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WEEK NOVEMBER 30, 2016 VOL. 1 NO. 41

REBUILD INITIATIVE Mayor Kenney and City Council announce $100 million grant for neighborhood spaces. 5

HOPE COMMUNITY Hope Partnership for Education Celebrates Ribbon Cutting of New Quint Learning Center. 6

D.U.O. Chapter Four of Spirit News’ Serial Fiction Saga. 8

DEVELOPMENT NEWS Find out what’s being built on your block. 4

ACCU-REGGIE 7-day weather forecast for the region. 3

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Events and happenings in our neighborhoods. 7

HOT OFF THE

PRESS

C

ommunity Partnership School (CPS) will be participating in #GivingTuesday, an annual international fundraising campaign that serves as a philanthropic response to the consumerism of Black Friday and Cyber Monday. This is the third year CPS has participated in #GivingTuesday. The campaign coincides with the holiday season and starts Tuesday, November 29th. CPS plans to raise funds through the campaign to maintain the variety of academic programs the school offers, as well as its Three C’s Scholarship Fund. The “Three C’s” in the scholarship fund stand for curiosity, courage and compassion. These are the values CPS seeks to instill in students. #GivingTuesday is more than a fundraising campaign for CPS. Founded in 2012, it is an international day of giving during the holiday season. According to the #GivingTuesday website, the campaign is spread through social media and serves as a major fundraising opportunity for other organizations like CPS, increasing donations and creating new partnerships in the process. The idea of collaboration intersects with the mission of CPS because the school is reliant upon partnerships with the community. According to Christopher Jenkins, CPS’ Director of Communications and Civic Engagement, the school’s mission is to nurture talent in students from North Central Philadelphia and to shape the child into a curious, courageous and compassionate human being. The school encourages students to learn more about their communities and embrace new experiences, no matter how challenging.

According to the CPS website, parents are empowered to participate as partners by being classroom volunteers, event coordinators and family council members. This, in turn, builds confidence in students by seeing their parents being active in their education. Rebecca Cain, CPS’ Director of Philanthropy, told Spirit News that in the past on #GivingTuesday, gifts to the scholarship fund were matched dollar for dollar up to $20,000. CPS’ fundraising goal this year is $40,000. The independent, nonprofit school was founded in 2006 through a partnership between Germantown Academy and Project HOME. Most of CPS’ funding comes from private donations instead of tuition fees, which are on a sliding scale. Thanks to these donations, parents pay what they can, usually in the $35-$150 range. The average family pays $750 yearly. CPS puts its funding to use through programs that prepare low-income students for high-performing schools. The school offers a 7:1 student-teacher ratio and limits class sizes to 14 students. Throughout the past month, CPS posted descriptions of its programs on Facebook every day leading up to #GivingTuesday. Each post describes ways in which the school stays engaged with the community by encouraging parents to volunteer and students to be active learners, along with describing their alumni program and more. The alumni program allows students to connect to middle schools, high schools and post-secondary schools. Alumni are able to stay connected Continued on Page 2.


The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

Page 2

Continued from Page 1. to other students through social gatherings organized by the alumni program. One example of a class that has benefited from #GivingTuesday is the fifth grade cooking program that teaches students how to cook affordable meals from scratch. The course is staffed by volunteers and lasts eight weeks. More programs can be found on the school’s website and on the Facebook page. These are just some of the classes that money raised in the #GivingTuesday campaign will fund. “We’re doing our best to include the community in our world,” Jenkins said. “We’re about partnering with the community. •

Eric Jone, CPS Director

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The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016 7 D AY F O R E C A S T F O R P E N N ’ S G A R D E N

accu reggie TWITTER: @ACCUREGGIE • FACEBOOK: ACCU-REGGIE

L

ast week was beautiful. All the food, all the family, all the friends — it was truly a wonderful time! The weather wasn't too bad either. Yes, it was cool, but we are in the heart of fall and it’s going to be cool in Philly this time of year. After an extremely dry November we turn the page into a stormy December. Rain storms will attack the area one by one the next few weeks. We start and end this seven day period with a significant storm. No snow in the forecast yet, but we are getting close. I expect snow before December 15th, but either way, it’s coming! We will start the week with rain from a storm cutting to the Great Lakes, which means we are on the warm side of

the storm, so only rain for me and you! Sunday and Monday could feature a big daddy storm that brings snow to the Mid-west and rain to the East Coast. Stay tuned because the exact track of this storm is not locked in yet. Wednesday features a warm rain as moisture streams up from the South. It’s a soggy day, but at least it’s not cold and wet. Thursday will see the return of sunshine and cooler temperatures. We jump down from the 60s to the 50s. Friday is a cool, crisp day typical of what we have been experiencing lately. Saturday is chilly as temperatures barely make it to 50. Clouds may increase overnight.

On Sunday and Monday we have the potential to be impacted by a large storm. For now it looks like mostly or all rain for the area, but it could be A LOT of rain. The track is uncertain but a storm during this time is likely. The wet weather will clear out for Tuesday as cold weather swooshes back in behind the storm! More storms are on the horizon, though. The weather winner of the week is Friday; the weather loser is Sunday-Monday. •

No one understands small business like small business. We may be getting a bigger staff and more readers, but we’re still just like you. Work together with Spirit News to help grow your business and inform your neighbors. ads@spiritnews.org 215.423.6246

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The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

Page 4

WRITTEN BY JORDYN CORDNER

Development News FIND OUT WHAT’S BEING BUILT ON YOUR BLOCK.

Francisville

get buyers at these prices, this could encourage additional home development in a neighborhood that has skewed According to Naked Philly, referring to a tip from one of toward condos in recent memory.” their readers, a home has been demolished at 755 N. Capitol Street. The developers are reportedly building a quaSpring Garden druplex, “sacrificing” parking units in favor of building a residential unit looking south on Capitol Street, where a A Naked Philly reader observed some zoning notices on new foundation is being poured the 1700 block of Brandywine Street that indicate the exNaked Philly predicts that this will recur in multiples pansion of an existing parking lot rather than repurposing over the coming years, resulting in either all homes being the land for new development. The north side of the block turned over or the area being rezoned; it is currently zoned is zoned for multi-family use but is currently overtaken by as a multi-family residential. the large parking lot. Years ago, Naked Philly reported that developers sought The zoning notices will expand the parameters of the lot to add another story to an abandoned warehouse at Capi- zoning that was granted over the summer by the ZBA. The tol and Brown Streets and convert it into residential prop- lot is used by the Carpenters Union (1800 block of Spring erty. The plan fell through and the property was put on the Garden Street). Naked Philly speculates that the eastern market. It was purchased this year and there are two single family homes are under construction in its place. A sign designates that the project is called Capital (sic) 1700 block of Brandywine St. Estates. The homes are 2,300 square feet and listed for $725K — not the average price for a single family home in the area. Naked Philly speculates that, “provided they

part of the lot was once owned by developers, but the Carpenters Union bought the property back in 2014. “As far as we can tell,” Naked Philly reports, “these lots have pretty much been sitting empty forever, since they were once the enormous rear yards of mansions on Green Street.” The publication believes that these lots will remain empty for quite a bit. •

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The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

WRITTEN BY RUTHANN ALEXANDER

Rebuild Initiative

M AY O R K E N N E Y A N D C I T Y C O U N C I L A N N O U N C E $ 1 0 0 M I L L I O N G R A N T F O R N E I G H B O R H O O D S PA C E S

M

ayor Jim Kenney and City Council announced an early Christmas present in a press conference held at the Cecil B. Moore Recreation Center on Monday, November

21st. The William Penn Foundation will award a $100 million grant to fund the city’s Rebuild initiative to revitalize neighborhood spaces that have been in disrepair for years. These spaces include libraries, recreation centers and parks located in underserved communities. Rebuild Executive Director Nicole Westerman said no sites have been chosen as of yet for the Rebuild program. The press conference was held at the Cecil B. Moore Recreation Center because the facility is one of many the city may consider for the program. During press conference, Westerman explained that identifying neighborhoods with the greatest needs, such as Strawberry Mansion, would be part of the process of selecting areas to revitalize. Rebuild will consider physical conditions of facilities such as libraries, parks and recreation centers that have not received new equipment or repairs in years. Westerman does not know how many sites Rebuild will choose, but they will be chosen within the next few months. City Council is still in the planning phase for the $500 million Rebuild program. To break that down further, $300 million of that money will come in bonds, $120 million will be from foundations and private donors, $32 million will come from state and federal funds and $48 million will be from city capital funds. Janet Haas, the President of the William Penn Foundation, said Rebuild is a once-in-a generation project for the city. She said a grant of this size is important, because the foundation was energized by the boldness of Mayor Kenney’s proposal. Overarching values of equity, engagement and economic opportunity shared by both the foundation and City Council are the driving force of Rebuild. Haas explained that the citywide scale of the effort is unprecedented and emphasized the importance of investing in neighborhoods citywide, especially the underserved communities. She applauded the mayor’s and City Council’s inventive approach to planning Rebuild. “Rather than slicing up the pie as is so often done in civic life, the mayor and his team have developed a strategic, data-driven investment approach to ensure maximum resources are directed to the areas of greatest need,” Haas said. In fact, Rebuild could potentially become a national model due to the amount of community reinvestment that would be a result of the initiative, Haas added. Rebuild will improve infrastructure and impact commu-

nities economically by providing jobs, increasing community engagement and providing new services once the repairs are complete. Revitalizing communities will breach social barriers that isolate residents from each other. Mayor Kenney agreed that people will come together as recreation centers, parks and libraries are repaired and rebuilt. He said people will want to volunteer more at these facilities. “When these facilities are rebuilt, it will generate more people who will want to help,” Kenney said. He explained that Rebuild is not just about creating capital projects, but building community and diversity in each of the 100 neighborhoods Rebuild will target. It will give children safe spaces to go to after school and provide crucial programming that supports educational achievement. Michael DiBerardinis, Managing Director of the City of Philadelphia, described the William Penn Foundation’s commitment to the Rebuild project as a historic moment for the city. DiBerardinis said the William Penn Foundation has made significant investments in high quality public spaces for all the residents of the city. “I think it was that history of smart, strategic investment into our libraries, into our recreation centers, into our

Council President Darrell Clarke praised the Cecil B. Moore Recreation Center volunteers for their commitment to running the facility in spite of its state of disrepair.

playgrounds, our ball fields, our swimming pools that made Rebuild possible,” DiBerardinis said. DiBerardinis also praised Mayor Kenney’s commitment to all Philadelphia neighborhoods for making Rebuild possible. “He was very clear about if we’re going to do something, we have to do something that reaches and touches all citizens across the city, provides the same opportunity for fairness and equity for all our young people and all our citizens,” he said. Council President Darrell Clarke said he personally visited the Cecil B. Moore Recreation Center after a man brought grievances about the facility’s state of disrepair to a City Council meeting. He praised the recreation center volunteers who contribute their time every day under the facility’s current conditions. Councilwoman Cindy Bass said she was a “rec center kid” growing up, so the Rebuild project is significant for her. “I know this neighborhood very well and I know the need that exists in this community,” Bass said. “I want to start by thanking the mayor for his vision for this Rebuild initiative, for having the vision to say to all of our kids, we deserve more. We deserve better.” •

Councilwoman Cindy Bass was a self-proclaimed “rec center kid” and wants to see safer facilities for children to go to after school.

Mayor Jim Kenney and City Council announced that William Penn Foundation will be awarding the city with $100 million for its Rebuild initiative to repair parks, recreation centers and libraries in underserved neighborhoods.


The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

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WRITTEN BY SPIRIT STAFF

hope partnership

H O P E PA R T N E R S H I P F O R E D U C AT I O N C E L E B R AT E S R I B B O N C U T T I N G O F N E W Q U I N T L E A R N I N G C E N T E R

H

ope Partnership for Education hosted a ribbon cutting for the Quint Learning Center, a newly renovated learning area and library opened in Hope’s Education Center (2601 N 11th St.). The area will provide middle school students, alumni, and adult learners new areas to study and collaborate. They will have access to eight new computers as well as a smart board, and many donated books in the previously unused space. The Quint family backed the creation of the center in honor of their parents, George and Barbara Quint, who were long time advocates of education. “My brothers and I found it an easy decision to donate funds to Hope for the purpose of building a learning center at the school to honor our late parents,” said Andrew Quint, M.D. “For as long as any of us can remember, the two of them valued their schooling above all else, recognizing the experiences as a gift that made everything in life that followed both possible and meaningful." “Both were unassuming, humble, and affable people who always struck us as profoundly grateful for the opportunities their educations provided,” Dr. Quint continued. “We know they'd be inspired by the accomplishments of Hope students that, similarly, arise from an understanding of the transforming power of a quality education.” George Quint (1919-2009) grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of the owner of a small men's clothing shop. That line of work was supposed to be his destiny, but he was allowed to apply to one college, which he did— the local school, that happened to be Harvard. He was in the same class as John F. Kennedy, Pete Seeger and Adlai Stevenson, a considerable source of pride, though for economic reasons he lived at home. After the Second World War, he made his way to the financial industry in New York and ended up as a vice-president of Merrill Lynch. Barbara Gilder Quint (1928-2012) always said her years at Vassar College defined her sense of self and her potential. She made her mark in the financial world by becoming one of the first female brokers, and she later went on to become the financial editor of Glamour magazine and Family Circle. The mission of Hope Partnership for Education is to break the cycle of poverty through education. Founded by Sisters of Mercy and the Society of the Holy Child Jesus, Hope Partnership is 15 years old as an organization and 13 years old as a school. The Education Center operates a private, independent middle school (grades 5-8), where most

students enter several grade levels behind, and an adult school (adult basic education, GED) to serve families in Eastern North Philadelphia. Also offered is the Graduate Support Program, which focuses on successfully transitioning students into quality high schools that meet their potential. The program offers Hope alumni academic and social support throughout their high school years, and aid in choosing, applying for, and meeting the requirements for college acceptance or successful entry into the workplace. Hope Partnership operates an extended day/ extended year model 9 hours a day, 11 months a year. Beyond its academic program, the school offers enrichment

activities, one-to-one tutoring, and community service projects that foster the personal and intellectual development of all its students. Hope Partnership also provides monthly family education programs and special interest courses on computer basics and other topics of interest to our parents and neighbors. The high school graduation rate for Hope alumni is over 95 percent, compared to 39 percent in this Eastern North Philadelphia neighborhood. Parents pay an average of $20/month in family contributions to send their child to Hope; if this amount is unaffordable, parents may opt to volunteer their time to support the school. •

The Barbara and George Quint Learning Center available to middle school, high school (Hope alumni) and adult students of Hope Partnership for Education

No one understands small business like small business. We may be getting a bigger staff and more readers, but we’re still just like you. Work together with Spirit News to help grow your business and inform your neighbors. ads@spiritnews.org 215.423.6246


Page 7

The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

COMMUNITY

calendar N E W S @ S P I R I T N E W S . O R G • 1 4 2 8 E . S U S Q U E H A N N A AV E • 2 1 5 . 4 2 3 . 6 2 4 6 December 10th & 11th, 12PM-6PM CERULEAN ARTS HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Stop by for some hot mulled cider and treats while you shop. Storewide specials all weekend plus trunk show featuring Adorn Custom Jewelry by Jennifer Tefankjian and ceramic cups by Matthew Courtney. 1355 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19123

at (215)-763-8100 Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30PM MAKE STUFF A drop-in program to craft handmade objects or create art being surrounded by the art of The Philadelphia Museum of Art. Activities include sketching, knitting, Lego fun or even creating a puzzle. For further information contact Philadelphia Museum of Art at (215)-763-8100

Thursdays, 12-1PM COFFEE AND CONVERSATION On Thursdays, The Stephen Klein Wellness Center opens up for the community to talk about what they please while enjoying free coffee and snacks. Anyone can drop in.

Sunday, December 18, 2PM CERULEAN ARTS ARTIST TALK: BILL SCOTT Bill Scott’s Intaglio Prints, 1999-2016 will be on display at the gallery from November 30th - December 24th. Scott Wednesdays, 6PM will be giving his artist’s talk on Sunday December 18th at DHYANA YOGA 2pm. 1355 Ridge Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19123 Practice your poses with Dhyana yoga outdoors in the Museum’s sculpture garden. Class size varies. Weather DeNETWORKING EVENTS pendent and cancelled above 90 degrees. 1st Tuesday of the Month, 6:30-8:30 PM For further information contact Philadelphia Museum of Art DIG - Philadelphia Commercial Sub Group at (215)-763-8100 Diversified Investors Group Meetup for London Grill 2301 Fairmount Avenue For more info, contact Joe Scorese 215-290-5108 jscorese@ firstrust.com WINTER BOCCE LEAGUE Playing on Mondays beginning December 5th and ending Feb 6th, we're holding our inaugural indoor winter league at Urban Saloon. We donate a portion of our proceeds to the Fairmount Civic Association and interested players can sign up at www.aallsports.com. All skill levels welcome. WINTER CORN HOLE LEAGUE Begins December 6th and ends January 24th at the Ukrainian League. We donate a portion of our proceeds to the Fairmount Civic Association and interested players can sign up at www.aallsports.com. All skill levels welcome. Through December 14, 2016 MIGHTY WRITERS MID-DAY CAFE Wednesdays, 1:00-3:00PM. This workshop will take place at 2123 N. Gratz St, for ages 13-17. If you get dismissed early on Wednesdays, join us to explore fantasy fiction. November 26 and December 10 at 2PM VINYASA FLOW YOGA. Laurie Schaffer will lead a one-hour yoga session at the Wagner Institute of Science (1700 W Montgomery Ave). Please bring your own mat and your block. This program has limited space. First come, first served. Mondays, 6-8PM TOUR AMBASSADOR STEWARDS TRAINING PROJECT The Strawberry Civic Association is looking for young and young at heart folks to come out to Mander Rec Center (33rd and Diamond St.) to learn Philadelphia history, Fairmount Park history, museum and trail information, etc. Tourism is a lucrative industry…. Be prepared. For more call 215-765-9500 Tuesdays, 7-8:30PM SUPPORT GROUP FOR PARENTS OF ADOLESCENT & ADULT CHILDREN LIVING WITH ADDICTION AND BRAIN DISEASE Learn about substance use and mental health disorders every 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month at Rodeph Shalom (615 N Broad St) Those affected can share experiences and resources as well as how to support their children anonymously. For further information contact Caron at 800-854-6023 or Rabbi Jill Maderer at (215)-627-6747 x216 or rabbimaderer@rodephshalom.org. Tuesdays, 7-9PM OPEN MIC NIGHT Mugshots Coffeehouse (1925 Fairmount Ave.) hosts an open mic night every Tuesday. For more information visit Mugshots Coffeehouse on Facebook. Wednesdays, 5-8PM WEDNESDAY NIGHTS GAMEPLAY Every week there are different games to play in the galleries of The Philadelphia Museum of Art. Play with friends or with fellow visitors in friendly competition provided by the Museum. For further information contact Philadelphia Museum of Art

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The Spirit of Penn’s Garden – November 30, 2016

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL FERRENCE

d.u.o.

I

CHAPTER 4 OF PENN'S GARDEN'S RECURRING SERIAL FICTION

t got immeasurably worse. The beatings were nothing compared to what would come. Dutten began erasing anyone and everyone who posed a threat, removing every fiber of their being. At first I only knew that it was happening and that he was solely responsible; unsure of how he did it, where he put the bodies, how he determined who had to go, how he remained free from incrimination; how he was able to lead a double life, appear so with it while inside he was someone else entirely, what the hell would happen next? Though I’d dealt with extremely violent clients in the past, it was never anything like this. It was never so ruthless, so vicious, so widespread and far-reaching, an issue of public health. I was never so enmeshed. Dutten trusted me because I saved his life. For my own psychological and ethical well-being, I was obligated to act. I had two choices: I could go to the police and turn him in, tell them everything I knew, wear a wire, work with them on a confession, which would be enough to put him away forever; out of my life, off the streets OR I could help him. I could help him change. I could work with him; become something better, someone new. Make him whole again. Fix this. I didn’t see any of it coming. Of all the possible outcomes, mass annihilation and hysteria wasn’t something I’d projected. After I saved him, I thought about it a lot, whether or not I should sever ties immediately, right then and there, or see what happened, how it all played out. Before I could decide, he befriended me. He made the choice before I did. I hesitated. Maybe that was my mistake, maybe not. Either way, I am not morally, ethically, or legally compromised. I am not his accomplice. I have done nothing wrong; have nothing to do with his actions. How could I have predicted his complete mental breakdown and insane, incomprehensible future behaviors? It defies rational thought. I never envisioned a scenario where he would detach emotionally and evaporate morally, and kill. Or erase as he says. I’ve now considered every perspective, every potential response, every plausible consequence, and I feel no responsibility for him, have taken no ownership, nor will I. This is not on me. Yet still I must choose: I can either turn on him or help him. Where is the greater good, with Dutten imprisoned or dead, or rehabilitated and reformed? If I work with Dutten, if I help him, he poses no threat to me, or anyone I care about. I’m not even worried about that, never have been. I just don’t see it going that way. He’s on his own hyper-focused, delusional plane. He has terroristic tunnel vision. If I help him, this can stop. If I don’t, if I turn him in, will it ever end? No matter what, lives are lost; nobody gets to come back from this, we don’t get to turn back the clock. There is really only one option here, and it’s clear as day. •

Michael Ferrence has written 3 novels, dozens of short stories, and hundreds of Hall of Fame caliber rock songs. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife Julia and son Jack, and works as a teacher. Read more from Michael at www.milkfuzz.com.

Marcus Balum


The Spirit of Penn's Garden - November 30, 2016