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R ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

22 NOVEMBER 2012

LONDON

R R

69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET www.spink.com

LONDON

© Copyright 2012

22 NOVEMBER 2012

STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES

ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA


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GROUP CHAIRMAN AND CEO Olivier D. Stocker

SALE CALENDAR 2012/2013

YOUR SPECIALISTS STAMPS UK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom Smith USA - George Eveleth Andrew Titley Ed Robinson Rick Penko EUROPE - Guido Craveri Fernando Martínez CHINA - Anna Lee Johnny Sang COINS UK - Paul Dawson Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Richard Bishop William MacKay Barbara Mears John Pett USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini Normand Pepin CHINA - Mark Li BANKNOTES, BONDS & SHARES UK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew Pattison Tom Badley USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini CHINA - Mark Li ORDERS, DECORATIONS, MEDALS & MILITARIA UK - Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys BOOKS UK - Philip Skingley Bobby McBrierty AUTOGRAPHS USA - Stephen Goldsmith WINES CHINA - Anna Lee Guillaume Willk-Fabia YOUR EUROPE TEAM (LONDON - LUGANO) Chairman’s Office Dennis Muriu Monica Kruber Directors Tim Hirsch Anthony Spink Auction & Client Management Team Miroslava Adusei-Poku Sandie Maylor Charles Blane Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Rita Ariete Sarah Schmitz María Martínez Maurizio Schenini

STAMPS 3 November 13/14 November 14/15 November 15 November 15 November 27 November 12 December 13 January 13 January 23 January 24 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Morgan Collection of Australian Commonwealth The Collector’s Series Sale La Collection “Alienor” - Type “Blanc” de France The Collector’s Series Sale Great Britain - The “Fordwater” Collection The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part IV The Mizuhara Collection of Korean Stamps Fine Stamps and Covers of Hong Kong and China The “Lionheart” Collection of Great Britain and British Empire Specimen Stamps The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong London London London New York London London Hong Kong Hong Kong London London

CSS04 12046 12020 12051 141 12049 12021 13008 13009 13010 13011

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals Fine Coins of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals

Hong Kong New York London Hong Kong New York London London

CSS04 315 12027 13007 316 13012 13013

The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes The David Kirch Collection of English Provincial Banknotes - Part II Banknotes of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes

Hong Kong London London Hong Kong New York London

CSS04 12024 12050 13005 316 13004

Orders, Orders, Orders, Orders,

London London London London

12004 13001 13002 13003

The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World Bonds and Share Certificates of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World

Hong Kong London Hong Kong New York London

CSS04 12011 13006 316 13016

The Collector’s Series Sale

New York

An Evening of Exceptional Wines

Hong Kong

COINS 3 November 12/13 November 4/5 December 12 January 15/16 January 27 March 27 June

BANKNOTES 3 November 13 December 14 December 12 January 15/16 January 9/10/11 April

MEDALS 22 25 25 21

November April July November

Decorations, Decorations, Decorations, Decorations,

Campaign Campaign Campaign Campaign

Medals Medals Medals Medals

& & & &

Militaria Militaria Militaria Militaria

Finance Alison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Billy Tumelty IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe Harry Gladwin Tom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo Canzi YOUR AMERICA TEAM (NEW YORK - DALLAS)

BONDS AND SHARES 3 November 29 November 12 January 15/16 January 17 May

Chairman Emeritus John Herzog Auction Administration and Marketing & Design Rick Penko Patricia Gardner James McGuire Emily Cowin Clyde Townsend

AUTOGRAPHS 15/16 January

316

Finance & Administration Sam Qureshi Ingrid Qureshi Ed Robinson Auctioneers Stephen Goldsmith Andrew Titley

WINES 6 December

YOUR ASIA TEAM (HONG KONG - SINGAPORE) Vice Chairman Anna Lee Administration Amy Yung Dennis Chan Newton Tsang Raymond Tat Gary Tan

The above sale dates are subject to change Spink offers the following services: – VALUATIONS FOR INSURANCE AND PROBATE FOR INDIVIDUAL ITEMS OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS – – SALES ON A COMMISSION BASIS EITHER OF INDIVIDUAL PIECES OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS –

SFW02


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ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

22 November 2012 in London and on

and/or

SALE LOCATION

YOUR SPINK TEAM FOR THIS SALE

spiNK LoNdoN 69 southampton row, bloomsbury London WC1b 4et tel +44 (0)20 7563 4000 fax +44 (0)20 7563 4066 vat No: gb 791627108

for your questioNs about the saLe Lots

SALE DETAILS thursday 22 November 2012 at 10.00 a.m. in sending commission bids or making enquiries, this sale should be referred to as FOXTROT FOUR - 12004

Mark Quayle mquayle@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4064 Oliver Pepys opepys@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4061 John Hayward jhayward@spink.com +44 (0)20 7563 4049

for your bids

VIEWING OF LOTS spiNK LoNdoN 69 southampton row, bloomsbury London WC1b 4et tuesday 20 November 2012 10.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. Wednesday 21 November 2012 10.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m.

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spink is pleased to continue to offer spink Live, the internet bidding service which has revolutionized the way in which our clients bid at auction. to get started, feel free to contact us today for personal assistance. attila gyanyi is available by e-mail: agyanyi@spink.com or tel: +44 (0)20 7563 4090. use this qr code to visit our online catalogue and leave proxy bids on spink Live. you can download the qr Code reader for iphone, blackberry and android from app store on your smartphone

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria

Order of Sale Thursday 22 November 2012

Orders and Decorations for Gallantry or Distinguished Service ..............

1- 26

Campaign Groups and Pairs ...................................................................... 27- 70 A Collection of Volunteer Medals The Property of a Gentleman ................................................................ 71-141 Single Campaign Medals .......................................................................... 142-347 Coronation, Jubilee and Long Service Decorations and Medals ............ 348-353 Miscellaneous ............................................................................................ 354-359 Militaria .................................................................................................... 360-363 Life Saving Medals .................................................................................... 364-368 Miniature Awards .................................................................................... 369-394 Foreign Orders, Decorations and Medals ................................................ 395-438 A Fine Selection of Flying Awards from the Collection of the late Arthur Jones Esq............................................... 439-497

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN

THURSDAY 22 NOVEMBER 2012 Commencing at 10.00 a.m. All Sales are subject to the Terms and Conditions for Buyers printed at the back of this catalogue. Estimates The estimated selling price of each lot is printed below the lot description and does not include the Buyer’s Premium. Bidders should bear in mind that estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are not definitive. They are subject to revision.

ORDERS AND DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY OR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

Obverse

1

Reverse

1 The Indian Mutiny V.C. to Sergeant Major, Later Lieutenant, P. Gill, Loodiana Regiment, for Saving the Life of an Officer and His Family at Benares, 4.6.1857, and Seeing Off 27 Mutinous Sepoys With Only His Sergeant’s Sword- The First Victoria Cross Awarded to an N.C.O. of the Indian Army Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved ‘Serjt Major Peter Gill Loodiana Regt’, reverse of Cross engraved ‘4 June 1857’, nearly extremely fine £80,000-100,000 V.C. London Gazette 23.8.1858 Serjeant-Major Peter Gill, Loodiana Regiment ‘Date of Act of Bravery, 4th June, 1857. This Non-Commissioned Officer conducted himself with gallantry at Benares, on the night of the 4th of June, 1857. He volunteered, with Serjeant-Major Rosamond, of the 37th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry, to bring in Captain Brown, Pension Paymaster, and his family, from a detached Bungalow into the Barracks, and saved the life of the Quartermaster-Sergeant of the 25th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry, in the early part of the evening, by cutting off the head of the Sepoy who had just bayonetted him. Serjeant-Major Gill states, that on the same night he faced a Guard of 27 men, with only a Serjeant’s sword; and it is also represented that he twice saved the life of Major Barrett, 37th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry, when attacked by Sepoys of his own Regiment.’

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria Lieutenant Peter Gill, V.C., was born Dublin in 1816, and after leaving school trained as a tailor. Moving to London he enlisted for service with the Honourable East India Company in the Bengal Artillery, February 1842, and sailed for India aboard the H.E.I.C. Steamship Henry. Upon his arrival in India he was posted to 5th Company, 3rd Battalion, Bengal Artillery as a Gunner, and served with the Artillery in both the First and Second Sikh Wars, and was awarded both the Sutlej and Punjab Medals, before transferring to the Loodiana Regiment of Sikhs as Sergeant Major in April 1850. Mutiny at Benares The Great Sepoy Mutiny started at Meerut on the 10th May 1857, and before the month was out unrest had spread across large parts of northern India. Reports of the mutinies had made the large ‘ruffian population’ of Benares, many of whom openly carried arms, even more volatile than usual, and fearing a civil uprising the Commissioner, Henry Tucker, and the temporary Station Commander, Colonel Patrick Gordon, Loodiana Regiment, proposed evacuating the garrison, comprising of the Loodiana Regiment, the 37th Native Infantry under Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Spottiswoode, a wing of the 13th Irregular Cavalry, and a half battery of European Foot Artillery, to the nearby stronghold at Chunar. However, owing to the importance of securing the road, river, and telegraph links between Calcutta and upper India, it was decided to stay put in the town, and re-enforcements were called for. News of the Azimgarh mutiny reached Benares during the afternoon of the 4th June- by this time the European Garrison had been reinforced by 150 men of the 10th Foot, and 60 men of the 1st Madras Fusiliers, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel James Neill. Immediately upon arriving in Benares Neill was determined to disarm the 37th N.I., the most suspect regiment in the town. Despite the reservations of the Officers of the 37th, including their Commanding Officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Spottiswoode, and Major Barrett, who was convinced that the Regiment would remain loyal, Neill got his way and At 5:00pm the disarmament parade began. However, the preparations had been so hurried that that none of the supporting European troops was in position by the time the command was given, and one company after another came up to lodge their muskets in the bells-of-arms. As No. 6 Company were lodging their arms the advance guard of the 10th Foot, accompanied by a number of guns, appeared on the parade ground. A cry went up from the 37th N.I.: ‘Our officers are deceiving us, they want us to give up our arms, that the Europeans who are coming up may shoot us down!’ (The Indian Mutiny, Saul David refers). Pandemonium broke out. The Sepoys rushed forward to reclaim their muskets from the bells-of-arms, and opened fire on the nearby European troops, who replied with rifle and accurate artillery and grape fire. Meanwhile the Officers of the 37th were seeking safety with the guns, with the exception of Major Barrett who, believing that his troops had been most unfairly treated, cast in his lot with them and was carried away by Sepoys of his own Regiment. Several Europeans were hit in the ensuring fight, and command soon devolved to Colonel Neill, who ordered the European and Sikh troops to charge the lines of the Sepoys. In the confusion, sowars of the still-loyal 13th Irregular Cavalry shot in the direction of the Sikhs, who faced about and returned fire. Assuming that the Sikhs had mutinied, the European gunners opened fire on them, causing the whole Regiment to scatter. Fighting continued into the evening; those mutineers who had sought shelter in the Lines were driven out and destroyed, whilst a few who succeeded in hiding themselves were burnt to death in their huts. During the operations Gill volunteered along with Sergeant-Major Rosamond, 37th N.I., to collect to safety the Pension Paymaster and his family, who were cut off in an isolated detached bungalow, which the mutineers had set on fire. He also claimed to have twice saved the life of Major Barrett, who having entrusted his life to the men of his Regiment soon found himself under attack by mutinous sepoys. For these acts of Gallantry Gill was awarded the Victoria Cross, the first V.C. to be awarded to a Non-Commissioned Officer of the Bengal Army, and the first to a Sikh Regiment. Commissioned Ensign in the Moradabad Infantry Levy on the 16th April 1858, Gill served with his new Regiment for the rest of the Mutiny until frontier operations in Oudh came to an end in April 1859, and he was presented with his Victoria Cross later that year in India. Promoted Lieutenant, Indian Establishment, in May 1863, he served as Lieutenant on Duty at Lucknow for the next four years, before being appointed Barrack Master (1st Class) at Morar, Gwalior, on the 21st October 1867. Lieutenant Peter Gill died at Morar a year later on the 24th October 1868, aged 52, and is buried in the Artillery Lines Cemetery, Gwalior.

2 The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Grand Cross (G.C.M.G.) set of Insignia, sash Badge, 100mm including crown suspension x 75mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 89mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, extremely fine, with full length and evening dress section sash riband, and miniature width neck riband, in Spink and Son, London, case of issue, with Central Chancery enclosure cards (2) £1,800-2,200 3 Knight Bachelor’s breast Badge, 77mm x 56mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1926) and enamel, extremely fine £240-280 WWW.spiNK.Com

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4 4 An Outstanding North-West Frontier Operations C.B. Group of Eight to Brigadier-General H.A. Abbott, Indian Army, Six Times Mentioned in Despatches and Twice Severely Wounded During a Career Which Spanned 20 Years of Hard Campaigning with the 15th (Ludhiana) Sikhs: ‘A Fine HardFighting Soldier who was Never Daunted or Dismayed’, On One Occasion he Refused to be Evacuated After Being Shot ‘Bang in His Face’ by a Blunderbuss a) The Most Honourable Order of The Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1896) and enamel, with integral silver-gilt riband buckle, minor enamel damage to central medallion b) Delhi Durbar 1903, silver c) Afghanistan 1878-80, two clasps, Ahmed Khel, Kandahar (Capt. H.A. Abbott, 15th Ben. N.I.) d) Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (Capt. H.A. Abbott, 15th Regt. Bengal N.I.) e) Egypt 1882-89, undated, two clasps, Suakin 1885, Tofrek (Capt. H.A. Abbott, 15th Sikhs) f) India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Samana 1891 (Major H.A. Abbott, 15th Bengal Infy.) g) India General Service 1895-1902, three clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Tirah 1897-98 (Ltt. Coll. H.A. Abbott, 15th Sikhs) h) Khedive’s Star 1884-6, minor contact wear and edge bruising, nearly very fine or better, with various photographic images of the recipient (8) £5,500-6,500 C.B. London Gazette 20.5.1898 Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Alexius Abbott, Indian Staff Corps ‘In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India.’ Brigadier-General Henry Alexius Abbott, C.B., was born in Allahabad in January 1849, the fourth son of Major-General Augustus Abbott, C.B., Bengal Artillery, and was educated at King William’s College on the Isle of Man. Commissioned Second Lieutenant in the 37th (North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot, February 1868, he transferred to the Indian Army with the rank of Lieutenant in the 15th Sikhs, November 1870. He served with the Regiment during the Second Afghan War, and was present at the actions of Ahmed Khel and Urzoo, near Ghuznee, and in the march from Kabul to the relief of Kandahar, including the action of the 2.9.1880; Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 3.12.1880), and promoted Captain, February 1880. Abbot was next actively employed in the Suakin Expedition of 1885, where he was present at the actions of Hasheen and Tofrek, 22.3.1885, where the 15th Sikhs held the left flank, and ‘stood their ground most gallantly, pouring volley after volley into the enemy without any sign of unsteadiness’, and at the operations at Tamaai; Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 25.8.1885), and promoted Brevet Major. Back in India, Abbott commanded the 15th Sikhs in the Miranzai Expedition of 1891, and was again Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 15.9.1891). Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, February 1894, he saw extensive service on the North-West Frontier in 1897-98, where he was present during operations on the Samana and in the Kurram Valley during August and September 1897, as part of Colonel G.L.R. Richardson’s flying column, and was again Mentioned in Despatches for his gallantry and good work: ‘I cannot speak too highly of the able

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Brigadier-General H.A. Abbott (front row, second from left)

manner in which Lieutenant-Colonel Abbott handled his small force. The fact that this force, in the middle of an August day, captured the Samana Ridge, relieved Laka and Saifuldarra, and fought a rear-guard action home, with the loss of one Sepoy killed, one wounded, one follower killed and one wounded, testifies to the skill with which the operation was conducted... Lieutenant-Colonel H. A. Abbott, commanding the 15th Sikhs, was my right-hand man throughout the operations. His vast experience and untiring energy I cannot speak too highly of. He is a most valuable officer.’ (Colonel Richardson’s Despatch, dated Shinwari, 28.1.1898 refers). During the Tirah operations in November 1897, Abbott was twice severely wounded, having been present in the actions of Chagru Kotal and Dargai, at the capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes, the reconnaissance of Saran Sar subsequent action, and in operations in the Waran Valley and the resulting action, 16.11.1897, where the 15th Sikhs were charged with defending the heights either side of the Tseri Kandao, an incident later described by a fellow officer: ‘After a bit the Colonel [Abbott] arrived with about 10 men. He had signalled back to the main body that we were running short of ammunition and had too many wounded to retire and asking for help. Just as he arrived, the answer came from Kempster, ìretire on the Gurkhasî. Again we signalled that we could not retire without leaving our wounded and got the same answer twice. So we ignored it and made up our minds to stick it out the night if we could. Just then Custance and two companies of the 36th Sikhs arrived and almost immediately he and our Colonel were wounded. The Colonel had taken a rifle and was trying to Shikar a man who was heaving bricks, when the man fired a blunderbuss loaded with slugs and telegraph wire, bang in his face. He refused at first to go back and I had to forcibly put him in a stretcher and pack him off.’ For his gallantry on the North West Frontier Abbott was thrice mentioned in despatches (London Gazettes 1.3.1898, 5.4.1898, and 3.5.1898); promoted Colonel; and appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath. His final appointment was as a Temporary BrigadierGeneral commanding Allahabad District, in which capacity he was awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal, before retiring with the rank of Brigadier-General in August 1912. Appointed Colonel of the 15th Sikhs in 1913, General Abbott died at his home up in the Simla Hills in June 1924.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria

Captain H.M. Carless, having received his C.M.G. at Buckingham Palace, 1976

5 The C.M.G. Group of Five to Captain H.M. Carless, Intelligence Corps, Later Diplomatic Service, Whose Tenure as Chargé d’Affairs to Argentina and Ambassador to Venezuela coincided with the Lead Up and Aftermath of the Falklands War- He Previously Achieved Literary Fame as Eric Newby’s Travel Companion in ‘A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush’ a) The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with neck riband, in Spink, London, case of issue b) France and Germany Star c) Defence and War Medals d) Brazil, Republic, Order of the Southern Cross, Commander’s neck Badge, 89mm including wreath suspension x 64mm, gilt and enamel, with neck riband, in H. Stern case, nearly extremely fine, with the following related items: - The recipient’s related miniature awards - Bestowal Document for the Order of the Southern Cross, named to Senor Hugh Carless, and dated 24.5.1976 - Central Chancery letter for the C.M.G., dated 12.6.1976 - Two photographs of the recipient, one outside Buckingham Palace having just received his C.M.G. - The recipient’s silver letter opener (5) £500-700 C.M.G. London Gazette 12.6.1976 Hugh Michael Carless, Counsellor, Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Captain Hugh Michael Carless, C.M.G., born Nainital, India, 22.4.1925, the son of Henry Alfred Carless, C.I.E., Indian Police; educated at Sherborne; the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, where he spent a year learning Persian; and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Intelligence Corps, 8.1.1944 and served during the Second World War with the 12th Indian Division in Tehran, as part of the Persia and Iraq Force (Paiforce), and in North West Europe with the 6th Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers. Promoted Lieutenant, 8.7.1944, and Captain, 1.1.1949, Carless entered the Foreign Service in 1950, and the following year was posted as Third Secretary to Kabul. While in Afghanistan he and an American colleague travelled to the Panjshir Valley to make a reconnaissance of Mir Samir, an unclimbed glacial peak of 20,000 feet. In 1953 he was posted as Second Secretary to Rio de Janeiro, and whilst there he represented Brazil in a cricket match against Argentina.

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‘A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush’ In the spring of 1956 Carless was finishing his posting in Rio de Janeiro, before being transferred to Tehran, when he received a cable from his good friend Eric Newby: ‘Can you travel to Nuristan, June?’ He immediately sent back the reply: ‘Of course’, and arriving back in London the two men got together. After a week-end’s mountain climbing in Wales, the two men set off for Afghanistan, where they planned to climb Mir Samir, the still-unclimbed mountain that Carless had recced four years previously. The tale of their adventure was described in Newby’s classic account, ‘A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush’, which he dedicated to his travelling companion ‘To Hugh Carless of Her Majesty’s Foreign Service, without whose determination, it must be obvious to anyone who reads it, this journey could never have been made.’ Later described as ‘the book that virtually invented modern travel writing’, the work was notable for its hilarious account of the disasters that befell the inexperienced pair as they floundered and bumbled their way across Afghanistan. After several tries, they eventually managed to come within 700 feet of the summit of Mir Samir, only to realise that they would have to spend the night at the top and they had not brought their sleeping bags with them. ‘I’m afraid we wouldn’t last out’, Newby recalled Carless saying, before adding: ‘We can try if you like.’ As they made their final descent, Newby recorded: ‘The fact that we were roped together and had one another’s lives in our hands, produced in me a feeling of great affection for Hugh, this tiresome character who had led me to such a spot.’ The expedition famously ended with a chance encounter on the banks of the Upper Panjshir river between the distinctly amateurish pair and the very professional explorer Wilfred Thesiger. At the end of a long evening swapping anecdotes, the three men prepared to turn in for the night. Watching as they blew up their airbeds to sleep on the hillside, Thesiger dryly remarked: ‘God, you must be a couple of pansies’, giving Newby’s book its ending, and Carless his share of literary fame. Carless resumed his diplomatic career as Oriental Secretary in Tehran, a period that coincided with the Suez crisis, before returning to London for a long spell at the Foreign Office, two years of which were spent as private secretary to Lord Dundee, Minister of State at the Foreign Office under Harold Macmillan. Following postings to Budapest, Luanda, and Bonn, Carless was appointed head of the Latin America Department at the Foreign Office in 1973. In May 1976 President Geisel of Brazil was invited on a The intrepid explorers: Carless (top) and Eric Newby controversial state visit to Britain, which went ahead despite fierce opposition from the Labour back-benches opposed to the country’s military dictatorship. On the eve of the visit, the Prime Minister, James Callaghan, said to Carless: ‘Hugh, if we don’t get one large contract out of the Brazilians you had better look for another job.’ Carless accompanied President Geisel to Buckingham Palace and acted as interpreter. The visit resulted in British investment in an offshore oil development, the contract worth £300 million- and for his involvement Carless was appointed a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George (ahead of his seniority) and awarded the Brazilian Order of the Southern Cross. Offered the job of Ambassador to Peru in 1977, Carless instead opted to go to Buenos Aires as chargé d’affaires, the Argentine government having dismissed the previous British ambassador. For the next three years he was involved in talks about the status of the Falkland Islands. In 1982, after the end of the Falklands War, he was appointed Ambassador to Venezuela. The Venezuelans had been keen supporters of Argentina during the War, and anti-British sentiment was high, leading to the cancellation of a number of lucrative contracts and initiatives. For the next three years Carless pursued a ‘cultural diplomacy’, which ‘restored great warmth to our relations.’ Hugh Carless retired from the Diplomatic Service in 1985, and in retirement served as vice-chairman of the South Atlantic Council and chairman of the British Committee, Argentine-British Conferences, as ‘an endeavour to re-establish constructive relations after the war.’ He died in London, 20.12.2011.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 6 The C.V.O., ‘Korean War’ O.B.E. Group of Eleven to Commander S.R. Le H. Lombard-Hobson, Royal Navy a) The Royal Victorian Order, Commander’s (C.V.O.) neck Badge, silvergilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘1485’, with full and miniature width neck ribands, in Collingwood, London, case of issue b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt c) Naval General Service 1915-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1936-39, clasp a tailor’s copy, naming neatly erased d) 1939-1945 Star e) Atlantic Star f) Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar g) Italy Star h) War Medal, M.I.D. Oak Leaf i) Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (Cdr. S.R. Le H. LombardHobson. O.B.E. R.N.), rank and initials officially corrected j) United Nations Medal for Korea k) Italy, Republic, Order of Merit, Commander’s neck Badge, 74mm including tower suspension x 55mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with neck riband and lapel rosette, in Cravanzola, Rome, case of issue, generally nearly extremely fine, the breast awards mounted court style as worn, with the recipient’s related miniature awards, all housed in a Gieves, London, fitted case, the lid embossed ‘S. L-H.’, with the following related items: - The recipient’s riband bar and Naval cloth badge - Portrait Photograph of Her Majesty the Queen, black and white, 230mm x 170mm, the mount signed ‘Elizabeth R.’ and dated ‘1961’, Her Majesty in evening dress wearing the sash, Badge, and Star of the Order of the Garter, and the Royal Family Orders of George V and George VI, in Plante, London, leather glazed frame - Illuminated Scroll, granting John William Edmund Lombard the arms of Hobson, dated 29.7.1924, with two attached seals, in box of issue (lot) £800-1,000 C.V.O. London Gazette 30.5.1961 Captain Samuel Richard Le Hunte LombardHobson, O.B.E., Royal Navy. O.B.E. London Gazette 1.6.1953 Commander Samuel Richard Le Hunte Lombard-Hobson, Royal Navy, H.M.S. Newcastle ‘For distinguished service in operations in Korean waters.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 27.8.1940 Lieutenant Samuel Richard Le Hunte Lombard-Hobson, Royal Navy, H.M.S. Whitshed ‘For good services in Operations off the Dutch, Belgian and French Coasts.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 14.7.1942 Lieutenant Samuel Richard Le Hunte Lombard-Hobson, Royal Navy ‘For skill and judgment while escorting a Convoy.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 4.4.1944 Lieutenant Samuel Richard le Hunte LombardHobson, Royal Navy ‘For undaunted courage, determination and endurance in H.M. Ship...Rockwood...in many sweeps against enemy shipping in the Aegean under fierce and constant attack from the air, and in maintaining supplies to the islands of Kos and Leros until they fell to superior enemy forces.’ Captain Samuel Richard Le Hunte Lombard-Hobson, C.V.O., O.B.E., Commissioned Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Navy, 16.1.1934; promoted Lieutenant, 16.7.1936; served during the Second World War and appointed to the command of the patrol vessel H.M.S. Guillemot, 11.7.1941; and of the escort destroyer H.M.S. Rockwood, 11.8.1942; Promoted Lieutenant-Commander, 16.7.1944; Commander, 30.6.1949; Captain, 31.12.1953; Appointed a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order and awarded the Italian Order of Merit on the occasion of H.M. The Queen’s State Visit to Italy, 2-5.5.1961; Appointed Naval Aide-deCamp to H.M. The Queen, 7.1.1963; retired, 28.11.1963.

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Franklin (second on left) and Marconi (far right) with Pope Pius XI (centre) having installed a radio telephone service between the Vatican and Castel Gandolfo, the Pope’s summer residence, April 1932 7 The Historically Important C.B.E. and Boer War Pair to Mr. C.S. Franklin, Wireless Telegraph Department, Who, As Marconi’s Right Hand Man, Was a Giant in the Development of Wireless Transmission, and Who Developed and Designed the Transmitters Used For Both The First Ever Radio Broadcast in 1922 and First Ever Television Broadcast in 1936 of the British Broadcasting Corporation a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with full neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (Mr. C.S. Franklin. Wireless. Tel: Dpt), toned, extremely fine, extremely scarce, with various photographs and copied research (2) £1,000-1,200 C.B.E. London Gazette 9.6.1949 Charles Samuel Franklin, Esq., M.I.E.E., Consultant, Marconi’s Wireless Telegraph Company, Ltd. Mr. Charles Samuel Franklin, C.B.E., was born in Walthamstow, Essex, in March 1879, the thirteenth child of a local builder, and was educated at the local school and Finsbury Technical College, where he received his engineering and scientific training, before working briefly in Manchester and Norwich. In 1899 he joined Marconi’s Wireless Telegraph and Signal Company, with which he remained associated for the next 40 years. However, no sooner had he started work, he was sent to South Africa with five other engineers from Marconi to establish the wireless telegraph during the Boer War, the first time the British Army had attempted to use portable wireless stations in the field. Although the heliograph remained the usual method of communication, the wireless telegraph played a key part in the operations. Franklin returned to England in 1902, and was soon appointed Wireless Telegraph and Signal Company’s main wireless operator. Thus began a long personal association with Guglielmo Marconi, with whom he remained close friends throughout their lives. In 1902 they sailed across the Atlantic together to investigate the range of wireless messages being sent from their high-powered transmitter in Cornwall, and such was the success, and the speed of development, that within a year the President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, was able to send a message from the U.S.A. to King Edward VII. The Atlantic conquered, in 1904 Franklin moved to Russia, where he worked on sending radio messages across vast tracts of land. Returning to England in 1907, he continued with his work, which by now involved short-wave transmissions, and soon after invented the multiple tuner, a device that allowed for different signals to be sent and received simultaneously. By 1922 he and Marconi had established a voice-radio link between London and their station in Cornwall, and had for the first time noticed the effect of reflections of short-wave signals by large metallic objects located a considerable distance from their transmitter, a finding which they suggested could be developed so as to allow for short-wave apparatus to be installed on ships to provide warnings as to the presence of other ships in conditions of poor visibility. That November a Franklin designed transmitter was used for the first ever broadcast of the newly-formed British Broadcasting Corporation. Later Franklin designed the transmitters and the aerial system for the BBC station at Alexandra Palace, which transmitted the world’s first regular television service in 1936, before retiring from day-to-day work in 1939, shortly after Marconi’s death, although staying on as a Consultant. In 1949 he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire, and awarded the Faraday Medal by the Institute of Engineering and Technology ‘for his distinguished work in radio engineering, and more particularly for his development of the beam aerial and other devices that made long-range high-frequency communication a practical possibility.’ He died at home in Ilford, Essex, in December 1964. Approximately 6 Queen’s South Africa Medals awarded to the Wireless Telegraph Department.

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8 The C.B.E. Group of Ten to Colonel W. Tozer, York and Lancaster Regiment a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, lacking suspension ring b) 1914-15 Star (Lieut. W. Tozer. York. & Lanc. R.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. W. Tozer.) d) Defence and War Medals e) Jubilee 1935 (Lt. Col. W. Tozer T.D. 1935.), engraved in sans-serif capitals f) Coronation 1937 (Col. W. Tozer, T.D., 1937), engraved in serif capitals g) Territorial Decoration, G.V.R., with integral top riband bar h) Efficiency Decoration, E.II.R., reverse officially dated ‘1952’, with top ‘Territorial’ riband bar, and two E.II.R. Additional Award Bars, nearly very fine or better, mounted court style as worn, with the recipient’s Master of the Cutlers Company of Sheffield Badge, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1934) and enamel, reverse engraved ‘Col: Wm. Tozer. Master Cutler. 1936-37.’ (10) £400-500 C.B.E. London Gazette 9.6.1938 Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet Colonel William Tozer, T.D., Officer Commanding, The Hallamshire Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment, Territorial Army. T.D. London Gazette 13.10.1920 Maj. William Tozer, Hallamshire Bn., Y. & L.R. Efficiency Decoration, with First and Second Bars London Gazette 19.2.1952 Col. W. Tozer, C.B.E., T.D. (23969), Commands and Staff (late Infantry). Colonel William Tozer, C.B.E., T.D., born Sheffield, Yorkshire, February 1894, the elder son of Major William Tozer, V.D.; educated at Malvern College and Clare College, Cambridge; served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 4th (Hallamshire) Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment, promoted Lieutenant, 2.1.1915; Captain, 3.1.1916; Mentioned in Despatched (London Gazette 1.1.1916); appointed Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding, York and Lancaster Regiment, 1931; promoted Brevet Colonel, 1935; Colonel, 1939; served during the Second World War as Assistant Adjutant and Quarter Master General. Colonel Tozer served as Master of the Cutlers Company of Sheffield, 1936-37; he died March 1971. For the other medals to the Tozer family see Lots 18 and 356.

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9 9 The Great War ‘1915 Neuve Chapelle V.C. Action’ D.S.O., ‘1916 Somme’ M.C. Group of Seven to Lieutenant-Colonel H.D. Harington, West Yorkshire Regiment a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) Military Cross, G.V.R., reverse engraved in serif capitals ‘Captain H.D. Harington. D.S.O. West Yorkshire Regiment, “For Conspicuous Gallantry” 15th. 16th. Sept. 1916.’ c) 1914 Star, with Bar (Capt. H.D. Harington. W. York: R.) d) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. H.D. Harington.) e) Defence and War Medals, both privately engraved ‘Lt. Col. H.D. Harington.’, good very fine (7) £2,800-3,200 D.S.O. London Gazette 28.4.1915 Captain Henry Douglas Harington, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales’s Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) ‘For the ability and gallantry displayed on 12th March, 1915, at Neuve Chapelle. After the enemy had gained temporary possession of a portion of our trenches he brought a flank fire to bear on them, which saved the situation.’ M.C. London Gazette 14.11.1916 Capt. Henry Douglas Harington, D.S.O., W. York. R. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and consistent good work. Regardless of his personal safety, he was frequently in a fire-swept area encouraging all ranks. He was a splendid example.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 22.6.1915 Harington, Captain H. D., D.S.O., 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the field.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Douglas Harington, D.S.O., M.C., born May 1886, the son of Colonel F.W. Harington, West Yorkshire Regiment, and educated at Bedford Grammar School and Sandhurst; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, West Yorkshire Regiment, 7.11.1906; promoted Lieutenant, 24.4.1909, and Captain, 14.3.1914; served with the Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front from 4.11.1914; awarded the Distinguished Service Order for his gallantry at Neuve Chapelle, 12.3.1915, during a major German counterattack. Harrington’s Battalion, the 2nd West Yorkshires, had a position on the line next to a salient held by the Sherwood Foresters. At 5:00 a.m. the enemy attacked along the entire length of the British line, and at the salient they were able to approach unhindered, being mistaken in the mist for a British listening post returning at daybreak. The garrisons of the trenches near were rushed, and either kiled, captured, or driven out, and the remnants of the Sherwood Foresters, who had lost nearly all their officers on the previous two days, were carried back towards the support trenches two hundred yards to the rear. Other lines of the enemy followed into the gap. Sensing the danger, the West Yorkshires, to the south, then fired on them ‘and charged with bomb and bayonet on the initiative of the company commander’ (Official History of the War refers.) The swift action of Harington’s Battalion forced the enemy back to their own trenches, and undoubtedly saved a far more serious situation from developing; as it was casualties amongst the Sherwood Foresters amounted to 16 Officers and 342 other ranks, including Private Jacob Rivers, who was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross for two acts of great bravery that materially assisted in checking the attack. Appointed Brigade Major, 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade, B.E.F., 10.12.1915; awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry at the capture of Courcelette, Somme, September 1916; appointed Staff Captain, War Office, 1.9.1917; promoted Brevet Major, 1.1.1919. PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, March 1974

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10 10 The Outstanding Second War 617 Squadron ‘Special Duties’ 1944 D.S.O., ‘Pathfinder’s’ D.F.C., D.F.M. Group of Nine to Wellington, Lancaster and Mosquito Pilot, Squadron Leader R.S.D. ‘Terry’ Kearns, Royal New Zealand Air Force. He Flew in At Least 87 Operational Sorties, 30 of Which Were With the “Dam Busters”. A Veteran of The First Thousand Bomber Raids, He Became a “Tallboy” Specialist; Arguably His Finest Hour Came When He Scored A Direct Hit, With the “Earthquake” Bomb, on the Entrance of the Saumur Tunnel, 8.6.1944; Having Obliterated Leonard Cheshire’s Marking Flare He Caused the Squadon Commander to Remark “Hold on Chaps, I’ll Have to Mark it Again.” After A Brief Flirtation With Vampire Jets Over the Malayan Jungle, Kearns Returned to Bomber Command To Take Part in Operations During the Suez Crisis, November 1956 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, reverse of suspension bar dated ‘1944’, with integral top-riband bar b) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse dated ‘1943’ c) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (NZ. 405572 Sgt. R.S.D. Kearns. R.N.Z.A.F.), suspension slack d) 1939-1945 Star e) Air Crew Europe Star, with France and Germany Bar f) Defence and War Medals g) New Zeland War Service Medal h) General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., two clasps, Malaya, Near East, 2nd clasp loose on riband as issued (Flt. Lt. R.S.D. Kearns. R.A.F.), light contact marks throughout, very fine, with an Operation Overlord Commemorative Medal, in card box, and the following contemporary related items: - Pathfinder Force Badge with two Enclosures relating to the award of the Badge; Riband Bar - Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, dated 26.9.1944 - Two R.N.Z.A.F. Pilot’s Flying Log Books (5.5.1941-30.6.1946 and 15.7.1946-23.5.1960), 1st signed by Leonard Cheshire in his capacity as Commanding Officer 617 Squadron - Civil Pilot’s Log Book and Pilot’s Certificate and Licence For Public Transport or Aerial Work Flying Machines, whilst employed by British Overseas Airways Corporation - Congratulatory Postagram for the award of the D.S.O. from Air Chief Marshal A.T. ‘Bomber’ Harris, dated 18.8.1944 - Air Ministry Letter to recipient on the occasion of his retirement from the Service, dated 7.3.1963 - Two Audio CDs with recordings of interviews carried out with recipient relating to his war memories (original recordings held by the Imperial War Museum Sound Archive) - A number of photographs relating to various stages of recipient’s career - First Reunion Dinner of 617 Squadron Menu, dated 19.10.1951, with a large number of signatures including: Barnes Wallis and Jack Buckley - A 617 Squadron Reunion Dinner Menu, dated 3.6.1966, with a large number of signatures including: Leonard Cheshire, Barnes Wallis, Bill Reid, David Shannon, and Don Maclean; with other ephemera (lot) £14,000-18,000 15


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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria During the time he has been with this squadron, he has completed 19 operational sorties against targets in Germany, Italy and enemy occupied territory. Flight Lieutenant Kearns has been consistent in pressing home his attacks, and has at all times displayed the highest qualities as a pilot, and it has been largely due to his sense of airmanship that his many operations have been successfully performed. By his capabilities as a pilot, and supreme devotion to duty, he has set a very high example to the other members of the squadron.’ D.F.M. London Gazette 27.10.1942 N.Z.405572 Sergeant Richard Stansfield Derek Kearns, Royal New Zealand Air Force, No. 75 (N.Z.) Squadron. The Recommendation states: ‘The above named N.C.O. has completed 22 major operations and in each and every case has displayed determination of a very high order. He expends every effort to find and bomb the target and to date he has been most successful, bringing back a photograph of the aiming point when many other crews have been unsuccessful in their mission. He sets a fine example to all aircrew of high devotion to duty and cool courage in the face of intense opposition.’ Covering Remarks of Station Commander: ‘An outstanding operational pilot whose courage, keeness, enthusiasm and devotion to duty deserve the highest recognition. Through an intensive operational period this pilot maintained these qualities up to an exceptional level.’

Squadron Leader R.S.D. Kearns D.S.O. London Gazette 26.9.1944 Acting Flight Lieutenant Richard Stansfield Derek Kearns, D.F.C., D.F.M. (N.Z.405572), R.N.Z.A.F., 617 Sqn. The Recommendation states: ‘Flight Lieutenant Kearns has now completed a total of 87 operational sorties as captain of aircraft, 39 of which have been undertaken since he was awarded the D.F.C. in March, 1943. He has, moreover, frequently operated against the most heavily defended objectives in Germany and has on many occasions returned to base with his aircraft damaged through enemy action. During the last seven months he has been employed on Special Duties and a particularly high standard of leadership and skill has been essential for the successful completion of the independent and often hazardous operations of his Squadron. This officer has never failed to rise magnificently to the occasion and he has truly set an outstanding example of fortitude and determination. He has consistently brought back aiming-point photographs and he has never once failed to complete his task. The unsurpassed gallantry and devotion to duty which this officer has so long and so enthusiastically displayed has had a most profound effect upon the morale and fighting spirit of his Squadron. His cheerfulness, great courage, and determination have enabled him to create a crew whose efficiency could not be exceeded in the Royal Air Force of today. His efforts have resulted in much damage to the enemy and his conduct and leadership throughout his operational career have been an inspiration to all and are worthy of the highest praise.’ Remarks by Base Commander: ‘During his long tour of operational duty, Flight Lieutenant Kearns has shown exceptional determination and courage. He proved himself one of the best Captains in the Squadron and he set an example which was admired by all his associates.’ D.F.C. London Gazette 20.4.1943 Acting Flight Lieutenant Richard Stansfield Derek Kearns, D.F.M. (N.Z.405572), Royal New Zealand Air Force, No. 156 Squadron. The Recommendation states: ‘This officer has carried out 46 operational flights over enemy and enemy occupied territory.

Squadron Leader Richard Stansfield Derek Kearns, D.S.O., D.F.C., D.F.M., born Reefton, New Zealand, 1920; studied Engineering at Canterbury College; joined Royal New Zealand Air Force, December 1940; carried out Pilot training at No.1 E.F.T.S Taieri and No.1 F.T.S. Wigram, gaining his ‘Wings’, 26.7.1941; arrived in England, November 1941, and undertook a refresher course at No.1 A.F.U., R.A.F. College Cranwell; posted to No.11 O.T.U., Bassingbourn, for conversion to Wellingtons, March 1942; whilst at Bassingbourn Kearns formed his crew of: Navigator W.J. ‘Hone’ Barclay, Wireless Operator M.W. Egerton, and the two Gunners J.A. Moller and H.E.A. Price; this crew were to carry out two tours of operations together, with Kearns and Barclay flying together for most of the war; whilst stationed at No.23 O.T.U. he flew on the first ‘Thousand Bomber’ raid to Cologne, 30.5.1942, quickly followed by the ‘Thousand Bomber’ raid on Essen, 1.6.1942; posted for operational flying to 75 (New Zealand) Squadron (Wellingtons), Feltwell, Norfolk , 17.6.1942; and carried out 25 operational sorties with the Squadron including: Emden; Bremen (3), including 25.6.1942, ‘Attacked by Three ME 110s - Evasive Action Successful’ (Log Book refers); St. Nazaire, 28.6.1942, ‘Very Sticky Trip - 17 x 250lbs. 2 Runs on Target - Shot Down Both Times - Flak Very Accurate in Search Light Cone - Shot Up By “E” Boats Off French Coast - Rear Gunner Slightly Wounded’; Frisian Islands (2); Wilhemshaven; Duisberg (4); Hamburg (2), including 26.7.1942, ‘Load 9 S.B.C.s - Very Busy Trip - Bombs in Target Area - Brought to OFT By Flak and Searchlights & 7 Searchlights Destroyed and One Machine Gun Nest Silenced - Good Trip’; Saarbrucken (2), including 29.7.1942, ‘Load 1 x 1000lb, 7 x 500lb, 2 x 250lb. Bombs in Target - No Searchlights - Flak Weak - One Ju 88 Encountered - Close Call’; Dusseldorf; Essen; Osnabruck (2); Mainz (2); Frankfurt, 24.8.1942, ‘Load 9 S.B.C.s 9lb Incendaries. Flak Intense - Searchlights Poor. Attacked By F.W. 190 Evaded Successfully’; Kassel, 27.8.1942, ‘Attacked By Two Enemy Fighters. Evaded Successfully’; and Nurnburg; transferred 156 (Pathfinder Force) Squadron (Wellingtons and later Lancasters), Warboys, September 1942; Pathfinder Force had been formed in August 1942, and 156 Squadron was one of the four squadrons to form the nucleus of the new force; Kearns flew in 31 operational sorties with the Squadron including: Bremen; Wilhelmshaven (2), including 19.2.1943, ‘Load 1 x 1000lb M.C. - 4 X 250 T.I. Bombs - 6 x 500lbs

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Kearns (third from left) with 617 Squadron, Woodhill Spa, 1944. The motif of the saint holding a bomb on the side of the Lancaster was the design of Kearns. His crew had it emblazoned on their flying jackets

H.E.T. - Vis. Good - Hit By Flak Over Target - Returned on 3 Motors - E A/C Encountered Over A. - A. Photos. Very Interesting Trip - W/Op’s Final Op.’; Essen (4); Saarbrucken; Krefeld; Genoa; Hamburg (2); Turin (3); Stuttgart; Mannheim; Duisburg; Munich (2); Lorient (2); Dusseldorf; Cologne; St. Nazaire (2); Berlin; Keil; La Spezia; and Pilsen (raid on Skoda Armaments Factory), 16.4.1943.

against factories in France which were reluctantly working for the German war effort, where the object was ensure maximum damage with minimum loss of French lives; other operations included: the Gnome & Rhone Aero-Engine Factory, Limoges, 9.2.1944, when Cheshire tried out his newly developed low-level marking system for the first time on operations; Aircraft Factory at Albert, 2.3.1944; La Ricamerie, 10.3.1944 ‘To Ball Bearing Factory St. Ettienne 1 x 12,000lbs - Good Raid - Factory Destroyed - Bombed 7,500 feet’; Aero-Engine Factory, Metz, 15.3.1944; Michelin Tyre Factory, Clermont-Ferrand, 16.3.1944, ‘Direct Hit - 1 x 12,000lb. Factory Destroyed - Landed Conningsby’; Powder Factory, Bergerac, 18.3.1944; Explosive Works, Angouleme, 20.3.1944, “Pouderie Nationale” Explosive Works - Angouleme - Southern France. Photo A/P Factory Destroyed - Wizard Prang’; Aero-Engine Factory, Lyons (3); he converted to Mosquitos and returned to fly, as one of the squadron’s four Mosquito markers, on operations over Juvisy Railway Sidings, 18.4.1944; Railway Marshalling Yards, La Chappelle, North of Paris, 20.4.1944; Brunswick, 22.4.1944 - the first time the squadron used its low-level marking method over a heavily defended German city; Munich, 24.4.1944; German Military Barracks, MaillyLe-Camp, 3.5.1944; returning to Lancasters he flew in Operation Taxable, 5/6.6.1944, as part of the D Day landings, ‘Tactical Operation Causing a Diversion to Cover the Initial Landings on the Cherbourg Peninsular. Ht. 3000! - Believed Very Successful’; two days later he flew in the attack led by Cheshire on the Saumur Railway Tunnel; this was the first occasion that Barnes Wallis’ new 12,000lb Tallboy bombs were used and Kearns used it to very good effect, ‘Bombing Very Accurate - Load 1 x 12,000lb Tallboy - Direct Hit Tunnel Mouth. Believed Very Successful Raid’ (Log Bok refers); a newspaper cutting adds the following detail ‘Kearns... scored a bull’s eye with his “Tallboy” - a 12,000lb earthquake bomb. He was so accurate that he obliterated the squadron commander Leonard Cheshire’s marking flare, preventing other Lancaster crews from seeing their target. “Hold on chaps,” Cheshire said. “I’ll have to mark it again”; the operation was a complete success, the

617 ‘Dam Buster’ Squadron Once Kearns had finished his second tour, ‘I completed a Flying Instructor Course and was posted back to No.11 O.T.U. now located at R.A.F. Westcott. I was an Instructor on the satellite airfield - R.A.F. Oakley - converting pilots to Wellington Aircraft before they joined the remainder of their crew at R.A.F. Westcott for advanced training. I was recalled to Operational Flying with No. 5 Group in September 1943. My Navigator Flight Lieutenant Barclay and I joined [C Flight] No. 617 Squadron as it moved to R.A.F. Conningsby. We formed a new crew and trained to the operational requirements in Low Level Flying and Specialist attack procedures. In addition when the Stabilised Automatic Bomb Sight (SABS) was introduced, we trained for the delivery of the 12,000lb Blast Bomb. This was replaced by the 12,000lb Tallboy and later by Grand Slam (22,000lb). Our best effort on the practice range was - I believe - never beaten. The average error of eight practice bombs dropped from 20,000ft on Wainfleet Bombing Range was 15 yards from the Aiming Point Peg ‘(typed manuscript included with lot refers); due to the casualties suffered by 617 Squadron during the Dams Raid, May 1943, Kearns was one of several skippers drafted in to bolster the squadrons strength, ‘it was a new squadron being formed for a special low level operation on an unknown target - all very Hush Hush. He [Len Chambers] passed my name on to the C.O. Guy Gibson - as a recruit - but I could not get my release from instructing at Westcott/Oakley until after the Dams Raid’ (Ibid); he flew his first operational sortie with the squadron, now led by Leonard Cheshire, to the Antheor Viaduct, 11.11.1943; this was the first of 30 operational sorties flown with 617 Squadron, including to 7 Special Duties Targets over December 1943-January 1944 - a series of pin-point attacks

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‘Terry’ tunnel was destroyed, and a German Panzer division was prevented from reaching the Allied invasion beach-head that had been established two days earlier; four days later Kearns was part of the operation over the Submarine Pens at Le Havre, ‘Blue Flight Formation Leader - 1 x 12,000T.B. Very Good Raid - A/B Claims Direct Hit’; the next day he attacked, with the same bomb load, the “E” Boat Pens at Boulogne; he flew two abortive sorties on a V-Weapon site at Wizernes, Pas De Calais, before carrying out his final operational sortie of the war, 25.6.1944, ‘Operation to “Siracourt” Rocket Installation - 3 Direct Hits On Installation - Flak Damage - Cat A/C. Load 1 x 12,000lb T.B.’; posted as Chief Flying Instructor, No. 17 O.T.U., Silverstone, October 1944; towards the end of the war he was seconded to British Overseas Airways Corporation to fly transports on the Karachi route and on 28.5.1946 he piloted the ‘1st BOAC Service Out of London Airport’ (Log Book refers); on 8.6.1946, he helped fly a Sunderland in ‘ “V” Day Fly Past In London’; discharged in 1947, he returned to New Zealand to complete his studies before accepting a permanent commission in the R.A.F. in 1949; posted to 3 (T) Squadron at the start of 1949, he spent the following two years at No. 1. I.T.S., flying a mixture of aircraft including Vampires and Meteors; posted for operational service in Malaya to 60 (Fighter) Squadron (Vampires), Tengah, December 1952; he carried out numerous “strikes”, rocket attacks and jungle reconnaissance as “A” Flight Commander; having spent two years at Tengah he was posted back to the UK, April 1954; returned to Tengah in the Summer, and continued to serve with the squadron over the Malayan jungle until the end of July 1955; having taken part in 49 “strikes” with the squadron he returned to Bomber Command, and was posted to R.A.F. Lindholm, followed by No. 231 O.C.U., Bassingbourn, where he converted to Canberras; Squadron Leader 1956; posted as Flight Commander to 139 (Jamaica) Squadron (Canberras), Binbrook, January 1956; the squadron took part in the Suez Crisis, and flying from Nicosia, Kearns’ Log Book gives the following: 31.10.1956, ‘1st Strike Inchas Airfield’; 1.11.1956, ‘2nd Strike Luxor Airfield’; 2.11.1956, ‘3rd Strike Huckster Depot’; 5.11.1956, ‘4th Strike Port Said, Mkr. For French Para Drop’; posted to H.Q. Bomber Command Communications Squadron (Meteor Flight), April 1959, and subsequently held a number of appointments including as part of the operational control of the Thor Missile Programme; in 1963 he contracted tuberculosis and was forced to retire later that year; in civilian life he went on to work for Shell, before retiring in 1980

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11 11 A Superb and Well Documented Second War ‘1944’ D.S.O., 1941 ‘Defence of Malta’ D.F.C. Group of Seven to Hurricane Fighter Ace, Wing Commander H.W. ‘Chubby’ Eliot, Royal Air Force; Who Claimed 2 Victories, 2 Damaged and 1 Shared During the Battle of France; Was Shot Down During the Battle of Britain, and Returned to Add to His Score With At Least 3 Victories By Day and 1 By Night in the Skies Over Malta, 1940-41; He Recorded Further Victories in Beaufighters and Mosquitos. Eliot was Killed in Action Whilst Leading His Squadron in an Attack on a Bridge in Northern Italy, 4.3.1945 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, reverse of suspension bar dated ‘1944’, with integral top-riband bar, in Garrard & Co. Ltd case of issue b) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.VI.R., reverse dated ‘1941’, in Royal Mint case of issue c) 1939-1945 Star, with Battle of Britain Bar d) Air Crew Europe Star e) Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar f) Italy Star g) War Medal, nearly extremely fine, campaign awards in card box of issue addressed to ‘F.H. Eliot, Esq., 3, Romanhurst Gardens, Hayes Lane, Bromley, Kent’, with named Condolence Slip and the following contemporary related items and documents: - Pair of Second War Flying Gauntlets, leather, inside inscribed ‘F/O Eliot’ - Cockpit light; canvas Gas Mask bag and First Aid bag - Two R.A.F. Pilot’s Flying Log Books (27.6.193930.11.1943 and 1.12.1943-10.1.1945), both annotated ‘Killed in Action’ and stamped ‘Central Depository Royal Air Force, Apr. 1946’, both bound in leather

- Air Ministry Certificate of Competency and Licence to Fly Private Flying Machines, dated 3.8.1939 - Commission appointing Hugh William Eliot an Acting Pilot Officer in the Royal Air Force, dated 1.9.1939, this glazed and framed - Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, dated 23.5.1944 - M.I.D. Certificate, dated 22.7.1940 - Central Chancery Letter requesting recipient’s attendance at Investiture, dated 28.3.1942; two Buckingham Palace Investiture Tickets, dated 14.4.1942 - Telegram addressed to recipient’s father, dated 7.9.1940, informing him that his son has been wounded and admitted to Twickenhurst Hospital, Kent - Telegram similarly addressed, 6.3.1945, informing him that his son has been reported missing as a result of air operations - Metropolitan Police Telegram similarly addressed informing him that his son is believed dead, dated 20.5.1945; Air Ministry Letter confirming the death of recipient, dated 23.5.1945 - Letter to Mr. and Mrs. Eliot from F/O Richard Bradley, 19 S.A.A.F. Squadron, containing a poem he composed in memory of their son, dated 10.4.1945 - An archive of over 100 Letters and Telegraphs, the vast majority addressed to recipient’s parents, mostly from the recipient dated between 1938-1945, from his various postings including with the B.E.F. in France and whilst stationed in Malta; the balance relating to him, his service and death - St. Dunstan’s College Chronicle, Michaelmas Term 1945, which carries an Obituary for the recipient - A number of family and service photographs relating to various stages of recipient’s life, newspaper cuttings and other ephemera (lot) £28,000-32,000 19


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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria D.S.O. London Gazette 23.5.1944 Acting Wing Commander Hugh William Eliot, D.F.C. (42490), Royal Air Force, No. 255 Squadron D.F.C. London Gazette 26.9.1941 Acting Flight Lieutenant Hugh William Eliot (42490), No. 185 Sqn. The Recommendation states: ‘This officer has carried out 14 months continuous operational flying as a fighter pilot. When serving with No. 73 Squadron in France he shot down 2 enemy aircraft and damaged a further 1 E/A. Was shot down and badly burnt during the Battle of Britain. He was posted to Malta to 261 Squadron and then to 185 Squadron. Whilst at Malta he has shot down 3 and a half enemy aircraft by day and 1 E/A by night and 1 probable, making his total successes 6 and a half enemy aircraft confirmed, 1 enemy aircraft probable and 2 damaged. He has at all times shown great courage and a grand spirit even when against heavy odds. He has been an inspiration to those under him and has led his flight with skill and determination.’ Wing Commander Hugh William Eliot, D.S.O., D.F.C., born Bromley, Kent, 1921; educated at St. Dunstan’s College, Catford, 1931-1938; briefly employed by Coutts Bank before taking up a Short Service Commission into the Royal Air Force; commenced his training as a Pilot at No.6 E.&R. F.T.S., Sywell, 27.6.1939; Acting Pilot Officer 22.8.1939; after further training at No.12 F.T.S. he was posted for training in Hurricanes to No. 6 O.T.U., Sutton Bridge, 12.3.1940; posted for operational flying to 73 Squadron (Hurricanes) as part of the B.E.F. in France, 6.5.1940; on the 10th May German ‘Blitzkrieg’ commenced with the invasion of Belgium and Holland, and Eliot was in the thick of it the following day whilst on Patrol, ‘Disabled He III Damaged’ (Log Book refers); two days after his first success in damaging an enemy aircraft he wrote to his mother, ‘As you have read in the papers the old balloon has really gone up this time and action is thick and fast. I am feeling very pleased with myself just now and I expect you can guess why. Old “Jerry” certainly has lost a lot of machines!..... Well there goes the air raid warning again but I have got to the stage now when I only run when I hear the bombs beginning to whistle!’; success continued 14.5.1940, ‘Patrol - Shot Down Me.109 Near Namur. Also Met 110s’; the following day whilst on, ‘Defensive Patrol - Shot Down Me.110 Crashed in Flames. Damaged A Second Me.110’; he moved with the squadron to Gaye, and on 13.6.1940, ‘Interception 3 Heinkel III. Shot One Down With Sgt. Friend. Bullet Grazed My Ear Piece!’; with the collapse of France returned with the Squadron to the UK, 18.6.1940; the squadron was taken out of the front line and based at Church Fenton for a rest; he was detached to Sherburn for Night Fighter training; the squadron was operational again on the 7th July, and operatational as a Night Fighter Squadron during the Battle of Britain on the 8th August; moved with the squadron to Castle Camps, 5.9.1940; and on the same day flew in a defensive patrol, ‘Enemy Contacted. Sgt. Griffin Shot Down. Chased Several E.A.s’; the following day he was shot down near Maidstone and had to bale out, ‘Attacked 6 Me 109s. What A Sucker!’; he suffered serious burns leading to a period of recuperation in a hospital just up the road from his place of birth. Malta - What A Way To Make An Entrance Eliot rejoined the squadron in the first week of October volunteering for service in Malta shortly after; in early November he embarked upon the carrier H.M.S. Argus, as part of Operation White; the Argus sailed for Gibraltar with twelve Hurricanes and two Skuas aboard, plus thirteen R.A.F. fighter pilots and two naval crews, ‘at dawn on the 17th... engines were started and at 0615 the first six Hurricanes took off, together with Skua L2882.... It was some 400 sea miles to Malta which should have meant that the Hurricanes, if flown at appropriate speed, revs and altitude, would reach the island with 45 minutes’ fuel to spare. In the event it took 15 minutes to get all the seven aircraft into the air and formed

up, so that a third of their safety margin had already evaporated. At last they set off; the flight was led by newly promoted Flt. Lt. J.A.F. MacLachlan, D.F.C.... The other pilots were Plt. Offs. C.E. Hamilton and H.W. Eliot, and Sgts. J.K. Norwell, R.A. Spyer and W.G. Cunnington. They headed for Malta at 150mph at a height of 2,000 feet - far from ideal, since the Hurricane’s best cruise range was achieved at 10,000 feet and at a lower speed. The second flight followed an hour later.... As the first flight headed on towards Malta it was noticed that the cloud shadows and sea patterns were changing. A smoke float was dropped from the Skua, showing that the wind had veered from west-southwesterly to east-south-easterly, thereby presenting the aircraft with an almost direct headwind to fly into. Soon visibility worsened....the first landfall - Galite Island - was safely reached, although 25 minutes behind schedule. Here a Sunderland from 228 Squadron met the formation to lead them on to Malta. Now, however, fuel was running very low. At 0908, when still some 30-40 miles from the island, Sgt Spyer’s V7413 ran out of fuel and fell towards the sea. The pilot was able to bale out and MacLachlan followed him down, calling in the Sunderland. The latter landed and picked up the very relieved pilot out of the sea. Taking off again, the flying boat joined formation with MacLachlan and they set off after the rest. Well ahead, the other four Hurricanes could be seen straggling after the Skua. They passed through some cloud, but on emerging from this, there were only three. Sgt. Cunnington too had run out of fuel; he waved farewell and baled out at 0912. By the time the Sunderland appeared there was no sign of him however, and he was never found. Finally the four remaining Hurricanes and the Skua landed at 0920, MacLachlan with four gallons of fuel left and Norwell with only two. The engine of another aircraft cut before it could taxi off the runway, and the fourth had little more left than Norwell’s.... Fortunately the most successful, Norwell, who had three individual and four shared victories listed in his log book, had survived, as had Hugh ‘Chubby’ Eliot, who had three and two shared with 73 Squadron during the Battle of France’ (Malta: The Hurricane Years 1940-41, C. Shores & B. Cull, refers); Eliot’s log book entry for the 17th shows the fate of the second flight, ‘H.M.S. Argus To Ta Kali. Twelve Hurricanes Took Off, Four of Which Arrived At Malta. Remaining Eight Were Lost. I Just Made It, With 5 Gallons of Petrol To Spare.’ 261 Squadron Once Eliot had refuelled at Ta Kali, he flew off to join the detachment of 261 Squadron at Luqa; Eliot arrived in time for the increase of fighter-bomber raids over the dockyard and Luqa; the Hurricanes carried out interceptions at high level, and left the island’s remaining Gladiator aircraft to patrol at low level; on 10.1.1941, ‘Interception - Chased 3 Macchis. No Luck. F/Lt. MacLachlan 2 Macchi and F/O Taylor 2 Macchi Destroyed’; in late January the competition stiffened with the Luftwaffe joining the Italians in heavy divebombing raids; the Hurricanes were hard pressed, with scramble after scramble, 15.1.1941, ‘Interception - Met 4 Me 109s. Enemy Aircraft Retired in Disorder!’, 16.1.1941, ‘Interception - 10 Me 109s F/Lt MacLachlan Shot Down (We Retired In Disorder!)’; Eliot’s first success over Malta came on the 26th February, when Axis forces launched one of their biggest ‘Blitzes’ to date, ‘Interception - One Ju 87 In Flames Confirmed. One Ju Probable. (Five Hurricanes v + 100 Enemy) F/O Taylor, P/O Kearsey, P/O Langdon Missing;’ he was successful at night, 11.3.1941, ‘Night Interception - Shot Down Dornier 215. Crashed In Sea (Illuminated By Searchlights)’; on the 22nd March the squadron suffered a beating, ‘Interception Ju 88s Me 109s. Squadron “Jumped” From Astern While Chasing Bombers. Five Pilots Lost Out Of Eight. Shot Down Me 109.’; despite the squadron’s continued success their battle against overwhelming odds continued into April, 11.4.1941, ‘Intercepted And Shot Down Me 110 With Sgt. Pollard. Rest Of Squadron Jumped By 40 109s & Macchi 200s. P/O

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Wing Commander H.W. Eliot Kennett, Sgt. Waghorn Killed. P/O Mortimer & Sgt. Deacon & P/O Whitney Forced Down.’; his last victory with the squadron came on the 29th April, ‘Shot Down One Of Six Ju 88s Bombing Harbour. Shared With AA And Rest Of Section. P/O Dredge Probable 109.’

255 Squadron - North Africa Eliot was very briefly posted as a Flight Commander to 242 Squadron, Digby, before being posted as a Flight Commander to 74 Squadron (Spitfires), Llanbedr, October 1941; with the latter he mainly flew convoy patrols until posted as Commanding Officer of 3 Delivery Flight, High Ercal, 1.4.1942; converted to Beaufighters at No. 54 Night Fighter O.T.U., August 1942; posted to 255 (Night Fighter) Squadron, Honiley, September 1942; he flew with the Squadron to North Africa in November of the same year; the Squadron got off to a disasterous start when three days after arriving, ‘Maison Blanche Bombed. F/O Wyrill Killed 12 a/c Written Off’; the surviving aircrew, including Eliot, returned to the UK to re-equip and arrived back in Algiers with their new Beaufighters, by 5.12.1942; they were immediately operational and their Beaufighters were now fitted with A.I. radar; crewed with Flying Officer Lewis, Eliot was to experience the usual technical difficulties that plagued Beaufighters fitted with A.I.; enemy activity died down at the start of the New Year leading the Squadron to undertake intruder and convoy patrols in April 1943; 16.4.1943, ‘Intruder Patrol - Shot Up M.T. On Road. Sardinia’; in August 1943 Eliot became Commanding Officer of 255 Squadron and took them to Sicily; 255 Squadron took part in the Salerno Bay Landings as part of the Allied invasion of Italy, 8.9.1943, ‘Patrol Salerno Bay. Covering Allied Landing Craft’; Eliot achieved success in his Beaufighter at last, 9/10.9.1943, ‘Patrol Naples - Salerno. Me 210 Destroyed. Crashed In Flames’; flying intruder patrols over the Italian

Just Up The Road To 185 Squadron Due to losses 261 Squadron was forced to disband at the end of April 1941; the remaining aircraft and crews, including Eliot, were drafted to 185 Squadron to form up at Hal Far; Eliot, as “B” Flight Commander, was now operating against almost incessant Axis raids, 1.5.1941, ‘Interception - Jumped By Six Me 109s At 22,000ft. Sgt. Walmsley Bailed Out. P/O Innes Forced Down Wounded. Jumped Again 10 Minutes Later But No Damage. No Enemy Shot Down. Sgt. Ottey Crashed And Was Killed’ and 16.5.1941, ‘Interception Large Formation of Me 109s Dropping Bombs And Also Me 109 Fighters. Self Attacked By Two. No Damage’; despite the pressures Eliot wrote home to his mother thus, 20.5.1941, ‘Well the weather here is fairly settled now and of course air activity is getting very frequent. We have many difficulties to contend with here but none the less we are getting along all right. On the whole I should say that France wasn’t a patch on this. So I leave the rest to you. I had a fairly narrow escape some weeks ago when a “small” bomb burst about eighteen yards from where myself and another fellow had flung ourselves. No damage was sustained as there was a small stone wall between us and the bomb! It might have been worse!’; in September he returned to the UK, where he was awarded the D.F.C.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria coast, he took the Squadron to Taranto on the mainland in November; he flew patrols over the Anzio beaches in support of the Anzio Landings, 22.1.1944; he recorded his last victory with the squadron, 31.1.1944, ‘Patrol Adriatic Destroyed Do. 217 At Nought Feet.’

a ceremonial burial by the local Priest in the Polesella cemetery. His long and splendid service and the near approach of the end of the war in Europe heighten the tragedy of his death, and we cannot but feel that this is one of the saddest of the many sad losses we have had to record.’

256 Squadron, Central Mediterranean Force At the end of February Eliot was posted to H.Q. Mediterranean Allied Coastal Air Force; he served under Air Commodore J.H. Edwards, HQ MACAF, CMF and the latter wrote thus to Eliot’s father 18.3.1945, ‘I have known Hugh now for well on two years. I knew him first of all as a Flight Commander in a Night Fighter Squadron under my command and as CO of the same squadron during the Salerno landings. During that difficult time by sheer brilliance and drive he kept the squadron going on most difficult night operations for tow months continuously. These operations were only supposed to have lasted for a few days. Last summer he came... to my Headquarters in Algiers, where he had been a delightful person to have on one’s Staff. He was always itching to get back on operations and as soon his six months were up he again took over command of the present squadron. Within the first few nights of his arrival he had destroyed two enemy aircraft... the first successes that the squadron had had for some months. He was a brilliant pilot, a born leader and a very gallant officer. His delightful personality has endeared him to everyone. I have not written this in the formal manner of a Senior Officer to a missing officer’s parents, but as a friend of his who has admired and like him enormously for a long time’; Eliot was posted as Acting Wing Commander to the command of 256 Squadron (Mosquitos), Foggia, 24.9.1944; he recorded victories on 4.10.1944, ‘Intruder Patrol Salonika - Ju 52 Shot Down In Flames’ and 6.10.1944, ‘Intruder Patrol Athens - Do.24 Shot Down In Flames’; as targets became harder to come by the squadron extended it’s intruder patrols over Southern France and Yugoslavia; Eliot’s Mosquito was shot down by flak whilst attacking a bridge in northern Italy, 4.3.1945, both he and his navigator were killed in action; further details are given in Eliot’s obituary which was published in his old school’s chronicle, ‘He had already been reported missing and it is with very great regret that we now receive confirmation of the news of his death. We thus lose, at the eleventh hour, one whose personal charm endeared him to all and whose achievements in the R.A.F. few can have surpassed. From the earliest days of the war down to the time of his death he had seen almost continuous operational service - as P/Offr. in 1940, when he was wounded and “mentioned in despatches”, as F/Lieut. in 1941 in Malta, where he was credited with the destruction of at least eight enemy planes and awarded the D.F.C.; as Sq. Ldr. in 1942 in England and North Africa; as Wing Cmdr. in 1943 in Sicily, where he must have been one of the youngest officers to hold such rank; and in the following year in Italy, where he received the D.S.O. for his distinguished services. On March 3 [sic], 1945, when he might very easily have left the duty to others, his keeness took him on an operational flight over Northern Italy from which his plane was the only one not to return, and it has since been established that he and his navigator were killed instantly in the Polesella area and given

The effect of his loss on friends and family is illustrated in the fine archive of letters accompanying his medals. A selection from which is listed below: A poignant returned letter addressed to him from his sweetheart, dated 12.3.1945, eight days after he was killed in action, ‘I have one of your pictures in the celluoid backed side of my wallet. The more I look at it the more I love it. I must answer your last letter, let me see what did you say - You were going on a “Show”. I do hope you got back safely without mishap. Would I know if anything happened darling? I couldn’t bear to think anything would, oh it musn’t darling. I hate to admit it but I say a prayer for you every night, honestly.... Hugh I only wish you could have another leave in the UK and just bully me into the nearest church.’ A letter to Eliot’s parents, dated 28.9.1945, from Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Lloyd, ‘I am writing to you to express my deepest regrets at the loss of your son Hugh. I have known Hugh for a long time and I have the greatest admiration for his stirling qualities. We were together in Malta. Later, he joined me in North Africa where he served under me as a Staff Officer and Flight and Squadron Commander. I was very fond of Hugh. He was by far the most efficient and popular officer on my Staff and a superlative Squadron Commander. Everyone in his squadron admired his courage and with it of course, he had such a delightful personality. His death came as a very great shock to me as I had always looked forward to seeing Hugh again. We knew each other so well and he stayed with me often.’ Shortly after Eliot’s death, his friend Flying Officer Richard Bradley composed a poem about him entitled ‘Hugh’, which he sent to Eliot’s parents, 10.4.1945: High-borne upon the capricious billows of this life, Sedulous of duty, his faith unmoved by strife Of warring elements around, within, above, His instant neighbour death, his constant confide love. He passed in sudden tumult, ‘the great surrender made Into that light that never more shall fade,’ The sky o’er Venice claimed him, the ‘Eternal Land’ his limbs, And the Eternal City arose, his hymn of hymns. Fire met fire, his spirit fervent, heroic, good, Of glorious dissemination passed on to the flood; His life - a vibrant freshet in Time’s gravid, steady wave; His death - a cry ‘to save mankind, himself he scorned to save.’ But from our sphere of sorrow we see nor light nor gain; Our conning of God’s subtle ways that pass and turn again, Our scanning books, our aching prayers unanswered, all seem vain. Yet in our hearts in depths profound our Hugh, dear Hugh will live, Encompassed by the warmest, greatest gifts that man can give To man - his thoughts.

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12 The Great War 1916 ‘Western Front’ D.S.O. Group of Eight to BrigadierGeneral D.J.E. Beale-Browne, 9th Lancers, Commander, 2nd Cavalry Brigade a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Capt. D.J.E. Beale-Browne. 9/Lcrs.) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (Capt. D.J.E. Beale-Browne. 9/Lcrs.) d) 1914 Star, with Bar (Major D.J.E. Beale-Browne. 9/Lrs.) e) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Brig. Gen. D.J.E. BealeBrowne.) f) Coronation 1911 g) Coronation 1937, generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn, with the recipients nine related miniature awards, these also including a Belgian Order of the Crown (8) £2,500-3,000 D.S.O. London Gazette 26.6.1916 Maj. and Bt. Lt.-Col. (temp. Brig.-Gen.) Desmond John Edward Beale-Browne, 9th Lrs. ‘For distinguished service in the field.’ Brigadier-General Douglas John Edward Beale-Browne, D.S.O., born July 1870; educated at Eton and Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 9th Lancers, May 1891; promoted Lieutenant, January 1893; served as Adjutant, March 1895 to April 1899; served in South Africa as Aide-de-Camp on the Staff of Lieutenant-General Sir F. Forestier Walker August 1899 to May 1900, and present during operations in Rhodesia, April to May 1900; Staff Intelligence Officer, May to October 1900; and Assistant Military Secretary, November 1900 to October 1901; promoted Captain, 1.1.1901; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 16.8.1914 (Twice Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 22.6.1915 and 15.6.1916), Awarded the D.S.O., and appointed Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel); Appointed temporary BrigadierGeneral Commanding 2nd Cavalry Brigade; promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, 15.3.1916; retired with the rank of Brigadier-General, 1.9.1920; Appointed a Justice of the Peace, 1925; High Sheriff of Sussex, 1932; and Deputy Lieutenant, April 1937; Appointed Colonel of the 9th Lancers, 13.3.1936; retired, 4.7.1940. Brigadier-General Beale-Browne died 26.1.1953.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria

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13 The Second War ‘Italian Theatre’ M.B.E. Group of Seven to Major M. Moss, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Late Royal Army Ordnance Corps a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver b)1939-1945 Star c) Africa Star d) Italy Star e) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf f) Army Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (7580939 W.O. Cl.II, M. Moss. R.A.O.C.), light contact marks throughout, generally very fine, mounted as originally worn (7) £250-300 M.B.E. London Gazette 13.12.1945 Major (temporary) Matthew Moss (199181), Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (Chorley, Lancs.) ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy.’ The recommendation, dated 7.10.1945, states: ‘This officer has been in charge of the REME Civil Labour Officer which has dealt with the trade testing, allocation, and payment of all skilled, semi-skilled, and unskilled civilian labour in REME Base Installations. These installations are mostly located in Naples, Rome, and the Bari area, and sub-labour offices were set up by Major Moss in all these towns. The total civilian labour employed exceeds 24,000. Major Moss has displayed quite exceptional devotion to duty in organising this complex work, and it is largely through his outstanding personal efforts that labour troubles in the workshops have been negligible, and that the vital programmes of operational tasks have never been interrupted.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 29.11.1945 Maj. (temp.) M. Moss (199181), Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in Italy.’ Major Matthew Moss, M.B.E., Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Army Ordnance Corps, 7.6.1941; transferred and appointed Lieutenant Quarter Master, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, 1.10.1942; served during the Second War with the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in North Africa and Italy, in charge of the Civil Labour Office; transferred to the General List, 25.1.1952; relinquished his Commission with the honorary rank of Major, 29.3.1956.

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14 The Great War 1915 D.S.C. and Lloyd’s Medal Group of Four to Lieutenant J.R. Green, Royal Naval Reserve, For His Gallantry In Facing Down a German U-Boat in a Four Hour Duel And Keeping the Union Flag ‘Proudly Flying High’ a) Distinguished Service Cross, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1914), reverse engraved in large serif capitals ‘Lieut. John R. Green. R.N.R. 27th. March 1915’ b) British War Medal (John. R. Green) c) Mercantile Marine War Medal (John. R. Green.) d) Lloyd’s Medal for Meritorious Service, silver, circular type (Captain John Richard Green, D.S.C.. S.S.”Vosges”, 27th. March 1915.), suspension claw loose on last, otherwise nearly extremely fine, together with various newspaper articles (4) £1,000-1,400 D.S.C. London Gazette 9.4.1915 Lieutenant John Richard Green, Royal Naval Reserve ‘In recognition of his gallant and resolute conduct when the steamship “ Vosges,” of which he was in command, was attacked by a German submarine on the 27th March, 1915.’ Attack on the Vosges ‘At 10:15 a.m. on the 27th March, 1915, the Vosges, bound for Cardiff, was approaching the Scilly Isles when the German Submarine U28 [commanded by Captain G. von Forstner] suddenly appeared and ordered the steamer to heaveto. Captain Green refused, increased speed, and fired rockets to summon help, having ordered all the firemen below and asked the passengers to volunteer to assist them, which they did willingly. The submarine opened fire from straight astern. A shell crashed into the Vosges, near the bridge, and Captain Green, hoisting the British Colours as a sign that he was ready to accept battle, swung his steamer round in an attempt to ram the U boat. Although shell after shell crashed into the Vosges, Captain Green did not abandon efforts to ram his attacker. One of the enemy shells cut the steamer’s ensign staff and blew the flag overboard. Instantly Green hoisted another Union Jack at the foremast head. When this was also carried away by a shell, the indomitable captain hoisted new colours which fluttered proudly from a signal yard. The duel lasted four hours, and the steamer’s hull was riddled in some places, and numerous fires were raging, which the crew and passengers were striving to extinguish. The chief engineer was killed near the stokehold by a shell striking him in the chest whilst he was exhorting the firemen and volunteers to further efforts. The second mate was hit in the arm whilst on the bridge. One fireman was hit in the wrist, and the mess-room boy was hit in the leg. The mate was slightly wounded in the hand, and splinters also grazed the captain’s hand. One lady passenger was slightly wounded in the foot. Eventually the submarine sheered off, when destroyers were signalled, and the Vosges made all speed to Milford Haven. Water, however, was gaining rapidly on the pumps. Then H.M.S. Wintonia came up, all hands were safely transferred, and the Vosges sank beneath the waves’ (account in the Liverpool Echo refers). In recognition of his gallant conduct Green was granted a commission in the Royal Naval Reserve, back-dated to the date of the action, and awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Captain von Forstner, the commander of U28, writing that evening in his diary, recorded: ‘I was so impressed by the extraordinary gallantry of this English captain, whose conduct was above all praise, that if, contrary to expectation, his severely damaged ship reaches port, he, by his plucky conduct, will have earned the reward offered by his Government.’ Lieutenant John Richard Green, D.S.C., of Liverpool; Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Naval Reserve, 27.3.1915, and awarded the Lloyd’s Medal for Meritorious Service.

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15 15 The Superb and Scarce Great War ‘Western Front’ M.C., D.C.M. Group of Seven to Sergeant Major J. Littler, Grenadier Guards, Who Formed Part of the Bearer Company at the Funeral of King Edward VII, For Which He Was Awarded the R.V.M. a) Military Cross, G.V.R., reverse contemporarily engraved ‘8380 Sgt. Major J. Littler, 4th Bn. Gren Gds’ b) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (8380 Drill Sjt. J. Littler. 2/G.G.) c) 1914 Star, with Bar (8380 Dr. Sjt. J. Littler, 2/G. Gds.) d) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (8380 W.O.Cl.I. J. Littler. G. Gds.) e) Royal Victorian Medal, E.VII.R., bronze (8380 Sgt. J. Littler. 1st Bn. Gren. Gds. Bearer Party) f) Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (8380 S. Mjr. J. Littler. G. Gds.), suspension repaired on R.V.M., otherwise generally nearly very fine or better, with a group photograph of the recipient (7) £4,000-5,000 M.C. London Gazette 3.6.1918 8380 S.M. Joseph Littler, D.C.M., G. Gds ‘For distinguished service in connection with Military Operations in France and Flanders.’ D.C.M. London Gazette 30.6.1915 8380 Drill-Serjeant (now Warrant Officer, Class II), Littler, J. 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards ‘For conspicuous gallantry throughout the campaign. He has rendered invaluable service on all occasions and has never failed in any duty allotted to him however dangerous.’ R.V.M. London Gazette 7.6.1910 Colour Sergeant Littler, Joseph, King’s Company (Bearer Company), 1st Battalion, Grenadier Guards M.I.D. London Gazette 22.5.1917 Littler, No. 8380 Serjt.Maj. J., Grenadier Guards Sergeant Major Joseph Littler, M.C., D.C.M., R.V.M., born Runcorn, Cheshire, 1876; enlisted in the Grenadier Guards, October 1899; formed part of the Bearer Party at the Funeral of H.M. King Edward VII, 20.5.1910; served during

Sergeant Major J. Littler (centre) the Great War with the 2nd Battalion on the Western Front from 13.8.1914, and promoted Drill Sergeant ‘in the field’; transferred to the 4th Battalion with the rank of Sergeant Major, May 1918; discharged October 1920 after 21 years with the Colours.

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16 Family Group: The Great War 1918 ‘Salonika’ M.C. Group of Four to Captain G.E. Gleave, Royal Lancaster Regiment a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, in case of issue b) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. G.E. Gleave.) c) France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated 1914-1918, with bronze palm on riband, Victory Medal fine, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s related miniature awards and the following related items: - A portrait photograph of the recipient on his wedding day - A most extensive and comprehensive file of research M.C. London Gazette 1.2.1919 T./2nd Lt. George Edmund Gleave, R. Lan. R. (Salonika) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and initiative on 19th September, 1918. The O.C. and adjutant being wounded early in an attack on P4, he took over duties of adjutant. During the attack he displayed great gallantry in supervising the operation. The final objective was not carried out, and a withdrawal was ordered, when the captain commanding the battalion was wounded. He reorganised all the available men he could find, took command of these and informed the brigade of his disposition. Throughout the day he showed himself a gallant and fearless leader, and set a fine example to all under his command.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 30.1.1919 Gleave, T./ Lt. G.E., M.C., Royal Lancaster Regiment France, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 21.7.1919 Temporary Lieutenant (acting Captain) George Edmund Gleave, M.C., Royal Lancashire Regiment ‘For distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign.’

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The Second War ‘Operation Market’ Dutch Bronze Cross Group of Five to Dakota Observer Warrant Officer G.D. Gleave, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Shot Down Over Arnhem, 23.9.1944, He Was Taken Prisoner of War 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star, with France nd Germany Bar; Defence and War Medals; Netherlands, Kingdom, Bronze Cross, in Gaunt, London, case of issue, suspension ring re-affixed on last, otherwise extremely fine, with the following related items: - Two Bestowal Documents for the Dutch Bronze Cross, one in Dutch and one in English, with Air Ministry enclosure - The recipient’s riband bar and Royal Air Force Observer’s brevet - The recipient’s identity tag and Prisoner of War identity tag - Arnhem 50th Anniversary Medal - The recipient’s England Lacrosse blazer badge - Portrait photograph of the recipient - A most extensive and comprehensive file of research (lot) £1,400-1,800 Netherlands, Bronze Cross London Gazette 2.9.1949 Flight Sergeant 1531331 George Derek Gleave, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve ‘In recognition of valuable service rendered during the war.’ The original Dutch citation states: ‘This airman joined No. 48 Squadron in September 1943, and as navigator of aircraft he has participated in many operational sorties. Flight Sergeant Gleave participated in four sorties during the airborne operations at Arnhem and on the last of these missions his aircraft was shot down. Flight Sergeant Gleave was wounded and made a prisoner of war. Throughout he has set a fine example and contributed materially to the success achieved by his crew.’

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Warrant Officer G.D. Gleave Captain G.E. Gleave on his wedding day

Operation Market On the 17th September 1944 Operation Market Garden was launched. Gleave’s Dakota took off from Down Ampney at 09:57 hours, towing a ‘Horsa’ glider with troops of the 1st Airborne Division, bound for Landing Zone ‘S’, west of Arnhem. A successful release was made on the approach to the Landing Zone. The next day he was involved in identical duties, and again made a successful release. Two days later, on the 20th September, on his third trip to Arnhem his Dakota was met with accurate machine gun fire and heavy flak, although he came through unscathed. Three days later, on the 23rd September, he was involved on a re-supply mission, carrying medical supplies to Drop Zone ‘V’. On the initial run up to the Drop Zone the aircraft was hit several times, and on the final run the aircraft was again hit by incendiary bullets, resulting in the whole of the underside of the aircraft and cabin being set ablaze. His pilot, Pilot Officer Pring, attempted to land the blazing Dakota on the south side of the Rhine, which was in Allied hands, but, having to abandon the attempt, crashed near the railway bridge at Oosterbeek in German-held territory. Pring was killed instantly; Gleave and two of his companions managed to get out of the blazing aircraft, but, despite being obviously unarmed, were immediately sniped at by an SS unit, killing one of the crew. Eventually, Wehrmacht soldiers came to their rescue, and Gleave was taken to hospital, where he was operated on to remove two bullets from his abdomen and to treat burns to his face, ears, and hands. His sole surviving crew-mate died in the hospital, Having recovered sufficiently from his injuries, he was sent in February 1945 as a Prisoner of War to Stalag VIIA at Mooseburg where he remained until the closing stages of the War until, along with two other PoWs, he liberated himself when the German guards left the camp, and arrived in Paris on VE-Day to join in the celebrations. Repatriated back to the U.K., he was discharged on the 10th October 1946.

Captain George Edmund Gleave, M.C., born Manchester, 1891; enlisted as 511899 Private, Royal Highlanders (Black Watch), 11.11.1915; served with the Regiment on the Western Front from 11.3.1916; wounded by a gun shot wound to the head, 16.6.1916; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 9th (Service) Battalion, Royal Lancaster Regiment, 28.3.1917; served with the Regiment in Salonika, and awarded the Military Cross for gallantry at the Battle of Doiran, 19.9.1918, when, following the order to retire, as the only officer in the Battalion not taken as a casualty, he immediately took the necessary measures for defence; appointed Adjutant and acting Captain, 20.9.1918; retired, 22.3.1919; died 1958. 1531331 Warrant Officer George Derek Gleave, born Manchester, August 1922, the son Captain G.E. Gleave, M.C.; educated at Cheadle Hulme School, Cheshire, where he became a keen lacrosse player; on the outbreak of the Second War joined the Home Guard, enlisting in the 39th Cheshire Battalion, and volunteered for the Royal Air Force. Enlisted in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 26.5.1941, and posted to No.5 Initial Training Wing at Torquay. Following training in Canada, he was presented with his Observer’s Brevet and promoted Sergeant, 19.9.1942. Following further training in Canada, he returned to the U.K., and his first operational posting was to No.48 Squadron (Hudsons), Coastal Command in September 1943, based in Gibraltar and engaged on air sea rescue, anti-submarine sweeps, and air cover for shipping duties. In February 1944 the Squadron returned to Bircham Newton and transferred from Coastal to Transport Command duties. Gleave’s first operation with the Squadron in its new role was on the 5th/6th June 1944. Taking off at 23:26 hours on the eve of ‘D’ Day, carrying 15 paratroopers in his Dakota, he ‘dropped’ them over Normandy at 01:04 hours on ‘D’ Day. For the next three months he was involved in transporting materials, bombs, blood, and medical supplies to landing grounds in France, returning with casualties and the occasional German Prisoner of War.

After the War he maintained his sporting interests, and represented Great Britain in Lacrosse against a team from the United States at Wembley Stadium, 5.8.1948, in an exhibition match as part of the 1948 London Olympics.

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17 The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Knight of Grace’s set of insignia, neck Badge, 54mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles; Star, 70mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles, good very fine, with neck riband, in case of issue The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, 42mm, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles, extremely fine (3) £300-400

18 The Order of St. John Group of Eight to Major W.G.S. Tozer, Grenadier Guards a) The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Commander’s neck Badge, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles b) The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, silver and enamel, lions and unicorns in angles c) 1939-1945 Star d) France and Germany Star e) Defence and War Medals f) General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Cyprus (Major W.G.S. Tozer Gren. Gds.), surname partially officially corrected g) Coronation 1953, good very fine, mounted court style as worn, with the recipient’s related miniature awards and a silver Order of St. John lapel badge (8) £350-450 Major William Gordon Sykes Tozer, the son of Colonel William Tozer, C.B.E., T.D.; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Grenadier Guards, 8.3.1941; promoted Lieutenant, 17.8.1943; Captain, 17.2.1948; Major, 17.2.1955. For the other medals to the Tozer family see Lots 8 and 356.

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19 Squadron Sergeant Major George William Mortiboy, D.C.M., born Edmonton, Middlesex, 1864; enlisted in the 18th Hussars, October 1884; promoted Corporal, May 1888; Sergeant, September 1889; served with the Regiment in India from September 1891 to October 1898; promoted Squadron Sergeant Major, May 1894; sailed with the Regiment to South Africa in October 1898, and saw action during the Boer War, both with the 18th Hussars and subsequently on attachment with Lieutenant-Colonel Bethune’s Mounted Infantry from 20.12.1899: ‘While we were at Ladysmith a force under Colonel Bethune had been holding Greytown and the line of the Tugela, that force being five squadron’s Bethune’s M.I., one squadron Umvoti Mounted Rifles, two 12-pounders, R.G.A., two 7-pounders, Natal Field Artillery, two Hotchkiss, Natal Field Artillery, and six companies of Imperial Light Infantry. This force I had directed to advance concurrently with our advance on Vermaak’s Kraal, and we established connection with it on the morning of the 13th May. Colonel Bethune’s arrangements had been very good. He had seized during the night, with his left, the hills which commanded the southern sides of the pass up which we had to approach. Shortly before noon we advanced up the pass. The enemy made a poor defence and fled, pursued by the Colonial mounted troops Natal was, almost without loss, cleared of the enemy’ (General Buller’s Despatch, dated 24.5.1900 refers). Twice Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 8.2.1901 and 29.7.1902), the first being in the despatch mentioned above, and awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal; awarded the Coronation Medal 1902 for being part of the Coronation Contingent; Awarded L.S.&G.C., 11.4.1903; transferred to the City of London Imperial Yeomanry (Rough Riders), 16.5.1903; discharged, 1.5.1911; re-enlisted for service during the Great War in the City of London Yeomanry Reserve, 14.9.1914, and served throughout the War in England as Regimental Sergeant Major; retired, 23.5.1919. Squadron Sergeant Major Mortiboy was awarded Meritorious Service Medal in June 1939, and died in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, 12.3.1948.

19 The Boer War D.C.M. Group of Eight to Squadron Sergeant Major G.W. Mortiboy, 18th Hussars, attached Bethune’s Mounted Infantry, Later City of London Imperial Yeomanry a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, E.VII.R. (Serjt:Maj: G.W. Mortiboy. Bethune’s M.I.) b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (2734 Sq. Sjt. M: G.W. Mortiboy. 18/Hrs.) c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2734 S. Serjt:-Maj: G. Mortiboy. 18th. Hussars) d) Defence Medal e) Coronation 1902, bronze f) Coronation 1937 g) Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (2734 Sq: Sjt: Maj: G.W. Mortiboy. 18th. Hussars.) h) Meritorious Service Medal, G.VI.R. (Sq. S. Mjr. G.W. Mortiboy. D.C.M. 18-Hrs.), very fine or better, with the following related items: - A silver three piece presentation tea set, by Joseph Rodgers and Sons, Sheffield, silver (Hallmarks for Sheffield 1910), the tea pot inscribed ‘Presented to S.S.M. G.W. Mortiboy by his comrades in the City of London Yeo. (Rough Riders) on his retirement 1st May 1911’ - A silver 12-inch presentation salver, by Joseph Rodgers and Sons, Sheffield, electro-plated, inscribed ‘Presented to S.S.M. G.W. Mortiboy by the Members of Permanent Staff City of London Yeo. (Rough Riders) on his retiring 1st May 1911’ - The recipient’s Bible, given to him by his grandmother, with handwritten details of his military service on the flyleaf - Three photographs of the recipient (lot) £3,000-3,500 D.C.M. London Gazette 31.10.1902 Sergeant-Major G.W. Mortiboy, Bethune’s Mounted Infantry ‘In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa.’

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20 The Boer War D.C.M. Group of Three to Sergeant J. Mundy, Wiltshire Regiment a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, V.R. (2734 Serjt: J. Mundy. Wilts: Regt.) b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (2734 Sgt. J. Mundy, 2nd. Wilts: Regt.), unofficial rivets between 2nd and 3rd clasps c) King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2734 Serjt: J. Munday. Wilts: Regt.), light contact marks, nearly very fine (3) £1,800-2,200 D.C.M. London Gazette 27.9.1901 Sergeant J. Mundy, The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment) ‘In recognition of services during operations in South Africa.’ 2734 Sergeant J. Mundy, D.C.M., served with the 2nd Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment in South Africa during the Boer War; Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 10.9.1901) and awarded the D.C.M. ‘for assisting a wounded officer under heavy fire at Hobkirk’s Farm, Rensburg, 12.2.1900.’ (Rudolph refers). ‘That day the Battalion lost 2 men killed and 1 officer [Captain W.S. Brown] and 11 men wounded’ (British Regiments in South Africa, J. Stirling, refers). For the medals to Captain W.S. Brown see Lot 53

21 A Scarce 1920 ‘Aden Field Force’ I.D.S.M. to Private Nayanar, 75th Carnatic Infantry, Indian Army Indian Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (Pte Nayanar, 75 C. Infy), heavy edge bruising and contact marks, nearly very fine £500-600 I.D.S.M. Indian Government General Order 89 1919 Nayanar, 3705 Pte., 75th Carnatic Infantry (Aden). M.I.D. London Gazette 23.7.1920 Nayanar, 3705 Pte., 75th Carnatic Inf., I.A. ‘For valuable and distinguished service rendered in connection with Military Operations in the Aden Field Force, during the period 1st June, 1918, to 30th April, 1919.’ Approximately 67 I.D.S.M.s awarded for Aden during the period 1914-1922.

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x22 Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (D. Mc.Kenzie, Greasr. (M.M.) H.M.S. Princess Margaret. 1915-6.), lacquered, good very fine £400-500 D.S.M. London Gazette 25.10.1916 Greaser Duncan McKenzie, Mercantile Rating. The award of the Distinguished Service Medal was in recognition of good services and devotion to duty whilst serving in the Minelayer H.M.S. Princess Margaret. In December 1914 the Princess Margaret was taken up from Merchant Service and converted to a Minelayer, with a mine carrying capacity of 500 mines. She was one of the largest Minelayers used by the Royal Navy.

23 The Great War 1916 ‘French Theatre’ M.M. Group of Four to Lieutenant J. Barratt, Royal Army Medical Corps, Later Tank Corps a) Military Medal, G.V.R. (42047 Sjt: J. Barratt. 59/F.A. R.A.M.C.) b) 1914-15 Star (42047 Cpl.- A.Sjt.- J. Barratt. R.A.M.C.) c) British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. J. Barratt), nearly extremely fine (4) £200-240 M.M. London Gazette 11.11.1916 42407 Sjt. J. Barratt, R.A.M.C. Lieutenant J. Barratt, M.M., served with the 59th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps, during the Great War on the Western Front; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Tank Corps, 30.1.1918; promoted Lieutenant, 30.7.1919; retired, 10.8.1920.

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24 24 A Scarce Second War 1941 ‘Evacuation of Greece and Yugoslavia’ D.F.M. Group of Six to Sunderland Air Gunner Warrant Officer W.H. Yates, Royal Air Force; Later Shot Down Whilst Engaging A Submarine Over the Mediterranean He Was Taken Prisoner of War by the Italians, 1.8.1941; Having Managed to Escape, He Was ReCaptured by the Germans in 1943 a) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (536375. L.A.C. W.H. Yates. R.A.F.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar d) Defence and War Medals e) Malta George Cross Fiftieth Anniversary Medal, nearly extremely fine, with the following related documents &c.: R.A.F. Observer’s and Air Gunner’s Flying Log Book, covering the period 4.10.19391.8.1941 - R.A.F. Service and Release Book - The recipient’s Goldfish Club Card, dated 1.8.1941 - The recipient’s Returned British Prisoners of War Association Membership card - A copy of ‘Flight Out of Yugoslavia’, the recipient’s account of evacuating V.I.P.s from Yugoslavia, 17.4.1941, prior to its fall to Germany - Handle with Care, a book of sketches drawn in German Prison Camps, inscribed by the recipient - The recipient’s Ministry of Aviation Aircraft Maintenance Engineer’s Licence - Various letters regarding the award of the Malta George Cross Fiftieth Anniversary Medal - Commemorative Italian Prisoner of War Medal for Merit, bronze, with top riband bar - Various photographs of the recipient (lot) £2,200-2,600 D.F.M. London Gazette 21.11.1941 536375 Leading Aircraftman William Henry Yates, Royal Air Force ‘For gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations.’ The Recommendation, dated 30.7.1941, states: ‘Leading Aircraftsman Yates was Rigger/ Air Gunner in Sunderland L2166 during the evacuation from Greece. L2166 carried out 58 hours 10 minutes operational flying and carried 138 passengers during the evacuation operations between 17 April and 2 May 1941. Although called upon to work both day and night and often 24 hours at a stretch he has never once failed any demand. His devotion to duty and continual cheerfulness under adverse conditions has been a continual inspiration to the Officers and men of the aircraft. LAC Yates has carried out 102 sorties totalling 657.40 operational hours since the outbreak of War with Italy. He has been under

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Warrant Officer W.H. Yates continual operations during this period. The serviceability of the machine has been such that not once has it failed to answer to requirements. This has been largely due to this airman. He has been involved in 5 enemy actions and has displayed skill and efficiency. His devotion to his duties which not only included those of an air gunner but also the maintenance of his aircraft has been outstanding particularly when operating from advanced bases without the usual ground staff facilities.’ 536375 Warrant Officer William Henry Yates, D.F.M., born 15.4.1917; enlisted in the Royal Air Force, 24.11.1936; served during the Second World War with No.230 Squadron (Sunderlands), based in Egypt, carrying out anti-submarine patrols over the Mediterranean; Operations stepped up with the entry of Italy to the War, and Yates’s first direct contact with the enemy occurred when flying from Malta to Alexandria, 15.9.1940: ‘Engaged Cant 506 fired 300 rounds’ (recipient’s Log Book refers); Yates saw further action on the 12th October: ‘Bombed 4 M.T. Boats and sighted Italian Fleet’ (ibid), before the Squadron’s role shifted to transporting freight and troops between Egypt and North Africa. Between April and May 1941 Yates was involved in the evacuation of Greece, Yugoslavia, and Crete, during which his Sunderland safely transported 138 passengers, including a number of V.I.P.s on the German ‘Hit List’ that were evacuated from Kotor, Montenegro, 17.4.1941, the day the Yugoslav Royal Army capitulated to the Germans. Yates had further contact with the enemy on the 12th June: ‘Italian submarine machine gunned. 100 rounds front turret’ (ibid), before resuming passenger operations, including carrying the Air Officer Commanding in Chief, Middle East Command, Air Marshal Arthur Tedder (later Marshal of the Royal Air Force Lord Tedder, G.C.B.) from Cairo to Aboukir, 26.7.1941. Yates’s final flight was a patrol over the Mediterranean, 1.8.1941- his Sunderland was shot down over the sea by an Italian submarine; eight of his crew members were killed, while Yates and three others joined the Goldfish Club by making use of their emergency dinghy, later to be picked up by the submarine and made Prisoners of War. Incarcerated in the Sulmona camp, in the mountains approximately 60 miles east of Rome, Yates succeeded in escaping in 1943, before being re-captured by the Germans and spending the rest of the War in a German Prisoner of War camp (newspaper cutting refers). Following the end of the War Yates left the Royal Air Force, 6.4.1946, and subsequently trained as a civilian Aircraft Maintenance Engineer, based at Filton, Bristol. In October 1973 he returned to his old Italian Prisoner of War camp at Sulmona, where he was presented with the Italian Prisoner of War Medal for Merit by the Italian Ministry of Defence.

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25 25 A Second War 1943 Lancaster Air Bomber’s D.F.M. Group of Four to Flight Sergeant G.H. Wood, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, Who Took Part in Operation Hydra, the Raid on Peenemunde, 17.8.1943, And Bombed Berlin On No Fewer Than Seven Occasions a) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (1575276. F/Sgt. G.H. Wood. R.A.F.) b) Air Crew Europe Star c) Defence and War Medals, light contact marks, nearly very fine or better (4) £1,600-2,000 D.F.M. London Gazette 15.2.1944 1575276 Flight Sergeant Guy Huitson Wood, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No. 626 Squadron The Recommendation, dated 11.12.1943, states: ‘Flight Sergeant Wood is an Air Bomber who has completed thirty successful sorties, including seven visits to Berlin. On June 25th 1943 during an attack on Gelsenkirchen, the aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire over the target area and the port outer engine set on fire. In spite of this a second bombing run was made although the aircraft was still engaged by searchlights and anti-aircraft fire. By his skill, determination, and high degree of courage during this and many other sorties this N.C.O. had contributed in a large measure to the successful conclusion of many attacks against heavily defended enemy targets. I strongly recommend the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal to this N.C.O.’ Remarks by Station Commander: ‘The skill of this air bomber in guiding his captain accurately over the centre of any target and his courage in any adversity has been a source of inspiration to his crew. I strongly recommend that the presence of mind and gallantry displayed by Flight Sergeant Wood deserve recognition by the award of the D.F.M.’ 1575276 Flight Sergeant Guy Huitson Wood, D.F.M., served during the Second World War as a Lancaster Air Bomber in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; his first operational sortie was a raid over Lille, 13.4.1943, and he followed that up at the end of May with a raid over Wuppertal; subsequent targets over the next five months included Dusseldorf (2); Bochum; Krefeld; Gelsenkirchen, 25.6.1943; Cologne; Turin; Hamburg (4); PeenemundeOperation Hydra, 17.8.1943; Leverkausen; Berlin (3); Munchen Gladbach; Hannover (3); Kassel; Frankfurt; and Leipzig; transferred to the newly-formed No.626 Squadron (Lancasters), Wickenby, on their formation, 7.11.1943, and took part in the Squadron’s first operational mission, a raid on Modane, 10.11.1043, before completing his tour with four more raids on Berlin by the end of month.

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26 Pearson, H.M.S. Fearless, dated 2.8.1982 - Letter to Mrs. Johnston from Michael Heseltine M.P., then Secretary of State for Defence with regard to the Falklands Memorial at San Carlos, dated 27.1.1984 - A number of contemporary newspaper cuttings (lot) £30,000-40,000

26 The Unique Posthumous Falklands’ Q.G.M. Group of Four to Colour Sergeant B. Johnston, Royal Marines, Coxswain of LCU Foxtrot Four, A Landing Craft Veteran, Who Gallantly Came to the Aid of the Stricken H.M.S. Antelope, When One of Two Undetonated Bombs Exploded inside Her, 23.5.1982; Despite Being Ordered to Stay Clear of the Ship Because of the Severity of the Flames and the Presence of a Second Unexploded Bomb, Johnston Remained Alongside Her Until His Load Was Complete - Rescuing Over 100 Men in the Process; Johnston and His Crew Were Killed in Action, When Foxtrot Four Was Attacked in Choiseul Sound, By Four Argentinian Aircraft, 8.6.1982 a) Queen’s Gallantry Medal (A C Sergt. Brian Johnston, R.M. PO23116X.) b) General Service 1962-2007, two clasps, South Arabia, Northern Ireland (RM-23116 B.R. Johnston. Mne. R.M.) c) South Atlantic 1982, with rosette (ACSGT B R Johnston PO23116X RM) d) Naval Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (Sgt. B R Johnston PO23116X RM), generally very fine or better, mounted for wear, with the following related contemporary documents: - Parchment Certificate of Service - Two Letters addressed to Mrs. Johnston with regard to the award of the Q.G.M. to her husband, from John Nott M.P., then Secretary of State for Defence, dated 11.10.1982, and Lieutenant General Sir Richard Trant, K.C.B., Land Deputy to the Commander in Chief Fleet, dated 8.10.1982 - Two Letters of condolence, from Colonel H.J. Flamank, O.B.E., 9.6.1982, and Sir Peter Emery M.P., dated 30.7.1982 - Letter to Mrs. Johnston regarding Dedication Service for a Memorial Plaque, from Commander G.S.

Q.G.M. London Gazette 8.10.1982 Acting Colour Sergeant Brian Johnston, Royal Marines, PO23116X, ‘Colour Sergeant Johnston, coxswain of LCU F4, was working in the vicinity of H.M.S. Antelope when her unexploded bomb detonated, starting an immediate fire which caused her crew, already at emergency stations, to be ordered to abandon ship. Without hesitation Colour Sergeant Johnston laid his craft alongside the Antelope and began to fight the fire and take off survivors. At approximately 2200Z he was ordered to stay clear of the ship because of the severity of the fire and the presence of a seconded unexploded bomb. Colour Sergeant Johnston remained alongside until his load was complete. In all LCU F4 rescued over 100 survivors from the Antelope. On 8 June, LCU F4 was attacked by enemy aircraft in Choiseul Sound. During this action Colour Sergeant Johnston and five of his crew were killed. Colour Sergeant Johnston’s selfless bravery in the face of extreme danger was in the highest traditions of the Corps.’ Colour Sergeant Brian Ronald Johnston, Q.G.M., born Belfast, 1948; employed as an Apprentice Tea Buyer prior to enlisting in the Royal Marines, 25.8.1964; served in 45 Commando, December 1965 - December 1966; served as part of the Royal Marine complement on H.M.S. Protector (Antarctic Patrol Vessel), March 1967 - March 1968; Lance Corporal, September 1973; served with 42 Commando and Commando Logistic Regiment intermittently between 19731975; Sergeant, August 1978 (L.S. & G.C. 16.12.1980) ;served in H.M.S. Intrepid, and at R.M. Poole, July 1980 October 1981; whilst serving at the latter he was part of the Landing Craft Branch under the command of Ewen SouthbyTailyour, whose book Reasons in Writing, A Commando’s View of the Falklands War is dedicated to Johnston and the crew of Foxtrot 4; whilst at Poole ‘part of my job [SouthbyTailyour] was to continue the practice, each winter, of the

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria inshore Arctic warfare tactics in independent support of the Commando Brigade that we had first attempted in 1972. To do this I would fit out by fair means or foul (money being unavailable for even conventional trials) one of my onehundred-ton LCUs (Landing Craft Utility designed to carry two main battle tanks) to operate in temperatures down to 30 degrees centrigrade. She would be transported to north Norway in the ‘duty’ assault ship (Fearless or Intrepid), replacing one of those they carried in their internal dock. It was during just such an exercise in the winter of 1981/1982 that we loaded into Fearless a landing craft named, eventually, The Black Pig. Her cox’n was ColourSergeant Brian Johnston who had left his own Foxtrot Four behind at Poole for the duration of the winter deployment. Other cox’ns had helped me and many landing craft officers over the previous winters, but none were as willing to take the calculated risks required to reach beyond the limits of ‘the book’ as Colour Sergeant Johnston. His crew were Sergeant R.J. Rotheram, Marine A.J. Rundle, Marine P.A. Cruden, MEA A.S. James and LMEM D. Miller’; posted as Acting Colour Sergeant for service with H.M.S. Fearless, 23.10.1981; the Fearless was a Landing Platform Dock, ‘a 13,000-ton ship with a small flight deck and a dock. They can operate support helicopters from two spots, while beneath, the dock floods to float out four one-hundred-ton landing craft (Landing Craft Utility or LCU) each designed to carry two main battle tanks. The ships also carry four smaller landing craft (Landing Craft Vehicle and Personnel) on davits, each of which can carry thirty troops equipped for temperate climate operations’ (Ibid); she set out, as part of the Naval Task Force, for the Falklands in April 1982; based on the Fearless were the Staff of the Amphibious Force Commander (Commodore M. Clapp), and the Commanding Officer of 3 Commando Brigade (Brigadier J. Thompson) as well as his staff and elements of the landing force; on the 11th April Fearless was ordered to Ascension Island, the half way ‘stop’ and a place for the Landing Force Task Group to plan; Johnston left the island in H.M.S. Fearless on the 7th May, with orders to proceed to the Falkland Islands. Operation Sutton Having arrived in the waters surrounding the Falklands, Johnston and his LCU Foxtrot Four were to be prominently involved in the landing of the Amphibious Task Group on the beaches around San Carlos Water; approximately 4,000 men of 40, 42, 45 Commando and 2 and 3 Para, with support units and equipment, were to be landed on various beaches on the night of the 21st May; they were to be disembarked from H.M.S. Fearless, her sister ship H.M.S. Intrepid, SS Canberra and SS Norland and transported to shore by the 8 LCUs and 8 LCVPs of Fearless and Intrepid; the unarmed Landing Craft, under the command of SouthbyTailyour, were to land the force in waves; the whole operation was to be carried out in radio silence and without visual signalling; the ships were to progress to a certain distance from the shore and as Southby-Tailyour states, ‘the complication for us on D Day would be that once we rounded Chancho Point we would be out of sight and sound of the flag ship, meaning that even if we were to be so minded there would be no contact at all. We would not be able to seek advice if things went wrong, nor would the command be able to abort or alter. The responsibility for any change would be mine or the cox’ns, some of whom were young Corporals.’ With the arrival of D Day, Southby-Tailyour, ‘went below [in H.M.S. Fearless] to the blue-smoke-filled dock. Some things never change and exhaust fumes from eight three hundred horse-power diesels are among them. At last (and it was one of the longer waits of my landing craft career) the welcome noise of the stern gate’s massive hydraulics drowned out that of air escaping from the ballast tanks. Slowly the dim outline of the far hills to the south and east opened up as the lip of the stern gate swung out and down to sink into Falkland Sound. A cool breeze replaced the heavy blue smoke of the

Colour Sergeant B. Johnston

well dock... “Retract the LCUs.” The order from ‘Dock Control’ to my leading cox’n came over the internal comms. It was the final word of command and came from a Royal Naval Lieutenant. The LCUs backed stern-first into the dark. The sudden nearsilence was comforting as the exhaust noise no longer echoed back from the closed steel walls. Men now whispered, if they spoke at all... From across the Sound the ‘crump’ of naval gunfire was loud and sudden. Four-inch shells landing on Fannings Head, and the long, silent arcs of small-arms tracer, were a telling reminder that this was not Lulworth Cove, Loch Eribol or even Lyngen Fiord.’ Johnston and the LCUs of H.M.S. Fearless travelled the 5 mile passage at full throttle to land 40 Commando on Blue Beach One; having completed the first wave of the landing, Johnston went to the Intrepid to load up with 3 Para; the latter was destined for the unexplored Sand Bay Beach (Green Beach) to the west of Port San Carlos; with dawn rapidly approaching and keen to get 3 Para landed before daylight the LCUs arrived at Intrepid; Southby-Tailyour led the second wave from Johnston’s LCU, ‘I was thrilled to be back on board Foxtrot Four. Colour Sergeant Johnston and his crew were the friends with whom, so recently, I had shared many amusing and professional moments north of the Arctic Circle in The Black Pig.... A beautiful clear dawn, with

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN us tense and impotent.... I shared a cup of tea - my first of the already long day - with the crew as we waited for the first men of 3 Para to appear.... Once the leading two craft were loaded the next two replaced them. In the lead craft we orbited slowly astern of the ship.’ As the Landing Craft were running behind schedule, a direct line of approach was taken to Green Beach, but ‘the worry of mines still niggled at my brain. A mine of any size would destroy a LCU and, of greater importance, its human cargo’; the LCUs were accompanied by four LCVPs carrying the balance of the battalion, while two of the LCUs carried light tanks of the Blues and Royals; having found the beach, ‘one of my fears was realized about 20 yards short of the narrow beach. I had just gone forward to tell Hew Pike [C/O 3 Para] that the men I had spotted at the back of the beach were SBS when we hit the bottom. The craft had grounded forward in about three foot of crystal-clear water. It was not sensible to ask any man to begin a campaign at the onset of the austral winter after he had waded ashore in waist-deep water, so I ordered the other 3 LCUs to hold off. The enemy were not in evidence, the SBS were on the beach, it was daylight and as the four shallow-draft LCVPs roared past us at ten knots to land their men I shouted to them to back off when empty and moor alongside Foxtrot Four. Heavily laden men then clambered up and over the catwalks, either side of the LCU, to drop into the bellies of the LCVPs to be ferried ashore dryshod. The makeshift operation went smoothly and 3 Para quickly fanned out to begin their advancement eastwards and towards the settlement. Behind us, and on the northern shore about a third of a mile to the west, the other 3 LCUs had each found a rocky, dry landing for the two unwaterproofed Scorpions and the balance of the battalion.’ All eight of the Landing Craft retracted and formed up in two columns to return to H.M.S. Fearless; enroute, however, as recorded in Southby-Tailyour’s diary at the time, “returning to Fearless, which is steaming up San Carlos Waters - along with Intrepid, Norland, Canberra, the LSLs, Nordic Ferry and Plymouth - the fleet has now come under attack. A Mirage and Pucara have just flown past us being chased by a Sea Cat Missile which went straight on into the hill above Ajax Bay. Very exhilarating sight but it landed just where 45 Commando are trying to digin. Once Fearless anchored, we asked permission to dock but have just been told to lie off as she is under attack and ‘would call us in when more convenient’. The unarmed LCUs would have been sitting ducks in open water during the daylight hours, and as a consequence hid beneath the cliffs of Doctor’s Head; they were eventually given the all clear and returned to the Fearless having successfully carried out their part of the operation.

bridge to find that in those few moments events had over taken me. Antelope was burning fiercely, and now continually, with the two LCUs already alongside fighting fires and picking up survivors. I hated the impotence of my position and longed to be able to give some positive form of help; but this personal feeling of helplessness was mollified by the remarkable sight of the boats alongside the inferno, quite clearly acting against the direct orders, being relayed to them from the flag ship, to leave the area. Leading the rescue attempt were Foxtrot One commanded by Colour Sergeant Francis and Foxtrot Four with Colour Sergeant Johnston.... “Survivors coming on board and I was thrilled - but deeply sad - to see Nick Tobin her Captain and great friend. She has lost one dead and a RE Staff Sergeant [J. Prescott - awarded a Posthumous C.G.M.] who was killed trying to defuse the thing (His Warrant Officer [J.H. Phillips - award a D.S.C.] was to lose an arm in the Ajax Bay Hospital - obviously quite remarkable men). The LCUs had to be ordered away from the ship before she finally blew up - great work by the lads.” ‘It was indeed great work by the landing craft crews who man slow and unwieldy craft with no personal protection and I felt immense pride and humility watching their calm bravery’ (See Q.G.M. Citation). Another Night -Time Landing Operation On the 24th May orders were received for 42 Commando to be moved from their position in Cerro Montevideo to Port San Carlos; this was to be a night transit using Tango One and Foxtrot Four to negotiate the Port San Carlos River; SouthbyTailyour was to once again lead the way in Foxtrot Four, ‘orders were simple enough. Sunset was at 2003Z and high water 0115: we had four hours to cover a total of 16 miles, each leg being four nautical miles, and we could lift half the commando in each wave of two craft. We would plan to steam at about four knots to give us time in hand for possible obstacles (I used the word on purpose), delays, and loading and unloading times... Neither craft would show any lights, but I decided that a method of judging distance-off between the two should be determined. We did not want the rear craft riding over our stern in a rather suggestive manner if the lead LCU were suddenly to halt on a sand bank. I was, though, anxious that the craft steamed as close together as safety would allow in order to give maximum military support, and take men off, in an emergency.... I asked that two dim lights be placed, one on each quarter, of the leading LCU so that the cox’n of the second craft would have a perspective of the vessel ahead..... Orders were given for the drills in case of enemy action and in the rather more likely event of craft becoming stranded. The only communication would be by pin-point red light.’ At 9pm on a moonless night the two LCUs set off from Clam Valley and proceeded up the Port San Carlos River, ‘from the cox’n’s position, perched on his ‘high chair’ it is not easy to read the water nor to see any distance ahead. There were no silhouettes against the river and the dark cliffs behind masked any constrast in tones, but luckily I had kept the passive night goggles and again they were to prove invaluable. Very quickly Colour Sergeant Johnston and I established our wellpractised bad-weather routine first tried in the testing conditions of an Arctic winter. While the cox’n was all but blind I kept up a constant barrage of course and speed corrections based on my radar and passive night goggles observations..... To an outsider the continual stream of orders interspersed with relevant anecdotes and reminiscences must have been unitelligible and probably rather puzzling. To someone with a little understanding it would have sounded highly suspect and not very comforting to his confidence, but to Colour Sergeant Johnston and me it was our natural method of working and was developed to mask the drama of our navigational and visibility problems. Paradoxically, we had found that this each-way interplay of orders and double checks and seemingly unconnected banter, kept us both more alert and alive to the task. There was no other way to con the craft.’

H.M.S. Antelope On the 22nd of May, with the beachead secured, Johnston now concentrated on his duties as ship-to-shore transport; the Landing Craft set up and ran Amphibious Beach Units at the two re-supply beaches (Bonners and Ajax Bay); the LCU crews had to be flexible and constantly available for whatever tasks needed urgent attention - and this was put into practice on the 23rd, when H.M.S. Antelope was hit by two unexploded bombs; Antelope continued to steam around the Sound belching smoke until ‘H.M.S. Antelope’s bomb exploded later that evening... I was called immediately to the Captain [of H.M.S. Fearless].... a calm but concerned Jeremy Larken greeted me without taking his eyes off the glare from beyond the bridge windows. The enormous flames flared and died causing alternate light and shadow across the surrounding ships and shore. Through this changing kaleidoscope searchlights from a number of helicopters probed and hunted. It was a majestically awful sight. “Can you tow her onto a beach if I give you three LCUs?” “Yes” “Right - get on with it. You don’t have much time.” Whilst gathering his gear Southby-Tailyour, ‘ran back to the

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria Southby-Tailyour and Johnston safely navigated the first hour of the trip, mainly using the middle of the river for depth reasons, when ‘suddenly, we hit solid ground. The craft slewed against the tide, which, though rising, was also pushing us harder aground. There had been no warning, no unexplained ripples on the surface of the otherwise flat waters. The undeniable sound and feel of a steel ship grinding harder into solid rocks and shifting stones quivered through the deck. Colour Sergeant Johnston slammed both engines into reverse - a process with a ‘V’ drive, which takes precious seconds to engage. The slope was too gentle, which meant that, although any damage would be minimal, we would have travelled some way across and up the shoal. Astern of us Colour Sergeant Davies had seen the gap between our two stern lights suddenly widen and guessed what had happened. Without altering course he slowed down and brought his bows close to our transom. His crew, waiting for just such an event, and without orders, passed two warps, crossed over, one for each of our quarters. As soon as turns had been taken around the Staghorns Tango One backed away against the flood stream. Both craft set their engines to full astern and with the same, but psychologically more satisfying noise, we slid off into deep water. The lines were slipped; I plotted the position of the shoal, judged which side lay the deepest water and the convoy set off again at slightly reduced speed. The teasing between myself and my cox’n took on a different note. Relief on my part and a smile on his. “Like to change places, boss? We need younger eyes for this sort of thing!” I reminded him that the safety of the vessel was his responsibilty; I was merely a ‘local pilot’ in an advisory capacity!’ The rest of the first trip to pick up 42 Commando passed without incident; in total Johnston had to do four passages in these tricky waters, mainly navigating by instinct alone, ‘almost exactly at high water we disembarked the second wave at Port San Carlos while Brian Johnston poured us all a well-earned tot... however, the new day was not yet over; the offloading rota was short of two LCUs so we returned to San Carlos Waters at best speed.’ Daylight and Dangerous Waters The fleet were subject to almost continual air-attack, and on the 25th, ‘during the day there were a number of air raids. I watched one from the bridge of an LCU while it unloaded cargo across Bonners Bay jetty and recorded seeing a pilot eject over H.M.S. Fearless. He landed in the water alongside the ship and was rescued by Colour Sergeant Johnston. He had a badly torn knee but was otherwise in fair shape.’ Having successfully landed 3 Commando Brigade, the LCUs were once again heavily occupied with the arrival of the Army’s 5th Infantry Brigade (consisting of 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, 2nd Battalion Scots Guards, 1/7th Gurkha Rifles, along with equipment and support units) in the first week of June; whilst the Scots Guards were succesfully landed at Bluff Cove, confusion over orders delayed the landing of the Welsh Guards; with the result that only half the battalion were landed by Foxtrot One and Foxtrot Four at Bluff Cove; on the 7th June, six out of eight available LCUs (including Johnston’s) were employed unloading the LSL Sir Tristram at Fitzroy, ‘as sunset grew nearer I made my way back to ‘clock in’ with the Army headquarters to discover that at dusk we were due to lose the four Intrepid LCUs, leaving us to rejuggle the offload priorities, procedures and timings... We knew we could not complete the task that night, but if we

worked fast, I suggested, she might, just might, be ready to sail the following night. During this conversation it was suggested that we send one of the two LCUs to Darwin to collect the Brigade radio vehicles so urgently needed [5th Brigade forward positions had no radio contact]. While the collection of the radios was vital for 5 Brigade, there were distinct disadvantages in transporting them by LCU. On the other hand there were two other ways of getting the vehicles to Fitzroy - overland or slung beneath a Sea King. These, though, were also fraught with difficulties, not least of which was the average speed over the peat at that time of year and the lack of helicopters.... Now that we had lost Intrepid’s four we needed both the remaining LCUs, working flat out, to ensure that Sir Tristram was unloaded in time for her return journey to San Carlos after dark. Secondly, as we could not tell the garrison at Darwin that the LCU would be on its way, I was hesitant to risk it when I knew that the Gurkhas had orders to destroy anything that moved up Choiseul Sound..... Thirdly, if I did send a LCU it would not be available until the next night as Gurkhas or no Gurkhas, it was clearly a target for Pucara over the Sound by day.... I was being cautious, but also trying to ensure that the LSL was given the first priority.... The unloading of the LSL and the safety of the LCU were, rightly or wrongly, uppermost in my mind at that stage.... During a brief discussion with Colour Sergeant Johnston he helped me with my decision by stating: “LCUs have been shot up by the Royal Navy on both flanks [he had been challenged twice when on a run back from Teal Inlet] and I would rather not face the Gurkhas. My luck may not last.” These were to be tragically prophetic words.’ In the early hours of the 8th June, Southby-Tailyour was ‘woken by Barnie Rolfe-Smith to tell me that MV Monsunen has returned from GG and has comms with the RN and is prepared to escort Foxtrot Four up Choiseul Sound so I have now ordered Colour Sergeant Johnston to sail but to make absolutely certain that he remains in comms with Monsunen in whatever way he and they deem fit to ensure that the Gurkhas know they are transiting the Sound. Told him that under no circumstances is he to sail back until dark tonight regardless of who orders him to do so.’ On the evening of the fateful day that Southby-Tailyour witnessed the air-attack on Sir Galahad and Sir Tristram he received news about Foxtrot Four - ‘2000. “F4 reported sinking - 6 wounded 11 dead or missing.” A cool army signaller had managed to get a message through while his Land Rover remained chained to the sinking LCU.’ Southby-Tailyour immediately sent out Foxtrot One to look for survivors, ‘my thoughts, though, were for Colour Sergeant Johnston and his men. “Who the hell ordered F4 to sail back in daylight down Choiseul Sound I would like to know.” ‘I do know now. Colour Sergeant Johnston, having loaded his craft, turned to the senior passenger and said: “Bugger the orders. The Brigade needs these vehicles forward now. We’ll sail.” He was a brave man who was to be awarded, posthumously, the Queen’s Gallantry Medal.’ Returning from Goose Green Foxtrot Four had been attacked by four Argentinian aircraft, three of these aircraft were eventually shot down. Johnston and his crew are commemorated on the memorial at San Carlos, there is also a memorial to the crew of Foxtrot Four on Lively Island.

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CAMPAIGN GROUPS AND PAIRS

27

x27 Three: Sergeant C. Maxen, King’s German Legion Military General Service 1793-1814, nine clasps, Talavera, Busaco, Fuentes d’Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Vittoria, St. Sebastian, Nivelle, Nive (Charles Maxen, Serjt. 5th. Line Bn. K.G.L.); Waterloo 1815 (Serj. Charles Maxen. 5th Line Batt. K.G.L.), with contemporary silver clip and original split ring suspension; Germany, Hanover, King’s German Legion Volunteer Medal, bronze, unnamed as issued, some contact marks to the Waterloo medal, otherwise generally very fine (3) £3,800-4,200 Sergeant Charles Maxen, born Gottingen, Hanover; served with the King’s German Legion in the Peninsula, and in the 7th Company, 5th Line Battalion, K.G.L. during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged 1815. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, May 1909 Glendining, 1919 Seaby, 1976

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28 Pair: Chaplain J. Jenkins, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (John Jenkins, Chaplain.); St. John d’Acre 1840, silver, pierced for ring suspension as issued, with contemporary silver straight bar, minor edge bruising to first, nearly extremely fine (2) £1,000-1,400

29 Pair: Assistant Surgeon E. Robertson, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (E. Robertson, Asst. Surgn.); St. John d’Acre 1840, silver, pierced for ring suspension as issued, minor edge nicks, nearly extremely fine (2) £900-1,100

John Jenkins served as Chaplain in H.M.S. Benbow during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Ebenezer Robertson served as Assistant Surgeon in H.M.S. Benbow during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

The Rev. John Jenkins, joined the Royal Navy as Chaplain, June 1835, and posted to H.M.S. Barham for service in the Mediterranean; posted to H.M.S. Benbow (Captain Houston Stewart, C.B.), May 1839; appointed Naval Instructor and Schoolmaster alongside his role as Chaplain, August 1839; posted as Chaplain and Naval Instructor, H.M.S. Curacoa, for service in the South Americas, March 1843; future postings included H.M.S. Superb, May 1845; H.M.S. Victory, December 1850; H.M.S. Seringapatam, Cape of Good Hope, June 1851; and H.M.S. Castor, January 1856; died 1860.

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31

30 Pair: Mate H. Ley, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Henry Ley, Mate.); St. John d’Acre 1840, silver, pierced for ring suspension as issued, with contemporary silver straight bar, edge bruise and heavy contact mark to first, therefore nearly very fine (2) £800-1,200

31 Pair: W. Biddlecombe, Royal Navy Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Biddlecombe.); St. John d’Acre 1840, bronze, pierced for ring suspension as issued, piercing on second strengthened, and cut to edge, otherwise good very fine (2) £550-650

Henry Ley served as Mate in H.M.S. Vanguard during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

William Biddlecombe served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. Edinburgh during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

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32 Three: Sergeant-Major T. Bulkley, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers Sutlej 1845-46, for Aliwal, one clasp, Sobraon (Qr. Mr. Serjt. T: Buckley [sic] Nusseeree Battn.), with contemporary silver eye-let and ring suspension; India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Pegu (Serjt. Majr. Timy. Bulkley. 40th Regt. N.I.); Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Timy. Bulkley, 1st Eurn. Bengal Fusrs.), 1st with contact marks, otherwise generally very fine or better (3) £600-700

33 Pair: Sergeant T. White, 1st European Bengal Fusiliers India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Pegu (Thos. White. 1st Eur. Bengal Fusrs); Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Delhi, Lucknow (Serjt. Thos. White, 1st Eurn. Bengal Fusrs), light contact marks, very fine (2) £600-700 34 Three: Sergeant E. Rushton, Royal Artillery Crimea 1854-56, two clasps, Inkermann, Sebastopol, unofficial rivets between clasps (Bombdr. E. Rushton 12th. Battln. Royl. Artly.), contemporarily engraved in predominately large serif capitals; Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (458, Serjt. E. Rushton, 12th. Brigade. RA); Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die, unnamed as issued, plugged and fitted with a Crimea-style suspension bar, edge bruise to first, generally good very fine (3) £250-300

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35 Pair: Surgeon A. Burn, Rajpootana Field Force India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (Field Surg. A. Burn.); Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Surgn. A. Burn, M.D. Rajpootana Fd. Force), nearly extremely fine (2) ÂŁ800-1,200 Surgeon Alexander Burn, born East Lothian, Scotland; appointed to the Madras Medical Establishment, February 1829; served with the Rajpootana Field Force during the Indian Mutiny and present at the siege, assault, and capture of Kotah, 30.3.1858 (Mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 11.6.1858).

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36 Three: Colonel W.W. Woodward, Royal Artillery, Late Bombay Artillery Empress of India 1877, edge engraved in large serif capitals ‘Major W.W. Woodward. Comg. II/II Mountain Battery Royal Artillery.’; India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (Lieut. W.W. Woodward. Artillery), with contemporary top silver riband buckle; Indian Mutiny 185759, no clasp (Lieutenant W.W. Woodward, Bombay Artillery.), nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s related miniature awards for the two campaign medals; and various cloth rank insignia (3) £1,200-1,600 Colonel Walter William Woodward, born May 1834; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Bombay Artillery, June 1852; served with the Bombay Artillery in Persia 1856-57, and present at the Battle of Kooshab; promoted Lieutenant, April 1858, and saw further service during the Indian Mutiny, including the action on the Taringa Hills at Mybeekanta and Goozerat; promoted Captain, February 1861; transferred to the Royal Artillery and subsequently appointed Adjutant, March 1866; promoted Major, July 1872; Lieutenant-Colonel, October 1877; Colonel, October 1881; retired, May 1889.

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37

39

37 Pair: Private J. Shipp, 19th Foot, Late Madras Fusiliers Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (J. Ship, 1st. Madras Fusrs.); India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Northwest Frontier (1050 J. Shipp. 1st. Bn. H.M.s. 19th. Regt.), minor edge bruising, therefore good very fine £400-450 38 Pair: Sergeant H. Trydell, 73rd Foot Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Hy. Trydell, 73rd. Regt.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (3426. Sergt. H. Trydell. 73rd. Foot), suspension claw re-affixed on first, edge bruising, nearly very fine or better (2) £220-260 3426 Sergeant Henry Trydell, born Montreal, Canada, 1840; enlisted in the 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot at St. Helier, Jersey, January 1855; served with the Regiment in South Africa, Ceylon, and in India during the Indian Mutiny; promoted Corporal, March 1868; Sergeant, October 1869; awarded L.S.& G.C., November 1876; discharged, February 1879, after 21 years and 3 days with the Colours.

39 Pair: Corporal J. Brown, Army Hospital Corps, Late 74th Foot Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Jas. Brown. 74th. Highlanders); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (1733. 2nd. Corpl. J. Brown, A.H. Corps), first polished, therefore nearly very fine, second nearly extremely fine (2) £250-300

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41

40 Pair: Corporal M. Grace, 9th Lancers Afghanistan 1878-80, three clasps, Charasia, Kabul, Kandahar (1083. Corpl. M. Grace. 9th. Lancers.); Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880 (1083 Corpl. M. Grace 9th. Lancers), light pitting, good very fine (2) ÂŁ600-800 1083 Corporal Michael Grace, born Cashel, Tipperary, Ireland, 1850; enlisted in the 9th Lancers, February 1868; promoted Corporal, July 1878; served with the Regiment in Afghanistan, March 1879 to December 1880; promoted Sergeant, October 1879; discharged, February 1889, after 21 years with the Colours.

41 Pair: Quarter Master Sergeant Foreman of Works J. Middleton, Royal Engineers South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (13016, Lce. Corpl. J. Middleton, R.E.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (13016. Q.M.S. F. of Works, J. Middleton. R.E.), light contact marks, very fine (2) ÂŁ450-550 Quarter Master Sergeant Foreman of Works James Middleton, born Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1855; enlisted in the Royal Engineers, April 1875; promoted Lance Corporal, November 1878; served with the Engineers in South Africa from December 1878 to May 1880, and present at the Battle of Inyezane, 22.1.1879, the Blockade of Eshowe, 23.13.4.1879, and Operations before Ulundi, 4.7.1879; promoted Corporal, April 1882; Sergeant, April 1885; Company Sergeant Major, April 1886; Quarter Master Sergeant Foreman of Works, April 1892; awarded L.S.& G.C., October 1893; discharged, May 1901, after 26 years and 47 days service.

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43 Pair: Private F. Middleton, 20th Hussars Egypt 1882-89, undated, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (2199. Pte. F. Middleton. 20th. Husrs.); Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, Star gilded, heavy pitting, therefore nearly very fine (2) £180-220

42 Three: Blacksmith A. Wright, Royal Navy Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Alexandria 11th. July (A. Wright. B’Smith’s Crew. H.M.S. “Superb”.); Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R. (A. Wright, Blacksmith, H.M.S. Pembroke.); Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, light pitting throughout, nearly very fine (3) £300-350

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44 44 Three: Private E.D. Barton, Rifle Brigade Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (2090. Pte. E. Barton. 2/R. Bde:); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek, South Africa 1901, unofficial rivets between last two clasps (2090 Pte. E. Barton, Rifle Brigade); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (2090. E. Barton. Rifle Brigade.), engraved in upright serif capitals, edge bruising to last, nearly very fine or better (3) £380-420 2090 Private Edward Daniel Barton, born Ashford, Kent, 1870; enlisted in the Rifle Brigade, February 1892; served with the Brigade in Egypt and the Sudan, July to September 1898, and with the 1st Battalion in South Africa, November 1899 to March 1901; wounded at Grootvlei, 26.12.1900; discharged, June 1902, after 10 years and 131 days with the Colours. The Rifle Brigade at Grootvlei, Boxing Day 1900 After a quiet Christmas based at the Oceana Mine near Grootvlei, Lieutenant-Colonel A. Colville, 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade, proceeded on a farm-clearing expedition, with a small column consisting of six companies of the 1st Battalion, a squadron of the 13th Hussars, four guns of 63 Battery, Royal Field Artillery, as well as one ‘pom-pom’. Colville left ‘F’ Company under the command of Captain Radclyffe, as well as some artillerymen, to guard the baggage wagons based at the mine. The Column moved out in the direction of Roddewal, where after five miles they became involved in a small skirmish at the first of the target farms. During the skirmish a large party of approximately 450 Boers were spotted heading towards the Oceana Mine. A signal was sent to Captain Radclyffe informing him of this development, and he at once set about disposing his small force in an attempt to protect the baggage, with the pom-pom located

near a small hollow. After a couple of hours had passed a number of mounted Boers appeared on a ridge a thousand yards away. As Radclyffe’s men opened fire the Boers dismounted, pushed forward, and sent out small parties to the left and right in an encircling movement against the Rifle Brigade position. Under heavy and accurate fire the pompom was moved down towards the hollow and back towards the compound- of the nine men who assisted in moving the pom-pom one was killed and the other eight all wounded. Seeing that the enemy were now advancing in considerable force, Radclyffe decided to send the baggage back to the Column, whilst attempting to hold the Boers in check for as long as possible. Under cover of heavy Rifle Brigade fire from behind the wagons, the native teams began inspanning the oxen. When they were ready to move the native teams started off the wagons in the direction of Colville’s column and, as they did so, the small Rifle Brigade covering party came under very severe fire and had to retire, as the Boers saw that they were losing their target. During this time, Radclyffe and his sections continued their holding action but suffered a number of casualties, with their ammunition running out fast. With the baggage now well on its way, Radclyffe, who was lying wounded, ordered those in advanced positions who could do so to retire to the compound so as to avoid capture. No.1 section provided covering fire until their ammunition ran out, at which point the Boers advanced rapidly, forcing their surrender, along with the wounded soldiers. Fortunately, at this point, the main column appeared on the horizon, forcing the Boers to withdraw, leaving their wounded prisoners behind. For some time the wounded on the ridge were exposed to fire from both the returning column and the Boers, and a corporal was seen to make a valiant attempt to carry the wounded Radclyffe to safety. Total losses that day were heavy, with 13 Officers and men killed, 44 wounded, and 19 taken prisoner. For his gallantry in defending the position, Captain Radclyffe was awarded the D.S.O. (article in the O.M.R.S. Journal, Winter 1995 refers.)

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN 45 An I.G.S. and Boer War Pair to Sergeant W. Christie, Highland Light Infantry, Wounded at Magersfontein, 11.12.1899, on Which Occasion Corporal Shaul of the Regiment was Awarded the Victoria Cross for Dressing Men’s Wounds Under Heavy Fire Out in the Open; Severely Wounded at Retief’s Nek, 23.7.1900; and Mentioned in Despatches India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (No.3424. Sergt: W. Christie. 2. High: L.I.); Queen’s South Africa 18991902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Wittebergen (3424 Sgt. W. Christie, 1st. High: Lt. Infy.), nearly very fine (2) £240-280 3424 Sergeant William Christie, born North Leith, Edinburgh, 1871; enlisted in the Highland Light Infantry, November 1889; promoted Corporal, June 1892; served with the 2nd Battalion in India, November 1894 to March 1899; promoted Sergeant, 1895, and took part in the Campaigns on the North West Frontier at Malakand, and present at the operations in Bajour, in Mamund Country, at Buner, and the attack and capture of the Tanga Pass; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa, October 1899 to December 1900; wounded at Magersfontein, 11.12.1899, when the Battalion’s losses throughout the day were 2 Officers and 12 men killed and 7 Officers, including the Commanding Officer, and 73 men wounded- Corporal John Shaul, in charge of the Battalion’s stretcher-bearers, was awarded the Victoria Cross at Magersfontein for most conspicuous gallantry during the day in dressing men’s wounds out in the open under continuous heavy fire, in one instance ‘as calmly as if there had been no enemy near’. Mentioned in Despatches for gallantry in action at Wittebergen, 9.7.1900 (London Gazette 30.11.1900), and severely wounded at Retief’s Nek, 23.7.1900: ‘That day the Highland Light Infantry did much useful work, gaining a footing on the lower spurs and kloofs of the rocky height to our left of the nek. During the night a portion of the H.L.I., guided by several men of Lovat’s Scouts, succeeded in gaining possession of the highest peak of the hill on the east of the pass, a point of vantage whence a successful occupation of the whole height was made next day’ (British Regiments in South Africa 1899-1902 refers); discharged, 28.3.1901, after 11 years and 145 days with the Colours; died Perth, 26.11.1914.

46 46 Pair: Lieutenant-Colonel F.M. Sandys-Lumsdaine, Highland Light Infantry India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (Capt. and Adjnt. F.M. Sandys-Lumsdaine 2. High: L.I.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, unofficial rivets between State and date clasps (Capt. F.M. SandysLumsdaine, H’land: L.I.), minor contact marks, nearly very fine, together with various photographic images of the recipient (2) £500-600 Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Myles Sandys-Lumsdaine, born November 1865, the second son of the Rev. F. SandysLumsdaine, of Lumsdaine and Blanerne, Berwickshire, and of Innergellie, Fife; Commissioned Lieutenant, 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, November 1885; promoted Captain, December 1892; served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion, April 1897 to June 1900; served with the Regiment in the campaign on the North West Frontier of India under the command of Sir William Lockhart, and took part in the operations of the Malakand and Buner Field Forces including the forcing of the Tanga Pass (Mentioned in Despatches); Appointed Brigade Major, August 1900, he served in South Africa on the Staff as Station Commandant at Riversdale, Cape Colony, from January 1901; whilst in South Africa he served as prosecuting counsel at the trial of Frederick Toy, a Swedish-born guerrilla and spy in Boer service, charged with High Treason and Attempted Murder; Toy was subsequently found guilty and executed in September 1901. Promoted Major, February 1904, Sandys-Lumsdaine transferred to the Reserve of Officers in February 1913. On the outbreak of the Great War he was appointed to the Command of the 12th (Service) Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, a position he held until 1915; subsequently he held Staff appointments at home, finally retiring with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in June 1919. He died in October 1938.

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48 47 Pair: Corporal T. MacDonald, Highland Light Infantry India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (No. 4055. Pte. T. Mc.Donald. 2. High: L.I.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Modder River, Wittebergen (4055 Corl. T. Mc.Donald, 1: High: Lt. Inft.), good very fine (2) £240-280 4055 Corporal T. McDonald, enlisted in the 1st Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, 1892; served with the 2nd Battalion in India from November 1894; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa from 1899; wounded at Magersfontein, 11.12.1899, when the Battalion’s losses throughout the day were 2 Officers and 12 men killed and 7 Officers, including the Commanding Officer, and 73 men wounded- Corporal John Shaul, in charge of the Battalion’s stretcher-bearers, was awarded the Victoria Cross at Magersfontein for most conspicuous gallantry during the day in dressing men’s wounds out in the open under continuous heavy fire, in one instance ‘as calmly as if there had been no enemy near’. Killed in action at Retief’s Nek, 23.7.1900: ‘That day the Highland Light Infantry did much useful work, gaining a footing on the lower spurs and kloofs of the rocky height to our left of the nek. During the night a portion of the H.L.I., guided by several men of Lovat’s Scouts, succeeded in gaining possession of the highest peak of the hill on the east of the pass, a point of vantage whence a successful occupation of the whole height was made next day’ (British Regiments in South Africa 1899-1902 refers).

48 The Regimentally Unique Group of Four to Major C.E. Andrews, Highland Light Infantry, Who Served on Secondment With the West Africa Frontier Force in Northern Nigeria, And Was Killed in Action on the Western Front, 25.10.1916 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, 1898 (Capt: C.E. Andrews. High’d. L.I.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Modder River, Orange Free State (Capt. C.E. Andrews, Highd. L.I.); British War Medal (Major C.E. Andrews); Delhi Durbar 1911, unnamed as issued, very fine or better, with various photographic images of the recipient (4) £700-900 Major Charles Edward Andrews, born August 1871, the only son of Captain Henry Andrews, 74th Highlanders; educated at Oundle School and R.M.A. Sandhurst; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 1st Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, May 1891; promoted Lieutenant, May 1893; seconded for service under the West Africa Frontier Force, March 1898, and served in the expeditions in Northern Nigeria; re-joined his Regiment and promoted Captain, February 1900; served in South Africa with the 1st Battalion, and took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Modder River and Magersfontein; the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; and in the Orange River Colony, May to November 1900. At Magersfontein Andrews had a lucky escape: ‘Of course there were many strange escapes, none more so than that of Andrews. A Mauser bullet passed through his right hand pouch (he was wearing a private soldier’s accoutrements, as were we all) and, striking the metal plate fastening the belt, exactly over the middle of the stomach, glanced harmlessly away instead of going right through him’ (South Africa 18991900 by Lieutenant-Colonel H.R. Kelham refers). Appointed as Adjutant to the Lanark Volunteer Rifles, May 1905, he was promoted Major in August 1908 and re-joined his original Battalion in India in November of that year, and was present at the Delhi Durbar in 1911, where he was one of four Officers from the Regiment (all subsequently Killed in

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Major C.E. Andrews action) who received the Regiment’s new Colours from H.M. King George V. Transferred to the Reserve, December 1913; he re-joined on the outbreak of the Great War and served as Second-in-Command of the 11th (Service) Battalion, H.L.I, and served with the Battalion on the Western Front from May 1915; Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazette 1.1.1916), Major Andrews was killed in action whilst commanding the Battalion in Le Sars sector, 25.10.1916, and is buried in Peake Wood Cemetery, France.

51 Pair: Private J. Middleton, Royal Berkshire Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (5010 Pte. J. Middleton, 2nd. Rl. Berks: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (5010 Pte. J. Middleton. Rl: Berks: Regt.), contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £110-130

49 Pair: Private M. Moss, Connaught Rangers Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal (3707 Pte. M. Moss. 1st. Connaught Rang:); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3707 Pte. M. Moss. Con: Rang:), very fine (2) £120-150

52 Family Group: Four: Private G.G. Hargraves, 4th Dragoon Guards, Late East Surrey Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (2167 Pte. G. Hargraves. E. Surrey Regt.); 1914 Star (5369 Pte. G.G. Hargreaves. 4/D. Gds.); British War and Victory Medals (5369 Pte. G.G. Hargraves. 4-D. Gds.), mounted as worn, nearly very fine, with a 4th Dragoon Guards Rifle Club prize medal, bronze, the reverse engraved ‘Presented to Pte. G. Hargraves by the 4th Dragoon Gds. Rifle Club 1915’ Pair: Trooper G.G. Hargraves, Royal Armoured Corps Defence Medal (G.G. Hargraves Tpr 7686836 R.A.C.); War Medal (Tpr G.G. Hargraves 7686836 R.A.C.), both impressed ‘Boots style’, good very fine (6) £140-180

50 Five: Gunner H. Abrey, Royal Garrison Artillery Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith (16064 Gnr: H. Abrey, 4th. M.B., R.G.A.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (16064 Gnr: H. Abrey. R.G.A.); 1914-15 Star (1963 Gnr. H. Abrey, R.G.A.); British War and Victory Medals (SR-1963 Gnr. H. Abrey. R.A.), generally very fine (5) £140-180

5369 Private G.G. Hargraves, served during the Great War on the Western Front from 31.10.1914; discharged 2.12.1915.

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53 53 Five: Lieutenant-Colonel W.S. Brown, Wiltshire Regiment, Wounded During the Boer War, He Subsequently Served on the Court Martial of Lieutenant ‘Breaker’ Morant; In the Great War he Commanded the 1st Battalion Until Killed in Action at the Battle of the Somme, 6.7.1916 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Transvaal, Wittebergen (Capt. W.S. Brown. 2/Wilts. Rgt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (Maj. W.S. Brown. Wilts. Rgt.); 1914-15 Star (Lt. Col. W.S. Brown. Wilts. R.); British War and Victory Medals (Lt. Col. W.S. Brown.), very fine or better (5) £600-800 Lieutenant-Colonel Walter Sidney Brown, born March 1871; educated at Harrow; served with the 7th (Militia) King’s Royal Rifle Corps; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Wiltshire Regiment, March 1892; promoted Lieutenant, January 1894; served in South Africa with the 2nd Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment during the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River, and Magersfontein; promoted Captain, February 1900, and served with the 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment during operations in the Cape Colony, February to May 1900, including the action at Colesberg, and in the Orange River Colony, May to June 1900, including the actions at Bethlehem and Wittebergen; severely wounded at Hobkirk’s Farm, 12.2.1900; Mentioned in Dispatches, and appointed Brevet Major, 22.8.1902. Whilst in South Africa, he sat as a board member on the Court Martial of Lieutenant ‘Breaker’ Morant, Bushveldt Carbineers, who stood accused with other officers of that unit of murdering Boer prisoners- Lieutenant Morant was found guilty and subsequently executed in one of the more celebrated incidents of the War. Served as Staff Captain, Western Counties Regimental District, and No.8 District, Southern Command, June 1905 to March 1908; Deputy Assistant Adjutant and Quarter Master General, Wessex (Territorial) Division, Southern Command, April 1908 to June 1909; promoted Major, January 1909; Appointed Commanding Officer and temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, 5th Battalion, Wiltshire Regiment, 19.8.1914; served with the Regiment on the Western Front during the Great War, and took command of the 2nd Battalion after the Battle of Neuve Chapelle. Appointed to the command of the 1st Battalion, 1.7.1915, at the outbreak of the Battle of the Somme he was the longest serving Wiltshire Battalion commander on the Western Front; killed in action at Thiepval, 6.7.1916, and is buried in Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood, France.

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54 54 A Fine Campaign Group of Six to Major D.A. Blair, Indian Army, Late Highland Light Infantry, Twice Mentioned in Despatches for the Boer War, In Which He Organized and Led the Gallant Defence of Commissie Bridge, 6.12.1900- ‘A Small Affair, But Still it Was Something For A Second Lieutenant to Have Beaten De Wet’ Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Modder River, Wittebergen (Lieut. D.A. Blair. 1/High. L.I.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (Lt. D.A. Blair. High. L.I.); 1914 Star, with copy Bar (Capt. D.A. Blair, 2/39/Garhl. Rfls.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. D.A. Blair), surname partially officially corrected; Defence Medal (Major D.A. Blair), impressed in large sans-serif capitals, generally good very fine, mounted court style as worn (6) £500-600 Major Douglas Alexander Blair, born July 1879; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Highland Light Infantry, October 1899; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa, and was present in the advance on Kimberley and the engagements at Modder River and Magersfontein, 11.12.1899, when the Battalion’s losses throughout the day were 2 Officers and 12 men killed and 7 Officers, including the Commanding Officer, and 73 men wounded; took part in operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900, and in the Orange River Colony, May to November 1900, including the actions at Wittebergen and Witpoort. Defence of Commissie Bridge In December 1900 half of ‘D’ Company, under Blair, was given the task of holding Commissie Bridge: ‘We found the Commissie Bridge to be a fine iron one about 200 yards long, supported by four massive stone pillars, and spanning the Caledon River, which there runs between high banks; therefore an important place to protect, for, although there is a drift a little higher up the river, the destruction of the bridge would have caused our forces a good deal of inconvenience had the Boers succeeded in blowing it up. The only buildings were a stone house, occupied by a native labourer connected with the bridge, and a tin one for the toll collector who had disappeared.’ (Recipient’s own account in the H.L.I. Chronicle, April 1901, refers). The defences consisted of four trenches covering either end of the bridge and four more from which fire could be directed up or down the gorge. Although Blair had been left alone with his Platoon of 40 men in this remote spot for some weeks, he was evidently keeping a sharp look-out, so that when, on the 6th December, scouts of De Wet’s advanced guard arrived they were immediately spotted: ‘The Boer Scouts having reported the bridge held, the advanced guard of some 300 men attempted to cross at a point where the gorge levelled out lower down, but were frustrated by the enfilade fire which Blair opened on them and withdrew out of range. An envoy under a flag of truce then arrived, was halted some distance away, and then brought in blindfolded. He handed Blair a written order from De Wet to surrender within ten minutes, but was sent back a reply which was, the Cape Times stated “a sarcastic one”. The Boers then brought up two of the guns which they had captured at Dewetsdorp and bombarded the defences at either side of the bridge, while their riflemen dismounted and endeavoured to work forward from three sides. Unable to make any headway, they then desisted for a while and finally renewed the attack from in front in considerable force, but could get no closer than 300 yards. Finally they drew off discomforted, having been held up by Blair and his men for 24 hours. Hector MacDonald in his official report of this incident stated that “Second Lieutenant Blair’s presence of mind and resolution are in the General’s opinion worthy of all praise”. It may only have been a small affair, in which Blair and his Platoon did no more than their plain duty, but still it was something for a Second Lieutenant to have beaten De Wet.’ (Proud Heritage, The Story of the Highland Light Infantry, by Lieutenant Colonel Oates refers). Promoted Lieutenant, 2.1.1901, and Twice Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 7.5.1901 and 10.9.1901); Blair transferred to the Indian Army, November 1903, and initially joined the 2nd (King Edward’s Own) Gurkha Rifles before moving, prior to the outbreak of the Great War, to the 39th Garhwal Rifles. Served during the Great War on the Western Front, promoted Major, September 1915, and appointed a Regimental Company Commander, March 1916. PROVENANCE:

Spink, November 1998

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55 Six: Warrant Officer Class I J. Alexander, Highland Light Infantry Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Modder River (3506 Serjt: J. Alexander. Highland L.I.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3506 Serjt: J. Alexander. Highland L.I.); 1914-15 Star (3506 C.Sjt. (A.S.Mjr.) J. Alexander. High: L.I.), number officially corrected; British War and Victory Medals (3506 W.O. Cl.1 J. Alexander. High. L.I.), VM lacking recipient’s initial; Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (3506 C. Sjt: J. Alexander. H.L.I.), light contact marks to QSA and KSA, otherwise good very fine or better (6) £300-350 3506 Warrant Officer Class I John Alexander, enlisted in the Highland Light Infantry, 1892; promoted Corporal, July 1893; Sergeant, November 1895; granted Certificate, School of Musketry, Hythe, June 1899; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa and wounded at Magersfontein, 11.12.1899, when the Battalion’s losses throughout the day were 2 Officers and 12 men killed and 7 Officers, including the Commanding Officer, and 73 men wounded- Corporal John Shaul, in charge of the Battalion’s stretcher-bearers, was awarded the Victoria Cross at Magersfontein for most conspicuous gallantry during the day in dressing men’s wounds out in the open under continuous heavy fire, in one instance ‘as calmly as if there had been no enemy near’; promoted Colour Sergeant, July 1903.

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56

56 Four: Lieutenant Commander R.W. White, Royal Naval Reserve Transport Medal 1899-1902, two clasps, China 1900, S. Africa 1899-1902 (R.W. White.); 1914-15 Star (Lt. Commr. R.W. White, R.N.R.); British War and Victory Medals (Lt. Commr. R.W. White. R.N.R.), edge bruise to first, otherwise nearly extremely fine (4) £800-1,000 Lieutenant Commander Reginald William White, served as 3rd Officer on the British India (Steam Lines) Ship Pundua, employed in the transport service 1899-1902; Commissioned temporary Lieutenant Commander, 2.8.1915, and commanded the British India Steam Navigation Company’s vessel S.S. Lunka, fitted out as an armed boarding steamer, during the Great War; relinquished command, 12.3.1917.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 58 Four: Engine Room Artificer A.G. Stuart, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (M.15436, A.G. Stuart, Act. E.R.A.4., R.N.); British War Medal (M.15436 A.G. Stuart. E.R.A.2 R.N.); Mercantile Marine War Medal (Andrew G. Stuart); Victory Medal (M.15436 A.G. Stuart. E.R.A.2 R.N.), good very fine Three: Able Seaman F.R. Long, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (J.38983, F.R. Long, Boy.1., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (J.38983 F.R. Long. A.B., R.N.), worn, good fine Three: Fireman G.J. Laxton, Mercantile Marine Reserve British War Medal (G.J. Laxton. Fmn. M.M.R.); Mercantile Marine War Medal (G.J. Laxton); Victory Medal (G.J. Laxton. Fmn. M.M.R.), nearly extremely fine (10) £80-120

Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic L.W. Barnes

57 Family Group: Five: Stoker Petty Officer B. Barnes, Royal Navy, Later Royal Fleet Reserve Naval General Service 1915-62, G.V.R., one clasp, Persian Gulf 1909-1914 (312459. B. Barnes, Sto. 1Cl. H.M.S. Philomel.); 1914-15 Star (312459, B. Barnes, S.P.O., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (312459 B. Barnes. S.P.O. R.N.); Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (312459 (PO.B. 9633) B. Barnes. S.P.O. R.F.R.), good very fine, with a portrait photograph of the recipient Five: Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic L.W. Barnes, Royal Navy 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 Bar; Burma Star; War Medal, good very fine, with the following related documents &c.: - The recipient’s parchment Certificate of Service - The recipient’s History Sheet for Stoker Ratings and Recommendations for Advancement and Conduct Record Sheet - The recipient’s Passing Certificate for Stoker Petty Officer and Interim Trade Certificate - The recipient’s Ancient Order of Shellbacks Certificate (10) £250-300

59 Four: Corporal F. Mansbridge, Coldstream Guards 1914-15 Star (12679 Pte. F. Mansbridge. C.Gds:); British War and Victory Medals (12679 Cpl. F. Mansbridge. C.Gds.); Coronation (Metropolitan Police) 1902, bronze (P.C. G. Mansbridge. T. Div.), nearly very fine, with the recipient’s Silver War Badge, lacking pin, the reverse impressed ‘134699’ (4) £80-120 12679 Corporal F. Mansbridge, born 1883; died 12.7.1966.

60 Four: Ordinary Seaman A.L. May, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (L.3908. A.L. May, O.S.2., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (L.3908 A.L. May. O.S.1 R.N.); Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (L.3908 A.L. May. O.S.1. H.M.S. Ramillies.), light pitting to BWM, nearly very fine or better (4) £70-90 L.3908 Ordinary Seaman Alwyne Llewellyn May, born Truro, Cornwall, September 1890; enlisted in the Royal Navy, 27.8.1912; posted to H.M.S. Actaeon, 6.6.1913; transferred to H.M.S. Dido, 25.6.1917; further postings included to H.M.S. Ramillies, 27.1.1927; awarded L.S. & G.C., 1927; discharged, 28.12.1928.

Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic Leonard Walter Barnes, born Mortlake, Surrey, 11.9.1919; enlisted in the Royal Navy, 24.4.1939; service during the Second World War included in H.M.S. Suffolk, September 1939 to April 1941, H.M.S. Lucifer, October 1941 to July 1942; H.M.S. Cormorant, July 1942 to March 1943; and H.M.S. Hannibal, April 1943 to March 1944; advanced Stoker Petty Officer, 10.8.1944; Petty Officer Stoker Mechanic, 2.5.1947; discharged, 7.12.1952.

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN 61 Three: Able Seaman A. Noble, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 1914-15 Star (CZ-603, A. Noble. A.B., R.N.V.R.); British War and Victory Medals (C.Z. 603 A. Noble. A.B. R.N.V.R.), good very fine, with a small portrait photograph of the recipient framed in a gilt fob (3) £100-140 CZ-603 Able Seaman Andrew Noble, born Fraserburgh, April 1894; enlisted in the Clyde Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 6.10.1914; served with the Royal Naval Division in Gallipoli from April 1915; wounded by a gunshot wound to the head, 1.5.1915; wounded a second time by a severe gun-shot wound to the leg and chest, 13.7.1915; discharged on medical grounds, 6.5.1916; received War gratuity of £8, 10/-, 26.2.1919

62 Three: Corporal T.P. White, Royal Artillery 1914-15 Star (53999. Gnr. T.P. White, R.H.A.); British War and Victory Medals (53999 Cpl. T.P. White. R.A.), very fine, with the recipient’s Royal Life Saving Society bronze medal, the reverse engraved ‘Gr. T.P. White June 1914’ Pair: Private F.W. Carter, London Regiment British War and Victory Medals (1409 Pte. F.W. Carter. 23-Lond. R.), very fine Pair: Airman P.J. Rundle, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (26601. 2.A.M. P.J. Rundle. R.A.F.), good very fine Second World War Medals (5), 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star, the first a later issue, good very fine (12) £80-120

Able Seaman A. Noble

65 Pair: Driver J. Smythe, Army Service Corps British War and Victory Medals (T4-234243 Dvr. J. Smythe. A.S.C.), extremely fine, with named card box of issue British War Medal (2) (L.Z.4170 A.E. Miller. Sig. R.N.V.R.; 379 Sjt. F.J. Walburn. E. Surr. R.), very fine Second World War Medals (6), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; Defence Medal; War Medal, generally good very fine (10) £60-80

63 Three: Private C. Gough, Army Service Corps 1914-15 Star (M2-101676. Pte. C. Gough, A.S.C.); British War and Victory Medals (M2-101676 Pte. C. Gough. A.S.C.), very fine, with the recipient’s National Fire Brigades Association Long Service Medal, bronze, two clasps, Ten Years, Five Years, second clasp loose on riband (11703 Charles Gough) Three: Private W.J. Belcher, Army Service Corps 1914-15 Star (M2-149292. Pte. W.J. Belcher, A.S.C.); British War and Victory Medals (M2-149292 Pte. W.J. Belcher. A.S.C.), good very fine (7) £70-90

379 Sergeant Frederick Joseph Walburn, born Brixton, London; served with the 7th Battalion, East Surrey Regiment during the Great War on the Western Front; killed in action, 13.8.1916, on which date the Battalion was involved in an attack north of Ovillers, in which they met strong enemy fire and heavy bombing and suffered 169 casualties, and is buried in Pozieres British Cemetery, France.

64 Three: Private J. Hursey, London Regiment British War and Victory Medals (1589. Pte. J. Hursey. 7-Lond.R.); Territorial Force War Medal (1589 Pte. J. Hursey. 7 Lond.R.), nearly very fine (3) £100-140

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Flight Sergeant N.A. Lacey-Johnston 66 A Poignant Group of Three to Flight Sergeant N.A. Lacey-Johnston, Royal Air Force, Killed in Action In the Raid on Mailly-le-Camp, 4.5.1944, His First and Only Operational Sortie of the War 1939-1945 Star; Air Crew Europe Star; War Medal, extremely fine, with the following related items: - Air Council enclosure, named to ‘F/Sgt. N.A. Lacey Johnson’ - The recipient’s Royal Air Force Navigator’s brevet - Mailly-le-Camp 50th Anniversary of the Bombardment by the Royal Air Force commemorative medallion 1994 - One of the Many, an Account of the events leading to the death of F/Sgt. N.A. Lacey-Johnson, by Lieutenant-Colonel L. Lacey-Johnson, the recipient’s brother - A comprehensive file of research, including many letters from the recipient’s brother (lot) £200-300 1576434 Flight Sergeant Nigel Arthur Lacey-Johnson, born Birmingham; enlisted in the Royal Air Force, 8.7.1941; advanced Sergeant Navigator, 13.2.1943; promoted Flight Sergeant, 13.2.1944; after three years of training posted to No.101 Squadron (Lancasters), Ludford Magna, Lincolnshire, 12.4.1944; his first and only operational sortie of the War with the Squadron was the raid on Mailly-le-Camp, 3.5.1944 Raid on Mailly-le-Camp The decision to bomb Mailly was part of the change in bombing strategy in the early part of 1944, when preparations for Operation Overlord required that every effort should be made to minimise the German capabilities for reinforcement of the forthcoming invasion area. The target for the raid was a German military depot housing the major part of the 21st Panzer Division. A force of 495 Lancasters, including 20 from No.101 Squadron took part in the raid. Lacey-Johnson’s crew took off from Ludford Magna at approximately 22:00 hours on the 3rd May 1944 and crossed the French coast at Dieppe. German night fighters soon appeared once the coast was crossed, attacking them nearly all the way to the target area. The target was successfully marked by low level pathfinder Mosquitos backed up by Lancaster marker aircraft under the command of Marker Leader Wing Commander G.L. Cheshire. The main attack commenced just after midnight, with No.101 Squadron in the second wave at about 00:30 hours on the 4th May. In all approximately 1,500 tons of bombs were dropped from heights of around 8,000 feet with great accuracy. 114 barrack buildings, 47 transport sheds, and some ammunition buildings were hit, 102 vehicles, including 37 tanks were destroyed, and 218 German soldiers, mostly Panzer N.C.O.s, were killed and 156 wounded. But a delay in starting the attack had brought most of the German night fighters to the area, and the highest casualties occurred during and shortly after the attack when the bombers were on their way home. Lacey-Johnson’s aircraft fell victim to a German night fighter, and was shot down over the town of Voué. The future Mayor of Voué described the air battle as terrible, ‘with aircraft exploding in the air and falling in pieces over a large area.’ His account of Lacey-Johnson’s aircraft was that ‘it was in flames and exploded at 1,500 feet. The remains of the crew were collected by the French and buried secretly by the Catholic Priest of Voué.’ (One of the Many refers). Lacey-Johnson was buried with his crew in Voué churchyard; in 1991, to mark the 47th Anniversary of the raid, the French authorities erected a permanent memorial to honour those crews, some 42 in all, that were lost in the attack. The unveiling ceremony was attended by amongst others Group Captain Leonard Cheshire, V.C., O.M., D.S.O., D.F.C., and Lieutenant-Colonel Lionel Lacey-Johnson, the brother of Flight Sergeant Nigel Lacey-Johnson.

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67 The Second War ‘Commando’ Group of Six Attributed to Captain G.J. Jones, No. 6 Commando, Late Hampshire Regiment 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star, with 1st Army Bar; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf, extremely fine, with the following related items: - The recipient’s Commando ‘Fighting Knife’, by Wilkinson, with scrolled blade inscriptions, ‘No. 6 Commando’ and ‘Capt. G. Jones’, complete with metal-tipped leather scabbard - The recipient’s related miniature awards, the Africa Star lacking 1st Army Bar, mounted in a glazed display frame - The recipient’s Mentioned in Despatches Certificate, date 21.4.1944, housed in a glazed display frame - War Office letter to the recipient on the occasion of his release from active duty, granting him the honorary rank of Captain, dated 16.7.1946 - Letter from the recipient to his sister, dated 28.3.1945, written on German writing paper - The recipient’s Old Comrades Association of Army Commandos membership booklet - Group photograph of the recipient (6) £400-500

68 Five: Major L.J. Ghost [M.V.O.], Royal Artillery, Later Clerk of the Board of Green Cloth Verge of the Palaces 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals, extremely fine, with the following related items: - Card box of issue for the Second War awards, addressed to ‘Major L.J. Ghost, 17, Carlisle Street, Soho Square, W1’ - The recipient’s Mentioned in Despatches Certificate, dated 23.5.1946 - Central Chancery letter informing the recipient that he has been appointed a Member of the Fourth Class of the Royal Victorian Order, dated 24.11.1983 - Various letters and enclosures relating to the Royal Victorian Order and the Board of the Green Cloth Verge of the Palaces (5) £60-80 M.V.O. London Gazette 31.12.1983 Leonard John Gost M.I.D. London Gazette 23.5.1946 Maj. (temp.) L.J. Ghost (233027), Royal Regiment of Artillery ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the Mediterranean Theatre.’ Major Leonard John Ghost, M.V.O., Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery 16.4.1942; served during the Second World War, advanced Major and Mentioned in Despatches; after the War changed his name to Gost, 11.3.1948, and served as Clerk to the Board of Green Cloth Verge of the Palaces; retired October 1983, and appointed a Member (Fourth Class) of the Royal Victorian Order on retirement.

M.I.D. London Gazette 27.4.1944 Lt. G.J. Jones (153962), Hampshire R. ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in the field.’ Captain Gerald James Jones, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Hampshire Regiment, 26.10.1940; served with the 2nd Battalion during the Second World War; taken Prisoner of War at Tebourba, North Africa, ‘before escaping and re-joining the Army in No. 6 Troop Commando’ (accompanying handwritten note refers); subsequently took part in the advance through Germany: ‘The War is going first class over here, and all the boys are in fine fettle- if we can’t beat the Russians to Berlin I’ll give up soldiering and start a girl’s school’ (Letter from the recipient, dated 28.3.1945 refers); released from active service with the rank of Captain, 16.7.1946.

The Board of the Green Cloth comprised officials of the Royal Household, among them the Lord Steward, Treasurer and Comptroller, and took its name from the green baize that covered the table at which the members met. Among other duties the Board audited accounts and made royal travel arrangements.

For the action at Tebourba in December 1942 Captain H. W. Le Patourel, 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment was awarded the Victoria Cross.

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Captain J.H. Wansey-Jackson crossing the Ardennes, December 1944

69 A Fascinating and Well-Documented Second War Group of Four to Auster Pilot Captain J.H. Wansey-Jackson, Royal Artillery, attached No. 652 (Air Observation Post) Squadron, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals, about extremely fine, with the recipient’s scrapbook, covering his career from the Normandy landings through to post-war Germany as a member of the B.A.O.R., the contents including his handwritten monthly reports; over 250 photographs, many being air-to-ground intelligence shots taken from No. 652 Squadron’s Austers, but also including a fine series of pictures taken in the chaos of immediate post-war Germany; various assorted banknotes, newspaper cuttings, and leaflets; a signed receipt for ‘1 - Mercedes Benz’, delivered by Wansey-Jackson to H.Q., 31st A.A. Artillery Brigade, 21.5.1945; examples of German and Allied ‘anti-radar paper’ from the Caen battlefront; and several embroidered unit shoulder flashes, among them a most unusual and rare ‘Three Witches’ badge of I.S.9 (Western European Area), a component of M.I.9 (4) £500-600

Captain Jeffrey Howard Wansey-Jackson, born October 1919; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, 19.10.1940. Promoted Lieutenant, 17.4.1942, he qualified as a pilot in Austers and joined the strength of No. 652 (Air Observation Post) Squadron, Royal Air Force, in readiness for the Normandy invasion. The unit’s priority task was to spot for Allied artillery, work that sometimes entailed drawing enemy fire to reveal their gun positions: ‘We landed with Ground Party at H+5 on D-Day 6 June 1944, near Arromanches at a little village called Courseilles. Throughout the month we remained in the small bridgehead after an unpleasant little battle with the Radar Station at La Deliverande- an enemy pocket. Our first Advanced Landing Ground at Beny-sur-Mer proved too hot and we moved to Reviers... During the month [July] the Yank Fortesses bombed Caen and my Auster got a few holes in it from exploding ammunition. We leave 3rd Canadian Division and go to 6th Airborne Division, and then to 49 (W.R.) Division’ (Recipient’s scrapbook refers). Wansey-Jackson moved with his unit onto Belgium and Holland and was involved in operations on the River Maas, while in December 1944, as a result of the Ardennes offensive, its Auster pilots were rushed down to ‘plug the gap - flying furiously throughout Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and on till the end of the month’ (ibid). In late January 1945, after further flying in the Roer sector in support of 12 Corps ‘one of our pilot’s got the D.F.C. for his work in this battle’ (ibid) he returned to the United Kingdom on leave, but he was back on active service in the following month, this time employed in a clandestine role: ‘Spent most of the month on cloak and dagger work, intermingled with a little shooting on the banks of the Maas. We are in a large “Luny Bin” but quite comfortable. Weather throughout the month atrocious!’ (ibid). He continued his ‘cloak and dagger work’ in March and made contact with members of I.S. 9 (Western European Area), a component of M.I. 9, a unit charged during this period with rounding up and taking witness statements from British P.O.W.s as the Allies advanced, and also for getting members of the Dutch Resistance to carry out intelligence gathering missions. He ended the War at Wilhelmshaven, having latterly returned to spotter duties with a Polish Armoured Division. Promoted Captain, 18.10.1946, he was attached to Headquarters, B.A.O.R. post-War, and played a role in support of the Berlin Airlift, as well as serving with No.2 Reconnaissance Squadron: ‘We mapped all Russian occupied Germany and the Russians didn’t know’ (ibid), before retiring, 30.4.1949. PROVENANCE:

Penhall Collection, September 2006.

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Scarisbrick competing for Great Britain at the 2002 Winter Olympics

Sergeant N.J. Scarisbrick

70 An Unusual ‘2002 Winter Olympics’ Group of Three to Sergeant N.J. Scarisbrick, Royal Tank Regiment, and the Driver of the British Bobsleigh Team Iraq 2003, no clasp (24797029 Cpl N J Scarisbrick RTR); Jubilee 2002; Army Long Service & G.C., E.II.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (Sgt N J Scarisbrick RTR 24797029), extremely fine, the latter two in boxes of issue, with the following related items: - XIX Olympic Winter Games Commemorative Plaque, Salt Lake City 2002, bronze, in wooden presentation box inscribed with the Olympic rings - The recipient’s Armed Forces Veterans lapel badge - Copy of Tank magazine, June 2002, featuring an article on the recipient’s Olympic experiences - Photograph of the recipient in Iraq (3) £500-700 Sergeant Neil J. Scarisbrick, born 6.6.1970; represented Great Britain in the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics in both the two-man and four-man bobsleigh teams, as the driver of both sleds; subsequently served with the Royal Tank Regiment in Iraq.

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A COLLECTION OF VOLUNTEER MEDALS THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN Due to the uncertainty that exists with the original provenance and manufacture of some early engraved Volunteer Medals, the following 70 Lots are sold as viewed.

71 71 Royal Regiment of Artillery 1821 A large impressive circular, convex medal, 83mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1821), with integral struck floriate rim interspersed with roses, obverse centre engraved with the Royal Arms, Artillery Cannon and motto below, reverse inscribed ‘Won by Sergt. James Bruce, Royal Regiment of Artillery, at Woolwich, 14th. June 1821.’, minor dinting therefore very fine, with integral silver floriate suspension loop £350-400 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911

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72 73 Bethnal Green Volunteer Infantry 1803 A finely-struck circular medal, by P. Wyon, 50mm, silver, obverse featuring Britannia standing on dragon holding olive branch aloft and inscribed ‘England’s Perseverance Dethroned Buonaparte’, reverse inscribed ‘Bethnal Green Volunteer Infantry’ above and ‘Lt. Col Carrick’ below, oak and laurel wreath surround, the centre inscribed ‘Enrolled 13th. Aug. 1803, and Disembodied at the General Peace of Europe, 24th. June 1814.’, nearly extremely fine £120-150

72 Bethnal Green Volunteer Infantry 1803 A finely-struck circular medal, by P. Wyon, 50mm, silver, obverse featuring Britannia standing on dragon holding olive branch aloft and inscribed ‘England’s Perseverance Dethroned Buonaparte’ and additionally neatly engraved in field ‘Robt. Bone’, reverse inscribed ‘Bethnal Green Volunteer Infantry’ above and ‘Lt. Col Carrick’ below, oak and laurel wreath surround, the centre inscribed ‘Enrolled 13th. Aug. 1803, and Disembodied at the General Peace of Europe, 24th. June 1814.’, nearly extremely fine, a scarce named example of this medal £180-220 Presented in silver by Lieutenant Colonel Carrick to members of his Command. PROVENANCE:

Stanley Gibbons 1972

73

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74 75 Loyal Birmingham Light Horse Volunteers 1798 A circular struck medal, 40mm, bronze, obverse featuring Peace seated by column inscribed ‘LBLHV BLA’ handing sprig of olive to a cupid, inscribed ‘Ducit Amor Patriae’ above, ‘Instituted June 1797’ in exergue, reverse featuring crossed Union Flag and Pennant behind crowned pedestal inscribed ‘Struck to commemorate the Presentation of Colours to the Birmingham Loyal Association June 4 1798’, extremely fine £100-120

74 Loyal Birmingham Light Horse Volunteers 1798 A circular struck medal, 40mm, gilt-bronze, obverse featuring Peace seated by column inscribed ‘LBLHV BLA’ handing sprig of olive to a cupid, inscribed ‘Ducit Amor Patriae’ above, ‘Instituted June 1797’ in exergue, reverse featuring crossed Union Flag and Pennant behind crowned pedestal inscribed ‘Struck to commemorate the Presentation of Colours to the Birmingham Loyal Association June 4 1798’, retaining almost all original gilt, good very fine £150-180

75

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76 76 Loyal Birmingham Light Horse Volunteers 1798 A circular struck medal, 40mm, bronze, obverse featuring Peace seated by column inscribed ‘LBLHV BLA’ handing sprig of olive to a cupid, inscribed ‘Ducit Amor Patriae’ above, ‘Instituted June 1797’ in exergue, reverse featuring crossed Union Flag and Pennant behind crowned pedestal inscribed ‘Struck to commemorate the Presentation of Colours to the Birmingham Loyal Association June 4 1798’, the edge engraved in running script ‘Edward Jones. Flautist.’, good very fine, with swivel ring suspension £100-120

77 Birmingham Loyal (Volunteers) Association 1802 A fine circular struck medal, 48mm, silver, obverse featuring Peace awarding a medal to a Roman soldier, City of Birmingham in background ‘For True Patriotism’ above, ‘Peace MDCCCII’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to Jno. Jones 6th. Compy. Birmm. Loyl. Associat. by the Town of Birmingham May XXVIII MDCCCII’ all within laurel wreath, neatly plugged below suspension ring, otherwise good very fine, with later silver ring suspension £150-180

PROVENANCE:

Stanley Gibbons 1980

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78 79 Birmingham Loyal (Volunteers) Association 1802 A fine circular struck medal, 48mm, silver, obverse featuring Peace awarding a medal to a Roman soldier, City of Birmingham in background ‘For True Patriotism’ above, ‘Peace MDCCCII’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to Corpl. Michl. Smith 1st. Compy. Birmm. Loyl. Associatn. by the Town of Birmingham May XXVIII MDCCCII’ all within laurel wreath, good very fine, with applied silver ring suspension £150-180

78 Birmingham Loyal (Volunteers) Association 1802 A fine circular struck medal, 48mm, silver, obverse featuring Peace awarding a medal to a Roman soldier, City of Birmingham in background ‘For True Patriotism’ above, ‘Peace MDCCCII’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to Lieutt. Josh. Randell L.B.L.H.V. by the Town of Birmingham May XXVIII MDCCCII’ all within laurel wreath, some edge bruising, otherwise nearly very fine £150-180 A Joseph Randall is listed in ‘Yeomanry Volunteers 1804’ (War Office 1804), advanced from Lieutenant, September 1803, and noted as serving with the Birmingham (Loyal) 2nd Battalion. Lieutenant Joseph Randell served with the Loyal Birmingham Light Horse Volunteers.

79

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80 80 Royal Bristol Volunteers 1816 A somewhat ovoid struck medal, 55mm x 36mm, silver, obverse featuring Bristol Coat of Arms, ‘Royal Bristol Volunteers’ inscribed above and ‘In Danger Ready’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Imbodied for the Maintenance of Public Order & Protection of their fellow Citizens of the Threat of Invasion by France MDCCXCVII. Revived at the Renewal of Hostilities MDCCCIII. Disbanded when the Deliverance of Europe was Accomplished by the Perseverance and Magnanimity of Great Britain and Her Allies MDCCCXIV’ in centre, ‘GR’ above and ‘Pro Patria’ below, nearly extremely fine and one of the most intricate obverse strikings seen on a Volunteer award £120-140

81 Buckinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry Horse 1821 A circular struck medal, 35mm, silver, obverse featuring a laureated head of George IV and inscribed ‘Georgius IIII D.G. Britanniarum Rex F.D.’ around, reverse featuring three godesses attending the crowning of the King, ‘Proprio Jam Jure Animo Paterno’ above, ‘Inauguratus die Julii XIX Anno MDCCCXXI’ in exergue, edge engraved ‘Robt. Jarvis 1st. Reg. B.Y.C.H.’, edge bruise, very fine, pierced as issued with ring suspension £140-180 These interesting and understated awards were made in imitation of the official Pistrucci Coronation Medal to the order of the Colonel of the Buckinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry Horse for the members of his command who lined the Coronation route but who did not receive the official medal.

PROVENANCE:

Baldwin 1971

81

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82 83 14th (Buckinghamshire) Regiment of Foot 1818 A circular engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 43mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1818), obverse featuring a spirited horse in full gallop, ‘14th. Regiment Foot’ inscribed above, ‘Nec Aspera Terrent’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Regimental 100 Yards Shooting Prize won by Quarter-Master Wm. Harris 1818’, some dints, otherwise very fine, with silver loop suspension £140-180

82 Buckinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry Horse 1821 A circular struck medal, 35mm, silver, obverse featuring a laureated head of George IV and inscribed ‘Georgius IIII D.G. Britanniarum Rex F.D.’ around, reverse featuring three godesses attending the crowning of the King, ‘Proprio Jam Jure Animo Paterno’ above, ‘Inauguratus die Julii XIX Anno MDCCCXXI’ in exergue, edge engraved ‘Jas. Side. 2d. Reg. B.Y.C.H.’, edge bruising, good very fine, pierced as issued with ring suspension £140-180

A Medal for Military Merit won by William Harris in April 1816 is referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, January 1972

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84 84 Bury (Lancaster) Volunteers 1803 A Maltese Cross, 61mm x 45mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1803), obverse engraved ‘Best Shot Prize Medal’ on arms of cross, central crown surrounded by ‘Bury Volunteers’, reverse engraved ‘Sir Robert Peel Bart., Lieut. Col. Commandant’ on top arm, ‘John Scholes 1803’ on bottom arm, very fine, with integral fitting for ring suspension £180-220

85 Cardiff Volunteer Artillery 1804 A large circular engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 60mm, silver, obverse featuring various cannon and other paraphernalia of war, ‘Cardiff Volunteer Artillery’ inscribed above, ‘Reward of Merit 1804’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to Thos. Jones by the Officers of the Battery’, nearly extremely fine, with integral ring suspension £240-280

Sir Robert Peel, 1st Bt., was the father of the better-known Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Bt., sometime Prime Minister and founder of the Metropolitan Police. Referenced in Hastings Irwin

Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, December 1975

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911

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86

86 Chatham and Gillingham Artillery Volunteers 1813 A large finely-engraved oval medal, with deeply embossed floriate border, 94mm x 70mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1813), obverse featuring Britannia seated amidst a swirl of clouds, holding a cannon-ball which radiates beams of light upon two soldiers standing left and right on guard, a marquee top partially open above the clouds, from which a lion and a unicorn look out, ‘Chatham and Gillingham Arty.’ engraved in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Prize Medal for the Best Shot of the Regiment the Gift of The Officers won by Mr. John Skillet September 1813’, nearly extremely fine, and exhibiting some of the most unusual artistry noted on any military award, with integral silver floriate loop suspension £300-350 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926 J.B. Hayward, November 1971

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87

87 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment of Foot 1785 A circular struck medal, 38mm, bronze-gilt, obverse featuring Hercules crowning a Roman soldier, ‘Order of Merit Established MDCCLXXXV’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Reward of Military Virtue from Lt. Col. Crosbie’ within two palm branches, ‘XXII or Cheshire Regiment’ around, retaining almost all original gilt, good very fine, with integral silver-gilt loop suspension £110-130

88 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment of Foot 1820 A circular struck medal, 35mm, silver, obverse featuring George III receiving a medal from Colonel Crosbie on the terrace at Windsor, the Castle in the background, ‘Established under Royal Sanction’ around, ‘1785’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Reestablished by Col: Sir H: Gough 1st. January 1820’ in centre, ‘Order of Merit 22nd Regiment’ around, minor edge bruise, therefore nearly extremely fine, with integral hinged-bar suspension, together with a similar striking in white metal, good very fine, lacking suspension (2) £140-180

Gilt-bronze Medal awarded for 10 years’ service. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, 1973

Silver Medal awarded for 14 years’ service White metal Medal awarded for 4 years’ service. PROVENANCE:

(i) J.B. Hayward, May 1971

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PROVENANCE:

90 Cumberland Rangers 1806 A circular engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 52mm, silver, obverse featuring crossed muskets with fixed bayonets with a crown and bugle between, ‘Cumberland Rangers’ inscribed above, ‘Best Shot at the Target’ below, reverse inscribed ‘First Prize at the Whitehaven Shooting Trials won by Mr. Josh. Chambers. Bandsman April 1806’, good very fine, with integral suspension ring £240-280

Midland Medals 1973

PROVENANCE:

89 Cumberland Militia 1778 A circular struck medal, 45mm, silver, obverse inscribed ‘Cumberland Militia’ above crown and ‘G.R. 1778’ within oakleaf wreath, the reverse featuring a Dragon within wreath inscribed ‘For Merit’, ‘Presented by Colonel James Lowther’ above, ‘Won by P. Taylor’ below, good very fine, with integral ring suspension ring £140-180

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward, 1972

90

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91 Dewsbury Light Horse Volunteers 1801 An oval finely-engraved medal with deeply embossed floriate border, 65mm x 42mm, silver, obverse featuring ram suspended from clouds, Coat of Arms below, inscribed ‘Dewsbury Light Horse Volunteers’ above, ‘Merit Rewarded’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to James Knowles by the Members of the Troop. A Reward for his Skill as a Swordsman and Proficiency at Military Exercises 1801’, good very fine, with silver ring suspension £240-280 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, July 1972

91

92 Diss Volunteer Infantry 1811 An oval engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 67mm x 50mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1811), obverse centre inscribed ‘G.R.’ with ‘Diss Volunteer Infantry’ around, surrounded by trophy of arms including cannon, balls, sword, standards, drum &c., ‘Reward of Merit 1811’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Awarded to Mr. Jabez Waller for Proficiency at the Military Exercises’, good very fine, with silver loop suspension £240-280 PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, August 1971

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94 Dukinfield Independent Riflemen 1807 A circular struck medal, 43mm, silver, obverse featuring a rifleman in a kneeling firing position, ‘Dukinfield Independent Riflemen’ inscribed around, ‘Embodied July XXII MDCCCIV’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Presented by Captain Francis Dukinfield Astley’ around, and ‘To Thespn. Hurst for firing the best at the Target March 2d. 1807’ within wreath in centre, some edge bruising, nearly very fine, pierced for suspension £140-180

93 Doddington and March Troop of Cavalry 1809 A most exquisite oval inscribed award with embossed floriate border, 58mm x 44mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1809), obverse featuring an Officer at ease in full Hussar-style uniform within laurel wreath, ‘Doddington & March Troop of Cavalry’ inscribed around, ‘Reward of Merit 1809’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Mr. John Matthews was awarded this Medal for his Great Proficiency as a Cavalryman’, minor dinting, otherwise good very fine, with integral floriate silver ring suspension £240-280

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 Colonel Murray Collection 1926 J.B. Hayward, August 1972

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911

94

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95 (Loyal) Edenside Rangers 1802 An oval engraved medal with embossed floriate border, 60mm x 43mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1802), obverse featuring a Crowned Garter inscribed ‘Loyal Edenside Rangers’ enclosing a bugle, ‘Fortiter et Recte’ above, reverse inscribed ‘To George Moss, a Token of Regard from Colnl. Henry Howard July 1802.’, nearly extremely fine, with integral silver floriate loop suspension £240-280 PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward, December 1975

95

96 (Royal) Edinburgh Volunteers 1804 An oval struck medal, 54mm x 42mm, silver-lemon gilt, obverse featuring a Rifleman standing at the firing position, ‘Best shot at ball practice’ inscribed above, ‘Given by the Society for the Defence of the Country’ in exergue, reverse featuring Crown and Garter with motto, ‘Alexr. Lawson 1st. Battn. 2d. Regt. R.E.V. 23 March 1804’ engraved within, minor edge bruising, good very fine, with integral ring suspension £180-220 Alexander Lawson won the Best Marksman Medal previously on 11th July 1801; this medal is referenced in Hastings Irwin

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97 Royal Flint Regiment 1807 A circular engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 56mm, silver, obverse inscribed ‘George Rex III’ above crown, ‘1807’ below, ‘Royal Flint Regiment’ on riband around, reverse inscribed ‘James Wilkie Best Shot wh. Ball at 100 Yards September Firings’, nearly extremely fine, with silver ring suspension £220-250

98 Central Regiment Glamorgan Local Militia 1810 A circular engraved medal, 33mm, silver, obverse featuring central Prince of Wales’s feathers within crown, surrounded by laurel leaves, ‘Reward of Merit Central Regt. Glamorgan Local Militia’ inscribed around, reverse inscribed ‘Won by Henry Thomas Capt. Morgan Davie’s Compy. 22nd. July 1810’, nearly very fine, with silver twisted loop suspension £150-180

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911

98

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99 99 37th (North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot 1801 An interesting, finely engraved, circular medal, 50mm, silver and gold, obverse featuring a central eight-sided gold filigree-work lozenge, with bugle, crossed flags, and drum within, flanked by ‘North Hampshire’ to the left, and ‘Regiment of Foot’ to the right, crossed rifles with fixed bayonets behind, Crowned rose above, and ‘37 1801’ below, all encompassed by alternate roses and crowns, reverse inscribed ‘1st Merit at Shooting awarded by Lieut. Colonel John Hope to Quartermaster Samuel Woodford’, this encompassed by similar alternate roses and crowns, edge bruise, therefore good very fine and highly decorated, with integral silver loop suspension £240-280

100 North Hampshire (Volunteers) 1843 A circular struck medal, 38mm, silvered-copper, obverse featuring a crowned circulet with ‘North Hampshire XXXVII’ at centre, surrounded by alternate roses, shamrocks, and thistles, ‘July 12th 1843’ below, reverse inscribed ‘The Best Marksman Light Company’ within laurel wreath, edge bruise, therefore very fine, with integral silver rings suspension £100-120

Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward, August 1971

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101 Loyal Honiton Volunteers 1796 A large circular engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 54mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1796), obverse featuring a crowned laurel wreath around ‘Merit Rewarded 1796’, surrounded by ‘Loyal Honiton Volunteers’, reverse inscribed ‘Quarterly Ball Firing Competition won by Captn. J. Townsend September 1796’, minor dinting, therefore very fine, with silver ring suspension £180-220 Captain James Townsend was advanced to Major, Commanding the Loyal Honiton Volunteers, September 1803. Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, June 1972

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102 103 King’s Royal Bodyguard Company 1822 A most unusual circular ‘Multi-Award’ engraved medal with finely decorated rim, 50mm, silver, obverse Prince of Wales’s feathers within crown and flanked by motto, hunting horn &c. below, ‘Royal King’s Body Guard Compy.’ inscribed around, reverse inscribed ‘Ball Firing Target 100 Yards’ in centre, ‘Wm. Egerton 21st. June 1822 XI’ at top, ‘W.W. Drake 5th July 1822 XX’ at side, ‘Wm. Egerton 30th August 1822 VIII’ at bottom, ‘W.W. Drake 21st. Decr. 1822 XXI’, at side, nearly extremely fine, with integral one piece ring suspension £200-240

102 Irvine Archers 1817 An oval medal with a reeded and decorated border, 50mm x 44mm, silver, obverse inscribed ‘Given by John Campbell of Ardoch to the Irvine Archers’, reverse inscribed ‘Prize Medal 1817 Shot for on 18th. Octr. 1817 and Won by John Dean Irvine.’, good very fine, with integral ring suspension £140-180

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

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104 104 Royal Liverpool Volunteers 1806 A finely engraved circular medal on a struck planchet with double-stepped rim, 40mm, silver, obverse featuring the Arms of Colonel Bolton, ‘Royal Liverpool Volunteers’ inscribed on riband below, reverse featuring a Royal Crown, and inscribed below ‘Lieut. Colonel Bolton to Corporal Williams for his Faithful Services August 25 1806’, edge bruise, therefore very fine, with silver loop suspension £130-150

105 Royal Liverpool Volunteers 1806 A finely struck circular medal with double-stepped rim, 40mm, silver, obverse featuring the Arms of Colonel Bolton, ‘Royal Liverpool Volunteers’ inscribed on riband below, reverse featuring a Royal Crown, and inscribed below ‘Lieut. Colonel Bolton to Sergeant Longworth for his Faithful Services August 25 1806’, all struck lettering except for recipient’s name, good very fine, with silver loop suspension £150-180

PROVENANCE:

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

J.B. Hayward, January 1972

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106 107 London (Loyal) Volunteers 2nd Company, 6th Regiment 1805 A fine quality deeply struck circular medal, 48mm, silver, obverse featuring laureated head of George III right, ‘G III R’ below, within heavy beaded border, reverse featuring a central drum with ‘VI Regt. L.L.V.’ inscribed, crossed Colours of the Union and the City of London, fasces below, inscribed above ‘From Sir Robert Wigram Bart. M.P. Lieut. Col. Commandant, Adjudged to Richard Winter.’, all surrounded by oak leaves, edge inscribed ‘Best Shot of the 2nd Company, 30th July 1805’, edge bruising, therefore good very fine, with silver ring suspension £200-240

106 Lochaber Rifle Volunteers 1869 A Maltese Cross, 2nd Volunteer Movement engraved award, 38mm, silver, obverse featuring a soldier in the kneeling firing position, ‘Lochaber Rifle Volunteers 1869’ engraved on arms, reverse inscribed ‘Presented by Henry Burrell’, very fine with silver ring suspension and reverse central brooch fitting £40-50

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911

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108 Duke of Gloucester’s Loyal Volunteers (Middlesex) 1804 A circular struck medal, 43mm, silver, obverse featuring Britannia seated, a lion couchant at her feet, presenting a palm branch to a soldier with rifle and fixed bayonet, reverse all engraved ‘Prize Medal the gift of Sir Wm. Pulteney Bt. won by Corporal Richard Cox Grenadier April 13, 1804’, surrounded by ‘Duke of Gloucester’s Loyal Volunteers’, good very fine, pierced with ring suspension £120-140

109 Acrotormentarian Society of Riflemen (Middlesex Rifle Volunteers) 1814 A circular finely casted and chased medal, 45mm, silver, obverse with central skull and crossbones surrounded by a serpent seemingly devouring itself and open laurel wreath, ‘Acrotormentarian’ engraved above, and ‘Society’ engraved below, reverse inscribed ‘R.L.V.R. Presented by the Acrotormentarian Society of Riflemen for Merit at Arms 1814.’, good very fine, with integral ring suspension £140-180

A similar medal won by a Corporal in the 4th Company, 13th April 1804 is referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926 Sotheby, January 1973

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111 Montgomeryshire Yeomanry Cavalry 1820 A well struck circular medal, 45mm, silver, obverse featuring a central Griffin standing, ‘Anorchfygol’ below, ‘Montgomeryshire Yeomanry Cavalry’ around, reverse featuring an oak leaf wreath, nearly extremely fine, with integral silver ring, clip, and bar suspension £150-180

110 Monmouthshire Volunteers 1798 An oval engraved medal with scalloped edge, 52mm x 40mm, silver, obverse featuring a central Royal Crown above ‘GR’, ‘Monmouthshire Volunteers 1798’ and laurel wreath around, reverse inscribed ‘Presented by Colonel Chas Morgan to Mr. Wm. Manning for his Great Services in raising this Regt to 1656.’, good very fine, with integral silver ring suspension £140-180

Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, July 1972

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112 112 Newcastle Volunteers 1806 A finely engraved circular medal, 46mm, silver (Hallmarks on edge indistinct), obverse featuring a Roman Centurion leading a Militiaman to a seated Britannia with lion couchant behind, reverse inscribed ‘Prize Medal presd. by Coll. Clennell to Mark Lambert, Rifle Compy. N.V.’, ‘Decr. 24 1806’ below, ‘England Expects Every Man to do his Duty’ around, some edge bruising and light contact marks, very fine, with silver ring suspension £180-220

113 48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot 1819 A circular engraved medal with single-stepped rim, 37mm, silver, obverse featuring a Royal Crown above ‘48’, ‘Thos. Davison.’ on central riband, ‘1819’ below, ‘Northamptonshire’ around, reverse inscribed ‘Oporto, Talavera, Albuera, Rodrigo, Badajos, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Orthes, Toulouse’, laurel leaves around, good very fine, with integral silver hinged suspension bar and M.G.S. riband £300-350

A similar medal to Thomas Johnson, Left Battalion, Newcastle Volunteers, 24th December 1806 is referenced in Hastings Irwin

A similar medal instituted in April 1819 is illustrated and referenced in Hastings Irwin to a different recipient. Hastings Irwin states that the reverse refers to the number of Peninsula Battles in which the recipient was engaged; these vary in number from 1 to 11.

PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, December 1975

PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, July 1972

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114 114 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot 1830 A circular engraved medal with heavystruck reeded edge, 44mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1830), obverse featuring a central grenade numbered ‘5’ dividing ‘Northumbd. Fusiliers 1830’, ‘Awarded to Corpl. C. Knuck’ below, reverse featuring a lily wreath with ‘Pro Merito’ inscribed in centre, good very fine, with integral ring and upper and lower silver riband bar suspension £140-180

115 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot 1818 A circular finely engraved medal with a triple-stepped edge, 50mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1818 on decorated suspension), obverse featuring a mounted St. George slaying the dragon, ‘Quo Fata Vocant’ inscribed above, ‘V Foot’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to John Watson by Coln. Sir C. Pratt, K.C.B., and the Officers of the Regiment. A Token of Regard May 1818’, nearly extremely fine, with decorated silver ring suspension £240-280 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, September 1971

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116 116 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot c.1840 A circular struck medal, 34mm, silver, obverse featuring a mounted St. George slaying the dragon, ‘Quo Fata Vocant’ on scroll above, reverse inscribed ‘V Northumberland Fusiliers Merit March 10th 1767 [date of institution]’, within laurel wreath, edge inscribed ‘No. 1948 Pte. T. Dixon. 1/5th Fus.’, very fine, with later ‘Indian Mutiny’ type silver swivel suspension £120-150

117 Nottinghamshire Yeomanry 1802 A well struck circular medal, 36mm, silver, obverse featuring a laureated bust of George III right, ‘Georgius III Rex’ above, ‘MDCCCII’ below, reverse featuring a green dale oak in centre, the oak in full flower with ‘Foi Loi Roi’ on trunk, ‘Notts Yeomanry’ above, minor contact marks, therefore very fine, with integral silver ring suspension £100-120 Also awarded in gold to Officers. Referenced in Hastings Irwin

The silver medal was awarded for 21 years’ service with the Regiment.

PROVENANCE:

Baldwin 1971

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118 118 Oxford Light Dragoons 1796 A circular engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 38mm, silver (Hallmarks for 1795), obverse featuring a cavalryman holding a bugle and banner inscribed with a crowned ‘GR’, ‘Oxford Light Dragoons’ above, crossed sabres and ‘Practice’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Prize First Troop the gift of Coln. Hon. Thos. Parker May 1st. 1796’, good very fine, with silver loop suspension £140-180

119 Prince of Wales’s Volunteers 1799 A circular engraved medal with single-stepped rim, 44mm, silver, obverse featuring a Royal Crown with Garter inscribed ‘Pro Rege et Patria’, ‘P.W.V.’ in central field, laurel wreath surround, reverse inscribed ‘Prize Medal for skill at Ball Practice awarded to Henry Brymer Best Shot 8th May 1799’, good very fine, with integral silver ring suspension £160-180 Referenced in Hastings Irwin

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926 Sotheby, January 1973

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward, July 1972

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120 95th (Rifle Brigade) Regiment of Foot 1807 A circular engraved medal, 37mm, silver, obverse featuring a Crowned bugle horn in centre, ‘95’ inscribed between suspension cords, surrounded by a Garter inscribed ‘Rifle Regiment’, reverse inscribed ‘Monte Video’, very fine, rare, with integral silver ring suspension £500-600 On the 13th June 1806 Major Gardner marched to Portsmouth with three Companies of the 2nd Battalion, 95th Regiment and embarked for Monte Video, as part of a force destined for service under Brigadier General Auchmuty in the South Americas. On the 16th January 1807 the troops landed and General Auchmuty immediately occupied the suburbs of Monte Video. On the 20th January the enemy in large force made a desperate sortie and the detachment of the 95th on this occasion lost five men killed and 25 wounded. A breach having been reported to the General as practicable, he resolved to take the town by storm. On the 3rd February, before daybreak, the attacking column was on the move, the Forlorn Hope being led by Captain Dickenson (95th Regiment) at the head of his own Company. After a desperate struggle with the defenders the British troops forced themselves into the town and the Union flag was soon raised above the walls of Monte Video. During the attack Captain Dickenson fell gloriously at the head of his Company; casualties were a further ten men killed, and two Officers and 19 men wounded. The riflemen engaged were specially thanked in General Orders. Eleven Sergeants received Silver Medals under the sanction of the Duke of York for their Gallantry on this occasion; similar medals were also awarded for other achievements. Referenced in Hastings Irwin

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121 121 Sadlers Sharpshooters 1802 A circular engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 52mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1802), obverse featuring a Militiaman in the standing firing position, military camp in background, ‘Sadlers Sharpshooters’ above, ‘Best Shot at Ball Practice’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Awarded to Corpl. Wm. Staples for the Best Target at 100 Yards September 30th 1802’, good very fine, with heavy silver scroll supported suspension ring £280-320

122 Sidmouth Loyal Artillery c.1801 A large circular engraved medal with integral silver roped border, 66mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1800), obverse inscribed ‘GR’ in centre, Royal Crown above, Cannon below, surrounded by laurel wreath, ‘Sidmouth Loyal Artillery’ on banner at top, reverse inscribed ‘First Prize adjudged to Gunner Geo. Smith for skill in Gun Practice’, very fine, with silver loop suspension £240-280

This medal is illustrated and referenced in Hastings Irwin

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward October 1971.

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123 124 West Somerset Yeomanry 1868 A circular 2nd Volunteer Movement struck medal, 35mm, silver, obverse featuring a mounted cavalryman, sabre at the ready, ‘West Somerset Yeomanry’ above, ‘W.H.B. Portman Coll.’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Awarded to Corpl. J. Slade Ilminster Troop for being best shot in the Regt. 1868’, edge bruising, therefore very fine, with contemporary silver swivel suspension £100-140

123 13th (1st Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot c.1830 A circular cast and chased uniface medal, 46mm, silver, obverse featuring a Sphinx with ‘Egypt’ inscribed on plinth and a Bugle horn inscribed ‘Ava’ and ‘Martinique’ with ‘XIII’ between suspension cords in centre, ‘Medal of Merit’ above, ‘For 14 Years Good Conduct’ below, reverse blank, very fine for issue, with a flattened loop suspension £120-150 Silver medals were awarded for 7, 10, or 14 Years’ Good Conduct; a Gold medal was awarded for 20 Years’ Good Conduct. Some of these awards are noted with the recipient’s name. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, January 1973

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125 125 Loyal Volunteers St. John’s Southwark 1799 A circular finely engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 49mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1799), obverse featuring Arms for Southwark in central field, lion and unicorn couchant left and right, ‘Pro Rege et Patria’ on scroll above, all encompassed by a Garter inscribed ‘Loyal Volunteers of St. John’s Southwark’, reverse inscribed ‘Given by the Corps of Loyal Volunteers of St. John’s Southwark to Joseph Knight one of their members for the Best Shot upon the second essay of the Corps with Ball Cartridge on Thursday Septr. 19th 1799’, nearly extremely fine, with silver loop suspension £280-320

126 Staffordshire Yeomanry 1840 A circular struck medal, 38mm, silver, obverse featuring a Royal Crown above a Staffordshire Knot in centre, ‘Queen’s Own Royal Yeomanry’ around, reverse inscribed ‘Firm and Constant’ in central field with oak leaf wreath, ‘Private Samuel Coates 1840’ inscribed around, minor edge bruising, therefore very fine, with steel clip and split ring suspension £120-140 Granted the title ‘Queen’s Own Royal Regiment of Staffordshire Yeomanry’ in 1838. Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, October 1971

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127

128 Loyal Tooting Volunteers 1811 A circular engraved medal with single-stepped rim, 42mm, silver (Hallmarks for 1810), obverse inscribed ‘The Reward of Merit’ within laurel wreath, reverse inscribed ‘The gift of Lieut. Coll. Hardy Inspg. Field Officer to Serjeant Overton Loyl. Tooting Volrs. 4 June 1811’, good very fine, with silver ring suspension £140-180

127 Surrey Rifle Volunteers 1813 An oval finely engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 58mm x 44mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1812), obverse featuring a defensive, patriotic lion astride a trophy of arms including cannon, Union flag, drum &c. on a bed of roses, ‘Surrey Rifle Volunteers’ above, ‘Merit Rewarded’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘The Gift of Cptn. Commandant John Dabbs to Mr. H.M. Young, Best Shot at Ball Practice June 1813’, good very fine, with integral flattened silver loop suspension £280-320 PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, October 1971

128

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130 Loyal United West and East Ham Volunteers 1799 A circular struck medal, 38mm, silver, obverse featuring a volunteer Militiaman standing at attention with rifle and fixed bayonet in front of trees and church, ‘The Loyal United West and East Ham Volunteers’ around, ‘Associated May 18 1798’ in exergue, reverse featuring central Coat of Arms flanked left and right by the Union flag and Royal Standard with ‘G.R.’, ‘Toy Apietetein Eneka’ above, ‘Deus Major Columna’ below, ‘For Preservation of Internal Peace our King and Constitution’ around, ‘Presented by Sr John Henniker Bt Stratford House Essex 1799’ in exergue, minor edge bruise, otherwise nearly extremely fine £140-160

129 Tower Hamlet Volunteers 1804 A circular engraved medal with double-stepped rim, 50mm, silver (Hallmarks for 1804), obverse inscribed ‘Ratcliff Division of Tower Hamlet Volunteers’ within wreath, reverse inscribed ‘The gift of Captn. Easum to Serjt. Balfour of the third Company being the best shot at Highbury Septr, 27 1804’, good very fine, pierced at top for suspension £140-180 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

130

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131 132 Westmoreland and Cumberland Yeomanry Cavalry c.1868 A circular 2nd Volunteer Movement finely struck medal, 37mm, silver, obverse featuring an attractive and youthful Queen Victoria left, surrounded by laurel leaves, ‘Westmoreland & Cumberland Yeomanry Cavalry’ around, reverse featuring two mounted Yeoman either side of a Coat of Arms, all on a decorated dais, ‘W.C.Y.C.’ within laurel wreath above, edge inscribed ‘Trumpeter W. Hogg. Whitehaven Troop.’, nearly extremely fine, pierced with ring and silver straight bar suspension £100-140

131 Royal Westminster Rifle Volunteers 1804 A large circular engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 55mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for 1803), obverse featuring a large portcullis, ‘R.W.R.V.’ above, reverse inscribed ‘Presented to the 5th Company by Major Twining Won May 15th 1804 by Mr. John Dunn.’, good very fine, pierced at top with ring suspension £240-280

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133 133 Westmoreland East and West Ward Volunteers 1809 A large oval engraved medal with embossed floral border, 65mm x 50mm, silver, obverse featuring a volunteer soldier standing presenting arms, ‘Westmoreland’ above, ‘East and West War Volunteers’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Won by Richd. Bellus. Lieut. 1809. The Best Shot’, nearly extremely fine, with integral silver ring suspension £280-320

134 Colonel Williams’ Corps of Volunteers 1800 A circular engraved medal with integral doublestepped rim, 42mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1800), obverse engraved with Coat of Arms featuring crossed foxes and inscribed ‘Colonel Williams’ above and ‘Corps of Volunteers’ below, reverse inscribed ‘J. Carey, Best Shot wh. Ball at 100Yds. August 1800’, minor dints, otherwise very fine, with integral suspension ring £120-140

Referenced in Hastings Irwin

PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, 1972

PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection 1926 J.B. Hayward, July 1972

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135

135 Worcester Loyal Volunteers 1799 A superb and highly decorated multi-faceted oval jewel, 67mm x 56mm, enamelled, contained within glazed lunettes held in a gold frame, obverse featuring a trophy of arms and Regimental flag in centre, wreath around, ‘A token of Respect from Major Forester June 4th 1799’ inscribed around edge on glazed lunette, reverse inscribed ‘W.L.V.’ within a wreath, all depicted in fine seed pearl work, on blue enamel, Royal Crown painted in gold on glazed lunette, obverse glazing cracked and repaired, otherwise good very fine and of the highest rarity, with integral gold top loop suspension £1,000-1,200 Referenced in Hastings Irwin

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137 Yarmouth Cavalry 1805 A circular engraved medal with single-stepped edge, 41mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1805), obverse featuring a mounted galloping cavalryman, sabre at ready, ‘Pro Rege et Patria’ inscribed above, ‘For Merit’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘Yarmouth Cavalry to Corpl. H. Curtis for Skill at Sword exercise Sept. 1805.’, good very fine, with silver-gilt ring suspension £160-180

136 Worlingworth Volunteers 1798 A circular struck medal, 38mm, silver, obverse featuring a volunteer soldier at attention with shouldered arms, a drum in the foreground, houses and tower with Union flag flying in background, reverse transposed, featuring a Crowned Garter with ‘For King and our Country’ inscribed, a heart surrounded by nine hands in central field, the whole surrounded by branches of roses, ‘1798’ above, ‘John Henniker Major Commt.’ below, edge inscribed ‘Robert Gooch’, edge bruising and heavy contact marks to obverse, therefore fine, reverse better, with applied ring suspension, this partially obscuring the recipient’s name £100-120

Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

Colonel Gaskell Collection 1911 J.B. Hayward, October 1971

137

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138 Yarmouth Volunteer Infantry 1803 A large oval engraved medal with triple-stepped rim, 71mm x 57mm, silver (Hallmarks for 1803), obverse featuring Britannia standing in a defiant pose, one hand on hip, the other supporting a spear, with the Union flag flying behind, lion couchant at feet, ‘Yarmouth Volunteer Infantry’ inscribed on riband below, reverse inscribed ‘The Best Shot of the Corps Mr. W. Jacobs 1803’, laurel wreath around, very fine £280-320 Referenced in Hastings Irwin PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, October 1971

138

139 Yorkshire Volunteers, 5th North Riding Regiment 1811 A large circular engraved medal with doublestepped rim, 57mm, silver, obverse featuring a Crowned bugle horn in central field, ‘G’ and ‘R’ to the left and right, ‘Yorkshire Volunteers’ above, ‘5th North Riding Regiment’ below, reverse inscribed ‘Reward for Military Merit awarded to John Taylor 1811’, good very fine, with silver ring suspension £280-320 PROVENANCE:

C.J. Dixon, June 1973

139

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140 23rd Light Dragoons 1814 An oval well-struck medal, 43mm x 36mm, silver, obverse featuring frontal view of Sphinx, Pyramids behind, ‘Egypt’ in exergue, reverse inscribed ‘The Reward of Merit and Faithful Service XXIII LD’, edge inscribed as issued ‘R. Johnson. 1814.’, good very fine, with integral ring and contemporary wide bar suspension with original ‘Waterloo’ riband £160-200

141 HASTINGS IRWIN, D. War Medals and Decorations, issued to the British Military and Naval Forces and Allies from 1588 to 1910, 4th Edition, London 1910. Duodecimo, 536pp, with plates, bound in original two-tone cloth with gilt title inscription £40-60 The fourth edition and best of the series which includes 192 pages of Regimental and Volunteer Medals

PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, January 1972

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SINGLE CAMPAIGN MEDALS

142 143 General Eliott’s Medal for the Defence of Gibraltar 1782, 49mm, silver, no suspension, as issued, minor contact marks, otherwise good very fine £500-600

142 Battle of Dogger Bank 1781, oval silver medal, 39mm x 29mm, obverse featuring Victory on prow facing right, reverse featuring inscription within wreath, with integral ring for suspension (Milford Haven I, 630), nearly very fine £200-300 PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, March 1974

143

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144 144 Red Hot Shot Medal 1782, 41mm, copper, obverse featuring a moored floating battery with fire bombs landing on the roof, ‘The Pastora Battl. Ship Adml. Morino’ inscribed below, recipient’s name ‘H. Hobbs’ at bottom, reverse featuring an active furnace with ‘Fur’ to the left and ‘nace’ to the right, ‘Spaniards defeated by Red Hot Shot at Gibraltar Septey. 13th. 1782’ inscribed below, minor dinting, good very fine, with integral large ring suspension £800-1,200

145 Red Hot Shot Medal 1782, 38mm, copper, obverse featuring a moored floating battery with three fire bombs landing on the roof, ‘The Pastora Battery Ship Adl. Morino’ inscribed below, recipient’s initials ‘H.C.’ at bottom, reverse featuring an active furnace with ‘Fur’ to the left and ‘nace’ to the right, ‘Spaniards defeated by Red Hot Shot at Gibraltar Sept. 13th. 1782’ inscribed below, nearly very fine, with integral large ring suspension £300-400

Approximately ten named medals are known to exist. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1909 Glendining, July 1923 Glendining, July 1928 Glendining, June 1947 Charles Lovell Collection 1977.

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147

146 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, 1 June 1794 (Allan Wilson.), very fine £2,000-2,400

147 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Camperdown (James Turner.), very fine £1,400-1,800

Allan Wilson served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Gibraltar during the fleet action that became known as ‘The Glorious First of June.’ A total of seven Large Naval Gold Medals and 15 Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for this action.

James Turner served as Private, Royal Marines in H.M.S. Belliqueux for the defeat of the Dutch fleet by the British Naval squadrons under Admiral Duncan, including the capture of nine ships of the line and two frigates off the Dutch coast, 11.10.1797. Two Large Naval Gold Medals and fourteen Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for Camperdown. Two other men with this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List both as single clasp awards for Syria.

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1952

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148

149

148 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Egypt (John Mayhew, Purser.), virtually Mint state £2,500-3,000

149 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, 4 Novr. 1805 (John M. Denney.), good very fine £1,600-2,000

John Mayhew served as Purser in H.M.S. Pallas in cooperation with the Army on and off the coast of Egypt, 1801.

John M. Denney served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Santa Margarita as part of Commodore Sir Richard Strachan’s squadron, when he captured four French ships of the line, off Ferrol on the north coast of Gallicia, Spain, 4.11.1805. Four Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for this action. PROVENANCE:

McKenzie Collection, 1873 Lord Cheylesmore Collection, July 1930 Spink Numismatic Circular, February 1974

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150

151

150 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, San Fiorenzo 8 March 1808 (John Finch.), good very fine £5,000-7,000

151 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Anse La Barque 18 Decr. 1809 (John Clements.), edge bruise, good very fine £1,800-2,200

John Finch served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. St. Fiorenzo (36 guns) during the chase, action and capture over three days of the French 40 gun frigate Piémontaise off Cape Comorin, in the Gulf of Manaar, Indian Ocean, 6-8.3.1808; one other man with this name appears on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, as a single clasp award for Egypt. Ordinary Seaman John Finch was severely wounded in action, 7.3.1808, the day before his Captain was killed by a broadside from the Frenchman. The San Fiorenzo suffered 15 officers and ratings killed or died of wounds, and 23 wounded as a consequence of this action.

John Clements served as Landsman in H.M.S. Elizabeth for the storming of enemy batteries at Barque Island, Guadeloupe, and the chase and capture of the French 40-gun frigates Loire and Seine, 17-18.12.1809; one other man with this name appears on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, as a single clasp award for Camperdown. PROVENANCE:

Murray Collection, Glendinning May 1965 (£85)

Approximately 16 clasps issued for this action PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1940

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153

152 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Guadaloupe (J.L. Thompson.), good very fine £1,200-1,600

153 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Guadaloupe (William Driver.), very fine £800-1,000

John L. Thompson served as Acting Master in H.M.S. Blonde for the combined naval and military operations commanded by Vice Admiral the Honourable Sir Alexander Cochrane and Lieutenant-General Sir George Beckwith which culminated in the capture of the French-held island of Guadaloupe, January-February 1810.

William Driver served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. Melampus for the combined naval and military operations commanded by Vice Admiral the Honourable Sir Alexander Cochrane and Lieutenant-General Sir George Beckwith which culminated in the capture of the French-held island of Guadaloupe, January-February 1810.

Lieutenant John Last Thompson, R.N., born 1779; joined the Royal Navy, 1804, and was posted for service as Acting Master in H.M.S. Snipe later the same year; served as Master in H.M. ships Snipe, Volcano, Camilla and Blonde, on the Home Station, Newfoundland and in the West Indies, May 1805 - April 1810; when ‘in the Volcano he was often in action with the enemy’s batteries and flotilla at Boulogne, and saw, as a volunteer, much hazardous boat-service. On 24 Sept. 1809, being then in the Blonde, he offered, of his own accord, to cut out a privateer schooner from under two batteries in the south-east part of Guadaloupe; and while endeavouring to accomplish this object he lost his right arm, and was otherwise much injured in the side by a grape-shot shattering his musket. He was in consequence presented by the Patriotic Society with the sum of 150l, and was allotted, 7 May, 1810, a pension of 91l. 5s per annum. Prior to uniting in the Blonde in the operations immediately connected with the reduction of Guadaloupe, Mr. Thompson aided, in Dec. 1809, in Anse la Barque, the French 40-gun frigates Loire and Seine, together with a heavy battery by which they had been defended. He had witnessed in the same ship the surrender, in Dec. 1807, of the Danish islands of St.Thomas and Ste. Croix’ (O’Byrne refers); nominated ActingLieutenant of the Statira and Neptune, before being promoted Lieutenant, December 1810; employed in command of a Signal station at Gunton, near Lowestoffe, 1812-1814.

PROVENANCE:

Glendinning July 1909 (51/-)

PROVENANCE:

Seaby July 1963 Christie February 1982

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155

154 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Lissa (William Hays.), minor edge bruising, very fine £1,600-2,000

155 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, St. Sebastian (William J. [sic] Scott, Capt. R.N.), nearly extremely fine £2,800-3,200

William Hays served as Carpenter in H.M.S. Amphion, as part of a British squadron, for the action with a Franco-Venetian squadron, capture of two enemy frigates, the 40-gun Bellona, the 40-gun Corona, and the destruction of the 40-gun frigate Favorite, off the island of Lissa in the Adriatic, 13.3.1811. A total of four Small Naval Gold Medals were awarded for this action. PROVENANCE:

Glendinning February 1906

William Isaac Scott served as Captain in H.M.S. Freija, which assisted in the capture of St. Sebastian when some ship’s boats were employed in the inner blockade, 8.9.1813. Captain William Isaac Scott, R.N., joined the Royal Navy as a Volunteer, and was appointed to H.M.S. Windsor Castle (Captain W.H. Kelly); served as Midshipman, H.M.S. St. George and the Solebay, on the West India station, and was ‘part of the force engaged in 1794 at the reduction of the French islands’ (O’Byrne refers); served in the Veteran and the Revolutionnaire prior to being appointed Lieutenant, H.M.S. Voltigeur, May 1799; he served in the Clyde and the Urania and with the latter returned to the West Indies, August 1808; served in H.M.S. Hibernia (flag-ship of Sir Charles Cotton), at Lisbon; promoted Commander, October 1810; served in H.M.S. Freija, 1812-1814; Captain 1814. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, November 1987

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156

157

156 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Gaieta 24 July 1815 (Charles Barclay.), very fine ÂŁ2,000-2,500

157 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Algiers (J. Garrett, Midshipman.), good very fine ÂŁ1,600-2,000

Charles Barclay served as Landsman in H.M.S. Berwick when she combined with H.M.S. Malta during the attack and reduction of Gaieta, on the Italian coast, in the Kingdom of Naples, 8.8.1815.

John Garrett served as Midshipman in H.M.S. Granicus when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1816. British casualties amounted to 128 killed, 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. The Granicus, Glasgow, Impregnable, Leander, and Superb, had their masts and yards greatly damaged.

PROVENANCE:

Baldwin, 1969

Commander John Garrett, R.N., was the second son of John Garrett, Esq., of Ellington, near Ramsgate and was the brother of Lieutenant-Colonel Garrett, K.H., Commanding Officer 46th Foot; joined the Royal Navy as First Class Volunteer, 1810, and was appointed to H.M.S. Hamadryad (Captain Sir Thomas Staines); in the latter he visited St. Helena and cruized on the Irish station until 1812, when he removed as Midshipman with his Captain to H.M.S. Briton; he served with the later in the Pacific until August 1815, when he served in the Niger followed by the Granicus; promoted Lieutenant, March 1822, and was appointed to H.M.S. Euryalus, on the Mediterranean station; appointed to H.M.S. Shannon, September 1828, and saw subsequent service in the West Indies with H.M. ships Slaney, Mersey and Racehorse; assumed acting-command of H.M.S Falcon, 1831; Commander 1833.

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159

158 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Algiers (Joseph Smithson.), minor edge nicks, otherwise nearly extremely fine ÂŁ800-1,200

159 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Algiers (Geo. Selby.), minor edge nicks, otherwise extremely fine ÂŁ700-900

Joseph Smithson served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Superb when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1816. British casualties amounted to 128 killed, 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. The Granicus, Glasgow, Impregnable, Leander, and Superb, had their masts and yards greatly damaged.

George Selby served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. Hebrus when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1916. British casualties amounted to 128 killed and 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. One other man with this name appears on the Admiralty Claimants List, for a single clasp award for Royalist May & June 1810 (one of only three recipients of this clasp). PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, December 1970 Spink Numismatic Circular, February 1974

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160

161

160 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (J.G. Mackenzie, Midshipman.), toned, good very fine £1,200-1,600

161 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (John Underhill, Gunner.), good very fine £800-1,200

James George Mackenzie served as Midshipman in H.M.S. Philomel during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eightyone men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever put to sea again.’

John Underhill served as Gunner in H.M.S. Talbot during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, August 1973

Commander James George Mackenzie, R.N., joined the Royal Navy, 1823; served as Midshipman in H.M.S. Philomel (Captain the Lord Viscount Ingestrie) at Navarino; Lieutenant May 1830; appointed to H.M.S. Caledonia, on the Mediterranean station, 1833; in February of the following year appointed to the command (as FlagLieutenant to Sir Thomas Briggs, Admiral-Superintendent of Malta) of the Ceylon receiving-ship; appointed FirstLieutenant, H.M.S. Indus, October 1840; Commander April 1847, and was employed as Second-Captain of the Caledonia at Devonport. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1927

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162

162 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Navarino (William Kell.), good very fine £700-900 William Kell served as a Boy in H.M.S. Dartmouth during the Battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France, and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827. The morning after the Battle Admiral Sir Edward Codrington described the state of the Turkish fleet as such, ‘Out of a fleet composed of eighty-one men-of-war, only one frigate and fifteen smaller vessels are in a state to ever to put to sea again.’

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163

163 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (H.W. Craufurd, Commander.), good very fine, with Royal Naval College Second Mathematical Prize Medal, silver, 53mm., reverse engraved, ‘Henry Willm. Craufurd, 17 Decr. 1822’ (2) £800-1,200 Henry William Craufurd served as Commander in H.M.S. Powerful during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. Captain Henry William Craufurd, R.N., joined the Royal Navy, 1821; passed his examination in 1827, and acquired the rank of Lieutenant, March 1828; appointed to H.M.S. Pelorus (Captain M. Quinn), on the Mediterranean station, 1830-1831; served in H.M.S. Melville (flagship of Sir John Gore), in the East Indies, 1831-1835; Commander, July 1835; commanded the sloop Racehorse on the North American and West India stations, 1837-1839; married at Barrackpore, by the Bishop of Calcutta, to the daughter of the Dean of Wells, 1853; retired Captain, April 1856; died 1859. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, April 1978

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164

164 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Henry H. Bingham, Senr. Lieut. R.N.), suspension re-constituted, very fine £400-600 Henry Hope Bingham served as Senior Lieutenant in H.M.S. Princess Charlotte during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840. Captain Henry Hope Bingham, R.N., second son of the Reverend Richard Bingham, Canon of Chicester; joined the Royal Navy as First Class Volunteer, December 1813, and was appointed to H.M.S. Rosamond (commanded by his uncle Captain D. Campbell), in which he accompanied with convoy to Hudson’s Bay; he served in the Leven, co-operating with the Royalists in La Vendee, 1815; attained the rank of Midshipman whilst serving in H.M.S. Rivoli; and served in the Carron (Captain J. Furneaux), ‘under whom he was wrecked, as Master’s Mate, in the Bay of Bengal, on the night of 5 July, 1820, and, with others, cast senseless on the beach’ (O’Byrne refers); passed his examination, August 1821, whilst serving in H.M.S. Queen Charlotte (flag-ship of Sir James Whitshed); subsequent postings included in the Seringapatam, ‘in the boats of which frigate we find him as Mate, repeatedly employed in the suppression of piracy in the Grecian Archipelago - and the Warspite, fitting at Portsmouth, towards the close of 1825, for the flag of his uncle, RearAdmiral Bingham, whose premature death, when on the point of sailing, proved in a great measure detrimental to his prospects’ (Ibid); Lieutenant, January 1826; served in H.M.S. Hyperion, 1828-1831, ‘lying in Newhaven harbour for the purposes of the extended Cost Blockade.... and experienced during that period much arduous boat-service. From 8 May, 1833, until 17 June, 1836, he served as Senior of the Larne... on the West India station, where he appears to have been very actively employed, the latter part of the time in protecting the British mercantile interests on the coasts of New Granada and Venezuela, then in a state of insurrection. The Larne was also present throughout the siege of Puerto Caballo, by Gen. Paez..... Mr. Bingham joined the Princess Charlotte bearing the flag in the Mediterranean of Sir Robert Stopford, and for his services as First Lieutenant of that ship, during the operations on the coast of Syria, particularly at the capture of St. Jean d’Acre, was advanced to the rank of Commander 4 Nov. 1840, and appointed, 15. Dec. following, her Second-Captain’; appointed Second-Captain, H.M.S. Formidable, August 1842....in March, 1844, Commander Bingham witnessed the settlement of the Greek Constitution at Athens....Captain Bingham... was also presented with the Gold Cross of the Order of the Saviour of Greece, but existing regulations prevented him from accepting it’ (Ibid); he was latterly employed as Inspecting Commander, Coast Guard, 1845-1850; retired Captain, April 1856.

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165

166

165 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Guland. Surgn.), nearly extremely fine ÂŁ800-1,000

166 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Robert Anderson, Asst. Surgn.), lacquered, very fine ÂŁ800-1,000

William Guland served as a Surgeon in H.M.S. Bellerophon on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Robert Anderson served as Assistant Surgeon in H.M.S. Princess Charlotte during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, May 1940 Sotheby, June 1990

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, September 1923 Christie, November 1982

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167

168

167 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (J.E. Price, Clerk.), initial ‘E’ neatly corrected, good very fine £600-800

168 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Angelo Aguis.), very fine £400-500

John E. Price served as a Clerk in H.M.S. Hydra during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

Angelo Aguis served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Asia during the operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1980

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170

169 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (William Barter.), light contact marks, therefore very fine £400-500

170 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (Thomas Webb.), suspension slack, very fine £400-500 Thomas Webb served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Castor during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840; two other men of this name appear on the Admiralty Claimant’s List, this being the only award for Syria.

William Barter served as Boy in H.M.S. Hazard during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

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172

171 Naval General Service 1793-1840, one clasp, Syria (John W. Jeffery.), very fine £400-500

172 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Gut of Gibraltar 12 July 1801, Algiers (William Strath.), very fine £2,800-3,200

John W. Jeffery served as Boy in H.M.S. Princess Charlotte during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840.

William Strath served as Gunner’s Mate in H.M.S. Pompee as part of the successful attack upon the Franco-Spanish squadrons under the enemy batteries in Algerciras Bay, 12.7.1801. This resulted in the destruction of the Spanish three-decker, 112-gun Real Carlos abd San Hermenegildo together with the French 74-gun St. Antione; Strath served as Quarter Master’s Mate in H.M.S. Impregnable when the combined English and Dutch fleets attacked the heavily fortified town of Algiers, 27.8.1816. British casualties amounted to 128 killed, 690 wounded; the Dutch suffered 13 killed and 52 wounded. The Granicus, Glasgow, Impregnable, Leander, and Superb, had their masts and yards greatly damaged. William Strath, born Aberdeen, 1770; between 1795-1798 he was borne on H.M.S. Pompee’s books as Quarter Gunner, Midshipman and Gunner’s Mate; he was invalided out service in 1802, only to rejoin the Royal Navy in 1816; he was invalided out of service once again, July 1817, and finally received his medal through the Staff Officer for Pensions at Exeter. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1915 Spink, March 1979

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173

174

173 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Basque Roads 1809, St. Sebastian (William Jeram.), minor edge nicks, good very fine £3,000-3,500

174 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, Navarino, Syria (John Brown.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £1,000-1,200

William Jeram served as Cooper in H.M.S. Beagle during Lord Cochrane’s successful destruction of a number of French ships, including four ships of the line, in the Basque Roads, off St. Nazaire, 11-12.4.1809; Jeram served as the same rate in the same vessel, when she assisted in the capture of St. Sebastian when some ship’s boats were employed in the inner blockade, 8.9.1813.

John Brown served as Able Seaman in H.M.S. Albion during the battle of Navarino in which the combined fleets of Britain, France and Russia engaged and routed the Turkish fleet, 20.10.1827; Brown served as the same rate in H.M.S. Cambridge during operations on and off the coast of Syria, 1840; there are several men of the same name listed on the Admiralty Claimant’s List, however, the medal appears entirely as issued. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1923

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176

175 Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Corunna (G. Middleton, R. Arty. Drivers.), minor edge nicks, good very fine £600-700

176 Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Barrosa (R. Whenn, Serjt. 1st. Foot Guards), issued as Wrenn, surname neatly and contemporarily partially corrected to read Whenn, very fine £1,000-1,200

Driver George Middleton, born Fettercairn, Montrose, Scotland, 1782; enlisted in the Royal Artillery, December 1804; served with the Artillery in the Peninsula; discharged August 1824, after 19 years and 109 days service. PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, 1974.

Sergeant Robert Whenn (latest published transcript of the Medal roll lists recipient as Wrenn), born Norwich, Norfolk, 1782; enlisted in the 1st Foot Guards, February 1801; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula at the Battle of Barrosa, 5.3.1811, and in Lieutenant-Colonel the Hon. James Stanhope’s company during the Waterloo campaign, 1618.6.1815 (received medal); severely wounded at Quatre Bras, losing his right arm above the elbow, and receiving a wound in the thigh; discharged as a result of his wounds, March 1816; died, Romford, Essex, November 1859.

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177

178

177 Military General Service 1793-1814, two clasps, Sahagun & Benevente, Vittoria (G. Harman, Serjeant, 10th. Hussars.), some edge bruising, otherwise nearly extremely fine £1,400-1,600

178 Military General Service 1793-1814, two clasps, Vittoria, Toulouse (J. Freeman, R. Arty. Drivers.), edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £500-600 Driver James Freeman, born Upminster, Essex; enlisted in the Royal Artillery, March 1803; discharged, August 1816, after 13 years and 244 days service.

1 Sergeant George Harman, born Clonakilty, Co. Cork, Ireland, 1785; enlisted in the 10th Hussars, September 1805; promoted Corporal, April 1806; Sergeant, May 1807; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula and wounded through the right lung by a sword at Morales, Spain, 2.6.1813: ‘At the village of Morles the rear guard of the French was overtaken on the 2nd June by the Hussar Brigade, of which the 10th were the leading Regiment. The French horsemen immediately passed a bridge and a swamp under fire, and then facing about in two lines, gave battle. The British charged the French dragoons with such effect that their first line was at once overthrown, and, becoming a confused mass, galloped back on to their supports. Following up their success, the 10th, with the 18th still in support, the 15th in reserve, attacked the second line; this soon broke and fled, the pursuit being carried on for two miles. In addition to their loss in killed and wounded, two Officers and 202 men of the enemy, with an equal proportion of horses, were captured’ (Memoirs of the Tenth Royal Hussars refers).

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, April 1964 J.B. Hayward, January 1974

When Regimental numbers were introduced in the 1820s Harman was allocated the number 1 as the longest serving N.C.O.; discharged, September 1830, after 24 years and 350 days with the Colours; died, Kenmare, Co. Kerry, Ireland, December 1864. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, April 1918.

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180

179 Military General Service 1793-1814, three clasps, Egypt, Talavera, Salamanca (J. Holland, Coldstm. Guards), minor edge nick, otherwise nearly extremely fine £1,300-1,500

180 Military General Service 1793-1814, three clasps, Martinique, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz (M. Middleton, 23rd. Foot.), edge nick, good very fine £900-1,100

Private John Holland, born Oxendon, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, 1780; enlisted in the Coldstream Guards, January 1799; served with the Regiment in Egypt and the Peninsula, wounded in the left hand in Egypt, March 1801; discharged, March 1817, on account of ‘his being subject to asthma and being infirm from the effects of service in Egypt and different parts of Europe’ after 18 years and 55 days with the Colours; died, Tewkesbury, March 1851.

Private Matthew Middleton, born Norwich, Norfolk; served with the 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers in the Peninsula; discharged due to ‘fracture of right leg from gunshot wound’ (WO97 refers). PROVENANCE:

Glendining, September 1958 J.B. Hayward, March 1971

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181

182

181 Military General Service 1793-1814, three clasps, Salamanca, Pyrenees, Toulouse (P. Canavan, 11th. Foot.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £1,400-1,600

182 Military General Service 1793-1814, three clasps, Vittoria, Orthes, Toulouse (Thomas Green, 10th. Hussars.), lacquered, edge bruising, good very fine £700-900

Private Patrick Canavan, born Dozenart, Tyrone, Ireland, 1790; enlisted in the 11th (North Devonshire) Regiment of Foot, January 1808; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula, and present at the Battle of Salamanca, 22.7.1812, when casualties for the Regiment were 16 Officers and 325 men out of a total force of 516, earning the Regiment the soubriquet ‘The Bloody Eleventh’; discharged, May 1816, on account of being ‘lame from a gunshot to left leg and wound in breast from fall at Bayonne’ after 8 years and 133 days with the Colours.

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, May 1937 J.B. Hayward, January 1974

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183

184

183 Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Sahagun & Benevente, Vittoria, Orthes, Toulouse (J. Fowler, Serjeant, 10th. Hussars.), lacquered, nearly extremely fine £1,000-1,200

184 Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Talavera, Busaco, Fuentes d’Onor, Badajoz (E. Middleton, 14th. Lt. Dgns.), lacquered, good very fine £1,000-1,400

PROVENANCE:

Private Edward Middleton, born Northolt, Middlesex, 1783; enlisted in the 14th Light Dragoons, June 1805; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula; transferred to the 11th Royal Veterans Regiment, June 1813, on account of a viscural obstruction; discharged, July 1814, on the disbandment of the Regiment, after 9 years and 50 days with the Colours.

J.B. Hayward, January 1974

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185

186

185 Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Albuhera, Ciudad Rodrigo, Vittoria, Toulouse (H. Firth, 7th. Foot.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £1,200-1,400

186 Military General Service 1793-1814, six clasps, Fuentes d’Onor, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Orthes (Michl. Smith, Serjt. 51st. Foot), light contact marks, otherwise nearly extremely fine £1,400-1,600

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, November 1928 Glendining, December 1965

Sergeant Michael Smith, born Clanterbant, Monaghan, Ireland, 1777; enlisted in the 10th (North Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot, January 1800; transferred to the 51st (West Riding) Light Infantry, November 1803; promoted Corporal, June 1804; Sergeant, November 1806; served during the Waterloo Campaign in Captain Edward Kelly’s Company, 16-18.6.1815 (entitled to a Waterloo Medal, which is recorded as having been sold at Baldwin’s in March 1909); discharged, October 1820, after 22 years and 283 days with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, March 1974

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188

187 Military General Service 1793-1814, eight clasps, Corunna, Busaco, Fuentes d’Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees (James Brush, 52nd. Foot.), minor edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £1,800-2,200

x188 Military General Service 1793-1814, nine clasps, Busaco, Fuentes d’Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthes, Toulouse (Alexr. Mc.Gregor, 42nd. Foot.), left hand side of third clasp facing sprung, edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £2,400-2,800

Private James Brush, born Glasgow; enlisted in the 52nd (Oxfordshire) Light Infantry, April 1805; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula and wounded in the left shoulder at Sarré, France, 10.11.1813; discharged, May 1815, after 10 years and 14 days with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, February 1927 J.B. Hayward, February 1972.

Private Alexander McGregor, born Glasgow, May 1793; enlisted in the 42nd (Royal Highlanders) Regiment of Foot, May 1808; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula and in Captain John Campbell’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged, November 1837, after 28 years and 105 days with the Colours

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189

189 Military General Service 1793-1814, ten clasps, Martinique, Busaco, Albuhera, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, St Sebastian, Toulouse (William Campbell, 7th. Foot.), left hand side of penultimate clasp sprung, edge bruising, good very fine ÂŁ2,500-3,000 Private William Campbell, born Drogheda, Louth, Ireland, 1786; enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers, January 1805; served with the Regiment in the Peninsula and severely wounded in the left thigh by a musket shot at Pamplona, during the Battle of the Pyrenees, 2830.7.1813, when the Royal Fusiliers charged with the bayonet on four separate occasions; discharged February 1823, after 18 years and 26 days with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

Whitehouse Collection 1869 Spink Numismatic Circular, March 1974

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190 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, silver, mounted in a silver casing with glazed lunettes, the outer silver rim engraved in large serif capitals ‘A Tribute of Regard from Alexr. Davison Esgr. St. James’s Sqr’, contact marks, otherwise good very fine, with ring suspension £900-1,200

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191

x191 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, silver, edge bruising, slightly worn in parts, nearly very fine £700-900

192 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, bronze-gilt, nearly extremely fine, with contemporary ring suspension £280-320

192

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194 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, bronze, nearly extremely fine £200-250

x193 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, bronze-gilt, minor edge bruising, gilding rubbed in places, therefore nearly very fine, with contemporary loop suspension £250-300

194

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195 x196 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, bronze, good very fine, with contemporary ring suspension £200-250

195 Alexander Davison’s Medal for the Nile 1798, 48mm, bronze, with contemporary bronze loop suspension, nearly extremely fine £240-280

196 131


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197 x197 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver-gilt, Soho Mint, contact marks, otherwise good very fine £400-450

198 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver, Royal Mint, extremely fine, with contemporary silver loop suspension £800-1,000

198

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199

x199 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver, Soho Mint, pierced with ring suspension, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £400-450

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200

x200 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze, Soho Mint, minor edge bruising, very fine £280-320

x201 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, pewter, Soho Mint, pierced, nearly very fine £200-250

201

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202

x202 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 45mm, gold, Calcutta Mint, about extremely fine, rare £4,000-5,000

203 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 45mm, silver, Calcutta Mint, with contemporary silver loop suspension, good very fine £500-500

203

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205

204 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Laswarree (J. Kernon, 8th. Lt. Dragns.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, about extremely fine £2,200-2,500

205 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Nagpore (Cornet B. Roxburgh, 6th. L. Cav.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, lacquered, good very fine £1,800-2,200

Corporal Joseph Kernon, born Kells, Co. Meath, Ireland; enlisted in the 14th Dragoons, May 1792; transferred to the 8th Light Dragoons, August 1794; served with the Regiment in India during the Second Mahratta War, 1803-05, as part of General Lake’s force, and took part in the decisive Battle of Laswarree, 1.11.1803, when Lake defeated the Scindhia of Gwalior’s army- the 8th Light Dragoons gallantly charged three times through the enemy lines; casualties for the Regiment were 2 Officers, including their Commanding Officer, Colonel T.P. Vandeleur, and 16 men killed, and 2 Officers and 34 men wounded; wounded a year later at Futtehgarh in the subsequent final operations of the War; discharged, August 1805, on account of ‘having lost three fingers of his left hand by a sabre wound’; died at Chelsea Hospital, December 1851.

Captain Bruce Roxburgh, born Calcutta, December 1797, the son of Dr. William Roxburgh, Superintendent, Calcutta Botanical Gardens; educated at Charterhouse and Addiscombe; Commissioned Cornet, October 1816, and posted to the 6th Light Cavalry; served with the Regiment in India during the Pindari and Third Mahratta War, 1817-19, as part of General Doveton’s force, and took part in the advance and action at Nagpore, 16.12.1817, when Doveton drove out the Bhonsla of Berar’s force; promoted Lieutenant, September 1818; appointed Acting Instructor and Quartermaster, 6th Light Cavalry, November 1824; promoted Captain, December 1829; retired, September 1832, after 17 years with the Colours; died Torquay, Devon, June 1861.

Approximately 8 Army of India Medals with the single clasp Laswarree issued to Europeans. PROVENANCE:

Approximately 13 Army of India Medals with this clasp to European cavalrymen PROVENANCE:

Spink, June 1987

Lord Dillon Collection 1892 Christie, July 1987.

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206

207

206 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Maheidpoor (J. Handy, 22nd. Lt. Dragns.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, extremely fine £1,600-1,800

207 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Ava (Asst. Surg. W. Stevenson. 2nd. Locl. Hse.), officially engraved in serif capitals, India, traces of lacquer, light contact marks, therefore very fine £1,200-1,400

Trooper John Handy, born Hanley, Worcestershire, 1796; enlisted in the 22nd Light Dragoons, May 1813; served with the Regiment in India during the Pindari and Third Mahratta War, 1817-19, with Captain William Blundell’s Troop as part of General Hislop’s force, and took part in the Battle of Maheidpoor, 21.12.1817, when Hislop defeated the Holkar of Indore’s numerically superior army; discharged, July 1819 PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, March 1893 Needes Collection, 1939 Ritchie Collection, 2005

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209

208 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Bhurtpoor (Serjt. W. Hallam, 14th. Foot.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, minor edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £800-1,000

209 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, two clasps, Allighur, Laswarree (T. Emery, 29th. Lt. Dragns.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, minor edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £2,500-3,000

Sergeant William Hallam, born Nottingham, 1788; enlisted in the 14th (Prince of Wales’ Own) Regiment of Foot, April 1809; promoted Corporal, January 1810; Sergeant, January 1814; served with the Regiment in India, October 1818 to June 1831; discharged April 1832, after 29 years and 132 days with the Colours.

Private Thomas Emery, born Haywood, Staffordshire, 1782; enlisted in the 29th Light Dragoons, September 1802; served with the Regiment in India during the Second Mahratta War, 1803-05, as part of General Lake’s force, and took part in the attack on the fortress of Alligurh, 4.9.1803, and in the decisive Battle of Laswarree, 1.11.1803, when Lake defeated the Scindhia of Gwalior’s army: ‘The trumpet of the 29th Dragoons sounded the charge, and was answered forthwith by the roar of every Mahratta gun; but the troopers, galloping through a tempest of grape-shot and a general volley of musketry, rode straight into the line of the guns, scattering the gunners, then crashed into the first line of infantry and broke it up, then pressed on against the second line of infantry and swept it away to its right, and finally wheeling to the left, fell again on the Mahratta horse and routed them completely’ (A History of the British Army, Vol. V, Sir J.W. Fortescue, refers). Casualties for the 29th Light Dragoons were 62 of all ranks, including their Commanding Officer who was killed, and 112 horses. Discharged, May 1808; Emery re-enlisted in the 6th (Royal Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot, and served with the Regiment in South Africa; finally discharged, May 1825, after 18 years and 243 days with the Colours.

PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, July 1974

Note: The 29th Light Dragoons were re-numbered as the 25th Light Dragoons, July 1804, whilst Emery was still serving with them out in India. Approximately 14 Army of India Medals awarded to the 29th Light Dragoons, all with Laswarree clasp. Approximately 8 Army of India Medals with this clasp combination. PROVENANCE:

Christie, July 1987

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210

210 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, two clasps, Ava, Bhurtpoor (Lieut. E.C. Archbold, 8th. Lt. Cavy.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, extremely fine £2,200-2,500 Captain Edward Cook Archbold, born Gibraltar, November 1800; Commissioned Cornet, May 1820, and posted to the 8th Light Cavalry, September 1820; appointed Aide de Camp to the Governor-General, October 1823, and served with the Governor-General’s Bodyguard from November 1823; promoted Lieutenant, May 1824, and appointed Extra-Assistant to the Resident at Nagpur, July 1824; served during the First Burma War 1824-25 with the Governor-General’s Bodyguard, and wounded at Kokein, on the banks of the Irrawaddy near Rangoon, 15.12.1824, when the enemy forces of 25,000 men were attacked by 1,500 troops- without artillery- under General Willoughby Cotton and routed with incredible loss; returned to Calcutta, February 1825, and re-joined his parent unit; took part in the siege and capture of Bhurtpoor, 10.12.1825-18.1.1826; Appointed Deputy Paymaster at Benares, January 1828; Sub Assistant Commissary General, June 1828; promoted Captain, May 1835; retired, February 1836; died, Brighton, January 1867. Approximately 14 Army of India Medals with this clasp combination, and the only one to a European cavalryman.

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212 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Egypt 1801, 48mm, silver, with contemporary pillar suspension, a fine quality later striking with die cracks to obverse, good very fine £350-400

211 The Earl St. Vincent’s Medal 1800, 48mm, silver, with contemporary silver loop suspension, small collector’s number ‘2373’ on reverse, otherwise nearly extremely fine £450-550

212

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213

213 Matthew Boulton’s Medal for Trafalgar 1805, 48mm, bronze, extremely fine £200-250

214 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for the Capture of Rodrigues, Isle of Bourbon, and Isle of France 1809-10, 49mm, silver, with contemporary silver loop suspension, a superb early striking, good very fine £1,600-1,800

214

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215 Spanish Medal for Bagur and Palamos 1810, 46mm, silver, good very fine and rare, with original eyelet and ring suspension £2,500-3,000

216 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Java 1811, 50mm, silver, with contemporary silver loop suspension, a later striking with slight traces of rust on dies, very fine £250-300

This medal was awarded by the Spanish Government in gold and silver to the crews of H.M. Ships Ajax, Cambrian and Kent for their part in expelling the French from Catalonia on the 10th and 14th September 1810. At Bagur Spanish forces in conjunction with British Marines defeated a French detachment and destroyed a battery. Palamos was similarly captured from the French.

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217

218

217 Waterloo 1815 (Will. Cocker, Gunner, Royal Horse Artillery.), minor edge bruise, good very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £1,000-1,400

218 Waterloo 1815 (Jos. Moass, 1st Reg. Dragoon Guards.), traces of lacquer, nearly very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £1,400-1,800

Gunner William Cocker, born Aberdeen, September 1777; enlisted in the Royal Artillery, September 1794; served in Captain Mercer’s “D” Troop, Royal Horse Artillery during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; discharged, September 1816, after 23 years with the Colours.

74 Private Joseph Moass, born Newbury, Berkshire, March 1796; enlisted in the 1st Dragoon Guards, March 1813; served with the Regiment in the Waterloo Campaign, 1618.6.1815; discharged, April 1838, after 26 years and 46 days with the Colours.

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220

219 Waterloo 1815 (John Compton, 10th Royal Reg. Hussars.), traces of lacquer, nearly very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £1,200-1,600

220 Waterloo 1815 (Richard Middleton, Royal Artill. Drivers.), some edge bruising, nearly very fine, with later silver clip and straight bar suspender £1,000-1,400

Private John Compton served in Captain Charles Wood’s No.5 Troop, 10th Royal Regiment of Hussars during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815

Driver Richard Middleton served in Major N. Turner’s ‘A’ Troop during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

221 Waterloo 1815 (Thomas Wood, 2nd Batt. 69th. Reg. Foot.), polished, heavy edge bruising, therefore good fine, with later silver clip and ring suspension £800-1,200 Private Thomas Wood, born Stanford, Essex, 1790; enlisted in the 69th (South Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot, December 1813; served during the Waterloo Campaign, 1618.6.1815, and wounded at Waterloo with a musket ball in the thigh, 18.6.1815; discharged, November 1827, after 15 years and 339 days with the Colours.

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223

222 Waterloo 1815 (William Greenwood, 3rd Batt. 95th Reg. Foot.), good very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £4,000-5,000

223 Waterloo 1815 (Tr. Ser. Maj. J. Schumacher, 1st. Reg. Light Drag. K.G.L.), minor edge bruise, good very fine, with original steel clip and later split ring suspension £1,200-1,400

Private William Greenwood, born Market Rasan, Lincolnshire; enlisted in the Rifle Brigade, May 1812; served in Captain J. Fullerton’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815, and wounded by gun shot to the left shoulder in action at Waterloo, 18.6.1815; discharged as a result of his wounds, August 1816, after 6 years and 119 days with the Colours.

Troop Sergeant Major John Schumacher served in Captain Philip Sichart’s No.5 Troop, King’s German Legion during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815

Only two companies of the 3/95th were present during the battle, making it the smallest British infantry unit at Waterloo. PROVENANCE:

Colonel Murray Collection, 1908.

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226

224 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Burma 1824-26, 38mm, silver, edge nicks, very fine, with contemporary silver loop and ring suspension £600-800

225 Ghuznee 1839, reverse ornately engraved ‘T. O’Brien 13th. or Prince Albert’s Lt. Infantry’ in large serif capitals, edge additionally engraved ‘Pte. Ths. O’Brien 13 P-A-L-I’ in serif letters, nearly very fine, with contemporary silver straight bar suspension £400-500 PROVENANCE:

227

227 Candahar Ghuznee Cabul 1842 (Private James Shrivell, H.M. 40th. Regt.), contact marks, nearly very fine, with original steel clip, screw fitting, and straight bar suspension £300-400 865 Private James Shrivell, born Brighton, Sussex, 1801; enlisted in the 20th (East Devonshire) Regiment of Foot, December 1825; promoted Corporal, January 1829; Sergeant, August 1830; transferred to the 40th (2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot, October 1836, with the rank of Private; served with the Regiment in Afghanistan, February 1839 to December 1842, and in the Gwalior Campaign; present at the Battle of Maharajpoor, 29.12.1843 (entitled to Star); discharged, April 1846, after 20 years and 56 days with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

Glendining, March 1974

226 Ghuznee 1839 (Private Samuel Middleton H.C. 1st European Regt.), reverse engraved in running script, nearly very fine, with later ball and ring suspension £450-550 Private Samuel Middleton, killed in action at Sobraon, 10.2.1846

228 Defence of Jellalabad 1842, 1st ‘Mural Crown’ type (Gowan XIII P.A.L.I.), edge impressed in serif letters, good fine £400-500 PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

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230

229 China 1842 (James Cock. Royal Marines.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £500-550

230 Scinde 1843, for Meeanee and Hyderabad (Lieut. C.P. Leeson.), engraved in serif capitals, nearly very fine, with contemporary silver clip and silver straight bar suspension £800-1,200

James Cock, born Castle Cary, Somerset, 1822; enlisted in the Royal Marines, October 1840; killed, October 1853, when the main top mast of his ship H.M.S. Sybille accidentally fell on deck.

Lieutenant Charles Ponsonby Leeson, born Dublin, January 1810; posted to the Bombay Native Infantry, December 1832; transferred to 25th Native Infantry, January 1834; appointed Brigade-Major at Poona, December 1838; served as Baggage-Master during the Scinde Campaign, 1843, and Mentioned in Major-General Napier’s Despatch, 24.3.1843; posted to Native Veterans Battalion, April 1845; appointed Adjutant, Native Veterans Battalion, March 1851; Paymaster of Pensioners, Poona, September 1851; died at Poona, July 1852.

PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

231 Scinde 1843, for Meeanee and Hyderabad (Ratr. Thaynor. (I) 22nd. Regt.), engraved in serif capitals, nearly fine, with original steel clip and bar suspension £300-400

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232 Family Group: Maharajpoor Star 1843 (Private Joseph Gainsford H.M. 40th. Regt.), nearly very fine, original brass riveted hook replaced with brass ring and silver straight bar suspension Maharajpoor Star 1843 (Private James Gainsford H.M. 40th. Regt.), very fine, with original brass hook, this pierced, but lacking ring suspension (2) ÂŁ800-1,000 1022 Private Joseph Gainsford, born Tunbridge Wells, Kent, 1813; enlisted in the 40th (2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot, December 1837; served with the Regiment in Afghanistan, and awarded the Candahar Ghuznee Cabul Medal 1842; served during the Gwalior Campaign and awarded the Maharajpoor Star 1843; discharged, December 1858, after 20 years and 359 days with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward, January 1974

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234

233 Sutlej 1845-46, for Ferozeshuhur, no clasp (Lieut. E:V: Utterson 27th. Regt. N:I:), good very fine £400-500

237

235 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Mooltan, Goojerat (2nd. Lieut. W. Delane, 2nd. Tp. 2nd. Bde. H. Arty.), officially re-impressed, suspension claw re-affixed, very fine £380-420

234 Sutlej 1845-46, for Sobraon, no clasp (Serjt. Wm. Morley 10th. Regt.), good very fine £450-550

Lieutenant-Colonel Walter Delane, born at East Hampstead, Berkshire, 1829; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Bengal Artillery, December 1845; served throughout the Second Sikh War, and present at the passage of Chenab and the Battles of Chilianwala, 13.1.1849, and Goojerat, 21.2.1849; promoted Lieutenant, March 1852; Captain, August 1858; Appointed Commandant, GovernorGeneral’s Body Guard, March 1862; promoted Major, July 1872; retired with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, August 1872.

677 Sergeant William Morley, born Dymchurch, Kent, 1811; enlisted in the 10th (North Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot, December 1830; promoted Corporal, January 1832; Sergeant, November 1834; served with the Regiment during the First Sikh War and severely wounded at the battle of Sobraon, 10.2.1846, resulting in his right leg being amputated; discharged as a result of his wounds, June 1847, after 16 years and 171 days with the Colours.

Lieutenant-Colonel Delane was entitled to the Punjab Medal with the clasps Chilianwala and Goojerat, not Mooltan and Goojerat. In light of the fact that his medal is officially reimpressed, it is possible to speculate that his was a slightly later claim, and that his medal, taken from the Mint’s mountain of returns, had originally been issued with these clasps.

PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

236 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Chilianwala, Goojerat (John Middleton. 14th. Lt. D.), heavy contact marks, lacquered, good fine £400-500 237 South Africa 1834-53 (D. Huggett. 1st. Btn. Rifle Bde.), minor edge nicks, nearly extremely fine £380-420 Private David Huggett served with the 1st Battalion, Rifle Brigade, in South Africa during the Second Kaffir War, 184647.

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239

241

238 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Bhootan (113 H Thompson H Ms. 55th. Reg), nearly extremely fine £200-240

242 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Waziristan 1894-5 (3678 Corpl. J. Durkin 2d. Bn. Border Regt.), officially renamed, good very fine £80-120

239 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Perak (83 Pte. E. Middleton. 80th. Foot.), minor edge nick, very fine £240-280

243 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Samana 1891, Hazara 1891 (1083 Sergt. D. Mc.Niven 2d. Bn. High. L.I.), traces of lacquer, good very fine £280-320

240 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hazara 1888 (3049 Pte. C. Willement, 2nd. Bn. R.Ir.R.), good very fine £140-160

244 Baltic 1854, unnamed as issued, suspension claw slightly loose, extremely fine £100-140

241 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hunza 1891 (1004 Sepoy Illahia 3rd. Kash: L. Infy. I.S.T.), suspension slightly loose, nearly very fine £450-550

245 Crimea 1854-56, no clasp, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £80-100

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246 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Balaklava (T. Broomfield. 2nd. Dragns.), officially impressed, nearly very fine £600-800 1164 Private Thomas Broomfield, served with the 2nd Dragoons in the Crimea from 3.10.1854, and in all probability took part in the Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava, 25.10.1854.

249

PROVENANCE:

x249 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (H. Burgess. 11th. Hussars.), officially impressed, good very fine £3,000-4,000

Sotheby, January 1974

247 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (Serjt. A. Kell. 10th. Hussars.), officially impressed, contact marks, very fine, with top silver floral riband bar £180-220

1232 Private Henry Burgess, born Norfolk; enlisted in the 11th Hussars, March 1846; served with the Regiment in the Crimea, and was present with the Regiment on the occasion of the Charge of the Light Brigade, 25.10.1854; died at Scutari, 21.1.1855.

58 Sergeant Alfred Kell, born Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1826; enlisted in the 58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot, April 1844; transferred to the 4th Light Dragoons, December 1844; 10th Hussars, April 1846; promoted Corporal, December 1852; Sergeant, August 1855; discharged, December 1865, after 21 years and 239 days with the Colours.

Although Private Burgess’s name does not appear on the list of confirmed ‘Chargers’, this does not preclude him from having taken part in the Charge of the Light Brigade. Most members of the Light Brigade entitled to the Balaklava clasp, in the absence of any evidence or status details to the contrary, took part in the Charge. Verified on Muster roll.

248 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol, this loose as issued to foreign troops (Normand 3’Art. 5263), engraved in large serif capitals, minor edge bruise, very fine £80-120

PROVENANCE:

Hamilton Smith Collection 1927 Glendining, December 1937 Darwent Collection 2004.

250 Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (Wm. Friend. 10. Hussars.), impressed in large serif capitals, very fine, with contemporary silver straight bar suspension £70-90 151


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251 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Qr. Master Jas. Irvin. Pearl.), good very fine £550-650 Quarter Master James Irvin, born Gosport, Hampshire, October 1816; enlisted in the Royal Navy, September 1837; advanced Quarter Master, serving in H.M.S. Algiers, December 1854; transferred to H.M.S. Pearl, February 1856; retired June 1859.

252 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (G. Bennett 2nd Dragoon Guards), unit partially re-impressed, very fine £120-160 225 Private George Bennett, born Guildford, Surrey, 1833; enlisted in the 2nd Dragoon Guards, December 1856; discharged, September 1875, after 18 years and 220 days with the Colours, of which 12 years were spent in India.

253 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Josh. Hughes. 82nd. Regt.), suspension claw tightened, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £120-160 2392 Private Joseph Hughes, born Glenoe, Co. Tyrone, Ireland, 1828; enlisted in the 82nd (Prince of Wales’s Volunteers) Regiment of Foot, February 1846; served with the Regiment in the Crimea (Medal and clasp for Sebastopol and Turkish Medal), and in India for ten years; discharged, May 1868, after 21 years and 296 days with the Colours.

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255

254 Family Group: Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Schoolmr. H.L. Shead, 2nd. Bn. Rifle Bde.), good very fine Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (12841 Dr: H. Shead, A.S.C.), extremely fine (2) £240-280

255 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Sepoy Lanah Sing 3rd. Regt. Sikh Infy.), suspension claw tightened, good fine £100-140

256 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Lieut. Taylor. Civil Service), minor edge bruise, good very fine £300-350 Two men with the name of Taylor were employed as Sixth Class Civil Servants in the Bengal Presidency at the time of the Indian Mutiny- Mr. V.T. Taylor, Assistant Under-Commissioner of Revenue, Benares Division; and Mr. R. Taylor, Assistant to the Magistrate and Collector, Benares.

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257 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (W.W. Mc.Mullen,), suspension claw re-affixed, very fine £120-160 Mr. W.W. McMullen served during the Indian Mutiny with the Customs Foot Patrol, Agra, and took part in the Battle of Agra, 4.7.1857.

258 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Geo. A. Thomson.), extremely fine £200-300

259 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Asst. Surgn. R. Parker, Cashmere Contingent), very fine £400-450 Surgeon Robert Parker, born August 1825; appointed Assistant Surgeon, January 1849; served during the Indian Mutiny and present at the Siege and Capture of Delhi; promoted Surgeon, February 1863; retired, June 1865.

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261

260 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Thos. Smith, Qr. Master. Shannon.), extremely fine £700-900 Quarter Master Thomas Smith, born Hampshire, September 1815, enlisted in the Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Sparrowhawk, November 1833.

261 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Thos. Cox, A.B. Shannon.), light contact marks, nearly extremely fine £600-700 Able Seaman Thomas Cox, born Hayling Island, June 1832; enlisted in the Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Excellent, March 1851; transferred to H.M.S. Leopard with the rank of Ordinary Seaman, January 1853; transferred to H.M.S. Shannon, August 1856; promoted Able Seaman, February 1858, and present at the Capture of Lucknow; discharge, May 1862.

262 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Wm. Hackett, A.B. Shannon.), extremely fine £600-800 Able Seaman William Hackett, died at Lucknow, 26.3.1858.

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263 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Saml. Jeffries, A.B. Shannon.), contact marks, very fine £600-700 Samuel Jeffries (also listed as Jeffery), born Underwood, Devon, March 1836; entered the Royal Navy, serving in H.M.S. Indefatigable, November 1853; transferred to H.M.S. Shannon, August 1856; transferred to the Coast Guard, May 1875; advanced Chief Boatman in Charge, at Bangor, December 1885; retired February 1892. PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, January 1974

264 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Gunner Wm. Cockland, F Tp. R.H.Art), naming double struck in parts, nearly extremely fine £280-320 Gunner William Cockland, born Lewes, Sussex, 1823; enlisted in the Royal Horse Artillery, August 1842; served with the Artillery in Bengal from November 1857; died 13.5.1858.

265 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Bombr. & Colr. Maker Wm. Warboys, 12th. Bn. R. Arty.), contact marks, nearly very fine £260-300

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267

266 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Gunner Edwd. Watson, Arty. Recruit Depot.), backstrap of clasp repaired, minor edge bruise, therefore good very fine £260-300

267 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (W. Hyrons, 38th. Regt.), contact marks, nearly very fine £240-280 4378 Private William Hyrons, born Nuneaton, Warwickshire, 1827; enlisted in the 38th (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot, March 1855; served with the Regiment in the Crimea (Medal and clasp for Sebastopol and Turkish Medal), and in India for 14 years; discharged, September 1874, after 19 years and 56 days with the Colours.

268 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (John. Wilson. 3rd. Bn. Rifle Bde.), suspension claw re-affixed, nearly very fine £200-240

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269 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Revd. C J Waterhouse. Asst. Chaplain.), nearly extremely fine, with contemporary top silver riband buckle ÂŁ400-500

270 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Capt. E.S. Daniell, 1st. Madras Fusrs.), contact marks, otherwise good very fine, with contemporary top silver riband bar ÂŁ400-500 Captain Edward Staines Daniell, born Blandford, Dorset, 1828; Commissioned Ensign, Madras Fusiliers, June 1845; promoted Lieutenant, December 1849; Captain, February 1857; retired, October 1870; died, November 1906.

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272

271 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Hospl. Appce. Jas. Duncan, 1st. Bde. Bengl. H. Art.), good very fine £250-300

272 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Lieut. Foote, Attd. Goorkha Force), good very fine £400-450 Lieutenant F.B. Foote, Commissioned Ensign, 71st Native Infantry, December 1849; served with the Force under Sir Colin Campbell against the Hill Tribes on the Peshawar Frontier, 1851; promoted Lieutenant, September 1854; served during the Indian Mutiny and present at the siege and capture of Lucknow; twice Mentioned in Despatches, and received the Thanks of Government; appointed to the Command of the Hoshungabad Military Police, he subsequently took part in several actions against the rebels in Hoshungabad District, and received the Thanks of the LieutenantGovernor, N.W.P. on two occasions.

273 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Corpl. Alexr. Rhind, 72nd. Highlanders), about extremely fine £280-320 1717 Corporal Alexander Rhind, born Aberdeen, 1825; enlisted in the 72nd (Duke of Albany’s Own Highlanders) Regiment of Foot, January 1843; promoted Corporal, April 1857; discharged, April 1860, after 16 years and 281 days with the Colours.

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274 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Capt. W.S.S. Mulcaster, 6th. Madras Cavalry.), extremely fine £500-700 Major-General William Sidney Smith Mulcaster, born November 1825, the son of Captain Sir W. Mulcster, R.N.; Commissioned Cornet, Madras Cavalry, March 1842; promoted Lieutenant, April 1845; appointed Acting Quarter Master, 1st Regiment Light Cavalry, August 1849; Quarter Master, 6th Regiment Light Cavalry, October 1852; sub-Assistant Commissary General and Superintendent of Police at Mhow, January 1855; promoted Captain, November 1856; served during the Indian Mutiny and present at the affair near Sehora, 11.12.1857, and at Kooagaum, 29.12.1857, and with Brigadier Rowcroft’s Sarun Field Force in the action at Amorah, 9.6.1858; Commanded the Cavalry in action at Hurriah, 18.6.1858, where he had his horse wounded under him (Mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 5.10.1858), and at Bansee, 9.9.1858 (Mentioned in Despatches, London Gazette 31.1.1859); promoted Major, September 1866; LieutenantColonel, March 1868; retired with the rank of Major-General, October 1874.

275 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Asst. Chaplain. C.T. Wilson, M.A. Rajpootana Fd. Force), nearly extremely fine £400-500

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277

276 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Gunr. Peter Watson, 1st. C, 2nd. Bn. Bombay Arty.), very fine £260-300

277 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Asst. Apothy. R. Mc.Leane, Bombay Med. Dept.), nearly extremely fine £280-320

278 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Delhi, Relief of Lucknow (Hy. Steggles, 75th. Regt.), good very fine £400-450

279 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Lucknow, Defence of Lucknow, clasps in this order (Pte. Edwd. Bairstow. 84th. Foot.), an officially impressed post-1873 issue, very fine £400-500 Clasps Confirmed. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

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280 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow (John Thomas, 1st. Bn. 23rd. R.W. Fusrs.), suspension claw slightly loose, otherwise nearly extremely fine £400-450 Two men of the name John Thomas who served as Privates with the 1st Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers during the Indian Mutiny received the medal with clasps for Relief of Lucknow and Lucknow; both died out in India, 6.10.1858 and 10.7.1859.

281 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow (John O’Connor, 53rd. Regt.), edge nicks, toned, nearly very fine £400-450 3425 Sergeant John O’Connor, born Limerick, Ireland, 1834; enlisted in the 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment of Foot, June 1853; promoted Corporal, August 1860; Sergeant, March 1861; discharged, August 1871, after 18 years and 67 days with the Colours.

282 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow (Michl. Blake 53rd. Regt.), minor edge bruise, nearly very fine £400-450 1863 Private Michael Blake, born Limerick, Ireland, 1836; enlisted in the 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment of Foot, March 1854; served with the Regiment in India and present at the Relief of Lucknow and subsequent operations; transferred to the 99th (Duke of Edinburgh’s) Regiment, February, and served with the Regiment in China, and took part in the advance on and capture of Pekin (Medal and clasp); transferred to the 32nd (Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot, June 1870; discharged, May 1875, after 21 years and 39 days with the Colours

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285

283 New Zealand 1845-66, reverse dated 1863-1866 (3181 Henry Mc.Cormick, 50th. Qn’s. Own Rgt.), very fine £340-380

284 New Zealand 1845-66, reverse dated 1865-1866 (811 Wm. Henley, 57th. Regt.), very fine £320-360 PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, March 1974

285 Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp, Fenian Raid 1866 (Pte. T.L. Rogers, 3rd. V.V.R.), nearly extremely fine £200-240

286 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (F.H.M. Whitfield, Asst. Payr. R.N., H.M.S. Active, 73-74), good very fine £240-280

287 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (2037. Pte. E. Mc.Kay. 42nd. Highds. 1873-4.), suspension claw re-tightened and loose, good very fine £180-220

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x288 The South African Campaign Medal to Private T. Walsh, 1st Battalion, 24th Foot, Killed in Action at the Battle of Isandhlwana, 22.1.1879 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1877-8-9 (285. Pte. T. Walsh. 1/24th. Foot.), minor edge bruise, otherwise nearly extremely fine ÂŁ5,000-6,000 285 Private Thomas Welsh, enlisted in the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot, June 1875; served with the 1st Battalion in the South African Campaign, 1877-79; killed in action at Isandhlwana, 22.1.1879.

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290

291

291 Cape of Good Hope General Service 1880-97, one clasp, Transkei (Sappr. C. Rutter. C.T. Vol. Engrs.), traces of lacquer, nearly extremely fine £200-240

289 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1877-8 (1502. Sergt. J. Nokes. 2-24th. Foot.), contact marks, very fine £400-450 1509 Sergeant John Nokes, born Birmingham, 1846; enlisted in the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot, July 1864; promoted Corporal, January 1875; Sergeant, June 1875; served with the 2nd Battalion in South Africa; transferred from ‘B’ to ‘F’ Company at Rorke’s Drift, 4.2.1879; disembarked in England, March 1879; Awarded Long Service & G.C. Medal, March 1883; discharged, February 1885, after 20 years and 229 days with the Colours.

292 Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (W.A. Worley. Caulkr. H.M.S. “Minotaur”.), light pitting, very fine £80-100

293 Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, Suakin 1885 (25272. Gunr. H. Middleton. 5/1st. Sco. Div: R.A.), pitting from Star, otherwise very fine £120-150

x290 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (2231. Pte. B. Walters. 17th. DCO. Lrs.), pawn broker’s mark to obverse field, suspension bar slightly loose, nearly very fine £420-450

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294

296

294 Egypt 1882-89, undated, two clasps, Suakin 1885, Tofrek (2452. Pte. J. Robins. 1/Rl. Berks: R:), minor edge bruise, good very fine £180-220

295 Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, good very fine £50-70

299

298 British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. H. Long. Gwelo Vol.), nearly extremely fine £200-250 The latest published transcript of the medal roll lists Trooper H. Long as receiving the B.S.A. Company’s Medal for Matabeleland 1893, as a trooper with Raaff’s Column; and a clasp for Rhodesia 1896, as a trooper with the Gwelo Volunteer Corps. However, the medal here appears entirely as issued. PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, February 1974

296 British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. J.F. Buske. “L”. Troop. B.F.F.), nearly extremely fine £200-250

297 British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. J. Berry. M.F.F.), good very fine £200-250

299 Hong Kong Plague Medal 1894 (Private R. Tranter, S.L.I.), edge bruising, good very fine £900-1,100 3713 Private Richard Tranter, born Hereford, May 1871; enlisted in the Shropshire Light Infantry, June 1892; served with the Regiment in Hong Kong, December 1893 to December 1894; discharged, October 1901.

300 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Punjab Frontier 1897-98 (4115 Pte. S. Rees 1st. Bn. Som: Lt. Infy.), very fine £100-140 PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

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301

303

304

301 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (3120 Pte. M. Middleton 2d. Bn. K.O. York: Lt. Infy.), nearly extremely fine £160-200

303 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., four clasps, Malakand 1897, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, Waziristan 1901-02 (3754 Sepoy Magh Singh 45th. Sikhs), good very fine £140-180

302 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., three clasps, Relief of Chitral 1895, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98, unofficial links between first and second clasps (4408 Pte. J. Ward 2nd. Bn. K.O. Sco: Bord:), good very fine £200-240

304 Jummoo and Kashmir Medal 1895, one clasp, Chitral 1895, unnamed as issued, good very fine £400-500 PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

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305

305 Ashanti Star 1896 (1390 L.Sgt. J.W. Goodall 2. W. Yorks R.), reverse engraved as named to Regiment, very fine £340-380

309 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Wittebergen (Lieut. J. Shearer. 1/ High. L.I.), toned, retaining rod re-affixed, good very fine £200-240

1390 Lance Sergeant J.W. Goodall served with the 2nd Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment in the Ashanti, December 1895 to January 1896.

Captain John Shearer, Commissioned Lieutenant, 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Highland Light Infantry, July 1898; served with the 1st Battalion in South Africa, and present at the actions at Wittebergen, July 1900; Captain, March 1902

306 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (2588. Pte. W. Lakin. 1/R. War: R.), initial officially corrected, toned, good very fine £160-200

307 East and Central Africa 1897-99, one clasp, 1898 (122 Rifn. Waras Khan. 1/Uganda. Rif:), nearly very fine £220-260

308 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State (5445 Pte. J. Menzies, Arg: & Suth: Highrs:), nearly extremely fine £60-80

310 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1901 (459 Tpr: A.G. Gillies. Warren’s M.I.), edge bruise, slightly worn, therefore fine Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1887 (P.C. J. Page. L. Divn.), gilded, very fine (2) £60-80

311 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (Capt & Qr: Mr: W. Bissett, Highland. L.I.), edge bruise and minor edge nicks, otherwise extremely fine, with the recipient’s mechanical silver pen, engraved ‘W. Bissell, H.L.I. Regt.’ £240-280 Major William Bissett, enlisted as 1312 Private, Highland Light Infantry, 1867; Commissioned Lieutenant and Quarter Master, April 1882; Captain and Quarter Master, April 1892; served with the 3rd Battalion in South Africa, 1902; promoted Major, February 1903. Major Bissett died at home at Blairgowrie, July 1913.

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312

315

312 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Defence of Ladysmith, Belfast (4375, Pte. J. Clayton. 19/Hrs.), nearly extremely fine £400-500

x315 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lieut: W.L.L. Palk, Durham. L.I.), good very fine £280-320

4375 Private J. Clayton, killed in action at Lake Chrissie, 6.2.1901.

Lieutenant Sir Wilmot Lawrence Lancelot Palk, Bt., of Haldon House, Devon, born August 1876, the youngest son of William Palk; served as Midshipman, Royal Navy; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Durham Light Infantry, 14.9.1901; served in South Africa with the 3rd Battalion in Cape Colony and the Orange River Colony, and with the 1st Battalion in the Transvaal; promoted Lieutenant, 19.10.1904; retired, 7.10.1905; succeeded his second cousin Edward Arthur Palk, 5th Baron Haldon, to the Baronetcy as 9th Baronet, 11.1.1939; died heirless, 27.10.1945.

313 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (6199 Pte. S. Miller, E. Yorkshire Regt.), edge bruising, good very fine £70-90

316 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (4725 Pte. A. Strickland, 2: Sea: Highrs:), good very fine £60-80

314 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (5703 Pte. G. Middleton. Hampshire Regt.), nearly extremely fine £100-120 5703 Private G. Middleton, served with the 2nd Battalion, Hampshire Regiment in South Africa; died of disease at Pretoria on Christmas Day 1900.

317 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (8044 Pte. D. Middleton, Gordon Highrs:), good very fine £70-90

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319

322

318 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (9682 Pte. H. Middleton. 45th. Coy. Impl. Yeo.), edge bruising, nearly very fine £100-120

321 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901, last clasp unofficially attached (7891 Pte. A. Cummings, Scots: Guards), good very fine £80-100

9682 Private H. Middleton, served with the 45th (Dublin Hunt) Company, 13th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa; taken Prisoner of War at Lindley, 31.5.1900.

7891 Private Alexander Cummings, born Inverness, 1864; enlisted in the Scots Guards, December 1887; served in South Africa, March 1900 to April 1901; discharged December 1903, after 16 years with the Colours; died Inverness, December 1939. Clasps confirmed.

x319 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein (2058. Tpr. F.C. Loscombe. 2nd. L. Gds:), nearly extremely fine £240-280 2058 Trooper F.C. Loscombe, served with the Second Life Guards in South Africa; taken Prisoner of War at Sannah’s Post, 31.3.1900; died in captivity at Winburg, 13.4.1900.

320 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1902 (6771 Pte. P. Woodcock. E. Surrey Regt.), edge bruising, nearly very fine £70-90

322 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Talana, Defence of Ladysmith, Laing’s Nek, Belfast (3439 Pte. H. Mould, 1: Leic: Regt.), toned, good very fine £120-150 3439 Private Howard Mould, born Leicester, 1873; enlisted in the Leicestershire Regiment, June 1892; served with the Regiment in South Africa. December 1895 to September 1902; discharged June 1908, after 16 years with the Colours. PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

323 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Transvaal (2585 Pte. E. Middleton, E. Kent Regt.), right hand rivet between 2nd and 3rd clasps missing, good very fine £100-140 2585 Private E. Middleton, served with the 2nd Battalion, East Kent Regiment in South Africa; died of disease at Pretoria, 29.12.1900.

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328

329

324 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (6152 Pte. G. Ross, Rl. Highldrs:), partially officially corrected, very fine £50-70

328 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein (178059 A-B: J.H. Branton, H.M.S. Powerful), impressed naming, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £600-800 Approximately 19 five clasp awards to H.M.S. Powerful.

325 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902, unofficial rivets between State and date clasps (4227 Pte. F. Blackburn. 6th. Dragoon Gds:), edge bruise, slight scratching to obverse field, otherwise very fine £80-120

178059 Chief Petty Officer John Henry Branton, born Monkleigh, Devon, 1878; joined Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, 1896; served in H.M.S. Powerful, 8.6.1897-8.6.1900; Petty Officer, 1.4.1904; service during the Great War included in H.M.S. Berwick (armoured cruiser), 17.6.191619.8.1918.

329 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast (8528 Pte. W.H. Designey, Cldstm: Gds:), light contact marks, good very fine £100-140

326 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (4500 Pte. W.G. Luxton. 6th. Dragoon Gds.), edge bruising, very fine £80-120

8528 Private William Henry Designey, born Woolwich, Kent, 1870; enlisted in the Coldstream Guards, June 1891; served with the Regiment in South Africa from October 1899 to July 1902; discharged, June 1903, after 12 years with the Colours.

327 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (27724 Tpr: W.H. Jones. 31st. Coy. Imp: Yeo:), good very fine £70-90 27724 Trooper W.H. Jones served with the 31st (Montgomeryshire) Company, 9th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War. PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

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330

333

330 Queen’s Mediterranean 1899-1902 (8023 Pte. C. Allen. Yorks: L.I.), nearly extremely fine, with a contemporary silver ‘Mediterranean’ riband bar £200-240

336

336 Tibet 1903-04, one clasp, Gyantse (1553 Naik Nainsing Gurung 18th Gurkha Rifles), very fine £280-320 PROVENANCE:

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

331 King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3) (4656 Pte. A. Quayles. 18th. Hussars; 1154 Pte. J. Isherwood. Liverpool Regt.; 1139 Serjt: W. Organ. C.T. Highrs:), generally very fine or better (3) £80-120 332 China 1900, one clasp, Relief of Pekin (Jemdr. Krishna Appaji. No. 2 Coy: Bo: S.& M.), contact marks, nearly very fine £180-220 333 British North Borneo Company’s Medal 1900, bronze issue, one clasp, Tambunan (41. Corporal Powan.), good very fine £800-1,000 334 Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Somaliland 1908-10 (297770 W. Stacey, Act. Lg. Sto., H.M.S. Philomel.), light pitting, very fine £100-140 335 Tibet 1903-04, bronze issue, no clasp (Dvr. Boota 6th. Mule Corps), nearly very fine £60-80 PROVENANCE:

337 Natal 1906, no clasp (Pte: A.C. Pearce, Durban Light Infantry.), good very fine £90-110 338 Natal 1906, no clasp (Pte: D. Middleton, Natal Medical Corps.), edge bruising, nearly very fine Pair: Private D. Middleton, 1st Infantry, South African Forces 1914-15 Star (Pte. D. Middleton 1st. Infantry); Victory Medal, bi-lingual reverse (Pte. D. Middleton 1st. Infantry.), good fine British War Medal (Spr. D. Middleton. M.T.C.), good very fine (4) £80-120 339 Natal 1906, one clasp, 1906 (Pte. T. Cone, Lancs. & Yorks. Contg.), nearly extremely fine £140-180 340 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp (2), Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (DM2-163300 A. Cpl. W. Titchener, R.A.S.C.); Waziristan 1919-21 (1850414 Spr. R. Howard. F. Dvl. Signals.), number corrected on first, nearly very fine or better (2) £60-80

Spink Numismatic Circular, January 1974

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347

341 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Malabar 1921-22 (5718464 Pte. R. Keech, Dorset. R.), nearly extremely fine £60-80

344 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24 (6077699 Pte. A. Trebell. The Queens R.), extremely fine £60-80

342 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Burma 1930-32 (6282399 Pte. G.J. Goldsack. The Buffs.), minor edge nicks, good very fine £60-80

345 Naval General Service 1915-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1936-1939 (J.112583 F. Hissey. Slmmkr. Mte. R.N.), extremely fine £80-100

343 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1935 (10216 Sepoy Bostan Ali, 1-15 Punjab R.), good very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (7907 Sep. Hakim Khan, Tochi Scouts.), very fine India Service Medal, very fine Indian Independence Medal 1947 (SS-13728 Capt. B. Nanavati, A.O.C.), officially re-impressed, good very fine Pakistan Independence Medal 1947, unnamed as issued, very fine (5) £40-60

346 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Radfan (684059 Jnr. Tech. R.E. Pilcher R.A.F.), very fine £60-80 x347 South Atlantic 1982, with rosette (WEM(O)1 D N Turnbull D183708V HMS Hermes), nearly extremely fine £500-600

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CORONATION, JUBILEE AND LONG SERVICE DECORATIONS AND MEDALS

348

348 Empress of India 1877, silver, light contact marks, nearly extremely fine £300-350 PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

349 Jubilee 1935 (3), unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine Coronation 1937 (2), unnamed as issued, good very fine (5) £50-70

350 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (2282 Geoe. Sansome. 61st. Foot.), light contact marks, very fine £70-90 2282 Private George Sansome, born December 1824; enlisted in the 81st (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers) Regiment of Foot, November 1842; transferred to the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot, July 1844; discharged, February 1864, after 21 years and 67 days with the Colours.

351 Army Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (4185964 W.O. Cl.2. T.R. Phillips. R.W.Fus.), good very fine Efficiency Decoration, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1950’, lacking top ‘Territorial’ bar, very fine (2) £80-100

352 Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (2) (PO.13610 E.G. Jepson, Pte, R.M.L.I.; 210038 C. Parker. P.O. H.M.S. Pembroke.), generally very fine (2) £60-80

353 Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1892) and silver-gilt, with integral top riband bar, nearly extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue £100-140

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MISCELLANEOUS

354

354 Arctic Medal 1818-55, unnamed as issued, very fine £400-500

355 Death of Lord Nelson 1805, by T. Webb, 53mm, bronze, obverse featuring a bust of Nelson left, W on truncation, reverse showing Bellona hurling thunderbolts at War galleys, ‘Ipse Belli Fvlmen’ above (BHM.577; MH.507; S.LL/28), extremely fine £200-250

PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1974

355

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359

357 Birmingham Medical School Prize Medal, 40mm, frosted silver, obverse featuring the bust of a Greek philospher, reverse featuring a male torso, ‘Schola. Med. Birm. L.M’ above, housed in a silver frame with glazed lunettes, nearly extremely fine, with integral silver ring suspension £30-50

358 Birmingham University Fire Guards General Service Cross, silver (Hallmarks for London 1974), reverse named ‘H.A. Lilly’, extremely fine, in box of issue £30-40

356

356 Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire Master’s Jewel, 78mm x 52mm, silver-gilt and enamel, obverse featuring the arms of the company, the reverse inscribed ‘Edward Tozer, Esq. Master Cutler of Sheffield 1876 & 1877.’, gilding slightly rubbed on reverse centre, otherwise good very fine, with integral silver-gilt loop suspension Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, attributed to Major W. Tozer, York and Lancaster Regiment, V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1899) and silver-gilt, good very fine, lacking integral top riband bar (2) £100-140 The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire is a trade guild of metalworkers based in Sheffield. It was incorporated in 1624 by Act of Parliament, and is headed by the Master Cutler. V.D. London Gazette 17.8.1900 Captain and Honorary Major William Tozer, 1st (Hallamshire) Volunteer Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment.

359 A Spanish ‘Piece of Eight’ (Reales) 1814 Minted at Potosi, Bolivia, in the Reign of Ferdinand VII of Spain, contemporarily inscribed on obverse ‘Taken in Algiers by Ge. Jones of the Heron’, fine, pierced for suspension £60-80 H.M.S. Heron was present during Lord Exmouth’s bombardment of Algiers, 27.8.1816, and this personal and interesting relic was probably worn for many years by Mr. Jones in testimony to his presence in the Battle. As G. Jones does not appear on the Naval General Service Medal roll for Algiers it may be assumed that, like so many of those entitled to the retrospective award, he died before the official medal was issued in 1848.

Major William Tozer, the son of Edward Tozer, Master Cutler of Sheffield, served with the 1st (Hallamshire) Volunteer Battalion, the York and Lancaster Regiment; advanced Major, 22.5.1895. For the other medals to the Tozer family see Lots 8 and 18.

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MILITARIA

362 360 Royal Warwickshire Regiment Helmet A Home Service Helmet of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, by Hobson & Sons, London, complete with Helmet plate, 1881-1901 standard crowned star pattern with laurel and Garter overlays, in the centre on a ground of black velvet a silver antelope ducally gorged and chained, and at the base a silver scroll inscribed ‘The Royal Warwickshire Regiment’, gilt metal cross piece at top with spike, complete with gilt and velvet strap £600-800 361 King’s Royal Rifle Corps Officers’ Helmet Plate A Victorian silver Officers’ Helmet plate of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, in the shape of a Maltese Cross, Royal Crown above, bugle horn in centre with ‘The King’s Royal Rifle Corps’ around, lions in angles between arms of cross, complete with four screw attachments, these partly resoldered to back-plate £100-150 362 Birmingham Volunteers c.1800 A fine quality Officer’s oval cross-belt plate, 72mm x 54mm, silver, obverse inscribed with Royal Crown above and ‘B.V.’ in large floriate letters below, reverse interestingly inscribed in neat running script ‘Mr. John Innes No. 9 Broad St. Buildings’, good very fine, retaining original reverse fittings, together with two glazed and framed documents relating to the Royal Birmingham Volunteers £800-1,000 363 Ceylon Light Infantry Helmet Plate A Victorian Helmet plate of the Ceylon Light Infantry, crowned Prince of Wales feathers with motto surmounting a bugle horn, ‘C.L.I.’ intertwined between straps, complete with three ring attachments, together with the related Regimental Cap Badge and a pair of Collar Badges (4) £80-120 177

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LIFE SAVING MEDALS

364 364 A Rare Royal Humane Society and Northern Review Order of the Silver Shield Pair to Mr. A.R. Curson, For Gallantry in Rescuing a Child From Middlesbrough Dock, 4.9.1892; Although Suffering From Pneumonia, Curson, On Hearing of the Accident, Immediately ‘Threw Aside His Blankets, And Pluckily Plunged Into the Water’ Royal Humane Society, small bronze medal, successful (Arthur R. Curson, 4th. September, 1892.), with integral top bronze riband buckle, in Warrington, London, fitted case of issue; Northern Review Order of the Silver Shield, Knight’s breast Badge, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1892), reverse engraved ‘Presented to Knight A.R. Curson, in recognition of his bravery in Rescueing [sic] a Child in the Middlesbro Dock. Sep. 4 1892.’, with riband emblem and top silver riband buckle, in A.C. Bloxham, London, case, good very fine, together with two Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes Joseph Smith Lodge Jewels, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1903 and 1904 respectively) and enamel, the reverses engraved ‘Presented by the Joseph Smith Lodge to Primo Arthur R. Curson, Sept. 14th. 1904’ and ‘Joseph Smith Lodge M’bro. & Cleveland Province, Presented to Primo Arthur R. Curson by Host George Harker, for Services Rendered during 1904. Feb. 2nd. 1905’ (4) £500-700 Mr. Arthur R. Curson, citation reads: ‘4th September 1892: At great personal risk rescued Miss Polly Hunter from drowning at Middlesbrough.’ Mr. Arthur Richmond Curson (1873-1942) was awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal for saving the life of twelve-yearold Polly Hunter, ‘who, accompanied by some companions, fell into the water on the 4th September whilst playing on some floating baulks of timber in the dock entrance. She had disappeared, and only one hand was visible, when Mr. A.R. Curson, who is a clerk at Messrs Rolckow, Vaughan, and Co., and a son of the Middlesbrough Dockmaster, pluckily plunged into the water and rescued her. Mr. Curson had only been a short while out of bed, where he had been suffering from an attack of pneumonia for a fortnight; but, on hearing of the accident, he promptly threw aside the blankets in which he was wrapped, and rescued the child. No one was near at the time, and the gallantry of the act was all the more notable.’ (extract from the Northern Echo refers). Curson was presented with the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal and Northern Review Order of the Silver Shield by the Mayor of Middlesbrough, Councillor C.L. Bell, in his first public act as Mayor, at a ceremony held at the Athletic Institute, Middlesbrough, in which the Mayor, in making the presentation, ‘urged the boys present to be manly in the true sense of the word, which did not mean smoking a clay pipe and lounging about public-houses, but in showing their devotion to their fellow creatures and doing their duty as citizens.’ (extract from the Middlesbrough Evening Gazette refers). The ceremony ended with a musical performance, in which the little girl who was rescued participated. The Order of the Silver Shield was established by the proprietors of the Northern Review as a reward ‘for bravery and manliness’ in 1892; Curson was the first Knight of the Order.

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366

366 Corporation of Glasgow Bravery Medal, 3rd type, gold (9ct., Hallmarks for Edinburgh 1965), the reverse engraved ‘William McAuley 1971’, nearly extremely fine, lacking top gold riband bar £180-220

365

365 Scout Association Silver Cross for Gallantry, reverse engraved ‘M.E. Beale 7.8.1944’, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1943), with top silver riband bar, extremely fine, with related cloth badge and a photographic image of recipient £600-800

Mr. William McAuley, citation reads: ‘For bravery in helping to rescue a family from a burning house on 13th February, 1971.’ Family of Five Saved from Fire ‘Mary Fox, aged 11, and her brother Steven, aged 4, of Parkhouse Road, Nitshill, Glasgow, were both “satisfactory” in the Southern General Hospital yesterday after being rescued from a fire in their home on Saturday night. Their mother, father, and brother Robert, aged 2, also escaped. Mary was injured after jumping 30 feet from a window into a blanket being held by neighbours. Robert and Steven, who was detained in hospital for observation after inhaling smoke, were rescued by Mr. William McAuley, aged 22, who pulled his shirt over his head and ran through the smoke and the heat to reach the bedroom. Their father Mr. Charles Fox, who was trapped unconscious in the living room, was rescued by firemen.’ (Account in the Glasgow Herald, dated 15.2.1971, refers).

Scout Association Silver Cross for Gallantry, promulgated 4.10.1944 ‘For his gallantry in supporting until the arrival of a boat a man and a boy the occupants of an overturned canoe who were in danger of drowning at Bucks Mills, North Devon, 7th August 1944.’ Boy Scout Martin Edward Beale was a member of the 17th Wimbledon Scout Group, London.

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368

367

367 C.Q.D. Medal, 45mm, silver (H. Robinson Fireman), good very fine, a scarce named example Coronation 1953, unnamed as issued, extremely fine, in card box of issue (2) ÂŁ200-250

368 Hundred of Salford Humane Society Medal, cruciform type, silver (J. Middleton, Liverpool, 9th March 1898), nearly extremely fine, lacking top riband bar ÂŁ60-80

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MINIATURE AWARDS 369 Miniature Awards: Victoria Cross; Royal Red Cross, 1st Class (R.R.C.) Badge, G.V.R., silvergilt and enamel; Military Cross, G.V.R.; Distinguished Flying Cross, E.II.R.; Air Force Cross, G.VI.R.; Distinguished Service Medal, G.VI.R.; Military Medal, G.V.R.; Queen’s Gallantry Medal, generally very fine or better (8) £100-140 370 Miniature Awards: The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) Badge (2), gold and enamel, with integral top riband bar; silver-gilt and enamel; Kaisar-i-Hind Medal, 2nd Class, V.R., silver, with integral top riband bar, first two with light test marks to reverse, good very fine (3) £60-80 371 Miniature Awards: The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (10), 1st type (6), Military Division (2), Officer’s (O.B.E.) Badge, silvergilt; Member’s (M.B.E.) Badge, silver; Civil Division (4), Commander’s (C.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Officer’s (O.B.E.) Badge (3), silver-gilt, one on Lady’s bow riband; 2nd type (4), Military Division (2), Commander’s (C.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Officer’s (O.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt; Civil Division (2), Officer’s (O.B.E.) Badge, silver-gilt; Member’s (M.B.E.) Badge, silver, generally very fine or better (10) £100-120 372 Miniature Awards: An Unattributed M.B.E. Group of Three The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) Badge, silver; General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., three clasps, Cyprus, Near East, Arabian Peninsula; General Service 1962-2007, three clasps, Radfan, South Arabia, Northern Ireland, very fine, mounted court style as worn Miniature Awards: General Service 1918-62 (9), G.V.R. (4), no clasp [sic]; one clasp (3), S. Persia; Khurdistan; Iraq; G.VI.R. (3), one clasp (2), Palestine; Java 1946-47 [sic]; two clasps, Bomb and Mine Clearance 1945-8 [sic], Palestine 1945-48; E.II.R. (2), one clasp, Brunei; two clasps, Malaya, Cyprus; General Service 1962-2007, three clasps, Borneo, Malay Peninsula, South Vietnam, generally very fine or better (13) £100-140 Note: Service in Java between 3rd September 1945 and 30th November 1946 qualified for the S.E. Asia 1945-46 clasp.

373 Miniature Awards: Military Cross (2), G.VI.R.; E.II.R.; Distinguished Conduct Medal (2), G.VI.R.; E.II.R.; George Medal (2), G.VI.R.; E.II.R.; Military Medal (2), G.VI.R.; E.II.R.; Queen’s Gallantry Medal; Jubilee 2002, all of modern manufacture, nearly very fine or better (10) £30-40 374 Miniature Awards: Colonial Police Medal for Gallantry, G.VI.R.; Ceylon Police Medal for Merit, G.VI.R.; Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service, G.VI.R.; Royal Canadian Mounted Police Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R.; Ceylon Police Long Service & G.C., E.II.R.; Colonial Police Long Service & G.C., G.VI.R.; Indian Volunteer Forces Officers’ Decoration, G.V.R., with integral top riband bar and Second Award Bar; Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers’ Decoration, E.VII.R., with integral top riband bar and Second Award Bar; Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal, G.V.R.; Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., generally very fine or better, some scarce (10) £80-120 375 Miniature Awards: Medal of the Order of the British Empire (2), Military Division, silver; Civil Division, silver, good very fine, scarce (2) £50-70 376 Miniature Awards: Military General Service 1793-1814, two clasps, Vittoria, Toulouse, with contemporary silver top riband buckle; Waterloo 1815; Ghuznee 1839; Baltic 1854 (2), one with contemporary silver top riband buckle; New Zealand 1845-66, reverse undated, good very fine (6) £100-140 377 Miniature Awards: Waterloo 1815; Sutlej 1845-46, for Aliwal 1846, one clasp, Aliwal [sic]; Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Chilianwala, Goojerat; South Africa 1834-53; India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1885-7; Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Balaklava; Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow; Ashantee 1873-74, one clasp, Coomassie; South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879; Afghanistan 187880, one clasp, Kabul; Kabul to Kandahar Star 1880; King’s South Africa 1901-02, one clasp, South Africa 1901 [sic]; China 1900, one clasp, Relief of Pekin; Africa General Service 1902-56, G.V.R., one clasp, Nyasaland 1915; India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1935; 1914 Star, with Bar; 1914-15 Star; British War Medal; Victory Medal; Territorial Force War Medal; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Korea 1950-53, 2nd ‘Dei Gratia’ type; General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, South Arabia; United Nations Medal for Cyprus; South Atlantic 1982; Gulf 1990-91, one clasp, 16 Jan to 28 Feb 1991; United Nations Medal for former Yugoslavia, all of modern manufacture, nearly very fine or better (30) £60-80

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 378 Miniature Awards: India General Service 1854-95 (10), one clasp (7), Persia; Umbeyla; Looshai; Hazara 1888; Burma 1889-92; Hazara 1891; N.E. Frontier 1891; two clasps (3), Bhootan, Perak; Bhootan, Jowaki 1877-8; Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-9, edge bruise to third, otherwise good very fine (10) £140-180 379 Miniature Awards: Indian Mutiny 1857-58 (2), one clasp, Central India; two clasps, Relief of Lucknow, Lucknow, with contemporary top silver riband buckle; China 1857-60 (3), no clasp; one clasp, Fatshan 1857; three clasps, Canton 1857, Taku Forts 1858, Pekin 1860; China 1900, no clasp, good very fine (6) £100-140 380 Miniature Awards: Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp; East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp (5), Witu 1890, Niger 1897, Benin 1897, 1898, Sierra Leone 189899, good very fine (6) £80-120 381 Miniature Awards: South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879; Royal Niger Company’s Medal 1886-99, silver, one clasp, Nigeria 1886-97; British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97 (2), for Matabeleland 1893, two clasps, Rhodesia 1896, Mashonaland 1897; for Rhodesia 1896, one clasp, Mashonaland 1897; Ashanti 1900, no clasp; Natal 1906, no clasp, good very fine or better, second scarce (6) £80-120 382 Miniature Awards: Egypt 1882-89, dated, one clasp, El-Teb_Tamaai; Khedive’s Star 1882; Khedive’s Star 1884-6; Khedive’s Star, undated; Queen’s Sudan 1896-98; Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908 (2), one clasp, Khartoum; two clasps, Sudan 1899, Gedid, pitting to first, otherwise very fine or better (7) £80-120 383 Miniature Awards: India General Service 1895-1902 (3), V.R. (2), no clasp [sic]; one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895; E.VII.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1901-02; 1914 Star (3); Naval General Service 1915-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1936-1939; India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (2); 1939-1945 Star (2); Atlantic Star; Burma Star; Defence Medal (2); War Medal (2); United Nations Medal for Korea, generally nearly very fine or better (18) £60-80

388 384 Miniature Awards: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902 (9), one clasp, Def. [sic] of Ladysmith; two clasps (2), Cape Colony, Wepener; Natal, South Africa 1901; three clasps (2), Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Relief of Mafeking; Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein; four clasps (2), Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, Talana; Cape Colony, Johannesburg, Wittebergen, Defence of Kimberley; five clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901; six clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast; Anglo-Boer Oorlog Medal; Transport Medal, no clasp [sic], generally good very fine (11) £140-180 385 Miniature Awards: Africa General Service 1902-56 (7), E.VII.R., one clasp (2), Somaliland 1902-04; Somaliland 1908-10; G.V.R., one clasp (5), S. Nigeria 1903-04 [sic]; Jidballi [sic]; Nyasaland 1915; Jubaland 1917-18; Somaliland 1920, very fine (7) £60-80 386 Miniature Awards: India General Service 1908-35 (9), E.VII.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1908; G.V.R. (8), one clasp (5), Abor 1911-12; 3rd Afghan War 1919 [sic]; Waziristan 1921-24; Burma 1930-32; North West Frontier 1935; two clasps (3), Waziristan 1919-21, Waziristan 1921-24; Mahsud 1919-20, Malabar 1921-22; N.W. [sic] Frontier 1930-31, Mohmand 1933, the last on a ‘Kaisar-i-Hind’ type obverse, nearly very fine or better (9) £80-120 387 Miniature Awards: Imperial Service Medal (2), G.VI.R.; E.II.R.; Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1887, with 1897 Bar; Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1897; Coronation (Metropolitan Police) 1902, bronze (2); Delhi Durbar 1903, silver, lacking integral riband buckle; Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, very fine or better (8) £40-50 388 Miniature Award: Empress of India 1877, silver, struck on a thicker flan, nearly extremely fine, scarce £40-50

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN 389 Miniature Awards: Meritorious Service Medal (3), E.VII.R., ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type; G.V.R., ‘Coinage head’ type; G.VI.R.; Army Long Service & G.C. (6), E.VII.R.; G.V.R. (3), 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (2); 2nd ‘Coronation robes’ type, with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension; G.VI.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension; E.II.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension; Naval Long Service & G.C. (2), G.V.R., 2nd ‘coinage head’ type’ G.VI.R., generally good very fine (11) £60-80 390 Miniature Awards: Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, E.VII.R., with integral top riband bar and Second Award Bar; Volunteer Force Long Service Medal (2), E.VII.R.; G.V.R.; Territorial Decoration, G.V.R., lacking integral top riband bar; Efficiency Decoration (2), G.VI.R., with top ‘Territorial’ riband bar; E.II.R., with top ‘Territorial’ riband bar; Territorial Force Efficiency Medal (2), E.VII.R.; G.V.R.; Territorial Efficiency Medal, G.V.R.; Efficiency Medal (5), G.V.R. (2), with ‘Canada’ bar suspension; with ‘India’ bar suspension; G.VI.R. (2), with ‘Territorial’ bar suspension; with ‘Canada’ bar suspension; E.II.R., with ‘T.& A.V.R.’ bar suspension, nearly very fine or better (14) £80-120

394

392 Miniature Awards: Royal Humane Society Medal (2), silver, successful; bronze, successful, with integral riband buckle; Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, V.R., silver, with double dolphin suspension, nearly very fine or better, the last scarce (3) £100-140

391 Miniature Awards: Royal Naval Reserve Decoration, G.VI.R.; Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Decoration, E.II.R.; Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type; Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type; Cadet Forces Medal, E.II.R.; Civil Defence Long Service, British type; Indian Independence 1947; Voluntary Medical Service Medal; British Red Cross Society Medal for War Service, with integral top riband bar; Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service Cape Badge (2), silver; bronze; Territorial Force Nursing Service Cape Badge, very fine (12) £60-80

393 Miniature Awards: France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of Honour, silver, gold, and enamel, enamel damage to points of star and central motto, nearly very fine, together with a miscellaneous selection of approximately 24 foreign Orders, Decorations, and Medals (lot) £60-80 x394 Miniature Award: Netherlands, Kingdom, Military Order of William, a fine quality Knight’s Badge, silver, gold, and enamel, some enamel flaking on reverse, good very fine, scarce £60-80

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FOREIGN ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS 395 Honours and Awards Bestowed Upon Monsieur P.A. Lambin, Belgian Railways a) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Commander's neck Badge, 86mm including crown suspension x 56mm, gold and enamel, French motto, with neck riband, in J. Heremans, Schaerbeek, case of issue, with lapel rosette b) France, Third Republic, Legion of Merit, Officer's breast Badge, 57mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, gold and enamel, with rosette on riband, in Athus Bertrand, Paris, case of issue, with lapel rosette c) Germany, Prussia, Order of the Crown, Knight's breast Badge, 41mm, gold and enamel, in embossed fitted case of issue d) Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class neck Badge, by Eduard, St. Petersburg, 49mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker's name and mark on reverse, 1896-1908 kokoshnik mark and gold mark on suspension ring, with neck riband, in embossed red leather box of issue, with lapel rosette e) Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class neck Badge, 52mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, sacred beads all present, with neck riband, in rio-nuri lacquered fitted box of issue, with lapel rosette f) Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, Knight's breast Badge, C.IX.R. (1863-1906), 57mm including crown suspension x 26mm, gold and enamel g) United States of America, Fifth Universal Postal Congress Member's Medal, Washington 1897, silver, generally nearly extremely fine or better, with the recipient's miniature awards, additionally including a Belgian Civic Decoration and Medal for the Reign of Leopold II, the Prussian Order of the Crown missing, and the United States Postal Congress Medal not represented, mounted Continental style on a double braided gilt chain with fixing pins at either end; and the following named bestowal documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Commander, dated Lacken, 28.11.1910, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Officer, dated Wiesbaden, 31.3.1899, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter - Bestowal Document for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Chevalier, dated Brussels, 21.7.1891, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter - Bestowal Document for the Commemorative Medal for the Reign of Leopold II, dated Brussels, 31.10.1905 - Bestowal Document for the French Legion of Honour, Officer, dated Paris, 21.3.1905, with Ministry of Foreign Affairs enclosure and Belgian Permission to wear document - Bestowal Document for the Prussian Order of the Crown, Knight, dated 12.7.1896, with Belgian Permission to wear document, and various Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs enclosures and congratulatory letters

Monsieur P. Lambin - Bestowal Document for the Russian Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class, dated 24.10.1907, with Russian Railways enclosure letter and Belgian Permission to wear document - Bestowal Document for the Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure, 3rd Class, with Belgian Permission to wear document, and Imperial Railway Bureau of Japan congratulatory letter, dated 22.7.1903 - Bestowal Document for the Danish Order of the Dannebrog, Knight, dated Copenhagen, 12.4.1894, with various enclosures, Belgian Permission to wear document, and Ministry of Railways, Posts, and Telegraphs congratulatory letter - Two portrait photographs of the recipient (lot) ÂŁ4,000-5,000

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 396 Honours and Awards Bestowed upon Monsieur Julien Delacourt, Belgian Army a) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold II, Knight’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silvered and enamel, bi-lingual motto, with Second World War Crossed Swords on riband b) Belgium, Kingdom, War Medal 1940-45, bronze, with gilt crossed swords on riband c) Belgium, Kingdom, Medal for the Resistance 1940-45, bronze d) Belgium, Kingdom, Medal for Volunteers 194045, bronze, with Pugnator riband bar e) France, Republic, Order of the Association of Former Servicemen, Commander’s neck Badge, 62mm including tower suspension x 52mm, gilt and enamel, uniface, with neck riband f) Belgium, Kingdom, Medal for the Military Fighter of the War 1940-45, bronze g) Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Society of Former Servicemen, Officer’s breast Badge, 53mm including crown suspension x 30mm, bronze, with bronze A.I.R. palm and rosette on riband h) United States of America, Military Order of the Firing Squad, Cross, bronze i) Franco-Belgian Victoria Medal 1939-1945, bronze j) Franco-Belgian Association of Former Servicemen and Resistance Fighters, Officer’s Badge, gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband k) National Society for Encouragement and Development, Officer’s breast Badge, 64mm including suspension x 40mm, silver-gilt and enamel l) National Society for Encouragement and Development, Gold Medal, gilt, generally good very fine or better, with three unofficial commemorative awards; the recipient’s related miniature awards for medals a) to e); and the following bestowal documents, all named to Monsieur Julien Delacourt: - Bestowal Document for the French Order of the Association of Former Servicemen, Commander, dated 28.2.1979 - Two Bestowal Documents for the Belgian Royal Society of Former Servicemen, Chevalier, dated 20.5.1973, and Officer, dated 7.3.1976 - Bestowal Document for the Military Order of the Firing Squad, dated 16.3.1975 - Bestowal Document for the Victoria Medal, undated - Bestowal Document for the Association of Former Servicemen and Resistance Fighters, Officer, dated 12.10.1975 - Three Bestowal Documents for the National Society for Encouragement and Development, Officer, dated 1.9.1982, Chevalier, dated 20.9.1977, and Gold Medal, dated 10.3.1973 (lot) £120-150

397

397 China, Republic, Order of Extreme Bravery, Third Class Medal, 71mm x 63mm, bronze, bronze-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, nearly very fine £450-550 The Order of Extreme Bravery was instituted by Tsang TsoLin (1875-1928), Generalissimo; Supreme Commander of Manchuria and the 3 Eastern States.

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399

x398 Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, Silver Merit Cross, C.IX.R. (1863-1906), 55mm including crown suspension x 27mm, silver, good very fine £150-200

400 Finland, Republic, Medal for Liberty, First Class, silver, reverse dated 1941, reverse the edge stamped with Finnish fineness mark 813H, town mark for Helsinki, and date mark O6 for 1943, very fine Finland, Republic, Medal for Liberty, Second Class, bronze (16), reverse dated 1939 (8), reverse dated 1941 (8), good very fine (17) £120-150

x399 Ethiopia, Empire, Order of Menelik II (Order of the Lion of Judah), Knight Grand Cross Star, 82mm, gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine £200-240

401 Finland, Republic, Medal for the Winter War 1939-40, blackened bronze (11), one with crossed swords and bar ‘Tolvajarvi’ on riband, nearly extremely fine, together with approximately 37 loose ‘Kenttaarmeija’ riband bars Finland, Republic, Medal for the War with the Soviet Union 1941-45, bronze, good very fine (12) £80-120

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403

402 Finland, Republic, Silver Medal for Life-Saving, 39mm, silver, Finnish Lion on obverse, hand holding flame on reverse the edge stamped with Finnish fineness mark 813H, town mark for Turku, and date mark F6 for 1935, extremely fine, scarce, with ring suspension £120-150 x403 France, First Empire 1804-14, Legion of Honour, an Early ‘1st type’ 180406 Knight’s breast Badge with affixed ‘2nd type’ crown suspension, 50mm including crown suspension x 36mm, silver, gold, and enamel, reverse centre medallion depressed, minor enamel restoration to one arm, very fine, scarce £1,400-1,800 First Empire Legion of Honour Badges were often converted by the recipient to conform with changes in the Legion of Honour regulations regarding the appearance of the Badge.

x404 France, First Empire 1804-14, Order of the Three Golden Fleeces, prototype Badge of Coudray’s 1809 proposed design, 93mm including crowned eagle suspension x 35mm, silver-gilt and enamel, uniface, a fine quality collector’s copy made during the Second Empire, good very fine, scarce £400-600

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405

406

x405 France, Kingdom, Second Restoration 1815-30, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 65mm including crown suspension x 45mm, silver, gold, and enamel, Hallmarked on obverse tassel, minor enamel damage to one point of arm, otherwise good very fine £200-300

x406 France, Second Empire, Campaign in Mexico Medal 1862-63, by E. Falot, Paris, silver, nearly extremely fine, with original embroided riband £200-300

x407 Germany, Baden, Order of the Lion of Zahringen, Military Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including Oakleaves suspension x 40mm, silver, silvergilt, green crystal, and enamel, minor chip to green crystal, otherwise very fine £300-350

407

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411

x408 Germany, Brunswick, Waterloo 1815 (Ioh. Siebrecht. Leib. Bt.), bronze, with orignal clip and split ring suspension, good very fine, scarce to a casualty £1,000-1,400 Jäger Johann Siebrecht, served with the Brunswick Leib Battalion during the Waterloo campaign; killed in action, 18.6.1815.

409 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Red Eagle, Knight’s breast Badge, 38mm, silver and enamel, extremely fine, in fitted case £160-200

410 Germany, Prussia, Pour le Merite, a fine quality contemporary copy, possibly manufactured as a replacement, 50mm, gilt and enamel, lacking ring suspension, extremely fine £300-500

412

x411 Germany, Saxon Duchies, Saxe-Ernestine House Order, 2nd type, Civil Division, Knight First Class’s breast Badge, 69mm including crown suspension x 43mm, gold and enamel, enamel damage to one arm of cross on reverse, otherwise extremely fine £400-500 The Saxe-Ernestine House Order was awarded by the Duchies of Saxe-Altenburg, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and SaxeMeiningen. Up until 1864 insignia was marked to signify which Duchy had made the award; post 1864 the insignia is not marked.

x412 Greece, Kingdom, Order of the Redeemer, 2nd type, Officer’s breast badge, 55mm including crown suspension x 35mm, gold and enamel, extremely fine £300-400

PROVENANCE:

Spink, May 2003

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414

413 Hungary, Regency, Order of the Holy Crown of St. Stephen, Military Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 43mm, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse dated ‘1942’, hilt of one sword missing, extremely fine, scarce, in fitted case of issue £250-300

x414 Italy, Parma, Sacred and Military Constantine Order of St. George, Star, skeletal type, 76mm, gilt and enamel, of more recent manufacture, extremely fine £150-200

x415 Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Roman Eagle, Officer’s breast Badge, with Swords, 38mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine and rare, with rosette on riband £200-250

415

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418

419

x418 Mexico, Empire, Imperial Order of the Mexican Eagle, Officer’s breast Badge, 70mm including crown suspension x 39mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, rare, with rosette on riband £600-800

x416 Italy, Republic, Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, Grand Cross set of Insignia, by Gardino, Rome, sash Badge, 94mm including tower suspension x 70mm, gilt and enamel; Star, 82mm, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, extremely fine, with full sash riband, and lapel rosette, in fitted case of issue (2) £400-500

x419 Mexico, Empire, Imperial Order of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Civil Division, Officer’s breast Badge, 65mm including eagle suspension x 36mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband £300-400

x417 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Fourth Class breast Badge, 70mm including paulownia flowers x 46mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red cabochon in centre, extremely fine, with rosette on riband £120-150

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422

x420 Norway, Kingdom, Coronation Medal 1906, silver, about extremely fine, on Lady’s bow riband, in case of issue £100-140

x421 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Vladimir, 4th Class breast Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 35mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, Court stamp and maker’s mark on reverse, 1865-96 assay office mark and gold mark on suspension ring, nearly extremely fine £1,000-1,400 422 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class neck Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 46mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark and court stamp on reverse, 1865-96 assay office mark and gold mark on suspension ring, slight damage to gold suspension loop, good very fine £1,000-1,400 423 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Second Class neck Badge, by Eduard, St. Petersburg, 48mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s name and mark on reverse, gold mark on suspension ring, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in embossed read leather box of issue, with the following related items: - Bestowal Document for the award, named to a Monsieur Salaun, and dated 17.8.1914 - The recipient’s related miniature award, a fine quality badge of Continental manufacture in gold and enamel £4,000-5,000

421

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424

424 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Third Class breast Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 39mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark on reverse, 1896-1908 kokoshnik mark, maker’s mark, and gold mark on suspension ring, slight re-soldering to attached eagles in one angle of cross, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with original loop suspension replaced, but present, with a Continental-style ring suspension £800-1,200 425 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Third Class breast Badge, 39mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, obscured maker’s mark on reverse, gold mark on suspension ring, nearly very fine, with a Continentalstyle ring suspension £650-750 426 Russia, Imperial, Medal for Blameless Service in the Prison Guard, Nicholas II, 36mm, silver, good fine and scarce £200-250

427 Russia, Imperial, Medal for the 100th Anniversary of the War of 1812, bronze, good fine Russia, Imperial, Commemorative Medal for the 300th Anniversary of the Romanov Dynasty, bronze, nearly very fine Russia, Imperial, Red Cross Medal for the RussoJapanese War 1904-05, silver and enamel, nearly very fine Russia, Imperia, Cross for Service in the Caucasus 1864, 50mm, bronze, a later cast copy, lacking swords, uniface, fair (4) £50-100 428 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker, breast Badge, with Swords, 35mm, gilt and enamel, good very fine £300-400 The Order of St. Nicholas the Miracle Worker came in one class and was instituted in 1929 by H.I.M. Kyrille Vladimirovitch, a cousin of Tsar Nicholas II and, following the murder of the Romanov family, the pretender to the throne. The Badge of the Order could be obtained by any Russian veteran of the Great War, and had to be bought by the recipient.

x429 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of the Red Banner, 4th type breast Badge, with riband suspension, ‘CCCP’ obverse, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘434631’, nearly extremely fine £200-300

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430 x430 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Suvorov, Third Class, 3rd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘2324’, lacking reverse screw plate, nearly extremely fine £2,000-3,000

431

432

x431 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Second Class, 1st type, 2nd variation breast Badge, with screwback suspension, gold and silver, reverse officially numbered ‘429’, good very fine, scarce £3,000-4,000

x432 Russia, Soviet Union, Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky, Third Class, 2nd type breast Badge, with screwback suspension, silver, reverse officially numbered ‘2714’, lacking reverse screw plate, very fine and a very low serial number for this type £2,000-3,000

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434 433 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Fourth Class breast Badge, 78mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 62mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, minor enamel damage to two points of star on obverse, otherwise good very fine, in case of issue ÂŁ240-280

x434 Vatican, Holy See, Order of Christ, set of early Insignia from the reign of Pope Pius IX, 1846-1878, neck Badge, 120mm including crown and trophy of arms suspension, gold and enamel; Star, 75mm, silver, gold, and enamel, extremely fine, rare (2) ÂŁ2,800-3,200 PROVENANCE:

Sotheby, 11.5.1989

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435 x436 Vatican, Holy See, Order of the Holy Sepulchre, Civil Division, a late 19th Century Knight Grand Cross Star, by G. Wolfers, Brussels, 83mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, about extremely fine £300-400

x435 Vatican, Holy See, Order of Christ, a Superb Quality Star, by P. Stopin, Palais Royal, c.1860, 77mm, silver, gold, and enamel, no wreath, maker’s cartouche on reverse, extremely fine £1,400-1,800 PROVENANCE:

MacNamara Collection

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x437 Vatican, Holy See, Order of St. Gregory, Civil Division, an early 19th Century Knight Grand Cross set of Insignia, sash Badge, 67mm including wreath suspension x 47mm, gold and enamel; Star, 74mm, silver, gold, and enamel, nearly extremely fine, very rare, with full original sash riband (2) £800-1,200 x438 Vatican, Holy See, Order of Pius, Knight Grand Cross set of Insignia, by Tanfani, Rome, c.1865, sash Badge, 57mm, gilt and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse; Star, 79mm, silver, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, nearly extremely fine, rare, with full sash riband (2) £1,600-2,000 Attributed to Isma’il Pasha, Khedive of Egypt 1863-79 PROVENANCE:

Spink 1991

437

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A FINE SELECTION OF FLYING AWARDS FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE LATE ARTHUR JONES ESQ. The majority of the following 59 Lots come with a large quantity of copied research material. 439 A Fine ‘Civil Division’ C.B.E., Great War Fighter Ace’s 1917 M.C. Group of Five to Captain W.T. Price, 48 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Who Having Shot Down 2 Enemy Scouts, 9.5.1917, Became Lothar von Richthofen’s 22nd Victory on the Same Day a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel b) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued c) British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. W.T. Price. R.F.C.), rank officially corrected on BWM d) Coronation 1937, generally good very fine, with named card boxes of issue for campaign awards (5) £4,000-5,000 C.B.E. London Gazette William Thomas Price, Esq., M.C., Principal, Harper Adams Agricultural College, Newport, Shropshire M.C. London Gazette 18.7.1917 Temp. Lt. William Thomas Price, R. War. R., and R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. His machine being disabled by fire, and his gun out of action, he managed by skilful handling to effect a safe landing, thus saving the machine and his passenger from capture. He has previously done fine work against hostile aircraft.’ The Recommendation, from the Officer Commanding 48 Squadron, dated In the Field, 13.5.1917, states: ‘May I bring to your notice the good work done, successful patrols and combats carried out, and devotion to duty displayed by 2/Lt. W.T. Price 13th Royal Warwicks and R.F.C. and 2/Lt. M.A. Benjamin R.F.C. (S.R.) Observer in the same machine. These two Officers working together have on a great many occasions successfully engaged Hostile Formations. By their pluck and daring in action at all times have set a magnificent example to other pilots and observers. Lt. Benjamin’s cheerfulness and stoicism on the ground at all times and especially when casualties were heavy went a long way to maintaining the spirits of others. On 6.4.1917 an Albatros Scout was driven down out of control. On 9.4.1917 while on O.P. and after having fired a green light to signify engine trouble and their intention to return to our lines, H.A. were seen and without hesitation attacked; diving from 12,000 to 2,500 feet at which height H.A. was destroyed and seen to crash. This subsequently confirmed by A.A. On 25.4.1917 three hostile scouts were engaged, one of which was destroyed and the remainder dispersed. On 27.4.1917 two large two-seater H.A. were seen being escorted by 3 H.A. scouts; without hesitation and in spite of superior numbers and low altitude 3,500 feet, they attacked by diving on one 2-seater H.A. which also dived steeply, the fight finished at only 400 feet and not until H.A. was seen to crash into the River Scarpe. On 7.5.1917, dived from 10,000 to 2,500 feet after a twoseater which was forced to land in a field. On 9.5.1917 in company with another Bristol Fighter Lt. Price with another Observer dived from 8,000 to 1,200 feet on 2 L.V.G.’s one of which was forced to the ground and there again fired at and ultimately left when no movement

Captain W.T. Price was observed in hostile machine on ground as it was presumed both occupants were killed. The other H.A. was driven East. On 9.5.1917 Lt. Price (with Lt. Claye as Observer this time) engaged H.A. which, according to reports received from Machine Gunners in the trenches, they destroyed. During this fight a vital part of Lt. Price’s gun broke and he and his passenger were wounded. His machine was put out of action. But in spite of these disabilities Lt. Price successfully manoeuvred his machine, landing this side of the line, thereby saving his machine, his passenger and himself from falling into the enemy’s hands. Lt. Price was the best exponent of flying on a Bristol Fighter in the Squadron and probably the Corps. His demonstrations to and with new pilots as passengers over the aerodrome instilled great confidence in young officers, besides showing them how the machine could and should be handled; an example which most of them followed with excellent results.’

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Captain William Thomas Price, C.B.E., M.C. (1895-1982), born Cheltenham; educated at Christ’s College, London and Reading University; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 13th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 26.8.1915; attached Royal Flying Corps and gained Royal Aero Club Certificate (No. 4121), 28.11.1916; confirmed and gazetted Flying Officer on the latter date; accompanied 48 (Fighter) Squadron (BF2b’s) as a ‘founder member’ to Bertangles, France, 8.3.1917; the squadron’s first patrol (flying F2a’s) was on the 5th April during the Battle of Arras and, as a consequence of using defensive tactics unsuited to the aircraft, it went disastrously; four of the six aircraft on patrol were shot down by Jasta 11, including that of Captain W. Leefe-Robinson, V.C.; in the next eleven days a further eight aircraft were lost before one or two pilots started to fly the twoseater aircraft like a single-seater fighting scout; one of those pilots was Price who drove down an enemy scout out of control over Douai, 6.4.1917; three days later he destroyed an Albatros over Arras; working in tandem with another Bristol he drove down out of control another Albatros over Vitry, 23.4.1917; two days later he destroyed an enemy scout over Arras, before sharing another destroyed over Vitry, 27.4.1917; on the 9th of May he destroyed two enemy aircraft, both over the Vitry area, before both he and his Observer (Second Lieutenant C.G. Claye) were wounded and forced down to a crash-landing by the great German Ace, Lothar von Richthofen (brother of ‘The Red Baron’); Price was the von Richthofen’s 22nd victory out of an eventual 40; despite his wounds Price managed to safely land in British lines, north-east of Fampoux; the Combat Report taken by Captain Wall in the Ambulance Train on the day of the action gives the following, ‘Lieutenant Price states that: Whilst on Offensive Patrol over Vitry with a formation led by Lt. Holliday, he observed an enemy Scout machine flying about 1,000 feet below. He dived to engage the hostile machine and continued firing upon it until his gun stopped. On recovering from the dive he found himself attacked by five enemy machines which neither he nor his Observer had previously seen. Two of these fastened on to his tail, and he was unable to shake them off even by the most rapid manoeuvring. Finally he got into a spin from which he was able to recover only with extreme difficulty. Upon straightening out he found himself only a few feet from the ground with a hostile machine still after him. He was now compelled to land and he pancaked his machine on to the ground, his undercarriage settling into a shell hole. The enemy machine was lost to view.’ Price was presented with his M.C. by the King at Buckingham Palace, 9.3.1918; after leaving the R.A.F. ‘he flew for a time with a civilian aviation company, giving joyrides to holiday-makers in Blackpool. His career-path changed dramatically when he became a Lecturer in Dairy Husbandry at the Staffordshire Farm Institute from 1920 to 1922, before going on to lecture on Estate Management at the Harper Agricultural College from 1922 to 1924.... In 1926, he was appointed Organiser of Agricultural Education, a position he held until 1946, when he was made Principal of the Harper Adams Agricultural College. In 1960, Price was awarded the C.B.E. for his contribution to British agriculture, retiring two years later. Price worked for the BBC as an agricultural correspondent, as well as writing books and articles on his particular expertise, the breeding and care of pigs. (The Military Cross to Flying Personnel of Great Britain and the Empire 1914-1919, H. Giblin and N. Franks, refer); resided in Leamington Spa in later life.

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440 440 An Outstanding Great War ‘1914 Cavalry D.S.O.’ and 1917 Reconnaissance Pilot’s Second Award Bar Group of Seven to Major C.E. ‘Chas’ Bryant, 12th Lancers and Royal Flying Corps; For Playing a Prominent Role in Leading the Charge at Moy, 28.8.1914, the Last Occasion that the Regiment Charged with the Lance; He Was Also An Aggressive Pilot Who Served as a Flight Commander with both 23 and 18 Squadrons, Before Returning to Serve as Squadron Commander of 23 Squadron, 1917-1919 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with Second Award Bar, minor white enamel damage and obverse centre depressed, with integral top-riband bar b) 1914 Star, with copy Bar (Capt: C.E. Bryant. 12/Lrs:) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Major C.E. Bryant. R.A.F.), minor official correction to surname on BWM d) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf e) France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘1914-1918’, avec Palmes, generally nearly very fine or better (7) £4,500-5,500 D.S.O. London Gazette 18.2.1915 Charles Edgar Bryant, Capt. 12th (Prince of Wales Royal) Lancers ‘For services in connection with operations in the field.’ D.S.O. Second Award Bar London Gazette 18.7.1917 Capt. Charles Edgar Bryant, D.S.O., Lrs. and R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has displayed the utmost gallantry and skill in leading photographic reconnaissances. In spite of overwhelming opposition by hostile aircraft, he has never failed to carry out his difficult task.’ The Recommendation additionally states: ‘On 23rd April while leading a formation of Bombing machines to bomb Epinoy Aerodrome his formation of 5 machines was attacked by about 20 hostile scouts. These were successfully engaged and the raid carried out. One of the hostile scouts was driven down by Captain Bryant completely out of control. On March 6th 1917 he carried out an urgently needed reconnaissance of the localities Havrincourt - Vaulx Vraucourt - Ervillers during nearly the whole of which his formation carried out an engagement with vastly superior numbers of enemy machines. Captain Bryant led his formation with the greatest skill, drove down one hostile scout out of control, and a second with its engine damaged.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 17.2.1915 Bryant, Capt. C.E., 12th Lancers ‘For gallant and distinguished service in the field.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Major Charles Edgar Bryant, D.S.O., Royal Air Force (France) ‘For valuable services rendered during the war.’ France, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 21.9.1918 Capt. (T./Major) Charles Edgar Bryant, D.S.O. The Recommendation states: ‘For rendering a great service to the French Army during the German offensive of March and April 1918. Every day he carried out reconnaissance at low altitude and provided precise photographs.’

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria Major Charles Edgar ‘Chas’ Bryant, D.S.O. (1885-1950); commissioned Second Lieutenant 12th Lancers, 21.5.1905; whilst serving with the regiment in India he became a notable big game hunter and polo player; he was a member of the Subalterns’ Cup winning team in both 1908 and 1909; appointed Adjutant, April 1914, and was to join the 7th Hussars in India, July 1914; due to the outbreak of the Great War he remained as Adjutant with the 12th Lancers and served with the regiment in the French Theatre of War, from 17.8.1914; the Regimental Journal gives the following for the actions behind the award of Bryant’s D.S.O., ‘The Regiment, however, have always regarded the award as being for the action at Moy. On 28th August, 1914, the 12th Royal Lancers were resting in the grounds of the Chateau of Moy, on the River Oise, when gunfire was heard. This was assumed to come from a patrol of the Scots Greys which, along with the 20th Hussars and the Twelfth, was part of the 5th Cavalry Brigade. The Regiment was ordered to saddle up immediately, and ride towards the sound of the firing. The commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Wormald, and the Adjutant, Captain Bryant, led the Regiment. ‘C’ Squadron under Captain J.C. Michell, and Lieutenant Styles’ machine gun section followed close behind. A squadron of German cavalry was spotted, about half a mile away, moving in close formation down the hill towards Moy on the east side of the road. ‘C’ Squadron and the machine gun section dismounted to engage the enemy. Rapid fire forced the Germans to dismount also, and they retreated disorganised up the forward slope of the hill to the crest. By this time ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons had arrived, and these were ordered to move under cover to some high ground on the Germans’ east flank. Brigadier-General Sir Philip Chetwode Bart., commanding the 5th Cavalry Brigade, sent two squadrons of the Greys to support ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons of the Twelfth. He also sent the 20th Hussars west of the St. Quentin road in order to attempt to turn the Germans’ east flank. The 13 pounder guns of ‘J’ Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, then came into action in support of ‘C’ Squadron. Lieutenant-Colonel Wormald now decided to try to close the distance between ‘C’ Squadron and the enemy, while the latter’s attention was engaged by ‘A’ and ‘B’ Squadrons. Thus he ordered ‘C’ Squadron to mount, and sent Captain Bryant ahead to reconnoitre. Bryant found the ground immediately in front of the German position was such that it was possible to approach within fifty yards of it without being seen. Reporting back to Lieutenant-Colonel Wormald, he gave his opinion that the ground offered a wonderful opportunity for a charge. Wormald agreed, and moved ‘C’ Squadron forward, forming line just below the crest of a hill. As the squadron topped the crest ‘Gallop’ and ‘Charge’ were sounded in quick succession by Trumpet-Major Mowlam and the ‘C’ Squadron trumpeter. The squadron, led by a small group consisting of Wormald, Bryant, Mowlam and the Colonel’s two orderlies (Privates Pacey and Nolan), rapidly closed with the enemy. Surprise was complete, though the Regiment did suffer casualties; particularly among the leading group: Wormald was wounded, Mowlam was wounded in the thigh and later captured, Private Nolan was killed, and Private Pacey, had his horse shot from under him. Only Bryant was unscathed, and he passed through the enemy position having accounted for five Germans. Bryant later accorded his success to the type of sword he was using, “The C.O. was using a new Wilkinson thrusting sword (1912 Pattern), which buckled like an ‘S’ and was wrenched out of his hand after transfixing a German. I was using the old cutting sword (1895 Pattern), well sharpened, which went in and out of Germans like a pat of butter.” ‘C’ Squadron lost Captain Michell, killed as he topped the rise, and so it fell to Bryant to rally the Squadron after it had also passed right through the German position. Bryant led ‘C’ Squadron back through the position to the bottom of the hill, and then wheeled to charge a second time. The squadron

Major C.E. Bryant

reformed, and withdrew under the covering fire of ‘J’ Battery and the rest of the Brigade. ‘C’ Squadron’s other casualties were three killed and six wounded’; the German regiment that had been engaged was the 2nd Prussian Dragoons, and due to the large number of casualties that they suffered during the action they were withdrawn into the reserve; the charge at Moy was the last time that the 12th Royal Lancers charged with the lance. The Royal Flying Corps - A Different Type of Steed Bryant left the regiment in June 1916 and was attached Captain, Royal Flying Corps, 13.11.1916; posted as a Pilot to 23 (Fighter) Squadron (F.E. 2b’s), Vert Galland, France 30.11.1916; the squadron was mainly tasked with flying offensive patrols; appointed Flight Commander 22.12.1916,

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‘Chas’ and in the New Year his Combat Reports written by his Observers show that he was in the thick of the action, 23.1.1917, ‘Warlencourt. Several hostile aircraft were seen under fire from British Anti-Aircraft about the place mentioned. Two of these machines passed above us at about 10,500 feet and I opened fire on them. After firing a drum of tracer ammunition into them with the rear gun, they turned Eastwards and disappeared’; 6.2.1917, ‘While on Defensive Patrol near Le Sars four hostile machines were seen flying low over Hermies in a southerly direction. On our approaching they climbed and turned W. over Achiet-le-Grand, making to attack. One of the H.A. manoeuvred behind us and I at once opened fire on him with the rear gun at about 200 yards, my shots appearing to take effect. When about 100 yards away he opened fire on us, hitting the propeller and the body of the machine, and wounding the observer slightly. F/Sgt Critchley and Sgt. Watling (Observer) came up and opened fire, and being joined by 2/Lt. Russell and 2/Lt. Higginbottom (Observer) drove off the attacking H.A., one of which was evidently hit as it went down and was last seen about 1,000 feet off the ground preparing to land under control’; 6.3.1917 (see D.S.O. Second Award Bar Recommendation), ‘While on Photographic Reconnaissance over Havrincourt I observed a two seater Albatros about 500 feet below us, at which I fired half a drum apparently with

good effect, as he made off in the direction of Cambrai. We then proceeded to carry out our duties, when we were attacked over Morchies by several formations of H.A., which we had seen rising from the ground to intercept us. Our formation was heavily and persistently attacked, causing us to abandon our reconnaissance and join in the fight. I opened fire with my back gun on a Halberstadter Scout, which was directly on the tail of one of our machines, slightly behind and to the left. My fire took immediate effect causing the H.A. to dive steeply away and break off the combat. I could not observe if he was out of control as I had to turn my attention at once to an Albatros two seater which was pursuing one of our machines at very close range. I fired a drum at this machine and in spite of having to risk hitting our machine I opened fire, using one drum. He left the machine he was attacking and my pilot observed him go down with his engine apparently out of action. Immediately after this I observed another two seater Albatros shooting at me from below. I fired one and a half drums at this H.A. who also took no further part in the fight. I then found I had a type K scout on my tail about 30 feet away. I brought my back gun to bear and gave him one drum. He immediately diasppeared beneath us, as apparently my fire took effect, as the range being so close it was hardly possible for me to miss him.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria By this time we had fought our way back alone to over Moyenneville, as our own formation had been broken up, our machine being shot in the radiator and petrol tank. From there until we crossed the line we were engaged with Halberstadters at comparatively long range, using the remainder of my ammunition, which kept them from making a concentrated attack. I am of the opinion that the type K machines were using explosive bullets at me owing to the peculiar noise they made on striking our machine’; Bryant transferred as Senior Flight Commander to 18 Squadron (F.E. 2b’s), France, 5.4.1917; Bryant spent most of April leading Photo Reconnaissance including, 23.4.1917 (see D.S.O. Second Award Bar Recommendation), ‘While proceeding to bomb Epinoy our formation was attacked by two hostile formations consisting of at least 20 machines. 35 shots were fired at an Albatros Scout at 100 yds range. Tracers appeared to enter the H.A. just in front of the pilot’s seat. The H.A. which was attacking the F.E. suddenly turned on its side and went down absolutely out of control. It was last seen several thousand feet below the F.E. still going down out of control. A second H.A. was seen going down very steeply apparently out of control with engine smoking badly’ (Combat Report refers); he was regularly heavily engaged with larger enemy formations throughout April - May 1917, including 30.4.1917, ‘Captain Bryant (P) & 2/Lt. Couve (O) No. 18 Sqn. Captain Bryant was leading a photographic reconnaissance of No. 18 Squadron which engaged a formation of about 20 hostile machines near Baralle. A general combat ensued, which lasted for about half an hour. Capt. Bryant and 2/Lt. Couve fired three double drums at various hostile machines during this fight and drove down one small red hostile machine apparently under control, and had several other combats. They also report that one of the rear machines of their reconnaissance was seen to be in trouble, but the whole of the formation turned on the hostile machine attacking it drove it down. The F.E.s which took part in this combat showed great skill and kept together well throughout. In spite of this fight the reconnaissance succeeded in obtaining 24 photographs’; posted Temporary Major and Squadron Commander of 89 (Training) Squadron, Netheravon, 9.7.1917; returned to 23 (Scout) Squadron (Spads and later Dolphins), La Lovie, France and served as Squadron Commander, 27.10.1917-4.3.1919; the squadron was tasked with operational patrols and ground attack; after brief postings with 20 and 48 Squadrons, he was posted as Squadron Commander 79 Squadron (Dolphins), 4.5.1919; posted to Home Establishment 16.7.1919 (Five Times Mentioned in Despatches); despite being recommended for promotion to Lieutenant-Colonel (Flying) four times between November 1918-April 1919 he returned to the 12th Lancers, August 1919, with his substantive rank of Captain; Major 1920; retired 1925; re-engaged for service during the Second War as a Flight Lieutenant, R.A.F.V.R., for Intelligence Duties, March 1941 (M.I.D. London Gazette 14.6.1945).

441 A ‘Military Division’ O.B.E. Group of Six to Wing Commander W.L. Milburn, Royal Air Force, A Great War R.E. 8 Pilot with 16 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt b) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. W.L. Milburn. R.A.F.), BWM with minor official correction, VM erased c) Defence Medal d) Coronation 1953 e) Cadet Forces Medal, G.VI.R., with Second Award Bar (Act. Sqn. Ldr. W.L. Milburn. R.A.F.V.R. (T.)), generally very fine, with several newspaper cuttings picturing recipient in uniform (6) £180-220 O.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1959 Acting Wing Commander Wilton Legender Milburn (65119), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (Training Branch) Wing Commander Wilton Legender Milburn, born Sunderland, 1899; studied as a Dental Student at Durham University, 1915-1917, and was a member of the University O.T.C.; enlisted as 3/A.M, Royal Flying Corps, 29.5.1917; became a Cadet, June 1917; after training was posted as a Pilot to 16 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Bruay, France 27.3.1917; the squadron was mainly tasked with reconnaissance and artillery observation; returned to the Home Establishment, 25.1.1919; transferred to the Unemployed List, 27.1.1919; re-engaged as Acting Pilot Officer, Training Branch, R.A.F.V.R., for service with A.T.C., 1.2.1941; advanced Squadron Leader, 26.7.1943; Wing Commander, Durham Wing, A.T.C., 25.11.1947; retired 1965.

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442 442 A Civil M.B.E. Group of Six to Sopwith Camel Pilot, Second Lieutenant, Later Squadron Leader, W. Cox, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Shot Down Over France and Taken Prisoner of War, 8.8.1918 a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver b) British War and Victory Medals (2.Lieut. W. Cox. R.A.F.) c) Defence and War Medals d) Cadet Forces Medal, G.V.I., with Bar (Act. Flt. Lt. W. Cox. R.A.F.V.R. (T).), BWM and VM slightly worn, therefore nearly very fine or better (6) £300-400 M.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1963 Squadron Leader William Cox, Member, No. 1054 (Llanelly) Squadron Committee, Air Training Corps Squadron Leader William Cox, M.B.E., born Shrewsbury, 1899; educated at Alatts School, Shrewsbury; served as an engineer rating with No. 3 Wing R.N.A.S. in France, prior to transferring to No. 2 Officer Cadet Wing, Shorncliffe, Royal Flying Corps, 5.11.1917; commissioned Second Lieutenant (On Probation), 9.3.1918; Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; posted as Pilot to 201 Squadron (Sopwith Camels), St. Marie Cappel, France, 27.7.1918; he mainly flew in offensive patrols including, 7.8.1918, when in conjunction with six other aircraft he took off, ‘Height 13,000 ft. 10 Fokker Biplanes encountered at 12,000 ft. at 3.30pm at Morla Court, were indecisively engaged, E.A. diving away East’ (Squadron Record Book refers); the following day he took off at 9.30am and ‘2/Lieut. Cox dropped four 25lb bombs amongst troops in streets of Harbonnieres and shot up transport leaving the village, causing it to panic. Also fired into a party of men E. of Mericourt scattering them in all directions’ (Ibid); at 11.20am, on the same day, he took off on a ‘Low Flying Patrol. Lt. McLaughlin shot down in flames at Harbonnieres. Pilot safe. 2/Lt. Cox failed to return’; he was reported as ‘Missing’ the same day and recorded as Prisoner of War, 10.8.1918; Cox was flying Camel No. B.7157 and his is believed to be the aircraft claimed by German Ace Oberleutnant Robert Ritter Von Greim in combat near Bayonvillers; Cox being the 17th out of 28 victories; Cox was imprisoned at Karlsruhe Camp, 23.8.1918; he was repatriated 13.12.1918; transferred to the unemployed list 18.4.1919; re-engaged for the Second War as Acting Pilot Officer, Training Branch, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, for service with the Air Training Corps, 30.3.1941; advanced Acting Flight Lieutenant, 7.12.1943; appointed ATC Liaison Officer, R.A.F. Pembrey, 1.4.1952; Squadron Leader 5.3.1958; retired 31.3.1960.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 443 The Rare and Emotive Great War M.C. and Bar, D.F.C. Group of Seven to Major A.M. ‘Bunny’ Vaucour, Royal Air Force, Late Royal Field Artillery and Royal Flying Corps, a 7-Victory Pilot, Squadron Commander and Recipient of the Al Valore Militare, Who Was Killed in a Friendly Fire Incident on the Italian Front: He Had Advised Young Pilots on Joining His Squadron that ‘Should You Ever Find Yourself Alone in a Fight, Turn Straight at the Nearest Enemy and Fly for a Collision... And Never Give Way!’ a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, with Second Award Bar b) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued c) 1914-15 Star (2 Lieut. A.M. Vaucour, R.F.A.) d) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Major A.M. Vaucour. R.A.F.) e) Italy, Kingdom, Al Valore Militare, silver, reverse engraved ‘Piave-Trentino-Inverno 1917-18: Vaucour, Awdry Morris’ f) Italy, Kingdom, Lega Aerea Nazionale, Gold Medal, with enamelled decoration, reverse inscribed, ‘Al Major, R.F.C., Awdry M. Vaucour, Valoroso Difensore Del Cielo D’Italia, 1918’, extremely fine, with a superb Photograph and ‘In Memoriam’ Album containing the following: - Two Mentioned in Despatches Certificates, dated 30.11.1915 and 18.4.1918 - Contemporary newspaper cuttings regarding his awards and death - Assorted printed or old copy R.F.C. Communiques - Correspondence regarding the recipient’s tragic death in a friendly fire incident with an Italian Pilot - An impressive selection of wartime photographs - The recipient’s Training Badge transfer card, O.T.C. Record of Service, War Office Letter of Appointment to the R.F.A., and similar documentation for R.F.C. Orders and Postings - A number of Telegrams, including those for Investitures and death in Italy - Copy Letters of Condolence - Commonwealth War Graves Commission correspondence and photographs - Various other letters and ephemera (lot) £12,000-15,000 M.C. London Gazette 4.11.1915 Temporary Second Lieutenant Awdry Morris Vaucour, Royal Field Artillery and Royal Flying Corps ‘For conspicuous gallantry and skill on 28 September 1915, when, accompanied by Captain Rabagliati, they carried out a reconnaissance over Valenciennes and Douai. They had to fly in thick cloud for nearly the whole distance, and several times their aeroplane got into a “spin”. The Pilot, however, succeeded each time in righting his machine, and they reached their objective and carried out the reconnaissance at 2800 feet under very heavy fire.’

Major A.M. Vaucour M.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 25.11.1916 2nd Lt. (temp. Capt.) Awdry Morris Vaucour, M.C., R.F.A. ‘For conspicuous gallantry in action. He attacked ten hostile machines and completely scattered their formation. Previously, while returning with a perforated petrol tank, he shot down an enemy machine. Later, he shot down a hostile machine, being engaged with eight altogether. On another occasion he and his Observer shot down two hostile machines.’ D.F.C. London Gazette 3.6.1918 Captain (temp. Major) Awdry Morris Vaucour, M.C. M.I.D. London Gazette 1.1.1916 Vaucour, Temporary Second Lieutenant A. M., Royal Field Artillery M.I.D. London Gazette 30.5.1918 Vaucour, Capt. (T./Maj.) A. M., M.C. (late R.A.) Italian Al Valore Militare London Gazette 2.11.1918 Captain (T./Major) Awdry Morris Vaucour, M.C., D.F.C. (R. Art’y.) ‘In recognition of distinguished services rendered.’

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443

Major Awdry Morris “Bunny” Vaucour, M.C., D.F.C., a clergyman’s son, was born at Topcliffe, North Yorkshore, in March 1890 and was nominated for a Regular Commission in the 2nd Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery by Sir Douglas Haig on 1.9.1914, as a Lieutenant, when 24 years old. He served with his Regiment for ten months at home before transferring to the R.F.C. and being posted after less than four weeks training as an Observer to No. 10 Squadron in August 1915. Three months later he was awarded his first M.C. Having gained his Wings in May 1916 he was posted as a Pilot and Flight Commander to 70 Squadron (Sopwith Strutters), and on 24 August flew a particularly eventful Offensive Patrol with his Observer, Lieutenant Bott, SouthWest of Cambrai: ‘Lieutenant Bott discovered that the fuselage was on fire as a result of an A.A. shell which had fallen inside the fuselage and was lying on top of a longeron. He immediately tore off the surrounding canvas and beat out the flames with his hands. Just previously the machine had been hit by machine-gun fire in a combat, and the engine was firing in eight cylinders only, and the pressure pump propeller had one blade broken off When near Baupaume Lieutenant Vaucour fired a white light, and turned west as the engine was missing badly. East of Le Sars he saw and dived at two enemy machines, engaging them and driving them off. He now discovered that the petrol pressure piping had been shot through. He glided over the lines, crossing them at 1,500 feet and landed one mile south of Carnoy’. Next morning Vaucour was joined at the scene of the forced landing by First Air Mechanic Warniinger who carried out the necessary repairs and then hitched a ride with Vaucour to the aerodrome: ‘About three miles South-West of Albert they were attacked by three H.A., one attacking from the front and two from the rear. During the combat, Lieutenant Vaucour’s machine was hit by high explosive, presumably from A.A. guns, and 1 A.M. Wanninger was seriously wounded. The machine became uncontrollable for a time, the petrol tank being pierced and the engine stopped, but it was eventually safely landed’. Warminger, who ‘behaved with great pluck in an unfamiliar predicament’, died of his wounds the same evening. On 2 September Vaucour and Bott destroyed two Fokker Es on the same patrol

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria near Cambrai, one being destroyed with the rear- gun and one being sent down out of control with the front-gun. A fortnight later he secured his third and final victory in France, again with Bott, after they ‘engaged and drove off a hostile machine. During the engagement they lost their formation, and were later attacked by three machines, two of which attacked from below, the third from above. The latter was fired at by Lieutenant Bott, whereupon the enemy lost height and tried to get under the Sopwith. In endeavouring to do so, he collided with one of the other Germans, who crashed to earth. The two remaining machines, one of which was damaged, then left them. Shortly afterwards Vaucour was attacked by several Germans one of which he drove down’. After further fierce but inconclusive combats, Vaucour was posted home in January 1917 to command `B. Flight at the C.F.S. as a Captain, but a short time later was promoted Major and given command of 45 Squadron (Sopwith Camels) in France, in spite of the fact he had never attended machine-gun or wireless courses. He joined 45 on 22.8.1917, and by this time severe restrictions had been placed on operational Squadron Commanders, ‘who as a breed during that period of growth of R.F.C. Squadrons were relatively scarce and too valuable to be needlessly exposed to the risk of loss’. Vaucour felt that this was a serious imposition, but on the Squadron’s removal to the Italian Front felt less restrained. Here, whilst still under orders not to cross the lines in search of battle, he flew regularly with the excuse of ‘inspecting patrols’. But as patrols ranged deep into enemy territory it was obvious that his intentions were otherwise. On 27 February flying alone at 15,000 feet in Camel B. 6354 from Istrana he saw three Albatros D.IIIs diving to attack three Camels, belonging to 28 Squadron, flying along the Piave River at about 3,000 feet. He dived straight at them giving the Leader a burst of 200 rounds before breaking off at ten yards range, and turning to inject several good bursts into one of the others, sent it earthwards after its Leader. Vaucour’s next success came nearly three months later when ‘inspecting patrols’ on 25.6.1918 he spotted an aircraft crossing the lines from the direction of Conegliano at 17,000 feet: ‘He was uncertain of its identity or intent from his own height of 14,000, so for the next ten minutes he watched it while he climbed to 18,000. He then saw that it was an enemy two-seater ... He dived at it and opened fire at 50 yards range. After about 50 rounds the E.A. went down with its engine revving and Vaucour saw pieces falling off it in all directions. The Pilot and Observer, after holding on to a machine-gun, fell out’. Later, when he went to inspect the wreckage on the ground, Vaucour found the King of Italy’s Personal Guard standing over it. Retrieving a revolver and an air speed indicator he handed them to the Officer in Charge as souvenirs for Vittorio Emmanuele. At 9 a.m. 16.7.1918 ‘Bunny’ Vaucour’s luck ran out. Lieutenant Alberto Moresco piloting an H.D. of the 78th Squadron, was patrolling the Piave area when he saw approaching a machine of a foreign make slightly above him. The sun was in his eyes and ‘he imagined he could distinctly see a black cross painted on the aircraft which appeared to have a yellow transparency’. Believing he had encountered the enemy he flew over it, made a right hand turn, came down within 60 metres of its tail and tired five rounds killing Vaucour. Then as the aircraft made an immediate loop, he realised his fatal mistake. Moresco reported the dreadful error as soon as he landed, whereupon the Italian Command extended its genuine regret at the death of this well known British Pilot. In 45 Squadron a different version of events was discussed and there was talk of ‘reprisals’, but in the end good sense prevailed due chiefly to the sensitive cooling of the ‘hot-heads’ by Joubert and the C.-in-C., Lord Cavan. The facts of Vaucour’s death as a tragic accident were communicated throughout the R.A.F. in Italy and vendetta avoided. The Times commented: His Squadron almost worshipped him, everybody in the Wing liked him ... His loss is irreparable, but ... he died doing the work which always kept him happy and without which he was miserable’. PROVENANCE:

Aviation Collection, Spink, 6.5.1998

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444 dropped 33 bombs, fired about 3,000 rounds and dislodged the enemy from the edge of the wood, causing heavy casualties. The whole of this operation was carried out at a very low height. Six Albatros Scouts were engaged and compelled to retire. Having landed at 1.30pm he again led a patrol of all available machines (seven in number) to the same objective, again attacking groups of infantry in the open with bombs and machine guns, 13 bombs being dropped and about 2,000 rounds fired. An excellent leader. This officer by his dash has inspired his patrols with a very high moral. All these patrols were carried out in weather which was almost impossible for flying.’

444 A Superb Great War Fighter Ace’s ‘Battle of Cambrai’ M.C. and Bar, D.F.C. Group of Five to Captain J.A. ‘Jimmy’ Slater, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, He Was 64 Squadron’s Top Scoring Pilot For the Great War; Accredited With At Least 24 Victories, ‘In 18 Days He Has Engaged in 25 Combats at Close-quarters, Shooting Down 8 Enemy Machines’, He Was Killed in a Flying Accident, 26.11.1925, The Day Before His 29th Birthday a) Military Cross, G.V.R., reverse engraved in sansserif capitals ‘Capt. J.A. Slater. Nov. 1917. Bar: March 1918.’, with Second Award Bar b) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., reverse engraved in sans-serif capitals ‘Capt. J.A. Slater May. 1918’ c) 1914-15 Star (2. Lieut. J.A. Slater, R.F.C.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Capt. J.A. Slater. R.A.F.), generally good very fine (5) £14,000-18,000

M.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 22.6.1918 T./Capt. James Anderson Slater, M.C., Gen. List, and R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion during the recent operations he attacked a large formation of hostile scouts, one of which he drove down in flames. Later, during the same flight, he took part in a general engagement, in which he drove down another enemy machine completely out of control. Two days later heattacked two enemy scouts, causing one of them to crash to earth. In eighteen days he has engaged in twenty-five combats at close quarters, shooting down eight hostile machines. His great gallantry and fine offensive spirit have inspired all ranks to a very high degree.’ The Recommendation states: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership during the recent operations. On 21st March 1918 Capt. Slater attacked a large formation of scouts near Inchy, shooting down one in flames. Later during the same flight he joined in a big fight near Bourlon Wood, causing an enemy machine to fall completely out of control. On 23rd March 1918 he attacked two enemy scouts near Queant, causing one of them to crash to earth. In 18 days he has engaged in 25 combats at close-quarters, shooting down 8 enemy machines. He has led 50 offensive patrols, and his fine offensive spirit has inspired all ranks. This officer gained the Military Cross for low bombing and reconnaissance work during the Cambrai operations.’

M.C. London Gazette 4.2.1918 T./2nd Lt. (T./Capt.) James Anderson Slater Gen. List and R.F.C. The Recommendation states: ‘For skill and gallantry. On November 12th when returning from a patrol he attacked enemy infantry near Monchy, and also silenced a Field Gun and fired at transport, etc. On November 20th near Moeuvres he silenced a battery under very difficult weather conditions, and fired on ammunition waggons, dumps and enemy infantry, and brought his patrol back safely. On November 22nd he led a special reconnaissance to Bourlon Wood and East of the existing lines under heavy machine gun and shell fire. Much information was procured at an average height of 100 feet and an Albatros Scout engaged and driven off. On November 23rd he led a patrol of twelve machines to attack the N.E. corner of Bourlon Wood. These machines

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria to crash by two other pilots on patrol. A few minutes later another formation of enemy scouts was attacked. After he had fired a drum into a Pfalz Scout it turned over, fell completely out of control and was seen to crash by another Pilot. On 16.5.1918, on offensive patrol south of Douai, 12 Albatros Scouts were attacked. He attacked four of the enemy machines, in turn, and one into which he fired 50 rounds, fell completely out of control emitting smoke and was seen to crash. (Confirmed by another Pilot). In addition to the above, this officer has shot down 2 other enemy machines out of control.’

Captain J.A. Slater (on right) D.F.C. London Gazette 2.7.1918 Lt. (T./Capt.) James Anderson Slater, M.C., Royal Air Force ‘For exceptional gallantry and devotion to duty. He has led numerous offensive patrols with the utmost skill and determination, and it is entirely due to his fine leadership, and his total disregard of personal danger, that many enemy aircraft have been destroyed with the minimum of casualties to his formation.’ The Recommendation (originally for a D.S.O.) additionally states: ‘Since the award of the Bar to the Military Cross he has personally destroyed enemy machines as under: On 31.5.1918, when on offensive patrol, five Pfalz Scouts were attacked in the vicinity of Illies. After 200 rounds had been fired into one it fell in a spin out of control and was seen to crash. (Confirmed by another Pilot). On the same day he also shot down a Pfalz Scout out of control near Illies. On 29.5.1918 when on offensive patrol near Boyellies he fired about 300 rounds into a Pfalz Scout which was flying below. The enemy machine fell out of control and was seen to crash. (Confirmed by two other Pilots). On 27.5.1918 when on offensive patrol north of Cagnicourt, he joined in a combat between Dolphins and enemy. He fired 100 rounds into an Albatros Scout which fell out of control emitting smoke and crashed. On 26.5.1918 when on offensive patrol south-west of Armentieres he fired about 70 rounds into an Albatros Scout which was attacking a Bristol Fighter. E.A. fell out of control and is confirmed by Pilots of No. 40 Squadron R.A.F. to have burst into flames. On 19.5.1918, when on offensive patrol, a formation of enemy scouts was attacked east of Arras. He fired 150 rounds into the rear machine, which fell out of control and was seen

Captain James Anderson Slater, M.C., D.F.C., born 1896, the son of Major John Slater, of 4 Polsham Park, Paignton, Devon; was living and working in Brighton at the outbreak of the Great War; enlisted as a Private, Sussex Regiment, 10.9.1914; gazetted Second Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles, 29.9.1914, before transferring to his preferred county regiment, the Royal Sussex; attached Royal Flying Corps, qualified as an Observer, 2.6.1915; posted to join 18 Squadron (Vickers F.B. 5’s), in France, 10.11.1915; flew in fighter-reconnaissance sorties with the squadron; whilst scouting for Zeppelins with Second Lieutenant J.C. Callaghan, 6.3.1916, Slater’s aircraft was ‘forced to land through snowstorm and machine turned over on landing’ (Casualty Report refers); Slater was posted to Home Establishment, 18.3.1916, where he trained as a Pilot, and was duly confirmed and gazetted Flying Officer, 30.6.1916; posted to 1 Squadron (Nieuport Scouts), Bailleul, France, August 1916; whilst flying with the squadron, as part of “A” Flight, he claimed one enemy scout shot down out of control, 15.2.1917, and shared another 17.3.1917, his C/O recommended him for a Decoration, 16.2.1917, ‘for gallant and consistent good work in the Field. On 22nd Jany. 1917 he accomplished the attached list of photographic work under very adverse conditions and very heavy fire. He made three successive attempts to secure these, as owing to the intense cold the observer taking the photographs was unable to work the camera successfully. Copies of these photographs have been submitted to the 2nd Brigade. On 7th February this officer followed and caught up a H.A. over St. Omer, firing nearly three drums into it from a distance of 50 feet and following it in the direction of Vimy Ridge. The machine was seen by Lt. Le Gallais of this Squadron, to be behaving in an erratic manner and losing height, also Lt. Fowler of 2nd Section Anti-Aircraft reports that he, with his section, observed a Nieuport Scout attacking a H.A. over Arques going in the direction of Vimy Ridge. Owing to the fact that definite order were issued against Nieuport Scouts going near the lines Lt. Slater was forced to break off the engagement. Shortly afterwards a machine was seen to come down in flames on the Vimy Ridge.....On 15th February this officer attacked a H.A. while on Line Patrol over Warneton.’ 1 Squadron continued to fly offensive patrols over the lines against the German circuses; their first big operation was as part of the Battle of Arras, and from then on they were principally engaged in air combat as part of the 11th Wing of 2nd Brigade; on 26.9.1916, Slater flew on a ‘H.A. Patrol One H.A. seen over Hooge about half a mile from us. One F.E. dived in front of us to attack but broke off engagement and re-crossed the lines under control. H.A. dived down to Foret D’ Houthhulst and was lost in mist. One H.A. seen near Menin.’ (Squadron Record Book, refers); Slater returned to the UK for Instructor duties with Headquarters 7th Wing, May 1917; promoted Captain and appointed Flight Commander, he accompanied the newly formed DH5equipped 64 Squadron to St. Omer, France, October 1917; taking command of “C” Flight he flew from Izel-le-Hameau; Slater was thrust into action on the 20th November, groundstrafing, during the Battle of Cambrai; according to the R.F.C. Communique No. 115 on the first day of the battle Slater fired into and dispersed enemy troops and scored a direct hit on a gun position with a bomb; over the next ten

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN days, despite suffering heavy casualties, the squadron continued to carry out low-level attacks; on 30.11.1917 Slater claimed the squadron’s first victory, sending down out of control a DFW two-seater over Bourlon Wood; on the 13th December, Slater was presented with his M.C. by General Trenchard during his visit to squadron; in January 1918 the squadron re-equipped with S.E.5a’s; after several weeks of conversion the squadron was operational once again in March; it appeared that the new aircraft was much to Slater’s liking, as he again made a first, claiming 64’s first SE5 victory, 8.3.1918 over Cambrai; the squadron’s return to action coincided with the long awaited German Offensive of March, and during the period of March-August 1918, 64 Squadron shot down 128 enemy aircraft; Slater’s extraordinary record added greatly to their overall tally: 11th March, Pfalz DIII, forced down out of control, over Cambrai 11th March, Albatros DV, Destroyed in Flames, over Douai 15th March, Albatros DV, forced down out of control, over Masnieres 21st March, Albatros DV, Destroyed, over Inchy en Artois 21st March, Fokker DrI, shared forced down out of control, over Bourlon Wood 21st March, Albatros DV, shared forced down out of control, over Bourlon Wood 23rd March, Pfalz DIII, Destroyed, over Pronville 23rd March, Fokker DrI, forced down out of control, over Graincourt 30th March, unidentified two-seater, shared Destroyed, over Croiselles 1st April, Pfalz DIII, Destroyed in Flames, over Maricourt 20th April, Albatros DV, forced down out of control, over Neuf Berquin 20th April, Pfalz DIII, forced down out of control, over Neuf Berquin 16th May, Albatros DV, Destroyed in Flames, south-west of Brebieres 19th May, Albatros DV, Destroyed, east of Oppy 19th May, Pfalz DIII, Destroyed, Brebieres 26th May, Albatros DV, Destroyed in Flames, over Erquinghem-Lys 27th May, Albatros DV, Destroyed, over Cagnicourt 29th May, Pfalz DIII, Destroyed, over La Bassee-Boyelles 31st May, Pfalz DIII, Destroyed, over La Bassee 31st May, Pfalz DIII, forced down out of control, over La Bassee. The reason for the comparative period of calm in April was a combination of 64 Squadron changing from III Brigade R.A.F. to 10 Wing, 1st Brigade and Slater taking his first leave since February; his return to action in May, was very much ‘business as usual’; Slater ‘was by this time, a most competent and able flight leader, if, on occasion, somewhat unorthodox in his approach. A contemporary of his on the squadron recorded that Slater would often fly a loop around

a burst of German AA fire, should the shell explode near his machine. Also, if he doubted that a member of his patrol had broken formation for other than justifiable reasons, he would dive after them, fire a warning burst across the delinquent’s nose and chase him back in line... Slater’s last successful combat came on the last day of May. It was also the date which saw 64’s most successful day, 12 victories being claimed. Slater led an Offensive Patrol near Las Bassee and found an enemy formation of 11 scouts. A fierce fight ensued in which four of the enemy were shot down, Slater claiming one crashed. Later he added a Pfalz out of control to his day’s score’ (Article entitled Jimmy Slater Fighter Ace, Norman Franks, refers). On the 19th June he was awarded one of the newly instituted D.F.C.’s, before returning to the UK the following month; after a period of leave he was posted as an Instructor to No. 3 Fighting School, Sedgeford, Norfolk; he ‘enjoyed his period as instructor at Sedgeford, one of his main delights being to fly through one end of a hangar and out the other. On one occasion he was asked to give a solo aerobatic display for Queen Alexandra during a visit to the aerodrome from Sandringham. It was not long before the Queen turned to the Commanding Officer and said, ‘Order that young man down before he kills himself.’ Another favourite sport was to beat up the town of Hunstanton at chimney pot height at 8 o’clock on Saturday mornings, visiting each of his girlfriends’ houses in turn. Surprisingly enough the local authorities thought all this was ‘quite in order’. Immediately after the end of the war Jimmy Slater continued as an instructor at R.A.F. Thetford and was granted a permanent commission in the Royal Air Force in August 1919. In 1922 he sailed to Egypt and became an instructor at No. 4 FTS. As a Flight Lieutenant he joined 70 Squadron in 1924, flew with 216 Squadron and then joined 1 Squadron, his old unit of 1917 days. He returned home at the end of 1924 and in April 1925 joined 3 (Fighter) Squadron at Upavon, flying Gloster Grebes. Upavon was also the home of the Central Flying School. Flying both on the squadron strength he coupled his duties with that of instructor which he enjoyed but tragically was killed in a flying accident on November 26, the day before his 29th birthday. It was, sadly, the old story of an instructor not taking over control in time. Even so he nearly retrieved the situation. So died a fighter who, had he lived, his undoubted flare for the unorthodox and his terrific spirit would have taken him to the top of his chosen profession, in fact he was just about to be promoted to Squadron Leader when his luck finally ran out.’ (ibid). Slater had been instructing Pilot Officer J.R. Early in a Snipe aircraft, both officers were killed in the crash, and were buried in Upavon Cemetery; Slater’s son followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a Wing Commander in the R.A.F. and being awarded the D.F.C. and the A.F.C.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 445 A Great War 1918 Fighter Ace’s M.C. Group of Ten to Air Commodore R.W. Chappell, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force; Having Achieved 2 Victories in Elephants with 27 (Bomber Squadron), He Served as a Flight Commander with 41 (Fighter) Squadron and ‘A Highly Successful Tour Gained him a Further 9 Victories Between 2nd February and 16th May 1918, Including Two ‘Doubles’ on Single Days’ a) Military Cross, G.V.R., reverse engraved in sansserif capitals ‘RFC Capt. R.W. Chappell. March 1917. France.’ b) 1914-15 Star (Pte. R.W. Chappell. Hartigans Hse.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. R.W. Chappell. R.A.F.), rank officially corrected on VM d) 1939-1945 Star e) Pacific Star f) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf g) Jubilee 1935 h) Coronation 1937, generally very fine, mounted for display, with the following related items: - Two photograph albums containing a mixture of service photographs and family photographs, dating from the Great War onwards - A number of formal named invitations to various ambassadorial and diplomatic functions (lot) £3,500-4,500 M.C. London Gazette 22.6.1918 Temporary Captain Roy Williamson Chappell, No. 41 Squadron, Royal Air Force ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed the greatest skill and courage in leading patrols, with the result that during four days’ operations the formations which he led destroyed 19 enemy aeroplanes and drove down several others, the fate of which was not observed, owing to the intensity of the fighting. He has destroyed altogether five enemy machines, and has driven down seven others out of control.’ The Recommendation, dated 6.4.1918, states: ‘For continued gallantry and good service in the Field, especially during the recent operations. From March 21st to March 25th 1918, whilst on Offensive Patrols, this Officer has led his formations with the greatest skill and gallantry. As a result of these patrols Capt. Chappell’s formations destroyed 18 E.A., whilst he personally drove down two E.A. out of control at Sailly on March 24th, and crashed another at the same place on March 25th. Owing to the intensity of the fighting it was impossible to ascertain the fate of several other E.A. driven down by himself, and his formation. Whilst serving with No. 41 Squadron Capt. Chappell has led 30 Offensive Patrols. The total number of E.A. accounted for by this officer is 12, 4 crashed, one in flames, and seven driven down out of control.’ Air Commodore Roy Williamson Chappell, M.C. (18961982), educated at Brighton College; was employed in South Africa at the outbreak of the Great War, and enlisted as a Private in Hartigans Horse for service in the German South Africa campaign, from 20.1.1915; he travelled to England at his own expense, and joined the Inns of Court O.T.C., 20.1.1916; transferred Royal Flying Corps, 17.6.1916; gained his R.A.C. Aviators’ Certificate (no. 3329) on a Maurice Farman Biplane at Shoreham, 17.7.1916; after training was posted as a Pilot to 27 Squadron (Martinsyde Elephants), Fienvillers, France, September 1916; despite being a bombing and reconnaissance squadron Chappell claimed his first victory when he forced down out of control a German biplane, east of Bapaume, 27.9.1916, ‘flying at

Air Commodore R.W. Chappell

about 12,000ft. patrol was attacked by about four enemy machines. Pilot [Chappell] dived on fair sized biplane and put about half a drum into enemy machine. Enemy machine then got underneath Martinsyde and firing upwards shot holes in petrol tank, planes, fuselage and one centre section of strut, top gun was also damaged. Pilot then dived and with nose up, on left hand turn got sights of rear gun on to enemy machine and fired drum into him. Tracers were observed to be going into fuselage by pilot’s seat, and machine was observed to start diving, but whether on to another machine, or out of control it is impossible to say. Pilot then came home on gravity tank’; he got his second, and last victory, with the squadron (shared with Lieutenant W.S. Canter), 17.3.1917, when he forced down out of control a two-seater Albatros, north of Bois de Havrincourt; he returned to the UK to become an Instructor at the C.F.S., May 1917; posted as Flight Commander to 41 (Fighter) Squadron (S.E. 5a’s), Lealvilliers, France, October 1917; he was wounded, 13.1.1918, ‘At about 12.15pm whilst on C.O. Patrol a L.V.G. was observed at about 7,000ft. over Bois-de-Bourlon. Capt. Chappell dived on the E.A. twice and got off 100 rounds from about 50yds range. When in his second dive Capt. Chappell was slightly wounded in the face and his centre section cross bracing wire was shot, he therefore broke off combat’; whilst on a patrol, 2.2.1918, Chappell destroyed an Albatros Scout and forced another down out of control, ‘at about 2.30pm... over Auberchicourt, 6 E.A. Scouts, were observed... Major Powell, Capt. Chappell, Capt. Maclean and 2/Lt. Marchant dived on the E.A. each selecting one. Capt. Chappell got to within about 20 yards of the E.A. he had selected, getting off about 60 rounds whereupon the E.A. stalled, side-slipped and spun to earth and crashed near

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445 Erchin. Capt. Chappell then zoomed up and was immediately attacked by 6 E.A., Scouts, he spun and on coming out observed 1 E.A. in front of him and 5 still above. He attacked the single E.A. from about 40 yards getting in a burst of 50 rounds whereupon the E.A. did a long side-slip and then spun slowly down - when last seen the E.A. was still spinning about 2,000ft from the ground. Having lost the formation Capt. Chappell turned west, and was pursued by 4 E.A. to within about 7 miles of Arras’; he forced down out of control a Phalz DIII near Niergnies, 6.3.1918, before destroying in flames a two-seater L.V.G. ten days later; whilst leading a series of patrols 23rd-25th March (see M.C. Recommendation above) he accounted for three enemy aircraft forced down out of control and one destroyed, including 24.3.1918, ‘while on patrol at 6,000ft, between Sailly & Havrincourt, I observed at 2.55pm, 30 E.A., at 8,000ft. I turned W. and climbed above E.A., then dived and got a long burst of 150 rounds into 1 Triplane at about 100 yards range, E.A. side-slipped and then went down completely out of control. Lewis Gun drum then being empty, I reloaded and found a Triplane, painted red, on my tail. I managed to get on E.A.’s tail, and got burst of nearly 200 rounds from both guns into

E.A. from about 75 yards range. E.A. dived vertically and then turned over on his back and was still in this position at about 2,000ft. from ground’; his final success of the Great War came when he forced down out of control a two-seater, south-east of Arras, 16.5.1918; returned to the Home Establishment, July 1918; initially served at R.A.F. Turnberry before being posted with 84 Squadron, Shaibah, Iraq, 1922; he was employed as a Test Pilot at R.A.F. Henlow, 1924, before serving as ‘Language Officer’, in the Embassy in Tokyo; returned to Japan to give instruction in air fighting to the Japanese Navy, 1930; after brief appointments in Palestine and at Tangmere he returned to Japan in 1934 as Air Attache with the rank of Wing Commander; Group Captain 1938, appointed Deputy Director of Intelligence, Air Ministry, Far East Section, the following year; was serving as RAF Representative Far East Command Bureau, Singapore, when the latter was invaded by Japan; upon his return to the UK was appointed Chief Intelligence Officer, Fighter Command, 1942; after serving in several other Intelligence postings he retired Air Commodore, 1946.

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446 446 Family Group A Great War ‘1917 Salonika Front’ M.C. Group of Four to Captain H.J. Scales, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Flight Commander of 47 and 150 Squadrons, He Was Killed in a Flying Accident Over Kirec Aerodrome, 12.6.1918 a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) 1914-15 Star (2290 Pte. H.J. Scales. C. Of Lond. Yeo.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. H.J. Scales. R.A.F.), VM officially re-impressed, generally good very fine or better Three: Lieutenant J.W.H. Scales, Royal Air Force 1914-15 Star (2833 Pte. J. Scales. C. Of Lond. Yeo.), very lightly impressed; British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. J.W.H. Scales. R.A.F.), nearly extremely fine (7) £2,800-3,200 M.C. London Gazette 1.1.1918 T./2nd Lt. Herbert James Scales, Gen. List and R.F.C. (Macedonia) ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with the War.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 28.11.1917 T. Lt. H.J. Scales, Gen List and R.F.C. (Salonika)

Captain Herbert James Scales, M.C., born Surrey; enlisted as Trooper, City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders), August 1914; Acting Corporal 5.11.1915; served in the Egyptian Theatre of War, from 7.5.1915; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 11th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, May 1916; attached Temporary Second Lieutenant Royal Flying Corps, 9.2.1917; after training posted as a Pilot to 47 (Fighter) Squadron (Vickers F.B. 19’s, B.E. 12’s and S.E.5a’s), Janes, Salonika, May 1917; the squadron was tasked with reconnaissance and fighter duties, and on 19.7.1917, Scales was in combat with an L.V.G. over Lake Doiran, ‘I went up in response to an E.A. message. When I first saw the enemy machine I was about 3,000ft. Below, but I got directly underneath it and followed its course climbing steadily. When I got to within 1,000ft. It came down to my level and turned to the right. The Pilot and Observer were obviously unaware of the presence of my machine in the vicinity and I therefore got them well in my sights. I fired about 25 rounds when my gun jammed and as I was unable to clear it I came down. I was using tracer ammunition and what shots I did fire appeared to be going into the machine which was not more than 50 yards away’; on 8.8.1917, in combat with an Albatros single seater over Petric, ‘I was escorting bombing machines from 17 Squadron. After bombs had been dropped and the machines were getting into formation again the hostile machine approached at great speed and dived right through the centre of the formation on to a B.E. 2e I turned

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446 and dived upon the hostile machine and fired about 30 rounds with my Vickers gun. The hostile machine turned off to the left and went straight down’; on 21.9.1917, in combat with an Albatros two-seater over Pobreg, ‘I went up in response to a message received to the effect that an enemy machine was doing a shoot. Upon reaching 12,500ft. I saw the machine above me at about 15,000ft. I followed up underneath it climbing, and when I got to about 13,500ft. I opened fire with my vertical gun with the object of chasing it off as quickly as possible. I exhausted all my top gun ammunition without accomplishing that purpose and I then climbed up to 15,000ft and engaged with my Vickers. The enemy machine immediately turned about and went off over the enemy lines. I followed firing but eventually lost the machine owing to its superior speed. I continued to patrol no-mans land for about 30 minutes after the above mentioned occurance but the enemy machine did not come across the lines again’; on 24.1.1918 when on escort duties, ‘I observed an enemy machine attacking one of the machines of the formation. I dived upon it and fired 30 rounds. The shots appeared to be entering the machine. The enemy turned and came straight for my machine almost colliding. It then went straight off in the direction of the enemy aerodrome’; appointed Temporary Captain and Flight Commander, 12.2.1918; as part of the fighter flight of 47 Squadron Scales transferred to form and command “C” Flight 150 Squadron (Sopwith Camel’s), Kirec, Macedonia, May 1918; and on 8.6.1918 over Cestovo, ‘I left the ground in response to a Zepp message to the effect that 2 E.A. were over Lake Ardzan at 12.20 hours. I proceeded straight to the lines and picked up the machines at about 14,000ft. I climbed to within 1,000ft of one of the machines when the observer opened fire. I side-slipped away as I did not consider I was close enough to engage successfully. When I reached E.A.’s height I attacked from the right flank but had great difficulty in getting guns to fire and when they did it was very

fitful until they stopped altogether. The E.A. was firing at me so I had to break off. I then endeavoured to get my guns right meanwhile climbing to 18,000ft but was unsuccessful. I had about 500 ft in height above E.A. so I dived on him three or four times but I as I could not get guns to fire I turned to our lines. E.A. went down over Hudova aerodrome. Upon landing I examined my C.C. gear and found that the solder making joint between copper pipe and trigger motor had cracked and admitted air. The fact that my propeller was shot through proves that to be the cause of the failure’; on 12.6.1918 Scales took off to take part in bomber escort duties, whilst he was gaining height near Kirec aerodrome the machine suddenly crashed to earth and he was killed, ‘His loss was keenly felt by all those in 47 who had flown with him. Tall, always immaculate, generous to a degree, and a keen flier who sought the most dangerous jobs, Captain Scales was a loss to the Air Force’ (Over The Balkans And South Russia, refers); Scales is buried in Sarigol Military Cemetery, Greece. Lieutenant John W. Henry Scales, born Surrey; enlisted as Trooper, City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders), September 1914; transferred Lance-Corporal, Army Service Corps, December 1914; served in the Egyptian Theatre of War, from 11.4.1915, and subsequently served as a Driver with the Light Armoured Car Brigade, from May 1916; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), Royal Flying Corps, 27.2.1917; undertook his training in Egypt and was posted as a Pilot to 9 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Proven, France, March 1918; subsequently posted to 52 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Savy, France; the squadron was mainly tasked with reconnaissance, and on 27.9.1918 Scales was wounded in the arm by machine gun fire carrying out such an operation; he was invalided back the UK; discharged April 1919.

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447 447 A Fine Great War ‘D.H.4 Observer’s’ M.C. Group of Four to Captain J.M. Brisbane, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Who Was Accredited With Shooting Down At Least 3 Enemy Aircraft, 2 of Which Were Scored Whilst Flying With Second Lieutenant A.R. Atkey - The Highest Scoring British Two-Seater Ace of the Great War a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. J.M. Brisbane. R.A.F.) c) Efficiency Medal, G.V.R., with ‘India’ scroll suspension (L-Cpl. J.M. Brisbane. N. Beng. M. Rif., A.F.I.), last with minor official corrections, very fine, with the following contemporary related items: - Riband bar for first three awards - Commission appointing John Miller Brisbane, Second Lieutenant, Territorial Force, 15.10.1915 - Commission appointing John Miller Brisbane, Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918 (lot) £2,500-3,000 M.C. London Gazette 22.6.1918 Lt. John Miller Brisbane, R. Scots, attd R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When on a lowflying and bombing patrol, he engaged four hostile scouts, one of which he destroyed. Later, on four enemy two-seater planes attacking his patrol, he shot one of them down completely out of control. On the following day, when returning from a low bombing reconnaissance, his machine was attacked by 12 hostile scouts. He fired several hundred rounds into one of these, and it was seen to

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN crash to earth. He is a patrol leader of great dash and vigour.’ The Recommendation states: ‘For conspicuous courage and devotion to duty with which he has carried out low flying harassing and bombing patrols on Third and Fifth Army fronts. He has inflicted severe casualties to enemy troops with machine gun fire, and brought back most valuable information regarding movements of enemy troops etc. On 25.3.1918, when on low flying and bombing patrol over the Bapaume - Flers Road, 4 Pfalz Scouts were engaged. He fired a burst at one of these enemy machines, and it fell out of control and crashed in flames near Luisenhof Farm. Later, on the same patrol, 4 Albatros two-seaters attacked. He engaged one and shot it down out of control. On 26.3.1918 when returning from low bombing reconnaissance over Bihucourt, his machine was attacked from behind by 12 Albatros Scouts. He fired a long burst into one of the E.A. which went down and was seen to crash. The remaining E.A. followed but could not catch up the D.H.4 Captain John Miller Brisbane, M.C., born Edinburgh, 1897; educated at George Watson’s College, Edinburgh, and served with the O.T.C. there; enlisted as Private, Lovat’s Scouts, 3.4.1915; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 2/4th Royal Scots, 15.10.1915; transferred to Royal Flying Corps, July 1917; qualified as Flying Officer (Observer), 19.10.1917, and posted to 18 Squadron (D.H.4’s), Auchel, France; initially crewed with Captain J.L. Head as his Pilot he spent October carrying out day bombing and photoreconnaissance operations; these including 11.10.1917, ‘8 20lb bombs dropped on Haubourdin’ and 16.10.1917, ‘1 112lb bomb dropped on H.Q. in Cuincy. One bomb failed to release’ (Squadron Record Book, refers); he continued to mainly fly with Head into the new year, including 25.1.1918, whilst on a photo-reconnaissance mission ‘Height 17,000’ Visibility fair. AA fire active. 36 plates exposed. Driven off twice by formations of 5 and 6 E.A. Formation of E.A. seen over Lille at 20,000’; Brisbane was involved in a crash, 6.3.1918, whilst flying over the 1st Army front with Second Lieutenant W. Rochelle, ‘left aerodrome 9.40am... crashed at 11.40am. Cause - Engine was shot thro’ cylinders during combat with E.A. and lost all water. Pilot landed at 2 Sqdn but misjudged aerodrome and ran into ditch’; whilst flying with Captain A.G. Waller (an 11 Victory Bomber Pilot Ace), Brisbane claimed a shared forced down out of control, over Avelin, 15.3.1918, and another between Wavrin and Fromelles the following day; in late March the squadron was heavily involved in countering the German Spring Offensive, and on the 25th-26th Brisbane accounted for another 3 aircraft (see M.C. citation); on both days he was to fly with another two notable pilots - firstly A.R. Atkey, who with 38 victories was the highest scoring British two-seater ace of the war, and secondly with R.G. Gould, a veteran pilot, and subsequent Commanding Officer of 98 and 42 Squadrons; two days after his ‘purple patch’ Brisbane was involved in another accident, this time when his aircraft overturned on running into a shell hole; fortunately both pilot and observer were emerged unscathed; Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; returned to the Home Establishment, 4.5.1918; Brisbane was seriously injured in an aeroplane accident whilst stationed at 191 Night Training Squadron, Upwood, 6.9.1918; the resultant injuries effectively ended his operational career and he was discharged 9.5.1919.

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448 448 A Good Great War 1918 Fighter Ace’s M.C. Group of Three to Captain H.G. Hegarty, Flight Commander 60 Squadron, Royal Air Force, He ‘Achieved 8 Victories Between 28th January - 1st July 1918’ a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Capt. H.C. Hegarty. R.A.F.), generally very fine (3) £3,000-4,000 M.C. London Gazette 16.9.1918 T./2nd Lt. Herbert George Hegarty, R.A.F. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on offensive patrols. During recent operations he destroyed four enemy machines and drove down two. He is a bold and fearless pilot, and has done splendid work.’ The Recommendation, dated 16.5.1918, states: ‘On the 14th instant this officer whilst leading his patrol in extremely adverse weather, attacked alone an E.A. two-seater and fought him down from 3,000ft to 100 ft about 4 miles over the lines. He eventually drove down the E.A. which crashed. Also this morning he, together with another officer, attacked and destroyed an E.A. two-seater which crashed just in the enemy lines near Arras. This officer has also the following victories to his credit: 29.1.1918 Attacked 6 E.A. Scouts in vicinity Sheet 20 E22 at height of 13,000 feet and succeeded in driving down one completely out of control. 4.2.1918 Together with another officer attacked an E.A. Scout in vicinity of Sheet 28 D14 at 10,000 feet. This E.A. crashed in our lines. 18.2.1918 Attacked an Albatros Scout over Menin at 13,000 feet which he drove down completely out of control. 30.3.1918 Attacked an Albatros Scout S. of Albert at 12,000 feet and fought him down to 500 feet and E.A. crashed. Lieutenant Hegarty has fought many other combats and has driven down several which he has not claimed owing to lack of confirmation. He is a bold and fearless pilot and is extremely modest. He has frequently led patrols in an extremely capable manner. Throughout the time he has served in the Squadron (five and half months) he has never missed his turn on patrol and has always shown a splendid spirit and example to all.’ Captain Herbert George Hegarty, M.C., born 1887, a native of County Galway, Ireland; educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen, Ireland; employed as a Banker with the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank prior to the Great War; served as Second Lieutenant, Hong Kong Volunteer Corps, from October 1911-1917; returned to the UK and joined the Royal Flying Corps, June 1917; after training posted as a Pilot to 60 (Fighter) Squadron (S.E. 5a’s), St. Marie Cappel, November 1917; carrying out

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Captain H.G. Hegarty (back row, second from right) with No.4 Fighter School, Freiston, Lincolnshire, and a delegation from the Imperial Japanese Navy

offensive patrols with the squadron he amassed 2 destroyed, 2 shared destroyed and 2 forced down out of control, 28.1.1918-16.5.1918 (see M.C. Recommendation above); he was promoted Temporary Captain and Flight Commander of ‘A’ Flight, June 1918; on 30.6.1918, he destroyed an Albatros Scout, ‘While leading my patrol, flying south over Rainecourt, I observed 6 Albatros Scouts (blue tails) flying north at 14,000 feet. I turned in behind E.A. and dived on the leader firing 3 or 4 short bursts - the leader then spun away. E.A. were trying to fight us, I pulled out to see if any further E.A. were above us. Seeing no further E.A. I dived repeatedly, trying to get on E.A. who were good pilots. At 5,000 feet, I got on to an E.A. who was flying straight trying to get on to Lt. Bartlett and I fired a short burst at close range. E.A. stalled and at the top of his stall I fired another short burst into him at very close range and saw my tracers round engine and pilot. E.A. side-slipped and went into a slow spin. I turned to watch E.A. crash on Hun Aerodrome, but two E.A. Scouts on my tail and I went home at 3,000 feet. At 5,000 feet an additional 4 E.A. Scouts joined in the fight’; the following day Hegarty achieved his final victory of the war, destroying a Halberstadt two-seater, ‘while leading my patrol at 8.40am over Mericourt at 11,000 feet I observed an E.A. two-seater close to the ground. I dived but lost sight of him after firing a short burst from 150 yards range. I returned to our lines and climbed 4,500 feet and turned north when I observed 3 E.A. two-seaters very low down coming up to the lines. I tried to attack but E.A., in every case, turned east, I observed Lt. Griffith firing at one E.A. Turning south from Albert at 9am I attacked a Halberstadt two-seater over the woods near Bray firing a long burst at him from 100 yards range. E.A. did a very steep bank and side-slipped - result unobserved, owing to heavy fire from the ground as I was then at only 700 feet. I saw an Albatros Scout at 8.45am diving vertically very low down evidently the same machine that Lt. Griffith fired at. Lt. Daly 24 Sqn reports Halberstadt referred to above as having crashed and confirmation was phoned to Wing H.Q.’; having completed his tour with 60 Squadron he returned to the Home Establishment, 15.7.1918; he saw out the remainder of the war as an Instructor at No 4 Fighter School, Freiston, Lincolnshire; discharged February 1919. PROVENANCE:

Glendining, March 1988

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 449 A Scarce Great War 1918 D.F.C., 1919 A.F.C. Group of Four to Handley Page Bomber Pilot, Major T.A. Batchelor, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, For His Gallantry in Leading an Low-Level Night Attack on the Zeebrugge Lock Gates, 3.5.1918. A Noted Inventor, He Was Killed in a Flying Accident, 22.4.1918, Whilst Undertaking Experimental Night Flights a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) Air Force Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued c) British War and Victory Medals (Major T.A. Batchelor. R.A.F), campaign awards lacquered, generally very fine or better, with the following related items: - The recipient’s parchment Conduct Certificates, 1903-1917, bound in a book - Congratulatory letter dated 13.5.1918 - A portrait photograph of recipient in uniform (lot) £2,800-3,200 D.F.C. London Gazette 2.7.1918 Captain Thomas Archibald Batchelor, Royal Air Force ‘Displayed great gallantry, determination and skill in a night bomlbing raid under exceptionally adverse conditions. Two machines set out on this raid, but an accident befell one of them, which gave the enemy warning, and Capt. Batchelor’s machine was accordingly subjected to very intense fire. He continued his course, and dropped his bombs on a vulnerable position in the enemy’s strong post from a height of 500 feet. He was wounded in the arm, but managed with great difficulty to return. The loss of blood consequent on the wound made it very difficult to control his heavy machine, the petrol tank of which had been hit. He invariably displays great bravery and skill in action.’ The Recommendation (originally for a D.S.C.) states: ‘For conspicuous determination and gallantry. On the early morning of the 3rd instant he took off to Bomb Zeebrugge Mole and Lock Gates, under the following circumstances: The weather conditions on the night of the 2nd/3rd instant were not good as the Moon was late and there was a ground mist. It was decided, however, to undertake the operation. He set out at 2.30am in company with another machine. The other machine had engine trouble and returned after getting over the objective and putting the enemy thoroughly on the alert. Captain Batchelor, crossing the Mole at 500 feet, released his bombs, coming under intense anti-aircraft and machine gun fire. He was wounded in the wrist, but still kept on and attempted to take the line over the Lock Gates. He was unable to keep the machine on the correct course owing to the wound in his arm and on account of being blinded by searchlights. The return journey was made under great difficulties. Capt. Batchelor was in severe pain and suffering from loss of blood, which made it particularly difficult for him to control the heavy machine (a Handley Page) which he was flying. His petrol tank also had been hit. However, by the exercise of great determination and skill this was successfully accomplished and he made a perfect landing. He invariably displays great bravery and skill in action and his presence of mind and determination on this occasion set a very fine example to the pilots of his squadron.’ A.F.C. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Captain Thomas Archibald Batchelor, D.F.C. ‘For distinguished service rendered during the war.’

Major T.A. Batchelor

Major Thomas Archibald Batchelor, D.F.C., A.F.C., born Aldershot, Hampshire, 1886; served as Assistant Clerk, Royal Navy, and was posted in that capacity to H.M.S. Wildfire, July 1903; served as Assistant Paymaster and Additional Secretary to Captain G.H.W. Moore, H.M.S. Dreadnought (battleship), from April 1907; after serving as Paymaster at R.N.A.S. Calshot he transferred as Acting Flight Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 11.11.1915 (1914 Star Roll gives entitlement to medal as ‘Asst. Payr. R.N. Compensation Officer’ and that the medal was ‘Retd to R. Mint 1934’); gained RAC Aviators’ Certificate in a Maurice Farman Biplane, C.F.S. Upavon, 17.12.1915; served as Armament Officer at R.N.A.S. Cranwell and at Freiston, March 1916 July 1917; served at Air Ministry (Hotel Cecil, Strand), July 1917 - March 1918; Flight Commander 31.12.1916; posted as Pilot to 214 Squadron (Handley Page Bombers), Coudekerque, April 1918; the squadron was tasked with bombing raids and on 3.5.1918, he carried out a night attack on the Zeebrugge Lock Gates with Captain C. Darley, ‘experimental night raid... using a silent gliding approach from 9,000 ft. within 80ft. of the target; the aim was to release simultaneously one bomb close to each lock and a third midway between them, so that the combined underwater blast would burst open the lock gates. For this operation Captain Batchelor had designed a special lowaltitude bombsight and had carefully rehearsed its use with the aid of a full-scale model of the target marked out on the

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ground at Cranwell, where Darley and both crews had attended a special briefing. On the first attempt the two aircraft were spotted during their approach and heavily engaged at 500 feet by anti-aircraft guns, Batchelor and his observer being wounded and barely able to return to a safe landing at Coudekerque’; posted as Officer Commanding 207 Squadron (Handley Page Bombers), Ligescourt, 26.7.1918; he was wounded once again, 7.8.1918, whilst leading a bombing raid on Peronne Railway Sidings; invalided back the UK; Batchelor was killed in a flying accident whilst serving at No. 2. School of Navigation and Bombing, 22.4.1919; he was engaged in experimental night

time flying, ‘another O 400 (F3758), starting a similar flight had crashed in flames at Weyhill on take-off at 2am that same morning, killing the pilots Major Batchelor and Captain Adkins and three of their crew, two survivors being uninjured. Major Batchelor’s death was a severe loss to the peacetime R.A.F. as his contribution to navigational training was very great: his part in low-level bombing at Cranwell has already been mentioned and probably his most important invention was the Batchelor Mirror for training bombaimers’; Batchelor was buried in Penton Mewsey (Holy Trinity) Churchyard, Hampshire.

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450 450 A Fine Great War ‘1918 Salonika Front’ Ace’s D.F.C. Group of Eight to Flying Officer F.D. ‘On Line’ Travers, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, An Extremely Aggressive Pilot Who ‘Zoomed Up to My Left and Met a DV Coming Head On for My Machine... From About 200 Yards. E.A. Continued to Come Straight for My Machine As I Did for His Nose On... I Fired about 100 Rounds from Both Guns Up To Point Blank Range... My Machine Just Managed to Avoid Collision. I Then Turned Sharply Round and Observed the DV Going Down in a Steep Nose Dive, With Smoke Pouring’. He Later Accounted for 2 Albatros Scouts in the Space of 5 Minutes. In Between the Wars Travers Became a Pioneer of Civil Aviation, and in 1943, As a Master Pilot, He Piloted the ‘Golden Hind’ During the First Crossing of the Indian Ocean from West to East a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lieut. F.D. Travers. R.A.F.), minor official correction to BWM c) 1939-1945 Star d) Africa Star e) Defence and War Medals, with King’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, silver Badge f) France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘1914-1918’, avec Palmes, traces of verdigris to Africa Star, otherwise good very fine, with the following related material - The recipient’s two Imperial Airways and BOAC pilot’s bullion cap badges - Several original photographs of recipient in uniform - A quantity of letters from the recipient’s widow during the 1980s - A large amount of copied research including his Log Books, 1926-66, the originals being held along with other documents at the R.A.F. Musuem Hendon (lot) £3,500-4,500

D.F.C. London Gazette 3.12.1918 Lieut. Frederick Dudley Travers (Herts. Yeo) ‘A gallant and able officer who has displayed on many occasions boldness in attack, never hesitating to engage the enemy as opportunity occurs. On June 1st he, in company with two other pilots, attacked a hostile formation of twelve machines, four of which were shot down and the remainder driven off.’ (Salonika) M.I.D. London Gazette 7.6.1918 Lieut. F.D. Travers, R.A.F. (Salonika) France, Croix de Guerre avec Palmes London Gazette 8.2.1919 Lieut Frederick Dudley Travers, D.F.C. ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with the war.’ Flying Officer Frederick Dudley ‘On Line’ Travers, D.F.C. (1897-1970), born Yorkshire; educated at the John Lyon School, Harrow; enlisted as ‘No. 4031 Private’, Hertfordshire Yeomanry, 7.6.1915; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion Hertfordshire Yeomanry, 1.1.1916; sailed with the regiment for Mesopotamia, April 1916, arriving in Basra on the 27th May; as part of the Indian Expeditionary Force “D” took part in the relief of Kut-alAmara; whilst serving in Mesopotamia was attached Royal Flying Corps, April 1917; commissioned Lieutenant, R.F.C., 1.7.1917; after training at No. 3 School of Military Aeronautics, Egypt, was posted as a Pilot to 47 Squadron (B.E. 12’s), Salonika, Macedonia, 16.10.1917; the squadron was occupied with a variety of tasks including reconnaissance, bombing and air fighting; he recorded his first victory with the squadron whilst escorting three aircraft on photoreconnaissance, west of Lake Doiran, 19.12.1917, ‘One single seater scout DIII with one top gun on upper plane and believed one synchronised gun. Hostile Scout attacked from the sun my starboard planes with a burst from his upper plane gun and the shots missed my machine altogether. The Hun was then underneath me and I manoeuvred so that my three top Lewis guns were on to him when I gave him a burst of about 15 rounds. Unfortunately two of my guns stopped but I got underneath him to fire my vertical gun and this also stopped... The Hun then manoeuvred while I was rectifying the stoppages and had another burst at me missing again. By now my top guns were alright and he being underneath I dived on him and let him have my three guns which worked alright. I observed the tracer ammunition all round and into the machine and then the Hun went down in a spin several thousand feet when I lost sight of him’ (Combat Report

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Flying Officer F.D. Travers, being presented with his Croix de Guerre

refers); he took on another Albatros Scout over Stojakovo, 3.1.1918, however the combat proved inconclusive; whilst flying a S.E. 5b, 13.2.1918, ‘I observed an E.A. coming out of the sun towards me and so turned my machine’s nose towards the E.A. As the E.A. was about 1,000ft. above my machine I again turned and followed it climbing in the endeavour to a good target and reach the E.A.’s height which I did and opened with a burst from the overhead Lewis gun. The E.A.’s observer then fired at my machine so I then again opened fire with both Lewis and Vickers guns. The shots judging by the tracers appeared to be hitting the E.A. until all the double drum was finished and the Vickers gun stopped as a result of a cross-feed. As I was changing my drums and rectifying the stoppage I observed the E.A. to go down in a nose dive towards his lines’; on 27.2.1918, ‘Whilst escorting a bomb raid on Platenwald with Capt. Bell also on an S.E. 5a I observed Capt. Bell diving on a two-seater which appeared to be driven down. A D3 scout then dived on me firing but did not harm. I then joined up with Capt. Bell to attack the E.A.’s Four D3’s had then climbed above our machines and two of them attacked each of us with no affect. The E.A.’s broke off the combat for a few minutes and so Capt. Bell and I circled round to get an opportunity of engaging the E.A. favourably. I then observed two of the E.A. scouts above us and one D3 below me, so dived on the single D3 following him down as he dived firing my two guns into his tail until he spun and went down out of my sight. One of the E.A.’s that was above then dived on my tail with Capt. Bell firing on his tail and another of the D3’s diving on Capt. Bell’s tail. We then broke off the combat as all the E.A.’s returned towards their aerodrome and we had to escort our bombers over our lines’; Travers did not always get it all his own way, 13.3.1918, ‘Whilst escorting a formation on the Cestovo

Bomb Raid observed 5 DIIIs above in the sun. When the formation turned round for home the E.A’s attacked our S.E.s from above with dives at our machines. Owing to engine trouble was compelled to spin out of the E.A.’s fire. One E.A. then singled out my machine and stuck on my tail firing. Then did a series of sharp turns and spins to get away from E.A. until Capt. Bell came to my assistance and drove E.A. off a little. Then turned and faced E.A. firing my Vickers until E.A. turned home and broke off combat.’ 150 Squadron - Carry On With the Good Work Travers was posted to the newly formed 150 (Fighter) Squadron, Salonika, April 1918; he continued to fly similar escort missions in the same areas, and in May 1918, he encountered four enemy scouts with painted red cowlings, ‘I observed 4 E.A. getting height over Hudova Aerodrome. As the reconnaissance returned to our lines the E.A. followed at a distance and did not engage. When the recco. machine was across our lines I turned about to meet the E.A... When I got within range they appeared to be D5 scouts. I fired a burst at about 150yards at an E.A. which was slightly below my level whereupon 2 of the E.A. above dived at me and I had to break away turning S. E.A. then patrolled together up and down just N. of the lines gradually getting over Lake Doiran when I turned into a D5 just below firing several bursts and as another D5 above me dived firing at my machine I was forced to break off the combat. One E.A. left the formation for its aerodrome. The E.A. and myself fired periodical bursts, at each other at about 200 yards range just S. of Lake Doiran. At 0745 E.A. turned N. and returned to aerodrome. As my ammunition was getting short I returned to the aerodrome’; Travers continued with his aggressive approach and it continued to get results, 15.5.1918, ‘On returning from

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria Cestovo Reconnaissance I observed three E.A. getting height over Piravo and when the reconnaissance machines were over our lines Capt. Bell and I turned N. to meet E.A. over Cestovo. We dived down on two of the E.A. following them down to about 6,000ft. just S. of Hudova Aerodrome at close range with both guns. I fired about 150 rounds. I then zoomed up to my left and met a DV coming head on for my machine at 7,000ft. from about 200 yards range. E.A. continued to come straight for my machine as I did for his nose on. I fired about 100 rounds from both guns up to point blank range when E.A. and my machine just managed to avoid collision. I then turned sharply round and observed the DV going down in a steep nose dive, with smoke pouring from the centre section on to Hudova Aerodrome. E.A. was lost to sight as I had then to face another which was about to dive on my machine. Capt. Bell and I then climbed up to about 12,000ft. over Cestovo and patrolled but no E.A. were then to be seen. S.E.5a B688 [Travers’ aircraft] was so badly shot about that it partially collapsed on landing’; he shared a Halberstadt D.F.W. shot down in flames, east of Vardarhoe, 28.5.1918, and shot down an Albatros Scout, 1.6.1918; the first week of September provided Travers with somewhat of a ‘purple patch’; on the 2nd he shared a two-seater shot down in flames, S.E. of Seres; on the 3rd he shot down two Albatros Scouts in the space of five minutes and on the 4th he shared another two seater, ‘Whilst returning home from Recco. observed an E.A. two-seater flying N. of Rupel Pass. I dived down and met E.A. first at 9000ft, firing a burst into its starboard side. E.A. dived away followed by Lieut. Hamilton on another S.E. 5a. E.A. continued to make large spirals down and I followed it firing bursts at intervals with both guns with Lieut. Hamilton. We followed E.A. down to a few hundred feet of the ground. I managed to get on its tail and fired a long burst to point blank range when the E.A. slipstream turned me off from firing. E.A. then dived down to about 50 ft. and I next saw it strike some horses in a field turning completely over and crashing just N. of Karasu Bridge. The pilot of E.A. crawled out and ran across the fields’; he achieved his last success of war, forcing down a Fokker Biplane out of control, 16.9.1918, ‘Whilst returning with our formation of D.H.9’s after a Bomb Raid at 1200 hours on Hudova I observed 5 enemy Fokkers coming in pursuit below. E.A. continued to follow the formation until they returned over our lines. I dived down on the E.A. over Lake Doiran several times when opportunity permitted finally getting on the tail of one of the Fokker Scouts which was behind the rest of the E.A. formation. I fired a good burst at close range into the E.A. then it fell over on its back and continued falling from side to side and spinning. Owing to 2 other E.A. engaging my machine I lost sight of the falling E.A. after 3,000ft.’; Travers was posted to 17 Squadron, September 1918, and the squadron sent “A” Flight to Batoum in December 1918 to co-operate with the forces fighting the Bolsheviks; in 1919, ‘he was a pioneer pilot on the Salonica-Constantinople mail service and was the Air Member of the British Military Mission to Rumania from 1919-1920.

He joined Imperial Airways in 1926 as a captain and was one of the first pilots on the African and Far East air routes flying Hercules, Atlanta and Hannibal aircraft.... He became a senior captain first-class and flew all types of Imperial Airways and British Overseas Airways Corporation flying boats and amassed a total of 19,500 flying hours. He first flew to East Africa in 1931. One of his many memorable flights was the first crossing of the Indian Ocean from west to east when he flew ‘Golden Hind’ from Mombasa to the Seychelles and on non-stop to Colombo, for which he received the King’s Commendation for valuable services in the air. This operation was carried out with no aids to navigation’ (Obituary refers); in 1922 he had transferred to the Reserve, and from 1925-26 he operated a private air taxi service to the south of France; employed by Imperial Airways from the following year he started to pioneer the Cairo-Basra-Karachi air mail route, and as he stated in an interview, “We had no radio to speak of, no blind flying instruments that worked, practically no weather reports, and navigational aids which were in their infancy. With temperatures up to 127 degrees in the shade, we sat in open cockpits in the full blast of scorching air from our hot engines. The heat was so intense, the consumption of oil was enormous, and we had to feed in oil by hand from two-gallon tins. We had to force land frequently to wait for sand storms to pass; and on one occasion in Gaza’s heavy rains, water got into the petrol tanks. All three engines cut over the Syrian Desert, but we glided down safely on to a caravan track. Even at the best of times we had to do a lot of hard routine work which the modern pilot leaves to efficient ground crews with their up-to-date mechanical aids. We had to refuel in the desert at emergency landing grounds by pumping our petrol from locked tanks in the ground. We had to raise the fuel about thirty feet - a back breaking job. Landing grounds were strips smoothed out of the desert with harrows drawn by camels. A single line furrow ploughed across the Arabian desert, which was frequently obliterated after sand storms, was the sole guide through that featureless expanse of desolation.” (Article included in lot refers); along with Captain L.A. Waters he was granted the first Master Air Pilot’s Certificate by the British Air Ministry, February 1934; with the advent of the Second War Travers was employed to fly VIPs, secret agents and refugees to Lisbon, he also flew the famous “Horse-shoe” route to Australia; in 1943 he made his epic crossing of the Indian Ocean in the Golden Hind; and in 1945 he commanded Argentina on the first BOAC commercial service to South America; he retired to Kenya in 1951, having flown approximately 19,500 hours, 3 million miles and carried 140,000 passengers; during the Mau-Mau rebellion Travers joined the Kenya Police Reserve Air Wing as a District Commandant (he did not claim his medal); his last employment was a British Government Courier - collecting documents from Queen’s Messengers and delivering them to smaller outposts; he died in 1970 and his ashes were scattered over Lake Naivasha.

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451

Captain J.A. Yonge

451 A Great War ‘Aegean Theatre’ D.F.C. Group of Three to Short Seaplane and Sopwith Camel Pilot, Captain J.A. Yonge, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force a) Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued b) British War and Victory Medals (Capt. J.A. Yonge. R.A.F.), good very fine (3) £2,000-2,400 D.F.C. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Capt. John Arthur Yonge Captain John Arthur Yonge, D.F.C., born 1893, a native of Cranleigh, Surrey, and the son of the Reverend G. Yonge; commissioned Probationary Flight Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 24.12.1915; after initial postings to the Northern Aircraft Company and R.N.A.S. Calshot, he served as a Seaplane Pilot on H.M.S. Riviera (Seaplane Carrier - converted from a Cross-Channel passenger ship), from 1.6.1916; and seventeen days later in concert with Flight Sub-Lieutenant J.H. Woolner, was involved in ‘4 unsuccessful attacks on destroyer 4m off Belgian coast nr. Ostende’; Yonge was also tasked with spotting for warships, including H.M.S. Terror, off Zeebrugge, 24.9.1916; he also served at intervals in one of two Short 184’s embarked on the Monitor H.M.S. General Craufurd, for the bombardment of the Belgian coast, July 1916-April 1917; advanced Flight Lieutenant 1.10.1917; after service at R.N.A.S. Westgate, Yonge was posted to 222 Squadron (Shorts and Blackburn Babies), H.M.S. Ark Royal (Aircraft Carrier), and served on her from 18.10.1917; 222 Squadron was part of No.2 Wing, R.N.A.S., 2 Aegean Group; the squadron, as well as 220, 221 and 223 Squadrons were based on H.M.S. Ark Royal, at Mudros; No. 2 Wing took off from the Ark Royal to participate in the attack on S.M.S. Goeben, 20.1.1918, in what was to be the war’s greatest sustained air attack on a capital ship; Yonge was mainly tasked with aerial surveillance, sea patrols, and scouting for submarines, he is mentioned several times in The War Diary of a Naval Airman 1915-1918, Captain A.F. Marlowe; an Ops report from Gliki Air Station, gives the following, ‘a hostile Seaplane patrolling the mouth of the Straits, 8.8.1918, was pursued by two camels (Captain J.A. Yonge and Second Lieutenant J. Lynch) which continued to engage until Nagara Seaplane Shed was reached. Tracers from both Camels had been seen to enter fuselage of enemy machine which did not move after landing. Our machines were subjected to intense machine gun fire when at a height of about 100 feet, but were only slightly damaged and were turning for home when two Halberstadt Scouts from behind Chanak dived on them. An engagement which lasted 15-20 minutes took place over the Narrows and Chanak at an altitude of 50 to 1200 feet. The enemy machines eventually drew off and the camels, subjected to severe A.A. and machine gun fire from the land, did not follow, as Captain Yonge had expended all his ammunition’; Lieutenant (Honorary Captain), 1.4.1918; returned to England, November 1918; after the war Yonge travelled the country as a stunt pilot, putting on aerial displays.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 452 Family Group: A Scarce Great War 1918 ‘French Theatre’ D.F.M. Pair to ‘Gunner Ace’ Sergeant Mechanic J. Grant, 57 Squadron, Royal Air Force a) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.V.R. (100425 Sergt.-Mech. Grant, J., R.A.F.) b) British War Medal (100425. Sgt. J. Grant. R.A.F.), generally very fine or better, with the following related documents: - Four Photographs of recipient in uniform - Two Letters from the Royal Air Force Records Central Registry to addressed to recipient concerning the dispatch of his D.F.M., dated 20.11.1919 and 26.11.1919 - Two Letters from recipient’s sister written to a collector, dated in the 1970’s 1914-15 Star (1291. L-Cpl. J. Grant. A.&S. Highrs.), very fine (3) £3,000-3,500 D.F.M. London Gazette 3.12.1918 100425 Sergt.-Mech. James Grant (Sandbank, Argyllshire) ‘A gallant and capable non-commissioned officer who has accounted for six enemy aeroplanes. On 1st September, whilst on a bomb raid his formation was attacked by fifteen Fokker biplanes and five triplanes. In the severe fighting that ensued Sergt. Grant served his gun with exceptional skill, crashing one enemy machine, and it was largely due to his good shooting that the enemy were eventually driven off.’ 100425 Sergeant Mechanic James Grant, D.F.M., the son of Simon and Agnes Grant, of Sandbank, Argyll; enlisted Royal Flying Corps, 30.10.1917; advanced Sergeant Mechanic, 2.4.1918; re-mustered as Observer, April 1918 and qualified as Observer (N.C.O.), 4.7.1918; served with 57 Squadron (D.H. 4’s), Le Quesnoy, France, from 6.5.1918; and flew in long distance reconnaissance, bombing, and photography operations with the squadron; initially paired with Lieutenant C.W. Peckham, Grant spent the end of May and the beginning of June flying on reconnaissance missions over Bapaume Dump; his first success came on 10.6.1918, ‘during a bomb raid on Bapaume Dump, Lt. C.W. Peckham and Sergeant J. Grant, 57 Squadron, were attacked by eight Fokker triplanes at the first of which Sergeant Grant fired, sending it down in flames. The remaining E.A. then headed off the D.H. 4, compelling it to fly north. A little later another E.A. opened fired from below; Lt. Peckham dived on it, and after firing 80 rounds saw it crash to the ground. The D.H.4 then returned home’ (R.A.F. Communiques refers); another success followed nine days later when engaging six Pfalz Scouts over the Bapaume area; with Lieutenant J.T. Kirkland as his pilot, Grant shared a forced down out of control with a D.H. 4 piloted by Captain C.H. Stokes; whilst flying with Lieutenant E.M. Coles, Grant managed to add another two enemy aircraft destroyed to his total, ‘14.8.1918 - A formation of 57 Squadron was attacked on returning from a bomb raid. One E.A. which got on the tail of Capt. A. McGregor, was shot down by his observer (Lt. I.F.D. Tanqueray), the pilot being seen to jump out in a parachute just before the machine caught fire. Sergeant J. Grant (observer) with Lt. E.M. Coles also shot down a hostile machine which was on his tail, the pilot again descending in a parachute. 1.9.1918 - during the course of bomb raids carried out by 57 Squadron enemy scouts, which attacked their formations, were successfully engaged. Sgt. D.E. Edgley and Sgt. N. Sandison brought one hostile machine down in flames and drove another out of control. Lt. E.M. Coles and Sergeant J. Grant, and Lt. F.O. Thornton and 2Lt. F.C. Craig, destroyed two more hostile machines’ (Ibid); the first week of September saw Grant paired with Captain A. MacGregor, this combination worked to good effect when forcing down out of control another Fokker over Bourlon Wood on the 4th September, and bagging another brace of enemy aircraft destroyed the following day, west of Marcoing and west of Avesnes-le-Sec; despite the early success of the day Grant and MacGregor were forced down themselves by the machine guns of a Fokker DVII; MacGregor managed to land the aircraft without serious injury; Grant carried on flying with the squadron until his return to the UK at the end of October 1918; transferred to R.A.F. Reserve, 28.2.1919 (entitled to Victory Medal). 1291 Corporal John Grant, the son of Simon and Agnes Grant, of Sandbank, Argyll; served during the Great with the 1st/8th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders in the French Theatre of War and was killed in action, 13.11.1916; on the latter date the battalion were in action on the Somme and attacked Beaumont-Hamel, ‘with 1/5th Seaforth led 152nd Brigade’s assault - advancing north of Auchonvillers-Beaumont Road sustained heavy casualties from machine gun fire before first objective was taken - deep mud then hindered advance on to second line - all objectives taken and held. Casualties - 266. Relieved and to Mailly-Maillet Wood.’ (British Battalions on the Somme, R. Westlake refers); Grant is buried in Mailly Wood Cemetery.

453 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.), neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine £180-220

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454

Captain J.M. Child

454 The Great War M.C. attributed to ‘Fighter Ace’ Captain J.M. Child, 19 and 84 Squadrons, Royal Flying Corps Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, extremely fine, with the recipient’s silver identity tag, inscribed ‘Capt. J.M. Child, C of E, Royal Flying Corps’ £550-750 M.C. London Gazette 5.7.1918 Lt. (T./Capt.) James Martin Child, Manch. R. and R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While leading a patrol he encountered four enemy scouts, one of which he destroyed. On another occasion he attacked one of two enemy two-seater machines which he encountered over the enemy’s lines. He disabled the machine, and skilfully turned it towards our lines, where the enemy pilot was forced to land and he and his observer were taken prisoner. On another occasion he attacked five enemy scouts, one of which he destroyed. He showed the greatest judgment and determination.’ Captain James Martin Child, M.C., born Leytonstone, Essex, October 1893, and educated at Leyton County High School. After leaving school emigrated to Canada; enlisted as a Private in the 2nd Canadian Overseas Contingent, 20.11.1914; once back in England Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Manchester Regiment, 3.3.1915; seconded to the Royal Flying Corps, and gazetted Flying Officer, 2.3.1916; after briefly serving with No.4 Squadron, joined No.19 Squadron, July 1916, flying BE12s and later Spads. He achieved his first Victory on St. George’s Day, 1917, destroying an Albatros north-west of Douai, and followed that up with two more Victories (one Out of Control and one Destroyed) with the Squadron, earning himself a promotion to Captain and a Mention in Despatches (London Gazette 15.5.1917). After a rest joined the newly formed No.84 Squadron as a Flight Commander, flying SE5As, and gained a further five Victories (two Out of Controls (one shared); two Destroyed; and one Captured) between the 21st October and 30th November 1917, for which he was awarded the Military Cross, as well as being appointed a Chevalier of the Belgian Order of Leopold, and receiving the Belgian Croix de Guerre. Returning to the U.K., he was tragically killed in a motor car accident, 23.8.1918, and is buried in Chingford Mount Cemetery, Essex.

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456

455 Distinguished Flying Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, very fine £800-1,200 456 A Great War Campaign Group of Four to Seaplane Pilot, Lieutenant G.J. Pilgrim, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Late Howe Battalion, Royal Naval Division, Who Flew Operationally with 221 Squadron in South Russia, 1919 1914 Star, with later slide Bar (SX1/330. G.J. Pilgrim, A.B. R.N.V.R. Howe Bttn. R.N.D.); British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. G.J. Pilgrim, R.A.F.); Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Third Class breast Badge, with Swords, 37mm, gilt and enamel, of later Continental manufacture, with ball and ring suspension, nearly extremely fine (4) £300-500 Lieutenant George Jack Pilgrim, born 1896; educated at Brighton Municipal Secondary School and Brighton Technical College; served during the Great War as a Signaller in the R.N.V.R. for two years and 9 months prior to being commissioned Temporary Probationary Flight Officer, Royal Naval Air Service, 19.9.1917; after training was posted for service with H.M.S. City of Oxford (auxiliary seaplane carrier), March 1918; posted as a Pilot to H.M. Seaplane Base (Short 184’s), Port Said, 64 Wing, April 1918, and flew convoy escorts and anti-submarine patrols, occasionally operating from H.M.S. Empress (seaplane carrier); at the end of April Pilgrim left with the Empress for Malta; posted as Pilot to “A” Flight 221 Squadron (D.H.9a’s and Short’s), and taken by the seaplane carrier Empress to South Russia to support the White Russian forces, December 1918; operating out of Petrovsk the squadron’s main task was to provide reconnaissance and bombing support to the White Russian land forces (awarded 2nd [sic] Class St. Stanislas - ‘in recognition of services in South Russia’); discharged 2.10.1919

At the time of the award of the Order of St. Stanislas, following the Bolshevik uprising, the production and supply of Russian Orders was severely disrupted, and consequently were often hard to obtain, especially Military Division awards (i.e. those with swords). As a result, the actual insignia were often not presented to British servicemen, and one can speculate that Lieutenant Pilgrim was never issued with any official insignia, and had to purchase his own Continentallymanufactured insignia.

457 Three: Sergeant Mechanic W.J. Bridges, Royal Flying Corps 1914 Star, with Bar (726 1/A.M. W.J. Bridges. R.F.C.); British War and Victory Medals (726. Sgt. W.J. Bridges. R.A.F.), generally good very fine or better, with Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque, ‘William John Bridges’, last with remnants of solder on reverse added for mounting purposes (3) £400-500 726 Sergeant William John Bridges, born Horfield, Bristol, Gloucestershire; prior to the Great War served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve; joined Royal Flying Corps as 2/A.M., 31.5.1913; served with 4 Squadron, Mauberge, France, from August 1914; Corporal 1.9.1915; served as Sergeant with 8 Reserve Aeroplane Squadron, from October 1915; Sergeant Mechanic, April 1918; died of disease whilst serving in Salonika, 30.11.1918, and is buried in Mikra British Cemetery, Kalamaria, Greece.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 458 Four: Flying Officer E.T.H. Ellis, Royal Air Force 1914-15 Star (2. Lieut. E.T.H. Ellis. R.E.), a post 1921 issue; British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. E.T.H. Ellis. R.A.F.); India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Waziristan 1919-21 (F-Offcr. E.T.H. Ellis, R.A.F.), last officially re-impressed, generally very fine (4) £200-240 Flying Officer Eric Thomas Haulton Ellis born 1895, son of Major T.J. Ellis, a planter in Ambala, India; commissioned Second Lieutenant (South Midland) Royal Engineers (Territorial Force), 3.10.1914; served during the Great War with the Royal Engineers in the French Theatre of War from, March 1915; Lieutenant 1.6.1916; attached Royal Flying Corps as an Observer, 22.6.1916; posted to 17 Squadron (Be 2d’s), Kirec, Salonika, 1.8.1916, (his service record erroneously gives him as invalided and struck off the squadron’s strength the same day; the squadron War Diaries list ‘E.T.H. Ellis’ as regularly flying with the Squadron from that date onwards; there is no other ‘Ellis’ given in the R.A.F. Lists for that period, therefore one can assume that his service record provides a human transcription error); the squadron was mainly tasked with reconnaissance and Army cooperation, Ellis spent the first few weeks of August, as part of “A” Flight, taking photographs of the positions around ‘Horseshoe Hill’ and the Struma front; he continued in a similar capacity through to December; having re-mustered as a Pilot, Ellis was serving with 47 Squadron (Armstrong Whitworth’s), Macedonia, from June 1917; he flew with the squadron mainly on reconnaissance and artillery spotting duties; Ellis was also employed on bombing raids, 6.10.1917, ‘4-16lb bombs. One Bomb on Durbali. One Bomb on Kara Pazarli. Two Bombs on small detachment of enemy infantry at Fork Rd. 700yds S. of second “A” in Kara. Troops scattered and were machine gunned. Enemy infantry in wood W. of Gevzekli.’ (Air 29/613 refers); posted to 114 Squadron, India, 24.11.1917, prior to transferring to 31 Squadron (B.E. 2e’s), India, at the start of 1918; whilst serving with the latter he was part of the detachment at Sibi, Baluchistan, tasked with dealing with the hostilities against the Marri Tribe; he flew in reconnaissance operations over the Marri Hills and the Sibi Plain; in 1919 Ellis returned to 47 Squadron, and was posted with the squadron to the Crimea in support of the White Russians; in October of that year the squadron became “A” Squadron, R.A.F. Mission, South Russia; Ellis was demobilised 22.2.1920; he returned to India after service and was commissioned into the Army in India Reserve of Officers.

459 A Well Documented Great War Sopwith Pup Fighter Pilot’s Group of Seven to Lieutenant, Later Group Captain, A.J. Warwick, 46 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps and Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-15 Star (3532 Pte. A.J. Warwick. 9-Lond. R.); British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. A.J. Warwick. R.F.C.); 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Defence and War Medals, generally nearly very fine or better, with the following contemporary related items: - Two Army Book 425 Pilot’s Flying Log Books, covering the dates 18.11.1920- 21.11.1924 and 22.11.1924- 15.4.1930, both with repairs to spine - Card box of issue for Second War awards, addressed to ‘Mrs. A.J. Warwick, 56 Penn Hill Ave, Parkstone, Dorset’, with named enclosure slip

Group Captain A.J. Warwick

- The recipient’s three Identity Tags, two as Second Lieutenant, 6th Gloucestershire Regiment and the other as Private 9th London Regiment; cloth R.A.F. Insignia; and photographic images of recipient during both Wars (lot) £300-500 Group Captain Alwyn John Warwick, born 1898; served during the Great War as Private, 9th Battalion London Regiment, in the French Theatre of War, from 14.2.1915; commissioned Temporary Lieutenant, Gloucestershire Regiment, 25.10.1915; attached Royal Flying Corps, 28.4.1917, and posted as Pilot to 46 (Fighter) Squadron (Sopwith Pups), Le Hameau, 1.10.1917; he flew in many sorties with the squadron including 11.10.1917, when in concert with other aircraft from the squadron he ‘engaged Six E.A. seen. One E.A. driven down damaged’ (Squadron Record Book refers); the squadron converted to Camels the following month and added ground attacks to their duties; Warwick is mentioned and pictured in No Parachute - A Fighter Pilot in World War I, by Air Vice-Marshal A.S.G. Lee, who was a contemporary pilot and ace of 46 Squadron; post war service included with 216 Squadron in the Middle East, flying passengers and mail between Egypt and Palestine, 1922-24; after a period of illness he was appointed to the command of ‘C’ Flight, 32 (Fighter) Squadron, November 1926; advanced Wing Commander 1.7.1938; Temporary Group Captain 1.12.1940; died 10.11.1946, whilst employed with the Control Commission (B.E.) in Germany, and is buried in the Munster Heath Cemetery.

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Group Captain A.J. Warwick (second from right) with H.M. The King during an inspection

460 Three: Lieutenant J.E. Carpenter, Royal Air Force 1914-15 Star (1990 Pte. J.E. Carpenter. L’pool R.); British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaves (Lieut. J.E. Carpenter. R.A.F.), BWM partially officially corrected, very fine or better (3) £200-240

461 A Great War Campaign Group of Three to R.E. 8 Reconnaissance Pilot, Lieutenant F. Fowler, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Wounded in Action, 16.7.1918 1914-15 Star (PS-2696 Pte. F. Fowler. R. Fus.); British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. F. Fowler. R.A.F.), nearly extremely fine (3) £180-220

M.I.D. London Gazette 22.1.1919 Carpenter, Lt. J.E., Royal Air Force (Egypt)

Lieutenant Frank Fowler served during the Great War with the 21st Battalion Royal Fusiliers in the French Theatre of War, from 14.11.1915; transferred as Cadet, Royal Flying Corps, 26.9.1916; after training was Posted as a Pilot, and was serving with 15 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Verts Galand, France, during May-July 1918; the squadron were mainly tasked with photo reconnaissance and Fowler was wounded in action, 16.7.1918; discharged 1919.

Lieutenant John Edmund Carpenter born Bristol, 1889; educated at the Lord Weymouth Grammar School, Warminster; enlisted Private 6th Battalion, Liverpool Regiment, October 1914; served during the Great War with the regiment in the French Theatre of War, from 24.2.1915; commissioned Second Lieutenant 3rd Battalion Dorset Regiment, 22.7.1915; attached Machine Gun Corps, April 1916-September 1917; transferred Royal Flying Corps, October 1917; after training in Egypt was posted as a Pilot to 14 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Palestine Brigade, February 1918; the squadron was mainly tasked with bombing and reconnaissance and on 2.5.1918, Carpenter flew on a bombing raid over Shunet Nimrin, ‘4 [bombs] fell amongst a body of 500-600 infantry in Wadi 1 near mountain gun in action at V.13e causing it to cease fire’; on Amman Station, 7.5.1918, ‘8 - 20lb Coopers. Large explosion caused in station buildings, which subsequently caught fire. All bombs burst within effective distance of rolling stock’; and on Kerak Citadel, 2.7.1918; discharged 14.4.1919.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 462 Three: Captain N.F.V. Rockey, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Late 5th Mounted Rifles, Imperial Light Horse 1914-15 Star (Lt. N. Rockey 5th M.R.); British War Medal (Capt. N.F.W. Rockey. R.A.F.); Victory Medal (Lieut. N.F.W. Rockey. R.F.C.), nearly extremely fine (3) £180-220 Captain Norman Frank Vere Rockey, born 1890; educated at St. John’s College, Johannesburg; Bishop’s College, Cape Town; Bromsgrove School, Worcestershire and Transvaal University College; a British national he was employed as an engineer in the family firm Raleigh & Rockey Ltd, Johannesburg; commissioned Lieutenant, 5th Mounted Rifles, Imperial Light Horse and transferred to the Royal Flying Corps in October 1915; after training he was posted as a Pilot to 11 (Fighter) Squadron (F.E. 2b’s), Izel-leHameau, France, September 1916; the squadron mainly flew reconnaissance operations, and when flying in one such operation over Arras, 2.12.1916, ‘this officer when flying at 10,000 feet was struck on the head by his machine gun which had been dislodged through the explosion of a shell’ (Medical Board report refers); after a period of hospitalisation he was employed with the Air Ministry; Temporary Captain 1.4.1918; Captain 1.1.1919 and discharged later that month.

463 Pair: Lieutenant H.R. Hart-Davies, 48 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Shot Down and Taken P.O.W., 19.8.1917 1914-15 Star (10364 Bmbr. H.R. Hart-Davies. R.F.A.); Victory Medal (Lieut. H.R. Hart-Davies), very fine Pair: Captain B.C. Tooke, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Destroyed a Submarine in the North Sea, 30.3.1916, And Shot Down and Taken P.O.W., 20.8.1916 British War and Victory Medals (Capt. B.C. Tooke. R.A.F.), very fine (4) £250-300 Lieutenant Hugh Rowland Hart-Davies, born Bristol, Gloucestershire, 1892; employed as an engineer at Vickers Ltd, Sheffield, prior to the Great War; enlisted as Gunner, Royal Field Artillery, 1.9.1914; served with the Royal Field Artillery in the Egyptian Theatre of War, from 14.7.1915; Bombardier, 7.7.1916; commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps., 6.10.1916; after training was posted as Observer to 48 (Fighter) Squadron (Bristol F. 2b’s), Bray Dunes, Dunkirk, France, 14.8.1917; five days later, whilst flying with Second Lieutenant R. Dutton, he took off in F. 2b A7171 at 5.45am, ‘whilst returning from escorting bombing squadron, attacked by three enemy planes, Pilot killed by gun fire. Crashed somewhere near Ostend, exact whereabouts unknown. Cannot remember anything after crashing’ (Repatriation Form refers); their aircraft was believed to have been shot down by Leutnant Walter Brachwitz of Jasta 17; Hart-Davies was wounded during the action, and taken Prisoner of War on the same day; he was repatriated 28.11.1918; after the war he set up Hart-Davies & Haggard Ltd (Motor Agents & Engineers), Leamington Spa. Captain Benjamin Cecil Tooke, born Leeds, Yorkshire, 1892; was employed by the White Star Line at the beginning of the Great War, and served in R.M.S. Olympic when she was employed as a Troopship; he was serving in her when ‘an endeavour was made to get Audacious in tow, off S.W. coast of Ireland November 1914 (entitled to Mercantile Marine

Captain B.C. Tooke (second from left), with three other R.N.A.S. inmates of Clausthal Camp

War Medal); H.M.S. Audacious (battleship) had hit a German mine of Donegal; gained R.A.C. Flying Certificate (no.2035), at Central Flying School, Upavon, November 1915; posted as a Flight Sub Lieutenant, Pilot at R.N.A.S. Seaplane Station, Dunkirk, from December 1915; the Seaplane Squadron were tasked with flying day and night bombing raids on Ostend and Zeebrugge as well as flying anti-submarine patrols; an article by Norman Franks (on L.H. Slatter O.B.E., D.S.C., D.F.C.) that appeared in Cross & Cockade gives the following, ‘on the 30th March 1916 he and his usual pilot, Lt. Tooke, attacked one of four submarines they found off Ostend, dropping two 65lb bombs. The submarine was believed to have sunk. The next day they bombed another one off Zeebrugge but were then driven off by two German seaplanes. On 10th April, they attacked another submarine off Blankenburghe but without visible result’; as a consequence of the above Tooke was recommended for a promotion or gallantry award by the Station Commander, 25.4.1916; promoted Flight Lieutenant 30.6.1916; was present when the King visited the Rest Camp, 13.8.1916; seven days later whilst piloting Short Seaplane 184 9067, with Lieutenant O.H. Crowther as his Observer, he was shot down by gunfire ‘while spotting for monitor H.M.S. General Craufurd off Belgian Coast’; Crowther was killed and Tooke, wounded in both legs and his right hand, taken Prisoner of War; he was interned at Clausthal Camp, Germany; after the war he continued to be employed by the Royal Air Force, and died of illness at R.A.F. Combined Hospital, Basrah, 11.7.1924.

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Major J.W. Higgins (centre, holding Peter the dog) 464 Three: Major J.W. Higgins, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, Late Royal Artillery British War and Victory Medals (Capt. J.W. Higgins. R.A.F.); Territorial Force War Medal (Capt. J.W. Higgins. R.A.), generally very fine or better (3) £350-400 M.I.D. London Gazette 6.7.1917 Higgins, Lt. (temp. Capt.) J.W., R.F.A. (Egpyt) M.I.D. London Gazette 30.5.1918 Higgins, Lt. and Hon. Capt. J.W. (late R.F.A.), R.A.F. Major James White Higgins, born 1885; served during the Great War with the Royal Field Artillery in the Egyptian Theatre of War, from February 1916; attached Royal Flying Corps, May 1917, and after training posted as Captain, Observer to 45 (Fighter) Squadron, Fienvillers, France 8.7.1917; eight days later whilst flying with Second Lieutenant R.H. Deakin as his pilot he forced down out of control an Albatros D3 over Polygon Wood; the squadron was gradually re-equipped with single-seater Camels, AugustSeptember 1917; as a consequence of this and a combination of casualties and postings Higgins was the last Observer left with the squadron, ‘that left Capt. J.W. Higgins as the last manin. James Higgins elected to give up flying and stay with the squadron as its Recording Officer’; he held this position until June 1918; in October 1917, ‘at about this time Cardinal Bourne, Archbishop of Westminster, paid a visit to France. He intimated he intended to come to 45 Squadron to see our commanding officer, who had once been his pupil. The recording officer at the time was Captain J.W. Higgins, who had been an observer in our 1 1/2 Strutter days, and previously a Territorial gunner. He was a Glaswegian and a stout Protestant. Vaucour [commanding officer] told him, banteringly, that he would have to kneel and kiss the Cardinal’s ring. Higgins protested his objection and on the day of the visit kept a watchful eye from the squadron office upon the approach to the airfield. When the Cardinal’s car appeared he bolted through the back door and fled to the shelter of the camp. No kissing of the ring for him. But Vaucour received the Cardinal outside his office and dutifully knelt and kissed the ring upon the proffered hand’; Higgins moved with the squadron to Italy, December 1917; posted to the Home Establishment, 18.6.1918; subsequent postings included to R.A.F. Station Dundee; discharged 26.2.1919.

Second Lieutenant J.E.G. Robinson 465 Six: Second Lieutenant J.E.G. Robinson, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. J.E.G. Robinson. R.A.F.); 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Defence and War Medals, Great War awards nearly very fine, otherwise generally very fine or better, with R.F.C. bullion blazer badge (6) £80-120 Second Lieutenant James Edward Greenwood Robinson, born Hull, Yorkshire, 1899; enlisted Royal Flying Corps, as 3/A.M., 11.6.1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation) Royal Air Force, 9.1.1918; served as Lieutenant, 5th Green Howards, 11.4.19216.7.1921.

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466

466 Four: Squadron Leader R.S. Kenyon, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. R.S. Kenyon. R.A.F.); Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oak Leaf, very fine or better, mounted for display, with named lid of card boxes of issue for both Great War and Second War awards, the latter addressed to ‘S/L R.S. Kenyon, 105, Houghton Lane, Swinton, Lancs.’, and with medal entitlement slip (4) £80-120 Squadron Leader Ray Swinton Kenyon born Manchester, 1899; educated at Salford Secondary School; employed as an Apprentice at the Royal Aircraft Factory Farnborough prior to the Great War; briefly served as a Private, 3rd Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment before transferring as a Cadet, Royal Flying Corps, November 1917; after a brief posting to 119 Squadron, Duxford, he was posted as a Pilot to 107 Squadron (D.H. 9’s), Ecoivres, France, August 1918; the squadron was mainly tasked with attacks on enemy communications and airfields and Kenyon carried out bombing raids until November; returned to the UK and was discharged, May 1919; re-engaged for service during the Second War as Flight Lieutenant, Administrative/Special Duties Branch, Royal Air Force, 28.7.1943. M.I.D. Unconfirmed.

467 Four: Flight Lieutenant J.A.W. Jarvis, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. J.A.W. Jarvis. R.A.F.); Defence Medal; Cadet Forces Medal, G.VI.R. (Act. Flt. Lt. J.A.W. Jarvis. R.A.F.V.R. (T)), generally very fine or better (4) £160-200 Flight Lieutenant John Allan William Jarvis (1899-1983), a native of Matlock, Derbyshire; employed as a Clerk in the London City and Midland Bank, 1915-1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 3.8.1918; qualified as an Observer, 24.8.1918; posted 42 Squadron (R.E.8’s), Rely, France 10.9.1918; he mainly flew in reconnaissance and army co-operation duties; reengaged as Acting Pilot Officer, Training Branch, R.A.F.V.R. for service with A.T.C., 1.5.1941; retired 1960.

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468

468 Three: Second Lieutenant A. Smith, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. A. Smith. R.A.F.); Tunisia, Kingdom, Order of Nichan Itikhar, 2nd type, Officer’s breast Badge, 61mm including bow suspension x 42mm, silver and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, enamel damage to points of star, nearly very fine (3) £60-80 Tunisia, Order of Nichan Iftikhar, Officer London Gazette 23.8.1919 Lieutenant Archibald Smith (Flying Officer) ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with the War.’ There are several men with the name A. Smith listed in the R.A.F. Lists as having served with the Royal Air Force during the Great War.

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469

469 A Great War ‘Camel Ace’s’ Group of Three to Lieutenant E.C. Eaton, 65 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, Late Saskatchewan Regiment, Who Was Killed in Combat with the 45 Victory German Ace Fritz Rumey, 26.6.1918 British War and Victory Medal (Lieut. E.C. Eaton); France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated ‘1914-1917’, with bronze star on riband, extremely fine, with the recipient’s Great War Canadian Memorial Cross (Lieut. E.C. Eaton); and the following prize medals &c.: - Montreal Y.M.C.A. Swimming Prize Medal, bronze-gilt, obverse showing a man swimming, reverse inscribed ‘Aquatic Meet Dec 4. 13. 25 Yds. Under 16 1st’ - Montreal Amateur Athletic Association Prize Medal (3), silver, obverse with silver athlete sprinting, reverse inscribed ‘1914 Running High Jump Under 16 1st’; bronze, obverse with silvered athlete sprinting, reverse inscribed ‘1914 120 Yards Hurdles Under 16 2nd’; bronze, obverse with bronze athlete sprinting, reverse inscribed ‘Boys Under 16 Years Running High Jump 3rd 1913’, all with ‘Junior City Championships’ riband bar - Canadian Y.M.C.A. Standard Medal, bronze, with plaque showing an athlete appended - A gilt Locket, featuring a portrait photograph of the recipient together with a lock of his hair - Copy of recipient’s Flying Log Book (lot) £800-1,200 France, Croix de Guerre, London Gazette 17.7.1918 Lt. E.C. Eaton, R.A.F.

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469

Lieutenant Edward Carter Eaton, born Montreal, Canada, 1896; joined 60th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1915 and served in the French Theatre of War as a signaller, from February 1916; commissioned Temporary Lieutenant 19th (Reserve) Canadian Infantry Battalion, Saskatchewan Regiment, 28.4.1917; attached Royal Flying Corps, 25.6.1917; after training was posted as a Pilot to 65 Squadron (Camels), La Lovie, 23.10.1917; on 23.11.1917 he shared with two other pilots the squadron’s first claim, when they sent down an Albatros Scout out of control, east of Passchendaele; on 4.1.1918, he forced another scout down out of control, ‘while escorting R.E. 8’s 3 Albatros Scouts dived on 2 of our patrol. I turned and shot about 15 rounds at 30 yds range into 1 of E.A. who continued his nose dive for several thousand feet below into mist, and was then lost sight of. About 10.55am saw another Albatros Scout about 500 feet below me. Dived and fired about 40 rounds at close range into his machine. E.A. slowly turned over on its side and went into a slow spin obviously out of control, did not follow it down on account of the number of E.A. about’; on the 16th February he shared another scout destroyed over Moorslede-Dadizeele; on 20.5.1918 he shared a Fokker Dr I destroyed with Captain J. Gilmour south-east of Albert, ‘Lt. Eaton and I both fired at a triplane at point blank range which went down vertically. We could not observe any result as we were immediately attacked from above but Lt. Williams who was 2,000ft. below saw a triplane dive down vertically breaking up in the air’; his last victory of the war came eight days later, when he forced down out of control a Pfalz DIII over Bois de Tailleux, ‘Dived on 5 E.A. who were attacking an R.E. 8. Fired long burst into 1 E.A. at point blank range, who dived east almost vertically. Could not observe further owing to remainder of E.A. This was confirmed by Capt. Simpson, No. 3 Australian Squadron, through 22nd Wing as going down completely out of control’; on 26.6.1918 Eaton took off from the aerodrome at 7.30pm, flying Camel D6630, he was last seen engaging a Pfalz Scout east of Bouzincourt; the German aircraft was piloted by the 45 Victory German Ace Fritz Rumey of Jasta 5; Eaton was shot down and killed, making him Rumey’s 25th Victory; Eaton was buried in Bouzincourt Ridge Cemtery, Albert, France.

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Second Lieutenant C. Taylor (front row, far right)

470 Three: Second Lieutenant C. Taylor, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. C. Taylor. R.A.F.); France, Croix de Guerre, 1914-1918, very fine, with Commission appointing Cyril Taylor, Second Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, dated 1.4.1918, this framed and glazed (3) £100-140 Second Lieutenant Cyril Taylor, born 1899; commissioned Temporary Probationary Observer Officer, Royal Naval Air Service, 27.10.1917; after training posted as an Observer to 202 Squadron (D.H. 4’s), Dunkirk, 17.4.1918; the squadron was mainly tasked with bombing and reconnaissance on targets in Belgium, and on 3.6.1918, when flying with Lieutenant A.L. Godfrey in D.H. 4 N.5997, ‘When 10 miles off Ostend, flying at 3,000 feet, observed 7 enemy seaplanes 2,000 feet below. On sighting E.A. went down to see what they were, then dived on the leading machine, firing but missed it, so turned to allow Observer to fire. Repeated this four times; after last dive one two-seater was seen to crash into the sea nose first, about 3 miles off Ostend, but did not turn over. Pilot fired a total of 200 rounds, and Observer 150 rounds’; and on 18.6.1918, when flying with Lieutenant Round in the same aircraft, ‘Observed 5 E.A. off Ostend at 17,000 feet which were attacked, Pilot fired about 35 rounds. 1 E.A. single seater seen to go down about 4,000 feet when he was still absolutely out of control. Attention then had to be paid to two other E.A., so his descent could not be watched further. Observer’s gun jammed before any rounds were fired’; discharged March 1919. Croix de Guerre unconfirmed.

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471

471 Three: Second Lieutenant E.R. Hiscocks, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2. Lieut. E.R. Hiscocks. R.A.F.); Italy, War Cross, good very fine (3) ÂŁ100-140 Italy, War Cross London Gazette 5.4.1919 2nd Lt. Ernest Richard Hiscocks Second Lieutenant Ernest Richard Hiscocks, born 1899; commissioned Temporary Probationary Flight Officer, Royal Naval Air Service, October 1917; after training posted as a Pilot to 225 Squadron (Camels), Alminni, Southern Italy, August 1918; the squadron was mainly tasked with flying escort missions across the Adriatic to protect bombers; discharged September 1919.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria not very good on this occasion but the few I saw appeared to be going into the machine which dived and went in a direction towards Fresnoy. We were unable to follow as there were several other hostile machines above us; and we had only one gun on the machine; and only one mounting’; whilst on an Artillery Patrol with Lieutenant M.D.G. Scott as his Observer, 22.6.1916, ‘We went up on H.A. duty at 2pm and saw 13 hostile machines over Magnicourt from 7,000ft to 10,000. I [Scott] immediately opened fire on the leading machine when he was immediately above us. I had only fired off about 10 shots when the hostile machine had passed. The hostile machines were followed by one F.E. & 3 De Havilland Scouts. The next machine I fired at was the last while my pilot fired at the one next to it. After firing about a drum and a half my gun mounting broke off, my gun fell to the bottom of the nacelle, loosened the deflector bag & jammed a round in the bolt guide. My pilot kept on firing. While firing at the last machine I saw him turn round twice & then put his nose down & go straight for their lines. By this time all the hostile machines were over their own lines & all our ammunition had been fired off - seven and half drums in all’ (Combat Report refers); posted to 27 Squadron (Elephants), Fienvillers, France, August 1916; he flew bombing operations with the squadron throughout AugustSeptember; after a period of service with Headquarters, Adams was posted to 28 (Training) Squadron, April 1917; he was serving as Lieutenant (Temporary Major) in the Middle East when he contracted Malaria, July 1918; he was invalided to the UK in September and was in and out of service until passed permanently medically unfit, November 1919; during that time he was serving at 4 T.D.S., Cheshire, 21.3.1919, when he was involved in a flying accident, ‘taking off from a forced landing, the pilot was unable to clear some high trees and struck some with his wing tip’; Adams was admitted to Altrincham General Hospital with serious injuries; discharged November 1919.

Major S.E. Adams

472 Pair: Major S.E. Adams, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Major S.E. Adams. R.A.F.), minor official correction to BWM, good very fine (2) £240-280

473 Pair: Lieutenant J.L. Brewster, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, A Camel Pilot Who Was Shot Down and Killed, 21.5.1918 British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. J.L. Brewster. R.A.F.), VM officially renamed, good very fine (2) £160-200

Major Stanley Edward Adams born 1895; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery; attached Royal Flying Corps, October 1915; gaining his R.A.C. Aviators’ Certificate (no 2043), on a Maurice Farman Biplane, Castle Bromwich,15.11.1915; after training posted as a Pilot to 18 Squadron (Vickers F. B5’s, replaced in April by F.E. 2b’s), Auchel, France, March 1916; the squadron was mainly tasked with photo reconnaissance and artillery co-operation; on 29.5.1916, ‘When on Artillery Patrol over Petit Sains at 8.40am, and about 8,000ft up we saw a hostile machine coming towards us from Aix Noulette about 1,000ft above us. I [Second Lieutenant C.W. Arkle, Observer] immediately fired, in bursts, and he altered his course. By this time he was above us right over head. We turned and my pilot “stalled” the machine repeatedly so that I was able to fire at him. After turning round several times he went off over Cite Calonne and Lens. We followed until my drum was finished. Up to the time he went he was firing at us, but did not hit the machine’, Adams and Arkle were in action again later the same day, ‘At 9.10am while on Artillery Patrol, and about 8,000ft up, over Souchez we saw a machine (hostile) coming over the line. We immediately turned towards him. He was about 7,000ft and I fired a burst. He then turned and went back at 9.15am. He again tried to come over the lines. We immediately dived and I fired in bursts until we were 200 yards off. He turned and I fired the rest of my drum into him. The tracer bullets were

Lieutenant Joseph Lamonby Brewster, born 1897; a native of Hampshire he was employed as an engineer prior to the Great War; joined the Royal Flying Corps as a Cadet, July 1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), 8.11.1917; after training posted as a Pilot to 73 (Fighter) Squadron (Camels), Beavois, France, 1.5.1918; the squadron mainly flew fighter patrols and bomber escort, and on 21.5.1918 flying Sopwith Camel D6604 Brewster was last seen east of Armentieres under control; he was reported missing and later as killed in action, ‘Captain Hubbard and Lieutenant Graham each shot down an EA but Drew-Brook and JL Brewster were also brought down, the former being reported a prisoner. They appeared to be the victims of Leutnant Lehman and Leutnant Biebig, both of Jasta 5’; Brewster has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

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Lieutenant H.A.A. Brosse

Flight Lieutenant D.P. Capper

474 Pair: Lieutenant H.A.A. Brosse, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. H.A.A. Brosse. R.A.F.), good very fine (2) £100-140

475 Pair: Flight Lieutenant D.P. Capper, Royal Naval Air Service & Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. D.P. Capper. R.A.F.), very fine, with a related prize medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1915), the reverse engraved ‘H.M.S. Indus B.A.A.S. 2nd Tug of War 1916’ (2) £100-140

Lieutenant Hugh Alfred Arvid Brosse, born 1894, a native of Muswell Hill, London; prior to the war was employed as an Airship Designer by John Wulffing, 1913-1914; served ‘in German E. Africa 13 months’ (service papers refer), prior to joining the Royal Naval Air Service, 7.10.1917; gained R.A.C. Aviators’ Certificate in a B.E. 2c Biplane at R.N.A.S. Cranwell, 15.3.1918; posted as a Pilot to 273 Squadron (D.H. 9’s), R.N.A.S. Yarmouth, August 1918; the squadron was tasked with coastal reconnaissance and on 16.9.1918, when flying with Second Lieutenant Fenn as his Observer, ‘While on the Yellow Patrol with 2 Yarmouth Boats and 1 Yarmouth B.H.P. D.H.9 at approximately 11.45. I sighted 5 Hostile Seaplanes in formation at about 500 feet flying towards the Coast about 2-3 miles north of Shipwash Light Vessel; another Hostile Seaplane was afterwards sighted flying behind the others. I was flying at 4,000 feet. I waited some minutes for the other D.H. 9 to dive with me meanwhile I endeavoured to get my gun in action but found that owing to an oil leak in the C.C. Gear it was only possible to fire one round for every stroke of the hand pump. As the other D.H. 9 did not show any signs of coming down but remained with the boats I went down to 1,000 feet alone meanwhile manoeuvring for position behind the Hostile Aircraft and withholding our fire until within effective range. As I was descending the Hostile Aircraft altered their course to due south right into the sun slowly drew away from me out of sight despite my speed being 90 miles per hour... After landing at the Base we found 5 bullet holes in our fuselage’; after the war he was employed as Director and Works Manager, A Behn (London) Ltd. Wireless Manufacturers and served in the Reserve of Air Force Officers until 12.8.1932.

Flight Lieutenant Douglas Parode Capper, born Sydney, Australia, 1898; son of Lieutenant-Commander Capper, R.N.; initially enlisted in the Royal Navy as Boy Artificer, 1914; served at H.M.S. Indus (Training Establishment, Devonport); transferred as Probationary Flight Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 25.7.1916; gained RAC Aviators’ Certificate (no. 4129), flying a Maurice Farman Biplane, R.N.A.S. Cranwell, 23.12.1916; after training at RNAS Eastchurch, he was posted as an Observer to 202 Squadron (D.H. 4’s), Bergues, Dunkirk, June 1918; the squadron was tasked with bombing and reconnaissance missions over Belgium; and on 27.6.1918, when flying an escort operation with Lieutenant Moffett, ‘Encountered 5 Phaltz machines over Ostend. Fired several bursts at two machines which separated from formation and attempted to cut our machine off’ (Squadron Record Book, refers); on 21.8.1919, when flying an escort operation with Lieutenant Ringrose, ‘Observed 4 E.A. N. of Zeebrugge. Enemy Monoplane dived on machine when 8 miles N. of Zeebrugge, and closed to within 70 yards of tail, during which time Observer fired 50 rounds. E.A. then turned away and dived towards land. E.A. Monoplane dived very fast and appeared to have more speed than D.H. 4 on the level’; two days later whilst flying with Moffett, ‘On return journey when off Zeebrugge, observed 2 E.A. Monoplanes about 1,500 feet below and a long way astern of machine. E.A. gave chase, one shortly giving up, the second catching up with machine, being on same level and 150 yards astern, when Observer opened fire. At 80 yards tracers appeared to enter his fuselage and he turned sharply and dived away. E.A.’s shooting was erratic. The fuselage of the machine was of dull brown colour, tail painted white with plain black cross on rudder’; continued to serve with the squadron until March 1919; briefly posted to 110 Squadron before being discharged, October 1919.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 476 Pair: Lieutenant E.C. Hoar, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. E.C. Hoar. R.A.F.), very fine or better (2) £100-140 Lieutenant Ernest Cowley Hoar, born 1899, born Orpington, Kent; employed by Smith & Milroy Ltd (Automobile & General Engineers), Orpington, and as a Trade Lad for 10 months in a Chemical Laboratory, at R.A.F. South Farnborough prior to enlistment in the Royal Flying Corps, 18.7.1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps, 8.11.1917; Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; posted as a Pilot to 103 Squadron (D.H.9’s), Beaulieu, 25.4.1918; transferred to 97 Squadron (Handley Page O/400’s), 8.5.1918; accompanied the Squadron to Xaffevillers, France in August, to join the Independent Force for strategic bombing over Germany; operational sorties including an attack on Boulay Aerodrome, 23.8.1918 and a bombing raid on Lorquin Aerodrome, 5.9.1918; invalided to R.A.F. Hospital, Holly Hill, Hampstead, 13.11.1918; discharged 23.2.1919, and transferred to the Reserve of Officers; Flying Officer, 2.9.1926; retired 2.3.1929.

477 A Great War Pair to R.E.8 Pilot, Lieutenant W.H. Jackson, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. W.H. Jackson. R.A.F.), good very fine (2) £100-140 Lieutenant William Harold Jackson, born 1892, served as 1074 Sergeant, 19th Battery Motor Machine Service, on the Western Front, prior to being commissioned Second Lieutenant (Probationary), Royal Flying Corps, 30.5.1917; posted for service as a Pilot with 4 Squadron (R.E.8’s), Abeele, France, 8.9.1917; flew on reconnaissance and army co-operation duties with the squadron, before being admitted to hospital, 7.1.1918; posted to 16 Squadron (R.E.8’s), Complain l’Abbe, 2.2.1918; once again he was mainly tasked with reconnaissance and army co-operation duties, and whilst on Artillery Observation, 6.3.1918, with Lieutenant H.E. Rosborough as his Observer, ‘Two hostile machines seen flying at 6,500 feet just South of Lens. One dived on our tail and the other fired from above. R.E.8 Observer fired 250 rounds into the first machine as it dived, after which both broke off fight and turned East’ (Combat Report refers); returned to the UK, September 1918.

478 Pair: Lieutenant H.L. Jones, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. H.L. Jones, R.A.F.), VM partially officially renamed, extremely fine Pair: Lieutenant C.E. Mitchell, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. C.E. Mitchell. R.A.F.), extremely fine, with two named card boxes of issue Pair: Second Lieutenant W. Greenwood, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. W. Greenwood. R.A.F.), good very fine, with a Scarborough and District League Cup Runners up Medal, 1938-39, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1938) and enamel British War Medal (2/Lieut. W. Hunt. R.A.F.), nearly extremely fine Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (George William Cooper), nearly extremely fine (8) £120-160 In all of the above cases, there is more than one man with the same name listed in the R.A.F. Lists as having served with the Royal Air Force during the Great War.

479 Pair: Lieutenant C.G. Kitchingman, Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. C.G. Kitchingman. R.A.F), VM officially renamed, very fine Pair: Lieutenant D.L.H. Moore, Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. D.L.H. Moore. R.A.F.), good very fine (4) £120-160 Lieutenant Cyril Gilbert Kitchingman born Sheffield, Yorkshire, 1894; educated at Central Sheffield Secondary School; employed as a Mining Engineer prior to the Great War; enlisted as 3/A.M., Royal Flying Corps, 7.8.1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On probation), 3.11.1917; Flying Officer, 12.2.1918; after training posted as a Pilot to 82 Squadron (F.K. 8’s), Catigny, France, 23.3.1918; the squadron were mainly tasked with reconnaissance and artillery co-operation; posted 35 Squadron (F.K. 8’s), Villers Bocage, France, 9.8.1918, and flew in similar operations to that of his previous squadron until the end of the war; discharged to the Reserve, April 1919. Lieutenant David Lucius Henry Moore, born 1892, the son of the Reverend J.S. Moore, of Wellington, Salop; educated at Trinity College, Dublin; served in Dublin University Officers’ Training Corps; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps, 19.9.1914; served in Salonika, from 11.11.1915; Lieutenant 1.1.1916; contracted Malaria, and returned to the UK via Malta; transferred by application to Royal Flying Corps, 17.4.1917; appointed Flying Officer, 20.9.1917; posted as a Pilot to 18 Squadron (D.H.9a’s), Izel-le-Hameau, France, October 1918; the squadron undertook daylight bombing until the end of the war; admitted to Prince of Wales Hospital, 5.2.1919, before being discharged with the Honorary Rank of Lieutenant, 8.4.1919.

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Lieutenant K.J.P. Laing

480 A Great War Pair to Fighter Pilot, Lieutenant K.J.P. Laing, 1 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Who Claimed One Victory Over France, 5.6.1918 British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. K.J.P. Laing. R.A.F.), generally good very fine, with two original named card boxes of issue, and a portrait photograph of recipient in uniform (2) £240-280 Lieutenant Kenneth Joseph Price Laing, born Hawick, Roxburgh, Scotland, 1890; educated at Moffat School and the Royal Technical College, Glasgow; enlisted Motor Cycle Section, Royal Engineers, 22.9.1914; Lance Corporal 1.10.1914; transferred to Royal Flying Corps as Cadet, April 1917; training included at ‘advanced training unit, No. 58 Squadron at Cramlington, Laing reasoned that this could be his only chance to make a flight over his home town. Although he had only 12 hrs flying experience and was under standing orders not to fly out of sight of the aerodrome, Laing resolved to make the attempt and ordered a mechanic to fill the fuel tank of F.K. 3 A8093 to the brim... Taking off at 10.35am, Laing made directly for Hawick... Flying low over the Main street and over his parents’ home at Balcary... enroute he “buzzed” his brother Norman’s farm’; after training posted as a Pilot to 1 (Fighter) Squadron (S.E. 5a’s), Clairmarais South, France, 13.4.1918; flew on patrols and ground attacks with the squadron, including 5.6.1918, ‘when on Special Mission I was flying at about 6,000 feet when I observed a hostile two-seater at about 3,000 feet S.W. of Bailleul. I dived on E.A. firing bursts from Lewis & Vickers at about 150 yards range. E.A. was diving steeply East at 1,000 feet when I left him. Subsequently confirmed by “J” Battery A.A. as having crashed’; whilst on leave he was involved in a motor-cycle accident, 22.6.1918, he suffered concussion and injuries to his face; he did not return to operational duty and was discharged February 1919.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria 481 A Great War Pair to Lieutenant J.W. Pryor, South Lancashire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps, Wounded in Action on the Somme, 9.7.1916, Where His Life Was Saved by Wearing a Steel Waistcoat; He Was Taken P.O.W., 16.6.1918, Serving On His 13th Operation as an R.A.F. Observer British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. J.W. Pryor. R.A.F.), minor edge bruise to last, otherwise very fine or better (2) £240-280 Lieutenant James William Pryor (1896-1942); educated at Haileybury, where he was a Lance Corporal in the O.T.C.; he began his studies at Jesus College, Cambridge, August 1914; was a member of the University O.T.C. prior to being commissioned Second Lieutenant, South Lancashire Regiment, 23.9.1914; served with the 10th (Reserve) Battalion in the UK before joining the 8th (Service) Battalion in France, 29.5.1916; Pryor’s battalion as part of 75 Brigade, 25th Division, served during the first Battle of Albert, from 3.7.1916; the 8th Battalion were in action opposite Ovillers on the Somme, and the Regimental History Ich Dien gives the following for 9.7.1916, ‘The enemy’s artillery had now ranged on the positions held and the companies were subjected to intense shelling. Second Lieutenant J.W. Pryor and several men of “A” Company were buried by one shell burst and had to be dug out; the men were dead, but Pryor was wearing a steel waistcoat under his uniform jacket which kept his lungs from injury and so saved his life’; Pryor was evacuated to a casualty clearing station suffering from shellshock and other injuries; returning to the UK he was not passed fully fit for service until December 1916; joining the 3rd Battalion he returned to France, February 1917; he rejoined the 8th Battalion two months later, in time to take part in the advance on the Messine Ridge, 6.6.1917; Lieutenant 1.7.1917; transferred to the Royal Flying Corps, October 1917, and trained as an Observer; posted to the newly formed 148 Squadron (F.E. 2b’s), Andover, February 1918; went with the squadron to Auchel, France, April 1918, where it was employed as a night bomber squadron; to combat the German Spring Offensive the squadron was immediately engaged in attacks on enemy targets behind the lines; initially crewed with Lieutenant B.A.S. Lewin, Pryor was involved in night operations over targets including: Rumbeke Aerodrome; Lille; and Carvin and Le Cateau Railway Stations; carrying out his 13th operation, this time with Second Lieutenant C.E. Wharton, he was reported as missing in action, 16.6.1918; the aircraft was last seen crossing enemy lines heading for Douai at 10pm; Pryor was made Prisoner of War, and transferred by the Germans from Lille to a camp at Karlsruhe; he was repatriated 13.12.1918; after the war he was commissioned into the I.A.R.O. and saw service attached to the 1/131st U.P. Regiment; in later life he resided in Market Harborough.

482 Pair: Lieutenant F.L. Wills, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. F.L. Wills. R.A.F.), very fine, with the recipient’s related miniature awards (2) £80-120 Lieutenant Francis Lewis Mills born 1893; a native of Balham, London; employed as an Architect and Surveyor prior to the Great War; commissioned Temporary Probationary Observer Officer, Royal Naval Air Service, 31.5.1917; after training at R.N.A.S. Eastchurch he was posted as an Observer to R.N.A.S. Yarmouth, 8.10.1917; tasked with home defence he flew on a variety of aircraft, including in D.H.9 D1655 with Flight Commander E. Cadbury, on an anti-zeppelin raid, 12/13.4.1918; the latter was a night attack carried out by 5 zeppelins; discharged April 1919

483 A Great War Pair to ‘Fighter Ace’ Lieutenant C.E. ‘Worthy’ Worthington, 87 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Who Claimed 5 Victories in His Dolphin “Muddles”, May-October 1918 British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. C.E. Worthington. R.A.F.), generally very fine (2) £400-500 Lieutenant Charles Edward ‘Worthy’ Worthington, born February 1897, a native of Leicester. Pre-war he had received part of his education at Heidelberg College, in Germany, and spoke fluent German. A law student, Worthington joined the Artist’s Rifles OTC as a Private (then Lance Corporal) in December 1915, prior to joining the Royal Flying Corps in September 1916. Upon learning to fly, he served with a number of reserve and training units prior to going to 87 Squadron just before his 21st birthday. Worthington was a stalwart of the unit, scoring evenly during the last year of the war, and often acting as Deputy Flight Commander. His fifth, and final, claim came on 4th October, when he shared in the destruction of a Fokker DVII with his Flight Commander, Captain Hollinghurst; posted as a Pilot to 87 Squadron (Dolphins) at the start of 1918, he went with the squadron to France in April; he recorded his first enemy aircraft destroyed on the 16th May in the plane he christened “Muddles”, and followed that up with an Albatros DV forced down out of control, 14.8.1918, ‘whilst on special patrol I saw 3 Albatros apparently getting height at 9,000 feet over Nesle. I dived on the rear E.A. from the sun and got in a good burst at close range. I observed the pilot to collapse and the E.A. then went down in a vertical dive. I was unable to wait to see it crash as a large formation of E.A. appeared above me’; he shared in destroying a Fokker DVII over Velu Wood, 25.8.1918, following it up five days later with the same type of aircraft in the same area, ‘I dived on a formation of E.A. with Capt. Larkin. Selecting one of the E.A. I fired about 100 rounds into it at close range. E.A. then half rolled and went down in a spin emitting thick clouds of black smoke. I climbed away west and then attacked another E.A., firing about 50 rounds at blank range (I had to turn to avoid crashing into him) E.A. then went down in a fast spin. I saw this machine to within about 4,000 feet of the ground still spinning’; his final claim was a shared destroyed 4.10.1918 (see quote above); discharged March 1919

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN 484 Pair: Second Lieutenant F.W. King, Royal Air Force, S.E. 5a Pilot, Who Was Shot Down and Taken P.O.W. During ‘Black September’ 1918 British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. F.W. King. R.A.F.), minor official correction to BWM, good very fine (2) £160-200

486 Pair: Second Lieutenant J. Sellers, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, A Camel Fighter Pilot, Who Forced Down a Fokker Biplane, 4.10.1918 British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. J. Sellers. R.A.F.), good very fine (2) £140-180

Second Lieutenant Frederick Willis King born Battersea, London, 1892; served during the Great War as a Corporal, Despatch Rider, Royal Engineers; commissioned Second Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment, December 1917; attached Royal Flying Corps, March 1918; after training posted as a Pilot to 40 Squadron (S.E. 5a’s), Bryas, France, 21.8.1918; the squadron was mainly tasked with offensive patrols and low level attacks; on 17.9.1918 whilst flying S.E. 5a E.4053 on an offensive patrol King was last seen south of Cambrai; he was listed as missing on the same day - there is some speculation that he was the German Ace Fritz Rumey’s 38th victory, however it would appear more likely that he was shot down by Leutnant Hans Boes of Jasta 34b; King was reported as wounded and prisoner of war; he was reported as ‘Died’, November 1918, only to be repatriated via Leith the following month! He was finally discharged, March 1919.

Second Lieutenant John Sellers, born 1897; employed as a Motor Engineer in Harrogate prior to the Great War; served as 2/A.M. prior to being commissioned Probationary Flight Officer, R.N.A.S., 27.1.1918; after training posted as a Pilot to 3 (Fighter) Squadron (Camels), Valhereux, France, October 1918; the squadron was tasked with fighter and ground attack duties, and on 4.10.1918, whilst flying Sopwith Camel F6089, Sellers forced down out of control a Fokker Biplane, ‘whilst on C.O.P. I observed five Fokker Biplanes. I dived on the nearest and fired 350 rounds. E.A. flew on straight. My guns then stopped, and I saw the E.A. dive down East. Owing to the presence of other E.A. in close proximity I was unable to observe anything further’ (Combat Report refers); discharged February 1919.

487 Pair: Second Lieutenant F. Thornton, 74 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Who Shared Two Enemy Aircraft Forced Down Out of Control, and was Listed as Missing in Action, 30.10.1918 British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. E. Thornton. R.A.F.), very fine, with British Red Cross Society Medal for Proficiency in Red Cross First Aid (07395 F. Thornton.), with ‘1928’ and ‘1933’ date bars, and integral top-riband bar (3) £200-240

485 A Great War Pair to Camel Pilot, Second Lieutenant H.K. Scrivener, Royal Naval Air Service and Royal Air Force, Shot Down and Taken P.O.W., 8.7.1918 British War and Victory Medals (2/Lieut. H.K. Scrivener. R.A.F.), nearly extremely fine (2) £200-240 Second Lieutenant Hayter Kemball Scrivener, born Leytonstone, 1898, the son of a Corn Merchant; educated at Bishop’s Stortford and Stationers Company’s School, Hornsey; enlisted Aircraftman 2nd Grade, Royal Naval Air Service, 18.6.1916; transferred to Officer Cadet Wing, Denham, Royal Flying Corps, May 1917; commissioned Second Lieutenant (On Probation), Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918 and posted as a Pilot to 208 (Fighter) Squadron (Sopwith Camels), Serny, France, 22.5.1918; he flew on Offensive Patrols throughout June and into July including 6.7.1918, when he ‘Drove E.A. East’ and 8.7.1918, when on Offensive Patrol in the Meurchin - Epinoy area he ‘Left Aerodrome at 7am upon O.P. in company with 10 others. Patrol engaged E.A. at 7.50am and Pilot was not seen after but it is considered improbable that he could have been brought down as all E.A. were below Camels and there were many other British machines in the vicinity. Being at a low altitude and rather far over it is considered probable that he had an engine failure and was forced to land’ (R.F.C. Casualty Report, refers); despite this a Leutnant Becker of Jasta 52 claimed Scrivener’s Camel as his sole victory of the war; Scrivener was taken Prisoner of War, and repatriated 13.12.1918; discharged 14.3.1919.

Second Lieutenant Frank Thornton, born Moulton, Northwich, Cheshire, 1897; educated at Middlewich Council School and Technical School, Winsford; enlisted as Airman 2nd Class, Royal Flying Corps, 13.8.1915; served with the 6th Wing, H.Q. Dover, 1915-16; Corporal 1.3.1916; posted for service with 17th Wing, Gosport, August 1916; Acting Sergeant 19.12.1916; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant 1.2.1918; having qualified as a Pilot, he served as Second Lieutenant on the Western Front, from September 1918; posted for service with 74 (Fighter) Squadron (S.E.5a’s), Clairmarais, October 1918; on 5.10.1918, whilst piloting S.E.5a C1827, Thornton attempted a landing in a cross-wind which resulted in the aircraft turning over; whilst piloting S.E.5a F907 he shared two enemy aircraft forced down out of control, 17.10.1918; Thornton was listed as ‘Missing’ in action, 30.10.1918 (Service Papers refer); returning to action he continued to fly with the squadron throughout November 1918; returning to the Home Establishment, February 1919.

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488

488 Pair: Phantom Pilot Commander N.L.L. Featherstone, Commanding Officer No.750 Naval Air Squadron, Royal Navy General Service 1962-2007, three clasps, Radfan, South Arabia, Malay Peninsula (Lieut. N.L.L. Featherstone. R.N.); Jubilee 1977, nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s Fleet Air Arm cloth insignia (2) £300-400 Commander Neville Longdale Lee Featherstone, Commissioned Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Navy, 28.9.1959; Promoted Lieutenant, 26.3.1962, and trained as a fixed wing pilot, carrying out two front-line tours east of Suez flying Sea Vixens from the carrier H.M.S. Centaur; on return to the U.K. he qualified as a Flying Instructor (QFI) and spent two years at R.N.A.S. Brawdy in Wales teaching ëpipe-lineí pilots to fly the swept wing Hunter. Towards the end of this appointment he was invited to go to the US Naval Air Station Miramar at San Diego, California, to fly the F4 Phantom (this was at a time when the United States Navy was suffering heavy losses in Vietnam and was fully stretched to train sufficient replacements. More importantly it provided invaluable experience on the Phantom which had been ordered by the Royal Navy as a replacement for the Sea Vixen). In 1968 when the first Royal Navy Phantoms arrived at R.N.A.S. Yeovilton Featherstone joined 700P, the Intensive Flying Trials Unit. This metamorphosed into No.767 Squadron where as QFI and Senior Pilot he was responsible for training naval crews for the front-line No.892 Squadron and R.A.F. crews for the first Squadron to re-equip with the Phantom. Promoted LieutenantCommander, 1.3.1970; he served as personal pilot to Vice-Admiral J.D. Treacher, Flag Officer, Naval Air Command, 1972-73, before being appointed to the Command of No.750 Squadron at R.N.A.S. Culdrose in 1977. Promoted Commander, 1.9.1982, he carried out various staff jobs at the M.O.D. and SHAPE in Belgium, before retiring in 1987.

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Lot 488 - Commander N.L.L. Featherstone (front row, centre), Commanding Officer No.750 Naval Air Squadron, 1979 489 Three: Lieutenant I.R. Phillis, Royal Navy Gulf 1990-91, one clasp, 16 Jan to 28 Feb 1991 (Lt I R Phillis RN); Saudi Arabia, Kingdom, Medal for the Liberation of Kuwait, silvered and gilt, with riband bar; Kuwait, Emirate, Liberation Medal, Third Class, silvered and enamel, with riband bar, nearly extremely fine, together with the recipient’s miniature Gulf medal, and Fleet Air Arm insignia (3) £300-400

490 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut. W.A. Wedgewood R.E.), nearly extremely fine British War Medal (Lieut. A.P. Freer. R.A.F.), good very fine (2) £100-140 Second Lieutenant William Armstrong Wedgwood, a native of Middleton-St.-George, Co. Durham; served during the Great War with the Durham Fortress Company, Royal Engineers in the French Theatre of War, from 18.9.1915; attached Second Lieutenant, Royal Flying Corps and after training was posted as an Observer to 11 (Fighter) Squadron, France; he was listed as missing, later ‘presumed burnt to death’, when flying with Lieutenant H.T.L. Speer (Pilot) in F.E. 2b 6949, 9.7.1916; he is buried in the London Cemetery, Neuville-Vitasse, France.

Lieutenant Ian Richard Phillis, Commissioned Sub Lieutenant, Royal Navy, 1.1.1987; promoted Lieutenant, 3.1.1990.

Lieutenant Albert Paul Freer, born 1897; educated at Mackenzie College, Sau Paulo, Brazil; enlisted as Private, Army Service Corps (M.T.), April 1916; served with the A.S.C. in the French Theatre of War, June 1916-March 1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), Royal Flying Corps, April 1917; after training posted as a Pilot to 3 (Fighter) Squadron (Camels), Warloy Baillon, France, 5.1.1918; returned to the UK to for Instructional duties on fighter aircraft, August 1918; posted to 47 Squadron (Camels and D.H. 9’s) for service in South Russia, arriving for duty with the squadron, 26.5.1919; discharged 26.10.1919.

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Captain P.K. Fowler

491 British War Medal (Capt. P.K. Fowler. R.A.F.), naming rubbed, very fine £80-120 M.I.D. London Gazette 19.12.1917 Flight Sub-Lieutenant (now Flight Lieut.) P.K. Fowler, R.N.A.S. Captain Phillip Kenning Fowler (1895-1970), born Fielding, New Zealand; commissioned Probationary Flight Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, 30.4.1916; gained RAC Aviators’ Certificate (no. 3285) in a Curtiss Biplane at R.N.A.S. Eastbourne, 26.7.1916; after training posted as a Pilot to No. 2 Wing, December 1916; served with 220 Squadron, “A” Flight, Thasos, and the R.N.A.S. Operations Report gives the following, ‘Thasos Air Station, “A” Squadron, February 27th [1917]. Raid on Gereviz Aerodrome - An attack was made at dawn upon Geveriz Seaplane Base by four Henri Farmans, two Sopwith Bombers, a Sopwith Fighter, and a Bristol Scout. Owing to unfavourable weather conditions bomb-dropping was difficult, and the full results obtained were not discernable, but two of the 65lb bombs appeared to have hit the south end of the hangar. There was a spirited fight between a large hostile seaplane and the Bristol Scout. The enemy machine was flying over the lake. The Bristol Scout dived down to within 1,000 feet four times and fired three trays, the Sopwith Fighter joining in from the rear and above. The enemy machine then descended to the lake and taxied for shore, running up on the beach, where both pilot and observer deserted their machine. The Sopwith then, from 260 feet up, fired three trays from his rear gun and 50 rounds from his forward gun, rendering the enemy machine useless. Pilot - Flight Sub-Lieut. J.N. Ingham, Flight Sub-Lieut.

N.H. Starbuck, R.N.V.R., as observer in Sopwith Fighter. Flight Sub-Lieut. P.K. Fowler in Bristol Scout’; he was in action again, ‘On the morning of the 30th September [1917] three enemy seaplanes, two of them single-seater fighters of a type known to the Royal Naval Air Service as ‘Blue Birds’, and the other a two-seater reconnaissance seaplane, were reported to be approaching Mudros. Three pilots went up at once to engage them, but only two came into action. They were Flight Lieutenant H.T. Mellings in a Sopwith Triplane, and Flight Lieutenant J.W. Alcock in a Sop with ‘Camel’. The Triplane pilot shot down one of the ‘Blue Birds’, which dived into the sea and broke up, and the ‘Camel’ pilot eventually forced the other to land, and its wounded pilot was subsequently picked up by the ‘Acheron’. The German twoseater was pursued to the Dardanelles, where a Sop with ‘Pup’ pilot from Imbros (Flight Lieutenant P.K. Fowler) joined in the attack. The observer in the German seaplane was apparently wounded, but, flying low down, the two-seater came under cover of the guns of the Dardanelles forts and escaped destruction.’ (The War In The Air, Vol. V refers); Fowler was Mentioned in Despatches for this action, having ‘displayed remarkable skill and dash during these operations’ (service papers refer); both the other pilots were awarded the D.S.C.; transferred to “C” Flight and was involved in the attacks on the Turkish ships Goeben and Breslau, January 1918, ‘another attack was made by Flight Sub Lt. Murray in Sopwith Bomber escorted by Flight Lt. Wincott and Flight Lt. Fowler in “Camels”. About 0752, dropped 4 65lb bombs at the Goeben. She was then taken about 1 mile up the Straits, and was observed to have a very heavy list to port and was down at the stern’; served with 273 and 212 Squadrons at R.A.F. Station Yarmouth, October 1918-Ocotber 1919.

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Captain J.M. Turner

Lieutenant J. Buckley

492 British War Medal (2) (Capt. J.M. Turner. R.A.F.; Lieut. J. Buckley. R.A.F.), minor official correction to surname on first, good very fine (2) £100-140 Captain John Mackay Turner, born Glasgow, 1896; prior to the Great War was a Partner in the ship-owning firm J.M. Turner & Co., based at Southampton; commissioned Probationary Flight Sub Lieutenant, Royal Naval Air Service, July 1916; gained his RAC Aviators’ Certificate (No. 3712) on a Graham-White Biplane, at RNAS Chingford, 21.10.1916; after training on Seaplanes at Calshot, was posted as a Pilot to H.M.S. Campania (seaplane carrier), 17.2.1917; posted in a similar capacity to H.M.S. Engadine (seaplane carrier), based at Malta, June 1917; Flight Lieutenant 31.12.1917; Captain Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; remained with Engadine until the end of the war; discharged February 1919. Lieutenant John Buckley, born Gorton, Lancashire, 1898; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), Royal Flying Corps, May 1917; gained RAC Aviators’ Certificate (no. 5616), 23.9.1917; after training posted as a Pilot to R.A.F. Airship Station Luce Bay, July 1918; subsequently served at Airship Training Wing, Dundee before being discharged, April 1919.

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orders, deCoratioNs, CampaigN medaLs aNd miLitaria

Lieutenant J.S. Ingleby 493 British War Medal (2) (Lieut. A.L. Crow. R.A.F.; Lieut. J.S. Ingleby. R.A.F.), minor official correction to first, generally very fine or better (2) £100-140 Lieutenant Arthur Leslie Crow, born Canterbury, Kent, 1894; educated at the Simon Langton School, Canterbury; enlisted as Private, 26th (Service) Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, 9.8.1915; advanced Sergeant, 14.4.1916, and served with the British Expeditionary Force, 4.5.1916-1.2.1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant, 7th Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, 29.5.1917; attached Royal Flying Corps, October 1917, and after training was posted as Flying Officer Observer to 35 Squadron (F.K. 8’s), Estree-enChaussee, France, 14.12.1917; the squadron was mainly tasked with photo reconnaissance and artillery co-operation, and on 10.2.1918 Crow was flying with Lieutenant Williams ‘Arty Patrol - 4 25lb bombs dropped in Trench Junction... with good effect causing hostile retaliation with M.G... 200rds (Vickers) fired into Bellenglise and Bellicourt main streets from 1,000ft’ (Squadron Record Book refers). Lieutenant John Seymour Ingleby, born Kingston-on-Hill, 1899; educated at Harrow, 1914-1917; commissioned Flight Officer (On Probation), Royal Naval Air Service, 9.7.1917; gained R.A.C. Aviators’ Certificate (No. 5619) in a Cauldrom Biplane at Vendome, France, 23.10.1917; carried out further training at Cranwell before being posted to R.N.A.S. Eastchurch; Temporary Flight Sub Lieutenant, January 1918; served as a Delivery Pilot with 14 A.A.P., Castle Bromwich, from May 1918; he was killed when he crash landed a DH10, 11.6.1919 and is buried in Sonning (St. Andrew’s) Churchyard, Berkshire.

494 British War Medal (Lieut. M. Gibson. R.A.F.), naming rubbed, good very fine £180-220 Lieutenant Max Gibson, born 1893; prior to the Great War was employed as a Salesman in Toronto, Canada; commissioned Flying Officer, Royal Flying Corps, 8.9.1917, and was employed as an Instructor with 86 C.T.S., 43rd

Wing, Texas; arrived in the UK, February 1918; posted as a Pilot to 45 (Fighter) Squadron (Camels), Grossa, Italy, June 1918; flying on offensive patrol with another Camel, 6.8.1918, ‘Saw 6 E.A. (1 Aviatik 2/Str. 5 Scouts) at 10.50am at 11,000ft vicinity of Segusino. 1 E.A. driven down and crashed by Lt. James and 1 by Lt. Gibson. Confirmed by both Pilots. 2 others possibly crashed by Lt. James (Squadron Record Book refers); the Combat Report adds further insight, ‘While on Special O.P. ordered by telephone, Lt. James sighted 5 New type scouts escorting an Aviatik 2/Str. at 11,000ft over Segusino. He signalled to Lt. Gibson the other member of the patrol of their whereabouts but the latter did not observe his signal and dived on the 2/Str. not seeing the 5 scouts. The 2/Str. did not seem to see him approaching and he was able to get in two long bursts at very close range. The E.A. turned over on its back and dived vertically down absolutely out of control; Lt. Gibson followed it down to 7,000ft. and saw it crash N. of Alono. On seeing Lt. Gibson attack the 2/Str. the 5 scouts immediately dived on him. Lt. James at once attacked the scouts to guard Lt. Gibson who was in a dangerous position, firing long bursts at close range into each E.A. as they dived on him (Lt. Gibson). After firing a long burst into the first one it dived vertically down out of control. He then attacked the second E.A. and after firing a long burst into it, it stalled and fell down out of control. He fired long bursts at the third and fourth as they dived, but they immediately turned away. Lt. James then singled out the last E.A. and fired two long bursts at point blank range. The E.A. stalled, turned over on its back and dived vertically down with engine full on; he followed it down to 3,000ft. and observed it to crash in the valley of St. Pietro. Lt. James was unable to observe the crash of the first two scouts owing to the remainder of the enemy patrol attacking Lt. Gibson but strongly believes them to have crashed at Valdobbiadene and Moriago respectively. Lt. Gibson’s machine was badly shot about by machine gun fire’; Gibson was in the thick of it again, when flying on close patrol with Captain J. Cottle and Lieutenant E.H. Masters, 20.8.1918, ‘Saw 3 E.A. 2/Strs. (type unknown) at 7.10pm at 14,000ft. S. Asiago. Capt. Cottle shot one down. Lt. Masters shot one down. Lt. Gibson shot one down’ (Squadron Record Book refers); once again the Combat Report offers more detail, ‘While on No. 12 C.O.P. Capt. Cottle observed 3 2/Str. E.A. W.of Asiago travelling S.E. Capt. Cottle climbed his Patrol into the sun and cut them off from the rear. Each member of the patrol singled out one E.A. and attacked it at close range. Capt. Cottle getting on to the tail of one E.A. fired several long bursts at very close range, and saw the observer collapse, after he had fired several rounds. He observed this E.A. to dive down through the clouds with engine full on completely out of control at 7,000ft. over the mountains towards our lines. At the same time Lt. Masters attacked another E.A. which immediately dived towards Mt. Forcellona. Obtaining a good position he fired two long bursts at very close range after which the E.A. seemed to explode and burst into pieces (Lt. Gibson confirms). He was unable to ascertain where the wreckage fell owing to the low clouds. Lt. Gibson fired two long bursts at the above machine but seeing the other E.A. attempting to escape, chased it northwards. The E.A. immediately dived and Lt. Gibson fired several long bursts at very close range, after which the E.A. got into a spin with engine full on and dived through the clouds absolutely out of control (Lt. Masters confirms). Owing to very low clouds Capt. Cottle and Lt. Gibson were unable to see their E.A. crash but the former believes the E.A. which he attacked to have crashed on our side of the line’; Gibson moved with the squadron to France, and operated from Bettoncourt, September 1918; returned to Home Establishment, 8.2.1919; posted to 186 Squadron, 13.7.1919; the latter was a development squadron based at Gosport, tasked for naval co-operation duties; discharged 1920.

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Lieutenant R.N. Cresswell

The machine went into a spin and finally crashed upon some trees near Le Cateau. I can faintly remember being lowered to the ground, then passed out.’ Silk was taken Prisoner of War. Cresswell is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

495 Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (Ralph Neal Cresswell), good very fine, placed in a wooden mount £180-220 Lieutenant Ralph Neal Cresswell, born Wakefield, Yorkshire, 1898; joined the Royal Flying Corps as a Cadet, 6.6.1917; commissioned Temporary Second Lieutenant (On Probation), 11.10.1917, after training he was posted as a Pilot to 92 (Fighter) Squadron, Chattis Hill, December 1917; posted to 6 (Reconnaissance) Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Longavesnes, France, 6.10.1918; on the 23rd October whilst piloting R.E. 8 F6279, in his first operational flight, Cresswell was shot down by Leutnant Hans Boes of Jasta 34b; Lieutenant Ralph Silk (his Observer) provided an account of the action that was published in Tommy Goes To War, ‘I had already made two flights over the enemy’s lines that day, bombing, strafing and taking photographs, and had retired to my tent for rest when the Squadron Commander lifted the tent flap and said: ‘Silk, you will have to go up again. The Huns are withdrawing their guns on the Le Cateau road. I want you to blast the lot.’ Feeling apprehensive, I remarked: ‘I feel I shall not return this time.’ ‘Come, come,’ he said, ‘Your Guardian Angel will still look after you.’ He gave me a gentle pat. ‘But who’s going to be my pilot,’ I asked. ‘Creswell the new fellow.’ I shook hands with him and rushed off to the waiting machine. Over the lines a number of enemy Fokker machines swooped out of the sun upon our four R.E. 8 machines, the air was full of wings and bullets; when my machine gave a lurch, I turned my head to my pilot, he had slumped over the controls mortally wounded. Next I had a gun-shot wound in the head.

496 Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (Henry Carbines), very fine £80-120 Second Lieutenant Henry Carbines born Aintree, 1898; educated at Preston Agricultural College; son of Major H. Carbines, of Ilfracombe, Devon; initially a Private in the Lancashire Hussars, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, 8th Battalion Liverpool Regiment, 29.5.1917; served in the French Theatre of War, from 1917; attached Royal Flying Corps, January 1918; after training posted as Observer to 16 Squadron (R.E. 8’s), Complain l’Abbe, 19.3.1918; on 27.3.1918 whilst flying with Second Lieutenant L. Playne in R.E. 8 B5028, ‘Machine left aerodrome at 11.20am on Special Mission on Third Army Front and was shot through petrol tank and forced to land on 84 Sqn’s aerodrome at about 3pm. Machine was repaired and the pilot left at 6pm to fly back to the Squadron. Nothing has been since been heard of the machine or personnel-believed Missing’; both were later confirmed killed in action, and having no known grave are commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

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Captain R.L. Chidlaw-Roberts

497 A Great War S.E.5 Propeller A fine Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 propeller, approx. 1350mm, laminated hardwood fabrication with original matt painted sage-green fabric covered blade, mounted on a wooden plinth inscribed ‘Cpt. ChitlawRoberts 60th Sqn 1914-18 SE5 RFC’ £200-300 M.C. London Gazette 5.7.1918 Lt. (T./Capt.) Robert Leslie Chidlaw-Roberts, Hants. R. and R.F.C. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He constantly attacked superior numbers of enemy aeroplanes. On one occasion he repeatedly attacked five enemy machines, driving among them and attacking each in turn at short ranges. On three other occasions he brought down enemy machines. He showed great skill and courage.’ Captain Robert Leslie Chidlaw-Roberts, M.C., born Towyn, Montgomeryshire, June 1896; educated at University College School, London, and R.M.A. Sandhurst; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Hampshire Regiment, May 1915, and seconded for service with the Royal Flying Corps as an Observer in No.2 Squadron, flying with them on the Western Front for six months from May 1915; joined No.60 Squadron as a Flight Commander, 18.8.1917, and served with them on the Western Front based at St. MarieCappel, flying S.E.5s, from 7.9.1917- his first Victory (Out of Control) was an Albatros east of Menin, 14.9.1917; over the next four months he achieved a further eight Victories (7 Destroyed (5 shared) and 1 Out of Control (this shared)), the last when he shared in the destruction of an Albatros flown by Leutnant Max Muller, the 36 Victory Ace, who

497

jumped out and was killed. Promoted Captain and awarded the Military Cross, he was appointed to the Command of ‘A’ Flight, No.40 Squadron, June 1918, and shared in the destruction of a German kite Balloon, 29.9.1918, bringing his personal score to 10 Victories. Note: Owing to the large and bulky nature of this lot it is unsuitable for postage and we would recommend collection.

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November 22, 2012 - LoNdoN

Auction Notes

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69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET tel: +44 (0)20 7563 4020 fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037 email: auctionteam@spink.com

Name ______________________________________________________

22 NOVEMBER 2012

LONDON

WRITTEN BIDS FORM

this form should be sent or faxed to the spink auction office in advance of the sale. address ____________________________________________________ references for new clients should be supplied in good time to be taken up before the sale. bids received later than ____________________________________________________________ one hour before the start of the sale may not be processed.

____________________________________________________________ YOU CAN ALSO BID IN REAL TIME ON SPINK LIVE.

postCode ___________________________________________________

ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

JUST VISIT WWW.SPINK.COM TO REGISTER

saLe titLe

date

Code Name

saLe No.

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Thursday 22 November 2012 at 10.00 a.m.

FOXTROT FOUR

12004

i request spink, without legal obligations of any kind on its part, to bid on the following Lots up to the price given below. i understand that if my bid is successful the purchase price payable will be the sum of the final bid and a premium as a percentage of the final bid (together with any vat chargeable). the rate of premium is 20% of the final hammer price of each lot. all bids shall be treated as offers made on the terms and Conditions for buyers printed in the catalogue. i also understand that spink provides the service of executing bids on behalf of clients for the convenience of clients and that spink will not be held responsible for failing to execute bids. if identical commission bids are received for the same Lot, the commission bid received first by spink will take precedence. please note that you will not be notified if there are higher written bids received. if you require such notification then this is available on bids made via spink live bidding service.

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN STERLING

Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––



––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

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teL. home

______________________________________________

teL. offiCe ____________________________________________

____________________________________________________

e-maiL ________________________________________________

sigNature _______________________________________________

vat Number ___________________________________________

fax

please indicate the type of card:

v isa

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masterCard

sWitCh

ameriCaN express

PAYMENT MADE BY MASTERCARD OR VISA ARE SUBJECT TO A 2% SURCHARGE AND AMERICAN EXPRESS 4% Card No: sigNature

start date: expiry date

issue No:

seCurity Code:

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please charge all purchases to my card do not charge my card. i will arrange to send payment. (spink will only charge your card should you default on the payment terms agreed) please hold my purchased lots for collection

Continued ...


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date

saLe No.

Thursday 22 November 2012 at 10.00 a.m.

12004

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN STERLING Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

BIDDING INCREMENTS bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following order although the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction. the normal bidding increments are: up to £100 £100 to £300 £300 to £600 £600 to £1,000

by £5 by £10 £320-£350-£380-£400 etc. by £50

£1,000 to £3,000 £3,000 to £6,000 £6,000 to £20,000 £20,000 and up

by £100 £3,200-£3,500-£3,800-£4,000 etc. by £500 auctioneer’s discretion

Lot Number (in numerical order)

price bid £ (excluding buyer’s premium)

VAT is chargeable on the hammer and the premium of daggered (†) and (Ω) lots at the standard rate (currently 20%), and on lots marked (x) at the reduced rate (currently 5% on the hammer and 20% on the premium). vat on margin scheme lots is payable at 20% on the premium only.

REFERENCES REQUIRED FOR CLIENTS NOT YET KNOWN TO SPINK

trade refereNCes

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________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________


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AUCTION RESULTS saLe:

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

saLe No:

12003

date:

Thursday 19 November 2012

v eNue:

London

Spink & Son Ltd 69 Southampton Row Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Tel: (020) 7563 4000

The following prices in sterling do not include the buyer’s premium and are rounded to the nearest pound. Lots which did not sell are not shown. Spink & Son are not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. Lot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Price £230,000 £200,000 £6,500 £5,000 £78,000 £1,700 £320 £260 £3,800 £900 £2,100 £900 £2,200 £9,500 £3,500 £1,400 £1,800 £750 £750 £3,200 £900 £2,100 £580 £2,400 £2,700 £1,600 £900 £130 £800 £650 £600 £9,500

Lot 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

Price £1,500 £1,600 £260 £250 £500 £650 £650 £230 £850 £1,400 £260 £2,500 £2,300 £1,500 £900 £700 £450 £220 £1,900 £2,100 £500 £480 £2,300 £700 £320 £400 £850 £1,100 £650 £1,200 £3,200 £400

Lot 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 97 98

Price £180 £160 £200 £210 £250 £150 £210 £150 £150 £150 £400 £150 £140 £290 £270 £900 £280 £200 £260 £190 £300 £320 £950 £700 £130 £200 £170 £210 £140 £210 £210 £800

Lot 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130

Price £2,200 £170 £33,000 £1,600 £5,000 £3,200 £3,800 £1,400 £9,000 £4,000 £2,100 £23,000 £1,800 £5,000 £1,200 £3,800 £1,800 £2,500 £1,000 £3,000 £1,900 £600 £1,100 £1,200 £1,000 £750 £800 £650 £900 £4,500 £5,200 £1,800

Lot 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162

Price £900 £750 £1,700 £1,900 £1,400 £1,800 £1,200 £1,600 £450 £480 £260 £2,400 £1,600 £500 £350 £700 £950 £700 £500 £380 £300 £380 £550 £320 £230 £380 £1,600 £1,200 £60 £160 £190 £170

Lot 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194

Price £230 £170 £130 £250 £140 £180 £140 £120 £180 £580 £850 £2,200 £480 £240 £600 £170 £140 £480 £320 £320 £350 £780 £380 £900 £900 £380 £320 £280 £580 £320 £260 £900


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Lot 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236

Price £1,200 £580 £580 £500 £160 £260 £500 £270 £320 £290 £290 £240 £400 £450 £130 £130 £130 £180 £190 £120 £380 £100 £190 £130 £200 £130 £160 £80 £60 £70 £70 £70 £240 £400 £1,500 £1,800 £140 £80 £130 £800 £150 £160

Lot 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278

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Price £150 £190 £520 £270 £420 £150 £400 £150 £70 £150 £140 £70 £130 £240 £380 £700 £200 £90 £380 £350 £220 £50 £140 £600 £110 £70 £120 £100 £90 £70 £100 £280 £110 £170 £170 £160 £160 £230 £600 £140 £140 £210

Lot 279 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 322

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Price £180 £130 £380 £100 £400 £110 £160 £80 £120 £120 £90 £110 £70 £110 £110 £70 £140 £80 £380 £250 £190 £450 £140 £90 £120 £120 £150 £100 £110 £140 £130 £160 £230 £80 £80 £380 £240 £60 £140 £90 £700 £110

Lot 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366

Price £270 £100 £580 £110 £300 £220 £140 £450 £260 £180 £650 £450 £2,300 £140 £130 £750 £1,400 £1,600 £400 £520 £520 £210 £120 £350 £120 £450 £180 £210 £100 £150 £350 £170 £180 £190 £380 £600 £420 £120 £130 £380 £380 £1,600

Lot 367 368 369 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412

Price £420 £270 £400 £1,400 £40 £60 £60 £70 £70 £650 £500 £150 £150 £200 £80 £550 £210 £290 £420 £170 £150 £320 £150 £400 £400 £300 £280 £90 £100 £220 £190 £170 £380 £320 £230 £380 £380 £120 £110 £140 £210 £210

Lot 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431

Price £400 £120 £80 £60 £120 £80 £100 £320 £150 £80 £140 £110 £480 £480 £1,500 £700 £160 £280 £170


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AUCTION RESULTS saLe:

The Bentley Priory Battle of Britain Trust Appeal Charity Auction

saLe No:

12044

date:

Thursday 6 September 2012

v eNue:

London

Spink & Son Ltd 69 Southampton Row Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Tel: (020) 7563 4000

The following prices in sterling do not include the buyer’s premium and are rounded to the nearest pound. Lots which did not sell are not shown. Spink & Son are not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. Lot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Price £110,000 £30,000 £320,000 £40,000 £7,500 £4,500 £350 £1,700 £4,000 £75,000

Lot 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Price £2,900 £17,500 £26,000 £2,800 £2,500 £2,700 £2,300 £3,800 £8,500 £3,000

Lot 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Price £2,700 £2,400 £4,200 £320 £140 £50 £550 £230 £160 £240

Lot 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

Price £170 £220 £190 £11,500 £800 £1,300 £420 £120 £140 £120

Lot 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

Price £80 £320 £130 £180 £130 £900 £8,500 £1,000 £300 £950

Lot 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58

Price £3,800 £800 £230 £280 £140 £320 £800 £700

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SPINK “ON THE GO” TECHNOLOGY

Spink are pleased to provide our clients with What you can expect from the Spink app: exciting mobile technology which allows you to  Download auction catalogues straight to your take Spink with you no matter where on the globe device, which are then viewable while online or you may be. The Spink iPhone/iPad application, offline. which is available free of charge from the iTunes  Search all available lots in sales. store, is simple to download! Once installed the programme will download the latest auction  View lots individually and zoom in on important item details. catalogue instantly upon opening the application!  Share images, lots or entire auction catalogues We do hope you find these tools useful! Should you with friends via email, Twitter or Facebook. have any further questions or suggestions on how  Email the Spink Concierge directly from your we can improve our technology in an effort to assist device to leave bids or receive a quick reply to any our clients, please contact Berdia Qamarauli, Head query you may have. of IT at Spink on bqamarauli@spink.com.

WWW.spiNK.Com


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The

CHARTWELL Collection of GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs Stamps and Covers - Part IV

12 December 2012 • London


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5 auctions per year in our new gallery in hong kong. next auction on 6th December 2012. Contact us today on wine@spink.com for more information on buying or selling with Spink Fine Wines.


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TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR BUYERS These conditions set out the terms on which we (Spink and Son Limited of 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET (company no. 04369748)) contract with you (Buyer) either as agent on behalf of the Seller or as principal if we are the Seller. You should read these conditions carefully. 1

DEFINITIONS The following definitions in this condition apply in these conditions.

2

3

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme

means a VAT margin scheme as defined by HM Revenue & Customs;

Buyer’s Premium

means the charge payable by you as a percentage of the Hammer Price, at the rates set out in clause 5.1 below;

Certificate of Authenticity

means a certificate issued by an Expert Committee confirming the authenticity of a Lot;

Expert Committee

means a committee of experts to whom a Lot may be sent for an extension in accordance with clause 3.4.3;

Forgery

means a Lot constituting an imitation originally conceived and executed as a whole with a fraudulent intention to deceive as to authorship, origin, age, period, culture or source where the correct description as to such matters is not reflected by the description in the catalogue and which at the date of the auction had a value materially less than it would have had if it had been in accordance with the description in the catalogue. Accordingly, no Lot shall be capable of being a Forgery by reason of any damage and/or restoration work of any kind (including re-enamelling);

Hammer Price

means the amount of the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer in relation to a Lot;

Lot

means any item deposited with us for sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any catalogue;

Reserve

the amount below which we agree with the Seller that the Lot cannot be sold;

Seller

means the owner of the Lot being sold by us;

Spink Group

Spink and Son Limited, our subsidiaries and associated companies.

VAT

value added tax chargeable under VAT and any similar replacement or additional tax; and

VAT Symbols

means the symbols detailing the VAT status of the Lot details of which are set out at the back of the catalogue. the first session of the sale. If accepted by us, such request shall have the same effect as notice of an intention to question the genuineness or description of the Lot for the purposes of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) of these Terms and Conditions and the provisions of clause 5.13 (Refund in the case of Forgery) shall apply accordingly.

SPINK’S ROLE AS AGENT 2.1

All sales undertaken by us either at auction or privately are undertaken either as agent on behalf of the Seller or from time to time, as principal if we are the owner of the Lot. Please note that even if we are acting as agent on behalf of the Seller rather than as principal, we may have a financial interest in the Lot.

2.2

The contract for the sale of the Lot will be between you and the Seller.

3.4.2 Notice of a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity must give the reason why such opinion is required and specify the identity of your proposed expert which will be subject to agreement by us. We reserve the right, at our discretion, to refuse a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity including (without limitation) where the proposed expert is not known to us.

BEFORE THE SALE 3.1

3.2

Examination of goods You are strongly advised to examine personally any goods in which you are interested, before the auction takes place. Condition reports are usually available on request. We provide no guarantee to you other than in relation to Forgeries, as set out in clause 5.13 of these Terms and Conditions.

3.4.3 If we accept a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity we will submit the Lot to the Expert Committee. You acknowledge and accept that the length of time taken by an Expert Committee to reach an opinion will vary depending on the circumstances and in any event is beyond our control.

Catalogue descriptions 3.2.1 Statements by us in the catalogue or condition report, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, regarding the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of any Lot are merely statements of opinion, and are not to be relied on as statements of definitive fact. Catalogue illustrations are for guidance only, and should not be relied on either to determine the tone or colour of any item or to reveal imperfections. Estimates of the selling price should not be relied on as a statement that this price is either the price at which the Lot will sell or its value for any other purpose. 3.2.2 Many items are of an age or nature which precludes their being in perfect condition and some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. We provide this information for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. 3.2.3 Other than as set out in clause 5.13, and in the absence of fraud, neither the Seller nor we, nor any of our employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot nor for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot.

3.3

3.4

Your Responsibility You are responsible for satisfying yourself as to the condition of the goods and the matters referred to in the catalogue description. Extensions – Stamps only 3.4.1 If you wish to obtain an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity on any Lot (other than a mixed Lot or Lot containing undescribed stamps) you must notify us in writing not less than forty-eight hours before the time fixed for the commencement of

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3.4.4 We will not normally accept a request for an extension on account of condition. Any Lot described in the catalogue as having faults or defects may not be returned even if an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity cites other faults or defects not included in the catalogue description, other than in the case of a Forgery. 3.4.5 Should Spink accept a request for an extension under the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the fact may be stated by the Auctioneer from the rostrum prior to the sale of the Lot. 3.4.6 It should be noted that any stamp accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity is sold on the basis of that Certificate only and not on the basis of any other description or warranty as to authenticity. No request for an extension will be accepted on such a stamp and the return of such a stamp will not be accepted. 4

AT THE SALE 4.1

Refusal of admission Our sales usually take place on our own premises or premises over which we have control for the sale, and we have the right, exercisable at our complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or attendance at an auction.

4.2

Registration before bidding You must complete and sign a registration form and provide identification before making a bid at auction. Please be aware that we usually require buyers to undergo a credit check. Some lots may be designated, prior to the auction, as “Premium Lots”, which means a deposit may be required before placing a bid on the item for sale. Information will be posted on our website in such an event.


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4.3

Bidding as Principal When making a bid (whether such bids are made in person or by way of telephone bids operated by Spink, commission or online or email bids), you will be deemed to be acting as principal and will be accepting personal liability, unless it has been agreed in writing, at the time of registration, that you are acting as agent on behalf of a third party buyer acceptable to us.

4.4

Commission Bids If you give us instructions to bid on your behalf, by using the form provided in our catalogues or via our website, we shall use reasonable endeavours to do so, provided these instructions are received not later than 24 hours before the auction. If we receive commission bids on a particular Lot for identical amounts, and at auction these bids are the highest bids for the Lot, it will be sold to the person whose bid was received first. Commission bids are undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the sale, and the conduct of the auction may be such that we are unable to bid as requested. Since this is undertaken as a free service to prospective buyers on the terms stated, we cannot accept liability for failure to make a commission bid. You should therefore always attend personally if you wish to be certain of bidding.

4.5

On-line Bidding We offer internet services as a convenience to our clients. We will not be responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on the internet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i) a loss of internet connection by either party for whatever reason; (ii) a breakdown or problems with the online bidding software and/or (iii) a breakdown or problems with your internet connection, computer or system. Execution of on-line internet bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the auction and we do not accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or for errors or omissions in connection with this activity.

4.6

Telephone Bids If you make arrangements with us not less than 24 hours before the sale, we shall use reasonable endeavours to contact you to enable you to participate in bidding by telephone, but in no circumstances will we be liable to either the Seller or you as a result of failure to do so.

4.7

Currency Converter At some auctions, a currency converter will be operated, based on the one month forward rates of exchange quoted to us by Barclays Bank Plc or any other appropriate rate determined by us, at opening on the date of the auction. Bidding will take place in a currency determined by us, which is usually sterling for auctions held in London. The currency converter is not always reliable, and errors may occur beyond our control either in the accuracy of the Lot number displayed on the converter, or the foreign currency equivalent of sterling bids. We shall not be liable to you for any loss suffered as a result of you following the currency converter.

4.8

Video images At some auctions there will be a video screen. Mistakes may occur in its operation, and we cannot be liable to you regarding either the correspondence of the image to the Lot being sold or the quality of the image as a reproduction of the original.

4.9

Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following order although the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction. The normal bidding increments are: Up to £100 by £5 £100 to £300 by £10 £300 to £600 £320-£350-£380-£400 etc. £600 to £1,000 by £50 £1,000 to £3,000 by £100 £3,000 to £6,000 £3,200-£3,500-£3,800-£4,000 etc. £6,000 to £20,000 by £500 £20,000 and up Auctioneer’s discretion

4.10 Bidding by Spink 4.10.1 We reserve the right to bid on Lots on the Seller’s behalf up to the amount of the Reserve (if any), which will never be above the low estimate printed in the auction catalogue. 4.10.2 The Spink Group reserves the right to bid on and purchase Lots as principal. 4.11 The Auctioneer’s Discretion The auctioneer has the right at his absolute discretion to refuse any bid to advance the bidding in such manner as he may decide to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of error or dispute, to put an item up for bidding again. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

5

4.12 Successful Bid Subject to the auctioneer’s discretion, the striking of his hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid, provided always that such bid is higher than the Reserve (where applicable), and the conclusion of a contract for sale between you and the Seller. 4.13 After Sale Arrangements If you enter into any private sale agreements for any Lot with the Seller within 60 days of the auction, we, as exclusive agents of the Seller reserve the right to charge you the applicable Buyer’s Premium in accordance with these Terms and Conditions, and the Seller a commission in accordance with the terms of the Seller’s agreement. 4.14 Return of Lot Once your bid has been accepted for a Lot then you are liable to pay for that Lot in accordance with these Terms and Conditions. If there are any problems with a Lot then you must notify us within 7 days of receipt of the Lot, specifying the nature of the problem. We may then request that the Lot is returned to us for inspection. Save as set out in clause 5.13, the cancellation of the sale of any Lot and the refund of the corresponding purchase price is entirely at our sole discretion. We will not normally exercise that discretion if the Lot is not received by us in the same condition that it was in at the auction date. AFTER THE AUCTION 5.1 Buyer’s Premium In addition to the Hammer Price, you must pay us the Buyer’s Premium at a rate of 20% of the final Hammer Price of each Lot. 5.2 Value Added Tax Other than in respect of Zero-rated Lots (o) (see VAT Symbols for details), VAT is payable on the Buyer’s Premium and on the Hammer Price, if the Lot has been marked with a sign to that effect in the catalogue (see VAT Symbols for details). 5.3 VAT Refunds General 5.3.1 As we remain liable to account for VAT on all Lots unless they have been exported outside the EU within 3 months of the date of sale, you will generally be asked to deposit all amounts of VAT invoiced. However, if a Spink nominated shipper is instructed, then any refundable VAT will not be collected. In all other cases credits will be made when proof of export is provided. If you export the Lot yourself you must obtain shipping documents from the Shipping Department for which a charge of £50 will be made. 5.3.2 If you export the Lot you must return the valid proof of export certificate to us within 3 months of the date of sale. If you fail to return the proof of export certificate to us within such period and you have not already accounted to us for the VAT, you will be liable to us for the full amount of the VAT due on such Lot and we shall be entitled to invoice you for this sum. 5.3.3 To apply for a refund of any VAT paid, the proof of export certificate must be sent to our Shipping Department clearly marked ‘VAT Refund’ within 3 months of the date of sale. No payment will be made where the total amount of VAT refundable is less than £50 and Spink will charge £50 for each refund processed. VAT Refunds - Buyers from within the EU 5.3.4 VAT refunds are available on the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium of Daggered (†) and Investment Gold (g) Lots. You must certify that you are registered for VAT in another EU country and that the Lot is to be removed from the United Kingdom within 3 months of the date of sale. 5.3.5 Where an EU buyer purchases a Lot on which import VAT has been charged, no refund of VAT is available from us. It may be possible to apply directly for a refund on form VAT 65 to HM Revenue & Customs Overeseas Repayment Section, Londonderry. VAT Refunds – Buyers from outside the EU 5.3.6 Where a Lot is included within the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT element included within the Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. 5.3.7 Where the Lot is marked as a Daggered (†) or Investment Gold (g) Lot the VAT charged on the Hammer Price may be refunded where evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer. 5.3.8 Where the Lot is marked as an Omega (Ω) Lot or an Import VAT (x) Lot and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT charged on both the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. Where required, we can advise you on how to export such Lots as a specific form of export evidence is required. Where we advise you on the export of the Lots, please be aware that the ultimate responsibility in respect of obtaining a valid proof of export certificate will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to obtain such certificate.


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Payment 5.4.1 You must provide us with your full name and permanent address and, if so requested, details of the bank from which any payments to us will be made. You must pay the full amount due (comprising the Hammer Price, the Buyer’s Premium and any applicable VAT) within seven days after the date of the sale. This applies even if you wish to export the Lot and an export licence is (or may be) required. 5.4.2 You will not acquire title to the Lot until all amounts due have been paid in full. This includes instances where special arrangements were made for release of Lot prior to full settlement. 5.4.3 Payment should be made in sterling by one of the following methods: II(i) Direct bank transfer to our account details of which are set out on the invoice. All bank charges shall be met by you. Please ensure that your client number is noted on the transfer. i(ii) By cheque or bank draft made payable to Spink and Son Ltd and sent to Spink at 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET. Please note that the processing charges for payments made by cheques or bank drafts drawn on a non-U.K bank shall be met by you. Please ensure that the remittance slip printed at the bottom of the invoice is enclosed with your payment. (iii) By Visa or Mastercard. A charge of 2% will be applied. Payments exceeding £5,000 can normally only be made by the card holder in person whilst on our premises. 5.4.4 Payments should be made by the registered buyer and not by third parties, unless it has been agreed at the time of registration that you are acting as an agent on behalf of a third party. 5.5 Invoices Invoices may consist of one or more pages and will show: Zero rated Lots (o); no symbol Lots sold under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme; Lots marked (g) special scheme Investment Gold; Daggered Lots (†), imported Lots marked (x) and (Ω), (e) Lots with Zero rated hammer for EU VAT registered buyers. 5.6 Collection of Purchases 5.6.1 Unless we specifically agree to the contrary, we shall retain items sold until all amounts due to us, or to the Spink Group, have been paid in full. 5.6.2 Unless we notify you to the contrary, items retained by us will be covered in accordance with our policy which is available for inspection at our offices from the date of sale for a period of seven days or until the time of collection, whichever is sooner. After seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is the earlier, the Lot will be entirely at your risk. 5.6.3 Our policy will not cover and we are unable to accept responsibility for damage caused by woodworm, changes in atmospheric conditions or acts of terrorism. 5.7 Notification We are not able to notify successful bidders by telephone. While Invoices are sent out by mail after the auction we do not accept responsibility for notifying you of the result of your bid. You are requested to contact us by telephone or in person as soon as possible after the auction to obtain details of the outcome of your bids to avoid incurring charges for late payment. 5.8 Packing and handling 5.8.1 We shall use all reasonable endeavours to take care when handling and packing a purchased Lot but remind you that after seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is sooner, the Lot is entirely at your risk. Our postage charges are set out at the back of the catalogue. 5.8.2 It is the responsibility of the Buyer to be aware of any Import Duties that may be incurred upon importation to the final destination. Spink will not accept return of any package in order to avoid these duties. The onus is also on the Buyer to be aware of any Customs import restrictions that prohibit the importation of certain collectibles. Spink will not accept return of the Lot(s) under these circumstances. Spink will not accept responsibility for Lot(s) seized or destroyed by Customs. 5.9 Recommended packers and shippers If required our shipping department may arrange shipment as your agent. Although we may suggest carriers if specifically requested, our suggestions are made on the basis of our general experience of such parties in the past and we are not responsible to any person to whom we have made a recommendation for the acts or omissions of the third parties concerned. 5.10 Remedies for non-payment or failure to collect purchases 5.10.1 If you fail to make payment within seven days of your stipulated payment date set out in your invoice, we shall be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: 5.10.1.1 to charge interest at the rate of 2% per month compound interest, calculated on a daily basis, from the date the full amount is due; 5.10.1.2 to set off against any amounts which the Spink Group may owe you in any other transaction the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by you;

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5.10.1.3 we may keep hold of all or some of your Lots or other property in the possession of the Spink Group until you have paid all the amounts you owe us or the Spink Group, even if the unpaid amounts do not relate to those Lots or other property. Following fourteen days’ notice to you of the amount outstanding and remaining unpaid, the Spink Group shall have the right to arrange the sale of such Lots or other property. We shall apply the proceeds in discharge of the amount outstanding to us or the Spink Group, and pay any balance to you; 5.10.1.4 where several amounts are owed by you to the Spink Group in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not you so direct; 5.10.1.5 to reject at any future auction any bids made by you or on your behalf or obtain a deposit from you before accepting any bids. 5.10.2 If you fail to make payment within thirty-five days, we shall in addition be entitled: 5.10.2.1 to cancel the sale of the Lot or any other item sold to you at the same or any other auction; 5.10.2.2 to arrange a resale of the Lot, publicly or privately, and, if this results in a lower price being obtained, claim the balance from you together with all reasonable costs including a 20% seller’s commission, expenses, damages, legal fees, commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise, incurred in connection with your failure to make payment; or 5.10.2.3 take any other appropriate action as we deem fit. 5.11 Failure to collect Where purchases are not collected within seven days after the sale, whether or not payment has been made, you will be required to pay a storage charge of £2 per item per day plus any additional handling cost that may apply. You will not be entitled to collect the Lot until all outstanding charges are met, together with payment of all other amounts due to us. 5.12 Export Licence 5.12.1 If required we can, at our discretion, advise you on the detailed provisions of the export licensing regulations. Where we advise you in relation to export licensing regulations the ultimate responsibility in respect of any export will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to apply for any necessary licences. 5.12.2 If the Lot is going to be hand carried by you, you may be required to produce a valid export licence to us or sign a waiver document stating that a licence will be applied for. 5.12.3 You should always check whether an export licence is required before exporting. Export licences are usually obtained within two or three weeks but delays can occur. 5.12.4 Unless otherwise agreed by us in writing, the fact that you wish to apply for an export licence does not affect your obligation to make payment within seven days nor our right to charge interest on late payment. 5.12.5 If you request that we apply for an export licence on your behalf, we shall be entitled to recover from you our disbursements and out of pocket expenses in relation to such application, together with any relevant VAT. 5.12.6 We will not be obliged to rescind a sale nor to refund any interest or other expenses incurred by you where payment is made by you despite the fact that an export licence is required. 5.13 Refund in the case of Forgery 5.13.1 A sale will be cancelled, and the amount paid refunded to you if a Lot (other than a miscellaneous item not described in the catalogue) sold by us proves to have been a Forgery. We shall not however be obliged to refund any amounts if either (a) the catalogue description or saleroom notice at the auction date corresponded to the generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts at that time, or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of opinions, or (b) it can be demonstrated that the Lot is a Forgery only by means of either a scientific process not generally accepted for use until after publication of the catalogue or a process which at the date of the auction was unreasonably expensive or impracticable or likely to have caused damage to the Lot. Furthermore, you should note that this refund can be obtained only if the following conditions are met: 5.13.1.1 you must notify us in writing, within seven days of the receipt of the Lot(s), that in your view the Lot concerned is a Forgery; 5.13.1.2 you must then return the item to us within fourteen days from receipt of the Lot(s), in the same condition as at the auction date; and


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5.13.1.3 as soon as possible following return of the Lot, you must produce evidence satisfactory to us that the Lot is a Forgery and that you are able to transfer good title to us, free from any third party claims. 5.13.2 In no circumstances shall we be required to pay you any more than the amount paid by you for the Lot concerned and you shall have no claim for interest. 5.13.3 The benefit of this guarantee is not capable of being transferred, and is solely for the benefit of the person to whom the original invoice was made out by us in respect of the Lot when sold and who, since the sale, has remained the owner of the Lot without disposing of any interest in it to any third party. 5.13.4 We shall be entitled to rely on any scientific or other process to establish that the Lot is not a Forgery, whether or not such process was used or in use at the date of the auction. 6 LIABILITY Nothing in these Terms and Conditions limits or excludes our liability for: 6.1 death or personal injury resulting from negligence; or 6.2 any damage or liability incurred by you as a result of our fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation. 7 COPYRIGHT 7.1 We shall have the right (on a non-exclusive basis) to photograph, video or otherwise produce an image of the Lot. All rights in such an image will belong to us, and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. 7.2 The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material relating to a Lot is and shall remain at all times our property and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. You shall not use or allow anyone else to use such images, illustrations or written material without our prior written consent. 8 VAT You shall give us all relevant information about your VAT status and that of the Lot to ensure that the correct information is printed in the catalogues. Once printed, the information cannot be changed. If we incur any unforeseen cost or expense as a result of the information being incorrect, you will reimburse to us on demand the full amount incurred. 9 NOTICES All notices given under these Terms and Conditions may be served personally, sent by 1st class post, or faxed to the address given to the sender by the other party. Any notice sent by post will be deemed to have been received on the second working day after posting or, if the addressee is overseas, on the fifth working day after posting. Any notice sent by fax or served personally will be deemed to be delivered on the first working day following despatch. 10 ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS The following provisions of this clause 10 shall apply only if you are acting for the purposes of your business. 10.1 Limitation of Liability Subject to clause 6, we shall not be liable, whether in tort (including for negligence) or breach of statutory duty, contract, misrepresentation or otherwise for any: 10.1.1 loss of profits, loss of business, depletion of goodwill and/or similar losses, loss of anticipated savings, loss of goods, loss of contract, loss of use, loss of corruption of data or information; or 10.1.2 any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs, damages, charges or expenses. 10.2 Severability If any part of these Terms and Condition is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law. 10.3 Force majeure We shall have no liability to you if we are prevented from, or delayed in performing, our obligations under these Terms and Conditions or from carrying on our business by acts, events, omissions or accidents beyond our reasonable control, including (without limitation) strikes, lock-outs or other industrial disputes (whether involving our workforce or the workforce of any other party), failure of a utility service or transport network, act of God, war, riot, civil commotion, malicious damage, compliance with any law or governmental order, rule, regulation or direction, accident, breakdown of plant or machinery, fire, flood, storm or default of suppliers or subcontractors. 10.4 Waiver 10.4.1 A waiver of any right under these Terms and Conditions is only effective if it is in writing and it applies only to the circumstances for which it is given. No failure or delay by a party in exercising any right or remedy under these Terms and Conditions or by law shall constitute a waiver of that (or any other) right or remedy, nor preclude or restrict its further exercise. No single or partial exercise of such right or remedy shall preclude or restrict the further exercise of that (or any other) right or remedy. 10.4.2 Unless specifically provided otherwise, rights arising under these Terms and Conditions are cumulative and do not exclude rights provided by law. Spink Uni (07/11) (20)

10.5 Law and Jurisdiction 10.5.1 These Terms and Conditions and any dispute or claim arising out of or in connection with them or their subject matter, shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the law of England and Wales. 10.5.2 The parties irrevocably agree that the courts of England and Wales shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim that arises out of, or in connection with, Terms and Conditions or their subject matter.

Postal Charges Prices for books (items sent by this method are not covered by insurance) Weight

UK

EU

Rest of the World

Up to 1kg

£8 for any weight

£12

£15

Up to 2kg

£8 for any weight

£18

£25

Prices for all other items including postage and packaging Invoice Value

UK

EU

Rest of the World

Up to £1,500

£10

£15

£20

Above £1,501

£20

£30

£40

Shipments of more than 2kg or volumetric measurement of more than 2kg have to be sent by courier. Certain countries may incur extra charge when courier services are required by our insurance policy. For lots sent by courier please contact Auctionteam@spink.com for calculation of any further relevant cost in addition to the above charges. Value Added Tax (VAT) Charging of (VAT) at Auction The information shown on this page sets out the way in which Spink intends to account for VAT.

i.

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme 1. Where possible, we will offer Lots for sale under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. Such Lots can be identified by the absence of any symbol next to the Lot number in the catalogue and will not be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price. 2. Where Lots are sold using the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme to VAT–registered businesses, the VAT included within the Buyers’ Premium is not recoverable as input tax. Upon request on sale day, we will issue invoices that show VAT separately on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium. This will enable VAT-registered businesses to recover the VAT charged as input tax, subject to the normal rules for recovering input tax.

ii.

Zero-Rated Lots Limited Categories of goods, such as books, are Zero-rated (o) for VAT in the United Kingdom. Such Lots are offered under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. In these circumstances no VAT element will be included within the Buyer’s Premium.

iii.

Daggered Lots Lots which are Daggered (†) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 20% on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium.

iv.

Starred and Omega Lots Lots which are marked (x) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 5% on the Hammer Price and 20% on the Buyer’s Premium which is shown as inclusive of VAT. Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) are subject to VAT at 20% on the Hammer Price and on the Buyer’s Premium. Such Lots bear VAT because the Lot is liable for VAT at this rate on importation into the EU.

v.

Investment Gold Lots Lots marked (g) in the catalogue are exempt from VAT on the Hammer Price and are subject to VAT at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer.

vi.

Imported Lots Lots which are marked (x) and Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) have VAT charged on the Hammer Price and Buyers’ Premium because they have been imported into the United Kingdom from outside the EU. In these cases we have used a temporary importation procedure, which in effect means that the point of importation is deferred until the Lot has been sold. At this point the Buyer is treated as the importer and is liable to pay the import VAT due. We will collect the VAT from you and pay it to HM Customs and Excise on your behalf.


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GROUP CHAIRMAN AND CEO Olivier D. Stocker

SALE CALENDAR 2012/2013

YOUR SPECIALISTS STAMPS UK - Tim Hirsch Guy Croton David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Dominic Savastano Tom Smith USA - George Eveleth Andrew Titley Ed Robinson Rick Penko EUROPE - Guido Craveri Fernando Martínez CHINA - Anna Lee Johnny Sang COINS UK - Paul Dawson Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Richard Bishop William MacKay Barbara Mears John Pett USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini Normand Pepin CHINA - Mark Li BANKNOTES, BONDS & SHARES UK - Barnaby Faull Mike Veissid Andrew Pattison Tom Badley USA - Stephen Goldsmith Matthew Orsini CHINA - Mark Li ORDERS, DECORATIONS, MEDALS & MILITARIA UK - Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys BOOKS UK - Philip Skingley Bobby McBrierty AUTOGRAPHS USA - Stephen Goldsmith WINES CHINA - Anna Lee Guillaume Willk-Fabia YOUR EUROPE TEAM (LONDON - LUGANO) Chairman’s Office Dennis Muriu Monica Kruber Directors Tim Hirsch Anthony Spink Auction & Client Management Team Miroslava Adusei-Poku Sandie Maylor Charles Blane Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Rita Ariete Sarah Schmitz María Martínez Maurizio Schenini

STAMPS 3 November 13/14 November 14/15 November 15 November 15 November 27 November 12 December 13 January 13 January 23 January 24 January

The Collector’s Series Sale The Morgan Collection of Australian Commonwealth The Collector’s Series Sale La Collection “Alienor” - Type “Blanc” de France The Collector’s Series Sale Great Britain - The “Fordwater” Collection The Chartwell Collection - GB Line-Engraved Essays, Proofs, Stamps and Covers - Part IV The Mizuhara Collection of Korean Stamps Fine Stamps and Covers of Hong Kong and China The “Lionheart” Collection of Great Britain and British Empire Specimen Stamps The Collector’s Series Sale

Hong Kong London London London New York London London Hong Kong Hong Kong London London

CSS04 12046 12020 12051 141 12049 12021 13008 13009 13010 13011

The Collector’s Series Sale The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals Fine Coins of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals Ancient, British & Foreign Coins and Commemorative Medals

Hong Kong New York London Hong Kong New York London London

CSS04 315 12027 13007 316 13012 13013

The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes The David Kirch Collection of English Provincial Banknotes - Part II Banknotes of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale World Banknotes

Hong Kong London London Hong Kong New York London

CSS04 12024 12050 13005 316 13004

Orders, Orders, Orders, Orders,

London London London London

12004 13001 13002 13003

The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World Bonds and Share Certificates of Hong Kong and China The Collector’s Series Sale Bonds and Share Certificates of the World

Hong Kong London Hong Kong New York London

CSS04 12011 13006 316 13016

The Collector’s Series Sale

New York

An Evening of Exceptional Wines

Hong Kong

COINS 3 November 12/13 November 4/5 December 12 January 15/16 January 27 March 27 June

BANKNOTES 3 November 13 December 14 December 12 January 15/16 January 9/10/11 April

MEDALS 22 25 25 21

November April July November

Decorations, Decorations, Decorations, Decorations,

Campaign Campaign Campaign Campaign

Medals Medals Medals Medals

& & & &

Militaria Militaria Militaria Militaria

Finance Alison Bennet Marco Fiori Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Billy Tumelty IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Attila Gyanyi Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe Harry Gladwin Tom Robinson Cristina Dugoni Giacomo Canzi YOUR AMERICA TEAM (NEW YORK - DALLAS)

BONDS AND SHARES 3 November 29 November 12 January 15/16 January 17 May

Chairman Emeritus John Herzog Auction Administration and Marketing & Design Rick Penko Patricia Gardner James McGuire Emily Cowin Clyde Townsend

AUTOGRAPHS 15/16 January

316

Finance & Administration Sam Qureshi Ingrid Qureshi Ed Robinson Auctioneers Stephen Goldsmith Andrew Titley

WINES 6 December

YOUR ASIA TEAM (HONG KONG - SINGAPORE) Vice Chairman Anna Lee Administration Amy Yung Dennis Chan Newton Tsang Raymond Tat Gary Tan

The above sale dates are subject to change Spink offers the following services: – VALUATIONS FOR INSURANCE AND PROBATE FOR INDIVIDUAL ITEMS OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS – – SALES ON A COMMISSION BASIS EITHER OF INDIVIDUAL PIECES OR WHOLE COLLECTIONS –

SFW02


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£25

R ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

22 NOVEMBER 2012

LONDON

R R

69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET www.spink.com

LONDON

© Copyright 2012

22 NOVEMBER 2012

STAMPS COINS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS BOOKS WINES

ORDERS, DECORATIONS, CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND MILITARIA

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria  

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

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