SOME SUNSHINE.

MORNING SHOWERS POSSIBLE.

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE FOR SHOWERS.

CLOUDS INCREASING, SHOWERS LATE.

A PERIOD OF RAIN.

68 50 LOW

54 52 LOW

65 42 LOW

60 65 LOW

HIGH

72 60 LOW

HIGH

HIGH

HIGH

HIGH

46 50 LOW

HIGH

65 50 LOW HIGH

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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 PHOTOS AND WORDS BY THOMAS WEIR

operation warm C O M E S T O T H E R I V E RWA R D S

E

ven though we’ve had a very forgiving and mild winter, I think we all know harsher weather is right around the corner. On Monday, December 21, Operation Warm, a nationwide non-profit, partnered with Wawa and Operation Brotherly Love to donate 370 brand new coats to students of the Horatio B. Hackett Elementary School (2161 E York St.). The drive was organized by Tessa Donnelly, a teacher leader at Hackett, Principal Todd Kimmel, Adam Schall, Wawa’s senior director of strategy and supply chain, and Frank DiMauro, CFO of SNJ Today. Schall describes Operation Warm as “A grassroots movement, a way to give back to the community… it’s these kinds of necessities that we all take for granted.” The nonprofit has been collecting funds since 1998 to distribute new coats to children. It’s important that the coats are new. “They are all brand new coats and there’s a kind of sense of pride to owning them,” DiMauro said. DiMario and Schall started giving back 16 years ago. Staring with an idea they conjured up while working in a homeless shelter, the duo’s plan morphed into Operation Brotherly Love. Sometime around their nine year mark they received some positive press about their work and were featured on the local news. Wawa’s CEO and Mayor Michael Nutter were among those watching the news at home when Operation Brotherly Love was spotlighted. Both reached out to DiMauro and Schall and asked how to help. The coat drive at the The Hackett School is a such product of this partnership. This is the second year that Operation Warm has aided those in the Hackett community. Last year the organization donated enough coats for students in grades K - 3. This year, however, more than 370 brand new coats were purchased for students in every grade. “We want to show that good things are happening in our schools,” Donnelly said. ·

FRANK DIMAURO (LEFT), CFO OF SNJ TODAY AND ADAM SCHALL (RIGHT), WAWA’S SENIOR DIRECTOR OF STRATEGY. ADAM SCHALL

370 COATS DONATED TO OPERATION WARM.


The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015

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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WORDS AND PHOTOS BY PTAH GABRIE

soup kitchen cafe GOES FROM BRUNCH TO BAR

B

runch has grown into so much more than just a misplaced meal wedged between breakfast and lunch and served with a slice of cantaloupe — It’s become a social experience for friends to lament over the trials and tribulations of the night before. For chefs and food lovers, it’s a free form, anything goes meal leaving just about every avenue exposed for creative interpretation. Chances are that if you’re a fan of this special, social meal, you have a short list of places you readily refer to people when someone says, “You up for brunch?” Soup Kitchen Cafe (2146 E. Susquehanna Ave.) has long been a quaint neighborhood staple for people to grab a bite to eat (the soups and sandwiches are always fresh and tasty) and a cup of coffee. Owner Ben Bigler first opened Soup Kitchen Cafe after what he describes as a year of cooking in his free time for himself and others. Bigler, who was a lawyer prior to opening shop, wanted to run a restaurant that served the kind of food a self-described “picky” eater like himself would enjoy. “I just wanted to make food that I thought was really good to me,” Bigler said. As the surrounding neighborhood began to grow, Soup Kitchen Cafe gained popularity and it became clear that an un upgrade was necessary. That was when Bigler brought in his friend and restaurant consultant Steph Irwin to change almost every aspect of what his cafe was. Irwin is no stranger to the restaurant game in Philly and the Riverwards: She helped open Pizza Brain and has also managed at a few Starr Restaurants. While Soup Kitchen Cafe has always served alcohol, choices were limited to brunch staples like bloody marys and mimosas and a few beer options. According to Irwin, she was able to use some of her contacts around the neighborhood, like Billy Hines of Sancho Pistola’s (19 W. Girard Ave.), to come together and shape the new restaurant into something that highlighted booze as well as soups, sandwiches and coffee. “[Hines] was able to help make something in line with their current approach, which is fresh squeezed juices and herbal cocktails,” Irwin said. “We want them to be light and refreshing, something you can enjoy more than one of.” You’ll now find seasonal cocktails on Soup Kitchen Cafe’s menu with ingredients like carrot juice, walnuts, strawberry jam, fresh pears and elder flower. They’ll also be offering a six person “Brunch Punch Bowl,” with ingredients including champagne, ginger and cranberries, in addition to a well curated bottled beer list.

THE LOX BAGEL IS A STAPLE OF BRUNCH FARE, AND THE SOUP KITCHEN OFFERS THEIRS OPEN FACE OR WITH A “LID” IF YOU NEED IT.

SHAKSHUKA, LEFT, LOX BAGEL, RIGHT, AND I WASHED ALL DOWN WITH AN EDMUND FITZGERALD PORTER.

Aesthetically, Irwin says the old space was not efficient enough to handle the type of business Soup Kitchen Cafe wanted to do. With that in mind, she brought in Outside in Design to create a 3D model for their renovation. They added a bar and a food window. According to Irwin, some patrons have seen the new space and felt like it was smaller. That’s not the case. They’ve actually added about 10 seats including a community table. Irwin also brought in Heads of State, who have worked with Spruce Street Harbor Park, to help with rebranding. Now Soup Kitchen Cafe has a uniform logo on all their pint glasses, coasters and coffee sleeves. “The menu is relatively the same,” Irwin said. According to her, when she polled some patrons from the neighborhood about changing the menu, the response was overwhelmingly against it. However you will find specials and new to go items on their menu, including a ready-made marinated cauliflower sandwich and Sicilian tuna sandwich for those who may be in too much of a hurry for sit and eat situation. They also switched to Philly Bread and are serving cinnamon and sugar brioche donuts that they get daily from there too. Now time for my experience: From my seat at Soup Kitchen Cafe, I gazed through the tall glass window at a well manicured garden at the corner of Blair Street as I set this sunny Sunday morning brunch in motion. The Shakshuka came highly recommended to me, so I was sure to have a taste. According to Epicurious, Shakshuka originates in Tunisia, but is widely enjoyed throughout the Middle East and beyond. Soup Kitchen Cafe mixes red peppers, red onions and jalapenos into a

well seasoned tomato based stew. It’s thick and clings to the crunchy chunks of pepper and onions. Three poached eggs are submerged in the tasty sauce. It’s topped with crumbled feta cheese, cilantro and served with a baguette to make sure you sop up every last drop. I also tried their lox and bagel. This classic brunch sandwich is served on an everything bagel with a healthy schmear of cream cheese, capers, shaved fennel, red onions, sliced tomato and lox. Soup Kitchen Cafe does it open faced, which is the way it was meant to be enjoyed. If having all that deliciously cured, thin sliced salmon right up in your face is intimidating, you can get the other half of the bagel, or as they call it, the “lid” for a small upcharge. As a lover of lox and cream cheese bagels, I can assure you this was absolutely delicious. All the flavors here mix perfectly. The fresh salmon and the generous amount of cream cheese makes each bite decadently delicious. I’ll be returning for sure. ·

THE PLAIN EXTERIOR OPENS UP TO A BRAND NEW SPACE. ALL THE TALL WINDOWS ALLOW THE SUN TO WARM YOU UP AS YOU ENJOY THEIR DELICIOUS FOOD. ONE OF THE BIGGEST ADDITIONS IS THE NEW BAR. IT MAY SEEM LIKE THERE IS LESS SPACE, BUT THEY’VE ACTUALLY ADDED ABOUT 10 SEATS.

HERE’S A CLOSE UP OF THE SHAKSHUKA. THIS WAS AN ABSOLUTELY DELICIOUS DISH ON A BRISK SUNDAY MORNING.


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WORDS AND PHOTOS BY NATALIE PISERCHIO

joyful noise

SISTER CITIES GIRLCHOIR PERFORMS CHRISTMAS CAROLS FOR THE COMMUNITY

O

n Saturday, December 19, members of the community gathered at the First Presbyterian Church (418 E. Girard Ave.) to join in song and holiday joy as Sister Cities Girlchoir and organist Marian Geiger-Lynch performed Christmas carols for those in attendance. The event was free of cost, but all donations received that day were split between the Lutheran Settlement House, Sister Cities Girlchoir and Penn Home. I spoke to Alysia Lee, the Director of the Sister Cities Girlchoir. Lee describes the concert series as “a mix of girl power, music, song and joy — they’re kind of spectacular. It’s a good way to spend your afternoon, so we invite people out.” Sister Cities accepts members from 1st grade on up. Their mission is to get the kids thinking about leadership, empowerment and civic engagement as a tool to give back to the community. In the new year, Sister Cities plans on starting a boy’s choir called “The Brotherhood” and is currently looking for boys interested in joining. “It’s really exciting for us to expand the opportunity to boys as well [as girls] and we’ve seen so much success with the girls,” Lee said. “This concert is a good example of how the girls feel like they’re giving back to the First Presbyterian community with their song. “ “It’s more than just about singing songs together — it’s about building a strong, stable, healthy and sustained community,” Reverend Shawn Hyska from First Presbyterian Church said. If you’re interested in getting involved with Sister Cities Girlchoir, you can contact them by phone or by filling out

an online registration form at sistercitiesgirlchoir.org. There are also opportunities to volunteer or to simply come out to their concerts. They keep an updated schedule on their website. “[The choir’s] collective work is based around singing,” Lee said. “It’’s a way to give back and that’s what we’re all about; Using music as a tool to build confidence and their connection with each other and with their community. Check it out and come hear the girls sing, especially when we’re here in the Riverwards!” ·

ALYSIA LEE SINGS WITH MEMBERS OF THE LITTLE SISTER’S GIRL CHOIR.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN’S ORGANIST MARIAN GEIGER-LYNCH PLAYS CLASSIC CHRISTMAS SONGS.


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WRITTEN BY JUSTIN HELM

music row Y O U R M O N T H LY G U I D E T O L O C A L M U S I C

Local Band Review: Mumblr Few bands in Philly carry as much excitement as Mumblr. These local heroes are a tight, noisy band who set the stage for what Fishtown’s music scene can really be proud of. If Sunny Day Real Estate were ever to meet Cursive at a Philly house party, you could guarantee Mumblr would be opening. Sitting down with Nick Morrison (vocals and guitar) and Ian Amidan (lead guitar) at a coffee shop in Kensington, I got a chance to discuss their upcoming record and catch some details on the band’s songwriting process. For Mumblr, it is very much about viewing the music as a whole. Leaving lyrics open to interpretation, Nick paints pictures using metaphors, intelligence and comedy. Both serious and fun, Mumblr often accomplishes a unique atmosphere of high energy and deep thought. For their next record “The Never Ending Get Down”, Mumblr recorded live takes while adding additional production through vocal and guitar overdubs in order to keep the energy level high. Recorded entirely at Sex Dungeon Studios in West Philly, this new record will be the first time additional mixing/production will be done by someone other than Scott Stitzer, the band’s drummer. “The Never Ending Get Down” will likely be a little more polished and full sounding than the band’s previous recorded material. Ian described the record as a “chorus of Nicks” so those of us familiar with the vocalist’s powerful voice will no doubt be very excited for this eargasm. Why go for something so different? Nick told me that he was afraid of being pigeonholed as just another punk band. Experimenting with these techniques will bring Mumblr to the next phase of their musical career, one that I think we can all agree will make the band want to “Stay in Philadelphia.”

I Tried to Run Away When I Was Six is a throwback to the old days of guitar and vocals being enough to create a safe honest space. The haunting atmosphere created by Domenica Pileggi is both simple and beautiful. A combination of aggressive strumming and melody sustains listening even in the most intimate settings. Half Waif will be mixing it up a little that night with her experimental vocals and off time beats. This compliments Nandi Rose Plunkett’s experimental use of electronic drums, synths and rich female vocals, which echoes both indian and celtic music. Second Marriage is a four piece pop punk band from Philly featuring alternating vocalists Calvin and Andrew who keep things interesting with catchy layered guitars, punchy drums and classic chugging bass lines. Coping Skills are scheduled to open the show. Mixing Lofi guitars and dueling pop vocals, Coping Skills is a solid listen set to only be the tip of the iceberg that night. The show is Thursday, December 30 at 8PM. Admission for this all ages event is $10. Everybody Hits Philadelphia is located at 529 W. Girard Ave.

Full Line Up: ALEX G FORTH WANDERERS (NJ) I TRIED TO RUN AWAY WHEN I WAS SIX HALF WAIF (NY) PUPPPY (NY) SECOND MARRIAGE COPING SKILLS CALLING ALL MUSICIANS/MUSIC FANS: Is your band from the Riverwards? Did you record your last EP at a local studio or is your practice space in our ‘hood? Or is there a local band you love and want us to spotlight on Music Row? Shoot us an email at news@spiritnews.org with the subject line “Music Row.” ·

MUMBLR

ALEX G.

Local Show Spotlight: Kat Kat Phest @ Everybody Hits Philadelphia A plethora of good bands will be performing this year at the Kat Kat Phest — a six day long festival beginning December 27th and running through January 1st. Everybody Hits Philadelphia’s batting cages (529 W Girard Ave) will transform into a music venue each night. One evening in particular, December 30th, shapes up for an extra special lineup, featuring Alex G., Forth Wanders, I Tried To Run Away When I Was Six, Half Waith, Second Marriage, Coping Skills and more. One of the best artists to come out of Philly in the last few years is without a doubt Alex G. His sporadic music styles, soothing vocals and prolific recording career have been amazing to watch develop. Having recently released a new album titled “Beach Music”, Alex has been keeping busy touring all over the country this year. He will be headlining the show on Wednesday night with his dreamy lo-fi folk. Forth Wanders is also set to perform on that Thursday night. Featuring Ava Trilling, a singer who mleds melodies from the 50s with grunge vocals, Forth Wanders is a lush pop rock band from across the Delaware River that plays songs to sooth that restless emo soul.

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Come in and speak to our distribution manager at 920 N. 8th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19123 or fax your resume to 215-627-6398. No phone calls please.


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WORDS BY ANDREW MARK CORKERY – PHOTOS BY THOMAS WEIR

christmas village IS THE LAST YEAR OF A TIMELESS CHRISTMAS TRADITION UPON US?

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hen Andy Kroyos was a kid he would gaze at the train platforms in store window displays during the holiday season, marveling at their intricacies. Years later, the holiday platform he has built inside of his Fishtown home dwarfs any display he could have imagined during the heyday of his 1940s childhood. “Seeing all those window displays as a kid gave me the idea to create my own and a few years later I started mine on a little card table,” Kroyos said. Andy’s holiday village has moved far beyond the modest space allowed by a simple card table. Today it encompasses almost half of the space on the ground floor of his house on Berks Street where he has lived for more than 30 years. The holiday village has included a myriad of seasonal and not so seasonal items. More than 400 trees, some dusted in snow, fill the platform from end to end, while mountains made out of window screens tower over the village as if they were a barrier to everything outside the platform’s peaceful existence. Inside the quaint town are more than 200 houses scattered about in little sections, 130 matchbox cars and trucks and 400 miniature people that breath life into the village. The town’s little “citizens” take part in a number of winter activities including snowball fights, ice skating and skiing, just to name a few. Some newer elements of the village at first glance appear to be a bit unorthodox, but at the same time showcase Andy’s deep commitment to keeping the village ever-expanding and creative. One such element is the NE Philadelphia airport, which was placed in the village this year for the first time. Another newcomer is an oil refinery innovatively crafted out of old medicine bottles. The refinery was named “Brize chemical,” a homage to the Brize Norton Air Force base in England where Andy served for four years. His years on base were the only years in the past seven decades where Andy did not set up the holiday village. When Andy was away and thousands of miles from home, getting back to the holiday village was always on his mind. But upon returning from his service he came to find out that some of his oldest pieces for the village were gone. “I used to have a lot of old stuff, but when I was in the service my niece and her children had taken some of the really old stuff so they could use it. So I kind of had to start from scratch,” Kroyos said. There were still a few pieces of the holiday village waiting for him upon his return from England, including a group of four to five skiing figures that are said to be the oldest in Andy’s collection, dating back to the 1940s. These figures made out of metal have been with Andy through every incarnation of the holiday village since he started at the age of fifteen in 1945. 70 years later, Andy is just as eager and excited about his village as he was about seeing those holiday village displays in store windows as young child. As he walked me out the front door following our interview for this article, Andy waved hello to a neighbor passing by. Without wasting a moment Andy invited his neighbor in to take a look at his life’s muse, the holiday village. The neighbor’s gleeful response brought a bright smile to Andy’s face straight away.

“Of course we will be over to check it out Andy. See you later,” the neighbor replied. Jacqueline Maikner, Andy’s daughter, has always been her father’s go-to helper when it came to setting up the platform. Looking back on all their experiences together, she sees the village as an important part of her father’s life story. In recent years it has played a key role in keeping him motivated in the face of hardship. “I think ever since my mom died five years ago, the holiday village is what truthfully keeps him going, especially during this time of year,” Maikner said. According to Andy this may his last year setting up the holiday village, making the visit to see him and part of his life’s work all the more important. “With my age, 85 year old, I don’t know if I’ll be around to do it,” Kroyos said. “I’m getting too old to do it now.” He won’t be passing on his lifelong Christmas tradition to just anyone, instead leaving it in the most trusted hands of his helper: his daughter Jacqueline. She says that she will continue to set up a smaller version of Andy’s masterpiece. But while Andy makes it clear that the time is now to pass on the holiday tradition, his daughter has other thoughts. “That fact that he says this is the last year is new to me,” Jacqueline said. “But as long as he is physically capable and able he will put that platform up.” Chuck Valentine is a long-time neighbor and friend of the Kroyos family. He always makes it a point to spend time with Andy and holiday village every year. To him the notion of Andy not setting up the holiday village next year is simply not acceptable as long as he is healthy.

“Andy has always been a very light hearted person and the holiday village is a clear reflection of who he is. So we may have go over there and guilt trip him into doing it,” Valentine said. “Either way it’s a good idea for him to show his daughter how to set it up now while he is still around. But make no mistake about it, I’m sure he will be directing her on what to do.” Andy holds out some hope for us all that he will be a part of setting up up the platform again next year and in future years to come. “If I’m still in good shape,” Kroyos said. “I might not set up the whole thing, but I may help out.” ·


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WORDS AND PHOTOS BY JORDYN CORDNER

creatives wanted

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NEXTFAB’S OPEN STUDIO NIGHTS RUNNING THIS WINTER

he building on North 4th Street that houses NextFab’s Riverwards locations is warm and inviting tonight — There’s a mixture of finished walls and exposed areas of building material mixed throughout the space and the hum and whirr of the running electronics are softly audible. An innovative maker-space founded in 2009, NextFab serves as a work area for anyone creative and hands-on. To use the facilities, which accommodate woodworking, metalworking, 3D printing, jewelry making, members pay a monthly fee and are, based on the type of membership they choose, allowed to spend a certain amount of time each month tinkering, planning, building and creating at NextFab. The company caters to the needs of beginners and professionals alike, even offering kids’ programs. On this particular night, they are offering an open studio tour featuring take-away projects and beverages for the community. A door adorned with NextFab’s logo sits open, adjacent to a window through which a technology room is visible. The room is full of finished projects, devices and trinkets, which line the upper shelves above rows of computers. Inside of the facility, bright plastic buckets full of beverages sit atop a small coffee table in front of a couch. Across the way, a 3D printer chugs along on top of a counter full of previously printed projects. The printer is emitting plastic — its arm moving and twitching in the shape of a leaf, fabricating a fall-themed cookie cutter. People begin to filter in, greeted by Laate Olukotun, NextFab’s Marketing Manager, and Melissa Guglielmo and Matthew Malesky, two staff members. The guests stop and pick up the finished cutters, turning them over and passing them along, asking questions about printers, programs, memberships and the plastic pieces on the counter. The evening is part of an open studio winter series that welcomes community members to drop in and explore the future of making. Every Wednesday night throughout

the fall and winter months NextFab is inviting people to tour the space, enjoy beverages and see their 3D printers and laser cutters in action as they make seasonal projects. The tour being offered on this night, led by Malesky, begins, and the crowd shuffles into the woodworking facility, where walls of tools and equipment surround the working floor, which houses different types of machinery. “We try to make it easy for members. We have stuff like consumables, like glue and screws, here for them. We also have [materials for sale], hardwoods and stuff that you would need to go out to the saw mill and have a pickup truck to get yourself. It’s pretty nice [for members] to be able to access all of that,” Guglielmo said. The next space we visited at the open house is the metalworking space. Masks and aprons sit in a row outside and lifting back the plastic leads to a room lined with red plastic curtains and equipped with heavy duty machinery for the metal fanatics among us. To the right of the metalworking area is a jewelry making facility, where rows of desks with lamps line the middle of the room, which is full of equipment. In addition to all of the tools and machinery they already offer, NextFab is always looking to improve and meet the needs of their members. At orientations, they issue a survey to new members to garner ideas about what they’d like to see in the spaces they use. Only a short time earlier, for example, Guglielmo took a request for jewelry pieces that a client had hoped to learn to work with and incorporate into her creations. “We’re open ears to [suggestions],” Guglielmo said. “It’s a community based studio and it’s for members. It’s nice to set up the studio as much as Matt and I did over the winter… but now it’s more alive because it changes as members request new things.” In addition to the fully equipped spaces and new features by request, one of NextFab’s assets as a company is their knowledgeable staff – a resource for members of all skill levels.

“We have these unbelievable experts. Matt and Melissa are definitely the experts here. People come to them for serious guidance in every single project that they do. Some people are already very, very… proficient in everything,” Olukotun said. “But most need some kind of guidance and some kind of adjusted trajectory, and the wonderful thing is that between Matt and Melissa’s experience and their willingness and interest in expanding their own knowledge, the people that become members really kind of get a cheat sheet. You are accelerating your learning curve because you get to match [our staff’s] knowledge. To me, that’s one of the most wonderful things.”

Nextfab’s 1227 N 4th Street location will be hosting all ages open studio nights every Wednesday from 6-8 PM until February 10th. More details about their facilities and membership options are available on their website, nextfab.com. ·


The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WORDS AND PHOTOS BY MAX PULCINI

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KENSINGTON CHIRSTMAS

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F A C E B O O K S AV E S T H E H O L I D AY F O R F A M I L I E S I N N E E D

acebook is, by and large, an awful place filled a with screaming (read: all caps) commentary, painful political arguments and Star Wars spoile ers. But, on occasion, it can also be a place where ” dpeople can connect with each other with the intention gof doing some good for their community on the Internet rand on the streets. - Anyone who’s on Facebook in Kensington probably knows tGary Summerfield or Lynn Gillis-Shain, or at least “knows” ethem on the Internet. Summerfield runs the Kensington ,Pride group and Gillis moderates Kensington Neighborhood Alumnae. The two groups are very active and combine for almost 20,000 members, most of whom have called sKensington their home at one point in their lives. Members -post news articles about their ‘hood, recall old memories, -share photos from years past and take part in the long-running Kensington Pride word association game. While active on Facebook, Summerfield and Gillis-Shain are also active in the community and both make it a point to help out come Christmas time. So the two, along with Bill Lorch, Barb Raimo and Don Gould, decided to join forces and, through a crowdfunding campaign last month, raised around $5,000 to help make the holiday better for neighborhood families in need. In addition, $500 worth of ShopRite gift cards were given to the St. Francis Inn, a Franciscan institution under the El that aims “to meet the immediate daily needs of the people we serve with food, clothing and hospitality.” “I usually hit up [local businesses] for money each year, throw in some of my own money, buy a bunch of gift cards and hand them off to the St. Francis Inn for them to give out,” Summerfield said. “But what we did this year sure is something [special] and something that could be a lot bigger for the neighborhood moving forward.” In total, eight families and 24 children were presented with gift cards from retail shops like Old Navy, Target and Walmart, toys and a warm meal at the Kensington Pub (2116 E. Tioga St.) on Saturday, December 19th. Gift cards were given so that families could spend the credit how ever they saw fit. “There was one little boy who I heard needed sneakers, so I put a gift card to FootLocker in for his family,” Lorch said. “The families know how to spend this money on their needs better then we do.” “They can buy whatever they want,” Gillis-Shain added. “If it’s diapers that they need, they can go out and get diapers.” Many families were connected to their sponsor through word of mouth and, of course, Facebook. This was not the first time that members of these two Facebook groups have given back on the holidays: Last year, Gillis-Shain and Raimo rallied the Kensington Neighborhood Alumnae group and shipped 68 holiday care packages to troops stationed overseas. This year was, however, the first time that gifts were presented to families in person.

Sharon Reid was present at the Kensington Pub with family members Christine Reid and young Thomas Goodema, Jr. They were one of the families sponsored by Summerfield. As the family was presented with their gift cards and toys for their little boy, the smiles across their faces became infectious. “Gary is a lifesaver, he really is,” Sharon said as Thomas was given a new toy train set. “We just didn’t really have the money this year, but he contacted us and really saved Christmas this year. This is really going to make [Thomas’] Christmas.” Don Gould, President of the Olde Richmond Civic Association and a local business owner, took things one step further by taking the family he sponsored out shopping so they could get exactly what they needed this holiday season. The family, which Gould came into contact with through Hackett Elementary School, purchased necessities like winter jackets on their shopping spree. “Today was good for our first time, it’s good,” Gould said. “There’s 24 kids that are going to have a good Christmas, eight families that are going to have a good Christmas. It’s good. And that’s what you’re supposed to do if you can — give back. Next year, the two groups plan on starting the fundraising process around Halloween and create Amazon wishlists for families in need. This gift drive was a throwback to the days were being a good neighbor was expected, when families always pitched in to help those in need. “It’s all about paying it forward,” Summerfield said. “Anything I can do to help out the community, I’m there. I’m not wealthy, but I’m very fortunate. And this isn’t just my money, we raised these funds. I’m just the messenger, passing it along.” ·


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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 COMMUNITY

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M EET ING S

college, and completing the FAFSA. The event starts at 6PM. For more information call 215-685-9990.

NKCDC OPEN OFFICE HOURS NKCDC is hosting open office hours in the 19134 zip code at two locations. They will be at the Community Women’s Education Project (CWEP) on the corner of Frankford Ave. and Somerset St. the second Monday of the month from 4-7PM and Firm Hope Baptist Church on Tulip and Auburn Streets every second Wednesday of the month. They will assist you with signing up for benefits like SNAP, connecting to housing counselors for any housing needs, rent and property tax rebates, food referrals, health insurance and safety or quality of life issues in your community. For further information contact Tess at tdonie@NKCDC.org or 215-427-0350 x 139.

Tuesday, January 19 HOMEOWNERSHIP WORKSHOP Educating First Time Homebuyers Concilio will host a homeownership workshop to educate the community on how to become successful homeowners and prevent foreclosure. The topics include budgeting, credit repair, mortgage and the purchase process. Philadelphia residents who attend the workshop will be potentially eligible for a city grant that assists qualified purchasers with their closing costs. To register for the event and to learn more on Concilio’s Homeownership program, RSVPs should be sent to Irina at irina.valentin@elconcilio.net or 215-627-3100.

AL-ANON AT HOLY NAME CHURCH HALL Meetings are held every Monday night from 7-8PM at Holy Name Church Hall at 701 Gaul Street. Anything shared at a meeting stays there and everyone is welcome to attend. Al-Anon meetings are free, anonymous and confidential.

Wednesday, January 20 AMERICAN LEGION CASINO TRIP Tickets $26 and you get $25 back. The trip leaves the club at 11:30AM and leave the casino at 7PM, back at the club by around 8:30PM. For more information call 215-739-0615.

Wednesday, January 13 EKNA ZONING MEETING The meeting will take at 7:15PM at the Circle of Hope (2007 Frankford Ave). It will be concerning 2036 York St (thru to Arizona St.) – application to relocate lot line to create two lots from one. Existing structure to remain. 1935 E Letterly Street – erection of a two-story addition to the rear of existing structure. Undersized rear yard and 2011 Amber Street – three-story addition to an existing structure with twelve dwelling units. Sit down restaurant on the ground floor with interior parking spaces. Relocation of lot lines to create 8 new lots with single-family homes. The agenda subject to change. Please bring proof of address.

EVENTS HOLIDAY GIFT BASKET RAFFLE Family, friends and the community are invited to stop by St. Anne’s Senior Center at 2607 E. Cumberland St. to buy raffle tickets Monday through Friday from 9AM to 4pm. Tickets are $1 each or a book of 6 for $5 for a chance to win gift certificates and merchandise from over 20 local shops and restaurants. Put your “tickets in the bag” to win the gifts of your choice! The drawing will be held on Wednesday, December 23rd. You do not have to be present to win. The center will be closed December 24th and December 25th. All proceeds will benefit the center. For more information call 215-426-9799. 21-DAY PURIFICATION & WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM The Allegheny Family Chiropractic Center will be hosting a 21-Day Cleanse and Weight Loss program in January. Attend an informational meeting on Monday January 4 at 7:15 pm to learn all about the program and the wonderful results we have seen with it. Space is limited. For further information or to reserve your spot call 215-425-1110. Wednesday, January 6 KEEP YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION Join us at Allegheny Family Chiropractic at 7:15 pm for an interactive workshop on keeping your New Year’s goals so that 2016 becomes your happiest, healthiest, and most prosperous year yet! Space is limited, call today to reserve your seat at 215-425-1110. Saturday, January 9 TREE-CYCLING EVENT Keep your Christmas tree out of a landfill, and put it to good use right here in the neighborhood. Bring it in for chipping at the NLNA’s annual Treecycling event from 10AM-4PM, on the 3rd Street side of the dog park (900 block, across from Liberty Lands). Please remove lights, ornaments, and tinsel. Optional $5 donation requested to help offset expenses. No early drop-offs, please. Tuesday, January 12 PHEAA QUESTION & ANSWER The Fishtown Library will host a representative from the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) for an information session to answer questions about the financial aid process, planning and paying for

Friday, January 29 BIG TEXAS HOLD’EM The Port Richmond Tigers’ present the Big Texas Hold’em and Monte Carlo Night at the Columbia Social Club at 3521 Almond Street. There is a $40 buy-in with big cash prizes to the winner. Other games of chance available, and free food and a cash bar. For more information call Tom at 215-275-8838 or the Tigers’ Clubhouse at 215-423-7611. Sunday, January 31 MYSTERY BINGO Port Richmond Tigers present a Mystery Bingo event at the Columbia Social Club, 3521 Almond St. Prizes include Coach bags, American Girl Dolls, personal electronics, home furnishings and more. Tickets are $30 and bingo starts at 1PM. Tickets include homemade food and snacks, and there will be a cash bar. For more information call Tom at 215-275-8838 or the Tigers’ Clubhouse at 215-423-7611.

CHILDREN Tuesdays FISHTOWN LIBRARY EVENTS Toddler Storytime – Join Miss Dana for stories, songs and silliness every Wednesday at 10:30AM. For more information call 215-685-9990. Wednesdays PRESCHOOL STORYTIME AT RICHMOND LIBRARY This program is intended for children ages 1-4 and their caregiver. Siblings are always welcome. Daycares should call for separate appointments. Richmond Branch of the Free Library, 2987 Almond Street. For further information call 215-685-9992. CHILDREN’S THEATER ARTS Come grow, play and explore with the Portside Arts Center. Students will use their imaginations and learn acting skills like speech, movement, improvisation and character development through the use of theatre games, exercises and preparation for performance. Children will showcase their skills in a shared performance that will be presented at the end of the term. The class will be taught by Portside’s celebrity acting instructor Angela Goethals, an accomplished film, television and stage actress who has appeared in films such as Home Alone and Jerry Maguire. For information & registration, visit portsideartscenter.org. DANCE PROGRAM Ms. Jaclyn Scarborough will host hourly classes that take place on Tuesday evenings at 5:30PM for ages 3 and up. Also forming classes for 8 and older in jazz/Hip Hop from 7:30-8:30PM. Fee is $25 a month, with a $20 non-refundable registration fee also required at sign up. HANCOCK BASKETBALL RECRUITING Hancock S.N.B.L. 2015 is recruiting children from ages 6-11 years old to play in our annual co-ed Sixers Neighbor-

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hood Basketball League. We will be playing at John Moffet Elementary School’s Gym. The league will start in December 1 through late March. Children must participate in the basketball clinic to play in games. For more information please call Coach’s Larry or Don at r 215-685-9877. p m CIONE SIGNUPS Chess Club – For beginner to advanced players of all ages. w Meetings take place Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30- t w 8PM. Arts and Crafts for Kids – Meetings for 5-12 years old. s Arts and crafts have no cost and takes place every Saturt day from 12-1PM. Zumba – Adult classes are on Fridays from 7:30-8:30PM, t i and the cost is $5 per class. Tumbling – Class for ages 3 and up. Classes held on Mon- t days. Hip Hop Class – For ages 7 and up. Classes will be held on Mondays from 7-8PM. Both Tumbling and Hip Hop classes have a $20 Registra- 1 3 tion Fee Non-Refundable and costs $25 per month. 1 For more information call 215-685-9880. 1 1 2 SENIORS ½

P Sundays w SUNDAY BINGO a St. Anne Church will host bingo on Sundays in the Social c Hall, Memphis and Tucker streets. Doors open at 4PM; bingo starts at 6PM. Cost is $10. Call 215-739-4590 for more details.

LUTHERAN SETTLEMENT HOME EVENTS Lutheran Settlement House Senior Center, 1340 Frankford Ave. Computer Classes: Level 1: Mondays from 9-10AM, Tuesdays from 9-10AM and Thursdays from 122PM. Level 2 Classes take place on Mondays from 1-3PM and Thursdays 2-4PM. Dancercise with Rita, Mondays at W 9AM and Tai Chi with Milt on Wednesdays at 12:30PM. F For further information call 215-426-8610. A

4 Fridays f ART WORKSHOP FOR SENIORS e St. Anne’s Senior Center, 2607 E. Cumberland St., is offering an art workshop for people age 50 and older. “Clay T Creations” will meet weekly on Fridays, from 12:30-2 PM S Participants will learn about the art of hand building to S create pots and other clay forms. Those interested should C register in advance. For more details call 215-426-9799. T

P SENIOR EXERCISE CLASSES F Exercise classes for people 50 and older will be offered at A St. Anne’s Senior Center, 2607 E. Cumberland St. Class o schedule will be Enhance Fitness on Mondays and Thurs- F days at 9:30 AM, Chair Yoga on Tuesdays at 9:30AM, Tai Chi on Wednesdays at 10AM, and Line Dancing on the first and third Friday of every month. For more information call 215-426-9799.

sign ups

PORTSIDE ARTS CLASSES Holiday Make & Take Craft Class – Create fun handmade winter and holiday themed crafts – they make the perfect gifts. Classes are on December 14 for 7-10 year olds, and December 15 for 4-6 year olds. Private Music Lessons for All Ages – Affordable and fun professional music instruction for children, teens, and adults. Drum lessons with Michael Arcata – learn rock, funk, and jazz style drumming. Voice lessons with Ariane Kolet – improve your vocal range and learn proper technique while rehearsing songs of your choice. Adult Visual Arts Classes – Get creative! Learn how to use oil paint, glass, found objects, and recycled materials to create one-of-a-kind fine art. All materials are provided. Give the Gift of the Arts this Season – Portside Arts Center offers gift certificates for all of our art, theater, and music classes. To register go to portsideartscenter.org.


The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 23, 2015 WRITTEN BY CASEY ANN BECK

clean plate CREAM CHEESE SPRITZ COOKIES

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here isn’t a more reliable holiday cookie than the spritz. A buttery, sugar cookie dough base provides a confectionary empty canvas and just one batch makes an ample four dozen cookies. When pushed through various plates of a cookie press, the dough is transformed into tiny trees, flowers, stars and other unrecognizable shapes. On one hand, spritz cookies are nowhere near my favorite; they’re pretty basic and simple in flavor. On the other hand, and for the same reasons, I couldn’t not include them in my holiday cookie lineup. Growing up, we always made spritz cookies and the best part was using colored sugar to decorate them. My mom would even dye half of the batch green to press through the tree-shaped plate. And, on December 26th, when I take inventory of what’s left of our annual Christmas gathering, I usually find half a bottle of wine, forgotten serving plates and bowls from generous guests and about a dozen spritz cookies. Those last few sugar coated, dyed, buttery cookies taste their best, for some reason, once the hustle and bustle has subsided. The final batch in 2015’s series of holiday sweets, these cream cheese spritz cookies won’t fail you. And, if you don’t have a press, roll them into balls, flatten them and bake into rounds. Just be sure to set aside a few for yourself, to enjoy when the dust settles.

Cream Cheese Spritz Cookies From Wilton 1 cup softened, unsalted butter 3 oz. softened cream cheese 1 teaspoon almond extract 1 cup sugar 1 egg yolk 2 ½ cups flour ½ teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream butter and cream cheese together. Add sugar and mix well until light and fluffy. Add egg yolks and almond extract. Mix well. Gradually add flour and salt to cream mixture. Shape dough in small logs and place in cookie press. Press cookies onto cool ungreased cookie sheet. Bake 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. ·

FAITH

Wednesdays FIRST PRESBYTERIAN BIBLE STUDY GROUP A Bible study group meets at First Presbyterian Church, 418 E. Girard Ave at 7PM . Come and bring a friend for informative, exciting and lively open discussions. As always, everyone is welcome.

WE HELP YOU STAY MOBILE WITH OUR BALANCE PROGRAM.

Thursdays ST. ANNE WEEKLY NOVENA St. Anne weekly Novena Thursday evening service, 7:30PM Church of Saint Anne, Memphis St. and Lehigh Ave.

Tuesdays PRAYER MINISTRY First Emmanuel Prayer Partners Church, 711 W. Girard Ave. Prayer Ministry is looking for Prayer Partners. Everyone is Welcome to come pray with us. For further information call 215-456-9974.

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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 16, 2015 COMMUNITY

CALENDAR N E W S @ S P I R I T N E W S . O R G • 1 4 2 8 E . S U S Q U E H A N N A AV E • 2 1 5 . 4 2 3 . 6 2 4 6

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PLUMBING - WINDOWS PAINTING - DOORS CARPENTRY - CEILINGS CEMENT - FLOORS

THE FINE P RINT: We reserve the right to edit, refuse or classify any advertisement. Advertising is a privilege which must be protected against misuse. All classified advertisements subject to pre-payment. It is the responsibility of the advertiser to check the advertisements each time it is published. No responsibility is assumed by the newspaper for errors. Errors will be rectified by reinsertion in the following issue only.

The deadline is Friday at 5pm for display ads, and Monday at 12pm for classifieds. All advertisements must be paid for in advance.

HOME REPAIR SERVICES

AFFORDABLE ELECTRIC

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REAL ESTATE SALES: new or experienced; free training program. Call Mike Dunphy at 215-840-8399 Drivers: NE Regional Run. $.44cpm. Monthly Bonus. Home Weekly. Complete Benefit Package. Rider Program Immediately. 100% No-Touch. 70% D&H. 888-406-9046

PARENTS

FOSTER PARENTS Good, Loving homes needed for children of all ages.

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BUYING HOUSES We buy houses for cash. Fast settlement. Call John 215-740-4629

25XX Frankford FOR RENT Ave - Furnished Kitchenette. Two Luxury Apartments Clean, senior for Rent - 1st floor - 2 bedrooms- $1400/month large preferred $450, 2nd floor- 2 bedrooms1 private bath $1800/month. Both have -$500 hardwood floors, marble bathrooms, washer/dryer, 215-941-3000

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JUNK CARS

Up to $1,100 cash for cars or trucks with bad engines or transmissions. $550 CASH for any complete junk car or truck with or without title. Call 215-669-1000

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Landlords must allow you to make reasonable accommodations to ensure full use of your apartment. Telling you that you can’t install grab bars and ramps is against the law. You can fight back. If you suspect unfair housing practices, contact HUD or your local Fair Housing Center. Everyone deserves a fair chance.

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The Spirit of the Riverwards – December 16, 2015

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Introducing our ACCT Pet of the Week, Buckus. He is a senior dog who was surrendered by his owner because they could no longer care for him. Buckus is an 8 year old male pit bull who likes kids, he’s sweet and affectionate, likes fetch, and he has plenty of playful energy. If you love an oldie but a goodie please contact us. He is such a sweetie. If you have dogs of your own, you’ll need to bring at least one in to meet any potential dogs and make sure there is no major personality clash. Please also bring proof that you are allowed dogs/cats at your home if you rent. Buckus is located at ACCT, 111 W. Hunting Park Ave, 267385-3800, adopt@acctphilly.org

26th District Crime Report – december 9 through december 15 There were no homocides, rapes, robberies with guns, or aggravated assaults with or without guns reported in this time.

1

1

7

7

2

robberies with other weapon

residential burglaries

thefts from autos

thefts

stolen autos

2400 Cedar - 12/10

2400 York - 12/4

900 Canal - 12/9 2200 Amber - 12/9 2300 Harold - 12/10 1000 Front - 12/12 100 Ellen - 12/13 1900 York - 12/14 2600 Ritter - 12/15

2000 Dreer - 12/10 2200 Firth - 12/11 400 Miller - 12/11 2500 Aramingo - 12/11 1900 Front - 12/14 2500 Aramingo - 12/15 1300 Marlborough - 12/15

1100 Frankford - 12/10 1600 Eyre - 12/13


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The Spirit – December 23. 2015  

This week we look at what the Riverwards does during the holidays, an organization that gives new winter coats to kids, and the renovation a...

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