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Spink London Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011

COINS STAMPS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS & BOOKS 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7563 4000 Fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4066

ÂŁ25

11007

spink.com

ORders, Decorations, campaign medals and militaria LONDON, THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011


Coins, Stamps, Banknotes, Medals, Bonds & Shares, Autographs & Books

Olivier D. Stocker Group Chairman & CEO SPINK UK Timothy Hirsch Director Anthony Spink Non-Executivc Director Monica Kruber Executive Assistant to CEO Auction and Client Management Team Emily Johnston Miroslava Adusei-Poku Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Finance Alison Bennet Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Shyam Padhiar James Willan IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Segun Magbagbeola Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe

James McGuire

SPINK USA Charles F. Shreve President Tracy L. Shreve Chief Operating Officer John Herzog Chairman Emeritus Finance Dennis Muriu Ingrid Qureshi Sam Qureshi Auction Administration Rick Penko Patricia Lou Gardner Marketing & Design Emily Cowin William Jackson Shawn Barnes Administration Marcy Gottberg

Clyde Townsend

SPINK ASIA Gary Tan SPECIALISTS Banknotes Barnaby Faull Matthew Orsini Jim Fitzgerald Francesca Girelli Stamps David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Guy Croton Dominic Savastano Chris Anderson Charles Shreve Tim Hirsch George Eveleth Ed Robinson Coins Richard Bishop Paul Dawson John Pett William MacKay Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Jim Fitzgerald Arthur Bryant Matthew Orsini Thomas Tesoriero Normand Pepin Bonds & Shares Mike Veissid Autographs Robert Litzenberger Orders, Decorations, Medals & Militaria Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys Books Philip Skingley Rebecca Mason

AUCTION CALENDAR 2011 Stamps 24/25 March 12 April 5 May 24/25 September

Philatelic Collector’s Series Sale Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Spring Collector’s Series Sale Fine Stamps & Covers of South East Asia

New York Dallas London Singapore

Banknotes 12 April 12 April 13 April (am) 13 (pm)/14 April 20/21 May 24/25 September 27/28/29 September 8 December

The Laurence Pope Collection of World Banknotes Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale The Peter Griffiths Collection of World Banknotes World Banknotes Texas Numismatic Association Sale Banknotes & Bonds of South East Asia World Banknotes World Banknotes

London Dallas London London Fort Worth Singapore London London

11017 11019 11020

Bonds and Shares 12 April 20/21 May 20 May 21 October

Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Texas Numismatic Association Sale Bonds & Share Certificates of the World Bonds & Share Certificates of the World

Dallas Fort Worth London London

11006 11022

Coins 24 March 12 April 20/21 May 23 June 6 October 1 December

Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Texas Numismatic Association Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and

London Dallas Fort Worth London London London

11009 11023 11024

Medals 21 April 21 July 24 November

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

London London London

11007 11010 11011

Commemorative Medals

Commemorative Medals Commemorative Medals Commemorative Medals

The above sale dates are subject to change Our Environmental Commitment: Paper from Sustainable Forests and Non Hazardous Ink For centuries Spink and its employees have been preserving and curating collectable items. We now wish to play a modest role in preserving our planet, as well as the heritage of collectables, so future generations may enjoy both. We insist that our printers source all paper used in the production of Spink catalogues from FSC registered suppliers (for further information on the FSC standard please visit fsc.org) and use inks containing non hazardous ingredients. Spink recycle all ecological material used on our premises and we would encourage you to recycle your catalogue once you have finished with it.

Spink offers the following services Valuations for insurance and probate for individual items or whole collections. Sales on a commission basis either of individual pieces or whole collections.

11018 11016

11015 11014 11004

11008


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria Thursday 21 April 2011 at 10.00 a.m. 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET, UK and on

In sending commission bids or making enquiries, this sale should be referred to as KARS - 11007

Spink: 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Vat No: GB 791627108 Telephone: 020 7563 4000 Fax: 020 7563 4066

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Viewing: Tuesday Wednesday

19 April 2011 20 April 2011

YOUR SPINK TEAM

10.00 a.m.- 5.00 p.m. 10.00 a.m.- 5.00 p.m.

FOR THIS SALE

For your questions about the sale lots: Mark Quayle +44 (0)20 7563 4064 / mquayle@spink.com Oliver Pepys +44 (0)20 7563 4061 / opepys@spink.com John Hayward +44 (0)20 7563 4049 / jhayward@spink.com For your bids: Miroslava Adusei-Poku +44 (0)20 7563 4020 Fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4037 auctionteam@spink.com For your internet bidding: Segun Magbagbeola +44 (0)20 7563 4090 / segun@spink.com For your payment: James Willan +44 (0)20 7563 4018 / jwillan@spink.com For your VAT enquiries: John Winchcombe +44 (0)20 7563 4101 / jwinchcombe@spink.com

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Front Cover Illustration: Capitulation of Kars, by Thomas Jones Barker, Courtesy of the Council of the National Army Museum, London, 1 Back Cover Illustration: 2


April 21, 2011 - London

Order of Sale Thursday 21 April 2011 at 10.00 a.m. Lots Groups and Pairs with Orders or Decorations for Gallantry or Distinguished Service ........................................................ Honours and Awards to the Ryves and Corbett Families British Orders and Single Awards

1 - 29

..............

30 - 32

............................................................................

33 - 60

Honours and Awards Bestowed upon Sir Frederick William Maze, Inspector-General of Chinese Maritime Customs ................................................................................ 61 - 78 Honours and Awards Bestowed upon Mr. William Cartwright, Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service .............................................................................................................. 79 - 80 Honours and Awards Bestowed upon Upon Mr. Ardon Henry Hyland, Chinese Postal Service

........

81 - 84

Chinese Orders, Decorations and Medals

......................................................

85 - 116

Foreign Orders, Decorations and Medals

......................................................

117 - 164

Honours and Awards Bestowed upon Sir Peter Markham Scott ............................................................................................ 165 - 173 Arctic and Polar Medals

....................................................................................................

Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medals Campaign Groups and Pairs

174 - 181

................................................

182 - 199

..........................................................................................

200 - 255

Coronation, Jubilee, Long Service and Efficiency Decorations and Medals ............................................................................................ 256 - 288 Miniature Awards

....................................................................................................................

289 - 294

................................................................................................................................

295 - 301

..................................................................................................................................................

302 - 304

Miscellaneous Books

Single Campaign Medals

..................................................................................................

305 - 493

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011 Commencing at 10.00 a.m. All Sales are subject to the Conditions of Business printed at the back of this catalogue Estimates The estimated selling price of each lot is printed below the lot description and does not include the Buyer’s Premium. Bidders should bear in mind that estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are not definitive. They are subject to revision.

GROUPS AND PAIRS WITH ORDERS AND DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY OR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 1 The Unique ‘Defence of Kars’ V.C., K.C.M.G., C.B., K.H. Group of Sixteen to Lieutenant, Later Major-General Sir C.C. Teesdale, Royal Artillery, Who, As One of Just Four British Officers Present, Inspired by Personal Example and Led the Remnants of the Shattered Turkish Army To Victory Against a Russian Force Comprising 22 Battalions of Infantry and a Division of Cavalry, 29.9.1855, When He Volunteered to Take Command of the Most Vulnerable Positions, and ‘During the Hottest Part of the Action’, Having Rallied His Men, ‘Led the Final Charge Which Completed the Victory of the Day’; Having Forced the Russians to Revert to Siege Warfare, Teesdale Was Finally Taken Prisoner of War When The City Could Hold Out No Longer, 28.11.1855; In Later Life He Was Equerry to H.R.H. The Prince of Wales, and Master of Ceremonies to Queen Victoria a) Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved ‘Lieut. Christopher C. Teesdale C.B. Royal Artillery’, reverse of Cross engraved ‘29. Sep: 1855’ b) The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Companion’s (K.C.M.G.) set of Insignia, neck Badge, 90mm including crown suspension x 67mm, gold and enamel; Star, 79mm, silver, gold, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, enamel damage to both Badge and Star c) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) breast Badge, 47mm, gold (Hallmarks for London 1858) and enamel, lacking integral gold riband buckle d) The Royal Guelphic Order, Military Division, Knight’s (K.H.) breast Badge, 54mm including crown and crossed swords suspension x 31mm, gold and enamel, with integral gold riband buckle, tip of one sword broken, with suspension adapted e) Jubilee 1887, silver f) Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, Commander First Class set of Insignia, C.IX.R. (1863-1906), neck Badge, 79mm including crown suspension x 40mm, gold and enamel, gold mark on suspension ring; Star, 82mm x 72mm, silver-gilt, gold, and enamel, with Godet, Berlin, cartouche on reverse, minor damage to inscription, one retaining pin broken g) France, Second Empire, Legion of Honour, Officer’s breast Badge, 64mm including crown suspension x 42mm, gold and enamel, poincon mark on obverse www.spink.com

Major-General Sir C. C. Teesdale h) Greece, Kingdom, Order of the Redeemer, 2nd type, Knight Grand Cross set of Insignia, sash Badge, 86mm including crown suspension x 56mm, gold and enamel; Star, 84mm, silver, gold, and enamel, with Lemaitre, Paris, cartouche on reverse, with a short section of sash riband for display purposes i) Hawaii, Kingdom, Royal Order of Kalakaua I, Grand Officer’s set of Insignia, neck Badge, 87mm including crown suspension x 55mm, gold and enamel; Star, 70mm, silver, gold, and enamel, with Kretly, Palais Royal, cartouche on reverse j) Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Anne, Second Class neck Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 44mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark and court stamp on reverse, 1865 date mark and gold mark on suspension ring, with replacement riband suspension


April 21, 2011 - London k) Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Vladimir, Third Class neck Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 45mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark and court stamp on reverse, 1865-96 assay office mark, date mark, and gold mark on suspension ring, minor enamel damage to reverse central medallion l) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh, First Class set of Insignia, sash Badge, 82mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 63mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel; Star, 93mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with a short section of sash riband for display purposes m) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Second Class set of Insignia, neck Badge, 84mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 59mm, silver, gold, and enamel; Star, 85mm, silver, gold, and enamel n) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Third Class neck Badge, 87mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 64mm, silver, gold, and enamel, suspension re-affixed o) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Imtiyaz Medal, silver, reverse named (in Arabic) to the recipient, with ‘Kars’ riband bar p) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Defence of Kars Medal 1854 (AH 1272), silver, generally good very fine or better, together with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the K.C.M.G., named to Major General Christopher Charles Teesdale, R.A., V.C., C.B., and dated 21.6.1887, together with Chancery enclosure, dated 28.7.1887 - Chancery letter to the Recipient informing him of the award of the K.C.M.G., dated 5.7.1887 - Bestowal Document for the C.B., named to Lieutenant Christopher Charles Teesdale, and dated 10.5.1856, together with Heralds College enclosure, dated 21.6.1856 - Bestowal Document for the Commander First Class of the Order of the Dannebrog, named to Hrr. Christ. Teesdale, and dated 4.12.1875 - Bestowal Document for the Officer of the Legion of Honour, named to Monsieur le Lieutenant-Colonel Teesdale, and dated 6.12.1856 - Bestowal Document for the Grand Cross of the Order of the Redeemer, named to Colonel Teesdale - Bestowal Document for the Second Class Order of St. Anne, with Diamonds, named to LieutenantColonel Christopher Teesdale, and dated 6.3.1874 - Bestowal Document for the Third Class Order of St. Vladimir, named to Colonel Christopher Teesdale, and dated 8.4.1881 - Permission to Wear Document for the Third Class Order of the Medjidieh, named to Captain Christopher Charles Teesdale, and dated 21.1.1856, together with Foreign Office enclosure, dated 24.6.1856

- Bestowal Documents for the Imtiyaz Medal - Warrant Appointing Major General Sir Christopher Charles Teesdale, K.C.M.G., C.B., V.C. as Master of Ceremonies in Ordinary to Her Majesty the Queen, dated 1.6.1890, together with a copy letter detailing the duties of the Master of Ceremonies - Portrait photograph of the recipient - RUNDELL, Anthony J., O.B.E., Kars: Victory into Defeat, 2005, an account of Christopher Teesdale’s role at the Defence of Kars, 220pp, with illustrations, casebound with dust jacket (lot) £160,000-200,000 V.C. London Gazette 25.9.1857 Lieutenant Christopher Charles Teesdale, C.B., Royal Artillery ‘Date of Act of Bravery, 29th September 1855 For gallant conduct, in having, while acting as Aide-de-Camp to Major-General Sir William Fenwick Williams, Bart., K.C.B., at Kars, volunteered to take command of the force engaged in the defence of the most advanced part of the works,- the key of the position- against the attack of the Russian Army when, by throwing himself into the midst of the enemy, who had penetrated into the above redoubt, he encouraged the garrison to make an attack, so vigorous, as to drive out the Russians therefrom, and prevent its capture; also for having, during the hottest part of the action, when the enemy’s fire had driven the Turkish Artillerymen from their guns, rallied the latter, and by his intrepid example induced them to return to their post; and further, after having led the final charge which completed the victory of the day, for having, at the greatest personal risk, saved from the fury of the Turks, a considerable number of the disabled among the enemy, who were lying wounded outside the works,- an action witnessed, and acknowledged gratefully before the Russian Staff, by General Mouravieff.’ K.C.M.G. London Gazette 8.7.1887 Major-General Christopher Charles Teesdale, R.A., V.C., C.B. C.B. London Gazette 10.5.1856 Lieutenant Christopher Charles Teesdale, Lieutenant-Colonel in the Service of His Imperial Majesty the Sultan France, Legion of Honour, Officer London Gazette 1.5.1857 Lieutenant Christopher Charles Teesdale, C.B., Royal Artillery ‘For distinguished services before the enemy during the late war.’ Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh Third Class London Gazette 7.2.1856 Captain Christopher Charles Teesdale, a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Turkish Service ‘For distinguished services before the enemy during the defence of Kars.’

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria Major-General Sir Christopher Charles Teesdale, V.C., K.C.M.G., C.B., K.H., was born in Grahamstown, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, on the 1st June 1833, the third son of Lieutenant-General Henry Teesdale, Royal Horse Artillery, who was posted there at the time, and his wife Rose. At the age of two he returned with his family to England, and spent the remainder of his childhood in both England and Guernsey, the home of his mother’s family. In 1848 he was accepted as a Gentleman Cadet in the Royal Artillery, and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, on Waterloo Day, 18th June 1851, being promoted Lieutenant two years later on the 22nd April 1853. War with Russia As the British and French forces made their way to the Crimea, intending to destroy the Russian Black Sea Fleet and the Sebastopol port, in order to prevent a Russian naval advance on Constantinople, the land route through the Caucasus and Asia Minor was protected by a large Turkish standing army in the east of the country guarding against a Russian invasion from Tiflis. Earlier in 1854 the Russians had moved 35,000 troops into the area, hoping to open up a ‘second front’ against a weak and disorganised army, and thus have a largely unopposed march west. On the 3rd August a Turkish force of 8,000 was routed by 11,000 Russians at Bagazid; 1,800 Turks were killed and wounded. Three days later, at the Battle of Kurukdere, the result was even more emphatic, with the Turkish force, this time numbering over 35,000, again heavily defeated; only the caution showed by the Russian commander saved the Turkish army from being completely annihilated. As the disorganised remnants of Ottoman power in Asiatic Turkey fell back on the town of Kars, it was decided back in London, and confirmed following a heated debate in the House of Commons, to send out a British Commissioner with a small staff to join the Turkish force in the east and for him ‘to pick up what political information he could.’ The man chosen for the role was Colonel William Fenwick Williams, Royal Artillery, who was given the temporary rank of Brigadier-General. He was to be accompanied by Lieutenant Teesdale, as his Aide-de-Camp, who was given the temporary rank of Major, and Dr. Humphry Sandwith, as ‘Inspector General of Hospitals in Asia Minor.’ Williams was to maintain a suitable liaison between the Ottoman Porte in Constantinople and Lord Raglan’s Headquarters in the Crimea, under whose nominal command he was placed. Otherwise it was up to him. Arrival in Kars Williams, Teesdale, and Sandwith arrived in Kars in late 1854. It was a barren place. Situated at the far easternmost point of Turkey, over 1,000 miles from Constantinople, at a height of 1,770 metres above sea level, its climate was harsh and its land rocky. Yet by its location it acted as the key to Asia Minor- if the Russians could capture it then they could enter the Ottoman Empire and materially affect the course of the Crimean War. Soon, with the onset of winter, the snows arrived, and the town was all but cut off from the outside world. Williams and Sandwith left Kars to spend the winter travelling through Asia Minor, leaving Teesdale on his own in the town, to keep an eye on the situation there. For the 21 year-old Teesdale this was hardly good news: ‘I am not so enamoured of the “Sunny East” as to wish to stay six months in a mud hovel on my own, unable to get out more than six times during that period. As to the fair ones, I have had a fine opportunity of seeing them during our inspection of these winter quarters. They are about as fair as an old boot and if you can imagine anything between a chimney-sweep and a dancing bear you will form a better idea of their costume and grace than it is possible for me to give you.’ (letter written by Teesdale, quoted in Kars: Victory into Defeat refers). The following April, after a long, cold, and depressing winter Williams and Sandwith returned, and they were joined in Kars by three more Englishmen: Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Lake, Royal Engineers; Captain Henry Thompson, 68th Bengal

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Lieutenant C. C. Teesdale Native Infantry, and Mr. Churchill, an Attaché of Her Majesty’s Mission in Persia seconded as a civilian secretary for Williams. Formerly Commissioned into the Sultan’s Army, and given effective command of the Turkish force, together they all set about preparing the town’s defences and men into a state of readiness. Starting from scratch, Lake constructed, with remarkable haste and effectiveness, a complex series of fortifications designed to cover the heights behind Kars as well as the town to the south of the river, based upon a series of redoubts, known as tabias. At the centre of the fortifications was a new construction, called Fort Lake, ‘a large and very formidable redoubt’ which could hold 3,000 men, and which would become General Williams’ command post. Meanwhile Thompson, the Infantry expert, got to work training up the regular and irregular Turkish soldiers for the action to come. They would not have to wait long. Towards the end of June some 35,000 to 40,000 Russian troops arrived in the area, under the command of General Mouravieff, who, as a young subaltern, had taken part in the Russian capture of Kars in 1828, and set up camp approximately four miles from the town. For most of July they were occupied in reconnaissance and skirmishes to probe the town’s defences. On the 8th August, in the absence of Mouravieff, the skirmishes became more intense, as Teesdale relates: ‘To this moment I do not know what the demonstration against our position was meant for. The only explanation I can imagine is that, in the absence of Mouravieff, General Brumer wished to do something- what, no one probably knows except himself. The Russians were quite deceived by our silence on the day of the demonstration in that quarter as to the range of our guns, and therefore came within easy reach of them before they were made painfully aware of the fact. The number of enemy killed included a General, a Lieutenant-Colonel, and eight or nine officers of superior rank.’ (ibid). Just as the enemy retreated, Teesdale, who from the opposite side of the defences had


April 21, 2011 - London heard the firing, galloped up to the menaced position, ordered a large cannon to be elevated, and, laying the piece himself, threw a ball of enormous magnitude into the midst of the retreating squadrons, causing signal havoc amongst them. Thus he had the honour of firing, with his own hands, the last and best shot of the action. Following this reverse, and on the return of Mouravieff, the Russians ceased their occasional attacks, and switched tactics, laying siege to the town in an attempt to starve the defenders into submission. By the end of August the effects of the siege were being feltfewer and fewer carts from the surrounding countryside were getting into Kars, and the Russian army destroyed stores of grain in every village through which they passed. News of the fall of Sebastopol reached Kars on the 17th September. The defenders by this time were on less than half rations, and cavalry horses were dying where they stood. Re-enforcements were desperately needed, and plans were drawn up to send a relief force. On learning of this news, Mouravieff decided to switch tactics, abandoning the siege, and drawing up plans for an all-out attack. Defence of Kars, 29th September 1855 ‘I have the honour to inform your Lordship that General Mouravieff, with the bulk of his army, at day-dawn this morning, attacked our entrenched position on the heights above Kars, and on the opposite side of the river. The battle lasted, without a moment’s intermission, for nearly seven hours, when the enemy was driven off in the greatest disorder, with the loss of 2,500 dead, and nearly double that number of wounded, who were, for the most part, carried off by the retreating enemy. Upwards of 4,000 muskets were left on the field. Your Lordship can, without a description on my part, imagine the determination of the assailants, and the undaunted courage of the troops who defended the position for so many hours. I have great gratification in acquainting your Lordship with the gallant conduct of LieutenantColonel Lake, Major Teesdale, and Captain Thompson, who rendered the most important service in defending the redoubts. I beg to recommend these officers to your Lordship’s protection. I also beg to name my Secretary, Mr. Churchill, an Attaché of Her Majesty’s Mission in Persia. He directed the fire of a battery throughout the action, and caused the enemy great loss. Dr. Sandwith has been most active and efficient in the management of the ambulances and in the hospital arrangements. Our loss was about 700 killed and wounded.’ (Brigadier-General Williams’ Despatch, dated Kars, 29.9.1855, refers). The following day Teesdale wrote a letter home, relating the battle in more depth, and detailing his own involvement: ‘I dare say when this reaches you that you will heave heard of the desperate action we had here yesterday; I wish you to know as soon as possible that, by God’s mercy, I came out of it unhurt. I had just returned from a patrol at 4:30am when the first gun fired from Laz tabia, to which I immediately galloped and remained fighting there for hours in utter ignorance of how the day went. For seven hours I was in a tremendous fire but thank God, escaped with only a bruise on the thigh from a case shot. I had patrolled around our line of works from three in the morning on the 29th according to the wish of General Kmety who always advised my being in the saddle a little before daylight as he always expected that any attack would take place at dawn. The darkness of the nights together with the rocky ground and the nature of our duties usually obliged us to keep our horses at a slow walk, but on this particular night it was so bitterly cold that after having completed the rounds my interpreter, Rennison, begged that we should push home a little quicker; so, trusting our horses to keep on their feet we cantered sharply to our tents. Rennison was already in his tent and I had at that moment reined in my horse and taken my foot from the stirrup to dismount when I was startled by a gun flashing through the darkness directly in front of me. This was so extraordinary and event that almost before the sound had reached me I was galloping at speed to the work

Victoria Cross (reverse) from whence the sound had come. Springing from my horse I asked the officer at the gun what was going on when for the first time I was informed that the Russians were upon us. The Turk’s eyes were better than mine from being constantly at work at night; all I could see was a blacker than usual shadow across the valley. This was at half past four in the morning. The guns continued to fire continuously on the approaching mass, and soon all uncertainty ceased; the Russians, finding that they were discovered set up yell from twenty thousand throats. The whole black valley seemed alive with the howling mass, that came boiling up through the darkness in apparently irresistible numbers. The fire ran along the whole of our front line almost at the same moment and the flashes showed the busy figures of Turks rushing to every assailable point, and, before the noise became so great as to drown all human voices, the cries and screams of the wounded were heard with fearful distinctness, amid the general uproar. Knowing the confidence that the soldiery reposed in the English officers my first care was to make my presence known to them, and I addressed a few words to those already in place. My knowledge of Turkish and the pressing nature of the moment made this of short duration! However, they answered with a wild cheer for the Sultan in such a hearty manner that I finally anticipated the best of results from them. They were scarcely at their posts before the Russians were upon us. The guns were by this time in full play and being loaded entirely with case shot; this, assisted by the rolling fire of the musketry that at once broke out from the parapet swept the enemy completely from our front. The column thus split swerved to either side; on our left it overwhelmed the small open breastwork (Yarum-ai tabia) and on our right penetrated through the unguarded space and swept forward on the tents in our rear. As soon as the soldiers posted at Yarum-ai tabia took refuge in the redoubt I was defending and reported its occupation by the enemy I directed the fire of the guns and a portion of the infantry upon the interior of this work. This speedily cleared it of its occupants who then took refuge on the reverse side of the parapet- from whence they kept up a most galling fire on our men and were almost protected from our own fire. Whilst this conflict occupied our attention on our left front, that part of the Russian column

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria which had passed by on our right silently reformed amidst the darkness and, led on by an intrepid officer rushed upon an almost unguarded point in our rear. So sudden was the assault that almost before I could rally a company to resist it the Russians were swarming like bees upon the parapet and were already inside the work. This moment was the most critical for the Yuksek tabia. The Turks attacked on all sides, but bewildered by the firing which raged around them, wavered for a moment as the black figures of their enemies seemed to swoop down upon them as they jumped off the parapet. Every moment was now of such vital importance that ceasing my efforts to attract the attention of those who were fighting in front of their assailant in the rear, and shouting to the few who were around me, I rushed up into the salient already occupied by the enemy. This sudden impulse saved us. Those who had already penetrated were in a moment struck down on the platform where I stood and their gallant leader- as he was about to cross his sword with mine- received a ball in the centre of his forehead and fell backwards into the ditch. Seven Russian soldiers lay dead at my feet. Still the brave young volunteers who had made up the attacking column came swarming up but the deadly and deliberate fire from within kept them in check and their bravest already lay thickly in and on the edge of the little ditch which surrounded the work. It was a terrible scene before the day broke; in the darkness and confusion Russians actually got inside our redoubt and three men were killed at my feet while an officer, dashing over the parapet, was shot down when almost at the point of my sword. The Russians sent up battalion after battalion but our fire prevented them forming any regular formation for assault. Another mass was coming to their support and it became evident that succour of some sort must be given to those who opposed them. Seeing this I left them fighting with unflinching perseverance to try and bring a gun from the front. To my great delight I found that one of the guns of our reserve, having lost its way in the darkness and confusion had taken refuge in our work and stood limbered up and inactive. By dint of yelling at and beating the gunners I succeeded in attracting their attention to explain what I wanted. Leaving two men at the limber to supply nothing but grape I managed with the help of four of the gunners to run the gun up into the salient. Acting as No.1 I pointed at the thickest of the mass that approached us which was but a few yards from the muzzle. Six times the iron shower tore through their ranks and left long lines of dead and wounded in their tracks. Then the attacking column in utter confusion from the rapidity of the fire broke and fled past the redoubt down the hill pursued by the infuriated Turks. Dawn had just broken. The column we had just disposed of was the centre one of three that attacked simultaneously; on our left Tachmach tabia with its flanking line of breastworks turned seemed but a mass of smoke and fire. On our right a column of eight battalions had marched straight upon the Rennison lines, where Kmety commanded in person. The Third regiment of Arabistan and a battalion of Chasseurs formed the two sides of a triangle into which the enemy entered and made straight for the gate at the apex. Leaving the guns which protected their flank to do their work when the enemy was close upon them they then opened a converging fire upon the head of the column; the first rank fell but the rest still surged up pressing those in advance forwards- but it was impossible to withstand the deadly fire of the elite of our old soldiers who, deployed and protected by a breastwork, sent every ball into the centre of the advancing column. This horrid carnage continued until, stopped by a mound of dead, and dislocated by the repeated discharges of grape, the Russians were brought to a standstill. The Turks, led by the brave Hungarian General Kmety, leaped over the breastwork and finished with the bayonet the utter rout of their assailants. This column left 850 dead upon a space not exceeding an acre in area; their General Kavalieffsky was

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mortally wounded; Prince Gagarin who next took command fared little better and nearly every superior officer fell. A few moments breathing time were now afforded us; we rallied the men and put things in as much order as possible for a renewal of the struggle. The fire still raged on the left with undiminished violence and in our rear warm work was evidently going on. Day had now completely broken and our artillery became of more value. After having turned the left the Russians had managed to get up sixteen guns, the fire of which fell heavily upon us- without our being able in the confusion to reply to it. When the Russians saw how the position between ourselves and their comrades who were now fighting among the rocks on which Yarum-ai tabia stood, such a fire was concentrated upon us that for a time we were almost paralysed by the screeching showers that fell around us without interruption. But other movements were going on of which we were unaware; the troops by whom we were thus mercilessly ‘mitraillés’ were in their turn reduced to silence and finally obliged to leave the field by the well directed guns in our rear under the command of Colonel Lake and from a heavy gun for which Mr. Churchill (the General’s secretary) had assumed direction. Scarcely we were free from this crushing fire when Kmety at the head of three companies of our dashing chasseurs came up from the Russian lines and, running into Yarum-ai tabia, and springing like cats among the rocks, they made short work of the Russians who still held their ground there. By Kemty’s desire I remained at Yuksek tabia and directed the fire of our guns upon the column opposed to our right; this had reformed out of range under cover of some hills and was vainly endeavouring to mount a second attack. Each time they attempted to debouch on us our shot fell with such beautiful precision at the head of the column that after several vain attempts they finally retired and were no more seen. While the fight had thus raged along the line at Tachmach tabia the enemy had gained so important an advantage at the Inglis tabia that had it not been for the energy and decision of General Williams the day might still have been lost. Nine or ten battalions of infantry supported by sixteen guns and all Baklanoff’s division of cavalry attacked the Inglis tabia shortly after daybreak under the command of the Cossack General in person who, it is said by the Russians, had managed to gain during the preceding nights a perfect knowledge of the works he was to attack. Unfortunately for us the only garrison that could be spared for the defence of these lines consisted of about three hundred regular troops and some of the Laz irregulars. No officer in whom the men placed any confidence was there and the consequence was that the whole line was carried on the first attack without any resistance. The Laz fled so precipitately that, although the enemy were out of musket shot at that time, left their clan colours flying on the parapet to fall into the hands of the Russians. Not content with this disgrace these lawless mountaineers continued their flight into the town where, taking advantage of the general confusion, they began to plunder the unprotected houses. Luckily for us the few regular troops who were spread along the line rallied in a work called Williams Pasha tabia built expressly in anticipation of these circumstances; it was situated on the edge of the cliffs above the river and approachable only from beneath by a rugged path hewn from the cliff for this specific purpose. Here the regular troops were joined by many of the townspeople who by this time were flocking to the scene of action. As soon as the Russians had carried the Inglis tabia lines they broke down part of the breastworks and brought in their artillery which began to shell the town, undisturbed by the castle on the opposite side of the river where there were mounted three heavy guns which might have been of the greatest service had they not been under the command of an officer whom fear had rendered imbecilic, and who afterwards had no other excuse to offer that that “he was afraid”. No sooner was the news brought to General Williams that


April 21, 2011 - London the Inglis tabia was in the hands of the enemy than, selecting the bravest of the Anatolian troops under Kadri-Bey, an officer to be relied upon, he spoke a few words to them and sent them to the scene. Even before their arrival the enemy had been so disquieted as to make their longer stay doubtful. Captain Thompson seeing what had happened had harnessed some of his men to the heavy gun on the Cardagh and brought it at a run to a position bearing on the Inglis lines; it commanded Teesdale tabia as well as all the right of the line, and its plunging fire soon drove the enemy from that part of the position. His Bashi-Bazooks had already started to climb the rocky paths that led up to the rear of the Inglis redoubts, and, in anticipation of General Williams’ order to march up as a reserve part of Thompson’s regulars were already on their way to the start point when the order arrived. At this time, when the Russian artillery had been silenced, Colonel Lake left his command to a Turkish officer and succeeded in reaching Fort Lake; he arrived in time to alter the bearing of some guns to fire with deadly effect upon the already shaken enemy. The Russians were now fiercely striving to carry Williams Pasha tabia as well as to engage the guns in Fort Lake which swept the front of Williams Pasha tabia of its assailants. At the same time the reserves arrived at each extremity of the line, attacked with the bayonet, and finally drove the enemy back over the disputed line. Further than this they could not follow for the Russian cavalry remained in unshaken order to repel any attempt on the part of our infantry to pursue their advantage. Thus supported, Baklanoff’s column retreated under a heavy fire from all points, carrying away two field guns from the first rush and the colours which the Laz had left behind them. Once indeed, some of our soldiers, carried away by the excitement of success, jumped over the parapets and tried to pursue but a squadron of dragoons immediately faced about and charged fiercely on the scattered foot soldiers who would have been cut to pieces but for the earthworks which effectively stopped the progress of the Russian cavalry. Having just heard of the desperate plight of Tachmach tabia, great was our joy to see the dark masses of Russians retiring from the Inglis lines and the shot from our guns once more plunging amongst them. We then knew that our rear was safe, and that if we could hold out all was safe. At this moment a battalion of the enemy debouched from the right flank and apparently meant to repeat their previous manoeuvre which had so nearly succeeded; however, from Yuksek-tabia we opened such a fire of grape upon them that, despite the efforts of their officers who were bravely leading them on, they again took refuge inside the line. Here they encountered some of our reserves from below which cut off their retreat to the left. It appeared at that moment that their intention was to seize a small work overlooking the village of Chakmak so as to afford easy access for Baklanoff’s column which was then almost opposite to it and which could have made a considerable diversion in our rear. It was of importance therefore that they should not succeed and so fire was opened from every gun that could bear upon them; so severely did they suffer that, out of this single battalion, 250 men were hors-de-combat and it was finally dispersed by the garrison of guns in the small work they had tried to surprise. Baklanoff’s artillery fired its last shots in support of this battalion as it left the ground. In spite of our success on every other front, the fight still continued around Tachmach tabia with unabated fury. Kmety had taken up three companies to their assistance and I had sent three more with a gun but their losses were scarcely made good by this addition and all of their ammunition was expended. Incredible as it might appear, the last hour of that battle was fought with ammunition from the Russian dead. Sallies were made for no other purpose than to obtain the needful supply, and at one point, part of the garrison was employed in stripping off the pouches from the fallen on one side of the redoubt and throwing them to their comrades who were thus able to repulse the enemy from the other side.

Such fighting as this deserved to be crowned with success but the Russians fought with equal obstinacy until only two battalions remained which had not been committed to the battle proper. The last shadow of hope having vanished, the Russian General gave the order to retire- but it was too late. Reserves arrived from below and drove the enemy from the interior lines. Tired of acting so long on the defensive I mounted my horse which had remained unhurt and led a charge against the enemy’s chasseurs and stragglers who, favoured by the ground, still kept shooting our men at leisure. This was no easy task, and on reaching the exterior of Tachmach tabia we found ourselves confronted by a regiment of the enemy- fresh men firing heavily along their front. It was the last remnant of the Russian infantry. The Turks still left alive in Tachmach tabia could no longer be restrained; seeing our plight they burst forth like a pent-up torrent from the redoubt and rushed with the blind fury of wild animals to our assistanceand the Russian regiment seemed to melt before them. In a moment the ground was thick with corpses and the survivors flying as best each one might. Our men could not be stopped until they had passed the road at the bottom of the hill- but the affair was over. A few more shots were fired at the fugitives when a band struck up and the soldiers were dancing amidst all the horrors of a battle ground’ (letter from the recipient to his father, dated Kars, 30.9.1855, refers). Turkish loses after seven hours of uninterrupted combat were 362 dead and 631 wounded. The townspeople suffered an additional 101 dead and 202 wounded. Of the Russian dead General Williams wrote in a later despatch: ‘Their loss was immense- they left on the field more than 5,000 dead, which literally covered the country, and it took the Turkish infantry four days to bury. Their wounded and prisoners in our possession amount to 160, whilst those who were carried off are said to be upwards of 7,000.’ Later a Russian officer was to paint an even starker picture: ‘At the muster call in camp more than a third, and nearly a half, were missing from the night before. The whole of the following day was spent in collecting the dead and wounded. The Tsar’s personal regiment of Carabiniers had suffered most- all of its thirtytwo officers had either been killed or wounded, and we had up to 15,000 hors-de-combat as a result of the battle.’ That night, having spent the afternoon burying their own dead, with the wounded being treated to by Dr. Sandwith, the defenders of Kars slept out under arms in their positions, but no further attack was made. The Siege In the weeks following the battle it became apparent to both sides that there was little likelihood of an Allied relief force being sent to Kars. As one British civil commissioner commented: ‘To embark an army in the Crimea, to transport it across the Black Sea, to disembark it again at the worst port upon that sea, where it is often impossible for a week at a time to communicate with the shore, to march this army a distance of 180 miles over often impassable terrain, including two mountain passes at a season of the year when they are blocked with snow, and to arrive in a condition capable of coping with a hostile army 40,000 strong and perfectly fresh- and to have accomplished all this within the short space of six weeks would have been an achievement worthy of a greater general than this war has hitherto produced.’ Having deployed his troops once and lost, Mouravieff was in no hurry to do so again, and instead re-focused his efforts on maintaining the siege, and starving the defenders into submission. ‘The horrors of the concluding part of the siege are almost too terrible to recall- men too proud to beg locked their doors and lay down to die in their houses. The misery within the town increased by the day, and the vigilance of the Russians doubled. A stock of wood eked out to the last had vanished, and the cold at night became so bitter that numbers of men were found every morning to be frozen to death in their tents. Horses and mules had long ceased to be of any service except for food. Towards the middle of November

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria snow began to fall, and so intense did the cold now become that to sleep under canvas became nearly impossible. General Williams was now increasingly employed in nursing the remaining strength of the men. For some time past the health of Captain Thompson had been failing but he kept gallantly at his post until the cold and exposure had entirely unfitted him for further exertion. At last so few days provisions remained that it became evident that the place was untenable for any further length of time, and unless some very unexpected piece of good news reached us we should have to abandon the city we had so long defended. By November 20th the state of weakness and complete prostration to which the garrison was now reduced had increased so terribly that the prospect of cutting our way out through the Russian lines- which at one time had seemed feasible- now appeared utter recklessness.’ (Letters written by Major Teesdale, taken from Kars: Victory into Defeat refers). In his own account, Dr. Sandwith described the conditions in the town thus: ‘At last the pangs of hunger became unendurable; grass was torn up wherever it appeared, that the soldiers and people might feed upon the roots. Round the lines flocks of vultures hovered, contending with the dogs of the city for the corpses scratched by the latter from their shallow graves. The soldiers are dying at a rate of one hundred a day of famine. They were skeletons and were incapable of fighting. The city was strewn with dead and dying.’ (ibid) Following a Council of War on the 24th November, and with no prospect of being relieved, the inevitable decision to surrender was reached: ‘I was sent from the Council with the flag of truce to the Russian Camp. Having arrived at the outposts the Cossacks approached me. Having explained the object of my mission I was blindfolded and led towards their camp. Arriving at the headquarters of General Mouravieff I was admitted at once and presented the note from General Williams which I carried. An interview was arranged for the following day at noon and having been treated with great civility I took my leave. The following day General Williams, accompanied by his secretary Mr. Churchill and myself, presented ourselves at the Russian headquarters at the appointed time and, after the ordinary civilities, the two Generals were left alone to proceed to the settlement.’ (Letter written by Major Teesdale, taken from Kars: Victory into Defeat refers). Prisoner of War The formal surrender took place at an old Genoese church about three miles from Kars. The officers and regular troops of the garrison, around 8,000 in all, were all made prisoners of war, and the irregulars, numbering 6,000 in total, were allowed to go free. Under a clause in the surrender, personally inserted by General Mouravieff, ‘Officers of all grades will be allowed to retain their swords, in consequence of the brave defence made by the garrison of Kars.’ Dr. Sandwith, as a non-combatant, was allowed free to find his own way home. Armed with a Russian passport, he finally arriving back in England some three months later. The four British Officers, Williams, Lake, Teesdale, and Thompson, together with Mr. Churchill, as a volunteer prisoner, were all taken into custody at the Russian town of Tiflis. The Russians had finally had control of Kars, and with it the door to Constantinople lay ajar; but it was too late. On the conclusion of hostilities in the Crimea, and the signing of the treaty of peace on the 30th March 1856, the four British officers were released. General Williams, together with Teesdale, was granted to an audience with the Tsar in St. Petersburg. On arriving in St. Petersburg in June, he received

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a letter from his old adversity, General Mouravieff: ‘Dear General Williams, I shall always be happy to remember the times I passed in your company and I do not doubt for a moment the distinguished reception that you will meet in St. Petersburg from our Emperor; your renown could not but be honoured by a Sovereign who esteems real merit in friend and foe. I feel very gratified in reading in the newspapers that your Queen honours you with a grateful testimonial of her satisfaction. Please give my best compliments to Major Teesdale and believe me to be, ever most sincerely yours, Nikolay Mouravieff.’ Victoria Cross Teesdale arrived back in England on the 11th June 1856, reverting to his substantive rank of Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, having been created a Companion of the Order of the Bath the previous month in recognition of his distinguished services before the enemy in Kars (there were awards for all the British Officers present at Kars- General Williams was created K.C.B., raised to a Baronetcy as Sir William Williams of Kars, and voted a pension of £1,000 per annum for life; Lieutenant-Colonel Lake and Captain Thompson were also created a C.B.s; and there was a Civil C.B. for Dr. Sandwith), and awarded the Order of the Medjidieh by the Ottoman Empire. He was also created an Officer of the French Legion of Honour, and ultimately received the Victoria Cross, the only one given for Kars, being presented with his Cross by Queen Victoria on the 21st November 1857 at Windsor Castle, the first South Africanborn recipient of the V.C. He also received the Turkish campaign medal for the Defence of Kars- a unique occurrence of the Victoria Cross being paired with a foreign campaign medal. Later Life Teesdale was promoted Captain and Brevet Major in January 1858, and in November of that year was appointed Equerry to H.R.H. The Prince of Wales. The relationship was clearly a happy one, as evidenced by a letter written by the Prince of Wales in June 1861: ‘My dear Teesdale, I enclose two Post Office orders for £1 the sum you won here by successfully drawing the winner of the Oaks...I remain, yours very sincerely, Albert Edward.’ He also pursued his passion as an amateur artist, and later developed a close friendship with the French painter Gustave Doré. Ten years after his release from captivity in Russia and audience with the Tsar he returned once more to St. Petersburg, to take part in the Garter Mission for the Investiture of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Russia with the Order of the Garter; at the Investiture Ceremony on the 28th July 1867 he carried the hat, plume, and Star of the Order. Promoted Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel in December 1868, he was appointed an Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty the Queen, 1st October 1877, and promoted to his ultimate rank of Major-General in April 1887- in July of that year he was created a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in celebration of Her Majesty’s Golden Jubilee. His final appointment was that of Her Majesty’s Master of Ceremonies, a job he held from May 1890- his main duties, as a ‘Gentleman well languaged, of good education and discretion &c.’, involved liaising between the Court and the Corps Diplomatique, and being in attendance at the audience of an Ambassador or Minister with the Sovereign. MajorGeneral Teesdale retired from the Army on the 22nd March 1892, and died at home the following year in South Bersted, near Bognor, Sussex, on the 1st December 1893, where he is buried in the village churchyard.


April 21, 2011 - London

2 2 The Unique and Exceptionally Well Documented ‘North East Frontier 1891’ V.C. Group of Five to Lieutenant, Later Colonel, C.J.W. Grant, 12th Regiment (2nd Burma Battalion) Madras Infantry; Who Set Out With Only 80 Men to Rescue British Political Prisoners After Treachery at Manipur, March 1891; Having Discovered He Was Too Late to Prevent Their Murder, He Stormed and Captured the Fortified Position of Thobal and Held Out For 8 Days Against Overwhelming Odds, With Limited Ammunition and Growing Disease Amongst His Own Men. Twice Wounded During the Expedition, He Was Carried into Manipur By His Men a) Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved ‘Lieut: Chas. Jas. Wm. Grant Indian Staff Corps’, reverse of Cross engraved ‘27th March 1891’ b) India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, N.E. Frontier 1891, Burma 1885-7, clasps in this order (Lieut. C.J.W. Grant 12th Madras Infy.), suspension claw loose, light pitting from Star c) 1914-15 Star (Bt. Col. C.J.W. Grant. V.C.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Bt. Col. C.J.W. Grant.), generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn, with the following related contemporary items and documents: - Thirteen items of insignia including: 12th (2nd Burma Battalion) Madras Infantry Victorian Officer’s shoulder belt plate; 6th Punjab Rifles Victorian Officer’s pouch belt plate; 89th Punjabis Victorian Officer’s helmet plate; 92nd Punjabis Officer’s silver cap badge

- Inkwell fashioned from 9 pdr shell case retrieved from Thobal by Grant, case in the shape of a horses’ hoof and engraved ‘Thobal 1st April 1891’, with silver hinged lid, stamped O.R.R., surmounted by a silver cannon, all mounted on a turned mahogany base with a small silver plaque engraved ‘Helen Grant from Her Son’ - Commission appointing C.J.W. Grant a Lieutenant in the Suffolk Regiment, dated 5.5.1882 - Royal Military College Gentleman Cadet’s Certificate, dated December 1881; Examination For Promotion Special Certificate, dated November 1889; Riding Certificate, dated 26.9.1891 - Two Parchment copies of Grant’s Record of Officers Service - Grant’s Officer’s Field Note and Sketch Book and Reconnaissance Aide-Memoire, leather bound, in which he records in detail the march to Manipur, the capture and subsequent defence of Thobal, including several detailed sketches of both actions and positions - Folder of original letters, including negotiating between Grant and the Manipuris and a coded message from Grant in Greek characters to the relief force, with a similar folder of transcripts of the originals and of diary of events made in his Field Note Book - Scrap book made by recipient replete with annotated photographs taken during the relief expedition, dedicated to ‘Douglas & Helen Grant from their loving son, Charlie - 1891’ - Scrap book of newspaper cuttings relating to Grant and the expedition

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria - Copy of Manipur, a narrative and a copy of War Office official Correspondence Relating to Manipur - Portrait photograph of recipient in uniform - Official photograph of V.C. Dinner, 9.11.1929, with original named invitation and a handwritten seating plan - Several other photographs relating to Grants military career; copies of The Dwarf, dated 4.4.1891; The Graphic, dated 18.4.1891; Punch, dated 25.4.1891 - Three letters of condolence on the death of Grant (lot) £130,000-160,000 V.C. London Gazette 26.5.1891 Lieutenant Charles James William Grant, Indian Staff Corps ‘For the conspicuous bravery and devotion to his country displayed by him in having, upon hearing on the 27th March, 1891, of the disaster at Manipur, at once volunteered to attempt the relief of the British Captives, with 80 Native Soldiers, and having advanced with the greatest intrepidity, captured Thobal, near Manipur, and held it against a large force of the enemy. Lieutenant Grant inspired his men with equal heroism, by an ever-present example of personal daring and resource.’ Colonel James William Grant, V.C. (1861-1932), born Bourtie, Aberdeenshire; the son of Lieutenant-General P.C.S. St. J. Grant; educated privately and at R.M.C. Sandhurst, 1881; commissioned Lieutenant Suffolk Regiment, 1882; joined Madras Staff Corps, 1884; initially served as Wing Officer 5th Madras Native Infantry and was attached to the 12th Madras Native Infantry for the expedition against King Thebaw, Upper Burma, 1885-87; transferred 12th Madras Native Infantry, 1.6.1890. Manipur - Intrigue and Overthrow The small state of Manipur, under the rule of Rajah Chandra Kirti Singh, adjoined Assam and Burma. Despite having a small army the Rajah was reliant upon British protection against Burmese incursions. During the latter’s reign relations between the state and the British authorities had been cordial. In 1886 the Rajah died leaving eight sons. Sura Chandra Singh succeeded his father, however, rival factions soon appeared between the siblings. After a period of unrest, one brother, Takendrajit Singh who occupied the post of Senapati (Commander-in-Chief), allied with the 5th and 7th brothers to overthrow the declared ruler. After a fairly bloodless coup the throne was given to Kula Chandra Dhuya Singh, September 1890, and the declared ruler fled to the British Residency. The British authorities were well aware of the failings of the declared ruler, who had proved himself to be weak and unpopular amongst his subjects. Their response was to send the Chief Commissioner of Assam, J.W. Quinton, to Manipur to officially recognise Kula Chandra Dhuya Singh as Regent rather than Ruler and to remove the scheming Senapati. Quinton proceeded on his mission with an escort of 400 rifles under the command of Colonel Skene, 42nd Gurkhas. They arrived in Manipur on the 22nd of March with the intention of arresting the Senapati in open Durbar. The Senapati failed to turn up to the Durbar so it was postponed until the following day. Once again excuses were made by the Manipuris as to why he was unable to attend and the surrender of the Senapati was demanded. This was refused and at 4am on the 24th March troops were sent to the Senapati’s palace to arrest him. A sharp action ensued with the Senapati rallying his forces to counter-attack the Residency. The British forces fell back upon the Residency and came under artillery fire. With ammunition running short the decision to try and obtain a truce was made. The Chief Commissioner with Colonel Skene and three others agreed to meet the Senapati unarmed half way

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Colonel C. J. W. Grant between the palace and the Residency. Once there treachery occurred and the party were taken captives inside the palace. The remaining British forces withdrew and the Residency was raised to the ground. News of the difficulties being experienced in arresting the Senapati had reached the Viceroy on the 29th March and troops were despatched in the hope of saving the prisoners. They were ignorance of the fact that all of Quinton’s party had already been murdered. Grant to the Rescue During this time Grant, who had been posted to the 12th Regiment (2nd Burma Battalion) Madras Infantry, was in command of a detachment of 80 men at Tammu, Burma. Given his proximity to Manipur and that it was still believed that Quinton and the others might be still alive, on the 27th March General Stewart ordered him to move at once upon Manipur with his detachment. Grant advanced with a force that was comprised of a small number of old soldiers and a large number of recruits, who had only fired a few rounds in musketry practice let alone been under live fire. There was no artillery and his transport consisted of three elephants, a few ponies and some Cossiah Coolies. The little column started out on the 28th March and had only advanced 7 miles before they were under fire. This was to prove sporadic but continual throughout the rest of the day culminating in the discovery of a road block made out of felled trees, ‘Taking twenty men, he [Grant] passed beyond the obstacles , which the Gurkhas with kookris began to clear away. The Manipuris were on the hill above.... The twenty men on their way up the hillside fired 40 or 50 shots, and then rushed the position from the flank. It proved to be a shelter trench 90 yards long.... and was held by 150 men. These, in their flight, left some guns and accoutrements behind them.’ (Manipur, a narrative, refers) On the 30th Grant’s men reached Palel, which was garrisoned by 200 Manipuris. They were routed and forced


April 21, 2011 - London to flee, with Grant pursuing them for three miles and taking three prisoners. One of the latter informed him that Quinton’s party had been executed, ‘I did not like the news much, but I did not believe it. I considered the matter, and arguing that if the military authorities wished me to return they could easily recall me by a messenger from Tammu, I decided to push on. I thought I might find a fort of some kind in which I could entrench myself, leave my baggage and transport under a small guard, and go out with the rest of my men, taking plenty of ammunition. In that way I believed I might afford help to the prisoners.’ (Ibid) Grant sent a letter back to Tammu informing the authorities of what he intended to do and pushed on in the moonlight of the 30th, for Manipur. By dawn he reached a series of villages which began 4-5 miles from Thobal. The latter place being 14 miles south-east of Manipur. Advancing across open country towards Thobal they saw a bridge, directly on their route, in flames. Grant rushed to secure the bridge, when the Manipuris opened fire at close range from covered positions on the other side, ‘Hurrying forward to put out fire when 200 yards from river met with heavy fire from opp. bank. Advanced by alternate rushes to 100 yds, losing one man, Mahd. Lyat shot thro’ the head by snider rifle. I was grazed by bullet, but no damage. Fire very severe and enemy entirely concealed, could only fire at puffs of smoke.’ (Grant’s Field Note Book refers) Grant reformed his men and the order to advance was given, ‘they behaved beautifully. It was like a page out of the drill book. There was a volley from the right party, and a rush from the left, and vice versa.... The enemy were firing through loopholes in walls, hidden by hedges. We got to within 100 yards of them, but a watercourse was between us, and I could not tell their numbers. We lay down and fired for ten minutes, but made no impression. I went back to the supports on each flank and ordered them to creep up wide of the first firing line, but like brave fellows, as they are, they jumped up, rushed forward right to the edge of the stream and began firing. The fighting line fixed bayonets and joined them. There was a cry from the left that the enemy were running, and then we plunged pell-mell into the watercourse. It was rather deep, and one little Gurkha disappeared altogether. For a second I myself got fast in weeds, and was ignominiously hauled out by a Jemadar, but we got across somehow. The Manipuris were seen in full flight, their white clothing making them excellent targets. On the enemy’s left was a line of rifle pits, and in these numbers were caught, like rats in a trap, and bayoneted. On the right were the compound walls giving good shelter, but behind them lay a number of dead, shot through the head. There was 800 Manipuris holding this position.’ (Ibid) Grant had not found a fort ready to his hand to occupy, but he made for himself a fortified post amongst the three compounds beyond the watercourse. The rest of the day was spent destroying most of the houses in the compounds and cutting down trees to form an abatis around the walls. The Defence of Thobal The following day, ‘1.4.91 6am. Enemy advancing in force. Sent out 30 men to meet them, we fired 3 shots only, dropped 2 of the enemy. I got one at 700 yards. Enemy retired behind hill. Measured ranges up to 500 yards in front of position, found blood all about from yesterday’s action.’ (Field Note Book refers) Later that afternoon the Manipuris advanced to within 600 yards of Grant’s position before being repelled, ‘Then from hills 1,000 yards off, at 3.45pm, 2 guns opened fire and shelled us till 6.30pm with elongated common shell and shrapnel from two 9 pounder rifled guns. The enemies practice was very good till we got the exact range of the guns by “smoke and report” and then after 30 mins concentrated individual fire of 10 martinis we silenced one gun and the other retired to a higher hill 1500 yards off where they only ran the gun up to the crest to fire, retiring to load, and their firing was wilder, as they feared to lay the gun accurately.”

Victoria Cross (reverse) (Field Note Book refers) Whilst Grant was engaging the artillery the Manipuris had surrounded his position and from there kept up heavy rifle fire throughout the night. In an effort to maintain as much of their dwindling supply of ammunition as possible Grant ordered not a single shot to be fired in return during the night. On the 2nd of April the Manipuris showed no signs of renewing hostilities and Grant took the time to strengthen his position and also to pen the following summary, ‘Enemy appeared from 2,000 to 2,500 strong and at 6pm occupied an enveloping line 4 miles long. They were better armed than we are. I attribute our success chiefly to the fact that the enemy are nearly all in white coats and so distinctly visible. The men’s behaviour is wonderful; under the hottest fire they pay attention to all directions.... Our expenditure of ammunition is 600 rounds since 3pm on 1.4.91. Total expenditure 2,000 rounds of 9,000. Reinforcements begin to be looked for as Gukhas have only 35 rounds per man, and we depend on their M.H.’s to silence the guns... I consider every sepoy deserves the Order of Merit..... The flags displayed by the enemy showed that the army was commanded Sarnu Hun Juba, the youngest brother of the Maharaja.’ (Ibid) At 3pm Grant was out with a party near the enemy lines when he saw a man signalling with a flag. The man came running forward and proved to be a Gurkha signaller of the 44th who had been taken prisoner at Manipur. He had a letter from a number of babus, Clerks etc who had also been taken prisoner, in it they begged Grant to go back stating that if he continued to advance they would all be killed. The letter also stated that Mr. Williams was with them. Grant thought that he remembered an officer of that name in one of the Assam Regiments and sent back a message demanding to see him the following day. ‘Colonel Howlett’ Manipur takes up the narrative on the extraordinary sequence of events that followed, ‘The Gurkha returned to Manipur, and came back with an offer from the Senapati to suspend fighting that day. To this Lieutenant Grant assented. Next morning Mr. Williams appeared. Lieutenant Grant met him well outside his camp, and for the first time acted the part of Colonel Howlett. He borrowed two stars from a jemadar’s shoulder-straps and placed them on his own. He

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Lieutenant Grant returning to Tammu from Manipur in a Royal Sedan Chair carried by Chins was no longer a Subaltern commanding a small detachment, but a Colonel, with his regiment at his back. It was to this ruse that he unquestionably owed much of the respect with which he was afterwards treated by the Manipuris, who had no real idea of the strength of force with him, or that one solitary young officer was leading them. They had had a taste of the fighting quality of these bold intruders into their country, who continued to push forward, even when they knew that 500 Gurkhas had been beaten at Manipur itself and officers of high position killed. On meeting with Mr. Williams, Lieutenant Grant saw, to his astonishment, that he was not the officer he had expected to meet. A few words served to explain that Mr. Williams was the telegraph signaller. He stated that Manipuris had only taken him out of irons on April 1st, and sent him to Thobal to negotiate. Then followed a long conversation between the two, Mr. Williams telling Colonel Howlett, for such Lieutenant Grant said he was, and that was all that he knew.’ A series of letters were exchanged between ‘Howlett’ and the Senapati via Williams. The Senapati was willing to release the prisoners if Grant left, but Grant would not leave without the prisoners. The Senapati countered with the fact that the prisoners wanted to go direct to Assam in reply to which Grant’s ultimatum was as follows, ‘The babus can do as they like, but the sepoys must obey orders and come with me. If one of the prisoners is harmed the officers here will not be able to restrain the Sikhs and Punjabis from killing every man and burning every house in the country.’ Lieutenant Grant could not resist the temptation, even at this critical time, to show the contempt he had for the cowardly lot of men who attacked him and had been defeated, so he added: “P.S. - I am going to shoot some ducks, Don’t be afraid.” (Manipur, a narrative refers) The rest of the 3rd of April was spent strengthening the camp, placing Panjis (sharpened bamboo spikes) around the camp and improvising fire extinguishers for the flammable rooves left in the compounds. On the 4th of April Grant received a letter from the Senapati stating that all of the prisoners had been released the day before and that Grant must return to Tammu, with safe passage guaranteed, ‘Many an officer with greater experience than Lieutenant Grant would have closed with this offer and marched away, only to find himself treacherously attacked on the road and his party destroyed. But with his brevet rank of Colonel there seems to have come a ripening of his

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judgement, by which he was enabled accurately to gauge the danger which enveloped him.’ Grant sent a letter directly to the Regent saying that he could not return to Tammu empty handed as he would be disgraced. He requested a man of high rank to be sent to him as a hostage to return to Tammu with. Upon receiving a telegram saying that the prisoners had safely reached Cachar he would free the hostage and give him his horse to return to Manipur. By the 5th of April it became clear that negotiations were at an end, and the Gurkha prisoner made Grant aware that the Manipuris now knew of the limited strength of his force. The following day Grant ‘had to fight his third action, and the mettle of his sepoys was tried to the utmost. A little before 6 o’clock in the morning his patrols reported the enemy on the move, and their guns opened fire. Fifteen shells fell in and about the camp, wounding two of the elephants. At seven the guns ceased firing, and the Manipur Infantry advanced to the attack. This time Lieutenant Grant contented himself with holding the enclosure, which was his camp proper, on the bank of the watercourse... Not until they were within 200 yards did he give the signal for fire to be opened and then his men began pouring in steady volleys. These had the effect of making the Manipuris take such cover as was offered, behind walls and trees. At 8am finding the attack was most pressed against his left front, Lieutenant Grant took ten Gurkhas, crept along the watercourse, enfiladed the walls on his left, and in a few minutes had cleared that side..... At 11am no impression had been made on the camp, the sepoys being so well protected that they could fire accurately through the loopholes without exposing themselves. Lieutenant Grant now decided to try and clear his front a little. This time he took only six Gurkhas of the 43rd, with their Havildar. He himself was armed with a 16 bore breech-loader, doublebarrelled, and his revolver. This party crept up the ditch between the road and the compounds, got to the corner and enfiladed the wall, behind which were 100 of the enemy. They ran at once; but facing the corner, and cut off from it by a deep ditch full of water, was a wall five feet high, from which the party of Manipuris began firing...... For a quarter of an hour the Gurkhas had a fine chance of snap-shots at their heads as they were raised behind the wall; while their young commander was using his buckshot cartridges with fine effect. At last the Manipuris, finding that exposure was almost certain death, sneaked away from this hot corner, and his immediate front being clear, Lieutenant Grant returned to


April 21, 2011 - London

Victoria Cross Dinner hosted by HRH the Prince of Wales at the House of Lords, 9.11.1929 (Grant seated next but one to the Prince of Wales’s left) his entrenchment.’ (Manipur, a narrative refers) There was a pause in the fighting at around noon and during this time Grant distributed his last box of ammunition amongst his men. His new instructions to them was to let the enemy advance to within 100 yards before firing. Fortunately for Grant’s men the Manipuris did not make another organised assault that day. Despite being hard pressed Grant was resolute, ‘Thus our 10th day and no support. Determined not to return without hostage.’ (Field Note Book refers). After fifteen hours of constant fighting the Manipuris ceased fire for the night. At dawn on the 7th of April it appeared that most of the Manipuris had retreated to their capital. Grant, ever the professional, once again took the opportunity to strengthen his defences and search for food as supplies were running short, ‘At noon two men appeared, carrying a white flag. One was a Burman postman who had been sent with a letter from Tammu to Manipur, and was carrying back a letter from the Maharaja to the Viceroy. He reported only 300 Manipuris left, out of an army between 2,000-3,000 strong who had attacked on the previous day. Lieutenant Grant opened the Maharaja’s letter without ceremony, and was amused to find His Highness complaining of the doings of one Colonel Howlett, and requesting the Viceroy to cause him to withdraw. The postman had also in his possession a telegram addressed to Mr. Quinton. This was also opened and found to be from the Viceroy.’ (Manipur, a narrative refers) Grant now saw a chance to communicate with Tammu and wrote to Captain Presgrave informing him of what had happened and where he was, ‘Gave him a letter in vile French written in what I remember of Greek characters in case of treachery, telling them to hurry up.’ (Field Note Book refers) April the 8th passed without major incident, however, given the limited supplies fever and dysentery were becoming rife amongst the men. The following day a letter from Presgrave arrived with orders from Grant to retire on Palel at the first opportunity. That night there was a tremendous thunderstorm, ‘Ordered march at 7.30pm. Took straw out of wounded elephant’s saddle, it has eaten nothing since wounded on 6th in belly and can carry nothing. Throw enemies ammunition in the water. Rained heavily, pitch dark, night awful. Men falling down on road with fever. Met Presgrave at 2am - rain and hail and lightning.’ (Field Note Book refers) Punitive Expedition Affording himself little respite Grant and his men were to be attached to the Tammu Column, one of three columns under the overall command of Brigadier-General Collet, C.B., which were to advance on Manipur, capture the Regent, and restore British authority.

Grant and Presgrave were to wait for the advanced body of the Tammu Column under the command of Major Sir Charles Leslie. With this in mind they marched their combined force of 197 men back to Palel, ‘They were advancing towards Palel when they met a picquet of the enemy, which immediately retreated. A little further on they encountered three hundred Manipuris who did not long withstand their attack. Lieutenant Grant, with a portion of his force, pursued and killed fifty of the enemy, and Grant’s charger was shot under him.’ (Manipur a narrative refers) By the 18th of April the whole of the advanced body of the Tammu Column, under Leslie, had reached Palel. Combined with Grant and Presgrave their orders were to watch the enemy movement but not to take to the field against them. Over the course of the next six days the area was fully reconnoitred, and on the 24th April a fortified position blocking the road to Manipur was found near the village of Langatel. Another Fort to Storm The mud fort appeared to be garrisoned by approximately 300 Manipuris, a letter written by Grant to his mother shortly after the event gives the following, ‘On 25th I went out from Palel 50 of my own men, Sikhs, 50 of our mounted infantry under Cox and 50 2nd 4th Gurkhas, the whole under Drury of 2nd 4th Gurkhas. We had orders only to reconnoitre the enemies position, not to attack as the General - Graham and the rifles were to arrive that morning and the place was to be kept for them. The road ran along the plain due North towards Manipur and with open plain on the left and hills on the right. We saw the enemy on hills and in a strong mud fort..... I worked along the hills and drove the enemy out of them without loss. As we found them unexpectedly and had to fight in spite of orders. Then Drury sent in to the General to say we had them in a trap and would he come out with guns and more men and slate them. Then he sent the mounted infantry to the left to the NW of the enemy and we worked behind the hills to their NE, thus cutting them off from Manipur. So we went behind a hill and waited. At 11.30 we saw from the top of our hill the column from Palel, 2 mountain guns and 100 2nd 4th Gurkhas. The guns went to a hill 1000 yards to the E of the enemy fort and we waited and watched the fun.... Soon they started shrapnel and made lovely practice the enemy replying with 2 small guns and rifles. Then we got impatient and advanced and worked round to their west flank.... Then our party charged but were brought up by a deep nullah under their walls, down and up we scrambled and when a lot of our men had collected within 10 paces of their walls, firing at every head that showed. The enemy put up a white flag and I at

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once stopped the fire. Then they sprang up and fired at us. I felt a tremendous blow on the neck and staggered and fell, luckily on the edge of the nullah rather under cover, but feeling the wound with my fingers and being able to speak and feeling no violent flow of blood I discovered I wasn’t dead just yet, so I reloaded my revolver and got up. Meanwhile my Sikhs were swarming over the wall - I ran in and found the enemy bolting at last from the East and running away towards Manipur. My men were in first well ahead of both parties of Gurkhas. After I had seen all the Manipuris near the fort polished off I sent for a dresser and lay down in one of the huts in the fort and soon had my clothes off and found the bullet had gone through the root of my neck just above the shoulder and carried all the cloth of my collar and shirt right thro’ the wound leaving it quite clean. I was soon bound up and the men shampooed me and kept away the cramp. It was only a very violent shock and felt much better in the evening...... The Manipuris here say we killed over 400 so we paid off part of our score against their treachery.’ The next morning the column advanced to Grant’s fort at Thobal to find that it had been abandoned. Triumphant Entrance into Manipur The Cachar Column entered a deserted Manipur at 7am on the 27th April, followed by the Tammu Column and shortly after by Collett and the Kohima Column. Grant and his men were honoured, ‘My Thobal party, by order of the General, being first to enter the palace on our side... I alas in my doolie did not get up till 2 hours after as it poured all the march and the mud was awful...... General Collett commanding the whole army came today to see me and said all sorts of nice things to me and his AG asked me when I would be a Captain and said I wouldn’t be one long! - meaning I would get a brevet majority - but all these people are very excited now and talk of my getting brevet rank and VC and DSO, but when these things get home to Wolseley he will cut them all out as he usually does with Indian officers and if I get anything at all I will be content.’ (letter to mother dated 28.4.1891 refers)

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The Royal Family had fled Manipur, destroying both the Rajah’s palace and the armoury before they left. The remains of the Chief Commissioner and the rest of his party were exhumed from the grounds of the Residency and given a proper burial. Chandra Dhuya Singh, his brother Prince Angao Sana and the Senapati were captured in May, the latter was tried and executed, and the two others were exiled to the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal. Pomp and Ceremony Grant was to receive his brevet Majority and was presented his Victoria Cross by the Governor at Ootacmund, 6.7.1891, ‘The Band played the National Anthem, and the Guard of Honour, drawn up on the terrace below presented arms... the decoration of the Victoria Cross was handed to His Excellency the Governor, and the Adjutant-General of the Army conducted Major Grant to the front of the platform, the Band playing “See the Conquering Hero Comes.” At the same ceremony all of the men that were with Grant at Thobal were awarded the Order of Merit. When questioned about their part in the action at Thobal they attributed everything to Grant, ‘How could we be beaten under Grant Sahib? He is a tiger in fight. When hundreds of Manipuris were coming close he just took ten men out to stop them, and in a minute they had beaten the enemy back. We could not help winning under such a sahib.’ Later that year Grant was appointed A.D.C. to LieutenantGeneral Sir J.C. Dormer, Commander-in-Chief, Madras. Promoted Lieutenant Colonel in June 1904 he was given command of the 89th Punjabis in 1906. Made Brevet Colonel the following year he served as Commandant of the 92nd Punjabis, 1907-11. Grant retired in 1913, only to reengage as D.C.O. attached 3rd Royal Scots for service during the Great War. He lived out the rest of his life in Sidmouth, Devon.


April 21, 2011 - London 3 Family Group: A 1951 Military Division C.B., Second War 1945 ‘Far East’ D.S.O., ‘Operation Iceberg’ Group of Eleven to Rear-Admiral P.V. McLaughlin, Royal Navy, Naval Aide-de-Camp to King George VI a) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with full and miniature width neck ribands, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., reverse of suspension bar officially dated ‘1946’, with integral top riband bar c) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. H.G.B. [sic] McLaughlin.) d) 1939-1945 Star e) Atlantic Star, with copy France and Germany Bar f) Pacific Star g) Italy Star h) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf i) Coronation 1937, good very fine or better, mounted as worn, together with the following related documents &c.: - Commission appointing Patrick Vivian McLaughlin Esquire, D.S.O., a Rear-Admiral in His Majesty’s Fleet, dated 11.6.1951 - Bestowal Document for the Order of the Bath, named to Rear-Admiral Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, D.S.O., and dated 1.1.1951 - Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, named to Captain P.V. McLaughlin, Royal Navy, and dated 11.6.1946 - Certificate of award for the Coronation Medal, named to Commander Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, R.N., with forwarding letter from the Commander-inChief, Mediterranean Station - Letter appointing Mr. Patrick V. McLaughlin a Midshipman, R.N., of H.M.S. Colossus, dated 26.9.1917 - The recipient’s First Class Certificate for the Rank of Lieutenant, dated 15.12.1922 - The recipient’s Certificate of Qualification in Gunnery at the rank of Lieutenant, dated 10.5.1926 - Letter to the recipient informing him of his appointment as a Naval Aide-de-Camp to the King, dated 19.1.1949 - Photograph of the recipient in uniform receiving the arms of H.M.S. Swiftsure The Great War Memorial Plaque and Scroll to Second Lieutenant H.G.B. McLaughlin, Seaforth Highlanders Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque (Hubert Guy Bromilow McLaughlin); Great War Memorial Scroll ‘2nd Lt. Hubert Guy Bromilow McLaughlin 3rd attd. 7th Bn. Seaforth Highlanders’, together with Buckingham Palace enclosure (lot) £1,800-2,200 C.B. London Gazette 1.1.1951 Rear-Admiral Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, D.S.O. D.S.O. London Gazette 11.6.1946 Captain Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, Royal Navy ‘For distinguished service during the War in the Far East.’

Rear-Admiral P.V. McLaughlin (left) receiving the arms of H.M.S. Swiftsure M.I.D. London Gazette 23.1.1941 Captain Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, Royal Navy, H.M.S. Cairo ‘For courage and endurance in action against enemy aircraft in Norwegian Waters.’ Rear-Admiral Patrick Vivian McLaughlin, C.B., D.S.O., born Gloucestershire, 7.4.1901, and educated at Royal Naval College Osborne and Dartmouth; appointed Midshipman, 26.9.1917, and served during the Great War in H.M.S. Colossus; following the Armistice was invited by Admiral of the Fleet the Lord Jellicoe to serve on his Flagship on a World Empire Cruise; Commissioned Sub-Lieutenant, H.M.S. Dragon, 1921; Lieutenant, H.M.S. Dublin, 1923; Lieutenant-Commander, 1930; Commander, 1935; served as Fleet Gunner Officer on the Commander-in-Chief’s Staff, Mediterranean Station, 1937-39; served during the Second World War in command of H.M.S. Mashona, 1939 (North Sea Operations); Captain, 31.12.1939; appointed to the command of H.M.S. Cairo, 1940 (Norwegian Campaign, Mentioned in Despatches); served as Deputy Director of Naval Ordnance, Admiralty, 1941-43; Appointed to the Command of H.M.S. Spartan, August 1943; sailed with her to Malta, and took part in Operation ‘Shingle’, the Anzio Landing, in January 1944- H.M.S. Spartan was sunk after being attacked by a bomb from a glider aircraft which detonated in her magazine, 29.1.1944, with the loss of 5 officers and 41 ratings killed, and 42 ratings wounded; Appointed to the command of H.M.S. Swiftsure, 1945, as part of the British Pacific Fleet, and took part in Operation ‘Iceberg’, the invasion of Okinawa; Captain, H.M.S. Excellent, 1947-49; appointed Naval Aide-de-Camp to H.M. the King, 8.1.1949; Rear-Admiral, 8.7.1949; Senior Naval Member and Vice President (Naval), Ordnance Board, February 1950; President, Ordnance Board, February 1952. Rear-Admiral McLaughlin retired in 1953, and died at home in Sandwich, Kent, 8.6.1969. Second Lieutenant Hubert Guy Bromilow McLaughlin, the brother of Rear-Admiral P.V. McLaughlin, served during the Great War with the 3rd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders; died of wounds, 12.10.1916, whilst attached to the 7th Battalion, and is buried in Warlencourt British Cemetery, France. It is understood from a member of the recipient’s family that Rear-Admiral McLaughlin’s Great War medals were lost on the occasion of H.M.S. Spartan sinking in Anzio Bay, and in their place he wore the medals awarded to his late brother, who had been killed during the Great War.

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4 A 1942 Civil Division C.B. Group of Six to Colonel M. Barkley, Northamptonshire Regiment, Late Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battalion a) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Civil Division, Companion’s (C.B.) neck Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1939), very fine, with neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Wittebergen (Lieut. M. Barkley. 3 Co. 1/ Imp. Yeo.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf (Major M. Barkley) d) Territorial Force War Medal, unnamed e) Defence Medal f) Jubilee 1935 g) Coronation 1937, lacquered, contact marks, very fine, the pre-Second War awards mounted as worn, together with the related six pre-Second War miniature awards (8) £500-700 C.B. (Civil) London Gazette 1.1.1942 Brevet Colonel MacDonald Barkley, D.L., Chairman, Territorial Army Association of the County of Huntingdon Colonel MacDonald Barkley, C.B., born 1871; educated at Haileybury and Lincoln College, Oxford; Commissioned Lieutenant, 2.6.1900; served with the 3rd (Gloucestershire) Company, 1st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War, and severely wounded at Brandw’r Basin, 24.8.1900; served during the Great War with the Huntingdonshire Cyclist Battalion, attached to the 7th Sherwood Foresters in France (Mentioned in Despatches); Major 13.5.1916; Lieutenant-Colonel, 17.8.1917; Commanded the 5th (Huntingdonshire) Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment, 1919-24; Appointed Deputy Lieutenant of the County of Huntingdon, 30.10.1919; Managing Director, Huntingdon Steeplechases; served during the Second War as Zone Commander, Huntingdonshire Home Guard, 1940-42; Assistant Secretary, Territorial Army Association, Northampton, 1942-44. Colonel Barkley died, 8.7.1956.

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5 5 A Great War 1916 ‘Military Division’ C.B. Group of Five to Engineer Rear-Admiral F. Hore, Royal Navy, Who Served as Engineer-Lieutenant of the Royal Yacht Osborne, 1893-98 a) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, converted for neck-wear b) 1914-15 Star (Eng. Capt. F. Hore. R.N.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Eng. R. Adml. F. Hore.) d) Jubilee 1897, silver, generally very fine or better (5) £700-900 C.B. London Gazette 3.6.1916 Engineer Captain Fred Hore, R.N. Engineer Rear-Admiral Fred Hore, C.B. (1863-1932); educated at Plymouth Grammar School and Royal Naval College, Greenwich; joined Royal Navy as Acting Assistant Engineer, 1884; served as Engineer-Lieutenant of Royal Yacht Osborne, 1893-98; advanced Engineer-Commander, 1902; served in H.M.S. Albemarle (flagship of Rear-Admiral Sir John Jellicoe), 1908-09; Officer in charge of torpedo distribution and equipment of the Navy, 1909-13; Engineer-Captain 1913, and served during the Great War on the staffs of Vice-Admirals Sir Doveton Sturdee, Sir Charles Madden, The Hon. Sir Somerset Gough-Calthorpe and Admiral Sir Cecil Burney; Engineer Rear-Admiral, 13.5.1918; retired 1921. For the medals awarded to Commander R.W. Hore, D.S.C., the son of Rear-Admiral F. Hore, C.B., see Lot 16.

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July 23, 2009 - London 6 A Superb C.M.G., ‘Gallipoli’ D.S.O., and Rare ‘Archangel Command’ Albert Medal Group of Eight to Captain G.P. Bevan, Royal Navy, Who Extricated a Trapped and Wounded Seaman From a Burning Munitions Ship in the Port of Archangel, 8.11.1916, Despite Small Arms Ammunition Exploding All Around Him a) The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) neck Badge, silvergilt and enamel b) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar c) Albert Medal, Second Class, For Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea, bronze and enamel, the reverse officially engraved, ‘Presented By His Majesty To Capt. George Parker Bevan C.M.G., D.S.O. For Gallantry In Saving Life From the Burning S.S. “Earl of Forfar” After the Explosion at Bakaritsa On the 8th November 1916.’ d) 1914-15 Star (Commr. G.P. Bevan. R.N.) e) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Commre. 2 CI. G.P. Bevan. R.N.) f) France, Republic, Legion of Honour, Officer’s breast Badge, 52mm including wreath suspension x 40mm, gold and enamel, poincon mark to reverse, with rosette on riband g) Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Anne, Third Class neck Badge, by Eduard, St. Petersburg, 44mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, maker’s mark on reverse, 1908-17 kokoshnik mark and gold mark to suspension ring, extremely fine, with Great War Bronze Memorial Plaque, ‘George Parker Bevan’ and bullion cap badge, all housed in a glazed and hinged mahogany display case, with a large framed and glazed portrait photograph of recipient in uniform (8) £15,000-20,000

Captain G. P. Bevan

C.M.G. London Gazette 3.6.1918 Captain George Parker Bevan, R.N., D.S.O. (Commodore 2nd Class) ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered during the War.’

France, Legion of Honour, Officer London Gazette 7.6.1918 Capt. George P. Bevan, C.M.G., D.S.O., R.N. (Cdr., 2nd Cl.)

D.S.O. London Gazette 14.3.1916 Bevan, George Parker, Commander, R.N. ‘Has done continuous patrol work with great zeal and energy, and carried out valuable feints at landings in the Gulf of Xeros on 6 and 7 Aug. during the landing at Suvla.’

Russia, Order of St. Anne, Second Class, London Gazette 27.2.1917 Captain George P. Bevan, D.S.O., R.N.

A.M. London Gazette 9.7.1918 Captain George Parker Bevan, C.M.G., D.S.O., R.N. ‘For gallantry in saving life at sea. On the 8th November, 1916, a series of explosions and fires occurred at Bakaritsa, Port of Archangel, on merchant ships and on the wharves. The S.S. Baron Driesen had blown up at 1pm and part of the S.S. Earl of Forfar forty minutes later, and fresh explosions were expected every instant. It was thought that all their crews had either escaped or been killed or rescued, but after dark cries of distress were heard from the Earl of Forfar. The ship was a mass of flame at the time, and burning embers from the fire which was raging on shore were continually showered over her. She had a cargo of explosives on board and was abreast of the main conflagration. The flames were blown towards her by the wind, and the remaining portion of the ship was expected to be blown up at any moment. Captain Bevan, however, on hearing the cries proceeded on board, accompanied by Lieutenant-Commander MacMahon, and, hearing moans from under the smouldering debris of the forecastle, cleared away the wreckage and extricated the mate, who had an arm and a leg and his collarbone broken, and passed him into a tug. Captain Bevan displayed the utmost gallantry and disregard of his personal safety.’

Captain George Parker Bevan, C.M.G., D.S.O., A.M. (1878-1920), born Staines, second son of sixteen children, including four pairs of twins; joined Royal Navy as Naval Cadet, 1894; was a gunnery specialist and passed for the rank of Lieutenant with “Firsts” in every subject after only one years service as Sub-Lieutenant; Lieutenant 1899; served at Sheerness Gunnery School, March 1906-August 1908; advanced Commander 22.6.1911; appointed Naval Secretary to the Ordnance Board, Woolwich, April 1913; continued to serve in this capacity at the outbreak of the Great War, and received a letter of Appreciation from their Lordships for his invention of a quick firing gun; appointed to the Command of the Armed Trawler Emir, ‘in March, 1915, he was selected to command a flotilla of some 50 trawlers and drifters fitting out for the Dardanelles and he remained in the Eastern Mediterranean until the evacuation of Gallipoli, when he was awarded the D.S.O. and promoted Captain, June 1916’ (The Distinguished Service Order 1886-1923, refers); appointed as P.T.N.O. to the Staff of the Governor-General of the Province of Archangel, 7.4.1916, where he was in charge of the landing and transport of munitions to the Russian front (C.M.G. and promoted Commodore); it was whilst unloading such munitions that, ‘disaster struck on 8 November 1916 at Bakarista, Port of Archangel, North Russia when the merchant ship S.S. Baron Driesen blew up at 1pm. Desperate attempts were made to move other ships away but at 1.40pm the after part of S.S. Earl of Forfar also

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Albert Medal (reverse) exploded. Before that ship’s master, Capt. James Campbell Hurry, tried to return to his vessel but, being unable to do so, helped other vessels in danger of being burned. While doing so he heard voices coming from his own ship which was burning and exploding furiously so he led volunteers aboard and saved several men, having to lift live shells as he went. Ten minutes later the deck blew up. The ship was a mass of flame and burning embers from fires blazing ashore were being showered on her. A one-hundred-ton floating crane was moored between the quay and the ship and, after dark, cries were heard coming from the crane. To reach it, it was necessary to cross the ship which had a cargo of explosives aboard but, as Capt. George Parker Bevan and Lt. Cdr. Maurice McMahon were doing so they heard moans coming from under the smouldering debris of the forecastle. Helped by the crew of the tug Sunderland Lt. Edward Henry Richardson, Second Engineer Christopher Watson and A.B.s James Dixon Henry and Malcolm Thompson, all of whom had volunteered, they set about extricating the casualty. Ignoring the intermittent explosions from small arms ammunition they cleared away the wreckage and freed the mate of the Earl of Forfar - his arm, leg and collar bone broken - and passed him to the tug. Lt. Cdr. McMahon then

crossed to the crane on a single plank and finding the ship’s carpenter under the crane together with two Russian members of its crew rescued them all’ (Heroic Endeavour, D.V. Henderson, G.M., refers); all six named individuals received Albert Medals, Second Class for their gallantry during this incident; in February 1918 Bevan was recalled to London and appointed Naval Assistant Director of Transports and Shipping; he accompanied the Allied Naval Commission to Germany, December 1918; appointed to the command of H.M.S. Triad, October 1919, for passage to the Persian Gulf to take up duties as Senior Naval Officer, Persian Gulf; arrived in Aden, 14.1.1920; Bevan had been suffering from severe headaches for some time and had been advised by his doctor to take some leave, however, he insisted on putting in the necessary sea time required before his promotion; upon arriving at Aden, family tradition has it that, Bevan went ashore to call upon the Governor and as the two men shook hands he removed his hat, collapsed and died; Bevan had died of a brain tumour, he was buried in Maala Cemetery, Yemen. At the time of the award of Bevan’s Russian Order, following the Bolshevik uprising, the production and supply of Russian Orders was severely disrupted, and consequently were often hard to obtain. As a result, Imperial Russian Awards to British servicemen during the latter half of the Great War and Allied Intervention are sometimes numismatically incorrect or incomplete, as insignia was issued with what was available. It seems probable that at the time of the presentation of the Second Class Order of St. Anne to Captain Bevan the only insignia available was a Second Class Badge without swords.

7 The Miniature Awards Worn by Captain G.P. Bevan, Royal Navy The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silvergilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar; Albert Medal, Second Class, For Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea, bronze and enamel; 1914 Star; British War and Victory Medal, M.I.D. Oakleaves; France, Republic, Legion of Honour, Officer’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband; Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Anne, Second Class badge, with Swords, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to first, good very fine, mounted as worn, together with an additional miniature Legion of Honour Chevalier’s badge (9) £1,200-1,500

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 8 A Well Documented and Unusual Great War C.B.E., D.S.O. Group of Seven to Captain J.A. Leighton, Royal Naval Reserve, Naval Transport Officer, St. Petersburg, Russia, 1915-19, and Commercial Attaché, British Legation, Stockholm a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with neck riband b) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., with integral top riband bar c) British War Medal (Commr. J.A. Leighton. R.N.R.) d) Mercantile Marine War Medal (John A. Leighton) e) Victory Medal (Commr J.A. Leighton. R.N.R.) f) Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Anne, Second Class neck Badge, with Swords, 50mm, bronze-gilt and enamel, with neck riband g) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Officer’s breast Badge, 63mm including wreath suspension x 44mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband, traces of brooch mounting to the top riband bar of the D.S.O., very fine or better, together with the recipient’s miniature awards for the four Orders; and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the C.B.E., named to Commander John Albert Leighton, D.S.O., R.N.R., and dated 4.7.1919 - Letter to the recipient from the Minister of Shipping, Sir Joseph Maclay, Bt., congratulating him on the award of the C.B.E., dated 10.7.1919, and signed ‘J. Maclay’ - War Office enclosure for the D.S.O., dated 16.7.1918 - Ministry of Shipping letter to the recipient congratulating him on the award of the D.S.O., dated 6.5.1918 - Bestowal Document for the Officer of the Order of the Crown, named to Monsieur le Commandant J.A. Leighton, and dated 30.8.1919 - Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs letter regarding the award of the Order of the Crown, dated 31.10.1919 - Letter to the recipient from the Belgian Minister of Shipping congratulating him on the award of the Order of the Crown, dated 3.10.1919 - Permission to wear letter for the Order of the Crown, dated 29.10.1919 - Letter to the recipient from the Imperial Merchant Service Guild congratulating him on the award of the Order of the Crown, dated 12.11.1919 - Authority to wear letter for the British War Medal and Mercantile Marine War Medal, dated 29.9.1919 - Admiralty letter appointing John A. Leighton Temporary Commander, R.N.R., of H.M.S. Vindictive, dated 2.4.1917 - Admiralty letter appointing John A. Leighton, D.S.O., Commander, R.N.R., of H.M.S. President VI, dated 8.4.1919 - Certificate of Demobilisation, named to Temporary Commander John A. Leighton, C.B.E., D.S.O., R.N.R., and dated 21.5.1920

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- City of London Copy of Freedom document admitting John Albert Leighton, Citizen and Master Mariner of London, as a Freeman of the City, dated 20.1.1933, together with original envelope - Three of the recipient’s Passports, dated 1.2.1915, 24.3.1917, and 12.6.1918, all containing a large number of Foreign visas - Various identity cards and letters - A large file containing a vast quantity of correspondence, both official and personal, including telegrams, Naval Signals &c., covering the period 1914-20 - Portrait photograph of the recipient (lot) £2,400-2,800 C.B.E. London Gazette 4.7.1919 Commander John Albert Leighton D.S.O., R.N.R. ‘For valuable services as Commercial Attaché at the British Legation, Stockholm, and in connection with Shipping in the Baltic.’ D.S.O. London Gazette 7.6.1918 Cdr. John Albert Leighton, R.N.R. ‘In recognition of his services in connection with the transfer of British ships from the Baltic. He displayed the greatest tact and determination in carrying out this task in the face of great difficulties and opposition.’ Russia, Order of St. Anne, Second Class with Swords, by Order of the Day of the Commander in Chief, North Russian Armies, 15.1.1920 Leighton, J.A., Capt., C.B.E., D.S.O., R.N.R. (Accepted 9.2.1920). Belgium, Order of the Crown, Officer London Gazette 11.11.1919 Cdr. John A. Leighton, C.B.E., D.S.O., R.N.R. ‘For distinguished service during the War.’ Captain John Albert Leighton, C.B.E., D.S.O., was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in January 1881, and first went to sea aged 14, serving before the mast in small coastal sailing vessels known as collier brigs. In 1897 he joined the Merchant Navy firm J.T. Lunn & Co., serving in the ‘Dene’ ships, first as an Ordinary Seaman in the Myrtledene, before a number of rapid promotions brought him his first command, that of the Heathdene, in 1907. When War broke out in August 1914 he was in St. Petersburg in command of the Ivydene. Immobilised, first by the outbreak of hostilities, and then by the onset of the arctic winter, he returned to Britain overland via Sweden. His first hand knowledge of Russia was of considerable value to the Royal Navy and the Government, and he was Commissioned Temporary Commander, Royal Naval Reserve, returning to St. Petersburg as Naval Transport Officer in April 1915, charged with the special duty of obtaining the release of the many British merchant ships still held there, an assignment that lasted for the entire War. Appointed also Commercial Attaché, British Legation, Stockholm, following the defeat of Germany he served on the Allied Naval Armistice Commission and the Shipping Liquidation Committee of the Reparation Commission in Hamburg and The Hague. Leighton retired from the Royal Naval Reserve in May 1920, and founded in partnership with Alexander Stelp the shipping and insurance business of Stelp and Leighton Ltd. On the outbreak of War in 1939 he volunteered to work for the United Kingdom Commercial Corporation, and served as a full-time Director without remuneration throughout the War. He died in London in October 1945.


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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

9 A 1937 ‘Military Division’ C.B.E., Order of St. John, Group of Eight to Captain J. Mck. Robertson, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.), neck Badge, silvergilt and enamel b) The Most Venerable Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Officer’s breast Badge, silver c) 1914-15 Star (Lieut. J. Mck. Robertson, R.N.V.R.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. J. Mck. Robertson, R.N.V.R.) e) Jubilee 1935 f) Coronation 1937 g) Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Decoration, G.V.R, silver and silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1922), generally very fine or better, last seven mounted as originally worn (8) £450-500 C.B.E. London Gazette 11.5.1937 Captain John McKellar Robertson, O.B.E., V.D., R.N.V.R. O.B.E. London Gazette 3.6.1932 Captain John McKellar Robertson, V.D., A.D.C., R.N.V.R. Captain John McKellar Robertson, C.B.E. (1883-1939), born Glasgow, Scotland, son of Ship-owner William Robertson; educated Glasgow High School and Glasgow University; commissioned Lieutenant, Clyde Division, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 13.5.1913; appointed Captain, C.O. East Scottish Division, 1928; C.O. Clyde Division, 1930; R.N.V.R., A.D.C. 1930-33; retired 1937; appointed a Justice of the Peace; Honorary President Glasgow and District Naval Association; resided at Noddsdale, Largs, Ayrshire.

10 A Scarce Great War 1917 ‘Q-Ship Operations’ D.S.O., 1915 D.S.C. Group of Four to Lieutenant T.E. Price, Royal Naval Reserve, Decorated for Service in H.M.S. Gunner and for the Command of H.M.S. Merops When She Sank A German U-Boat, 24.5.1917 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar, in Garrard & Co. Ltd. case of issue b) Distinguished Service Cross, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1914), reverse contemporarily engraved in upright sans-serif capitals ‘Lieut. T.E. Price R.N.R.’, in Garrard & Co. Ltd. case of issue, the case embossed ‘Lieut. T.E. Price R.N.R.’ c) 1914-15 Star (Lieut. T.E. Price. D.S.C., R.N.R.) d) France, Republic, Croix de Guerre, reverse dated 1914-1917, avec Palmes, generally very fine or better, with Bestowal Document for the Distinguished Service Order, named to ‘Thomas Edward Price, Esquire, D.S.C., Lieutenant in Our Royal Navy’, dated 22.6.1917 (4) £1,800-2,200 D.S.O. London Gazette 22.6.1917 Price, Thomas Edward, D.S.C., Lieut., Royal Naval Reserve D.S.C. London Gazette 13.9.1915 Lieutenant Thomas Edward Price, R.N.R. France, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 17.5.1918 Lieutenant Thomas Edward Price, D.S.O., D.S.C., posted as Sub-Lieutenant for service in H.M.S. Gunner, 14.9.1914, for Special Service in the Firth of Forth Minesweeping Flotilla, the latter was in fact an armed trawler and better known as Q.31; during this time he was ‘awarded D.S.C. for services in connection with sinking of German submarine by armed trawlers..... 20.7.1915’ (Service papers refer); Lieutenant 22.12.1914; posted to the Command of Q.28, 22.3.1917, renamed H.M.S. Merops, 1.5.1917; and later that month, ‘sunk an enemy submarine by gunfire on 24.5.17. awarded D.S.O. Invested with D.S.O. at Buckingham Palace, 15.8.1917’ (Service papers refer); served with Q-Ship H.M.S. Alma (renamed Vera Elizabeth), 1.10.1917-9.2.1918; posted to H.M.S. Vivid, 8.9.1918, for Naval Ordnance Duties at Hayle; demobilised 6.8.1919.

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11 A Great War 1918 ‘Dover Patrol’ D.S.O. Group of Five to Captain W.J.T. Saunders, Royal Navy a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar b) Queen’s South Africa 1899-1900, no clasp (Lieut. W.J.T. Saunders. R.N. H.M.S. Sappho.) c) 1914-15 Star (Commr. W.J.T. Saunders. R.N.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Commr. W.J.T. Saunders. R.N.), genenerally very fine, mounted as originally worn (5) £1,600-1,800 D.S.O. London Gazette 6.4.1918 Saunders, Walter John Tite, Commander, R.N. ‘In recognition of services in vessels of the Auxiliary Patrol between 1st January and 31st December 1917.’ Captain Walter John Tite Saunders, D.S.O., born 1862; who ‘was the third son of Thomas William Saunders a High Court Judge and started his sea career in 1875 as a sailor in one of the famous China Tea Clippers’ (Obituary refers); commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Navy, 1895; served in H.M.S. Sappho, August 1900-18.9.1901; posted for service at H.M.S. Victory, for Portsmouth Dockyard, 6.11.1905; retired to the Reserve the following year taking up employment with the Netherlands Steamship Company; re-engaged for service as a Commander with the outbreak of the Great War, and was employed with the Dover Patrol; he commanded H.M. armed Yacht Rhouma, September 1914-May 1915 and the Lorna May 1915-December 1915, ‘February 1915 mentioned in report from C-in-C Home Fleet in connection with the recovery of German mines... and great bravery displayed in recovering and dismantling the mines’ (Service papers refer); subsequently in command of an Armed Drifter Flotilla, and was once again mentioned in ‘September 1917... for initiative and zeal in recovery an enemy mine’ (Ibid); promoted to Captain (Retd) in recognition of services rendered during the war, 11.11.1918; reverted to Retired List, 14.10.1919; in ‘the 1939 War he joined the Home Guard and served with it when he was 80. He was a member and post Captain of the Bognor Regis Golf Club’ (Obituary refers); Saunders resided at Kingsmead, Felpham, and was 91 years old at the time of his death.

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April 21, 2011 - London

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12 A Great War ‘Patrol Services’ D.S.O. Group of Seven to Commander T.W. Bennett, Royal Naval Reserve a) Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, minor white enamel damage to left arm of cross, with integral top riband bar b) Transport 1899-1902, one clasp, S. Africa 1899-1902 (T.W. Bennett.) c) 1914-15 Star (Lt. Commr. T.W. Bennett, R.D., R.N.R.) d) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Commr. J.W. [sic] Bennett. R.N.R.), BWM officially re-impressed e) Royal Naval Reserve Decoration, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1911) and silver-gilt f) Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 35mm, gold and enamel, generally very fine or better (7) £1,800-2,200 D.S.O. London Gazette 6.4.1918 Bennett, Thomas William, Lieut.-Commander (Acting Commander), R.D., R.N.R. ‘For services in vessels of the Royal Navy employed on patrol and escort duty during the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1917’ Commander Thomas William Bennett, D.S.O., R.D. (1872-1939), born Beachampton, Buckinghamshire; served as 2nd Mate of S.S. Nubia (P&O Hospital ship), presented with his Transport Medal by the King, 4.11.1903 (published transcription or roll erroneously gives initials as ‘S.W.’); recommended for Royal Naval Reserve as a result of his work in the Transport services; commissioned Lieutenant 22.8.1901; retired 1909; re-engaged for service during the Great War, and was appointed Navigating Officer in the armed merchant cruiser Mantua, 8.8.1914; Lieutenant-Commander 26.10.1916; Acting-Commander 3.6.1917; served with the Mantua until 9.2.1918.

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13 The Second War 1940 ‘Norwegian Coast’ D.S.O. Group of Eight to Captain H.S.M. HarrisonWallace, Royal Navy, Mentioned in Despatches for the Command of H.M.S. Caledon in Action Off The Latvian Coast During the Allied Intervention in North Russia, 1919 a) Distinguished Service Order, G.VI.R., silver-gilt and enamel, reverse of suspension bar officially dated ‘1940’, with integral top riband bar b) 1914-15 Star (Lt. Commr. H.S.M. Harrison-Wallace, R.N.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Commr. H.S.M. Harrison-Wallace. R.N.) d) 1939-1945 Star e) Atlantic Star, with France and Germany Bar f) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf, nearly extremely fine, together with the recipient’s related miniature awards, the 1914-15 Star a 1914 Star, and additionally including a France and Germany Star, and Great War riband bar, both groups housed in Spink and Son, London fitted cases (8) £2,000-2,500 D.S.O. London Gazette 25.6.1940 Captain Henry Stewart Macnaughton Harrison-Wallace, Royal Navy (Retired) ‘For courage and resource in operations on the Norwegian Coast.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 9.4.1920 Commander Henry S.M. Harrison-Wallace, R.N., “Caledon” Captain Henry Stewart Macnaughton Harrison-Wallace, D.S.O., born Jamaica, July 1883; educated at H.M.S. Britannia, Dartmouth, and Royal Naval College, Greenwich; Appointed Midshipman, July 1899; Commissioned Sub-Lieutenant, 15.7.1902; Lieutenant, 31.12.1904; Lieutenant-Commander, 31.12.1912; served in H.M.S. Emperor of India from 26.3.1914; Commander, 31.12.1916; served in the Light Cruiser H.M.S. Caledon from September 1917; Appointed to the Naval Intelligence Division, 10.7.1919; served as Commander of the Caledon during the Allied Intervention in North Russia, under the command of Rear Admiral Walter Cowan, and engaged the Bolsheviks off the Latvian coast at Windau, shelling them out of the town (Mentioned in Despatches); placed on Retired List, 1.1.1923; Advanced Captain, 1.7.1928; served during the Second World War in H.M.S. Calliope as Extended Defence Officer, Tyne; served with the Norwegian Expeditionary Force, 1940 (D.S.O.); Captain, H.M.S. Quebec, 1941-42; Headquarters Staff Combined Operations and Admiralty Naval Staff, 1942-44; took part in the Invasion of Normandy as a Captain of Landing Barges, June 1944. Captain HarrisonWallace reverted once more to the retired list, 1945, and died at home in Jamaica, 24.6.1963.

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14 A 1929 ‘Civil Division’ O.B.E. Group of Five to Captain R. Tharle-Hughes, Indian Army, Late Corporal 4th Dragoon Guards a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1928) b) India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (4117 Corpl. R. Hughes 4th Dragoon Gds.) c) British War Medal (Capt. R. Tharle-Hughes.) d) Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, engraved ‘Sub. Condr. R. Tharle-Hughes. India Misc. List’ e) Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (Sub Condr R. Tharle Hughes India Misc List), last officially renamed, generally very fine or better, first four mounted as originally worn (5) £280-320 O.B.E. London Gazette 1.3.1929 Reginald Tharle-Hughes, Esq., M.B.E., Establishment Officer, Army Department, Government of India. M.B.E. London Gazette 4.12.1917 Second Lieutenant Reginald Tharle-Hughes, Indian Army Reserve of Officers, Registrar, Army Department, Government of India. Captain Reginald Tharle-Hughes, O.B.E., commissioned Second Lieutenant, Simla Volunteer Rifles, 20.8.1912; appointed Registrar, Army and Marine Department, Government of India, 12.12.1914; Lieutenant 1.10.1915; Temporary Captain 12.9.1918; appointed Establishment Officer, Army and Marine Department, Government of India, 1.4.1921.

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15 A Great War ‘Auxiliary Patrol’ O.B.E. Group of Nine to Lieutenant-Commander R.H. Palmer, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve; Who Served as Second-in-Command to “The Terror of Tobermory”, Vice-Admiral G.O. Stephenson, at H.M.S. Western Isles, 1940-45 a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1919) b) 1914-15 Star, unnamed c) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. R.H. Palmer. R.N.V.R.) d) 1939-1945 Star e) Defence and War Medals f) Jubilee 1935 g) Coronation 1937, generally very fine, mounted court-style as originally worn (9) £200-250 O.B.E. London Gazette 16.9.1919 Lieutenant Reginald Howard Palmer, R.N.V.R. ‘For valuable services in the Auxiliary Patrol.’ Lieutenant-Commander Reginald Howard Palmer, O.B.E., commissioned Temporary Sub-Lieutenant, R.N.V.R., 8.12.1915, and posted to M.B. Resourceful later the same month; served at H.M.S. Wallington (Auxiliary Patrol Base), from 14.1.1916, before service in the Motor Fishing Boat Our Girls Three and M.L. 62 and 198; Temporary Lieutenant 8.12.1916; commanded ML. 198 from 28.5.1918; invested with his O.B.E. at Buckingham Palace, 3.3.1920; re-engaged for service in the Second War as Temporary Lieutenant-Commander, 13.10.1939; served on ‘Defence Duties’ in Gibraltar, October 1939-April 1940; appointed to H.M.S. Western Isles (AntiSubmarine Training School), under Vice-Admiral G.O. Stephenson, 17.7.1940; he served as Second-in-Command for the remainder of the War, with Stephenson effusive in his praise for him, ‘an officer of exceptional organising ability. A very good seaman. A great designer. He made out all the plans for alterations of Western Isles. He has a great flair for persuading business people, especially in dockyard to do all he wants.... He has done wonderful work in helping to develop the base at Tobermory and by his ingenuity, engineering knowledge and the immense circle of business friends he has got work done here which without him would not have been done...... A wonderful second in command who has risen to every request I have made.... I urge as a matter of justice that Palmer, after 11 years war service in a most responsible position where he has worked with marked and outstanding success shall be promoted to the rank of Commander’ (Service Papers refer); Palmer did not, however, get his promotion and was discharged in 1946.

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April 21, 2011 - London

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16 A Great War D.S.C. Group of Seven to Commander R.W. Hore, Royal Navy, For His Services in the Grand Fleet Destroyer H.M.S. Tirade, 1st January-30th June 1918 a) Distinguished Service Cross, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1918) b) 1914-15 Star (S. Lt. R.W. Hore, R.N.) c) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. R.W. Hore. R.N.) d) 1939-1945 Star e) Defence and War Medals, generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn (7) £1,200-1,400 D.S.C. London Gazette 11.12.1918 Lieut. Reginald Warren Hore, R.N. ‘For services in Grand Fleet Destroyers between the 1st January and 30th June, 1918.’ Commander Reginald Warren Hore, D.S.C., born 1894, son of Engineer Rear-Admiral Fred Hore, C.B.; joined the Royal Navy, May 1907; commissioned Midshipman 15.1.1912; Acting Sub-Lieutenant, 15.5.1914; served during the Great War in H.M.S. Nubian (destroyer), 7.11.1914-29.1.1916, as part of the Dover Patrol; served in H.M.S. Noble, 29.1.1916-15.6.1917 and in H.M.S. Tirade (destroyer), 25.6.1917-9.1.1919, as part of the Grand Fleet; during his service with the latter she was involved with H.M.S. Sylvia in the sinking of the German U-Boat UC-55 (which was credited with the sinking of 9 allied ships), 29.9.1917; Hore was commended ‘for going overboard in bowline to rescue survivors’ when the Tirade collided with and sank H.M.S. Marmion, 21.11.1917; advanced Lieutenant-Commander 15.9.1924; retired Commander 23.8.1939; re-engaged for the Second War and served at H.M.S. Northney (Landing Craft Training Base), Hayling Island; reverted to retired list, 30.7.1946. For the medals awarded to Rear-Admiral F. Hore, C.B., the father of Commander R.W. Hore, D.S.C., see Lot 5

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17 17 A Great War 1918 ‘Battle of Bapaume’ M.C. and 1919 ‘Allied Intervention’ Second Award Bar Group of Four to Captain, Later Lieutenant-Colonel, H.S. Walker, London Regiment, attached 45th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, Late Private Seaforth Highlanders a) Military Cross, G.V.R., with Second Award Bar b) 1914-15 Star (963 Pte. S.H. Walker. Sea. Highrs.) c) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Capt. S.H. Walker.), generally good very fine (4) £1,800-2,200 M.C. London Gazette 30.7.1919 Lt. (A./Capt.) Sidney Hamilton Walker, 1/24th Bn. Lond. R. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night September 1st/2nd, 1918, at St. Pierre Vaast Wood. When ordered to attack at short notice he volunteered to guide the battalion under most difficult conditions to the assembly position. No guides were available and by his skilful leadership the battalion was able to assemble although having to pass through a heavy enemy barrage. His skilfulness and total disregard of danger inspired all ranks.’ M.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 21.1.1920 Lt. (A./Capt. Sidney Hamilton Walker, M.C., 1/24th Bn., Lond. R., attd. 45th Bn., R. Fus. ‘He led his platoon with conspicuous gallantry and skill under severe machine-gun fire, successfully charging two machine guns. Subsequently, after the final objective had been taken, the rear of the column was subjected to severe fire by a strong enemy force. He immediately turned about his platoon and formed a line, thus helping to save a dangerous situation.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Sidney Hamilton Walker, M.C., initially served during the Great War as Private Seaforth Highlanders in the French theatre of war, from 1.5.1915; commissioned Temporary Lieutenant 24th Battalion London Regiment, 24.10.1915; Lieutenant 1.7.1917; Acting Captain 19.11.1917 (M.I.D. London Gazette 25.5.1917 and 10.7.1919); served with the battalion as part of the 142nd Brigade on the Somme, August-September 1918, and ‘the infantry brigades of the 47th Division were to relieve those of the 12th Division during the night of the 29th-30th August; but owing to the retirement of the enemy this change could not be carried out as planned, and it was arranged that the 142nd Brigade, to which mounted troops, artillery and machine guns had been attached, should, as advanced guard, pass through the line of the 12th Division at 6a.m., the remainder of the division following. Actually, at the named hour the 142nd Brigade, realizing that a deliberate attack was necessary, sent forward two battalions with the third in support, under a barrage. By 9a.m. the 1/24th London on the right, having met only with slight opposition, although the 1/22nd London on the left came under considerable machinegun fire from the north-east, had captured Hill 150 (2 miles north of Cléry), taken over a hundred prisoners, two field guns and a number of machine guns and had reached a line from the western side of Marrières Wood’; Walker particularly distinguished himself on 1/2nd September 1918, when ‘for half an hour before the 142nd Brigade started at 5.30a.m. to pass through the 141st on the western edge of St. Pierre Vaast Wood, the enemy maintained a heavy barrage, and throughout the advance over ground cut up by old trenches and shellholes offered strong opposition [Private J. Harvey, 1/22nd London Regiment was awarded the V.C. for this action]. Nevertheless, the brigade had a successful day. The 1/22nd London, on the right, reached a trench N.N.E. of Moislains, the northern part of the trench which the 140th had occupied; in the gap between the two brigades were several parties of Germans, those who, as above related, were using bombs against the 140th, and were not mopped up for some time. On the left, the 1/24th London managed to cut off a large party of Germans in dug-outs a little west of the south-west edge of St. Pierre Vaast Wood; two officers and sixty men were captured, most of the rest making good their escape into the wood, where they stampeded some of their own defenders. The battalion was then able to reach the western edge of Vaux Wood, as intended, with its left bent back towards Lonely Copse.’ (Official History of the War, Military Operations, France and Belgium 1918, vol. IV, refers); attached Acting Captain 45th Battalion Royal Fusiliers for service during the Allied Intervention; re-engaged for service as Temporary Major, Pioneer Corps 20.10.1940; advanced Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, 17.11.1942.

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April 21, 2011 - London

18 18 The ‘Allied Intervention’ Murmansk Command M.C., Great War 1916 M.M. Group of Five to Lieutenant G.E. Fullman, Royal Field Artillery, Later Police Constable, Metropolitan Police a) Military Cross, G.V.R., reverse privately engraved ‘Lieut. G.E. Fullman. M.C. M.M. R.F.A.’ b) Military Medal, G.V.R. (42010 Sjt: G.E. Fullman. 129/By: R.F.A.) c) 1914 Star and Bar (42010 Cpl. G.E. Fullman. R.F.A.) d) British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. G.E. Fullman.), generally good very fine, together with the following related documents and other items &c.: - Belgium, Kingdom, Albert I Veterans’ Cross, bronze, with Bestowal Document, named to George E. Fullman, and dated 18.6.1964 - Commission appointing George Edmund Fullman a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery, dated 27.2.1917 - Warrant appointing George Edmund Fullman a Warrant Officer, Class II, dated 22.11.1915 - The recipient’s Soldier’s Small Book - The recipient’s Third Class Certificate of Education, dated 1.2.1907 - The recipient’s Second Class Certificate of Education, dated 17.3.1910 - The recipient’s Assistant Instructor’s Certificate of Signalling, dated 3.12.1912 - Telegram from the recipient to his sweetheart, dated 4.9.1914, and later field postcard - The recipient’s diary, for his time in Russia, covering the period, 18.9.1918- 30.4.1919 - The recipient’s Metropolitan Police Certificate of Discharge, dated 19.8.1923 - Letter of reference, recommending Mr. G.E. Fullman, M.C., as suitable for working up a farm in Australia, dated 3.5.1923

Lieutenant G. E. Fullman

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Lieutenant G. E. Fullman with Murmansk Command in North Russia - The recipient’s Royal Artillery Association membership card - Letter to the recipient from Clementine Churchill thanking him for gift he had sent for the Red Cross “Aid to Russia” Fund, dated February 1942 - A selection of photographs of the recipient from his time in Russia, including some of the recipient on skis, as well as various group and portrait photographs - The recipient’s miniature awards, the gallantry awards both G.VI.R. issues, mounted as worn - Princess Mary Christmas tin, and stationery folder - The recipient’s Balaklava, as worn in Russia - The recipient’s shaving brush, together with various badges, buttons, and cloth insignia (lot) £3,000-3,500 M.C. London Gazette 3.10.1919 Lt. George Edmund Fullman, M.M., “A” Section, Mobile Column, 6th Bde., R.F.A., Murmansk Command ‘He has commanded the 65 m.m. section during the operations from Urosozoro to Medvyeja-Gora, 1st to 21st

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May, 1919, and has shown great gallantry and initiative in pushing forward his guns in close support of the infantry. On 3rd May, under heavy fire, he forced two armoured trains to withdraw, enabling our infantry to enter Maselga without further opposition. On 21st May he again did good work in dispersing the enemy, who were collected near MedvyejaGora station.’ M.M. London Gazette 11.10.1916 42010 Sjt. (now By. S./M.) G.E. Fullman, R.F.A. Lieutenant George Edmund Fullman, M.C., M.M., born Snodland, Kent, August 1888; enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery, February 1906; advanced Corporal; served with the Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 19.8.1914; advanced Sergeant, and awarded the Military Medal; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, 27.2.1917; promoted Lieutenant, 27.8.1918; served with the Murmansk Command in North Russia, 1918-19, arriving in Murmansk, 26.9.1918, and award Military Cross; relinquished his Commission with the rank of Lieutenant, receiving a gratuity, 24.12.1919; joined the Metropolitan Police, as a Constable in the Kilburn Division, 10.5.1920; discharged with gratuity on account of ill health, 19.8.1923.


April 21, 2011 - London

19 19 A Great War 1918 ‘Western Front’ M.C. Group of Four to Lieutenant G.E. Birkett, Royal Army Medical Corps, attached Gloucestershire Regiment, Late Surgeon Probationer, R.N.V.R., Who Was Shot in the Spine By a Sniper Whilst Bringing Wounded in from No-Man’s Land; A Renowned Radiologist After the War, He Finally Succumbed to His Wounds in 1931 a) Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, in Royal Mint case of issue b) 1914-15 Star (Surg. G.E. Birkett. R.N.V.R.) c) British War and Victory Medals (Surg. Prob. G.E. Birkett. R.N.V.R.), nearly extremely fine, last two in original named card box of issue, with the following related items and documents: - Two brass R.N.V.R. buttons - Congratulatory scroll from H.Q. Fourth Army named to recipient on the occasion of the award of his M.C., dated 10.12.1918; Army Orders by General Sir H.S. Rawlinson listing the award to the recipient, both scrolls in original postage tube addressed ‘C/O G. Birkett Esq., Thomfield, Marlborough Rd, Morecambe’ - Six Telegrams informing Birkett’s family of his wounds and recuperation in France - Various newspaper cuttings (lot) £900-1,100 M.C. London Gazette 1.2.1919 Lt. George Edmondson Birkett, R.A.M.C. (Spec. Res.), attd. 1st Bn., Gloucester Regt. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty throughout 15th and 16th September, 1918, during operations south of Maissemy. Working under heavy shell and machine-gun fire he brought in several wounded men. The enemy shot down

many stretcher-bearers and stretcher parties on the 16th, but this officer worked indefatigably and continued to search for and bring in wounded until he was wounded in the spine by a sniper on the 16th. By his personal courage and energy he undoubtedly saved many valuable lives.’ Lieutenant George Edmondson Birkett, M.C. (18931931), ‘It is with the deepest regret that we have to record the loss at the early age of thirty-seven of our brilliant colleague, George Edmondson Birkett. It is only a few weeks since we him saw slogging along our corridors bent only on the work in front of him..... Dr. Birkett was born in Morecambe on November 26th, 1893..... After receiving his early education at the Royal Grammar School, Lancaster, he won an open scholarship to Trinity Hall, Cambridge, but his career there, both scholastic and athletic, was interfered with by the war. He was Secretary of football and cricket at his college in 1914, and in the ordinary course of events would have been captain in the following year.... Despite advice to the contrary, he joined the Navy as a surgeon-probationer. After about fifteen months’ service with H.M.S. Loyal, he returned to qualify. His amazing activity was shown by the fact that before the end of 1917, he had completed a period of residence as an unqualified house surgeon, had taken his Conjoint Board diploma, and was out in France with the R.A.M.C. (Special Reserve). On September 16th, 1918 - with the end of the war within sight - he received a gun shot wound in the spine. One can see him now near St. Quentin, south of Maissemy, where he won the Military Cross...... A laminectomy was performed in France and later, in October, 1918, he was transferred to St. Thomas’ Hospital, where he remained until Christmas, 1920. After months of suffering and further operations, the almost impossible was achieved, and he succeeded in getting about again. In January, 1921, immediately after his discharge from hospital, Birkett went into residence again at the Manchester Royal Infirmary as house-physician to the late Dr. Reynolds. His extra-ordinary determination was shown by the fact that

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria he had to start dressing at six a.m. in order to be on the wards at nine a.m. Later on in the year he was appointed Pathological Registrar to the Manchester Royal Infirmary - a post which he held until 1924....... In 1924, he became attached to the Manchester and District Radium Institute. First as Pathologist, later as assistant and then as radiologist, he served the Institute in that wholehearted manner which was so characteristic of him.... in 1928, a party of surgeons came from London and saw the excellent work that Birkett was doing. Fifty cases of carcinoma of the mouth and tongue, treated by radium, were asked to come to the demonstration. Forty-eight patients came and the other two sent apologies for their unavoidable absence - a glowing tribute to his skill. The surgeons returned to London, and Birkett was established as one of the leading radium workers in Britain. Gordon-Taylor was so struck by the demonstration that he mentions it in his book The Dramatic in Surgery. It was not long before Birkett was writing leading articles, annotations and book reviews.... Success followed success. He became well known in London and on the Continent. At the time of his death, in addition to his various appointments in Manchester, he was consulting radiologist to Chester and Wrexham hospitals. His views were always listened to with the greatest respect, because they showed originality, clarity of thought, honesty and logic. A combination such as this will always command a hearing. In 1929 and 1930, he devoted all his spare time to the preparation of his book Radium Therapy - its Principles and Practice..... The points in Birkett’s character which stand out and which gained for him the regard of his fellows, were his courage in the face of a tremendous physical handicap and in his intellectual honesty. Few, even amongst his intimates, had any idea of the severity and constancy of his pain. Scarcely a night passed when his rest was not disturbed by it. Yet he never complained of his ill-luck. He was intolerant of humbug, and his success was due to thoroughness, systematic attention to detail and balanced judgment. We have lost him at a very early age, but not before he had made Manchester one of the principal radium centres in the world, and had left the hall mark of his ability on medical literature.’ (Manchester University Medical School Gazette, Obituary, refers)

and devotion to duty as a transport captain in this squadron during the period August, 1943 to January, 1945. During this period of 17 months he has flown 900 hours on transport duties, 350 hours of which have been during the last 6 months. He is also one of the captains who pioneered the night A.D.L.S. Mail to the Continent, which in some cases was carried out in extremely difficult weather and with poor navigational aids. F/Lt. Buchanan has never spared himself in his untiring efforts to ensure that the task set was carried out. His brilliant record and exceptional flying ability have been an inspiration to the remainder of the squadron.’ Flight Lieutenant Eric Kemp Buchanan, A.F.C., born Auckland, New Zealand, 1920; educated at Takapuna Grammar School and studied for two years at Auckland University College prior to employment as a Civil Engineer for the Auckland Harbour Board; served with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Auckland Regiment (T.F.) for three months prior to enlisting with the Royal New Zealand Air Force, as an Airman Pilot under training, 19.10.1941; posted No. 2 E.F.T.S., New Plymouth, 1.12.1941; carried out his first ‘solo’ flight 8.12.1941; posted to Canada at the start of the New Year to continue with training, and commenced at No. 10 S.F.T.S., Dauphin, Manitoba, 18.2.1942; undertook further training at No. 31 Coastal O.T.U., Nova Scotia before transfer to England for operational flying, March 1943; posted as Pilot, 24 Squadron (Dakotas), Hendon, June 1943; as part of Ferry Command he flew with the squadron to destinations such as Gibraltar and Malta; transferred “S” Detachment 512 Squadron (Dakotas), Transport Command, August 1943; he flew a mixture of V.I.P. and freight flights,

20 A Good Second War ‘1945’ Transport Command’ A.F.C. Group of Six to Dakota Pilot, Flight Lieutenant E.K. Buchanan, Royal New Zealand Air Force, A Veteran of D-Day and Arnhem, He Flew in Both Operations Tonga and Market a) Air Force Cross, G.VI.R., reverse officially dated ‘1945’ b) 1939-45 Star c) Air Crew Europe Star, with France and Germany Bar d) Defence and War Medals e) New Zealand War Service 1939-45, generally good very fine, mounted as originally worn with the following documents: - Royal N.Z. Air Force Pilot’s Flying Log Book (covering the period 1.12.1941-29.5.1945) - named Investiture Invitation, dated 21.6.1945 - Several photographic images from various stages of recipient’s flying career, photocopies of original documents and copied research (lot) £2,000-2,500 A.F.C. London Gazette 3.4.1945 Flight Lieutenant Eric Kemp Buchanan, 512 Squadron (NZ 415743). The Recommendation states: ‘For outstanding good work

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Flight Lieutenant E. K. Buchanan


April 21, 2011 - London

20 including 15.12.1943, ‘Cairo - Tripoli, 1 V.I.P. Rus Gen, 1 P.O.W.’ and 24.12.1943, ‘Portreath - Gibraltar 1 V.I.P., Governor of Gib.’ (Log Book refers); began training as a Glider tug and supply dropping, February 1944; flew on two Nickel Raids with the Squadron on Vire, 25th April and 25th May, prior to the invasion of France; Buchanan’s training was extended to dropping paratroopers and this was put to the test when he flew his Dakota as part of Operation Tonga, the airborne element of Operation Overlord; on the evening of 5.6.1944, ‘Ops. “Tonga” 17 Paratroopers on D.Z. “V” (Caen) (Cabourg) Flak Hits Nose + Port Tyre + Wheel’ (Log Book refers); the paratroopers were successfully dropped and as part of 9 Parachute Battalion, 3rd Parachute Brigade, 6th Airborne Division they were to move from Drop Zone “V” at Caen and Cabourg and proceed to destroy the guns of the Merville Battery; he spent the rest of June and July flying supply drops over Normandy to fuel the advancing army, and in August began evacuating casualties from small airstrips on Northern France, 13.8.1944, ‘B14 Loaded 18 Stretcher + 6

walking -Base’ (Log Book refers); on the 17th September Buchanan’s squadron took part in Operation Market, the airborne element of Operation Market Garden; on the first day of the operation Buchanan flew ‘Base - Hatfield Aldburgh - LZ (Arnhem) Glider Tow - (1 Jeep, 2 Trailers, 6 Troops -6500lbs); on the 19th, in the face of considerable flak, he flew a supply mission over Arnhem, where by this stage the 1st Airborne Division were already hard pressed; for the remainder of September and October he mainly flew supplies and casualty evacuation flights; March 1945 was a notable month, in that he transported the New Zealand Rugby Team on the 5th, and a replacement engine for General Montgomery’s staff car on the 20th; for the rest of his operational tour he mainly transported V.I.P.s, casualties and P.O.W.s; Buchanan was invested with his A.F.C. at Buckingham Palace, 3.7.1945, and discharged shortly after; he remained in the UK after the War and died in Hemel Hempstead, 1993.

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21 21 A Fine Order of St. John Group of Three to Major J.H. Rivers, Royal Army Medical Corps a) The Most Venerable Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Serving Brother’s breast Badge, silver and enamel, reverse engraved “Captain John Herbert Rivers, R.A.M.C., 1901” b) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Fourth Class breast Badge, 80mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 65mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with rosette on ribbon c) Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, NyamNyam (Major J.H. Rivers. R.A.M.C.), nearly extremely fine, mounted as worn (3) £1,200-1,500 Turkey, Order of Osmania, Fourth Class London Gazette 3.4.1906 Major John Herbert Rivers, Royal Army Medical Corps ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered to His Highness the Khedive of Egypt.’ Major John Herbert Rivers, (1869-1913), born Harlow, Essex; Appointed Surgeon-Lieutenant, January 1893; Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps, January 1896; Major, July 1904; seconded for service with the Egyptian Army, January 1899-January 1906, and served in the Sudan during 1905, taking part in the operations against the Nyam-Nyam tribes in the Bahr-el-Ghazai province on the Belgian Congo border, as part of a force comprising 18 British and 30 native officers, and 700 men (awarded Order of Osmania); retired, February 1911.

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Major J. H. Rivers


April 21, 2011 - London

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22 A Great War 1918 ‘French Theatre’ D.C.M. Group of Four to Battery Sergeant Major W.T. Baudains, Royal Field Artillery a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (686818 B.S.Mjr: W.T. Baudains. A.156/Bde: R.F.A.) b) British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (13889 A-W.O. Cl.1. W.T. Baudains. R.A.) c) Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (13889 B.S.Mjr: W.T. Baudains. R.F.A.), contact marks, therefore nearly very fine, mounted as originally worn (4) £600-800 D.C.M. London Gazette 3.9.1918 686818 B.S.M. W. T. Baudains, R.F.A. (Athlone) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When the two forward guns of his battery had been surrounded by the enemy, he pushed forward alone, and on his own initiative, from our front line to reconnoitre the position and ascertain if it were possible to get the guns back. Finding this to be hopeless, he returned under very heavy machine-gun and rifle fire, and was largely instrumental in saving the other four guns from falling into the hands of the enemy. The fine example of gallantry set by this warrant officer throughout the operations had a most inspiriting effect on the men.’ 13889 William T. Baudains, D.C.M. served during the Great War on the Western Front with the 156th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. M.I.D. Unconfirmed.

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23 A Great War ‘Gallipoli’ C.G.M. Group of Four to Leading Seaman J. Dewar, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, attached Drake Battalion, Royal Naval Division a) Conspicuous Gallantry Medal, G.V.R. (Cl.Z.232. J. Dewar, Lg. Sea. R.N.V.R. R.N.D. Gallipoli. 20 Nov. 1915.), minor edge bruise b) 1914-15 Star (C.Z. - 232, J. Dewar, C.G.M., L.S., R.N.V.R.) c) British War and Victory Medals (C.Z. 232 J. Dewar. Act. L.S. R.N.V.R.), generally good very fine (4) £5,000-7,000 C.G.M. London Gazette 31.5.1916 Acting Leading Seaman John Dewar, R.N.V.R., Clyde Z/232. ‘On the 20th November, 1915, in the Gallipoli Peninsula he threw away a live grenade, which had fallen in the trench, just in time to save a serious accident.’ Leading Seaman James Dewar, C.G.M., born 1886; prior to service in the Great War he was employed as a Railway Porter; enlisted Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, 21.9.1914; served with Drake Battalion in the Gallipoli theatre of War; demobilised 25.2.1919 Approximately 13 C.G.M.s awarded to the R.N.V.R. for the Great War.

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April 21, 2011 - London

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24 A Fine Great War ‘Jutland’ D.S.M. Group of Six to Chief Stoker F.A. Truscott, Royal Navy, A Veteran of the Battle of the Falklands, 8.12.1914, He Served the Entire War With the Battle Cruiser H.M.S. Inflexible a) Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R. (284217. F.A. Truscott, Ch. Sto. H.M.S. Flexible. 31. May-1 June 1916) b) Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Somaliland 1902-04 (F.A. Truscott, Lg. Sto. 2 Cl., H.M.S. Mohawk.) c) 1914-15 Star (284217, F.A. Truscott, L. Sto., R.N.) d) British War and Victory Medals (284217 F.A. Truscott. Ch. Sto. R.N.) e) Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (284217 F.A. Truscott, Sto. P.O., H.M.S. Falmouth.), generally good very fine, mounted for display purposes (6) £1,200-1,500 D.S.M. London Gazette 15.9.1916 Chief Stoker Frederick Arthur Truscott, ON 284217 ‘For services rendered by Petty Officers and Men of the Grand Fleet in action in the North Sea on the 31st May-1st June, 1916.’ 284217 Chief Stoker Frederick Arthur Truscott, D.S.M., born Ongar, Essex, 1876; joined the Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class, 1896; served in H.M.S. Mohawk, 8.1.1903-13.7.1904; served as Chief Stoker in H.M.S. Inflexible, 11.5.1912-9.4.1919; with the outbreak of the Great War Inflexible was the flagship of the Mediterranean fleet and as such was involved in the pursuit of the German battle cruiser Goeben and the light cruiser Breslau, August 1914; she was next in action as part of the squadron under the command of Admiral Sir Doveton Sturdee at the Battle of the Falklands, 8.12.1914; during the latter she worked in tandem with her sister ship H.M.S. Invincible, and successfully accounted for the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau; after repairs and a refit the Inflexible returned to the Mediterranean, where once again she was to act as flagship of the fleet; she arrived in the Dardanelles, 24.1.1915, and was engaged in the Gallipoli campaign; whilst serving here she was nearly sunk by a 100kg mine, leading to her having to be escorted to Malta for repair, 6.4.1915; on the 19th June she returned to the UK and joined the 3rd Battle Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet under the command of Rear Admiral Hood; she was present during the Battle of Jutland, and scored hits on the Pillau, the Lutzow and the Seydlitz, whilst experiencing a torpedo passing underneath her without detonating; the Inflexible was also present at Scapa Flow to witness the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet; Truscott was discharged November 1919.

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25 25 A Great War 1916 ‘Jutland’ D.S.M. Group of Five to Petty Officer P.F. Knapman, H.M.S. Castor, Royal Navy a) Distinguished Service Medal, G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (J.17156. P.F. Knapman, A.B. H.M.S. Castor. 31. May-1. June 1916.) b) 1914-15 Star (J.17156. P.F. Knapman, A.B., R.N.) c) British War and Victory Medals (J.17156 P.F. Knapman, L.S. R.N.) d) Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type, non-swivel suspension (J.17156 P.F. Knapman. P.O. H.M.S. Emperor of India), worn, therefore good fine or better, with a copy of H.M.S. Castor, Grand Fleet Destroyer Flotillas, 1915-1918, Souvenir of a War Commission, in which the recipient’s award is listed (lot) £1,000-1,200 D.S.M. London Gazette 15.9.1916 Able Seaman Percy Frederick Knapman, ON J.17156 ‘For services rendered by Petty Officers and Men of the Grand Fleet in action in the North Sea on the 31st May-1st June, 1916.’ J.17156 Petty Officer Percy Frederick Knapman, D.S.M., born Bow, London, 1896; joined Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, June 1914; served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. King George V, May-June 1914; at the outbreak of the Great War Knapman was serving in H.M.S. Audacious (Battleship) as part of the 2nd Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet; she was sunk by a German mine off the coast of Donegal, 27.10.1914; his next posting was to H.M.S. Excellent (Shore Establishment), prior to his next operational posting in H.M.S. Castor (light cruiser), 12.11.1915; he served the remainder of the war with the latter, including at the Battle of Jutland where she was the flagship of the 11th Destroyer Squadron, ‘at about 10pm three dark shapes suddenly came into view on our starboard side, steering a course converging at two points on our own. For a few moments we seemed

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mutually uncertain of each other. We challenged, they replied, but not to our entire satisfaction, so for the reasons before stated the challenge was repeated. Their reply was to switch on their searchlights, and after sweeping for a moment, turn them full on the Castor. Then Hell broke loose. We opened fire simultaneously on each other with all guns at a range of about 2000 yards. Castor was hit almost at once, and the wireless aerials put out of action; moreover, blinded as we were by the rays of the searchlights, the flashes of our own guns, and the bursting shells of the enemy, it was a matter of impossibility to make any signals to destroyers. A heavy shell striking the starboard side forward burst inside the ship, killing or wounding nearly everyone in the vicinity. A six-inch shell hit the Commodore’s barge, blowing it to flinders and starting a fire on the booms; another burst on the port side of the fore bridge, converting it into a shambles, and blowing a great hole in the deck through which living and dead fell on to the deck below. A salvo burst on the water short of the ship, laying out most of a four-inch guns’ crew, and deluging the ship in flying splinters. Boats falls were shot away, funnels and boats riddled, and much minor damage done. The cries of the wounded and dying, the crash of riven stell, the smell of burning wood and worse, and dominating all the roar of the guns, made a tout ensemble which none who experienced those few minutes will ever forget. Officers and men stood their ground with admirable pluck and coolness. Meanwhile we had not been idle, and were blazing away with every gun that would bear at the leading Hun, firing a torpedo at the second ship..... Three to one at 2000 yards under modern gunnery conditions is not a pleasant business, but there is every reason to believe that we gave more than we got, and indirectly accounted for the German light cruiser Elbing’ (Publication included with lot refers); the Castor also accounted for a German torpedo boat destroyer during the battle; Knapman was awarded 1 of 2 D.S.M.s given to Castor for Jutland. For the medals awarded to Chief Engineer Officer D.P. Knapman, the son of Petty Officer P.F. Knapman, D.S.M., see Lot 241.


April 21, 2011 - London

26 26 A Second War ‘1944’ D.S.M. Group of Eight to Leading Seaman E.H.J. Steer, Royal Navy, Who Served in the Destroyer H.M.S. Paladin, As Part of the Eastern Fleet a) Distinguished Service Medal, G.VI.R. (SSX.29454 E.H.J. Steer. T/L.Smn.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Atlantic Star d) Africa Star, with North Africa 1942-43 bar e) Italy Star f) Burma Star g) War Medal h) Royal Fleet Reserve Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (SSX.29454 E.H.J. Steer. D.S.M. POB.23705 L.S. R.F.R.), generally good very fine, mounted as originally worn (8) £800-1,000 D.S.M. London Gazette 1.1.1944 Temporary Leading Seaman Ernest Henry James Steer, P/SSX.29454 (Horsham) Leading Seaman Ernest Henry James Steer, D.S.M., served with H.M.S. Paladin (destroyer) during the Second World War; as part of the Eastern Fleet she took part in the operations following the sinking of the heavy cruisers Cornwall and Dorsetshire, 5.4.1942, and assisted in the recovery of approximately 1,120 men, many of whom were in the shark-infested water for 30 hours; in June 1942 she was loaned to the Mediterranean fleet and took part in Operations Vigorous and Harpoon; in 1943 she also took part in Operations Husky and Avalanche and in January 1944 she returned to the Eastern Fleet; Steer’s Investiture took place 31.10.1944. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

27 27 Family Group: A Great War Western Front M.M. Group of Four to Private F.G. Miller, Royal Army Service Corps a) Military Medal, G.V.R. (M2-051993 Pte. F.G. Miller. R.A.S.C.) b) 1914-15 Star (M2-051993 Pte. F.G. Miller. A.S.C.) c) British War and Victory Medals (M2-051993 Pte. F.G. Miller. A.S.C.), good very fine, with two Fourth Army scrolls regarding the award of the Military Medal, in scroll holder Pair: Quarter Master Sergeant B. Miller, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 1914-15 Star (3857 Q.M.Sjt. B. Miller. L.N.Lan: R.); Victory Medal (3857 W.O. Cl.2. B. Miller. L.N.Lan. R.), nearly very fine (6) £150-180 M.M. London Gazette 17.6.1919 M2/051993 Pte. Miller, F. G., Royal Army Service Corps (Bournemouth). M2-051993 Private F.G. Miller, M.M. served with the Royal Army Service Corps as part of General Sir H.S. Rawlinson’s Fourth Army on the Western Front.

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April 21, 2011 - London

28 28 A Second War 1942 ‘Middle East Command’ D.F.M. Group of Six to Sunderland Engineer/Air Gunner, Flight Sergeant K.J. Cole, Royal Air Force, A Member of the Crew Who Evacuated the King of the Hellenes to Crete, During the German Invasion of Greece, April 1941; His Aircrew Were Also Credited with the Destruction of 3 Enemy Fighters and 2 Submarines a) Distinguished Flying Medal, G.VI.R. (569476. Sgt. K.J. Cole. R.A.F.) b) 1939-1945 Star c) Africa Star d) Defence and War Medals e) Greece, Kingdom, Air Force Cross, bronze, generally good very fine or better, together with the following related documentation &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Greek Air Force Cross, named to K.J. Cole, and dated 29.3.1955, in card scroll holder - The Recipient’s Royal Air Force Certificate of Service - The Recipient’s Royal Air Force Service Book - Letter to the recipient from the Central Chancery regarding the investiture for the D.F.M., dated 3.5.1945 - Two letters to the recipient regarding the award of the Greek Air Force Cross - Letter and Telegram of congratulations to the recipient on the award of his D.F.M. - Photograph of the recipient (6) £2,400-2,800 D.F.M. London Gazette 18.9.1942 569476 Sergeant Kenneth John Cole, 230 Squadron. The Recommendation, dated 3.8.1942, states: ‘This airman has completed over 1,000 hours operational flying involving 168 sorties as Fitter and Engineer/Air Gunner on

Sunderlands. In the course of these operations, the aircraft in which he served has performed valuable reconnaissance and anti-submarine patrols, the successful completion of which was due in no small measure to the outstanding qualities of coolness and resource shown by him. He contributed extremely valuable work whilst the aircraft was engaged on the evacuation of British forces from Crete and Greece, the unfailing serviceability of his aircraft under difficult conditions being largely the result of his untiring efforts. The aircrew of which he was a member have been responsible for the destruction of three enemy fighters in aerial combat and carried out 12 attacks on hostile submarines, two of which were definitely sunk and at least three severely damaged.’ 569476 Flight Sergeant Kenneth John Cole, D.F.M., born Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, 1919; enlisted Royal Air Force as Aircraft Apprentice, R.A.F. Halton, 26.6.1936; posted 29 Squadron, Debden, 5.1.1939 and from there to Singapore, 25.8.1939; posted for operational flying with Far East Command to 230 Squadron (Sunderlands), Singapore, 24.9.1939; with the latter he flew in patrols over the Indian Ocean and the approaches to Malaya and Singapore; moved with the squadron to Ceylon, February 1940, before the squadron was transferred to Middle East Command, May 1940; initially flying out of Egypt the squadron flew reconnaissance sorties for the Mediterranean Fleet and anti-submarine patrols; Sergeant 1.3.1941; with the German invasion of Greece in April 1941, 228 and 230 Squadrons were tasked with the evacuation of 900 refugees from the Greek coast; these included senior Allied Commanders and the King of Greece; Cole’s Sunderland, piloted by Wing-Commander P.R. Woodward, evacuated the King of the Hellenes from Greece to Crete; the crew of seven all received Greek awards in recognition of this service with Cole awarded the Greek Air Force Medal, 26.3.1945 - he did not receive the award until 1962, at which time he was sent the Greek Air Force Cross and relevant bestowal document; Cole continued to serve with the squadron until 31.5.1943, when he was posted for service in an instructional capacity; discharged 2.3.1949.

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29

29 An R.V.M. Group of Eleven to Mr. George Woods, Stores Clerk, Master of the Household’s Department a) Royal Victorian Medal, G.V.R., silver, unnamed as issued b) Jubilee 1887, bronze, with 1897 Bar (George Woods) c) Coronation 1902, bronze d) Coronation 1911 e) Norway, Kingdom, King’s Commemorative Medal for Court Servants, H.VII.R., silver, with crown f) Denmark, Kingdom, Royal Medal of Recompense, C.X.R., silver, without crown g) Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Household Medal for Servants of Foreign Courts, A.I.R., silver, with crown h) France, Republic, Medal of Honour, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Civil Division, silver i) Italy, Kingdom, Royal Service Medal, V.E.III.R., silver j) Sweden, Kingdom, Medal of the Order of Vasa, silver, with crown k) Portugal, Kingdom, Carlos I Coronation Medal 1889, bronze, toned, nearly extremely fine, mounted court style as originally worn (11) £400-500 Mr. George Woods, R.V.M., was awarded the Royal Victorian Medal, 3.6.1922, whilst employed as 2nd Stores Clerk in the Master of the Household’s Department.

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April 21, 2011 - London

HONOURS AND AWARDS TO THE RYVES AND CORBETT FAMILIES 30 The Important ‘Malayan Emergency’ C.B.E., Q.P.M. Group of Ten to Deputy Commissioner of Police H.T.B. Ryves, Taken P.O.W. By the Japanese at the Fall of Singapore, February 1942, and Interned at the Infamous Changi Prison; Served as Director of Special Branch, Federated Malay States Police, 1954-60 a) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, in damaged Garrard case of issue b) Queen’s Police Medal, for Distinguished Service (Harvey T.B. Ryves, Sen. Asst. Commr. Fed. Malaya Police) c) 1939-1945 Star d) Pacific Star e) Defence and War Medals f) General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (Asst. Supt. H.T.B. Ryves. Malaya Police) g) Colonial Police Medal, for Meritorious Service, E.II.R. (Supt. Harvey T.B. Ryves, Fed. Malaya Police) h) Malaya, Federation, Order of the Defender of the Realm, Companion’s neck Badge, silver and enamel, white enamel damage, in Garrard case of issue i) Malaya, Perak, Meritorious Service Medal, reverse engraved ‘Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves 1950’, generally very fine, breast awards mounted for wear as originally worn, with the following related contemporary items and documents: - Associated miniature awards and Riband Bar - Various items of cloth insignia; four Federated Malay States Police Cap Badges, one reduced in size in 14ct. gold; 14 silver buttons and two tie-pins - The recipient’s F.M.S.P. Whistle - C.B.E. Sweetheart’s brooch, silver-gilt and enamel - Bestowal Document for the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, C.B.E., dated 11.6.1960, framed and glazed - Two photographs, one of recipient being awarded his C.P.M., the other being bestowed with the Order of the Defender of the Realm, by the Sultan of Selangor - Congratulatory letter on the occasion of the award of Ryves’ C.B.E. from Lieutenant General Sir Rodney Moore, K.C.V.O., C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., Chief of Staff, Armed Forces, Kuala Lumpur, dated 8.6.1960 - Congratulatory telegram from the High Commissioner on the occasion of the award of Ryves’ Q.P.M.; letter to the same effect from Lieutenant General Sir Roger Bower, K.B.E., C.B., General Officer Commanding and Director of Operations for Malayan Command, dated 14.6.1957 - Letter from the same correspondent at the end of his appointment expressing thanks to Ryves for his assistance during his tenure, dated 18.9.1957; similar letter from Commissioner C.H. Fenner, dated 23.3.1960 - Copy of a “White Paper”, co-authored by Ryves and Desmond Palmer for the Federal Legislative Council, called The Communist Threat to the Federation of Malaya- Statement of Service, together with a typed ‘C.V.’ written by Ryves - Typed Secret Report ‘Meeting of S.E.A.C.D.T.

Deputy Commissioner of Police H. T. B. Ryves Committee to Counter Subversion at Bangkok’, in which Ryves is praised, dated 14.5.1955 - Typed transcript of Farewell letter from Ryves on the occasion of his retirement, dated 15.4.1960, and later printed in the Police Magazine - Letter from Harvey Miller, author of Menace in Malaya and Jungle War in Malaya, consulting with Ryves for details for his book, dated 28.3.1971, with other ephemera (lot) £3,000-4,000 C.B.E. London Gazette 11.6.1960 Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves, Esq., formerly Deputy Commissioner of Police, Federation of Malaya Q.P.M. London Gazette 13.6.1957 Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves, Senior Assistant Commissioner of Police, Federation of Malaya C.P.M. London Gazette 1.1.1953 Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves, Superintendent, Special Branch, Johore, Federation of Malaya Police Force The recommendation states: ‘Mr. Ryves is an officer with a wide range of experience in police work and since 1946 has been identified with Special Branch duties. From 1946 to 1950 he worked in the Special Branch, Perak, and through his efforts and organising ability the Perak State Registry was built up ahead of any state in the Federation. The smooth and efficient running of the Perak Special Branch in the early days of the Emergency was responsible for many telling blows against the bandit organisation, and Mr. Ryves’ valuable work was recognised by the State award for meritorious service. On his return from leave at the end of 1951, Mr. Ryves was transferred to Johore as Superintendent, Special Branch,

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria where he has faced a bigger task with the same energy as he displayed in Perak. It is clear that his initial efforts in the past 6 months are being successful and the efficient functioning of the Branch is largely due to Mr. Ryves’ hard work.’ Perak M.S.M. London Gazette 12.12.1950 Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves, Esq., Assistant Superintendent, Colonial Police Service Deputy Commissioner of Police Harvey Theodore Blackburne Ryves, C.B.E., Q.P.M., born Bungsar, Kuala Lumpur, 1916; educated King’s College School, Wimbledon, where he was Captain of Cricket; briefly employed with the Mercantile Bank of India before being employed as a Junior Master at the South Kensington Preparatory School, 1937; was one of four Cadets out of 350 applicants to be appointed to the Federated Malay States Police Force; attended an intensive Malay language course at the School of Oriental Languages, August-December 1937, from which he passed out first in the final examination; posted to Malaya the following month and undertook training at the Police Depot, Kuala Lumpur; promoted Passed Cadet, December 1938, and served as Personal Assistant to the Chief of Police of the State of Selangor, November 1938-September 1939; served as Officer-inCharge of Police District in several different parts of the country and was responsible for the maintenance of law and order, crime investigation, court work and internal security, September 1939-January 1942; during this period Ryves was seconded to the Immigration Department for 9 months, for specialist duties including security intelligence work on the Malayan/Thai frontier; advanced Assistant Superintendent of Police, January 1941, and was one of the two most senior policemen left behind in Singapore when it was captured by the Japanese, February 1942, ‘the Japanese authorities arrested and detained him with his friends in Changi Prison. But his wife, who was also born here, managed to escape to England. Ryves still remembers the incidents when he was detained in Changi and then at the detention camp in Sime Road. As it was known at that time, cigarettes were not obtainable and people made their own cigarettes with local tobacco leaves. In Changi, Ryves found several boxes of ‘Jeys’ paper. Although he used it secretly, the Japanese officer who was in charge there, however, came to know about it. The Japanese officer was suspicious, and took the paper.... He suspected there was some secret document there. Eventually he found several lines of writing’ (personal tribute to Ryves by Bala Chandran refers); the writing was eventually translated to show nothing suspicious other than instruction to the smoker that the paper was nearly finished and not to replace it with a new one; Ryves was interned until September 1945, after which he was reunited with his wife in the UK; he returned to Malaya in April 1946, and was appointed Assistant Officer-in-Charge of the C.I.D. for the State of Perak; promoted Officer Commanding Special Branch, State of Perak, August 1946; held the latter post for the next four and a half years (awarded Perak M.S.M. 1950); promoted Superintendent, March 1951, and posted as Officer Commanding Special Branch, State of Johore in December of the same year; in this capacity Ryves was responsible for the internal security of the States concerned and for the creation and running of an efficient intelligence gathering organisation to counter the outbreak of Communist armed rebellion in Malaya; Assistant Commissioner of Police, January 1953; appointed Senior Assistant Commissioner in Charge of the Federation Special Branch, November 1954; the title changing to Director Special Branch, Federation of Malaya Police, September 1957; his duties from 1954-1960 encompassed responsibility for all security matters affecting the internal security of the country; the Federation Special Branch was the sole security intelligence organisation for the Federation of Malaya and Ryves had a staff of approximately 1,500 under him including a Senior Assistant Commissioner and seven Assistant Commissioners of Police; during this period he ‘pulled the strings’ of his organisation eliciting the

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The recipient’s F.M.S.P. Whistle

following praise from Lieutenant General Sir Roger Bower, K.B.E., C.B., General Officer Commanding and Director of Operations for Malayan Command, ‘Although I sent an official farewell signal to the Police as a whole, I thought I would like to add to you personally my grateful thanks for your help and advice in Special Branch matters. As you know, I regard this war as largely a Special Branch war and I often wonder if the Special Branch gets due credit for the efforts they make, and the risks they run. I would not like to leave this country without making quite certain that you realise how much I appreciate all this and I would like to add my grateful thanks to you personally for the help and support you have given me whilst I have been here.’ In April 1960 Ryves, having been at the forefront of promoting ‘Malayanisation’ of the force, retired after 22 years service and Commissioner C.H. Fenner wrote the following: ‘By the time you read this I shall have said goodbye to you in person, but I would like to write and thank you for all the excellent support and help you have always given me since I have been Commissioner of Police. I would also like to place on record the very great debt that this country and this Force owes to you. Special Branch’s contribution to the successful prosecution of the Emergency needs no elaboration from me. You have headed it for some five momentous years, during which period you have guided it successfully through a most difficult and delicate period caused by changing Communist tactics and fresh political activities, brought about by constitutional developments. I have no doubt that you will have very mixed feelings when you come to leave Malaya, but you can console yourself with the thought that you are leaving behind for your successor a well conceived organisation, based on sound principles -and, what is more, it works.’ During the Emergency Ryves was a wanted man by Chin Peng, as was revealed whilst examining some captured Communist documents which gave personal details of him including his car number plate.


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Lieutenant G. H. Corbett 31 A Group of Six to Lieutenant G.H. Corbett, Royal Field Artillery, Later Government Entomologist, Federated Malay States; Taken P.O.W. by the Japanese at the Fall of Singapore, February 1942, and Interned at Changi British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. G.H. Corbett.); 1939-1945 Star; Pacific Star; Defence and War Medals, generally very fine, mounted as originally worn, with the following related contemporary documents: - Commission appointing George Hamblin Corbett, Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, dated 7.11.1916 - Two P.O.W. Postcards, addressed to ‘Mrs. G.H. Corbett, Broomwood, Reigate Road, Reigate, Surrey’ - Three photographs of recipient in uniform - Officers Training Corps Certificate, dated 1.10.1914 - Service Report for period spent on attachment to the Agriculture Department, Sudan Government, dated 6.7.1919 - Letter of Reference from the Acting Governor of Berber Province, dated 19.8.1919 - Letter of appointment as Government Entomologist, Federated Malay States, dated 4.2.1920 - Degree Certificate, B.Sc. in Agriculture from Edinburgh University; 12 Honours Certificates from the same university; and two Edinburgh & East of Scotland College of Agriculture Certificates (lot) £150-200 Lieutenant George Hamblin Corbett, educated at Edinburgh University where he specialised in Entomology; served Royal Agricultural College O.T.C., 1914; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, 7.11.1916; between 1914-16 much correspondence was passed between the Imperial Bureau of Entomology and the Colonial Office to find a posting for Corbett as an Entomologist rather than a serving officer in the Army, with Ceylon appearing to be his likely destination; however in October 1916, due to a shortage of Artillery Officers, the Army Council refused permission to release him from military service; Corbett was however attached to the Agriculture Department, Sudan, 1918-19, ‘I have much pleasure in recording the fact that you were working under me all last year when I was in special charge of the Government Pumping Schemes in this province, your own particular charge being the Timerab and Zeidab Schemes. I found your quickness in grasping conditions that were quite new to you most valuable and the results you produced were most satisfactory, the wheat crops grown at Timerab being the biggest grown anywhere in the Sudan’ (letter from Acting Governor, Berber Province included in lot refers); he continued to be employed by the Colonial Office after the Great War and was appointed Government Entomologist, Federated Malay States, 4.2.1920; Corbett was still serving in that part of the world when he was taken P.O.W. by the Japanese at the fall of Singapore, February 1942; he was interned at Changi, coincidentally with his son-in-law H.T.B. Ryves as confirmed in his postcards sent from Changi to his wife.

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April 21, 2011 - London

Signalman K. G. Corbett 32 A Well Documented Second War Casualty Group of Three to Signalman K.G. Corbett, Royal Navy, Killed in Action Whilst Serving in ‘Q’ Ship H.M.S. Fidelity, 1.1.1943 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; War Medal, nearly extremely fine, with named enclosure slip and card box of issue addressed to ‘Mr. G.H. Corbett, Downings, 42 Kingstone Avenue, Steyning, Sussex’, and the following related contemporary documents: - Parchment Certificate of Service - 24 letters from Corbett mainly addressed to his mother, covering the period 3.7.1941-13.12.1942, a large proportion written from H.M.S. Fidelity - Several photographs of recipient in uniform - Telegram informing Mrs. Corbett that her son is missing in action, dated 23.1.1943, and two letters to the same effect - Several letters of condolence including from the Royal Naval Barracks, Portsmouth; The Royal Naval Benevolent Trust and Roysse’s School - Certificate of The Inspector of Seamen’s Wills - named Lloyds Bank Commemoration Scroll, with letter of enclosure from the Chairman of Lloyds Bank Ltd. (lot) £200-300 JX212306 Signalman Kenneth George Corbett, born Reigate, 1917, son of George Hamblin Corbett; educated at Roysse’s School and was employed as Bank Clerk prior to enlisting in the Royal Navy, 12.8.1940; undertook Signals Training at H.M.S. Mercury prior to being posted to H.M.S. Fidelity, 22.7.1942, ‘Am afraid that I will not be up this weekend as my long awaited draft has come. In future please address all letters to H.M.S. Fidelity, c/o G.P.O. London’ (Letter included in lot refers); the latter was a French Merchant vessel called Le Rhin, which had escaped to Britain after the fall of France, 1940, and volunteered its’ services to the Royal Navy; it was commissioned as a Special Service Vessel, 24.9.1940, and armed with four 4inch guns, four torpedo tubes and equipped with two seaplanes and a Motor Torpedo Boat and torpedo nets; her role as a ‘Q’ Ship was to transport S.O.E. agents to and from the French coast whilst on covert operations; by June 1942 she had also been equipped with a company of Marines; in November 1942 it was decided that Fidelity would embark for the Far East where she was to act as an offshore base from which to mount Commando operations on the Japanese held coasts of South East Asia; for the initial part of her journey she joined a convoy; whilst acting as rescue ship she became detached from the convoy and was damaged by an attack from U-615, then sunk by the torpedoes of U-435, 1.1.1943; of the 326 on board ship only 10 survived; Corbett is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

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BRITISH ORDERS AND SINGLE AWARDS

33

33 The Most Noble Order of the Garter, A Mid 19th Century Knight Companion’s (K.G.) ‘Great George’ Collar Badge, by Garrard, London, 42mm x 43mm, 83.7g, gold (22 carat) and enamel, Hallmarks on base and on horse’s tail, St. George with a blue cap and green enamel sword attacking the Dragon with a gold lance, his horse white with black hooves and a red saddle cloth, the Dragon green with red spots and red wings, all resting on an oval green enamel base with rose, thistle, and shamrock on ground, and a salamander in the grass, with a border of red and white ribbons, minor damage in parts, St. George lacking cape, base slightly loose, otherwise good very fine, rare, with additional top gold loop suspension £30,000-40,000

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April 21, 2011 - London

x34 The Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight Companion’s (K.G.) sash Badge, 76mm x 46mm, gilt, a good quality privately made badge possibly manufactured for display purposes, very fine, with short section of sash riband £400-600 PROVENANCE: Spink, 16.6.1987

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

x35 The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Knight’s (K.T.) sash Badge, 55mm x 48mm, copper-gilt, an attractive privately made early badge possibly manufactured for display purposes, very fine, with full sash riband £400-600 PROVENANCE: Spink, 20.5.1991

35

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April 21, 2011 - London

37

36 The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) breast Badge, gold (Hallmarks for London 1868) and enamel, minor enamel damage to one arm of cross on reverse, and to wreath, therefore good very fine, converted for neck wear £700-900 37 The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue £600-800 38 The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Military Division, Companion’s (C.B.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, in Collingwood, London, case of issue £500-600

39

39 The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) breast Badge, silvergilt and enamel, with integral silver-gilt riband buckle, nearly extremely fine £400-450

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40

40 The C.I.E. Attributed to Sir G.W. Forrest, Director of Records, Government of India The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) breast Badge, by Garrard, London, gold and enamel, with top gold riband bar, extremely fine, in case of issue, with the related miniature award £450-500 C.I.E. London Gazette 3.6.1899 George William Forrest, Esq. Sir George William Forrest, C.I.E. (1846-1926), born Nusseerabad, India, the second son of Captain George Forrest, V.C., and educated at St. John’s College, Cambridge; Fellow of Bombay University; appointed to the Bombay Education Department, 1872; acted as Census Commissioner, Bombay, 1882; Professor of English History, Elphinstone College, 1887; Director of Records, Bombay, 1888; Director of Records, Government of India, 18911900; Appointed Assistant Secretary to the Government of India, 1898; retired 1900; Knighted by H.M. The King at Buckingham Palace, 12.2.1913 (London Gazette 14.2.1913). For the miniature V.C. to Captain George Forrest, see Lot 289

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x41 The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire, Companion’s (C.I.E.) neck Badge, gold and enamel, extremely fine £450-500 42 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine £160-200 43 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Military Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with neck riband, in Garrard, London, case of issue £180-220


April 21, 2011 - London 44 A Good Great War 1917 ‘Salonika’ D.S.O. Attributed to Captain A.R. Cooper, Worcestershire Regiment Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., silver-gilt and enamel, with integral top riband bar, extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue, together with a portrait photograph of the recipient, mounted in a glazed frame with a piece of D.S.O. riband; and a commemorative booklet concerning the award of the D.S.O. to Captain A.R. Cooper £800-1,000 D.S.O. London Gazette 26.7.1917 Temp. Capt. Arkwright Richard Cooper, Worc. R. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. [During an attack on the 24th-25th April, 1917, Captain Cooper commanded one of the assaulting companies. The company came under a very heavy barrage during the advance, and was temporarily checked]. He passed through the barrage several times when reorganising his company and was severely wounded in doing so. He remained in command and personally led the assault and did not leave his men until the objective was gained.’ Captain Arkwright Richard Cooper, D.S.O., served with the 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, during the Great War, and was awarded the D.S.O. for his gallantry during an attack on the Salonika Front. ‘The advance began at 9:00pm, when Captain Cooper led his first platoon through heavy barrage to the bottom of Fumeaux Ravine. Being wounded in the face, left shoulder and arm, and ribs, and having many casualties, he rested and reorganized his men under cover until 9:45. Then he went back through the barrage for his second platoon, and brought it down the ravine through a still fiercer barrage. At the head of the men left of the two platoons he reached the Bulgar trench and took it. On mounting the parados on the far side a trench mortar bomb burst at his feet and severely wounded his left leg inside from the knee upwards. He continued to lead his men for further action on the right, then advanced alone to reconnoitre. Whilst using his revolver a 5.9 high explosive shell burst near him. This shattered his right arm, lifted him off the parados, and hurled him right back over the trench (six feet wide) down into the Bulgar wires fifteen yards below. One recovering consciousness he managed with his left hand, which he badly lacerated, to extricate himself, and his right arm which was caught by the wire up behind his back with the hand against the left shoulder. Owing to the darkness he then fell to the bottom of the slope, fifty yards down, among men of the Berkshire Regiment. A tourniquet was applied to his arm, which was put into a sling. Captain Cooper then, at midnight, started off alone to get back to his own trench, and deliver his report for headquarters. Though it was but five hundred yards up the ravine, it was not till 5:00am that he succeeded in struggling to the top, his legwounds and exhaustion from other wounds making it so difficult to get up after falling or resting. The barrage was still on, and he was wounded twice more- in the left knee, and then in the right. After attention by a medical officer he was carried to the Casualty Clearing Station, and thence to the 4th Canadian General Hospital at Salonika, which was not reached till 29th April. During this action he passed through the barrage no fewer than six times, and had one hundred and thirty casualties among the one hundred and forty-six men of his company.’ (Account in commemorative booklet refers).

Captain A. R. Cooper

Captain Cooper was for eleven weeks in the Salonika Hospital on a supporting bed, unable to lie down or turn on his side, and underwent three serious operations. While in bed General Milne, C.B., Commander-in-Chief, British Salonika Force, personally pinned the D.S.O. riband on to his bedjacket.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 45 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) breast Badge, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1919), good very fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue, together with the related miniature award £40-50

46 The Royal Victorian Order, Member’s (M.V.O.) breast Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘886’, white enamel damage to right arm of cross, otherwise good very fine £120-160

47 The M.B.E. Attributed to Mr. H.B. Spencer, Ministry of Munitions The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver (Hallmarks for London 1917), extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue, together with the related miniature award, also in Garrard, London, case of issue, and the following document: - Bestowal Document for the M.B.E., named to Henry Bath Spencer, Esq., and dated 3.6.1918 £50-70 M.B.E. London Gazette 7.6.1918 Henry Bath Spencer, Esq. Assistant Inspector of Cartridges, Ministry of Munitions.

48 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Military Division, Member’s (M.B.E.) breast Badge, silver (Hallmarks for London 1919), extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue £40-60

49 Indian Order of Merit, 2nd type, Military Division, Second Class, silver and enamel, minor enamel damage, good very fine, lacking integral riband buckle £280-320

50 Distinguished Service Cross, G.VI.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1945), reverse officially dated ‘1946’, very fine £600-700

51 Military Cross, G.V.R., unnamed as issued, good very fine £400-450

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54

52 The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Knight of Grace’s set of Insignia, neck Badge, 54mm, silver and enamel; Star, 72mm, silver and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue (2) £150-200

53 The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Commander’s neck Badge, 52mm, silver and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband, together with the related miniature award The Most Venerable Order of St. John, Officer’s breast Badge, 40mm, silver and enamel, nearly extremely fine, together with the related miniature award (2) £80-100

54 Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R. (200076 C.S.Mjr: W. Harvey, 1/5 R.War.R.), minor official correction to rank, good very fine £600-800 D.C.M. London Gazette 30.10.1918 200076 C.S.M. W. Harvey, R. War. R. (Little Coggeshall) ‘For conspicuous coolness and initiative. When the enemy appeared on a ridge in front of the company sector, he immediately organised company headquarters and caused heavy casualties to the enemy. During the attack he succeeded with great difficulty in keeping the company supplied with ammunition. His services were invaluable.’


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55

55 The Rare E.VII.R. Edward Medal for Industry to Foreman F. Smith, for Attempting to Rescue a Man Who Had Been Rendered Unconscious From the Effects of Gas Whilst Sinking a Well at East Markham in Nottinghamshire Edward Medal (Industry), E.VII.R., Second Class (Frank Smith), bronze, sometime lightly gilded, otherwise good very fine and rare, in fitted case of issue £1,400-1,800 E.M. Second Class London Gazette 14.2.1911 Frank Smith (listed jointly with John Wapplington) ‘On the 30th September, 1910, John Wapplington and another labourer, named Albert Templeman, were engaged in sinking a well at East Markham, Nottinghamshire, and had fired a shot in order to blast the rock at the bottom. After an interval, during which they tested the air with a lighted lamp and found no gas, Templeman went down the well and struck the rock with a crowbar. Immediately afterwards he cried out that he was feeling dizzy, and asked Wapplington to lower a ladder and rope. He did not wait to fasten a rope around himself, but tried to mount the ladder, and fell back when he was half way up. Wapplington, calling for help, went down to Templeman’s assistance; but found that he could not lift him, and came up in a dazed condition. After a rest of a quarter of an hour, he bravely made another attempt; but called out that he could not attach the rope to Templeman, as he was overcome by the gas. He managed, however, to reach the top before becoming unconscious. Frank Smith, foreman, then came to the spot with other men, and, fastening the rope round his body, went down the well, and succeeded in getting the rope round Templeman, by which means he was hauled up. Smith reached the surface in a state of collapse, though he soon recovered. Templeman was found to be dead.’ Mr. Frank Smith, E.M., was awarded the Edward Medal whilst employed as a Foreman labourer with the Lincoln Water Works at the construction of a well at Cowlishaw’s Farm, East Markham, Nottinghamshire, 30th September 1910, and was presented with his medal by King George V at Buckingham Palace on the 23rd February 1911. Only 2 silver and 5 bronze E.VII.R. Edward Medals were awarded. PROVENANCE: Tamplin Collection, 2003.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

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57

56 Distinguished Service Medal, G.VI.R. (JX.166288 C.E., Paul. P.O.), nearly extremely fine, mounted for wear, with photographic image of recipient at Buckingham Palace Investiture £600-700

57 A Great War ‘French Theatre’ M.M. to Able Seaman A. Rennie, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Military Medal, G.V.R. (C.Z.2757 A.B. A. Rennie R.N.V.R.), partially officially corrected, good very fine £450-550

D.S.M. London Gazette 11.6.1942 Petty Officer Cecil Ernest Paul, P/JX.166288 (HMT Hornbeam).

M.M. London Gazette 14.5.1919 C.Z./2757 A.B. Rennie, A. R.N.V.R. (Clydebank)

58 A Great War ‘Italian’ Theatre M.M. to Corporal C. Whittey, Royal Warwickshire Regiment Military Medal, G.V.R. (242649 Cpl. C. Whittey. 6/R.War.R.), edge bruise, very fine £180-220 M.M. London Gazette 29.3.1919 242649 Cpl. Whittey, C., 6th Bn. R. War.R. (Kidderminster) 242649 Corporal Charles Whittey, M.M., served during the Great War with the 1/15 Mounted Division Cycle Company in the French Theatre of War, from 30.3.1915; transferred to the 6th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment and served with them in the Italian theatre of War.

59 Military Medal, G.V.R. (22043 Pte. W. Dooner. 1/L.N.Lanc:R.), suspension claw re-pinned, nearly very fine £100-120 M.M. London Gazette 23.2.1918 22043 Pte. W. Dooner, N. Lanc. R. ([E] Manchester) 22043 Private William Dooner, M.M., served during the Great War with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment on the Western Front from 22.6.1915.

Petty Officer C. E. Paul (right), with Petty Officer J. Martin (left) and Cabin Boy T. Garraghan (top) outside Buckingham Palace, having all received the D.S.M., 13.4.1943. www.spink.com

60 Royal Victorian Medal, E.VII.R., bronze, unnamed, extremely fine, in case of issue £100-130


April 21, 2011 - London

HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON SIR FREDERICK WILLIAM MAZE, INSPECTOR-GENERAL OF CHINESE MARITIME CUSTOMS

Sir Frederick Maze (© National Portrait Gallery, London)

Sir Frederick William Maze, K.C.M.G., K.B.E., was born in Belfast in July 1871, the younger son of James Maze, a linen merchant, and Mary, the daughter of Henry Hart of Lisburn, and was educated at Wesley College, Dublin. In 1891 he followed his uncle, Sir Robert Hart, into the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service, and in 1899 was appointed as acting audit secretary at the Inspectorate-General in Peking. During the Boxer uprising in 1900 he was serving as acting Commissioner at Ichang. Appointed Deputy Commissioner at Foochow in 1901, and at Canton two years later, in 1904 he opened a new Customs House at Kongmoon, West River. Subsequently, he served as Commissioner in Tengyueh, Canton, Tientsin, Hankow, and Shanghai. His period in the Customs service was a time of great political upheaval in China, and he witnessed the fall of the Ch’ing dynasty in 1911; the breakdown of the republic; the attempts of the Nationalist Party to unite the country; and the splitting away of the Communists and the invasions by Japan in the 1930s. In 1928 he was appointed by the Chinese Government Deputy-Inspector General of Customs; the following year he was promoted to the job of Inspector General of Chinese Maritime Customs. Created a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1932, he was appointed Counsellor to accompany Dr. Kung, the Envoy Extraordinary, to the Coronation of King George VI in 1937. Following the outbreak of the Second World War the situation in China became very difficult, and Maze was one of approximately 200 Britons and Americans held captive at the ‘Bridgehouse’ in Shanghai following the attack on Pearl Harbor. On his release in 1942 he was repatriated to Portuguese East Africa, but returned to China in an effort to help his staff still imprisoned there. He retired in 1943, and was created a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in recognition of his services. Upon retirement Sir Frederick Maze emigrated, first to Cape Town, before moving to Victoria, British Colombia, in 1948, where he died in March 1959. Page 65


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

61 The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Commander’s (K.C.M.G.) set of Insignia, neck Badge, 84mm including crown suspension x 63mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 73mm, silver, silver-gilt, gold, and enamel, with gold retaining pin, extremely fine, with neck riband, together with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the K.C.M.G., named to Sir Frederick William Maze, K.B.E., and dated 1.1.1944, with accompanying Central Chancery letter - Warrant dispensing with the Investiture of the K.C.M.G., named to Sir Frederick William Maze, K.B.E., and dated 1.2.1944 - Letter to the recipient from the Foreign Secretary, the Rt. Hon. R.A. Eden, M.C., on the occasion of the award of the K.C.M.G., and signed ‘Anthony Eden’ (2) £1,200-1,400 K.C.M.G. London Gazette 1.1.1944 Sir Frederick William Maze, K.B.E., until recently Inspector-General of Chinese Maritime Customs.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

62 The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Knight Commander’s (K.B.E.) set of Insignia, neck Badge, 80mm including crown suspension x 63mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 80mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, extremely fine, with miniature-width neck riband, together with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the K.B.E., named to Frederick William Maze, Esquire, and dated 1.1.1932, with accompanying Central Chancery letter - Warrant dispensing with the Investiture of the K.B.E., named to Frederick William Maze, Esquire, and dated 1.1.1932 (2) £600-800 K.B.E. London Gazette 1.1.1932 Frederick William Maze, Esq., Inspector-General of Chinese Maritime Customs

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

63 China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Third Class, First Grade neck Badge, 77mm, silver and enamel, sapphire at centre, lacking top coral, good very fine, with neck riband and the following related documents &c.: - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Double Dragon, First Class of the Third Division [sic], named to Frederick William Maze, Esquire, and dated 3.6.1909, with Foreign Office and Inspectorate General of Customs, Peking, letters £2,500-3,000 China, Order of the Double Dragon, First Class of the Third Division [sic] London Gazette 11.6.1909 Frederick William Maze, Esq. ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered by him.’

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

64 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class Star, 87mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, good very fine, with the following document: - Certificate sending F.W. Maze as Officer of the Special Representative Group to participate in the Coronation of King George VI, dated 25.3.1937, with translation ÂŁ1,200-1,400 Sir Frederick Maze was awarded the Second Class of the Order of the Golden Grain in 1919.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

65 China, Republic, Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, Third Class neck Badge, 84mm including golden grain suspension x 69mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with ruby at centre and pearls around central medallion, two pearls missing, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse; Second Class Star, 91mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with ruby at centre and pearls around central medallion, one pearl missing, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, enamel slightly worn with minor damage to central medallion on Star, some pearls possibly replaced, otherwise good very fine, with neck riband, Third and Second Class lapel rosettes, and the following related document: - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class, named to Frederick William Maze, Esquire, and dated 23.6.1915 (2) ÂŁ4,000-5,000 Sir Frederick Maze was awarded the Third Class of the Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain in 1921; and the Second Class of the Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain in 1923.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

66 China, Republic, Conservancy Medal, First Class, 49mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, minor enamel damage to points of badge, nearly very fine, with the following document: - Commission appointing Mr. F.W. Maze Deputy Inspector General of Customs, dated 3.10.1928 ÂŁ600-800 Sir Frederick Maze was awarded the First Class of the Conservancy Medal in 1924.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

67 China, Republic, Order of the Striped Tiger, Second Class set of Insignia, sash Badge, 107mm including wreath suspension x 73mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 83mm, silver-gilt and enamel, significant enamel damage to both central medallions, with full sash riband, and the following document: - Certificate appointing Sir Frederick Maze as Counsellor to China’s Special Delegation attending the Coronation of King George VI, dated 25.3.1937, with translation £2,000-3,000 Sir Frederick Maze was awarded the Second Class of the Order of the Striped Tiger in 1927.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

68 China, Republic, Order of the Brilliant Jade, Grand Blue Cordon set of Insignia, sash Badge, 64mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red jade at centre, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, the reverse officially numbered ‘114’; Star, 75mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red jade at centre, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, the reverse officially numbered ‘114’, good very fine, scarce, with full sash riband, lapel rosette, and the following related documents &c.: - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Brilliant Jade, Grand Blue Cordon, named to Sir Frederick William Maze, K.B.E., and dated 9.2.1938, with Foreign Office accompanying letter £3,000-5,000 China, Order of the Brilliant Jade, Grand Blue Cordon London Gazette 18.2.1938 Sir Frederick William Maze, K.B.E. ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered by him in the employment of the Chinese Government.’

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

69 Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class neck Badge, 54mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, with neck riband and the following related letters: - Two letters to the recipient from the British Embassy, Tokyo, dated 22.4.1920 and 16.12.1920, informing him that he has not been granted permission to wear the insignia ÂŁ200-250

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

70 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 83mm including crown suspension x 55mm, silver-gilt and enamel, French motto at centre, enamel damage to points of badge, very fine, with neck riband and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Commander of the Order of Leopold, named to Mr. Frederick William Maze, and dated 12.2.1930 - Restricted Permission to wear letter for the Belgian Order of Leopold, Commander, named to Frederick William Maze, Esq., and dated 22.2.1930, with accompanying British Legation, Peking, letter, dated 22.4.1930 £100-140

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

71 Portugal, Republic, Military Order of Christ, Commander’s set of Insignia, by da Costa, Lisbon, neck Badge, 57mm x 43mm, silver-gilt and enamel, silver mark on suspension ring; Star, 70mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, about extremely fine, with neck riband and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Commander of the Military Order of Christ, named to Frederick W. Maze, and dated 5.3.1932 - Restricted Permission to wear letter for the Portuguese Military Order of Christ, Commander, named to Sir Frederick W. Maze, K.B.E., and dated 28.7.1932 (2) £250-300

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

72 Norway, Kingdom, Order of St. Olav, Commander First Class Star, by Tostrop, Kristiania, Star, 75mm, silver, silver-gilt, gold, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, minor enamel damage, nearly extremely fine, with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Commander First Class of the Order of St. Olav, named to Sir Frederick Maze, and dated 20.6.1933 - Restricted Permission to wear letter for the Norwegian Order of St. Olav, Commander, named to Sir Frederick W. Maze, K.B.E., and dated 12.7.1933, with accompanying British Consulate-General, Shanghai, letter, dated 27.9.1933 £700-900

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

73 Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, Commander First Class set of Insignia, C.X.R. (191247), neck Badge, 79mm including crown suspension x 40mm, gold and enamel, gold marks on suspension ring; Star, 73mm x 56mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, minor enamel damage to star, otherwise extremely fine, with neck riband and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Commander First Class of the Order of the Dannebrog, named to Sir Frederick William Maze, and dated 17.6.1935, with accompanying letter - Copy of an Extract from the Statutes of the Order of the Dannebrog - Restricted Permission to wear letter for the Danish Order of the Dannebrog, Knight Commander, named to Sir Frederick W. Maze, K.B.E., and dated 4.7.1935 (2) £600-800

74 Germany, Order of the German Red Cross, 3rd type, First Class Star, 84mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with lapel rosette and the following related document &c.: - Bestowal Document for the German Red Cross, named to Sir Frederick Maze, and dated 29.7.1937 - Plaque engraved ‘Sir Frederick Maze, Star of the German Red Cross, Awarded July 29, 1937 £2,500-3,000 A Photograph of this lot is available on request.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

75 France, Republic, Legion of Honour, Commander’s neck Badge, 74mm x 56mm, silver-gilt and enamel, poincon mark on reverse, silver mark on suspension ring, enamel damage to central medallions, otherwise good very fine, with neck riband and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Commander of the Legion of Honour, named to Sir Frederick Maze, and dated 28.7.1937 - Restricted Permission to wear letter for the French Legion of Honour, Commander, named to Sir Frederick Maze, K.B.E., and dated 7.1.1938 £180-220

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

76 Vatican, Holy See, Order of Pius, Knight Commander’s neck Badge, by Tanfani, Rome, 56mm, silver-gilt, gilt, and enamel, maker’s cartouche on reverse, extremely fine, with neck riband in case of issue, together with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Knight Commander of the Order of Pius, named to Friderico Maze, and dated 30.10.1950, together with a translation - Copy of the Statutes of the Order of Pius, together with a translation £200-250

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

77 Sir Frederick Maze’s Orders Case A fitted leather case designed to house the Orders bestowed upon Sir Frederick Maze, on two pull-out shelves, the Chinese awards contained on one; and the British and other foreign awards contained on the other; together with the bindings formerly containing the recipient’s brevets and other bestowal documents £250-350 N.B. The Vatican Order of Pius was bestowed upon Sir Frederick Maze after the case was built, and as a result has no place within.

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Orders for display purposes only


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

78 The Full Group of Sixteen Miniature Awards Worn by Sir Frederick Maze, Inspector-General of the Chinese Maritime Customs The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Commander’s (K.C.M.G.) badge, silver-gilt and enamel; The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Knight Commander’s (K.B.E.) badge, silver-gilt and enamel, suspended from 2nd type riband; China, Republic, Order of the Brilliant Jade, Grand Blue Cordon badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, Third Class badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class badge, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Striped Tiger, Second Class badge, silver-gilt and enamel; France, Republic, Legion of Honour, Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband; Denmark, Kingdom, Order of the Dannebrog, F.VIII.R. [sic], Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband; Norway, Kingdom, Order of St. Olav, Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, with rosette on riband; Portugal, Kingdom [sic], Military Order of Christ, Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Germany, Order of the German Red Cross, First Class Star, with rosette on riband; Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Third Class badge, silver-gilt and enamel, minor damage to sacred beads; China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Third Class, Second Grade [sic] badge, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel; China, Republic, Conservancy Medal, First Class, silver-gilt and enamel; Vatican, Holy See, Order of Pius, Knight Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, generally nearly extremely fine, mounted as worn The Short Group of Six Miniature Awards Worn by Sir Frederick Maze, InspectorGeneral of the Chinese Maritime Customs The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 1st type, Civil Division, Knight Commander’s (K.B.E.) badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, Third Class badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class badge, silver; China, Republic, Order of the Striped Tiger, Second Class badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Third Class, First Grade badge, silver and enamel, lacking coral centre; China, Republic, Conservancy Medal, First Class, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, good very fine, mounted as worn, both groups contained within a fitted leather case (22) £2,000-2,500

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON MR. WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT, CHINESE IMPERIAL MARITIME CUSTOMS SERVICE

Mr. W. Cartwright

79 The Chinese First Class Gold Medal of Pao Hsing Bestowed Upon Mr. W. Cartwright, Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service China, Empire, Gold Medal Pao Hsing, First Class, 36mm, gold, centre set with a coral cabochon, extremely fine, extremely rare, complete with neck riband and pendant tassels £10,000-12,000 Mr. William Cartwright, born July 1847, the son of Dr. John Cartwright, of Colne, Wiltshire; joined the Royal Navy and sailed to China as a Midshipman in the ‘LayOsborn’ Flotilla, 1863; upon the dis-banding of the Flotilla joined the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service, August 1863, and served in various capacities at Foochow, Amoy, Taiwan, Canton, Tamsui, and Hankow; served as Chinese Secretary on three occasions, 1875-76, 1887-89, and 1889-93; awarded the Chinese Gold Medal of Pao Hsing, First Class in 1868; appointed Commissioner of Customs, January 1873. Cartwright retired in May 1895, and died, March 1911. The Medal of Pao Hsing was instituted in 1862 following the establishment of the Foreign Ministry, and was China’s first official medal. It came in three classes, and was awarded for exceptional gallantry or distinguished service; awards of the medal ceased in 1881, when the new Imperial Order of the Double Dragon was instituted. PROVENANCE: Spink, 28.3.1995

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

80 The Chinese Order of the Double Dragon Bestowed Upon Mr. W. Cartwright, Commissioner of Customs, Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 1st type, Third Class, First Grade neck Badge, 90mm x 84mm, gold and enamel, sapphire at centre, maker’s mark on reverse, minor enamel damage to suspension, good very fine, rare, with two embroided silk neck cravats in excellent condition, and the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal document, named (in Chinese) to Mr. Cartwright, Commissioner of Customs, by decree number 282, and granted the 11th Day of the 5th Month in the 20th Year of the Guangxu period [1895], contained in a wooden box inscribed ‘W. Cartwright Esqr.’, together with a translation - Copies of various letters and papers relating to the recipient’s career, including his last Will and Testament; and a photographic image of the recipient £10,000-12,000 PROVENANCE: Spink, 28.3.1995

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON MR. ARDON HENRY HYLAND, CHINESE POSTAL SERVICE

81 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class set of Insignia, sash Badge, 64mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 88mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, enamel slightly worn with damage to central medallion on Star, otherwise good very fine, with full sash riband, in rionuri lacquer case, the sash badge smaller than case insert, together with the following related document: - Presentation Scroll presented to A.H. Hyland, Esq., Commissioner, Chinese Postal Services, Tsinan, by the Chinese members of the Postal Service of the Shantung District, dated 19.9.1925 (2) £2,500-3,500 China, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class London Gazette 1.8.1922 Ardon Henry Hyland, Esq., Postal Commissioner for Shantung ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered.’ Mr. Ardon Henry Hyland, served with the Chinese Postal Service since its inauguration in 1897 until his retirement in 1925. PROVENANCE: Sotheby, 11.4.1996

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

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82 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Second Class Star, 88mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, extremely fine, with lapel rosette, in original rio-nuri lacquer case of issue ÂŁ1,200-1,400 PROVENANCE: Sotheby, 11.4.1996

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April 21, 2011 - London

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83 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class neck Badge, 65mm, silver-gilt and enamel, very fine, with neck riband, in original rio-nuri lacquer case of issue, together with the following related document: - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class, named to Ardon Henry Hyland, Esquire, and dated 6.3.1916 £600-800

84 China, Republic, Order of the Striped Tiger, Fourth Class breast Badge, 95mm including wreath suspension x 69mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, extremely fine, in original rio-nuri lacquer case of issue, together with the following related document: - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Striped Tiger, Fourth Class, named to Ardon Henry Hyland, Esquire, and dated 20.3.1919 £2,000-2,500

China, Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class London Gazette 17.3.1916 Ardon Henry Hyland, Esq., Postal Commissioner for Chihli Province ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered.’ PROVENANCE: Sotheby, 11.4.1996

China, Order of the Striped Tiger, Fourth Class London Gazette 11.4.1919 Ardon Henry Hyland, Esq., Postal Commissioner, Tientsin ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered.’ PROVENANCE: Sotheby, 11.4.1996

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

CHINESE ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS 85 The Chinese Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain Bestowed Upon Sir John Jordan [G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.B.], British Minister at Peking China, Republic, Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, a Rare First Class set of Insignia, sash Badge, 97mm including golden grain suspension x 80mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with ruby at centre and rubies around central medallion, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse; Star, 100mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with ruby at centre and rubies around central medallion, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, enamel slightly worn with minor damage to central medallion on Star, some rubies possibly replaced, otherwise good very fine, rare, with full sash riband, in original decorative embroided fitted case of issue, together with the following related items and documents &c.: - Memorial Axe to commemorate the end of the Great War, 230mm x 73mm, silver, wood, and enamel, significant enamel damage, inscribed in Chinese ‘Gung Lay Jin Sing, Justice Rules, War Won’ and ‘Chung Wah Man Kok, Republic of China, 8th Year, 15th March 1919’, in fitted wooden case of issue - Silk purses presented to Lady Jordan, by His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Korea, March 1899, contained in an attractive and inscribed presentation box - Permission to wear Document for the Chinese Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, First Class, named to Sir John Newell Jordan, and dated 1.10.1920, with accompanying letter - Document appointing Sir John Newell Jordan, G.C.I.E., K.C.B., K.C.M.G., a Member of His Majesty’s Most Honourable Privy Council, dated 10.6.1915, with accompanying letter - Document confirming the fact that the Right Honourable Sir John Newell Jordan, G.C.I.E., K.C.B., K.C.M.G., had been sworn in as a Member of His Majesty’s Most Honourable Privy Council, dated 24.1.1917 - Bestowal Document for the G.C.M.G., named to the Right Honourable Sir John Newell Jordan, G.C.I.E., K.C.B., K.C.M.G., and dated 3.6.1920, with accompanying Chancery letter - Bestowal Document for the K.C.M.G., named to John Newell Jordan, Esquire, C.M.G., and dated 24.6.1904, with accompanying Chancery letter - Warrant dispensing with the Investiture of the K.C.M.G., named to John Newell Jordan, Esquire, C.M.G., and dated 24.6.1904 - Bestowal Document for the C.M.G., named to John Newell Jordan, Esquire, and dated 22.6.1897, with accompanying Chancery letter - Bestowal Document for the G.C.I.E., named to Sir John Newell Jordan, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., and dated 12.12.1911 - Warrant dispensing with the Investiture of the G.C.I.E., named to Sir John Newell Jordan, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., and dated 12.12.1911

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Sir John Jordan (right)

- Bestowal letter for the award of the Coronation Medal 1902, named to His Excellency Mr. John N. Jordan, dated August 1902 - Two letters to the recipient from the Foreign Secretary, the Lord Curzon, K.G., G.C.S.I., G.C.I.E., on the occasion of the award of the G.C.M.G., and of the recipient’s retirement, dated 21.5.1920 and 21.9.1920, and signed ‘Curzon’ and ‘Curzon of Kedleston’ respectively - Letter to the recipient from the Foreign Secretary, Sir Edward Grey, Bt., K.G., renewing his term as Minister at Peking, dated 18.10.1913, and signed ‘E. Grey’ - Letter to the recipient from the Commander in Chief in India, General the Viscount Kitchener, G.C.B., O.M., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., regarding a visit to Peking, dated 30.4.1909, and signed ‘Kitchener’ - Letter to the recipient from the British ConsulGeneral in Egypt, Field Marshal the Viscount Kitchener, K.P., G.C.B., O.M., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., regarding the Chinese situation, dated 19.2.1911, and signed ‘Kitchener’


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Memorial Axe to commemorate the end of the Great War - Instruction Manual given to Sir John Newell Jordan on his appointment as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Peking, with accompanying letter, dated 26.10.1906 - Letter to the recipient from the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the creation of a Norwegian Ministry in Peking, dated 20.1.1920 - British Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem certificate named and presented to Lady Jordan in recognition of valuable services rendered during the Great War - Queen’s University in Ireland Examinations for Women Certificate, named to Annie H. Cromie [later Lady Jordan], dated June 1875 - The Recipient’s Scrapbook, containing a large number of photographs and newspaper cuttings relating to the recipient’s career www.spink.com

- Chinese scroll in calligraphy presented to Sir John Jordan by the Anglo-Chinese Association on the occasion of his retirement, 12th April 1920, 8250mm x 310mm, with accompanying translation and signed dinner menu - Illuminated Address to Sir John Jordan from Members of the Consular Service in China, on his retirement after 43 Years’ Service in the Far East, March 1920, in box, with accompanying Foreign Office letter - An attractive bound Album of Hand Coloured photographs ‘Sights and Scenes in Fair Japan’, presented to Lady Jordan, Peking, 26.5.1915 (lot) £20,000-30,000


April 21, 2011 - London

Silk purses presented to Lady Jordan by His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Korea

China, Order of the Precious Brilliant Golden Grain, First Class London Gazette 5.10.1920 The Right Honourable Sir John Newell Jordan, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.B. ‘On the occasion of his retirement from the post of His Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Peking, and from His Majesty’s Diplomatic Service.’ Sir John Newell Jordan, G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., K.C.B., was born in Balloo, Bangor, Co. Down, September 1852, and educated at the Royal Academical Institution and at Queen’s College, Belfast. Upon graduating with First Class honours in ancient classics and history in 1876, he took up the appointment of Student Interpreter in China. The next ten years were spent at consulates at various treaty ports. From 1886 he was based in Peking, and in 1889 was appointed assistant Chinese Secretary to the British Legation, being advanced to the Secretaryship in 1891. Five years later, in 1896, he was sent as Consul-General to Korea, where he stayed for ten years, a period which included Korea’s

absorption by Japan, and the War with Russia, and throughout his entire stay in Korea he was charged with the protection of approximately 5,000 Chinese nationals. Created a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1897, the following year he was appointed Minister resident at Seoul, and in 1901 was advanced to Minister at the Court of Korea. In 1904 he was advanced Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George. Resigning as Minister in 1906, he returned home, only to be appointed British Minister at Peking, a position he held for the next 14 years. Created a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in 1909, and a Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Indian Empire in 1911, he retired in 1920, and was advanced to Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael and St. George on his retirement. Sir John Jordan married Miss Annie Cromie in 1885, and they had three sons and one daughter. He died in London in September 1925.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

86 China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Second Class, Second Grade sash Badge, 48mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with red carved coral at centre and top, very fine, with full sash riband ÂŁ2,400-2,800

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April 21, 2011 - London

87

87 China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Second Class, Third Grade set of Insignia, neck Badge, 47mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with red carved coral at centre and top; Star, 94mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with red carved coral at centre and top, enamel damage in parts, particularly to badge, nearly very fine (2) ÂŁ2,000-2,500

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88 China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Second Class, Third Grade neck Badge, 53mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with red coral at centre and top, extremely fine, with neck cravat ÂŁ1,000-1,200

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April 21, 2011 - London

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89 China, Empire, Order of the Double Dragon, 2nd type, Second Class, Third Grade Star, 92mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, with red coral at centre and top, nearly extremely fine £800-1,000 90 China, Empire, Bestowal Document for the Order of the Double Dragon, Third Class, Second Grade, inscribed (in Chinese) ‘to Lung Chung - Kan, of the Files Section of the Privy Council of the Foreign Ministry of the Great Russia, received on the 26th day of the 11th month of the 22nd year [1897] of the Guangzu period’, very fine, with translation £60-80

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

x91 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, First Class set of Insignia, sash Badge, 100mm including star suspension x 71mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Star, 95mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with full sash riband, in slightly damaged original rio-nuri lacquered case of issue (2) ÂŁ2,500-3,500

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April 21, 2011 - London

92 92 China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class neck Badge, 64mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, with neck riband £250-300 93 China, Republic, Bestowal Document for the Order of the Striped Tiger, First Class, inscribed (in Chinese) ‘The Great President of the Great Republic of China hereby gifts to Admiral the Commander-in-Chief of the Far East Fleet of Great Britain, the Order of the Striped Tiger First Class, as a mark of friendship, given on the 16th May, in the 9th Year [1920] of the Great Republic of China’, mounted on card in two parts, some damage, with translation £50-80 China, Order of the Striped Tiger, First Class London Gazette 26.7.1921 Adml. Sir Alexander L. Duff, K.C.B. Admiral Sir Alexander Ludovic Duff, G.C.B. ,G.B.E., K.C.V.O., (1862-1933), born Banff, Scotland; Midshipman, October 1877; Advanced Rear-Admiral, 2.3.1913; served during the Great War with the 4th Battle Squadron, 1914-17, and present at the Battle of Jutland (C.B., Mentioned in Despatches); Assistant Chief of Naval Staff, 1918-19; Vice-Admiral, 15.1.1918; Appointed Commander-in-Chief, China Station, 24.7.1919; Admiral, 1.7.1921; retired, 1.7.1925.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

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95

94 China, Republic, World War I Service Medal, silver, with enamelled flags, very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly £1,000-1,500 95 China, Republic, Medal for the Inauguration of President Tsao Kun 1923, silver, nearly very fine £250-300 96 China, Republic, Medal for the Inauguration of President Tsao Kun 1923, silver, extremely fine £350-400

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97 China, Republic, Order of Extreme Bravery, Third Class Medal, 71mm x 63mm, bronze, bronze-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, very fine £300-400 The Order of Extreme Bravery was instituted by Tsang TsoLin (1875-1928), Generalissimo; Supreme Commander of Manchuria and the 3 Eastern States.

98 China, Republic, Order of Extreme Bravery, Third Class Medal, 71mm x 63mm, bronze, bronze-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, nearly very fine £300-400 99 China, Republic, Merit Star, 61mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Chinese inscribed cartouche on reverse, good very fine £300-400 99

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

100

101 China, Republic, Medal for Public Affairs and Public Service, Wu Pei-Fu at centre, 51mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, nearly very fine, with original riband with eye assembly, lacking hook ÂŁ300-500

100 China, Republic, Medal for Public Affairs and Public Service, Wu Pei-Fu at centre, 51mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly ÂŁ300-500 Instituted by Wu Pei-Fu (1874-1939), General; Commissioner of Hunan and Hupei; Vice Commissioner of Chilli, Honan, and Shantung; and Divisional Commander of the Army 3rd Division

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103 China, Republic, Medal for Good Conduct, Wu PeiFu at centre, 51mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly ÂŁ300-500

102 China, Republic, Medal for Technical Superiority, Wu Pei-Fu at centre, 51mm, silver-gilt and enamel, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly ÂŁ300-500

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

104 104 China, Republic, Merit Medal for Shooting, Wu PeiFu at centre, 41mm, gilt and enamel, very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly ÂŁ250-350

105 China, Republic, Merit Medal for Shooting, Wu PeiFu at centre, 41mm, gilt and enamel, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly ÂŁ250-350

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April 21, 2011 - London

106 106 China, Republic, Commendation Medal, Wu Pei-Fu at centre, 39mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage, otherwise good very fine, with original riband with hook assembly, lacking eye £300-500 107 China, Republic, Star of Merit, First Class (2), Ch’en Chiung-Ming at centre, 60mm, gilt and enamel, one lacking central portrait, otherwise good fine (2) £200-300 Instituted by Ch’en Chiung-Ming Commander in Chief, Kwangtung Army.

(1878-1933),

108 China, Republic, Star of Merit, Second Class (2), Ch’en Chiung-Ming at centre, 61mm, silvered and enamel, one lacking central portrait, otherwise good very fine (2) £150-250

109 China, Republic, Guandong Army Fourth Class Award, lacking portrait of Ch’en Chiung-Ming at centre, 47mm, silvered and enamel, good fine £100-150 110 China, Republic, Support the Republic 5 Year Commemorative Medal 1916, Tang Chi-Yao at centre, 56mm, silvered, bronze, and enamel, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly China, Republic, Support the Republic 10 Year Commemorative Medal First Class 1921, Tang ChiYao at top, 45mm, gilt and enamel, good very fine China, Republic, Support the Republic 10 Year Commemorative Medal Second Class 1921, Tang Chi-Yao at top, 38mm, bronze and enamel, with gilt portrait, nearly very fine China, Republic, Support the Republic 10 Year Commemorative Medal Third Class 1921, green stone at top, 38mm, bronze and enamel, enamel damage, good fine (4) £160-200 Instituted by Tang Chi-Yao (1883-1927), Supreme Commander and Viceroy, Yunnan Province.

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111 China, Republic, National (Ching Kwok) Army Medal of Recompense, Second Class in Gold, 58mm, gold with amber centre, 49.47g, very fine, extremely rare, contained in an inscribed silver-gilt fitted case £3,000-4,000 Awarded by the Tang Chi Yao, Chief Commanding Officer, Hunan and Hupeh Provinces, April 1922. PROVENANCE: Maison Platt, Paris

112 China, Republic, Central Military Academy Graduation Medal, 50mm, gilt and enamel, with top gilt riband bar inscribed (in Chinese) ‘Central Academy for Army Officers, 1st General Group, 15th Session’, and named on the reverse (in Chinese) ‘Person No.297 Chow Kwok Fai 6th Infantry Group’ and officially numbered ‘724’, one digit of number officially corrected, minor enamel damage to central medallion, nearly very fine, scarce £80-120 113 China, Republic, Merit Medal Fourth Class, 50mm, gilt and enamel, nearly very fine China, Republic, Zhenwu Army Merit Decoration, 55mm x 52mm, silvered and enamel, lacking central medallion, therefore fine (2) £200-250

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114 China, Republic, A large selection of approximately 50 various Warlord Medals and Badges, Military and Civilian, silvered, gilt, bronze, and enamel, generally good fine or better China, People’s Republic, A selection of 8 miscellaneous Communist medals and badges, silvered, gilt, bronze, and enamel, generally good fine or better (lot) £200-300 115 China, Republic, Military Chi Hsueh Medal, Second Class, silver and enamel, reverse officially numbered ‘1959’, good very fine, rare, with riband bar £60-80 116 Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy Remembrance Insignia Two lapel buttons and matching brooch, silver and enamel, about extremely fine, in fitted case of issue, containing an inscription (in Chinese) reading ‘Formation of U.S. Military Aid to China Consultancy Regiment 10 Years Anniversary, For the Custody of Major and Lady Jones, Given by Lai Yuk Sai, 2nd Navy General and Commander-in-Chief of the Navy Headquarters of the Republic of China, 1st May, the 50th Year of the Republic of China [1961]’ £60-80


April 21, 2011 - London

FOREIGN ORDERS, DECORATIONS AND MEDALS

Captain J-B Coopman 117 A Fine Belgian Naval Group of Eight to Captain J-B Coopman, Commander of the Port of Anvers a) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold II, Officer’s breast Badge, 65mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silvergilt and enamel, French motto, with rosette on riband b) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silver and enamel, French motto c) Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 60mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, silver and enamel d) Belgium, Kingdom, Military Cross First Class, silver-gilt and enamel, with crossed anchors on riband, in Fisch, Brussels, case of issue e) Belgium, Kingdom, Allied Victory Medal, bronze f) Belgium, Kingdom, War Medal 1914-18, bronze, with Anchor emblem on riband g) Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 3rd type, Officer’s breast Badge, 68mm including crown suspension x 42mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with green robes, in Sorlini, Varazdin, case of issue h) France, Republic, Order of Maritime Merit, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 42mm, silver and enamel, generally good very fine or better, together with the following related items: - The Recipient’s miniature awards, mounted as worn continental style on a double braided gilt chain, with fixing pins at either end - The Recipient’s Ceremonial bicorn hat, epaulettes, and Sword - Maritime Captain’s Certificate, dated 7.8.1911 - Permission to wear document for the French Order of Maritime Merit, dated 19.12.1952 - Portrait photograph of the recipient, wearing his medals - Various riband bars and buttons (lot) £500-800 Captain Jean-Baptiste Coopman, born Antwerp, May 1882; served as Commander of the Port of Anvers; advanced Captain, August 1911.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 120 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the African Star, Officer’s breast Badge, 64mm including crown suspension x 39mm, gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with rosette on riband, together with the related miniature award £60-80 121 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the African Star, Knight’s breast Badge, 64mm including crown suspension x 39mm, silvered and enamel, extremely fine, together with the related miniature award £50-70 122 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the African Star (2), Silver Medal; Bronze Medal, 60mm including crown suspension x 30mm, silvered, bronze, extremely fine, together with the related miniature awards, and a Gold Medal miniature award (2) £40-60

119

118 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 68mm including crown suspension x 41mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, bilingual motto, very fine Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 61mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, silver and enamel, very fine (2) £60-80 119 Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the African Star, Commander’s neck Badge, 90mm including crown suspension x 57mm, gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with neck riband £150-200

123 www.spink.com


April 21, 2011 - London 123 Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Order of the Lion, Commander’s neck Badge, 91mm including crown suspension x 53mm, gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with neck riband £250-300 124 Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Order of the Lion, Officer’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 42mm, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine, with rosette on riband £80-100 125 Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Order of the Lion, Officer’s breast Badge, 71mm including crown suspension x 42mm, gilt and enamel, reverse central medallion re-affixed, good very fine, with rosette on riband £60-80

128

126 Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Order of the Lion, Knight’s breast Badge, 67mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silver and enamel, minor enamel damage to reverse central medallion, good very fine £50-70 127 Belgium, Kingdom, Royal Order of the Lion (3), Gold Medal; Silver Medal; Bronze Medal, 60mm including crown suspension x 30mm, gilt, silver, and bronze, nearly extremely fine, together with the related miniature awards (3) £60-80

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128 Bulgaria, Principality, Order of St. Alexander, 1st type, Officer’s breast Badge, 38mm, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, with rosette on riband, in Rothe, Vienna, embossed case of issue, with a related gold miniature award, this lacking obverse central medallion £150-200

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129 Bulgaria, Principality, Order of St. Alexander, 1st type, Military Division, Knight’s breast Badge, 39mm, silver and enamel, extremely fine £70-90 130 Bulgaria, Kingdom, Order of National Merit, Military Division, Commander’s neck Badge, 95mm including crown suspension x 65mm, gilt and enamel, restoration work to central cipher on reverse, otherwise nearly extremely fine £140-180 x131 Germany, Anhalt, House Order of Albert the Bear, Commander’s neck Badge, with swords, 52mm x 40mm, silver-gilt, nearly extremely fine £600-800

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132

132 Germany, Baden, Order of Berthold, Knight Grand Cross Badge, 106mm including crown suspension x 69mm, gold and enamel, extremely fine, scarce, with riband ÂŁ2,800-3,200

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x133 Germany, Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Order of the Griffin, Knights breast Badge, with crown, 60mm x 45mm, silver-gilt and enamel, extremely fine £380-420 x134 Germany, Prussia, Order of the Red Eagle, Knights breast Badge, with swords, 38mm, silver, gold, and enamel, extremely fine £200-250 x135 Germany, Prussia, Iron Cross 1870, Second Class breast Badge, with 25 Year Oakleaf Cluster, 65mm x 43mm, silver and iron centre, nearly extremely fine £280-320 x136 Germany, Saxony, Military Order of St. Henry, Knight’s breast Badge, 54mm including crown suspension x 38mm, silver-gilt and enamel, minor blue enamel damage to motto, therefore good very fine £280-320 x137 Germany, Schwarzburg-Sonderhausen, Honour Cross, Knight’s breast Badge, with swords, 42mm x 40mm, silver, silvergilt, and enamel, good very fine £350-400 www.spink.com

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137

138 Italy, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, 37mm, gold and enamel, extremely fine, in embossed case of issue £40-50


April 21, 2011 - London ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered by him to His Imperial Majesty.’ Note: The Insignia of the Second Class of the Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure is just the Star, and does not include an accompanying neck Badge.

139

142 Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Eighth Class breast Badge, 37mm, silver, nearly extremely fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in slightly damaged rio-nuri lacquer case of issue Japan, Empire, War Medal 1894-5, bronze, with clasp, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Russo-Japanese War Medal 1904-05, bronze, with clasp, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in box of issue Japan, Empire, Manchurian Incident Medal 1931, bronze, with clasp, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in box of issue Japan, Empire, China Incident Medal 1937, bronze, with clasp, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly, in box of issue Japan, Empire, Showa Enthronement Medal 1928, silver, good very fine, with original riband with full hook and eye assembly Japan, Empire, Red Cross Membership Medal (3), silver; white-metal (2), nearly extremely fine, all with original riband with rosette and full hook and eye assembly, two in damaged cases of issue with lapel rosettes (9) £160-200

139 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Fourth Class breast Badge, 70mm including paulownia flowers x 46mm, silver-gilt and enamel, with red cabochon in centre, extremely fine £140-180 140 Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Seventh Class breast Badge, 31mm x 28mm, silver and enamel, extremely fine, in rio-nuri lacquer case of issue Japan, Empire, Order of the Rising Sun, Eighth Class breast Badge, 31mm x 28mm, silver, extremely fine, with lapel rosette, in rio-nuri lacquer case of issue (2) £80-100 141 Japan, Empire, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Second Class Star, 74mm, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, very minor damage to two sacred beads, therefore good very fine, with the following documents: - Bestowal document for the Order of the Sacred Treasure, named to R.E. Bredon, dated 14.1.1903 - Licence to accept and wear the insignia, named to Robert Bredon, Esq., dated 28.11.1903 - Enclosure for the Licence, dated Peking, 1.2.1904 £400-500 Japan, Order of the Sacred Treasure, Second Class London Gazette 1.12.1903 Robert Bredon, Esq., Deputy InspectorGeneral of the Imperial Chinese Customs

141

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145

143 x143 Malta, Order of Malta, Knight of Justice’s neck Badge, by Rothe, Vienna, 124mm including crown and trophy of arms suspension x 49mm, silver-gilt and enamel, trophy suspension with Latin Cross, maker’s mark on suspension, extremely fine, with neck riband, in case of issue £250-300 144 Nepal, Kingdom, Order of the Star of Nepal, First Class Star, 97mm, gold, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel, some rays of star slightly loose, otherwise extremely fine £400-500 145 Nepal, Kingdom, Order of Trishakti-Patta, Commander’s neck Badge, 63mm, silver (Hallmarks for London 1939) and enamel, minor scratch marks to reverse, otherwise nearly extremely fine, with neck riband £100-150 www.spink.com

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April 21, 2011 - London

144 146 Nepal, Kingdom, Order of Trishakti-Patta, Knight’s breast Badge, 63mm, silver and enamel, silver marks to reverse, minor enamel damage to central medallion, very fine £50-70 147 Nepal, Kingdom, Order of the Gurkha Right Hand, Commander’s neck Badge, 60mm, silver-gilt, silver marks on reverse, nearly extremely fine, scarce, with neck riband £100-150 148 An Unattributed Nepalese Group of Four Nepal, Kingdom, King Bihendra’s Coronation Medal 1972, silver; Nepal, Kingdom, King Mahendra’s Coronation Medal 1955, silver; Nepal, Kingdom, Army 25 Years Long Service Star, silver-gilt and enamel, silver marks on reverse; Nepal, Kingdom, Army 10 Years Long Service Medal, bronze, good fine, mounted as worn, together with a number of miscellaneous Nepalese medals, miniature awards, and seals (lot) £40-60

149 149 Netherlands, Kingdom, Java War Medal 1825-30, bronze, extremely fine £100-140

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Major K. May receiving his Sultan’s Commendation Medal, 1982 150 A Fine Omani Group of Seven to Major K. May, Sultan of Oman’s Armed Forces, Late Royal Army Pay Corps a) Oman, Sultanate, Order of the Special Royal Emblem, Expatriate Officer’s breast Badge, silver (Hallmarks for London 1985), with Crown emblem on riband, with related miniature award and riband bar, in Asprey, London, case of issue b) Oman, Sultanate, Sultan’s Commendation Medal, with gilt palm on riband c) Oman, Sultanate, General Service Medal, with Dhofar bar d) Oman, Sultanate, As Sumood Medal e) Oman, Sultanate, Peace Medal, with Sultan’s Operational Award crown emblem on riband f) Oman, Sultanate, Tenth Anniversary Medal g) Great Britain, Army Long Service & G.C., E.II.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (22956786 S. Sgt. K. May. RAPC.), about extremely fine, the Omani medals mounted Court-style as worn, with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the Order of the Special Royal Emblem, named to Major Kenneth May, and dated 19.11.1985 - Photograph of the recipient receiving his Sultan’s Commendation Medal (7) £200-300 Major Kenneth May, serving with Head Quarters, Sultan’s Armed Forces, was awarded the Sultan’s Commendation Medal in 1982.

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151

153 155

x151 Russia, Imperial, Order of St. Stanislas, Third Class neck Badge, by Keibel, St. Petersburg, 44mm, gold (56 zolotniki) and enamel, 1861 date stamp, assay office mark, and gold mark on suspension ring; maker’s mark and court stamp on reverse, minor enamel damage to reverse central medallion, otherwise extremely fine £1,200-1,500

155 Russia, Imperial, Commemorative Jetton for the 50th Jubilee of the Reform of the Law 1914, by Osipov, St. Petersburg, 53mm x 27mm, silver (84 zolotniki), 1908-17 kokoshnik mark for St. Petersburg and maker’s mark on reverse, with spring suspension, good very fine £200-300

152 Russia, Imperial, Cross of St. George, Fourth Class, 34mm, silver, reverse officially numbered ‘155352’, fine £40-50

156 Serbia, Kingdom, Order of St. Sava, 2nd type, Commander’s neck Badge, 81mm including crown suspension x 50mm, silver-gilt and enamel, Bishop with red robes, good very fine £180-220

153 Russia, Imperial, Medal for Zeal, Nicholas II, 28mm, silver (132280 O. John Ch. Sto. H.M.S. Jupiter.), very fine £200-250 132280 Chief Stoker Owen John, born Pembroke, Wales, 1866; enlisted Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, 1885; service during the Great War included in H.M.S. Jupiter (battleship), 29.11.1914-19.5.1915; in 1915 the latter was sent to Archangel as an ice breaker, and became the first ship to arrive there in February of that year.

154 Russia, Imperial, Commemorative Jetton for the Coronation of Tsar Alexander III, 15th May 1883, 22mm, gold and enamel, extremely fine £150-200

157 Serbia, Kingdom, Soldiers’ Order of the Star of Karageorge with Swords, Silver Cross, 61mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silvered-bronze and gilt, reverse dated 1914-16, good fine £80-120 x158 Tunisia, Kingdom, Order of Nichan Iftikah, 2nd type, Knight’s breast Badge, 62mm including bow suspension x 42mm, silver and enamel, good very fine Miniature Award: Nepal, Kingdom, Order of the Star of Nepal, Knight’s Badge, silver gilt and enamel, extremely fine (2) £50-70

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159 159 An Unusual Group of Four to Sir Oswald Brierly, Marine Painter in Ordinary to Queen Victoria, Who Accompanied Captain Henry Keppel in H.M.S. St. Jean d’Acre to the Baltic and Black Seas During the Crimea War 1854-55, And Sketched the English and French Fleets in Action a) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Fourth Class breast Badge, 80mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 60mm, silver, gold suspension and applique, and enamel, with rosette on riband b) Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh, Fourth Class breast Badge, 70mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 55mm, silver, gold suspension and applique, and enamel, with rosette on riband c) Greece, Kingdom, Order of the Redeemer, 2nd type, Officer’s breast Badge, 56mm including crown suspension x 34mm, gold and enamel d) Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die, privately manufactured Officers’ type, with ring and ball suspension, extremely fine, mounted in a fitted glazed frame with a portrait photograph of the recipient, and the following related items: - A print of H.M.S. Meander 44 Guns, ‘Shortening Sail for Anchoring’, Rio, June 9th 1851, by Oswald W. Brierly, slightly damaged - A print of H.M.S. Agamemnon 91 Guns, ‘Getting under weigh from Spithead, 1853, by Oswald W. Brierly, slightly damaged - A print of the America ‘Winning the Match at Cowes for the Club Cup, August 22nd 1851, from the original sketch taken on the spot by Oswald W. Brierly - Letter from the recipient to Major W.M. Collins, undated, signed ‘Oswald W. Brierly’ www.spink.com

- BASSETT, Marnie, Behind the Picture, H.M.S. Rattlesnake’s Australia and New Guinea Cruise, 1846-50, Melbourne 1966, 112pp, including a copy of a sketch made by Oswald Brierly, casebound with dust jacket (4) £600-800 Sir Oswald Walters Brierly was born in Chester in May 1817, the son of a doctor and amateur painter. After attending the Academy of Henry Sass in Bloomsbury, he went to Plymouth to study naval architecture and rigging, and his first exhibits accepted by the Royal Academy were of H.M.S. Pique and Gorgon at Plymouth in 1839. In 1841 he sailed for Sydney, New South Wales in the yacht Wanderer, and briefly settled for a time there and also in Auckland, New Zealand. In 1848 the Royal Naval surveyor, Captain O. Stanley, offered to take him in H.M.S. Rattlesnake on a survey of the north and east coasts of Australia and he went on two voyages, keeping a valuable record with his drawings. In 1850 Captain the Hon. Henry Keppel asked him to join him aboard H.M.S. Meander, which cruised in the Pacific and off the west coast of South America, before returning to England via the Magellan Straits in July 1851; the following month whilst still in Portsmouth he watched and sketched the yacht America win the cup which bears her name. In 1854 Keppel was to accompany the Baltic Fleet in H.M.S. St. Jean d’Acre, 101 Guns, and again asked Brierly to accompany him. Many of Brierly’s watercolours of that first year of the Russian War were lithographed and published as ‘The English and French Fleets in the Baltic 1854.’ In 1855 he again accompanied Keppel, this time to the Black Sea for the final operations of the Crimean War. On his return Her Majesty the Queen asked him to sketch the Fleet from the royal yacht during the great review on the Fleet’s return. In 1874 he was appointed Marine Painter in Ordinary to the Queen, and in 1885 was knighted. He also served as Curator of the Painted Hall and Greenwich Hospital Collections. He died at home in London in December 1894. PROVENANCE: Pitt Rivers Museum Collection


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160 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Commanders neck Badge, 80mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 65mm, silver, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine £350-400 161 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Osmania, Fifth Class breast Badge, 79mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 63mm, silver and enamel, minor enamel damage, very fine £100-140 x162 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of Medjidieh, Third Class breast Badge, with Scimitars, 80mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 65mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver mark on reverse, nearly extremely fine £400-500 163 Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh, Fifth Class breast Badge, 73mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 60mm, silver, gold applique, and enamel, with mint mark and silver mark on reverse, minor enamel damage, good very fine £100-140

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164 Vatican, Holy See, ‘Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice’ Cross, 42mm, silver, extremely fine, together with an unrelated Italian bronze medal, commemorating the 10th International Congress in Rome, 1912 Miniature Awards: An Unattributed Group of Four to a Belgian Roman Catholic Belgium, Kingdom, Order of the Crown, Knight’s breast Badge, silver and enamel; Belgium, Kingdom, Industry, Agriculture, and Labour Decoration, gold and enamel; Vatican, Holy See, Order of St. Gregory, Officer’s breast Badge, gold and enamel; Vatican, Holy See, Order of the Holy Sepulchre, Military Division, Knight’s Badge, with trophy of arms suspension, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, mounted as worn ‘Continental style’ on a double braid gilt chain, with gold fixing pins at either end (6) £60-80

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HONOURS AND AWARDS BESTOWED UPON SIR PETER MARKHAM SCOTT 165 The C.H., C.B.E., Second War 1943 ‘Coastal Forces’ D.S.C. and Bar Group of Eight to Lieutenant-Commander Sir Peter Markham Scott, Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, Who Commanded a Flotilla of Steam Gun Boats in the English Channel During the War, was Honoured For His Gallantry at the Actions in the Baie de la Seine, April 1943, and off Cap d’Antifer, September 1943, and was Mentioned in Despatches for the Dieppe Raid, August 1942; A Celebrated Painter, Naturalist, and Olympic Sportsman, He Later Founded the World Wide Fund For Nature and was Knighted For His Services to Conservation a) The Order of the Companion’s of Honour, Member’s (C.H.) neck Badge, E.II.R., 68mm including crown suspension x 40mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1978) and enamel, minor enamel damage to motto, in Toye Kenning and Spencer, London, case of issue, with full and miniature width neck ribands b) The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) neck Badge, 81mm including crown suspension x 64mm, silver-gilt and enamel, in Garrard, London, case of issue, with full and miniature width neck ribands c) Distinguished Service Cross, G.VI.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1942), reverse officially dated ‘1943’, with Second Award Bar, reverse officially dated ‘1943’, in Garrard, London, case of issue d) 1939-1945 Star e) Atlantic Star, with France and Germany Bar f) Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf, the Second War Campaign Awards all in card box of issue, named to ‘Lt Cdr P.M. Scott- MBE. DSC- RN.’ and addressed to ‘The New Grounds, Slimbridge, Gloucestershire’ g) Netherlands, Kingdom, Order of the Golden Ark, Commander’s neck Badge, 71mm including wreath suspension x 55mm, silver-gilt and enamel, silver marks to reverse, in Royal Mint, Utrecht, case of issue, with neck riband and lapel rosette, extremely fine, with the following related documents &c.: - Bestowal Document for the C.H., named to Sir Peter Markham Scott, C.B.E., D.S.C., and dated 13.6.1987, contained in a glazed frame - Copy of the Statutes of the Order of the Companions of Honour, and List of Members, 1987 - Bestowal Document for the C.B.E., named to Lieutenant-Commander Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., D.S.C., R.N.V.R., and dated 1.6.1953 - Two letters to the recipient on behalf of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty regarding the award of the D.S.C., dated 30.6.1943, and the award of the Second Award Bar to the D.S.C., dated 22.11.1943, both contained in glazed frames - Three Mentioned in Despatches certificates, dated 8.7.1941, 2.10.1942, and 28.9.1943, all contained in glazed frames - Letter to the recipient from Admiral Sir Charles Little, G.B.E., K.C.B., Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth, dated 1.1.1945, contained in a glazed frame www.spink.com

Lieutenant-Commander Sir Peter Scott, on the Bridge of S.G.B. Grey Goose

- Bestowal Document for the Order of the Golden Ark, named to Sir Peter Scott, C.B.E., D.S.C., LL.D., and dated 1.1.1976, contained in scroll holder of issue, together with citation, - Copy of the Statutes of the Order of the Golden Ark - the recipient’s ‘Walley Medal’, the reverse named to ‘P.M. Scott M.B.E.’, together with a handwritten note stating ‘This medal was awarded to me by the Howard family on my return from the Dieppe Raid in August 1942’ (lot) £5,000-7,000 C.H. London Gazette 13.6.1987 Sir Peter Markham Scott, C.B.E., D.S.C. ‘For services to conservation.’ C.B.E. London Gazette 1.6.1953 Lieutenant-Commander Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., D.S.C., R.N.V.R., Director, Severn Wildfowl Trust. M.B.E. London Gazette 11.6.1942 Temporary Lieutenant Peter Markham Scott, R.N.V.R. D.S.C. London Gazette 1.6.1943 Temporary Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant-Commander) Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., R.N.V.R. ‘For skill and gallantry in action with enemy light forces.’ The Recommendation, dated 17.4.1943, states: ‘This Officer led a mixed Flotilla of one Steam Gun Boat and two Motor Gun Boats against a more heavily armed force of three trawlers off Le Havre in bright moonlight on the 16th April 1943. The result was two of the enemy severely mauled by gunfire. Lieutenant Commander Scott, M.B.E., has been in five previous Coastal Force actions with the enemy, and the


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria officers of Motor Gun Boats 608 and 615 are full of praise of his leadership and clearly thought out plan and manoeuvring on this occasion.’ Remarks of Naval Officer-in-Charge: ‘LieutenantCommander Scott appears to have shown the determined and offensive spirit against the enemy which would be expected from his general bearing, and to have displayed good leadership and judgement. I concur in the recommendation for the immediate award of a decoration.’ D.S.C. Second Award Bar London Gazette 9.11.1943 Temporary Acting Lieutenant-Commander Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., D.S.C., R.N.V.R. ‘For great courage, leadership, and enterprise in action with enemy forces in the Channel while serving in Light Coastal Craft.’ The Recommendation, dated 30.9.1943, states: ‘For foresight, determination, and efficient leadership in command of a Steam Gun Boat force which torpedoed one trawler and severely damaged two others by gun-fire on the night of the 27th September 1943. This makes a third local recommendation within two months for the award of a decoration to Lieutenant-Commander Scott.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 8.7.1941 Temporary Lieutenant Peter Markham Scott, R.N.V.R., H.M.S. Broke ‘For good services in rescuing survivors from a burning Vessel.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 2.10.1942 Temporary Lieutenant Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., R.N.V.R. ‘For gallantry, daring, and skill in the combined attack on Dieppe.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 24.9.1943 Temporary Acting Lieutenant-Commander Peter Markham Scott, M.B.E., D.S.C., R.N.V.R. (London) ‘For courage, determination, and resource in actions close to the enemy coast while serving in Light Coastal Craft.’ Lieutenant-Commander Sir Peter Markham Scott, C.H., C.B.E., D.S.C., was born in London in September 1909, the only son of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, C.V.O., of Antarctic fame, and the artist and sculptor Kathleen Bruce. Educated at Oundle School and Trinity College, Cambridge, his early passions were art, wildlife, and a love of sailing. In 1936 he represented Great Britain in the Berlin Olympic Games, winning a bronze medal in the single-handed sailing event. War Time Service At the outbreak of the Second World War, Scott was commissioned into the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve as a Temporary Lieutenant on the 2nd January 1940, serving in H.M.S. Broke. In June 1940 Broke was involved with the evacuation of France, assisting in Operation Cycle, the evacuation and demolition of St Nazaire and the French Biscay ports. The following month she returned to escort duty with 6th Escort Group on both the Gibraltar and South Atlantic, and North Atlantic routes- over the next two and a half years she escorted 30 north-south convoys. Broke was involved in one major convoy battle on this route in March 1941, when she was attacked by U-boats working in conjunction with the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau as part of Operation Berlin, and it is probable that the award of the M.B.E. he received in the Birthday Honours’ List that year for services in H.M.S. Broke was partly influenced by his conduct during that action. Introduction to Coastal Forces In March 1942 Scott joined the Coastal Forces, a force comprised of Motor Torpedo Boats (M.T.B.s), Motor Gun Boats (M.G.B.s), and Motor Launches (M.L.s). These ‘Spitfires of the Seas’ operated throughout the War in the English Channel and North Sea, and were often heavily outgunned; virtually every sortie that they undertook resulted in casualties, with their commanders suffering the highest casualty rate, as the wheelhouse was frequently the main

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target for enemy guns. Boats would often be riddled with gunfire even after brief encounters with E(nemy)-boats, and many of the encounters took place within range of shore defences. Arriving at Dover on the evening of the 3rd March, he was soon into the action: ‘It was already dark when the taxi from the station deposited me on the steps of the Lord Warden Hotel, now H.M.S. Wasp, the Coastal Force Base. I had been told to ask for Hillary Gamble, who was acting as Senior Officer, M.T.B.s, and so I asked the first person I met inside the Hall- an R.N. Lieutenant- who replied that his name was Gamble and how could he help me. I told him that I wanted to go to sea with the boats if they were going, and he said that they had already gone. However, it appeared that one of the boats was in trouble. Two boats were just off this very minute to the rescue, and if I would like to go with them I would have to run. Ten minutes later, and not twenty minutes since my train had pulled into Dover station, I was steaming out of the harbour entrance on the bridge of a “C” Class M.G.B. (322) under the command of Lieutenant J.H. Hodder, R.N.V.R.’ (The Battle of the Narrow Seas, by Peter Scott refers). Such was Scott’s baptism in the coastal forces. Dieppe Raid In August 1942 Coastal Forces took possession of nine Steam Gun Boats (S.G.B.s), which were slightly larger and more powerful than the existing M.G.B.s. Scott was given command of S.G.B. 9, and she made her debut in the Dieppe Raid on the 19th August. S.G.B. 9 was to support the landings at two beaches on the extreme right flank, Orange I and II, carried out by the 4th Commando Force. Having acted as an escort for the Commando Raid, and assisted further by rescuing from the sea five of the crew of H.M.S. Calpe, Scott was preparing to return home as instructed, when he decided to have one last look towards the French coast: ‘I saw a landing craft far away inshore of us. At first I took it for one of two derelicts, but through the glasses I saw three Canadian Commandos, one of who was semaphoring “S.O.S.” With a sinking feeling I turned once more towards Dieppe at 25 knots. We closed on the craft and, after turning, we passed them a rope, which they managed to secure. Then, miraculously still unshot at, although we were no more than a mile of so offshore, we increased the revs to 20 knots and set course for the now distant convoy and its cloud of protecting fighters. Five minutes later, at 15:00 hours, I spotted two dots upon the eastern horizon. Two boats were approaching at high speed with bow waves easily visible at their range of six miles. E-boats! Here was something right up our street. With an effort the immediate objective- to regain our fighter protection with the minimum of delay- was cast aside, as the gunners on the fo’c’sle cleared their mountings for low-angle fire. The E-boats were closing on us. Now was our time. We slipped the tow, turned towards, and increased our speed to 35 knots. It was just where we would have expected the enemy coastal forces to come in and harass the retirement, and here they were, and we were going to have a battle with them. Spirits were very high as we sped eastwards. But suddenly they were dashed as we received a signal “Vessels are friendly.” They were air/sea-rescue launches. Bitterly disappointed, we turned once again for the landing craft. Just then a Dornier appeared out of the clouds. It came from right astern and dived down as we increased speed. We and a M.L. were the only unprotected targets- money for jam. All guns opened fire and I watched the bombs come out. At once I saw that they were travelling in the same direction as us, but a little faster, and would fall just ahead. I yelled to the coxswain, “Full astern, both”. The result was most striking. We pulled up dead in our tracks, and the bombs went on to fall about 60 yards ahead with four great spouting splashes. Meanwhile the guns had been doing well. The Dornier, which was about 2,000 feet up, was hit by a burst from the 3-inch gun under its starboard engine. This caught fire and a stream of smoke came from it as the aircraft plunged almost vertically downward. There was great excitement on the


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‘A night attack on an enemy convoy off the French coast by Motor Gun Boats of the Royal Navy, April 1943’, by Sir Peter Scott, the action for which he was awarded his D.S.C. bridge. “We’ve got him! We’ve got him!” But when he was a couple of hundred feet up he flattened out and, still burning, disappeared into the haze over Dieppe.’ (ibid). Scott and his crew returned to Portsmouth at 00:45, just over 28 hours after they had left, carrying with them 11 casualties, the 5 survivors from H.M.S. Calpe, and two Luftwaffe Prisoners of War they had rescued from the sea. Action in the Baie de la Seine Having been promoted temporary Lieutenant-Commander in January 1943, Scott was given overall command of the 1st S.G.B. Flotilla, comprising the six surviving original S.G.B.s. As they were being re-fitted it was discovered that the S.G.B.s came just within the limiting length which entitled them to names instead of numbers, and so Scott named them after a series of animals beginning with the word Grey; Grey Wolf, Grey Seal, Grey Fox, Grey Shark, Grey Owl, and, his own boat, Grey Goose, named after the first boat that he had owned as a child. The six ‘Greys’ did not all complete their re-fits simultaneously, and one of them, Grey Shark, was ready much earlier than the others. As a result, a number of operations were therefore carried out in early 1943 in which she led a force of mixed coastal craft.

On the 16th April Scott, in command of a small force comprising the Grey Shark and two M.G.B.s, was out on patrol in the Baie de la Seine, when he spotted by the full moon three enemy trawlers. Guessing that the trawlers were heading for Le Havre, he gave chase: ‘After various detours in order to regain the advantage of the moon we suddenly sighted them right ahead about three and a half miles away making terrific bow waves, obviously legging it at speed. I must own to a sinking feeling on sighting. The moon was so bloody bright. While there was a doubt about finding them, the cowardly subconscious was saying hopefully “Perhaps you won’t”; although the conscious went on working out every possibility to make sure that we did find them. In the battle that followed, the leading trawler was silenced and stopped. Boarding was considered, but by now dawn was not far off and we had a long way to go. There did not seem to be time. So we ranged up opposite the silenced enemy and about 150 yards away slowed down, and raked her from end to end with gunfire, in an attempt to sink her, but unfortunately our 3-inch gun was irreparably jammed. Under a hail of machine-gun bullets the enemy brought one of his 20mm cannons into action, and the first burst came into the bridge, knocking us all down. By now the approaching dawn

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria forced us to start for home. And so the battle was once more indecisive, although we had undoubtedly given more than we received. Damage to our force was slight- the S.G.B. had one killed and two wounded, and the M.G.B.s had no casualties at all.’ (ibid). For leading this attack against the odds, and for disabling two of the enemy trawlers without serious loss to his own force, Scott was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Action off Cap d’Antifer By August 1943 all six ‘Greys’ had completed their re-fits, and were engaged night after night on operations. On the night of the 27th September Scott was in command of a force of four S.G.B.s: ‘It was a night of brilliant phosphorescence and heavy storms, with lightning but no thunder. The four of us had been down to Le Havre and drawn blank, and we swept northward again towards Cap d’Antifer. Just before 2:00am we found the enemy and stalked him for about an hour. I wondered if he would sight us in the lightning flashes, but I finally came to the conclusion that, unless someone happened to be looking directly as us at the moment of the flash, he wouldn’t. There was a very black storm approaching from the nor’-nor’-east, and we decided that there was a good chance of an unobserved attack if we could time it to coincide with the arrival of the storm. Gradually we worked our way round until the black cloud of it was behind us, and then we turned in to close the enemy as the storm broke. The hail pattered down on our tin helmets and the night was inky black. We came down the wind so that it was at our backs; all sight of the enemy ships was blotted out, and it was useless to try to use glasses because of the rain. Lieutenant Peter Mason, the Commanding Officer of the boat (Grey Fox), was at the torpedo sight and I stood just behind him. Rather impatiently I kept asking, “For Heaven’s sake, can’t you see them yet”, for I knew we must be getting close. Suddenly he saw them and said very calmly, “Yes, I can see them nowport ten.” The range was less than 600 yards when he fired both torpedoes. The enemy had been unable to keep a lookout upwind into the driving hail, and he seemed to be taken completely by surprise. We disengaged to starboard and fired a spread of starshells. By their light we saw two trawlers quite close together. The First Lieutenant, John Erskine Hill, put the guns onto the second one and opened fire at once. From that time on the illumination was continuous, partly supplied by our second in line and partly by the Germans. Although the rain restricted the area of starshell illumination, the scene directly below the bright white light seemed to be quite as bright as day. The two trawlers were so unready that they did not reply at all and all our guns ripped into the second one, which was about 300 yards away. A small fire appeared to start at once, just forward of the bridge. Suddenly I saw a third trawler right ahead, and as we turned to starboard it came down the port side at very close range. Just as Erskine Hill, without a moment’s delay, made all his guns change target to this trawler, there was an explosion on the after end of the leading trawler as our torpedo hit. A vivid flame of cherry red, with streaks of blue and green in it, shot out of her- not vertically, but sloping to the right, and after it had gone there was a white column of either smoke or spray, which must have been at least 100 feet high. At the same time all guns engaged the third trawler, now no more than 60 yards away. I think that one small machine gun was firing back at us, but that was all, and everything we had was going into her. The gunners couldn’t miss. There was a roar of escaping steam, and suddenly a white cloud came out of the ship’s stern. Whether this was steam or white smoke, I don’t know. At the same time she altered course to port around our stern. Bits were flying off the upper works as every gun hit. At that range and with bright starshell illumination, it was quite impossible to miss.

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As soon as we had passed this third trawler, two more ships began firing at us out of the rain. The fire was not very accurate, although we were hit twice by 20mm shells in the port torpedo tube. The torpedo had already gone, and so these two hits did practically no damage, although a splinter scratched the midshipman’s ear. We increased speed an disengaged. We were 3,000 yards from the cliffs of Etretat, we had achieved complete surprise and fired our torpedoes, we had emptied our Ready Use ammunition lockers into the third trawler, but the Hun was now fully roused. The starshells burst continuously overhead and the shore batteries joined in with a vengeance. I collected the flotilla together, and found that two of them had not yet fired their torpedoes. It was after 4:00am, the wind had freshened to about Force 5 from the north, and the sea was rising. I thought the time and weather were not very promising for another attack, and so we set off for home. The Germans kept firing their starshells for another half-hour, by which time we were well on our way to Newhaven. We all four entered the harbour in company at 7:20am. The only damage suffered by the whole force was the two 20mm holes in the port torpedo tube and the only casualty was Peter Platt, the midshipman, with a scratch on his ear. He was most annoyed when I insisted he should go to the sick bay to have the blood washed off it before he came into breakfast.’ (ibid). It was to be a quick breakfast for Scott though, for as soon as it was over he caught the train to London, and thence to Buckingham Palace, where he was invested with both his M.B.E. from two years previously, as well as his Distinguished Service Cross. And within hours of the King pinning the D.S.C. on him, Scott’s Commanding Officer was recommending that a Second Award Bar should be added to it, for his ‘foresight, determination, and efficient leadership’ the previous night. Later Life After the War Scott stood unsuccessfully as the Conservative candidate for North Wembley in the 1945 General Election, before founding the Severn Wildfowl Trust (now the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust) in 1948, an organisation that he was closely involved with for the rest of his life. In 1961 he was one of the co-founders of the World Wildlife Fund (now the World Wide Fund for Nature), and designed the WWF’s well-known Panda logo. As well as all this he maintained his earlier passions for painting, in which field he was the founder President of the Society of Wildlife Artists and President of the Nature in Art Trust, and for sailing, skippering the yacht Sovereign in the 1964 America’s Cup whilst President of the International Sailing Federation. He also developed a keen interest in gliding, and became British gliding champion in 1963, later taking up the post of Chairman of the British Gliding Association. Having been made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1953, to mark the Queen’s Coronation, twenty years later he was knighted for his services to conservation, received the honour of Knighthood from the Queen at Buckingham Palace on the 27th February 1973 (London Gazette 6.3.1973). Between 1955 and 1981 he regularly appeared on the television, presenting the BBC Natural History series Look. A long time Vice President of the British Naturalists’ Association, he was honoured by Conservation and Zoological Societies both at home and abroad. In 1976 he was appointed a Commander (the highest class) of the Dutch Order of the Golden Ark, an Order of Knighthood founded in 1971 to honour outstanding wildlife conservationists; and in 1987 was created a Companion of Honour, ‘for services to conservation’ and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. Having achieved remarkable success in many fields, Sir Peter Scott died in Bristol on the 29th August 1989, two weeks prior to his 80th birthday.


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166 Miniature Awards: The C.B.E., D.S.C. and Bar Group of Nine worn by Sir Peter Scott Knight Bachelor’s Badge; The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Commander’s (C.B.E.) badge, silver-gilt and enamel; Distinguished Service Cross, G.VI.R., with Second Award Bar; 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star, with France and Germany Bar; Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf; United States of America, European, African, and Middle Eastern Campaign Medal 1941-45; Netherlands, Kingdom, Order of the Golden Ark, Commander’s badge, silver-gilt and enamel, nearly extremely fine, mounted court style as worn (9) £200-300 Note: The insignia of the C.H. is never represented in miniature.

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167 Royal Geographical Society Founders Gold Medal, by W. Wyon, 55mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1982), bust of William IV on obverse; Britannia on reverse; edge engraved ‘Sir Peter Scott 1983’, (BHM 1467; Eimer 1229), extremely fine, in Royal Mint, case of issue £400-500

168 Royal Society of Arts Albert Gold Medal, by L.C. Wyon, 56mm, gold (9Ct., 81.0g, Hallmarks for London 1970), bust of Prince Albert on obverse; Art, Industry, and Commerce on reverse; edge engraved ‘1970. Awarded to Peter Scott, C.B.E., D.S.C., For His Work in the Conservation of Wild Life’, (BHM 2786; Eimer 1566), extremely fine, in John Pinches, London, case of issue £1,000-1,400

Awarded annually since 1839 for the encouragement and promotion of geographical science an discovery. Since 1975 the gold medal has been struck in silver-gilt.

Established in 1864 and awarded annually in gold for outstanding contributions to the promotion of arts, manufactures, and commerce.

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170 The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds Gold Medal, 38mm, gold (9Ct., 25.9g, Hallmarks for Birmingham 1975), bird within reeds on obverse, the reverse engraved ‘Sir Peter Scott For Services to Bird Protection 1985’, extremely fine, in box of issue £100-150

169 World Wildlife Fund Gold Medal, 51mm, gold (18Ct., 107.0g), Giant Panda within wreath on obverse, the reverse engraved ‘Sir Peter Scott 1986’, extremely fine, together with the Bestowal Document appointing Peter Markham Scott as Vice-President and Founder Chairman of the British National Appeal of the World Wildlife Fund, dated 6.1.1977 £1,500-2,000

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171 171 The Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia Gold Medal, 39mm, gold (14Ct., 20.8g), mythical beast on obverse, the reverse engraved ‘Award for Distinction in Natural History Art Sir Peter Scott 1982’, extremely fine, in Franklin Mint case of issue National Zoological Park Medal, 93mm, silvered, the obverse embossed ‘For Outstanding Services to Zoological Sciences and Conservation Awarded to Sir Peter Scott’, extremely fine, in box of issue (2) £180-220 Sir Peter Scott was awarded the Medal of the National Zoological Park, Washington D.C., in 1989.

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173 The Zoological Society of San Diego Gold Medal for Conservation, 57mm, gilt, Walrus on obverse, the reverse engraved ‘In Appreciation Peter Markham Scott October 5, 1966’, extremely fine £150-200

172 New York Zoological Society Gold Medal, by Tiffany, New York, 42mm, gold (14Ct., 40.7g), long-horned ram and American Eagle on obverse, the reverse engraved ‘Sir Peter Scott For Contributions to the Cause of Wildlife the World Over’, extremely fine, in case of issue, together with Certificate electing Sir Peter Scott a Scientific Fellow of the New York Zoological Society, dated 2.12.1987 £400-500 Sir Peter Scott was awarded the New York Zoological Society’s Gold Medal in 1975. In 1993 the Society changed its name to the Wildlife Conservation Society.

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ARCTIC AND POLAR MEDALS

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174 Arctic Medal 1818-55, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, very fine £350-400 175 Arctic Medal 1875-76 (W.R. Edwards. Ship’s Stewd. Pandora.), good very fine, scarce £600-800 William Henry Edwards served as Ship’s Steward aboard the yacht Pandora during the Arctic Exploration, 3.6-2.11.1876. Two duplicate medals are listed as having been supplied, on 18.1.1893 and 19.11.1904. 33 Officers and Men from the Pandora received the Medal.

176 Polar Medal 1904, E.VII.R., bronze, no clasp (J.A. Chester “Morning” 1902-4), good very fine £2,400-2,800 James Arthur Chester, born Hull, 1876; served as an Able Seaman on the relief ship Morning during Scott’s Discovery Expedition, 1902-04. 24 bronze no clasp Polar Medals awarded to the crew of the Morning for her part in the relief expedition.

177 Polar Medal 1904, E.VII.R., bronze, no clasp (W. Clark “Terra Nova” 1903-4), good very fine £2,400-2,800 William Clark, a native of Dundee, Scotland, served as Assistant Cook on the relief ship Terra Nova during Scott’s Discovery Expedition, 1902-04. 31 bronze no clasp Polar medals awarded to the crew of the Terra Nova for her part in the relief expedition.

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178 The Important Polar Medal to Chief Petty Officer F.V. Browning, Royal Navy, A Member of the ‘Northern Party’ During Scott’s Last Antarctic Expedition, 1910-13 Polar Medal 1904, G.V.R., 1st type, silver, one clasp, Antarctic 1910-13 (206545 F.V. Browning, P.O. 2Cl. Terra Nova), contact marks, nearly very fine £4,000-6,000 Frank Vernon Browning born Stockland, Devon, 1882; joined Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, June 1900; advanced Petty Officer 2nd Class, November 1905; whilst serving in H.M.S. Talbot he was recruited for service in the Terra Nova as part of Scott’s ill-fated Antarctic Expedition 1910-13; was present during the Terra Nova’s stormy passage south, before serving in the “Northern Party” - a six-man team under Commander Victor Campbell, R.N., January 1911-January 1913; Campbell’s party arrived at Cape Adare, 18.2.1911, established a base and settled down for the winter; between July-October short journeys of exploration were made and extensive scientific observations taken; between 4th-20th October an exhaustive return journey across the bay over the pack ice was carried out; on the 6th January 1912 Campbell and his team were embarked in the Terra Nova to Evans Cove to carry out a six week expedition; two days later the Terra Nova sailed away with an agreed return date for collection of the 18th February; Campbell took six weeks’ rations for the party, with the intention of sledging across Wood Bay; the party were unable to carry out the proposed journey but did however carry out considerable surveying before returning to a depot they had established at Evans Cove, to await the arrival of the Terra Nova; however, the ice was against them, and the Terra Nova was unable to come and pick them up thus leaving the men stranded, with the prospect of surviving the imminent Polar winter with scant

rations and the wrong survival equipment; nine months of extreme hardship and privation ensued during which both courage and great endurance were shown by the 6 men; equipped with summer clothing, light tents and no hut they constructed an igloo and only left the limited warmth of it to hunt for seals or penguins; the men’s adaptability and ingenuity undoubtedly saved their lives against some of the harshest climatic conditions on the planet - due to the regular collapse of the entrance to the igloo, and as such the constant threat of asphyxiation, Browning and Petty Officer G.P. Abbott managed to design and construct a secure entrance made out of ski-sticks and ice blocks; to counter-act the prospect of long months in darkness, Browning and Seaman Dickason constructed a lamp made out of a strand of rope suspended from a “bridge” across the top of an Oxo-tin filled with melted blubber; with the arrival of more temperate weather in August, the weakened men set off on their sledges for Cape Evans, 30.9.1912; enroute they fortunately stumbled across the contents of an old depot left by Shackleton’s 1907-09 expedition; they arrived at Cape Roberts four weeks later, returning to Hut Point on the 6th November, here only to learn of the tragic fate of Scott and his party; Browning returned to the Royal Navy as Petty Officer 1st Class, and was serving in the cruiser Carnarvon at the outbreak of the Great War; served in the latter at the Battle of the Falklands, 8.12.1914, when she supported the Inflexible and the Invincible in their action against the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau; advanced Chief Petty Officer and served with Carnarvon until November 1917; subsequent service included at H.M.S. Defiant (Torpedo Establishment) and in the Titania (submarine depot ship); served in H.M.S. Warspite from January 1920, off Ireland during the Sinn Fein troubles; retired June 1922. Browning’s diary of the expedition is in the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge, and his diary for 1912 is in a New Zealand Museum.

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179 Pair: Able Seaman M. MacNeil, Royal Navy Polar Medal 1904, G.V.R., 1st type, bronze, no clasp (M. MacNeil, Able Seaman, “Aurora” 1917.); Coronation 1953, nearly extremely fine, last with named enclosure slip (2) £2,200-2,600 Malcolm MacNeil served as an Able Seaman in the Aurora for the relief of the Ross Sea Party, 1917, during Shackleton’s TransAntarctic Expedition. 21 bronze no clasp Polar Medals were awarded to the Aurora for her part in the relief expedition.

180 Polar Medal 1904, G.V.R., 2nd type, bronze, one clasp, Antarctic 1930-31 (Frank Best), polished, very fine £1,600-2,000 Frank Best, born East Hartlepool, 1890; served as a Fireman in Discovery during the second voyage of the British, Australian, New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, 1930-31. 18 bronze medals with this clasp were awarded for the expedition (London Gazette 1.5.1934 refers).

181 Polar Medal 1904, G.VI.R., bronze, one clasp, Antarctic 1929-33 (Edward William Saddler), extremely fine £2,500-3,000 Edward William Saddler served as Second Steward in Discovery II for five seasons, including winter voyages, in the Antarctic, 192933. 5 Polar Medals with ‘Antarctic 1929-33’ clasps were issued (London Gazette 7.10.1941), from a total of 82 G.VI.R. Bronze Polar Medals and four clasps.

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ROYAL NATIONAL LIFEBOAT INSTITUTION MEDALS

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182 Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life From Shipwreck Medal, silver, type 1 1824-62, obverse: head of King George IV facing left, with ‘second award’ silver boat (Mr. Richard Eddy, Voted 19 March 1834), engraved in upright serif capitals, the medal officially fitted with a thin silver frame carrying the naming details and the silver boat pendent below from two short silver chains, extremely fine and very rare, with eyelet suspension and riband ring, in contemporary fitted red leather case £1,500-2,000 Richard Eddy, Pilot, citation reads, ‘23 November 1824: A violent storm caused at least 22 vessels to be wrecked off Plymouth, Devon. Mr. Eddy launched his skiff to try to save as many people as possible. The Coromandel had been upset off the Eddystone Reef and had drifted for some hours before striking the break-water off Plymouth, two of her crew being washed overboard and drowned. With his crew, Mr. Eddy saved four survivors from the ship, which had been in passage from Faro to the Downs.’ Richard Eddy, Pilot, citation reads, ‘13-14 January 1843: The ship Konigsberg, enroute from Memel, Prussia to Lisbon, Portugal, was driven on to rocks near Plymouth, Devon during the night, and Mr. Eddy, with others, reached her with two large boats at 1am then tacked about until daylight when they anchored. Their two small boats were hoisted out and, in six trips each, the whole crew of the Master, Mate and ten men were brought off, one of the boats being upset on the third trip. This service seems to have been a family affair as included among Mr. Eddy’s crew were three sons and two sons-in-law.’ Richard Eddy had previously received a silver medal for the rescue in November 1824. The above R.N.I.P.L.S. Medal is 1 of 6 Silver Medals awarded with ‘Boats’. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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183 Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life From Shipwreck Medal, silver, type 1 1824-62, obverse: head of King George IV facing left (Lieut. John Sargeant R.N. Voted. 5 Jan: 1831.), engraved in upright serif capitals, good very fine, pierced at top, as issued, with silver ring suspension £550-650 John Sargeant, Lieutenant, R.N., H.M. Coastguard, Budleigh Salterton, citation reads, ‘6 December 1830: The brig Unity was driven ashore near Exmouth, Devon, during a violent storm. The Manby rocket apparatus failed because the line broke. Lieutenant Sargeant went into the surf with a rope and with the assistance of two of his crew and several inhabitants succeeded in saving the whole crew of seven.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

184 Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life From Shipwreck Medal, silver, type 1 1824-62, obverse: head of King George IV facing left (Lieut. Sydenham Wylde. R.N. Voted 21 March 1838), engraved in upright serif capitals, letter ‘E’ of surname officially corrected, light pitting to obverse, very fine, with integral band, eyelet suspension and riband ring £500-600 Sydenham Wylde, Lieutenant, R.N., H.M. Coastguard, Caister, citation reads, ‘25 February 1838: With two Coastguardmen Wylde saved the crew of the Shields schooner Lapwing when she went aground in a storm at Caister, Norfolk. He got a rope on board the schooner,

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enabling a hawser to be hauled ashore, by which the Master and eight men were saved at one time. Lieutenant Wylde narrowly escaped drowning.’ Lieutenant Sydenham Wylde, R.N., joined the Royal Navy as Volunteer 1st Class, 1816; served in H.M.S. Minden at Algiers, and in H.M.S. Eden in operations against pirates in the Persian Gulf; as Mate of H.M.S. Boadicea he commanded her cutter in the attack on Melloone during the Burmese War and was promoted Lieutenant for his services in December 1826; served with the Coastguard from 1836, until his death in 1845. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

185 Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life From Shipwreck Medal, silver, type 1 1824-62, obverse: head of King George IV facing left (Mr. Robt. Parrott Voted 6 March 1856.), engraved in upright serif capitals, partially officially corrected, very fine, with a replacement silver swivel ring suspension, mounted for wear £340-380 Robert Parrott, Chief Boatman, H.M. Coastguard, Tenby, citation reads, ‘For long service covering 21 years in which the main services were to vessel The Teignmouth (1835), vessel Joseph and Ann (1840), brig Ellen (1850), vessel Queen of the West (1854) and schooners Agenoria and Alexandre (1855).’ The schooner Joseph and Ann, 106 tons, was built at Weymouth in 1820 and operated out of Torquay on a regular run to Bristol.

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186 A Scarce and Particularly Fine ‘Triple’ Service Award R.N.I.P.L.S. Medal Group of Three to Coxswain, Later Chief Officer, R.O. Johns, H.M. Coastguard, Tramore, Ireland Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., narrow suspension (R.O. Johns. Chf. Boatn. In Chge. H.M. Coast Guard.); Royal National Institution for the Preservation of Life From Shipwreck Medal, silver, type 1 1824-62, obverse: head of King George IV facing left, with clasp for ‘Second Service’, reverse dated ‘Voted 6th February 1868.’, clasp for ‘Third Service’, reverse dated ‘Voted 7th Octr. 1869.’ (Richard O. Johns. Voted 7 March 1861.), engraved in upright serif capitals, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, in fitted case of issue; France, Ministére de la Marine, Silver medal for lifesaving, reverse named to recipient and dated 1867 in relief, generally very fine (3) £2,000-2,500 Richard O. Johns, Coxswain, Tramore Lifeboat, in joint citation, with three others all of whom received silver awards, reads, ‘17 February 1861: At daybreak the Greek brig San Spiridione from Galaxidhi on the Gulf of the Corinth, laden with coal, was seen ashore in Tramore Bay, Co. Waterford, Ireland, where she had been driven during the night in a southerly gale. The Tramore lifeboat was launched through very high surf, but she had to return to shore with her crew exhausted. Replaced on her carriage, she was drawn to a better position and, manned by another volunteer crew, succeeded in almost closing with the wreck, but the brig’s crew refused to leave her. The lifeboat was upset by a heavy wave, her crew was thrown in to the water - three of them regained the boat and the other five reached the shore. After a while, the brig started to break up and her crew was thrown in to the surf by the falling masts; the lifeboat was launched for a third time and saved two of them. Two others were

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saved by Mr. Budd and Mr. Stephens going into the surf, the former on his horse from which he was washed off twice. Mr. Reade was in the lifeboat when she upset and Mr. Johns went out in charge on all three occasions.’ Second Service, in joint citation with Martin Norris, Crew Member, Tramore Lifeboat (also received a silver award), reads, ‘12-13 1868: Late in the evening of the 12th with a strong south-easterly gale blowing, the large iron ship Oasis of Liverpool was seen driving into Brown’s Bay where she struck west of the Metal Man, Newtown Head, near Tramore, Co. Waterford, Ireland. The Tramore self-righting lifeboat Tom Egan launched within half an hour but had great difficulty with the breakers. After prolonged exertions, she managed to reach the wreck at midnight. The Captain and two men had already been washed overboard from the casualty and drowned. Using an anchor, the lifeboat veered down and was able to take 20 survivors off the jib boom. The following day, they put out again after another man had been seen in the rigging. Mr. Norris boarded the wreck with difficulty and recovered the exhausted man; seven others had made the shore in the ship’s longboat.’ Third Service, citation reads, ‘For long and gallant services in acting as Coxswain to save the lives of a number of shipwrecked men.’ The medal was given when he left the station on promotion. Services in this period included those to the brig San Spiridione (1863), the schooner Sarah (1864), the brig Steffania (1865), the schooner Anemone and the barque Wild Horse (1867) and the ship Oasis (1868). The only vessel for which details are available is the Oasis. A full rigged iron ship built by Jones, Quiggin & Co. in Liverpool, 1861, she was registered at 1,117 tons and measured 213 feet in length with a 34 and half foot beam. Costing £16,533 and owned by Fletcher’s, she traded out of Liverpool to India and was under the command of Captain H. Parsall at the time of her loss. 1 of only 10 ‘Triple’ Service Silver, G.IV.R., R.N.L.I.P.S. Medals awarded. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995


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187 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left, with clasp for ‘Second Service’, reverse dated ‘Voted 7th. Jany. 1869.’ (Mr. Thomas Carbis. Voted 1st Feby. 1866.), engraved in mixed styles, suspension slack, edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £800-1,200 Thomas Carbis, Coxswain, Penzance Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘11 January 1866: The new screw-collier Bessie of Hayle went ashore on Hayle Bar in the estuary of the River Hayle, Cornwall, and became firmly embedded in the sand. Her nine man crew took to the foretop, and the St. Ives lifeboat Moses was taken to the spot together with rocket apparatus. In the mountainous seas, the range was too great for the rockets and the lifeboat had insufficient power to reach her, and a telegram was sent to Penzance seeking help from the self-righting class lifeboat Richard Lewis, which was despatched at once. After a journey of 50 miles around Land’s End, Coxswain Carbis brought his boat into St. Ives and both lifeboats set off. The Moses was the first to reach the casualty and picked up one of her crew who had fallen overboard, then, after a long struggle, both boats returned to the shore with the Master and eight members of the crew.’ Second Service, in joint citation with four others, all of whom received silver awards, reads, ‘6 December 1868: The Southampton barque North Britain, inward bound from Quebec with a 950 ton cargo of timber, mistook her position in the mist at daybreak, entered Mount’s Bay and found herself embayed in the northern corner. She dropped anchor off St. Michael’s Mount but the cable parted three times and, by noon, the barque was in the surf being driven ashore between the Mount and Longrock by a ferocious gale. The Penzance self-righting lifeboat Richard Lewis reached her in just over an hour, but seven lives had already been lost in an attempt by the barque’s boat to reach safety; another four men had been saved by rocket apparatus when they neared the shore. A great sea struck the lifeboat as she was pulling under the barque’s stern and capsized her nearly killing Coxswain Carbis who was trapped but was recovered in a disabled condition. Mr. Higgans, although barely able to stand, took control and, with Captain Cay’s help, took the lifeboat back to shore. Afresh crew was put on board with Mr. Blackmore as Coxswain and Mr. Higgs in the crew. Through tremendous wind and sea to reach the wreck and took off the remaining eight men shortly before the masts went and the vessel broke up.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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188 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. John Marshall, Junr., Voted Decr. 3rd, 1874), engraved in mixed styles, virtually mint state, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, silver riband buckle and in fitted case of issue; with an open-faced silver pocket-watch, with silver dial and gold numerals, by R. Richardson, Seaham, the inner dome engraved ‘John Marshall, 1876’, in good condition and in working order, with key (lot) £700-1,000 John Marshall, Junior, Second Coxswain, Seaham Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘29 November 1874: The Wells schooner Lady Ann was driven by heavy seas against Seaham North Pier, Co. Durham, and wrecked. Three of her crew were saved by lines thrown on board from the Seaham lifeboat Sisters Carter of Harrogate, but her Master, entangled in the rigging, was too enfeebled to save himself. Mr. Marshall went on board, but, before he could reach him, the Master was washed overboard and lost.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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189 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. Thomas Bate. Voted 7th April. 1881.), engraved in mixed styles, suspension claw slack, light contact marks, therefore very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £450-550 Thomas Bate, Coxswain, Bude Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘31 December 1880: The Bude ketch Stucley, on passage from Mumbles to Bude with coal, was wrecked in squally weather on Bude breakwater, Cornwall. Mr. Bate and his crew saved her crew of three men by means of lifelines and a hawser.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

190 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left, with clasp for ‘Second Service’, reverse dated ‘14th Decr. 1893’ (Mr. James Woodgate Voted 10th December 1891.), engraved in mixed styles, good very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £700-900 James Woodgate, Coxswain, Dover Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘In consideration of his valuable services during the twentyone years he has occupied that position (Coxswain). During

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that period Coxswain Woodgate had been out in the boat sixteen times on service and assisted to save twenty-four lives.’ Prominent among the services were those to the sloop Edith (1876), the barque Chin Chin (1881), the ship Macduff (1886) and the Government Dredger No. 18 (1891). Second Service, citation reads, 20-21 November 1893: The Norwegian barque Johanne Marie went aground on a sandbank in the early morning of the 20th, half a mile offshore at Lade, north of Dungeness, Kent. The morning was spent in efforts by the Littlestone and Dungeness lifeboats to try to reach her but, at 2pm, a telegram asking to help was received at Dover. The self-righting lifeboat Lewis Morice was launched and taken to the scene under tow by the steam tug Lady Vita. She arrived at 5.30pm. No attempt was possible that night, due to the intense darkness, torrential rain and a violent easterly gale. The lifeboat remained in the area all that wet and bitterly cold night until it sighted the wreck at 7am. Mr. Woodgate went alongside and snatched seven survivors from the rigging (four others had drowned), and passed them to the tug which towed the lifeboat back to Dover. This service lasted 28 hours.’ The barque Chin Chin, 342 tons, was built at Sunderland in 1868, owned by W.T. Pugsley and traded out of London. The iron full-rigged sailing ship MacDuff, 1,235 tons, was built and owned by McMillan’s of Dumbarton in 1877 and registered in Glasgow. The wooden barque Johanne Marie, 633 tons, was built at Bremerhaven in 1862 and owned by Westergaard & Co. of Christiania (the former name of the Norwegian capital Oslo). PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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191 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Lieut. H.T. Gartside Tipping. R.N. Voted 12th May 1892), engraved in mixed styles, nearly extremely fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £700-900 Henry Thomas Gartside-Tipping, Lieutenant, R.N., District Inspector of Lifeboats, citation reads, Awarded ‘in high appreciation of his zealous and efficient services... in acknowledgement of the risk of life he frequently incurred in the Life-boat service.’ Lieutenant Gartside-Tipping had filled the post of Inspector of the Irish District for 13 years and had resigned in consequence of private affairs. He invented the Tipping’s plates, named after him, which enabled a heavy lifeboat to be transported on her carriage over deep and soft sand. Lieutenant-Commander H.T. Gartside-Tipping joined the Royal Navy as Cadet, 1860; Sub-Lieutenant 1867; promoted Lieutenant, 1870, after a tour in the Royal Yacht Victoria & Albert, and left the service in 1874; held the post of Inspector of Lifeboats (Irish District), 1879-1892; with the outbreak of the Great War, despite his age, re-engaged for service as Lieutenant-Commander, 1914; he was assigned to the famous Dover Patrol and given command of the steam yacht Sanda which had been hired by the Admiralty as an auxiliary patrol vessel and armed with two 6 pdrs; on the evening of 24th September 1915, a large flotilla sailed from Dover to bombard Zeebrugge and Ostend in response to a request from the Army to create a diversion whilst they carried out a key offensive on the Western Front; the Sanda was part of the Ostend force and, arriving there the next morning, the bombardment commenced at 7am; two hours later the enemy heavy batteries opened fire and at 9.15am the Sanda received a direct hit below the bridge; all of her executive officers, including Gartside-Tipping, were killed instantly; only 13 of her complement of 26 survived her sinking; as if this was not tragic enough, Gartside-Tipping, having by then become something of a celebrity as the oldest

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naval officer serving afloat, had been presented to King George V only two days previously during the King’s inspection of the Dover Patrol; the incident, and the Ostend operation, are both recalled in Admiral Sir Reginald Bacon’s memoirs’ The (Concise) Story of the Dover Patrol, the author also offers his own obituary for Gartside-Tipping when he writes: “This gallant officer returned to the Navy on the outbreak of war at an age when most men are beyond active service, being over seventy years of age, and undertook the duties of Captain of a yacht in the Dover Command in spite of the arduous work and exposure which the performance of his duties entailed.”

192 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (William Crawford Esq. Voted 9th November 1893), engraved in mixed styles, good very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £400-500 William Crawford, Honorary Secretary, Margate R.N.L.I., citation reads, ‘Awarded on his retirement from the post of Honorary Secretary having held that office for many years and, previously, a member of the local committee. He had been out in the lifeboat on many occasions to the assistance of the crews of vessels in distress.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995


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193 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. William Hooke. Voted 10th Decr. 1896.), engraved in mixed styles, edge bruise, very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £400-500

194 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. H. Trewhella Voted 11th March 1897.), engraved in mixed styles, minor official correction to ‘h’ of surname, extremely fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, in damaged fitted case of issue £500-600

William Hooke, Coxswain, Blakeney Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘Awarded on Mr. Hooke’s retirement from the post of Coxswain during which period services were given to the barque Amana (1865), a Pilot coble (1866). the sloop Emma (1867), the schooner Gypsy (1869), the brigs John and Mary and Ravensworth (1870) and H.M.S. Beaver (1885).’ Despite the above statement, there was no H.M.S. Beaver in commission in the Royal Navy in 1885; this is probably a simple error in transcription. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

H. Trewhella, Coxswain, Penzance Lifeboat, citation reads, On his retirement ‘in acknowledgement of his long and gallant services in saving life from shipwreck’. For the last six years, Mr. Trewhella served in the post of Coxswain, during which period services were given to the schooner Joseph Nicholson (1891), the schooner Express (1892), a man who fell from the quay (1892) and the barque Lady Gladys (4th March 1897). The wooden barque Lady Gladys, 1,384 tons, was built by Putnam at Maitland, Nova Scotia, in 1874; by 1897 she was in Norwegian ownership and registered at Tönsberg (Norway). PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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195 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. William Todd. Voted 14th July. 1898.), engraved in mixed styles, good very fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension £400-500 William Todd, Coxswain, Gorelston No. 2 Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘Awarded on Mr. Todd’s resignation from the post of Coxswain. Services were rendered to the smack Sir John Astley (1885), the dandy Morning Star (1888), the trawler Favourite and the dandy Belinda (1890), the yawl Kate (1891), the dandy Hiram (1893), the dandy Fraternité (1894), the dandy Coquette (1895) and the smack Follow (1897)’. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

196 Three: Chief Officer Frank Kent, H.M. Coastguard, Sandwich Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., narrow suspension (F. Kent. Qr. Mr. H.M.S. Beagle.); Board of Trade, large Silver medal for lifesaving, 58mm. (Wreck of the Eclipse on the 19th November 1893), in fitted case of issue; Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 2 1862-1903, obverse: head of Queen Victoria with chaple of oak leaves facing left (Mr. Frank Kent, Voted 14th Dcr. 1898.), engraved in mixed styles, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, generally good very fine or better, original certificate mounted on card (lot) £1,200-1,400 Frank Kent, Chief Officer, H.M. Coastguard, Sandwich, citation reads, ‘18 November 1893: With four other men, Chief Officer Kent put off in the Coastguard gig in an attempt to help the Ramsgate ketch Eclipse, which had stranded at night in Minnis Bay, off Broadstairs, Kent, in a whole northerly gale and a heavy sea. Unable to reach the ketch because of the conditions, they lost sight of her, and returned to shore. They put off again at daylight, made contact with the casualty and rescued the only man aboard.’ PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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April 21, 2011 - London

197

197 An Extremely Rare ‘E.VII.R.’ R.N.L.I. Lifesaving Pair to J.D. Armstrong, Colliery Bank Keeper, Northumberland Rocket Apparatus Volunteer Long Service Medal, G.V.R. (John Armstrong); Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 3 1903-12, obverse: bust of King Edward VII in ermine cape facing left (Mr. John Dawson Armstrong, Voted 12th May 1910), engraved in mixed styles, suspension slack on last, otherwise extremely fine, last with double-sided ‘dolphin’ suspension, both in fitted cases of issue (2) £1,200-1,600 John Dawson Armstrong, Colliery Bank Keeper, citation reads, ‘18 April 1910: The Newbiggin coble Sunbeam was seen to capsize in a southerly gale in Druridge Bay, near Hauxley, Northumberland. Sending one their number to alert Hauxley lifeboat, Mr. Armstrong and four others put off in a small coble and succeeded in picking up the three men clinging to the casualty. With eight men on board, the rescue craft was seriously over loaded and, on the timely arrival of the lifeboat Mary Andrew, they transferred to her and were landed at Hauxley with despatch.’ Only 3 Gold and 75 Silver medals were issued during the period 1903-11 and bear the effigy of King Edward VII, although 8 silver clasps were also granted for additional service. PROVENANCE:

J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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198 198 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, silver, type 4 1912-37, obverse: head of King George V facing left, with clasp for ‘Second Service’, reverse dated ‘Voted 17th Feb. 1922.’, this with minor official correction (George Cromarty. Voted 8th Dec. 1916.), engraved in upright serif capitals, extremely fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, with riband brooch and in fitted case of issue £1,400-1,800 George Cromarty, Coxswain, Holy Island No. 2 Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘19-20 November 1916: The Gothenburg barque Jolani was seen to be drifting dangerously near to Emmanuel Head on Holy Island but succeeded in weathering it, and it became apparent that she would drive ashore in the neighbourhood of Goswick, Northumberland. The self-righting lifeboat Edward and Eliza was called at 2.40pm. Men and horses went to the boathouse two and a half miles away and transported the lifeboat on her carriage six miles over sands churned up by the waves. For four and a half miles of the journey, they were forced to wade through water two and a half feet deep. When they drew nearer the wreck they saw her crew of 14 men gathered on her stern - the only part not submerged. Although repeatedly thrown back by the violence of the waves, the lifeboat was finally launched successfully. The wreck was drifting northwards in a raging east-south-east hurricane with seas breaking over her. After unsuccessful attempts, Coxswain Cromarty eventually managed to get a line aboard and all the 14 men were brought off, the lifeboat being beached at Cheswick, three miles further north. After being given rest and refreshment at the Goswick Golf Club House, the lifeboat crew went home by cart and returned in the afternoon to collect the boat.’ Second Service, in joint citation with William Wilson and Thomas A. Bowman (both of the Holy Island Lifeboat and both received Bronze awards) reads, ‘15-16 January 1922: At 8pm in a strong south-easterly gale, heavy sea and a snow storm, the trawler James B. Graham went ashore on the rocks off False Emmanuel Head on the north side of Holy Island, off the Northumberland coast. The whole village turned out in the dark and snow to launch the lifeboat - it needed 60 helpers, and women waded out waist deep into the sea to help. When the self right lifeboat Lizzie Porter arrived at the sight of the wreck, the trawler was found lying in a perilous position by rocks and iron remnants of an old wreck. An unsuccessful attempt having been made, Coxswain Cromarty lay off for two hours for the tide to rise, but the next attempt also failed. After another hour, he veered his boat carefully down, took off the nine men and returned to station at 2am.’ The wooden barque Jolani, 881 tons, was built by J. Ahlers at Elsfleth in 1876 and was in Swedish ownership and registry for her entire life. PROVENANCE: J.B. Hayward Collection, November 1995

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April 21, 2011 - London

199 199 Royal National Lifeboat Institution Medal, bronze, type 5 1937-to date, obverse: head of Sir William Hillary Bart., the founder, facing left (John Watters, Voted 15th May, 1947.), engraved in upright serif capitals, extremely fine, with uniface ‘dolphin’ suspension, in fitted case of issue, with original illuminated vellum certificate from the R.N.L.I. voting the medal and a photograph of the recipient (lot) £600-800 John Watters, Coxswain, Fowey Lifeboat, citation reads, ‘23 March 1947: With Coxswain Watters in charge, the Watson class reserve lifeboat The Brothers launched at 4.40am, in a whole gale, a dark night and heavy seas. The auxiliary m.v. Empire Contamar had run on to Callyvardor Rock, Par Bay, Cornwall, but the Coxswain had to search the bay before he found her, fast on the rock with only her bow and poop visible. The seven man crew was waist deep in water on the poop. In a difficult operation a line was got on board, the men were taken off and all landed at Fowey, 50 minutes after the lifeboat had reached the wreck.’ Watters was awarded the bronze medal, a copy of the vote of the medal inscribed on vellum and a reward of £2 in addition to the ordinary scale reward of £1. Each member of the crew was rewarded with £2 in addition to the ordinary scale reward of £1.

Coxswain J. Watters

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CAMPAIGN GROUPS AND PAIRS

200 200 Pair: Private A. Holmes, 42nd Foot Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Fuentes d’Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Toulouse (Arthur Holmes, 42nd. Foot.); Waterloo 1815 (Arthur Holmes, 42nd or R.H.Reg. Infantry.), with contemporary silver ring and loop suspension, latter partially officially corrected, minor edge bruise, very fine, both with top silver riband buckles (2) £3,500-4,000 Private Arthur Holmes, born Rosskeen, Ross-shire; enlisted in the 2nd Battalion, 42nd Foot, February 1807; served with the Regiment during the Peninsula War; transferred 1st Battalion, 42nd Foot, May 1812; served with the Regiment during the Waterloo Campaign as part of Captain Daniel McIntosh’s Company, 16-18.6.1815, and was wounded in the head and neck at Waterloo; discharged, June 1824, after 19 years and 146 days with the Colours.

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201 201 The Regimentally Unique M.G.S. and Waterloo ‘Pair’ to Captain W.H. Armstrong, 19th Light Dragoons, Aide-de-Camp to Major-General Sir John Vandeleur for the Peninsula Campaign and also at the Battle of Waterloo, 1815 Military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nivelle, Nive (W. Armstrong, Lieut. 19th. Lt. Dragns. & A.D.C.); Waterloo 1815 (Capt. Wm. Armstrong, 19th Lt. Dragoons. A.D.C.), with contemporary silver eyelet and straight bar suspension, last contemporarily renamed in engraved upright serif capitals, very fine, both with original ribands (2) £3,500-4,500 Captain William Henry Armstrong commissioned Cornet 19th Light Dragoons, 1809, and advanced Lieutenant in June of the following year; served as ADC to Major-General Sir John Vandeleur (to whom he was related), September 1811-April 1814; he was present in that capacity at Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Vittoria, Nivelle, Nive and at the Siege of Bayonne; ADC to Vandeleur at Waterloo, where the latter commanded the 4th Cavalry Brigade, and by the end of the day had succeeded to the command of the entire cavalry; advanced Captain (Half Pay) Royal African Corps, August 1819; Armstrong resided at Farney Castle, Thurles, Tipperary, which had been in the family since 1660, and on the death of Vandeleur in 1849, he inherited the Squadron Guidons of the old 19th Light Dragoons. The main beneficiary from the sale of this lot will be the charity Help for Heroes. Please see www.helpforheroes.org.uk for more information.

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202 x202 Five: Captain W. Keily, Bengal Veteran Establishment, Late Sergeant Major 1st Light Cavalry and Gunner, Artillery Army of India 1799-1826, long hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Bhurtpoor (Gunner W. Reily [sic] Regt. of Arty.), officially engraved in running script, India; Cabul 1842, suspension re-affixed, naming details erased, with scroll suspension; Maharajpoor Star 1843 (Serg Major W. Keily 1st Regt Light Cavalry), with original brass rivets and contemporary silver ornate scroll suspension bar; Sutlej 1845-46, for Ferozeshuhur, one clasp, Sobraon (Serjt. W: Kieley [sic] Commt. Dept.); Indian Mutiny 1857-58, no clasp (Captn. Wm. Keily Veteran Esce.), last contemporarily renamed in running script, contact marks throughout, generally nearly very fine or better (5) £1,400-1,800 Captain William Keily, commissioned Bengal Veteran Establishment, 31.5.1852, War Services of Officers of The Bengal Army, 1863, gives the following, ‘Lieutenant Keily served at the siege and capture of Bhurtpore, ‘25, ‘26 (Medal). With the Force in Afghanistan, under General Pollock. Present at the forcing of the Khyber Pass, and in all subsequent operations leading to the occupation of Cabul, including those in the Mazeena Valley (Medal). Present at the battle of Maharajpore. (Bronze Star). Served during the Campaign on the Sutlej, including the actions of Ferozeshuhur and Sobraon. (Medal and clasp).’ ‘Keily’ or ‘Reily’ does not appear on the published transcription of the Army of India Medal Roll, however, this is not unusual for a medal claimed in India. This also appears to be the case for his Indian Mutiny Medal, probably due to similar circumstances.

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203 Pair: Captain J.D. Cowell, 3rd Light Dragoons Cabul 1842 (Lieut. J.D. Cowell. 3d K.O.Lt. Drags.), officially re-engraved, with silver clip and hinged straight bar suspension; Sutlej 1845-46, for Moodkee, Ferozeshuhur, Sobraon (Lieut. J:D: Cowell 3rd Lt. Dragns.), severe edge bruising to last, therefore good fine or better (2) £1,000-1,200 Captain James Cowell, commissioned Cornet 3rd Light Dragoons, 1834; Lieutenant 1837, served with the regiment ‘throughout the campaign of 1842 in Afghanistan (Medal), and was present at the forcing of the Khyber Pass, capture of Mamoo Khail, stroming the heights of Jugdulluck, actions of Tezeen and Huft Kotal, and occupation of Cabool’; served as ADC to Sir Joseph Thackwell at Maharajpoor (medal); during the Sutlej Campaign he had his Charger killed under him at Ferozeshuhur; served as Deputy-Assistant-QuarterMaster-General of the Cavalry Division for the close of the campaign; Captain 1848.


April 21, 2011 - London x204 Pair: Surgeon T.E. Dempster, Bengal Horse Artillery Sutlej 1845-46, for Sobraon, no clasp (Surgn. T:E: Dempster 1st. Brigade H: Ay.); Punjab 1848-49, one clasp, Mooltan (Surgn. T.E. Dempster, 1st. Bde. H. Arty.), good very fine (2) £500-700 205 Three: Private H. Huggins, 97th Foot Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol, clasp loose on riband as issued (Henry Huggins 97. Foot.), Regimentally impressed; Turkish Crimea, British die, pierced as issued, with contemporary silver ring and straight bar suspender engraved ‘Crimea’; Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Hy., Huggins, 97th. Regt.), heavy contact marks, fine, mounted as worn in this order (3) £300-350

204

206 206 Three: Major General T.A. de Moleyns, Royal Artillery Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Sebastopol (Lieut. Aremberg de Moleyns, Royal Artillery.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif upper and lower case, top lugs neatly removed; Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp, Fenian Raid 1866 (Capt. T.A. De Moleyns, 4/Bde: R.A.); Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die, Officer’s Hunt and Roskill pattern, (T.A. De Moleyns, Lieut. R.A.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, light contact marks to 1st, therefore very fine (3) £700-900 Major General Townsend Aremberg de Moleyns, born 1838, the grandson of Major The Honourable Edward Mullins - the family changed their name by Royal Licence to de Moleyns, 16.2.1841; commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, 1855; Captain 1862; Major 1872; advanced Major General 1885. For the Army Gold Medal awarded to Major the Hon. Edward Mullins, the grandfather of Major General T.A. de Moleyns, see Lot 307.

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207

210

207 Pair: Private W. Harris, 8th Foot Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Wm. Harris, 1st. Bn. 8th. Regt.); Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (1955. Wm. Harris, 1st. Bn. 8th. Foot,), very fine, both with ornate top silver riband buckles (2) £350-400

209 Pair: Private J. Ward, Leicestershire Regiment, Late East Yorkshire Regiment Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (1444. Pte. J. Ward. 2/15th. Foot.); India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1887-89 (2255 Pte. J. Ward. 2d. Bn. Leic. R.), suspension slack on last, nearly very fine (2) £180-220

1955 Private William Harris, born Bridgewater, Somerset, October 1824; enlisted in the 8th Foot, April 1842; awarded Long Service & G.C. Medal together with a gratuity of £5; discharged October 1863, after 21 years and 19 days with the Colours, of which 14 years and 23 days were spent in India

x208 A Scarce ‘Double Issue’ I.G.S. Pair to Sergeant C. Byrne, 80th Foot India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Bhootan (603. Corpl. C. Byrne H.M’s. 80th. Regt.); India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Perak (603. Sergt. C. Byrne. 80th. Foot.), good very fine (2) £400-450 603 Sergeant Christopher Byrne, born Dublin, 1841; enlisted in the 80th Foot, July 1859; promoted Corporal, March 1865; Sergeant, March 1874; discharged, March 1880, after 20 years and 298 days with the Colours, of which 6 years were spent in India; 3 years in the Strait Settlements; and 3 years in South Africa.

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x210 Pair: Sergeant Major W.K. Wilson, Brabant’s Horse Cape of Good Hope General Service Medal 1880-97, one clasp, Transkei (Sgt. Maj. W.K. Wilson.. P.A.Burg.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony (703 Tpr. W.K. Wilson. Brabant’s Horse.), minor edge bruise to first, good very fine (2) £280-320


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211

211 A Scarce Campaign Combination Group of Four to Chief Stoker E. Goodwin, Royal Navy East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, Witu 1890 (E. Goodwin, Sto., H.M.S. Turquoise.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, no clasp (E. Goodwin, Ch. Sto. H.M.S. Terrible.); China 1900, one clasp, Taku Forts (E. Goodwin, Ch. Sto., H.M.S. Fame.); Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., narrow suspension (Edwin Goodwin, Ch. Sto. H.M.S. Terrible.), contact marks throughout, therefore nearly very fine or better (4) £700-800 130321 Chief Stoker Edwin Goodwin, born Rainham, Kent, 1866; enlisted Royal Navy as Stoker 2nd Class, 1885; served as Stoker in H.M.S. Turquoise, September 1887-June 1891; served as Chief Stoker in H.M.S. Terrible, September 1899-May 1900 and in H.M.S. Fame, January 1902-January 1902 (L.S. & G.C. 4.5.1900); joined the Reserve, 28.1.1907.

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212

212 Six: Captain W.B. Drake [O.B.E.], South Wales Borderers, Late Devonshire Regiment, Damant’s Horse and Salisbury Horse British South Africa Company Medal 1890-97, for Matabeleland 1893, one clasp, Rhodesia 1896 (Troopr. W.B. Drake. Salisbury Horse.); Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, eight clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen (Lieut. W.B. Drake, Damant’s Horse), top lugs removed; King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (Lieut. W.B. Drake. W. Province. M.R.); 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut: W.B. Drake. Devon R.); British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Capt. W.B. Drake.), remnants of lacquer, contact marks throughout, therefore generally very fine (6) £600-700 O.B.E. London Gazette 3.6.1919 Drake, Capt. William Barnard, S.W. Bord. ‘For valuable services rendered in connection with military operations in Mesopotamia.’ Captain William Barnard Drake, O.B.E., born 1871, the son of Sir W.H. Drake, K.C.B.; educated at Sherborne; served in the ranks, Salisbury Horse, during operations in Matabeleland; commissioned into Damant’s Horse for service during the Boer War 1899-1902; served during the Great War in the Egyptian theatre of War, 1915-16; advanced Captain 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers, 15.8.1916; served as part of Embarkation Staff, Mesopotamia, 1916-18 (O.B.E.; M.I.D. London Gazette 5.6.1919); retired 22.1.1920; resided in later life at Cotmaton House, Sidmouth, Devon.

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213

213 Four: Colonel E. G. Curtis [C.M.G.], Northamptonshire Regiment India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (Lieut. E.G. Curtis. 1st. Bn. Bedford Regt.); 1914-15 Star (Lt. Col. E.G. Curtis North’n R.); British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Col. E.G. Curtis.), lacquered, extremely fine (4) £400-500 C.M.G. London Gazette 3.6.1916 Lt.-Col. Edward George Curtis, R. of O., North’n R., T.F. ‘For services rendered in connection with Military Operations in the Field.’ Colonel Edward George Curtis, C.M.G., born November 1868, the son of Major-General Reginald Curtis, Royal Artillery; educated at Westminster School, Cheltenham College, and R.M.C. Sandhurst; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Bedfordshire Regiment, August 1888; Lieutenant, August 1890; served with the Chitral Relief Force under Sir Robert Low in 1895 with the 1st Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment, and present at the storming of the Malakand Pass and the engagement near Khar; Captain, September 1896; appointed Adjutant, 4th Volunteer Battalion, 26.1.1901; Major, 2.5.1908; Lieutenant-Colonel, 6.8.1914; Commanded the 4th Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment during the Great War, and served with it at Gallipoli, 1915; and in Egypt with the British Expeditionary Force, 1916-19; Four times Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 13.7.1916, 28.11.1917, 11.6.1918, and 5.6.1919). Colonel Curtis died in March 1923.

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214

x214 Three: Sapper A. Worboys, Royal Engineers Queen’s Sudan 1896-98 (25296. Sap: A. Worboys. R.E.), suspension claw slack; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, six clasps, Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (25296, Sapr. A. Worboys, R.E.); Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, two clasps, The Atbara, Khartoum (25296. Sap. A. Worboys. Royal Engineers.), top lugs of last filled, generally good very fine (3) £340-380 25296 Sapper A. Worboys served with the 17th Field Company Royal Engineers during the Second Boer War, and is list on the medal roll as having “Died”.

215 Four: Private B. Ginn, Devon Regiment India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (3093 Pte. B. Ginn 1st. Bn. Devon Regt.), suspension slack; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Elandslaagte, Defence of Ladysmith, Belfast (3093 Pte. B. Ginn, Devon: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (3093 Pte. B. Ginn. Devon: Regt.); Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (3093 Pte. B. Ginn. Devon Regt.), contact marks, good fine or better, together with the recipient’s Army Pay Book (4) £450-500 3093 Private Benjamin Ginn, born Greenwich; enlisted in the Devon Regiment, September 1890; served with the Regiment in India from January 1893 and took part in the Perak Expedition on the North West Frontier; served in South Africa from September 1899 and present at the actions of Elandslaagte, the Defence of Ladysmith, and operations in the Transvaal; discharged 1910. Private Ginn served as a Bandsman, playing the clarinet. After leaving the Army he became a postman and belonged to the Glamorgan Yeomanry (Territorial Army), playing in their Regimental Band. After the Second World War he played for St. Peter’s Military Band, and played with the band at all the major rugby internationals at the Cardiff Arms Park. For the medals to Private Henry Ginn, brother of Benjamin Ginn, see the following Lot.

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April 21, 2011 - London

215

216 Three: Private H. Ginn, Devon Regiment India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (1730 Pte. H. Ginn 1st. Bn. Devon Regt.), suspension slack; Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Elandslaagte, Defence of Ladysmith, Belfast (1730 Pte. H. Ginn. Devon: Regt.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (1730 Pte. H. Ginn. Devon: Regt.), contact marks, very fine, together with the recipient’s cap badge, all housed in a fitted case (3) £380-420

x217 Pair: Private F. Payne, 2nd Dragoons Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (4595 Pte. W. Payne. 2nd Dragoons.); King’s South Africa, two clasps (4595 Pte. F. Payne. 2nd Drgns:), contact marks, therefore nearly very fine or better (2) £140-180

218 Pair: Private D. Doyle, King’s Own Scottish Borderers Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (7079 Pte. D. Doyle. K.O. Scot: Bord:); King’s South Africa 190102, two clasps (7079 Pte. D. Doyle. K.O. Scot: Bord:), contact marks, nearly very fine (2) £100-140

219 Four: Captain F.L. Pelly, Royal Army Medical Corps Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State (13260 Pte. F. Pelly. R.A.M.C.); 1914-15 Star (Lieut. F.L. Pelly. R.A.M.C.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. F.L. Pelly.), good very fine (4) £140-180 Captain Frank L. Pelly, born Madras, India, 1879; enlisted in the Royal Army Medical Corps, 19.2.1900; served in South Africa, 12.3- 18.12.1900; discharged, 23.1.1901; Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps, 7.9.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 20.9.1915; Captain, 7.9.1916.

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220

220 An Unusual Campaign Group of Five to Major J.G.Y. DelmarMorgan, Royal Air Force, Late Lieutenant-Commander, H.Q. Staff Russian Armoured Car Squadron, R.N.V.R., and Corporal Imperial Yeomanry, With Whom He Was Wounded During the Boer War, 19.11.1900 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (6258 Cpl. J. Morgan, 34th Coy. Imp. Yeo.); 1914-15 Star (Lieut. J.G.Y. Delmar-Morgan, R.N.V.R.); British War and Victory Medals (Lt. Commr. J.G.Y. Delmar-Morgan.); Belgium, Kingdom, Order of Leopold, Civil Division, Officer’s breast Badge, 66mm including crown suspension x 40mm, gold and enamel, with rosette on riband, extensive white enamel damage to last, otherwise generally very fine or better, mounted as originally worn (5) £280-320 Major John Godfrey Yule Delmar-Morgan, born 1878; served with the 34th (Middlesex) Company 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War and was wounded in action near Harrismith, 19.11.1900; with the outbreak of the Great War he was commissioned Temporary Lieutenant, R.N.V.R., 5.9.1914; served in H.M.S. Undaunted (light cruiser), from 25.7.1915; borne as an Additional H.M.S. President, 13.11.1916, ‘for service at the London Hqrs of Russian Armoured Car Squadron; advanced Lieutenant-Commander, 31.10.1917; transferred as Captain (Honorary Major) Royal Air Force, 19.9.1918; discharged 21.1.1919.

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221

221 Pair: Orderly W. Nowell, St. John Ambulance Brigade Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Cape Colony, this loose on riband (755 Ordly: W. Nowell. St. John Amb: Bde:); St. John Ambulance Brigade Medal for South Africa 1899-1902 (755 Pte. W. Nowell. Hebden Brigade Corps), minor edge bruise to first, nearly extremely fine (2) £350-400

x222 Pair: Private W. Knowles, Kimberley Town Guard Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, one clasp, Defence of Kimberley (Pte. W. Knowles. Kimberley Town Gd:); Kimberley Star 1899-1900, reverse hallmark with date letter ‘a’, last lacking top riband bar, generally very fine or better (2) £200-250 There are two ‘Private W. Knowles’ listed on the published transcription of the medal roll, both entitled to single clasp awards.

224

223 Pair: Driver P.F. Mahoney, Royal Engineers Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Transvaal (2096. Dr. P.F. Mahoney. R.E.); King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps (2096 Dvr: P. Mahoney. R.E.), good very fine War Medal, extremely fine (3) £110-150

224 Pair: Private J. Southworth, Liverpool Regiment Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (7165 Pte. J. Southworth. L’pool Regt.); Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., two clasps, Somaliland 1902-04, Jidballi (7163 Pte. J. Southworth. L’pool Regt.), good very fine (2) £340-380 Approximately 14 Africa General Service Medals with this clasp combination to the Liverpool Regiment.

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228 225 Three: Private R. Broomfield, Army Service Corps 1914 Star, with later slide bar (M1-7243 Pte. R. Bromfield. A.S.C.); British War and Victory Medals (M1-7243 Pte. R. Bromfield. A.S.C.), good very fine (3) £60-80 226 Pair: Sowar Muhammed Khan, 36th Horse 1914 Star (No.2811 Sowar Muhammed Khan, 36/ Horse); Victory Medal (2811 Sowar Mohd. Khan, 36 Horse.), good very fine 1914 Star (2) (No.4206 Sepoy Sultan Din, 107/Pionrs.; No.101 L.Nk. Fatteh Din, 2/Mule Corps.), nearly very fine (4) £100-120 x227 Four: Gunner S. Elsey, Royal Field Artillery 1914-15 Star (1002. Gnr. S. Elsey. R.F.A.); British War and Victory Medals (1002 Gnr. S. Elsey. R.A.); Defence Medal, nearly very fine Three: Private G. Sutherland, Gordon Highlanders 1914-15 Star (3-6579. Pte. G. Sutherland. Gord. Highrs.); British War and Victory Medals (3-6579 Pte. G. Sutherland. Gord. Highrs.), good very fine Pair: Private R. Esplin, Gordon Highlanders British War and Victory Medals (S-17985 Pte. R. Esplin. Gordons.), very fine, together with a number of unrelated items, including a Royal Navy prize medal; six miniature awards; various post-cards and other ephemera; and a Princess Mary Christmas box (9) £80-100

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228 Five: Warrant Officer Class I W.A. Webb, Royal Field Artillery 1914-15 Star (49228 B.S.Mjr. W.A. Webb. R.F.A.); British War and Victory Medals (49228 W.O. Cl.2 W.A. Webb. R.A.); Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (1042902 W.O. Cl.II. W.A. Webb. R.A.); Meritorious Service Medal, G.VI.R. (1042902 W.O. Cl.1. W.A. Webb. R.A.), contact marks, nearly very fine, mounted court style (5) £160-200 1042902 Warrant Officer Class I William Arthur Webb, born Plumstead, Woolwich, Kent, 1888; enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery, 25.11.1907; served with the Royal Field Artillery on the Western Front from 15.1.1915 (wounded in the shoulder 5.5.1915); awarded Long Service & G.C. Medal, 1926; promoted Warrant Officer Class I, 27th Field Brigade, Royal Artillery, 3.9.1927; discharged, 25.2.1933; re-enlisted in the Royal Corps of Signals, 10.7.1933; discharged, 6.4.1936.

229 Five: Quarter Master Sergeant A.T. James, Royal Engineers 1914-15 Star (27693 Q.M.Sjt. A.T. James. R.E.); British War and Victory Medals (27693 W.O. Cl.1 A.T. James. R.E.); Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (27693 S.Mjr: A.T. James. R.E.); Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (27693 Q.M.Sjt: A.T. James. R.E.), edge bruise to second, good very fine, mounted court style in this order (5) £180-220 M.S.M. London Gazette 2.1.1918 27693 S./M. A.T. James, R.E. (“E” Gosport) ‘In recognition of valuable services rendered with the Armies in the Field during the present war.’


April 21, 2011 - London 230 Four: Stoker Petty Officer W. Cowling, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (K.23029, W. Cowling, Sto.1., R.N.); British War and Victory Medals (K.23029 W. Cowling. Sto.1 R.N.); Naval Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (K.23039 W. Cowling, S.P.O. H.M.S. Ceres.), fine Pair: Master-at-Arms C. Peacock, Royal Navy 1914-15 Star (147188, C. Peacock, M.A.A., R.N.); Victory Medal (147188 C. Peacock. M.A.A. R.N.), good very fine (6) £70-90

231 Three: Private F. Clarke, Royal Marine Light Infantry 1914-15 Star (Ply. 245, Pte. F. Clarke, R.M.L.I.); British War and Victory Medals (Ply. 245 -S- Pte. F. Clarke. R.M.L.I.), nearly very fine Pair: Gunner T.W. Jeffery, Royal Artillery British War and Victory Medals (138348 Gnr. T.W. Jeffrey. R.A.), very fine British War Medal (2) (R.M.A. 2862 -S- Gr.2 H.W. Ingerson.; 140 Pte. W. Highfield. York & Lanc. R.), minor erasure before number on second, nearly extremely fine (7) £50-70 138348 Gunner T.W. Jeffery served with “D” Battery, 2nd Army Reserve Brigade, Royal Garrison Artillery during the Great War; died, 14.11.1918, and is buried in Hipswell (St. John) Churchyard, North Yorkshire.

232 Three: Captain G.R. Bodilly, Royal Field Artillery 1914-15 Star (2.Lieut:G.R. Bodilly, R.F.A.); British War and Victory Medals (Capt. G.R. Bodilly.), good very fine Army Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (82910 Q.M.Sjt: G. Scovell. R.G.A.), nearly very fine (4) £80-120 Captain George Rivers Bodilly, born November 1887; enlisted as 2530 Trooper in the Royal Field Artillery, 7.9.1914; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 12.11.1914; Lieutenant, 3.8.1916; Captain, 14.10.1918; retired, 29.1.1919; died, 24.7.1932.

233 Three: Corporal E.A. Jacobs, Army Service Corps 1914-15 Star (M2-033310. Pte. E.A. Jacobs, A.S.C.); British War and Victory Medals (M2-033310 Cpl. E.A. Jacobs. A.S.C.), nearly extremely fine, with two riband bars Pair: Corporal A.J. Meadows, Army Service Corps British War and Victory Medals (DM2-207611 A.Cpl. A.J. Meadows. A.S.C.), very fine 1914 Star, with copy Bar (CMT-1187 Pte. A.E. Smith. A.S.C.), good fine, together with an unrelated Old Contemptibles Association lapel badge, reverse numbered ‘6873D’; and a British Red Cross Society Medal for War Service (7) £70-90

234 Three: Nursing Sister L.M. Grant, Territorial Force Nursing Service British War and Victory Medals (Sister L.M. Grant.); Territorial Force War Medal (Sister L.M. Grant. T.F.N.S.), nearly very fine (3) £280-320

235 Three: Corporal J.R. Bowman, Royal Engineers British War and Victory Medals (54718 2.Cpl. J.R. Bowman. R.E.); Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R. (WR-250248 2.Cpl. J.R. Bowman. R.E.), good very fine, mounted court style (3) £100-140 M.S.M. London Gazette 3.6.1919 WR/250248 2nd Cpl. Bowman, J.R., 260th Rly. Con. Coy., Royal Engineers (Northwood) ‘In recognition of valuable service rendered with the Armies in France and Flanders.’ 250248 Corporal Jonathan Robert Bowman, born Kimberley, Norfolk, 1876; enlisted in the Royal Engineers, 14.10.1914; served with the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front from 24.12.1914; wounded by the effects of gas, 25.7.1916; promoted Lance Corporal, 5.11.1917.

82910 Quarter Master Sergeant George Scovell, born Newport, Isle of Wight, January 1872; enlisted in the Royal Garrison Artillery, January 1891; Corporal, September 1898; served in Singapore, December 1898 to October 1901, and India, February 1907 to November 1911; Sergeant, July 1899; Company Quarter Master Sergeant, September 1904; discharged, 11.1.1912 after 21 years with the Colours.

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236 Five: Captain W.B. Cooper, Chinese Labour Corps, Late Customs College, Peking British War and Victory Medals (Capt. W.B. Cooper); China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Third Class neck Badge, 60mm, silver-gilt and enamel, enamel damage to reverse; China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Fifth Class breast Badge, 46mm, silver-gilt and enamel; Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh, Fourth Class breast Badge, 70mm including Star and Crescent suspension x 53mm, silver, gold, and enamel, with rosette on riband, good very fine, with lapel rosettes for the Orders of the Golden Grain and the Medjidieh, contained in a Baldwin & Sons, London, fitted case (5) ÂŁ600-800 China, Order of the Golden Grain, Fifth Class London Gazette 18.10.1918 William Boyd Cooper, Esq., formerly of the Customs College, Peking. Captain William Boyd Cooper, born Belfast, 1878; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Chinese Labour Corps, 12.2.1917, and served with the Corps in France from 12.2.1917; Lieutenant, 12.8.1918; advanced Captain, General List; relinquished his Commission, 5.4.1919. Third Class Order of the Golden Grain and Order of the Medjidieh unconfirmed. PROVENANCE: Spink, 23.9.1993.

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237 Miniature Awards: The Group of Five Attributed to Captain W.B. Cooper, Chinese Labour Corps, Late Customs College, Peking British War and Victory Medals; Turkey, Ottoman Empire, Order of the Medjidieh, Fifth Class Badge, silver, silver-gilt, and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Golden Grain, Fifth Class Badge, silver-gilt and enamel; China, Republic, Order of the Striped Tiger, Fifth Class Badge, silver-gilt and enamel, minor enamel damage to third and fifth, good very fine, mounted as worn, in Baldwin & Sons, London, fitted case (5) ÂŁ100-150 Orders of the Medjidieh and Striped Tiger unconfirmed. PROVENANCE: Spink, 23.9.1993.


April 21, 2011 - London 238 Pair: Lieutenant G.I. Kitcat, Royal Garrison Artillery British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. G.I. Kitcat.), nearly very fine Pair: Second Lieutenant N.M. Ince, London Regiment British War and Victory Medals (2-Lieut. N.M. Ince.), good very fine Pair: Private W. McLaughlan, Royal West Kent Regiment British War and Victory Medals (G-30535 Pte. W. McLaughlan. R.W. Kent R.), traces of verdigris, very fine Pair: Private P. Smith, Machine Gun Corps British War and Victory Medals (153939 Pte. P. Smith. M.G.C.), good very fine Pair: Private C.F. Wakeford, Army Ordnance Corps British War and Victory Medals (018815 Pte. C.F. Wakeford. A.O.C.), nearly extremely fine (10) £80-100 Lieutenant G.I. Kitcat, Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1.7.1917. Second Lieutenant N.M. Ince, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 20th (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment, 30.11.1918.

239 Pair: Corporal J. Northam, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers British War and Victory Medals (9758 Cpl. J. Northam. R. Innis. Fus.), contact marks, nearly very fine 1914 Star (18358 Dvr: S. Hill. R.E.), nearly very fine British War Medal (46036. 2.A.M. H. Wood. R.F.C.), edge bruise, suspension slack, good fine Mercantile Marine War Medal (Ernest Westmore), very fine Canadian Memorial Cross, G.V.R. (47414 Pte. E. Wardle.), good very fine (6) £120-140 47414 Private E. Wardle served with the 15th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment) during the Great War; died, 24.4.1915, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.

240 Three: Brigadier R.A.M. Currie [C.M.G., D.S.O.], Somerset Light Infantry Victory Medal, M.I.D. Oakleaves (Brig. Gen. R.A.M. Currie.); France, Republic, Legion of Honour, Chevalier’s breast Badge, 57mm including wreath suspension x 43mm, silver, gold, and enamel, enamel damage to points of badge; Belgium, Kingdom, Croix de Guerre, A.I.R., bronze, good very fine (3) £120-140 C.M.G. London Gazette 1.1.1919 Maj. and Bt. Col. (T./Brig.-Gen.) Ryves Alexander Mark Currie, D.S.O., Som. L.I. ‘For services rendered in connection with military operations in France and Flanders.’ D.S.O. London Gazette 14.1.1916 Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Ryves Alexander Mark Currie, Somerset Light Infantry. France, Legion of Honour, Chevalier London Gazette 1.5.1917 Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Ryves Alexander Mark Currie, D.S.O., Somerset Light Infantry. Belgium, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 4.9.1919 Major and Brevet Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) Ryves Alexander Mark Currie, C.M.G., D.S.O., Somerset Light Infantry. Brigadier Ryves Alexander Mark Currie, C.M.G., D.S.O., born 18th June, 1875, on the Diamond Anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, the son of Lieutenant-Colonel F.A. Currie, Norfolk Regiment, and was educated at Wellington College. Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Somerset Light Infantry, June 1896; served in the campaign on the North West Frontier of India under the command of Sir William Lockhart, 1897, and was present at the engagement at Shabkadr; also with the Mohmand Field Force with the 1st Battalion Somerset Light Infantry; Lieutenant, December 1898; Captain, 1.1.1904; served as Adjutant, 1st Battalion, 1.1.1904- 31.12.1906; Brigade Major, 13th Infantry Brigade, Irish Command, 18.6.1912- 4.8.1914; Brigade Major, 5.8.1914- 24.3.1915; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 14.8.1914; (Eight times Mentioned in Despatches; Brevets of Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Colonel); Brigadier-General, 15.8.1917. Brigadier Currie died 30.3.1920, at Danzig, East Prussia, whilst acting as Brigadier-General, General Staff to General Haking, having since the Armistice commanded a Brigade on the Rhine, and is buried in Malbork Commonwealth War Cemetery, Poland.

241 Six: Chief Engineer Officer D.P. Knapman, Royal Navy 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Africa Star; War Medal; Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (C.E.O. D.P. Knapman R.N.); United Nations Medal for Korea, generally very fine, mounted as originally worn (6) £100-140 For the medals awarded to Petty Officer P.F. Knapman, D.S.M., the father of Chief Engineer Officer D.P. Knapman, see Lot 25.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 242 Five: Lieutenant-Colonel M.A.A. Little, Royal Horse Guards 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star, with 8th Army Bar; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals, all contemporarily engraved ‘Lieut. Colonel M.A.A. Little R.H.G’, lacquered, nearly extremely fine, together with a letter written by the recipient’s great grandfather, Thomas Brassey, 1st Earl Brassey, signed ‘Brassey’ Four: Lieutenant-Colonel R.H. Griffith 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaf, nearly extremely fine, with the recipient’s riband bar, and named card box of issue, addressed to 33 Mitchley Ave, Purley, Surrey Pair: Captain G.F. May, Royal Artillery 1939-1945 Star; War Medal, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to 31 Becon Road, Falmouth, Cornwall (11) £140-180 Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm Archibald Albert Little, born Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, 5.6.1904, the eldest son of Brigadier M.O. Little, C.B., C.I.E., and the greatgrandson of Thomas Brassey, 1st Earl Brassey; educated at Eton and New College, Oxford; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 9th Lancers, 5.9.1925; promoted Lieutenant, 25.8.1926; transferred as Captain, Royal Horse Guards, 12.6.1935; served during the Second World War; Major, 25.8.1941; Lieutenant-Colonel, 13.4.1942; Killed in action, 5.10.1944, and is buried in Cesena War Cemetery, Italy. M.I.D. London Gazette Lt.-Col. (temp.) R.H. Griffith (282756), General List ‘In recognition of gallant and distinguished services in NorthWest Europe.’ Lieutenant-Colonel Royston Harling Griffith, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, General List, 12.7.1943; War Substantive Major and Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel, 6.7.1944. Captain G.F. May, Commissioned Lieutenant and Quarter Master, Royal Artillery, 30.6.1939; served during the Second World War and taken Prisoner of War; held in Oflag 79, Brunswick, Germany; liberated, 12.4.1945.

243 Five: Warrant Officer Class II J.G. Fraser, Royal Artillery 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star, with 8th Army Bar; Defence and War Medals; Territorial Efficiency Medal, G.V.R. (730243 W.O. Cl.II. J.G. Fraser. R.A.), traces of verdigris to first, otherwise good very fine, with section of the recipient’s riband bar; and an unrelated American Purple Heart Medal 1914-15 Star (95739, Dvr. W.C. Hockley, R.F.A.), good very fine (7) £60-80

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244 Nine: Lieutenant J.S. Roszek, Polish Army Poland, Republic, Gold Cross of Merit, gilt and enamel; Poland, Republic, Silver Cross of Merit, with Crossed Swords, by Spink, London, silver and enamel; Poland, Republic, Active Service Medal; Poland, Republic, Monte Cassino Cross, reverse officially numbered ‘46016’; 1939-1945 Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; Defence and War Medals, good very fine, with named card box of issue, addressed to 9 Hoveden Road, London NW2; and two scarce and unusual sample strikings of the Monte Cassino Cross (9) £150-200 Lieutenant Jan Stanislaw Roszek, born Zakopane, Poland, June 1896; served in Pilsudski’s 1st Brigade during the Great War; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 40th Infantry Regiment; awarded the Monte Cassino Cross whilst serving as a Lieutenant and Doctor in the Ordnance Headquarters of the 2nd Polish Corps in Italy. Lieutenant Roszek died in London, 1972.

245 Six: Sergeant Chunbahadur Gurung, Gurkha Rifles 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; War Medal; India Service Medal; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (21135054 Sgt. Chunbahadur. Gurung 6 GR.); Indian Independence 1947, nearly very fine (6) £80-100 21135054 Sergeant Chunbahadur Gurung, born 1921; enlisted in the Indian Army, 18.10.1940; transferred to the Brigade of Gurkhas, 1.1.1948; served in Malaya, January to July 1948, March 1949 to September 1951, May 1952 to October 1955, and May 1956 to November 1958; promoted Corporal, 1.4.1952; Sergeant, 1.9.1954; discharged, 19.7.1959, after 18 years and 275 days with the Colours.

246 Five: Sergeant Kishnabir Thapa, Gurkha Engineers 1939-1945 Star; Burma Star; War Medal; India Service Medal; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (21132635 Cpl. Kishnabir’ Thapa R.E. Gur.), nearly very fine (5) £70-90 21132635 Sergeant Kishnabir Thapa, born 1922; enlisted in the Indian Army, 7.11.1940; discharged, 30.3.1947; reenlisted in the Brigade of Gurkhas, 5.10.1949; served in Malaya, November 1949 to September 1950, September 1951 to April 1952, and November 1954 to August 1956; promoted Corporal, 1.4.1952; Sergeant, 24.2.1956; discharged, 13.5.1958, after 15 years with the Colours.


April 21, 2011 - London 247 Four: Mr. E.R. Fithian, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Star; France and Germany Star; Defence and War Medals, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘54 Queenswood Road, Moseley, Birmingham’, with Air Council enclosure Pair: Sergeant G.F. Arundell Defence Medal; Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, G.VI.R. (Sergt. George F. Arundell, extremely fine, with named card box of issue for the first, addressed to ‘1 Clarence Place, Newport, Barnstaple, Devon’ One: Miss E.M. Mason Defence Medal, extremely fine, in named card box of issue, addressed to ‘85A Boutport Street, Barnstaple, N. Devon’, with Home Office enclosure Second World War Medals (7) 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Africa Star; Defence Medal (2); War Medal (2), verdigris to Atlantic Star, otherwise about extremely fine United Nations Medal for Korea, extremely fine, in card box of issue (15) £60-80

248 Pair: Captain H.E. Spencer, Royal Army Service Corps Italy Star; War Medal, extremely fine, with enclosure in box of issue, addressed to ‘43 Orchards Way, Southampton’ Second World War Medals (14), 1939-1945 Star (3); Africa Star; Italy Star; Defence Medal (2); War Medal (2); India Service Medal (78083 Rfn. Lalbahadur Limbu, 7 G.R.); Africa Service Medal (2) (210830 M.J. Groenewald; ACF82485 S. Messaris), heavy edge bruising to first; Australia Service Medal (V500372 A.E. Henderson); New Zealand War Service Medal. generally very fine or better (16) £80-100 Captain H.E. Spencer, Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Army Service Corps, 12.6.1943; Lieutenant, 12.12.1943.

249 Four: Sergeant T.C. Blake, Royal Air Force Defence and War Medals; General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (906999 Sgt. T.C. Blake. R.A.F.); Royal Air Force Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (906999 Sgt. T.C. Blake. R.A.F.), good very fine (4) £80-100

250 Three: Company Staff Sergeant Amarbahadur Gurung, Gurkha Engineers War Medal; India Service Medal; General Service Medal 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (21132875 Spr. Amarbahadur Gurung, R.E. Gur), minor official corrections to surname and unit, very fine Pair: Rifleman Baldhoj Gurung, Gurkha Rifles War Medal; India Service Medal, both impressed ‘70394 Rfn. Baldhoj Gurung, 3/6 G.R.’, good fine Pair: Corporal Rewantabahadur Thapa, Gurkha Rifles General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (21133633 Rfn. Rewantabahadur Thapa 2 GR); Indian Independence Medal 1947 (21133633 Rfn. Rewantabahadur. Thapa. G.R.), contact marks, nearly very fine (7) £80-100 21132875 Company Staff Sergeant Amarbahadur Gurung, born 1923; enlisted in the Indian Army, 1.11.1941; discharged, 28.2.1947; re-enlisted in the Brigade of Gurkhas, 8.12.1949; served in Malaya, January to September 1950, November 1952 to February 1953, October 1954 to May 1957, November 1957 to January 1961, and July 1961 to February 1962; promoted Corporal, 24.2.1955; Sergeant, 23.3.1957; Staff Sergeant, 2.4.1960; Company Staff Sergeant, 3.7.1961; discharged, 13.1.1961, after 18 years and 156 days with the Colours. 21133633 Corporal Rewantabahadur Thapa, born 1927; enlisted in the Gurkha Rifles, Indian Army, 9.11.1946; transferred to Brigade of Gurkhas, 1.1.1948; served in Malaya, March to November 1948, July 1949 to April 1952, and November 1952 to September 1953; promoted Corporal, 8.4.1960; discharged, 30.12.1962, after 16 years and 52 days with the Colours.

251 Pair: Sapper A. Clowes, Royal Engineers Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (19042019 Spr. A. Clowes. R.E.); United Nations Medal for Korea, good very fine (2) £100-140

252 Pair: Driver A. Shaw, Royal Army Service Corps Korea 1950-53, 1st ‘Britt: Omn:’ type (T/14426482 Dvr. A. Shaw. R.A.S.C.); United Nations Medal for Korea, very fine (2) £80-120

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253 A Rare Four Clasp N.G.S. Group of Three to Colour Sergeant A.R. Ellis, Royal Marines Naval General Service 1915-62, G.VI.R., four clasps, Malaya, Cyprus, Near East, Brunei, later clasps loose on riband as issued (RM.7118 A.R. Ellis Mne R M); General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Borneo (RM.7118 A.R. Ellis. Sgt. R.M.); Naval Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (RM.7118 Sgt. A.R. Ellis. R.M.), edge bruising to first, contact marks, good very fine, rare, mounted as worn (3) ÂŁ1,400-1,800 RM.7118 Colour Sergeant Arthur Ellis, born Sitarampur, India, 27.4.1930; enlisted in the Royal Marines, 2.3.1948; discharged, 26.4.1970, after 22 years and 56 days in the Service. Clasps confirmed.

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April 21, 2011 - London

254

Sergeant F. C. C. Pinnegar

254 Pair: Sergeant F.C.C. Pinnegar, Royal Marines Naval General Service 1915-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Cyprus (RM.15744 F.C.C. Pinnegar. Cpl. R.M.); General Service 1962-2007, three clasps, Radfan, South Arabia, Northern Ireland (RM.15744 F.C.C. Pinnegar. Sgt. R.M.), minor edge bruise to second, good very fine, together with the following related documents &c.: - The Recipients’ Certificate of Service - Three Certificates for Wounds and Hurts, dated 9.10.1961, 4.6.1963, and 16.9.1964 - Ministry of Defence enclosure for the Northern Ireland clasp, dated 6.7.1972 - Photograph of the recipient (2) £600-800 Sergeant Francis Colin Clive Pinnegar, born Polgooth, Cornwall, 9.1.1938; enlisted in the Royal Marines, 3.7.1956; promoted Corporal, 17.7.1958; Sergeant, 25.7.1961; served with 45 Commando Royal Marines in Radfan, April to October 1964, and was wounded in the head and chest by shrapnel from 76mm shells whilst on a 48 hour patrol in the Wadi Taym, Radfan; at the time of wounding he was calling for mortar fire over a radio; discharged, 14.7.1972 after 16 years and 12 days in the Service. Clasps confirmed.

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255 Pair: Petty Officer Medical Assistant M. Edwards, Commando Logistic Regiment General Service 1962-2007, three clasps, Borneo, Malay Peninsula, Northern Ireland, later clasps loose on riband as issued (053989 M. Edwards. S.B.A. R.N.); Naval Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (D053989E M. Edwards POMA Cdo Log Regt), pen mark to LS&GC, good very fine, mounted as worn (2) ÂŁ300-400

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April 21, 2011 - London

CORONATION, JUBILEE, LONG SERVICE AND EFFICIENCY DECORATIONS AND MEDALS 256 Imperial Service Medal (3), G.V.R., ‘coronation robes’ type (Alfred Jenkins.); G.VI.R. (William John Williams.); E.II.R. (Henry Emmanuel Wright), good very fine Coronation 1911, nearly extremely fine Jubilee 1935, extremely fine Coronation 1937, extremely fine (6) £60-80

257 Imperial Service Medal, G.V.R., ‘coinage head’ type (Albert Edward Johnson.), extremely fine Naval Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (150805 Frank Woodley, Boatman, H.M. Coast Guard.), good very fine (2) £60-80

258 Imperial Service Medal (3), G.V.R., ‘coinage head’ type (Edwin Michael Brown); G.VI.R. (John William Everitt); E.II.R. (Walter Frederick Collins), nearly extremely fine (3) £30-40

259 Jubilee 1897, silver, unnamed as issued, minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £70-90

260 Coronation 1902, silver, good very fine £80-100

261 Pair: Constable S. Knights, Metropolitan Police Coronation 1902, bronze (P.C.. S. Knights. P. Div); Coronation 1911 (P.C.. S. Knights.), second partially officially corrected, first fine, second good very fine Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1887, with 1897 Bar (P.S. E. Emeny. W. Div:), very fine Jubilee (City of London Police) 1887, with 1897 Bar (PS, 80. H. Watson.), nearly very fine Jubilee (Metropolitan Police) 1897 (P.C. W. Boobier. K. Divn.), edge bruising, good fine Special Constabulary Long Service (2), G.V.R. (James Scard); G.VI.R. (Sect. Ldr. Albert E. Goldsmith), very fine or better Service Medal of the Order of St. John, silvered, unnamed, rubbed, good fine (8) £120-150

262 Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £40-50

263 Delhi Durbar 1911, silver, very fine Jubilee 1935, extremely fine Coronation 1937, nearly extremely fine Coronation 1953, good fine Pakistan Independence Medal 1947 (3536089 Sep Mohd Alam 14 Pb.R.), very fine (5) £70-90

264 Jubilee 1935, good very fine Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, G.V.R. (313 Pte. H. Hopkins. 6/Welsh Regt.), nearly very fine, together with the recipient’s cap badge Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (D. 1715 J.J. Batten, Sean. R.N.R.), suspension broken, planchet only, good fine Pair: Mr. W. Osman Southern Railway Centre of St. John Ambulance Association Long Service Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1940), reverse engraved ‘Wilfred Osman 1943’, with top ‘14 Years’ riband bar; Southern Railway Centre of St. John Ambulance Association Long Service Medal, bronze, reverse engraved ‘Wilfred Osman 1936’, with top ‘7 Years’ riband bar, extremely fine, both in cases of issue Stephen Company Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Glasgow 1924), reverse engraved ‘L/C David Latto 1926’, with top silver riband bar engraved ‘18th Aberdeen Coy.’, good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 6 Month Medal (Crookshank Cross), silvered bronze, good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 1 Year Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1914), good very fine Army Temperance Association: India, 5 Year Medal, silver (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1914) and enamel, minor enamel damage, good very fine Miniature Awards (8): British War Medal (2); Victory Medal (2); General Service Medal 1918-62, G.VI.R., two clasps, Palestine, Malaya; Defence Medal; War Medal; Coronation 1953, good very fine (lot) £60-80

265 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Pvt. Jas. Nash 2nd. Battn. Gr. Gds 1852), with contemporary silver swivel suspension, nearly very fine £120-140 Private James Nash, born Devizes, Wiltshire, 1812; enlisted in the Grenadier Guards, December 1830; awarded Long Service & G.C. Medal, January 1852; discharged, June 1854, after 23 years and 167 days with the Colours, of which four years and five months were spent in Canada.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 270 Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (11271 Gnr: J. Carlisle. R.G.A.), very fine Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (5185080 Cpl. R.L. Taylor. R.E.M.E.), extremely fine (2) £60-80 271 Army Long Service & G.C. (2), G.V.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (390263 Sjt. E.V. Moon. 4-7 D.G.); G.VI.R., with ‘Regular Army’ bar suspension (5045060 Sjt. L. Catterball. N. Staff. R.), edge bruise to last, good very fine (2) £60-80

266

276

266 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (3281 Pte. T. Turner 106th Foot), toned, very fine £80-100 3281 Private Thomas Turner, born Birmingham; served with the 106th Regiment, ‘his conduct has been very good. He is in possession of... medal for long service and good conduct and the Persian War Medal’; discharged 1873, after 21years and 23 days with the Colours.

267 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (5. 1st Cl: Sgt. Artfr. W. Needham. Corps Ord: Artfrs.), suspension slack, letter ‘N’ of surname officially corrected, good very fine £70-90

268 Army Long Service & G.C., V.R. (57, C. Sergt. E. Hewitt, A.H. Corps), edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £70-90

269 Army Long Service & G.C. (2), E.VII.R. (4221 L.Cpl. C. Grant. Rl. Scots.); G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type (S. Sgt. Instr. A. Raybould, N. Bengal M. Rif.), good very fine (2) £60-80

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272 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., dated ‘1848’ below bust (John Wynn, A.B. H.M.S. Illustrious. 25. Yrs.), with replacement silver ring suspension, this Hallmarked, contact marks, nearly fine, scarce £200-300 Approximately 100 dated ‘1848’ Naval Long Service medals awarded.

273 Naval Long Service & G.C., V.R., narrow suspension (G.W. Watkins, P.O.1Cl., H.M.S. Hannibal.), toned, light contact marks, therefore very fine £70-90 274 Naval Long Service & G.C. (2), E.VII.R. (Ch. 6413 Herbert Arnold, Private., R.M.L.I.); G.V.R. 2nd ‘coinage head’ type (K.16073 S. Robbins. Sto.1. H.M.S. Walker.), very fine Royal Naval Reserve Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Admiral’s bust’ type (C.3546. G.L. Morgan, Sea. R.N.R.), good very fine (3) £80-100 275 Indian Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (2), 1st ‘Kaisar-i-Hind’ type (562 Rifleman Phire Khan, 125th. Napier’s Rifles); 2nd ‘Coronation robes’ type (5280 L-Daf. Ghulam Mohd., Scinde Horse.), contact marks to second, nearly very fine or better (2) £70-90 276 Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (Gnr. W. Jackman R.C.H.A.), nearly extremely fine £80-100


April 21, 2011 - London

277 277 Three: Inspector A.D. Marshall, Strathclyde Police Police Long Service & G.C., E.II.R. (Inspr Alistair D Marshall), in Royal Mint case of issue; Rhodesia Medal 1980, unnamed as issued to Police personnel; Zimbabwe Independence Medal 1980, bronze, officially numbered ‘12623’, extremely fine (3) £500-600 278 Volunteer Officer’s Decoration, V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1892), reverse engraved ‘Hon. Lt. Col. Wm. Mactear V.D. 1892’, good very fine, with integral top riband bar £100-120 279 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., V.R. (Cpl. J. Aslett. 2nd. Hants Artillery Volunteers. 1897), pawn broker’s mark to obverse, nearly very fine Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, E.VII.R. (347 C.Sjt: M. Seery. 8/ (Irish) L’pool Regt.), nearly very fine (2) £100-140 280 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., E.VII.R. (3494 Pte. B.J. Buckley. 1st. V.B. Manch: Regt.), toned, extremely fine £40-60 281 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (2) (Pte. J.C. Gilbert, Kolar G.F. Bn., A.F.I.; Pte. G.P. Strudwick, 7th. (S) U.P. Horse. I.D.F.), good very fine (2) £100-120 282 Volunteer Force Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (2) (Voltr E. Burgoyne E.C. Voltr. Rfls.; Vol. G Pereira Poona Vol Rifles), very fine (2) £100-120

283 Territorial Decoration, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1920) and silver-gilt, with integral top riband bar, extremely fine £80-100 284 Territorial Force Efficiency Medal, E.VII.R. (35 Pte. P. Miller. 6/Durham L.I.), good very fine £80-100 285 Territorial Efficiency Medal, G.V.R. (705089 Gnr. W. Hackney. R.F.A.), nearly extremely fine Efficiency Medal, G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (865153 Bmbr. L. Winkworth. R.A.), nearly very fine (2) £60-80 286 Efficiency Medal (2), G.VI.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (927116. Bdr. G.J.W. Meadows. R.A.), one letter of surname officially corrected; E.II.R., with ‘Territorial’ scroll suspension (T/6027747 Dvr. G.E. Harvey. R.A.S.C.), nearly extremely fine (2) £50-70 287 Royal Naval Reserve Decoration, G.V.R., silver (Hallmarks for London 1918) and silver-gilt, extremely fine, in Garrard, London, case of issue £100-120 288 Special Constabulary Long Service (3), G.V.R. (Alfred Hubbard); G.VI.R., with ‘Long Service, 1942’ Second Award Bar (David Day); E.II.R. (George A. Logan), generally good very fine (3) £40-60

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MINIATURE AWARDS

289

289 Miniature Award: The Indian Mutiny 1857 ‘Defence of the Delhi Magazine’ V.C. to Captain George Forrest, Bengal Artillery Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar neatly engraved ‘Captain George Forrest. Bengal Artillery. Delhi. 11th. May, 1857.’, extremely fine, housed in a gilt glazed frame £400-600 V.C. London Gazette 18.6.1858 Captain George Forrest, Bengal Veteran Establishment ‘For gallant conduct in the defence of the Delhi Magazine, on the 11th May, 1857.’ Captain George Forrest, V.C. (1800-59), born Dublin; served with the Bengal Veteran Establishment, Bengal Artillery during the Indian Mutiny, and was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry in the defence of the Delhi Magazine, 11.5.1857, where he was one of nine men who defended the Magazine for more than five hours against large numbers of rebels, until, on the wall being scaled and there being no hope of help, they fired the Magazine. Of the gallant nine only four escaped. When the Magazine was blown into the air five of them died with it- and with them over a thousand Mutineers.

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290

290 Miniature Awards: The Great War C.M.G., D.S.O. Group of Six Attributed to Colonel William Loring, Royal Artillery The Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Companion’s (C.M.G.) Badge, gold and enamel; Distinguished Service Order, G.V.R., gold and enamel, with integral top riband bar; 1914 Star, with Bar; British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves; Belgium, Kingdom, Croix de Guerre, A.I.R., bronze, good very fine, mount as worn (6) £100-140 C.M.G. London Gazette 3.6.1918 Lt.-Col. William Loring, D.S.O., R.A. ‘For services rendered in connection with Military Operations in France and Flanders.’ D.S.O. London Gazette 1.1.1918 Lt.-Col. William Loring, R.G.A. Belgium, Croix de Guerre London Gazette 15.4.1918 LieutenantColonel William Loring, D.S.O., Royal Garrison Artillery. Colonel William Loring, C.M.G., D.S.O., born Ryde, Isle of Wight, September 1872, the son of Admiral Sir William Loring, K.C.B.; educated at Marlborough and R.M.A. Woolwich; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Artillery, December 1892; Lieutenant, December 1895; Captain, 7.2.1900; Major, 28.1.1914; Commanded 110 Heavy Battery, Royal Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front, September 1914 to April 1916; commanded Heavy Artillery Groups, April 1916 to February 1918; Counter Battery Staff Officer, February 1918 to March 1919 (Four times Mentioned in Despatches London Gazettes 22.6.1915, 1.1.1916, 14.12.1917, and 20.12.1918; Brevet LieutenantColonel, London Gazette 3.6.1915); Colonel, 3.6.1919; Commander, Royal Artillery, South China Command, 1919-21; Colonel, Royal Artillery Northern Command, 1923-25; retired 1929. Colonel Loring died at home at Chandler’s Ford, Hampshire, 14.4.1935. PROVENANCE: Glendining, 18.9.1990 (when sold with the full size group).

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 291 Family Group: Miniature Awards: The O.B.E. Group of Six Attributed to Lieutenant Dr. D.W. Kent-Jones, Royal Air Force, Late Royal Engineers The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, 2nd type, Civil Division, Officer’s (O.B.E.) badge, silvergilt; 1914-15 Star; British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves; Defence Medal; Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, G.VI.R., good very fine, mounted as worn, together with the recipient’s Society of Analysts and other Analytical Chemists President’s neck Badge of Office, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for London 1949) and enamel, reverse engraved ‘D.W. Kent-Jones President 1953-1954’, with neck riband, in Toye, London, case of issue; and the City of London Copy of Freedom Document admitting Douglas William Kent-Jones, Citizen and Apothecary of London, as a Freeman of the City, dated 3.2.1948, together with original envelope The Great War M.C. Group of Four to Second Lieutenant L.J. Kent-Jones, London Regiment Military Cross, G.V.R.; British War and Victory Medals; Defence Medal, good very fine, mounted as worn, together with the recipient’s 23rd Battalion London Regiment collar badge, and a group photograph of the recipient (10) £70-90 O.B.E. London Gazette 15.6.1974 Douglas William KentJones ‘For services to the food industry.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 4.1.1917 Kent-Jones, Temp. 2nd Lt. D. W., Royal Engineers. Lieutenant Dr. Douglas William Kent-Jones, O.B.E., born August 1891; enlisted as 106376 Private, Royal Fusiliers, 13.11.1914; transferred as Corporal, Royal Engineers, 21.7.1915, and served during the Great War on the Western Front from 5.8.1915; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (Special Brigade), 16.5.1916; transferred Royal Air Force; taken Prisoner of War (recipient’s obituary refers); after the War he became a chemist, gaining a Ph.D., and specializing in cereals; finally retiring in 1965. Dr. Kent-Jones died 31.8.1978 M.C. London Gazette 18.2.1918 2nd Lt. Lionel John KentJones, Lond. R. ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. After a heavy bombardment, the enemy attacked in large numbers, using liquid fire, and penetrating into a portion of the post. He instantly organised a party and counter-attacked, driving them back. Although severely wounded, he remained on duty until our original sentry posts were re-established. His courage, leadership, and example to the men were splendid. Lieutenant Lionel John Kent-Jones; enlisted as 5621 Private, 2nd Battalion, London Regiment; seved with the Regiment during the Great War on the Westen Front from 28.6.1916; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, 23rd Battalion, London Regiment, 18.12.1916; promoted Lieutenant, 19.6.1918.

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292 Miniature Awards: The Great War M.C. Group of Six Attributed to Major E.W. Forbes, Royal Air Force, Late Royal Warwickshire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps Military Cross, G.V.R.; 1914-15 Star; British War and Victory Medals; Defence Medal; Territorial Decoration, G.V.R., with integral top riband bar, good very fine, mounted as worn (6) £40-50 M.C. London Gazette 24.6.1916 2nd Lt. (temp. Capt.) Ellert Webster Forbes, 6th Bn., R. War. R., T.F. (attd. R.F.C.) ‘For conspicuous gallantry and skill. He was acting as Observer when attacked by two enemy aeroplanes, and was wounded in the chest. On recovering from the shock he saw that his pilot was killed. Climbing into the pilot’s seat he succeeded in bringing his machine back from behind the enemy’s lines and landing safely.’ T.D. London Gazette 1.11.1929 Maj. Ellert Webster Forbes, M.C., 6th Bn. R. War. R., Territorial Army. Major Ellert Webster Forbes, M.C., T.D., born Birchfield, Birmingham, March 1895; educated at Shrewsbury School; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 29.6.1914; served with the 6th Battalion during the Great War on the Western Front; attached Royal Flying Corps, 15.12.1916, and posted as an Observer, 16.1.1916; on the 16th May, during a sortie in an FE2b over enemy lines, he was wounded in the shoulder and lung and his pilot killed in aerial combat whilst flying with 20 Squadron (M.C.); Captain, 1.6.1916; Major, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; retired from the Royal Air Force, January 1920, rejoined the 6th Battalion, Royal Warwikshire Regiment, Territorial Army; employed with the Royal Artillery at home during the Second World War; Major Forbes died 25.7.1967. PROVENANCE: Glendining, 28.3.1990 (when sold alongside the full size group).


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293

293 Miniature Awards: The Great War ‘Defence of Kutal-Amarah’ D.C.M. Group of Seven Attributed to Company Sergeant Major E. Toleman, Royal Engineers Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R.; Africa General Service 1902-56, E.VII.R., one clasp, Somaliland 1902-04; 1914-15 Star; British War and Victory Medals, M.I.D. Oakleaves; Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R., 1st ‘Field Marshal’s bust’ type; France, Republic, Medaille Militaire, silver and enamel, with trophy of arms suspension, nearly extremely fine, mounted as worn (7) £50-70 D.C.M. London Gazette 23.10.1919 4900 Sjt. E. Toleman, 17th Fd. Coy., R.E. (3rd S.& M.) Salford ‘For gallantry and distinguished service in connection with the defence of Kut-al-Amarah.’ M.I.D. London Gazette 19.10.1916 Toleman, No. 4900 Serjt. E., Royal Engineers ‘For distinguished service during the defence of Kut-alAmarah.’ France, Medaille Militaire London Gazette 6.2.1922 4900 Company Serjeant-Major Edward Toleman, Royal Engineers (Gorton, Manchester) ‘For distinguished service rendered during the War of 191419.’

294 Miniature Awards: Group of Four Attributed to Major-General E.T. Dickson, Royal Berkshire Regiment Egypt 1882-89, dated, two clasps, Suakin 1885, Tofrek; Jubilee 1897, silver; Coronation 1911; Khedive’s Star 1882, good very fine, mounted as worn (4) £60-80 Major-General Edward Thompson Dickson, born St. Heliers, Jersey, July 1850, the son of Major-General E.J. Dickson; educated at Cheltenham College and R.M.C. Sandhurst; Commissioned Ensign, 49th Foot, January 1869; Lieutenant, April 1871; Captain, October 1878; Major, February 1884; served with the Regiment in the Sudan 188586, at Suakin, the reconnaissance to Hasheen, actions at Hasheen and Tofrek, operations at and the destruction of Tamaai, and the action at Giniss; Lieutenant-Colonel, April 1891; Commanded the 1st Battalion, Royal Berkshire Regiment, 1891-95; Colonel, April 1895; Commanded 49th Regimental District, 1897-1902; General Officer Commanding Barbados, 1902-05; Major-General, 26.10.1905; Colonel Commanding the Troops in West Africa, 1905-06; Brigade-Major, 2nd Brigade; retired 1912. Major-General Dickson died at home in Tunbridge Wells, 23.8.1938.

Company Sergeant Major Edward Toleman, D.C.M., served during the Great War with the Royal Engineers in the Egyptian Theatre of War from 14.11.1914.

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MISCELLANEOUS

297

296 Second Cruiser Squadron Medal 1908, ten clasps, Durban, Pietermaritzburg, Ladysmith, East London, Port Elizabeth, Simonstown, Cape Town, Rio De Janeiro, Monte Video, Buenos Aires, unnamed as issued, good very fine £140-180 This medal was struck at the expense of the officers of H.M. Ships Antrim, Caernarvon, Devonshire and Good Hope to commemorate their visits to South Africa and South America.

296

295 Mayoress’s Badge of Office for Barnsley, 60mm x 45mm, silver-gilt (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1936), and enamel, reverse engraved ‘Mrs. J.F. Broley. Mayoress of Barnsley 1927-29.’, extremely fine, with neck riband, in Barnsley British Co-Operative Society Ltd. case of issue £50-70

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x297 33rd Infantry Battalion (The New England Regiment) Hat Badge A good quality die-stamped brass example, 47mm, featuring crowned wattle sprays, a mailed arm and dagger crest, unit numerals and title scroll, two loop fasteners (Cossum Pt. 1 page 22) £30-50


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298

299 x298 The 43rd Infantry Battalion (The Hindmarsh Regiment) Hat Badges Two fine quality examples, one die-stamped brass the other die-stamped with oxidized finish, both 51mm, crowned wattle sprays with central numeral, unit title and motto scroll at the bottom, two loop fasteners on each (Cossum Pt 1 page 25) (2) £50-80

x299 48th Infantry Battalion (The Torrens Regiment), Hat Badges and Collar Badges Four fine quality examples, the two hat badges in diestamped brass and die-stamped with oxidized finish, both 52mm, crowned strapwork with central pyramid and Sphinx’s head and neck over a boomerang, this with unit title, at the base “48” and motto scrolls, two loop fasteners on each; the two collar badges both diestamped with oxidized finish, both 30mm, pyramid with Sphinx’s head “48” and boomerang with motto scrolls, two loop fasteners on each (Cossum Pt 1 page 26) (4) £80-100 Page 193


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

300

300 Letter from Lord Nelson to Emma Hamilton An Autograph letter from Lord Nelson written aboard H.M.S. Medusa, asking her to forward to him a letter from Prince Castelcicala, the Neapolitan envoy, reading: ‘My Dear Emma, Pray send good Castelcicala’s letter. My mind is not so perfectly at ease as I wish it, but I hope by your next letter that I shall be made better. To our friends say every thing which is kind and to our enemies damn them. Ever yours most truly and faithfully’, signed ‘Nelson & Bronte’, dated ‘Medusa, Augst. 7th 1801’, together with the postscript ‘Your letter of yesterday not yet arrived’; the accompanying envelope addressed to ‘Lady Hamilton, 23 Piccadilly, London’ and additionally dated and signed ‘Margate, August Seventh, Nelson & Bronte’, with red wax seal, mounted and framed £3,000-5,000 Following the Battle of Copenhagen, Nelson had returned to England in the summer of 1801 and, after a brief stay with the Hamiltons, was given the command of the Fleet defending the English Channel against a proposed French invasion. He hoisted his flag aboard the Medusa at Deal on the 2nd August, and spent the summer reconnoitring the French coast, in order to observe the French invasion fleet. Apart from an attack on the French fleet at Boulogne on the 15th August, when Medusa suffered 55 casualties, there was little action, and on the 22nd October the Treaty of Amiens was signed.

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April 21, 2011 - London 301 A Commemorative Scroll Presented to David Stirling, Founder of the S.A.S. A fine quality illustrated and illuminated scroll, 970mm x 280mm, entitled ‘Amsit and David Stirling’, decorated with symbols of Ancient Egypt (gold, cobras, storks, vultures &c.) and Scotland (beer, golf clubs, the Loch Ness monster, ghosts &c.) and showing the winged figures of Amsit and David Stirling- the Ancient Egyptian God breathing life into his elected people, and the Scottish Warrior shooting down the German eagle and crushing it beneath the wheels of his chariot, surmounted by the Ancient Egyptian scarab, and submounted by the S.A.S. badge; the inscription below, in French, reading: ‘In the early days of the old Egyptian Empire, the god Amsit, one of the four brothers of Horus, had the privilege of the two signs of life: -The famous sign “Ankh”, the symbol of life - And the other, less well-known sign, the breath of life. After giving life to his elected people, the god Amsit engaged them to fortify his bones and to stand beside him for ever. Forty centuries later, in the year 1941, in the same country, the young David Stirling, of pure Scottish lineage, fought against the well known Rommel, the “Desert Fox”. The weakness of the 8th Army was obvious and David was upset about it. So, just as Ra, god of the Sun, was begotten from Nun, the god of the sea, so David, bursting out of the Army’s cocoon, founded the S.A.S. Just like the god Amsit, he possessed two signs of life: -The famous sign “Who Dares Wins” - And the other he used generously to breathe life into his faithful followers. For each of their followers one badge was created - The winged short sword for the “Who Dares Wins” sign - And the winged golden scarab god for the other sign. The story of David is well told, including the numerous and furious fights between him and the “Desert Fox”. Following his magnificent actions, David soon became the legendary example and the idol of each S.A.S. member and his sign “Who Dares Wins” became the symbol of total and enthusiastic engagement. As the gods of Ancient Egypt knew how to keep the memory of their prestigious story, so the present days will know how to perpetuate the magnificent tale of David and the S.A.S. David, Companion of the S.A.S., the next rendez-vous is in four thousand years!’, mounted in a glazed frame £1,000-1,200 PROVENANCE: Presented to David Stirling by a member of the French Resistance, and subsequently given by Stirling himself to the current vendor.

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BOOKS 302 [BURKE’S PEERAGE & GENTRY] World Orders of Knighthood & Merit, 2 volumes. London, 2006. Edited by Guy Stair Sainty and Rafal Heydel-Mankoo. Quarto, 2090 pages in two volumes; profusely illustrated throughout, mostly in colour. Casebound in slipcase. Virtually as new. (2) £140-160 303 SCARPA, C. & SEZANNE, P. Le Decorazioni del regno di Sardegna e del regno dItalia. Le decorazioni commemorative, 2 volumes. Rome 1982, 1985. 294; 374 pages plus 53 plates. WITH: Le decorazioni al Merito, volume 1. Rome 1987. 502 pages, 52 plates. WITH: Le decorazioni al

valore dei regni di Sardegna e dItalie (1793-1946). Rome, 1976, 432 pages, 32 plates. WITH: Le decorazioni al valore della repubblica Italiana (medaglie al valore e croce al valore militare). Rome, 1981, 128 pages, 8 plates. All books casebound with jackets in very good condition. (5) £60-80 304 WERLICH, R. Russian Orders, Decorations and Medals including those of Imperial Russia, The Provisional Government, The Civil War and The Soviet Union. Second edition, Washington D.C., 1981. Quarto, (viii), 160 pages; illustrations throughout, many in colour. Casebound. Virtually as new. £30-40

SINGLE CAMPAIGN MEDALS x305 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Mysore 1790-92, 38mm, silver, straight grained edge, with ring suspension, worn, fine Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, pewter, Royal Mint, pierced, areas of oxidisation, fair (2) £80-120

306 Naval General Service 1793-1840, two clasps, London 13 March 1806, Java (Charles Murray.), suspension and retaining rod re-affixed, with second clasp additionally affixed immediately on top of first, nearly very fine £450-550 Charles Murray served as a Private, Royal Marines in H.M.S. London at the capture of the French ship-of-the-line Marengo and the frigate Belle Poule, after a running fight lasting five hours approaching the Azores, 13.3.1806; and as a Private, Royal Marines, in H.M.S. Hussar during the assistance given by the Navy in the capture of the island of Java from July until the surrender, 18.9.1811. Two other men with this name appear on the Admiralty Claimants’ List, both single clasp medals, for Egypt and St. Vincent. A single clasp Naval General Service Medal, with the clasp London 13 March 1806, was sold as part of the Whitaker Collection in 1890. Approximately 27 ‘London 13 March 1806’ clasps issued.

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April 21, 2011 - London

307

307 Field Officer’s Small Army Gold Medal for Orthes (Major Hon.ble Edwd. Mullens, 28th Foot.), gilded, with replacement lunettes, good very fine, with gold riband buckle, original riband and a fine colour miniature portrait of the recipient on ivory, this in a gold and gilt metal glazed oval frame, the reverse engraved ‘Major The Honble Edward Mullens. 28th Regt.’ (lot) £8,000-10,000 Major The Honourable Edward Mullins, born 1777, the 5th son of Thomas Mullins, 1st Baron Ventry, Kerry, Ireland (cr. 1800); commissioned Lieutenant 28th Foot, September 1795; advanced Brevet Major June 1813; Major September 1813, ‘served in Spain and Portugal, and received a medal for the battle of Orthes, at which he commanded some light companies.’ (Royal Military Calendar 1820, Vol. V., refers); died 1841. For the medals awarded to Major General T.A. de Moleyns, the grandson of Major the Hon. Edward Mullins, see Lot 206.

307

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308

309

310

311

308 Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Corunna (T. Jubb, 1st Foot Guards), pawn broker’s mark on back strap of clasp, toned, good very fine £700-800

x310 Military General Service 1793-1814, two clasps, Nivelle, Orthes (J. Mc.Murray, Corpl. 51st. Foot.), pawn broker’s mark to edge, edge bruise, nearly very fine £600-800

309 Military General Service 1793-1814, one clasp, Salamanca (Samuel Ward, 11th Light Dragoons.), toned, minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £700-800

x311 Military General Service 1793-1814, four clasps, Corunna, Barrosa, Pyrenees, Toulouse (George Lavis, 28th. Foot.), edge bruising, good fine £700-900

Private Samuel Ward born Edgerton, Kent; enlisted 11th Light Dragoons, 1812 and ‘served three years and eight months in France in the Peninsula, and at the battle of Salamanca, Burgos, Waterloo and at the siege of Bhurtpore and nineteen years in the East Indies.’ (Service Papers refer).

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April 21, 2011 - London

312

313

312 Military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Egypt, Corunna, Barrosa, Vittoria, Pyrenees (A. McGillivray, 28th Foot.), edge bruise, good very fine £1,100-1,300

314

315

314 Military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Orthes, Toulouse (T. Stevenson, R. Arty.), good very fine £600-700 PROVENANCE: Glendining, July 1927.

313 Military General Service 1793-1814, five clasps, Fuentes D’Onor, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Orthes, Toulouse (Thos. Irons, 71st Foot.), toned, minor edge bruising, therefore very fine, with length of original riband £1,200-1,400 Private Thomas Irons, born Dundee, c. 1789; enlisted in the 71st Foot, August 1807; served with the Regiment during the Peninsula War; discharged, November 1814; reenlisted in the 75th Foot, June 1815; discharged, October 1825, after 17 years and 205 days with the Colours.

315 Military General Service 1793-1814, nine clasps, Vimiera, Busaco, Fuentes D’Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, St. Sebastian, Toulouse (P. Donohoe, 52nd Foot), very fine £2,000-2,500 PROVENANCE: Spink July 1994

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317

318

x316 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, silver, Royal Mint, edge bruising, good very fine £600-700

318 Army of India 1799-1826, short hyphen reverse die type, one clasp, Bhurtpoor (J. Greason, 11th. Lt. Dragns.), officially impressed, Royal Mint, nearly extremely fine £900-1,100

x317 Honourable East India Company’s Medal for Seringapatam 1799, 48mm, bronze, Royal Mint, with contemporary bronze loop suspension, minor edge bruise, nearly extremely fine £250-300

296 Corporal John Greason, born Manchester, c.1801; enlisted in the 11th Light Dragoons, April 1821; served with the Regiment in India, and present at the Siege of Bhurtpoor, 17-18.1.1826; promoted Corporal, December 1837; discharged, July 1838, after 17 years and 117 days with the Colours, of which 15 years and 8 months were spent in India.

319 319 Matthew Boulton’s Medal for Trafalgar 1805, 47mm, gold (79.5g), a later post-1860 striking by W.J. Taylor using Boulton’s original dies, plain edge, good very fine, rare £6,000-8,000 PROVENANCE: Trafalgar sale, Sotheby’s, 5.10.2005

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April 21, 2011 - London

320 320 Waterloo 1815 (Oliver McKernon. Royal Artillery Driver), very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £800-1,000 Driver Oliver McKernon served with Major N. Turner’s “A” Troop during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815. PROVENANCE:

Gray Collection, 1908.

x321 Waterloo 1815 (Ben. Pickles, 2nd. Batt. Grenad. Guards.), with original steel clip and split ring suspension, good fine £1,200-1,400

321

322 x322 Waterloo 1815 (John Price, 2nd. Batt. Grenad. Guards.), with contemporary silver straight bar suspension decorated with three grenades, toned, good very fine, with original riband £2,000-2,500 Private John Price, born Shrewsbury, c.1787; enlisted in the Grenadier Guards, April 1814; served in Lieutenant-Colonel J.D. West’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 1618.6.1815, and was wounded through the body and in the arm at the Battle of Waterloo; discharged as a result of his wounds, November 1818, after 4 years and 212 days with the Colours.

Private Benjamin Pickles (spelt Pickells on published roll) served in Lieutenant-Colonel G. Colqueet’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

323 323 Waterloo 1815 (Ensign William Thomas, 3rd. Bat. 1st Foot. or R. Scots.), with original steel clip and contemporary silver straight bar suspender, this detached, nearly very fine, housed in a small fitted glazed box £3,500-4,500 William Thomas, Commissioned Ensign, Royal Scots Regiment, December 1814; served with the Regiment during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815; Lieutenant, April 1820.

324 Waterloo 1815 (Lieut. Edward Methold. 23rd Regt. R.W.F.), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, contact marks, nearly very fine, with later hinged silver suspension bar and contemporary topriband bar £400-600

www.spink.com

325

326 325 Waterloo 1815 (Abraham Sledding. 51st. Reg. Light Infantry.), edge bruise, light contact marks, very fine, with original steel clip and contemporary split ring suspension £1,000-1,200 Private Abraham Sledding served in Captain Richard Storer’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign, 1618.6.1815. PROVENANCE: Baldwin, May 1910

326 Waterloo 1815 (William Woodland, 1st Batt. 52nd Reg. Foot.), contact marks, nearly very fine, with original steel clip, this loose, and later ring suspension £1,600-2,000 Private William Woodland served in Captain W. Rowan’s Company during the Waterloo Campaign.


April 21, 2011 - London

327 327 Waterloo 1815 (Donald Gunn 1st Batt. 79th Reg. Foot.), minor edge bruising, therefore very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £1,400-1,600 Two men of this name appear for the regiment on the published transcription of the roll.

328

329 329 Waterloo 1815 (Lieut. George Hall. Royal Staff Corps), contemporarily renamed in upright serif capitals, contact marks, nearly very fine, with later silver clip and hinged suspension bar £400-500 Lieutenant George Dry Hall, commissioned Royal Staff Corps, November 1811; served during the Waterloo Campaign and was wounded at the battle; retired 1839; died at Hythe, February 1852 (The Waterloo Roll Call, Dalton, refers).

328 Waterloo 1815 (William Olliver, 2nd Batt. 95th Reg. Foot.), nearly very fine, with original steel clip and split ring suspension £3,000-3,500 Private William Olliver served in Captain J. McNemara’s No. 3 Company, 2nd Battalion, 95th Foot during the Waterloo Campaign, 16-18.6.1815.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

330

331

x330 Ghuznee 1839 (Pte. John Bates, H.M. 16th. Lancers.), edge engraved in running script, with silver eyelet on reverse, pitting, good fine £400-450 1569 Private John Bates, born Durham; enlisted 16th Lancers, 1828; his service included, ‘the campaign in Afghanistan in 1838/9 at the assault and capture of Ghuznee, the actions at Maharajpoor in 1843, Aliwal & Sobraon in 1846 Ramnuggur, the passage of Chenab & Sadoolapor in 1848 & Chilianwala & Goojerat in 1849’ (service papers refer); transferred 3rd Light Dragoons, 1846; discharged 1852.

x331 Ghuznee Cabul 1842, unnamed, with original steel clip and straight bar suspension, steel clip slightly corroded, good very fine £350-400

333 x332 Candahar Ghuznee Cabul 1842 (Private David Booker, Her Majesty’s 40th. Foot), engraved in running script, with later silver swivel suspension, heavy contact marks partially obscuring unit, therefore good fine £500-600

333 Defence of Jellalabad 1842, 1st ‘Mural Crown’ type, unnamed as issued, very fine, pierced for ring and straight bar suspension £200-300

x334 Defence of Jellalabad 1842, 2nd ‘Flying Victory’ type (Ar, St, H Ulyett 13 PALI.), officially impressed, with original steel clip and straight bar suspension, good fine £800-1,000 106 Armourer Sergeant Henry Ulyett, born Birmingham; enlisted 13th Light Infantry, 1839 and during his service was awarded ‘medal for Jellalabad, medal for Cabool, medal for Crimea and clasp Sebastopol, Turkish War Medal... medal for distinguished service in the field with annuity £20’; discharged 1861.

www.spink.com


April 21, 2011 - London

335

335 China 1842 (W.T.F. Jackson, Midshipmn H.M.S. Wellesley.), remnants of lacquer, very fine, with later silver clip and straight bar suspension £600-800 Commander William Travers Forbes Jackson served as Midshipman in the Wellesley and the Blenheim during the operations on and off the coast of China, and served on shore at the capture of Amoy (Mentioned in Rear Admiral W. Parker’s Despatch London Gazette 14.1.1842) and landed with the right Column under the command of Captain Herbert, with Captain Bourchier commanding the Battalion of Seamen present, at Chinghae, 10.10.1841 (Mentioned in Rear Admiral W. Parker’s Despatch London Gazette 1842, p396); passed his examination in October 1842, and served for the following two and half years as Mate in H.M.s Ships Camperdown (flag-ship of Sir Edward Brace) and Inconstant (Captain C.H. Freemantle) on the Home and Mediterranean stations; Lieutenant 15.1.1846, and served from that month as Additional-Lieutenant in H.M.S. Hibernia (flag-ship of Sir William Parker); Commander 31.1.1861.

337

338

x336 China 1842 (John Willson, Gunner & Driver, Royal Artillery.), heavy contact marks, good fine £280-340

x337 Scinde 1843, for Meeanee and Hyderabad (Beeka Sing 1st. Gr. Regt. N.I), impressed, with contemporary silver clip and straight bar suspension, very fine £400-450 338 Maharajpoor Star 1843 (Lieut. C.A. Jackson 31st Regt. N.I.), extremely fine, with original brass hook suspension £550-650

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

339

x339 Punniar Star 1843 (Private Richard Reach H.M. 3rd. Regt.), original brass riveted hook partially replaced with contemporary silver suspension, nearly very fine £300-350

x340 Sutlej 1845-46, for Moodkee, two clasps, Ferozeshuhur, Aliwal (John Chapman 31st. Regt.), good very fine £1,000-1,200

340

344

x342 Punjab 1848-49, two clasps, Chilianwala, Goojerat (Gunner Wm. Madgwick, 3rd. Tp. 2nd. Bde. H. Arty.), nearly very fine £300-350

343 South Africa 1834-53 (W. Ellis. Ordinary.), darkly toned, good very fine £300-350 William Ellis served as Ordinary Seaman in H.M.S. Castor.

2293 Private John Chapman, 31st Foot, killed in action at Aliwal, 28.1.1846.

x341 Sutlej 1845-46, for Sobraon, no clasp (:R:D: Logg 6th. Batn. Arty.), area of erasure before name, very fine £200-250

www.spink.com

x344 South Africa 1834-53 (James Dawson, 6th Regt.), minor edge bruising, good very fine £380-420


April 21, 2011 - London

345

346

x345 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Pegu (John Filmer. Ordy. “Salamander”), very fine £180-220

x346 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Persia (M. Ganley, 64th. Foot.), good very fine £340-380

x347 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Umbeyla (379 T Eveson HMs. 1st. Bn. 7th. Regt.), very fine £180-220

x348 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Jowaki 1877-8 (2480 Pte. John Flinn. 4 Bn. Rifle Bde.), nearly extremely fine £180-220

347

348

x349 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1885-7 (103 Pte. J. Hollis 2d. Bn. Hamps. R.), nearly very fine £100-130

350 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1885-7 (251 Pte. J. Vatcher 2d Bn. Hamps. R.), minor official correction to surname, very fine £80-120

x351 India General Service 1854-95, bronze issue, one clasp, Burma 1885-7 (227 Bearer Gunga Dan. Transport. En. Circle Bl.), small area of erasure after name, very fine £60-80

x352 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Burma 1887-89 (256 Sepoy Aurociem Minbu Mily. Police Bn.), very fine £70-90

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

353

355

358

359

x353 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Sikkim 1888 (573 Pte. B. Bailey 2nd. Bn. Derby. R.), suspension loose, nearly very fine £220-250

x357 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hazara 1891 (786 Pte. J. Carman. 1st. Bn. R.W. Fus.), edge bruise, very fine £140-180

x354 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hazara 1888 (1737 Pte. R. Taylor 2d. Bn. North’d. Fus.), minor official corrections, good very fine £120-150

x358 India General Service 1854-95, bronze issue, one clasp, Hazara 1891 (1219 Muleteer Shah Mir 14th. Bl. Infy.), nearly very fine £120-150

x355 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Lushai 1889-92 (2193 Pte. Velayudham 4th. Madras Infy. (Pioneers)), nearly very fine £180-220

x359 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, N.E. Frontier 1891 (47795 Bombardier W. Burgess No.2 Mn. By. R.A.), nearly very fine £180-220

x356 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, ChinLushai 1889-90 (1019 Pte. Siuram Wardam 28th. Bo. Infy.), test mark to edge, good fine £80-100

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April 21, 2011 - London

360

361

362

363

x360 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Samana 1891 (2122 Pte. W. Collins 2d. Bn. Manch. R.), nearly extremely fine £220-260

x362 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Waziristan 1894-5 (584 Sepoy Lehna Singh 38th Bl Infy), suspension slack, nearly very fine £90-120

x361 India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Chin Hills 1892-93 (459 Sepoy Gulab Khan Late U.C. Bn.), nearly very fine £220-260

x363 India General Service 1854-95, bronze issue, one clasp, Waziristan 1894-5 (Sahuran Halim 1st. Sikh Infy.), good very fine £80-100

x364 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Northwest Frontier, Looshai, lugs added to first clasp (Sepoy Dudheeram Kowar 4th. Goorkha Regt.), very fine £240-280

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

365

367

369

365 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-89, second clasp loose on riband as issued (Surgn. W.A. Corkery I.M.S.), good very fine £220-260

368 Baltic 1854 (William Ashford P.O. H.M.S. Samarang), contemporarily engraved in large serif capitals, traces of brooch mounting, suspension reaffixed, otherwise good very fine £60-80

Colonel William Alfred Corkery (1855-1914), Commissioned Surgeon, Bombay Medical Department, April 1881; served with the Indian Medical Service officiating to the 9th Native Infantry in Burma; Surgeon Major, April 1893; Lieutenant-Colonel, 2.4.1901; Colonel, 1.1.1909; retired, 25.8.1912

369 Baltic 1854, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £100-140

x366 India General Service 1854-95, two clasps, Burma 1889-92, Burma 1887-89, clasps in this order (Sepoy Mahomed Khan (2) Katha Mily. Police Bn.), surname officially corrected, very fine India General Service 1854-95, one clasp, Hunza 1891 (5731 Sepoy Ganda Singh Shan States Mily. Police Levy.), top lugs present, nearly very fine (2) £100-140

x367 India General Service 1854-95, three clasps, Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-89, Kachin Hills 1892-93, replacement lugs (Sepoy Fouza Singh Ava Sagaing Mily Police), partially officially corrected, suspension re-affixed, good fine £150-200

www.spink.com

370 Baltic 1854, unnamed as issued, test mark to edge at 9 o’clock, good very fine £100-140

x371 Crimea 1854-56, one clasp, Inkermann, unnamed as issued, light contact marks, very fine £80-120

x372 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Sebastopol (.... Sparrow. Coldm. Guards.), regimentally impressed, suspension claw and rivets crudely re-affixed with solder, contact marks, good fine £160-200


April 21, 2011 - London

379

375

373 Crimea 1854-56, three clasps, Alma, Inkermann, Sebastopol (J.C. Furnish. Color. Serjt. 77. Foot.), regimentally impressed, contact marks, nearly very fine £400-500 1702 Colour Sergeant James Charles Furnish, 77th Foot, wounded in action at Inkermann, 5.11.1854 (London Gazette 11.12.1854), and dangerously wounded 9.6.1855 (London Gazette 22.6.1855).

374 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol (Clr-Mkr. C. Cully. Rl. Hse. Arty.), officially impressed, right top lug pierced, rivet missing between 1st and 2nd clasp on right hand side, nearly very fine £500-700

375 Crimea 1854-56, four clasps, Alma, Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastopol, unofficial rivets between last two clasps (No. 1794. Serjt. J. Burton. Master. Tailor. R.B.), regimentally impressed, nearly very fine £500-600

380

x376 Turkish Crimea (2), British die, re-engraved in upright serif capitals ‘W. Culver. R.M. H.M.S. Royal. Albert.’, pierced for ring suspension as issued; Sardinian die, engraved in upper and lower case sloping script ‘.... R. Allen 17th Foot.’, with later straight bar suspension, generally good fine or better (2) £50-70 377 Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (3499. B. Tyas. The Buffs), contemporarily engraved in upright serif capitals, nearly very fine, plugged with contemporary foliate suspension £50-70 378 Turkish Crimea, Sardinian die (2), unnamed, both with areas of erasure, nearly very fine or better, first pierced for ring suspension as issued, other plugged with ring suspension (2) £50-60 x379 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Delhi (Geo. Bell. 2nd. Eurn. Bengal Fusrs.), lacquered, otherwise good very fine £160-200 380 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Driver Richd. Watkins, Rl. H. Art.), very fine £220-260 Driver Richard Watkins served in “E” Troop, Royal Horse Artillery during the Indian Mutiny 1857-58.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

383

384

x381 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (W. Larkins, 1st. Bn. 20th. Regt.), erasure before name, very fine £180-220

382 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (No.1174. Thos. Fruen. 3rd Bn. Rifle Bde.), number additionally and contemporarily engraved, very fine £240-280 Published transcription of roll gives recipient as ‘1170 Private Thomas Frewen’; this is, however, at variance with the original roll which gives recipient’s name as it appears on the medal. Entitlement is confirmed.

383 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Lucknow (Hy.. Roberts, 3rd. Bn. Rifle Bde.), minor edge bruise, very fine £250-300

x384 Indian Mutiny 1857-58, one clasp, Central India (Sub-Condr. C. Smith, Ordnance Dept.), nearly extremely fine £220-260

www.spink.com

386

387

385 China 1857-60, one clasp, Taku Forts 1860, unnamed as issued, top lugs present, nearly very fine £80-100

x386 China 1857-60, two clasps, Taku Forts 1860, Pekin 1860 (Farrr.Wm. Fraser, 4th Bde. Rl. Arty.), contact marks, nearly very fine £200-250

x387 New Zealand 1845-66, reverse dated 1863-1866 (2818 Chas. Mc.Carthy, 50th. Qn’s Own Rgt.), good very fine £340-380


April 21, 2011 - London

388

390

391

397

x388 Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp, Fenian Raid 1866 (Boy 1: Cl: J. Pickard, H.M.S. Niger), suspension claw re-pinned, good very fine £300-340

393 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (1072. Pte. T. Matthews. 2/4th. Foot), suspension re-affixed, good fine, with top silver riband bar £240-280

x389 Canada General Service 1866-70, one clasp Fenian Raid 1870 (Pte. J.F. McLeod 58th Bn.), initials officially corrected, good very fine £180-220

x394 South Africa 1877-79, one clasp, 1879 (2221. Sergt. R. Peffers. 2-21st Foot.), very fine £350-400

x390 Abyssinia 1867-68 (319 W. Smith 33rd D.W. Regt.), suspension re-affixed, very fine £180-220 x391 Ashantee 1873-74, no clasp (2205. Pte. H. Stuart. 42nd Highds. 1873-4), minor official correction to number, edge bruise, good very fine £150-200 2205 Private Henry Stuart, born Edinburgh; employed as a glass-cutter prior to military service; enlisted 42nd Foot, 1872; discharged medically unfit 1874.

x392 Ashantee 1873-74, one clasp, Coomassie (1906, Pte. W. Smith, 2Bn. R.W.Fus: 1873-4), suspension claw slack, minor edge bruising, therefore nearly very fine £280-320

2221 Sergeant Richard Peffers (incorrectly listed on published transcription of roll as ‘Neffers’), born Wantage, Berkshire; enlisted as Drummer 15th Foot, 1867; advanced Sergeant 1875; transferred 21st Foot, 1879; served with the regiment during the 1st Boer War, 1880-81 (entitled to L.S. & G.C.); transferred Army Service Corps, 1890; discharged 1894.

x395 Afghanistan 1878-80, no clasp (668. Sergt. W. Gould. 70th. Foot.), very fine £140-180 x396 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Ali Musjid (2602. Pte. J. Crutch, 4th. Bn. Rifle Bde.), number partially officially corrected, nearly very fine £180-220 x397 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Peiwar Kotal (1072. Pte. J. Mc.Keown. 2/8th. Regt.), scratch to obverse, otherwise extremely fine £220-250

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

399

400

401

402

x398 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Ahmed Khel, top lugs present (Sowar Sultan Sing 2d. Punjab Cavy.), small area of erasure after unit, edge bruise, good fine £70-90

x402 Cape of Good Hope General Service Medal 1880-97, two clasps, Basutoland, Bechuanaland (Sergt. S.R. Style.. C.M.Riflen.), good very fine £250-300

399 Afghanistan 1878-80, one clasp, Kandahar (1534. Pte. J. Smith, 66th Foot.), toned, very fine £200-240

403 Egypt 1882-89, dated, no clasp (1863 Sergt. T. Coghlan. C.&T.C.), minor edge bruising, therefore very fine £80-100

1534 Private John Smith, born Leicester; enlisted 6th Foot 1869; transferred 66th Foot the following year (entitled to a Kabul to Kandahar Star; Egypt Medal with Suakin 1885 and Tofrek clasps; and Khedive’s Star); discharged 1889.

400 Afghanistan 1878-80, three clasps, Peiwar Kotal, Charasia, Kabul (Sowar Guzzan Far Ali 12th. Bengal Cavy.), very fine £240-280 x401 Afghanistan 1878-80, three clasps, Charasia, Kabul, Kandahar (58B/586 Pte. M. M’Intyre. 72nd. Highrs.), very fine £380-420 58B/586 Private Michael McIntyre served with the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders during the Second Afghan War.

www.spink.com

404 Egypt 1882-89, undated, no clasp (A.J. Walsham, A.B. H.M.S. Rambler.), good very fine £80-120


April 21, 2011 - London

405

409

x405 Egypt 1882-89, undated, two clasps, Gemaizah 1888, Toski 1889 (2469. Pte. J. Lindop. 20th Husrs.), suspension slack, pitted from Star, very fine £300-350

406 Khedive’s Star 1882, reverse contemporarily engraved ‘1624 Pte. W. Mosedale 2. Derby. R.’, very fine £70-90

412

x409 Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, nearly extremely fine £50-70

410 Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, good very fine £50-70 411 Khedive’s Star 1884-6, unnamed as issued, very fine

407 Khedive’s Star 1882, unnamed as issued, good very fine £50-70

x408 Khedive’s Star, 1882, unnamed as issued, very fine £50-70

£50-70

x412 North West Canada 1885, no clasp (G’nr. F. Greenstock. M.G.A.), engraved in upright sans-serif capitals, good very fine £250-300

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

413

x413 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, 1887-8 (2862. Pte. F. Sealey. 1/W.I.Rgt.), very fine £180-220

415

417

x416 East and West Africa 1887-1900, two clasps, 1893-94, 1892 (541. Pte. W.F. Jordan. 1/W.I.Rgt.), minor edge bruising, very fine £220-260 Clasps confirmed, additionally entitled to ‘Sierra Leone 1898-99’ clasp.

x414 East and West Africa 1887-1900, for M’wele 1895-6, no clasp (Jamdr Abdullah Shah 24th Bo. Infy.), good very fine £120-160

x415 East and West Africa 1887-1900, one clasp, 1900 (178 Corpl: Jinadu Lawoyin. 2nd N. Nigeria Regt.), good very fine £140-180

www.spink.com

x417 East and West Africa 1887-1900, two clasps, 1897-98, Sierra Leone 1898-99 (1943 Pte. J. Hamilton 2/W.I.R.), minor edge bruising, very fine £240-280

x418 British South Africa Company’s Medal 1890-97, for Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (T.S.M. John Lenson. B.F.F.), extremely fine £200-250


April 21, 2011 - London

419

x419 Central Africa 1891-98, no clasp, ring suspension, unnamed as issued, very fine £140-180

x420 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (3871 Pte. R.E. Leonard 1st. Bn. Bedford Regt.), good fine £120-150

x421 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Relief of Chitral 1895 (414 Dooly Bearer Chunni Comst. Transpt. Deptt.), good very fine £90-120

x422 India General Service 1895-1902, E.VII.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1901-02 (1397 Sepoy Baga Singh. 1st. Pjb: Infy:), lacquered, good very fine £70-90

423

426

x423 India General Service 1895-1902, E.VII.R., bronze issue, one clasp, Waziristan 1901-02 (Syce Antoo Pte. Servant), good very fine £60-80

x424 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Malakand 1897 (3999 Sepoy Mussalli 22d. Pjb. Infy.), suspension slack, nearly very fine £120-160

425 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897 (4918 Pte. J. Smith 2d. Bn. Ryl. Ir. Regt.), edge bruising, good very fine £130-160 Clasp entitlement unconfirmed

x426 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (2895 Dvr. J. Foster 3d. Fd. By: R.A.), pitting, good very fine £120-150

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

427

430

x427 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., bronze issue, two clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (236. Dooly Bearer. Manda. Aduee. C.T. Deptt.), nearly very fine £120-160

x428 India General Service 1895-1902, V.R., three clasps, Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Waziristan 1901-02 (1767 Sepoy Khaika Din 5th Pjb. Infy), good very fine £150-200

429 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98, engraved in Arabic script as to Egyptian/ Sudanese troops, very fine £80-100

x430 Queen’s Sudan 1896-98, bronze (Cook Popnasumy, Q.O. Mad. S. & M.), very fine £140-180

www.spink.com

432

434

x431 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-98, bronze, no clasp (Syce Buchoo 1st Bo: Lcrs.), minor edge bruising, very fine £80-120

x432 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Hafir, unnamed as issued, good very fine £100-140

433 Khedive’s Sudan 1896-1908, one clasp, Khartoum (4891 Pte. G. Barnes 1st Roy. Warwick Regt.), engraved in sloping serif script, toned, minor edge bruising, otherwise good very fine £80-100

x434 East and Central Africa 1897-99, one clasp, 1898 (644. Pte. Yasin. 27/Bom: Inf.), light contact marks, very fine £250-300

x435 British North Borneo Company’s Medal 1897-1916, bronze issue, one clasp, Punitive Expedition, unnamed as issued, extremely fine £300-400


April 21, 2011 - London

435

438

442

x436 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, bronze, no clasp (686 Bhisti Islam Din, S & T. Corps.), partially officially corrected, nearly very fine £60-80

x441 Queen’s Mediterranean 1899-1902 (5547 Pte. L. Luntley, W. York: Regt.), initial officially corrected, polished, therefore nearly very fine £180-220

437 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps, Cape Colony, South Africa 1902 (5361 Pte. J.A. Clare. Lincoln: Regt.), minor edge bruising, very fine King’s South Africa 1901-02, two clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (Civ. Surg. W.H. Sturge.), edge bruising, good very fine (2) £80-100

x442 St. John Ambulance Brigade Medal for South Africa 1899-1902 (1879. Pte. S. Lees. Oldham Corps.), good very fine £260-300

x438 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Johannesburg (3149 Pte. G. Gotts, Norfolk Regt.), good very fine £70-90 439 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901 (692 L. Corpl: A. Collier. Rly: Pnr: Regt.), nearly very fine £60-80 440 Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, five clasps, Tugela Heights, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (80208 Gnr: M. Aird, 64th Bty: R.F.A.), good very fine £70-90

x443 Yorkshire Imperial Yeomanry Medal for South Africa 1901-02, 3rd Battalion (22983 J.W. Dewhurst.), pawn broker’s mark to edge at 11 o’clock, contact marks, therefore nearly very fine £120-160 x444 Anglo-Boere Oorlog 1899-1902 (Burg. A. Swan.), suspension claw re-pinned, edge bruise, good very fine £60-80 445 China 1900, no clasp (W. Lloyd, Boy 1 Cl., H.M.S. Dido.), light scratch marks to rank, very fine £120-160 x446 China 1900, bronze, no clasp (327 Cooly Gulam Mohamed Cooly Corps.), nearly very fine £100-130

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

447

Sir Robert Bredon 447 The Rare China 1900 Defence of Legations Medal to Sir R.E. Bredon [K.C.M.G.], Deputy Inspector General of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service During the Boxer Rebellion, Late 97th Foot China 1900, one clasp, Defence of Legations (Dep: Insp: Genl: R.E. Bredon,), officially engraved, extremely fine, with the following documents and letters &c.: - Chancery Notification of the award of the C.M.G., dated 6.7.1903 - Grant of the Dignity of a C.M.G., named to Robert Edward Bredon, Esquire, dated 26.6.1903 - Chancery enclosure for the award of the C.M.G., dated 17.8.1903 - Chancery Notification of the award of the K.C.M.G., dated 23.6.1904 - Grant of the Dignity of a K.C.M.G., named to Robert Edward Bredon, Esquire, C.M.G., dated 24.6.1904 - Warrant dispensing with the Investiture of the K.C.M.G., named to Robert Edward Bredon, Esquire, C.M.G., dated 24.6.1904 - Chancery enclosure for the award and dispensation warrant of the K.C.M.G., dated 29.7.1904 - Letter to the recipient from the Foreign Office informing him that he is to be issued with a China Medal with clasp Defence of Legations, named to R.E. Bredon, Esq., and dated 31.12.1902 - Hand written enclosure sent with the medal, named to R.E. Bredon, Esq., and dated Peking, 12.3.1903 £5,000-7,000 Sir Robert Edward Bredon, K.C.M.G., was born at Portadown, Ireland, in February 1846, the son of Dr. Alexander Bredon, and was educated at the Royal School, Dungannon, and Trinity College, Dublin, where he read Mathematics and Classics. He passed out in First Place from Netley for the Army Medical Staff, 1867, and was appointed Assistant Surgeon to the 97th (Earl of Ulster’s) Regiment, April 1867; on retiring from the Army in 1873 he joined the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs Service, whose Inspector-General at the time was his brother-in-law, Sir Robert Hart. He was appointed Deputy Inspector-General of Customs in 1898, and was present at the Defence of Legations in Peking at the time of the Boxer Rebellion, 20th June to 14th August 1900. He was made a Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1903 (London Gazette 26.6.1903), and the following year was advanced to a Knight Commander of the Order (London Gazette 24.6.1904). On the retirement of Hart in 1908, he was appointed Acting Inspector-General, and in 1910 he was appointed to the Chinese Board of Customs, but retired in deference to the wishes of the British Government. He died in July 1918. Sir Robert Bredon married Lily Virginia Banks in 1879, and they had one daughter, Juliet Bredon, the well-known author (See following Lot). PROVENANCE: Spink, 20.11.2008

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April 21, 2011 - London

448

448 Medallions Awarded to Miss Juliet Bredon, Daughter of Sir Robert Bredon Peking Siege Commemoration Medal 1900, by J. Taylor Foot, bronze, 57mm, obverse showing the Chien Men engulfed in flames, with a cannon below, and the inscription ‘Junii XX - Augusti XIV, A.D. MDCCCC’; reverse showing Britannia and Germania clasping hands, with a Chinese figure in the background, and the inscription ‘Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin. Ichabod!’, the edge impressed ‘Juliet Bredon’, (BHM 3672), nearly extremely fine and very rare to a lady Grand Prize Medallion for the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, 73mm x 65mm, bronze, the obverse showing the American Eagle, unnamed, good very fine (2) £200-300 The Peking Siege Commemoration Medals were struck at the instigation of Mr Arthur D. Brent, an employee of the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank, who was himself present throughout the siege, and were presented to those who were present at the Defence of Legations, 20th June to 14th August 1900. The inscription on the reverse represents those words that appeared on the wall at Belshazzar’s Feast, and were interpreted to mean ‘thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting’ (Daniel, Ch.5, v.26-27). Miss Juliet Bredon was responsible for organising the Chinese exhibits at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. PROVENANCE: Spink, 20.11.2008

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

449

x449 China 1900, one clasp, Relief of Pekin (C.W. Tubby, Ord., H.M.S. Barfleur.), nearly very fine £380-420 188805 Able Seaman Charles Walter Tubby, born Battersea, London, 1879; enlisted Royal Navy as Boy 2nd Class, 1897; served in H.M.S. Barfleur, 1.10.189822.1.1902, and was wounded in action at Lang-fan, whilst serving as part of Admiral E.H. Seymour’s International Force, ‘bullet wound to left side of neck’, 19.6.1900.

x450 China 1900, bronze, one clasp, Relief of Pekin, with top lugs (2047 Cooly Mohamed Din S & T. Corps.), small area of attempted erasure to unit, nearly very fine £120-160 x451 Ashanti 1900, 1st high relief type, no clasp (864 Pte. Sumbuleta. 2nd C. Africa Regt.), nearly very fine £140-180 x452 Tibet 1903-04, bronze issue, no clasp (410 Cooly Dhanaman S.& T. Corps), nearly extremely fine £60-80 453 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (4) (1375 Rfmn. Panchaharka Rai, 3/11/ Gurkha Rfls.; 2326 Sepoy Sultan Bux, 2-54 Sikhs; 762 Havr. Rampal Singh, 3-150 Infy.; 3219 Dr-Havr. Shariff Khan, 3 S & M.), contact marks, generally nearly very fine (4) £80-100 www.spink.com

454 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp (2), Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919 (998 Rfmn. Sher Zaman, 2/125/Rfls.); Mohmand 1933 (38032 Gunner Pawittar Singh, Mtn. Bty.), test cut to first, good fine, the second very fine India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (9312 Sep, Mohd, Suleman, 3-7 Rajput R.), nearly very fine (3) £50-70 455 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1919-21 (3) (5903 Sepoy Udai Singh, 16 Rajputs.; 2559 Sep. Kartar Singh, 82 Pjbis.; 9943 Dvr. Hakim Singh, 2 M.T.Coy. R.A.S.C.), nearly very fine (3) £70-90 456 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, Waziristan 1921-24 (2) (2474 L-Nk. Abdul Hanif, 4-7 Rajput R.; 596 Sep. Suba Singh, 1-3 S. Prs.), nearly very fine (2) £40-60 457 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (2) (9053 Sep. Ajaib Singh, 1-1 Punjab R.; 8316 Sep. Sham Singh, 211 Sikh R.), nearly very fine (2) £50-70


April 21, 2011 - London 458 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., one clasp, North West Frontier 1930-31 (3) (6208 Pnr. Tara Singh, 2 Bombay Pnrs.; TA-23713 Dvr. Ruldoo Ram, 1 C.B.T. Coy.; 62325 Dvr. Sher Mohd., 27 A.T. Coy.), very fine or better (3) £60-80 459 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps (2), Afghanistan N.W.F. 1919, Mahsud 1919-20 (337 Sepoy Bhartu, 2-150 Infy); North West Frontier 1930-31, North West Frontier 1935 (7617 Sep. Amar Singh, 2-1 Punjab R.), good fine or better (2) £60-80 460 India General Service 1908-35, G.V.R., two clasps (2), North West Frontier 1930-31, Mohmand 1933 (44759 Dvr. Mahmad, 24 A.T. Coy.); North West Frontier 1930-31, North West Frontier 1935 (66673 Dvr. Bagh Ali Khan, 29 A.T. Coy.), minor official correction to surname on last, very fine (2) £60-80 461 1914 Star (395697 2.Cpl. J. Sloane. R.E.), nearly very fine 1914-15 Star (G-1212. Pte. A. Bassett. R.W. Kent. R.), good very fine, together with named Record Office enclosure Mercantile Marine War Medal (George Calliaras), very fine Victory Medal (1159 Pte. E. Abrams. W. York. R.), good fine British Red Cross Society Medal for War Service, the top riband bar engraved ‘F.T. Taylor’, good very fine British Red Cross Society First Aid Badge, gilt and enamel, the reverse engraved ‘O16252 I. Fox’, very fine (6) £80-100 G-1212 Private Albert Bassett, born Penshurst, Tonbridge, Kent; served with the 8th Battalion the Queens’ Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) during the Great War; killed in action on the Western Front, 11.11.1915, and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

462 1914 Star (10595 Sjt. S. Rattle. R. Dub: Fus.), nearly very fine £80-100 10595 Sergeant Samuel Rattle, born Woodbridge, Suffolk; served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers, during the Great War; killed in action on the Western Front, 25.4.1915; and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium

463 The 1914-15 Star to Sergeant W.W. Fairless [D.C.M. and Bar, M.M.], Royal Engineers 1914-15 Star (1075 Spr. W.W. Fairless. R.E.), good very fine, scarce to a triple gallantry winner £100-140 D.C.M. London Gazette 23.6.1915 1075 Sapper W.W. Fairless, 1st Northumbrian Field Company, Royal Engineers, Territorial Force ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in going out and working in front of the parapet in close proximity to the enemy. Sapper Fairless is a man who is always chosen for a dangerous piece of work.’ D.C.M. Second Award Bar London Gazette 2.12.1919 457142 Cpl. (A./Sjt.) W.W. Fairless, D.C.M., M.M., 446th (N’bn.) Fd. Coy., R.E., T.F. (Ashington) ‘On nights of 12th, 14th, and 15th October, 1918, he formed one of a small party engaged on important reconnaissances of River Selle, from Le Cateau to St. Souplet. The work had to be carried out at a distance of about 500 yards in advance of our outpost line. On each occasion he rendered very valuable assistance, and displayed great coolness and courage in entering deserted buildings near the river, and when under fire from enemy snipers and machine guns. On the morning of our attack he rendered invaluable service in leading his section of sappers, and in getting the infantry bridges across the Selle. Throughout he showed great gallantry and zeal.’ M.M. London Gazette 21.10.1918 457142 Cpl. W.W. Fairless, D.C.M, 446th (N’bn.) Fd. Coy., R.E., T.F. (Ashington) 1075 Sergeant William Wilson Fairless, D.C.M., M.M., was born in Newcastle and served during the Great War with the 1st Northumbrian Field Company, Royal Engineers, Territorial Force, on the Western Front from 19.1.1915. One of only 19 men in the Royal Engineers in the Great War to be awarded a Bar to the D.C.M.

x464 1914-15 Star (5) (Ply. 15477. Pte. A.J. Wood. R.M.L.I.; 81432 Pnr: H. Shaw. R.E.; 16278, Pte. E. Andrews, D. of Corn. L.I.; S-4748 Pte. R. Heaney, R. Highrs.; Z-2525 Pte. M. Hayes. Rif: Brig:), generally good fine or better British War Medal (2) (182655 Gnr. E.W. Binnington. R.A.; 38690 Pte. A. Mellor. S.Wales Bord.), number officially corrected on first, nearly very fine Victory Medal (3) (244419 Gnr. J.H. Pickering. R.A.; 121096 Spr. H. Simpson. R.E.; 34312 Sjt. F.H. Bowen. R. Fus.), generally nearly very fine War Medal, very fine (11) £80-100 465 1914-15 Star (3) (No.2496 Sowar Habib Khan, 5/Cavy.; No.737 Gunr. Jahan Dad, 27/Mtn. By.; No.1581 Sowar Kishan Singh, 3/Horse.), pitting to first, otherwise generally nearly very fine (3) £50-70 2496 Sowar Habib Khan, served with the 38th King George’s Own Central India Horse (5th Indian Cavalry) during the Great War; died, 1.1.1918, and is buried in St. Sever Cemetery, France.

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria 466 1914-15 Star (4) (No.1367 Sepoy Rasool, 106 Hazara Pnrs.; No.4466 Spr. Ali Muhd, 3/S.& M.; No.1362 Dvr. Mir Ali, 19/Mule Corps.; No.869 Dvr. Mohd. Alam, 18/Mule Corps.), generally nearly very fine (4) £50-70 467 1914-15 Star (3) (No.1199 Sepoy Lalta Singh, 11/Rajputs.; No.3055 Sepoy Khubi Singh, 16/Rajputs.; No.260 Sepoy Kashmir Singh, 1/27/Punjabis.), good fine or better (3) £40-60 468 British War Medal (5) (Lieut. A.C. Orrell.; Capt. G.E.L. Poulden.; Capt. H.J.G. Webb.; Capt. T.S.G. Martin.; Lieut. C.T.V. Marshall. R.A.F.), generally good very fine (5) £120-150 Lieutenant Arthur Cecil Orrell, born July 1887; served with the Denbighshire Hussars Yeomanry, May 1904 to March 1913; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, 29.6.1915; served during the Great War in South West Arabia from 20.1.1916; Lieutenant, 1.7.1917; discharged, 20.6.1919. Captain George Edward Lather Poulden; born Bristol; Commissioned Inspector of Works and Honorary Lieutenant, Royal Engineers (Services), 15.11.1914; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 21.11.1914; Captain, 13.7.1915; retired, 13.10.1919. Captain Herbert James Groves Webb, born July 1894; enlisted as 257 Sapper, Divisional Engineers, Royal Naval Division, 26.9.1914, and served during the Great War in the Gallipoli Theatre of War from 26.4.1915; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 7.3.1916; Captain, 19.11.1918; discharged, 2.8.1919. Captain Thomas Stanhope Gildea Martin, Commissioned Lieutenant, Royal Army Medical Corps; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 27.5.1915. Lieutenant Charles Thomas Vigors Marshall, served during the Great War with the 9th Lancers on the Western Front from 18.10.1915; Commissioned as an Observer, Royal Flying Corps, 23.8.1917, serving with 51 Squadron on Home Defence based in Norfolk; transferred to 102 Squadron, 10.12.1917, Lieutenant, Royal Air Force, 1.4.1918; discharged, 18.3.1919.

469 British War Medal (9) (2389 Dfdr. Sita Ram, 5 Cavy.; 2350 Sepoy Asd, 3 Ksmr. S. Rfls.; 1908 Sepoy Indar Singh, 57 Rfls. F.F.; 1549 Sepoy Hazrat Shah, 107 Pnrs.; 2691 Nk. Nadir Khan, 121 Pnrs.; 2014 Br. Thangmi, A.B.C.; 322 Nk. Wazir Chand, 2 Camel Cps.; 885 Dr. Karam Ilahi, 2 Mule Cps.; 2182 Dvr. Suraina, B. Mule Depot.), rank officially corrected on fourth; fifth partially officially corrected; retaining rod loose on second, good fine or better (9) £70-90

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470 British War Medal (8) (26013 Dr. Baz Khan, 6 M.B.; 104 Gnr. Jagat Singh, 38 Mtn. Batty.; 942 Dvr. Jaimal Singh, 24 P. Bty. F.F.; 3616 Sepoy Bishnu Desai, 19 Infy; 6021 Sepoy Ramzan Khan, 99 Infy; 2602 Sepoy Shaik Abdulla, 110 Infy.; 2782 Sepoy Mohan Ram, 122 Infy.; 1097 Sepoy Anji Singh, Alwar I.S. Infy.), fifth and eighth with official corrections, very fine or better (8) £60-80 471 British War Medal (8) (531 Sepoy Narata Singh, 1Bn. Cps Guides.; 1079 Sepoy Said Wali, 1Bn. Cps. Guides.; 4249 Sepoy Sucha Singh, 36 Sikhs.; 3521 Sepoy Sarwan Singh, 62 Pjbis.; 3997 Sepoy Bishan Singh. 72 Pjbis.; 1783 Sepoy Bahadur Khan, 1-89 Pjbis.; 3288 Havr. Bhagat. Ram. 1-91 Punjabis.; 6338 Sepoy Sahib Dad, 2-127 Baluchis.), third with official corrections, good fine or better (8) £60-80 472 Victory Medal (3) (2.Lieut. T.H. Brownlee.; 2.Lieut. J.M. Wilcock.; Capt. W.A. Watts.), nearly very fine or better (3) £60-80 Lieutenant Thomas Harold Brownlee, born 1895; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Royal Field Artillery, 22.3.1918; served during the Great War on the Western Front from 8.6.1918 (Gassed in action); discharged, 27.3.1919, with the rank of Lieutenant. Lieutenant Joseph Mark Wilcock, born Lancaster, December 1887; served with the Westmoreland and Cumberland Yeomanry; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, 1.1.1916; served with the 4th Battalion on the Western Front from 25.5.1916; relinquished his Commission on account of ill-health caused by wounds, 5.3.1917, and granted the rank of Lieutenant. Captain William Anderson Watts, born January 1870; Commissioned Second Lieutenant, Army Service Corps, 11.11.1914; Lieutenant, 1.12.1915; served during the Great War in France from 2.7.1916; Captain, 9.5.1918; relinquished his Commission, 2.5.1919.

473 Victory Medal (11) (1843 Dvr. R. Sakhi Mohd, R.A.; 4065 Sepoy Nur Khan, 57 Rfls F.F.; 4513 Rfmn. Mohd. Zaman, 104 Rfls.; 633 Sepoy Fazal Ahmed, 2-30 Pjbis.; 4863 Sepoy Lall Khan, 72 Pjbis.; 2435 Sepoy Bagga Khan, 1-89 Pjbis.; 2950 Sepoy Pahlwan Khan, 92 Pjbis.; 4891 Sepoy Ghafur Khan, 107 Pnrs.; 1712 Dvr. Jiwan, 6 Mule. Cps.; 1368 Dvr. Mohd. Khan, 9 Mule Cps.; 89 Gnr. Nezam Khan, 25 Pack Bty.), attempted erasure to rank on last, good fine or better (11) £90-120 474 Territorial Force War Medal (1333 Gnr. G. Hopkins. R.A.), good very fine, together with an unrelated Territorial Army lapel badge, reverse numbered ‘367174’ £80-100


April 21, 2011 - London 475 Territorial Force War Medal (1417 Pte. G.R. Clarke. R.W. Kent R.), very fine £120-150 476 Naval General Service 1915-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1936-1939 (Ply. 22110 V.R. Bees. Mne. R.M.), very fine £70-90 477 Naval General Service 1915-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Near East (L/FX. 893392 A.G. Marshall. E.M.(A). R.N.), very fine £70-90 478 General Service 1918-62 (2), G.V.R., one clasp, Iraq (314157 Spr. W.B. Ellis. R.E.); G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine (7263444. Pte. G. Cattle. R.A.M.C.), edge bruise to first, good very fine (2) £80-120 479 General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Palestine 1945-48 (19190472 Pte. R. Mills. R. Lincolns.), good very fine £50-70 x480 General Service 1918-62, G.VI.R., one clasp, Malaya (4387896 Pte. R. Bennison. Green Howards.), last letter officially corrected, good very fine £40-60 481 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (22546432 Gnr. M. Coles. R.A.), good very fine General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Northern Ireland (24160775 Spr. R.E. Hobbs RE.), nearly extremely fine (2) £80-100 482 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Malaya (2486367 S.A.C. R.G. James. R.A.F.), first initial of name officially corrected, extremely fine, in named card box of issue £40-60 483 General Service 1918-62, E.II.R., one clasp, Cyprus (23469801 Sigmn. J.T. Brown. R. Sigs.), nearly extremely fine £40-60 484 India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (3) (14104 Sepoy Amar Singh, 27 Rajput R.; 15124 L-Naik Sis Ram, 3-6 Raj. Rif.; 10375 L-Naik Sadhu Singh, 1-13 F.F. Rif.), number partially officially corrected on second, edge bruising and contact marks to first, otherwise good very fine (3) £60-80

485 India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (3) (36650 Driver Sawan Singh, 7 Mtn. Bty.; 38252 Driver Prem Dass. 13 Mtn. Bty.; 4509 Sepoy Samand Khan, 5 Rd. Constn. Bn.), minor edge bruising to last, good very fine (3) £60-80 486 India General Service 1936-39, one clasp (2), North West Frontier 1936-37 (13997 L-Naik Ahmed Khan, 3-6 Raj. Rif.); North West Frontier 1937-39 (42448 Dvr. Khushi Mohd., 3 Mtn. Bty.), nearly very fine (2) £50-70 487 India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1936-37 (57-F. 2B-Smith Jiwan Khan, 2 Rd. Constn. Bn.), unit partially officially corrected, very fine Second World War Medals (8), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Africa Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal; War Medal (2), generally very fine or better (9) £70-90 488 India General Service 1936-39, one clasp, North West Frontier 1937-39 (3) (6019 Sepoy Ram Singh, 1-17 Dogra R.; 17291 Clk. Mangal Singh, 19 Mtn. Bty.; G.C.116 Sep. Mang Ladha, 1 Garr. Coy.), very fine (3) £60-80 489 Second World War Medals (10), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal; War Medal, generally good very fine (10) £180-220 490 Second World War Medals (10), 1939-1945 Star; Atlantic Star; Air Crew Europe Star; Africa Star; Pacific Star; Burma Star; Italy Star; France and Germany Star; Defence Medal; War Medal, the Atlantic Star lacquered, generally good very fine (10) £180-220 491 Air Crew Europe Star, nearly extremely fine £120-150 492 General Service 1962-2007, one clasp, Malay Peninsula (069427 J.N. Keenan. S.A. R.N.), very fine £50-60

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Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

493

493 General Service 1962-2007, four clasps, Borneo, Malay Peninsula, South Arabia, Northern Ireland, later clasps loose on riband as issued (RM.20666 J. Dent. Mne. R.M.), edge bruise, nearly very fine ÂŁ400-500 Clasps confirmed.

THE END OF THE SALE

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April 21, 2011 - London NOTES

Page 227


Written Bids Form This form should be sent or faxed to be received by Spink Commission Bids Office in advance of the sale. References should be supplied in good time to be taken up before the sale. Bids received later than one hour before the start of the sale may not be processed.

69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET Tel: (020) 7563 4020/4005 Fax: (020) 7563 4037

ORders, Decorations, campaign medals and militaria LONDON, THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011

Sale Title

Date

Code Name

Sale No.

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria

Thursday 21 April 2011 at 10.00 a.m.

KARS

11007

I request Spink, without legal obligations of any kind on its part, to bid on the following Lots up to the price given below. I understand that if my bid is successful the Purchase Price payable will be the sum of the final bid and a premium as a percentage of the final bid (together with any VAT chargeable). The Rate of Premium is 20% of the final hammer price of each lot; VAT is chargeable on the purchase price of daggered (†) and (Ω) lots at the standard rate (currently 20%), and on lots marked (x) at the reduced rate (currently 5% on the hammer and 20% on the premium). All bids shall be treated as offers made on the Terms and Conditions of Buyers printed in the catalogue. I also understand that Spink provides the service of executing bids on behalf of clients for the convenience of clients and that Spink will not be held responsible for failing to execute bids. If identical commission bids are received for the same Lot, the commission bid received first by Spink will take precedence. Please note that you will not be notified if there are higher written bids received. If you require such notification then this is available on bids made via Spink’s online service.

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Continued...


Sale No. 11007

Date: Thursday 21 April, 2011

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY IN BLOCK LETTERS AND ENSURE THAT BIDS ARE IN STERLING Lot Number (in numerical order)

Price Bid £ (excluding Buyer’s Premium)

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AUCTION RESULTS Sale:

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals

and Militaria

Sale No:

1008

Date:

Thursday 25 November 2010

Venue:

London

Spink & Son Ltd 69 Southampton Row Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET Telephone: (020) 7563 4000

The following prices in sterling do not include the buyer’s premium and are rounded to the nearest pound. Lots which did not sell are not shown. Spink & Son are not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. Lot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43

Price £180,000 £110,000 £130,000 £210,000 £7,800 £2,800 £185,000 £7,500 £4,000 £880 £900 £1,150 £1,900 £1,400 £23,000 £15,000 £1,000 £4,500 £4,000 £2,400 £13,000 £3,400 £4,000 £1,800 £3,200 £2,600 £2,800 £2,600 £900 £1,200 £18,000 £6,500 £7,000 £460 £800 £2,100 £2,100 £3,300 £1,150 £1,800 £440

Lot 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86

Price £2,800 £550 £2,000 £1,000 £550 £1,800 £3,600 £800 £2,100 £900 £2,400 £140 £2,400 £2,100 £1,500 £800 £950 £110 £1,450 £1,250 £1,450 £700 £180 £300 £300 £800 £750 £700 £360 £2,300 £750 £5,200 £380 £750 £220 £750 £170 £400 £160 £460 £140

Lot 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127

Price £100 £120 £150 £100 £220 £130 £280 £130 £500 £170 £100 £210 £240 £760 £140 £120 £220 £220 £240 £110 £300 £320 £320 £320 £320 £380 £300 £320 £320 £320 £320 £240 £340 £260 £400 £150 £320 £280 £360 £140 £340

Lot 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168

Price £400 £90 £80 £320 £380 £400 £900 £2,000 £170 £1,000 £800 £620 £580 £200 £190 £100 £650 £100 £100 £13,000 £800 £3,000 £3,000 £1,700 £3,200 £800 £1,600 £550 £480 £220 £450 £300 £150 £130 £80 £190 £320 £950 £130 £220 £260

Lot 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209

Price £140 £280 £320 £200 £300 £360 £280 £200 £220 £800 £280 £550 £170 £160 £220 £160 £650 £140 £120 £130 £260 £120 £280 £70 £140 £220 £80 £140 £80 £340 £300 £140 £220 £260 £80 £110 £240 £70 £90 £850 £90

Lot 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 248 249 250 251 252

Price £440 £260 £380 £60 £60 £60 £180 £110 £90 £190 £80 £320 £100 £650 £240 £280 £280 £280 £220 £130 £110 £220 £240 £130 £120 £120 £240 £40 £320 £60 £190 £100 £120 £160 £500 £320 £110 £200 £180 £170 £170


Lot

Price

Lot

Price

Lot

Price

Lot

Price

Lot

Price

Lot

Price

253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 266 267 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 308 309 310

£170 £120 £200 £140 £110 £120 £90 £220 £130 £170 £240 £110 £120 £100 £100 £80 £130 £170 £280 £450 £1,400 £900 £900 £1,100 £460 £380 £300 £1,150 £1,750 £900 £900 £850 £900 £850 £440 £800 £420 £380 £340 £480 £440 £320 £360 £400 £520 £300 £220 £2,000 £500 £200 £700

311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 321 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 336 338 339 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366

£1,200 £2,500 £2,900 £2,300 £400 £1,600 £200 £170 £900 £110 £520 £750 £1,250 £120 £190 £80 £180 £420 £380 £460 £360 £180 £1,700 £110 £150 £360 £420 £180 £190 £100 £120 £170 £480 £190 £260 £11,000 £400 £600 £580 £760 £1,300 £1,200 £1,700 £1,500 £1,200 £230 £1,700 £500 £230 £1,100 £700

367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420

£500 £220 £270 £1,500 £1,000 £650 £210 £300 £170 £70 £70 £1,900 £70 £210 £80 £450 £750 £650 £750 £800 £400 £1,900 £600 £1,800 £90 £450 £500 £380 £150 £160 £140 £800 £320 £1,500 £900 £1,000 £170 £190 £220 £1,100 £500 £240 £220 £1,800 £480 £160 £110 £900 £150 £40 £350

421 422 423 424 425 426 427 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472

£700 £2,400 £3,200 £350 £3,500 £850 £1,300 £2,700 £290 £1,100 £700 £420 £550 £1,100 £1,200 £1,600 £600 £1,300 £1,800 £2,500 £650 £1,500 £800 £900 £1,000 £280 £120 £320 £230 £140 £290 £190 £180 £130 £130 £90 £40 £480 £210 £280 £210 £50 £260 £380 £1,600 £80 £500 £190 £230 £450 £800

473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523

£1,000 £650 £290 £320 £400 £100 £550 £650 £2,200 £450 £1,100 £580 £320 £120 £650 £300 £650 £240 £320 £650 £300 £130 £160 £850 £300 £170 £90 £2,500 £1,400 £600 £2,600 £1,700 £800 £800 £1,300 £2,800 £1,600 £580 £200 £650 £580 £130 £80 £130 £480 £2,700 £200 £500 £300 £220 £230

524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572

£480 £110 £350 £320 £210 £300 £400 £450 £160 £130 £250 £200 £350 £130 £200 £240 £120 £170 £1,200 £70 £3,650 £400 £180 £300 £210 £420 £480 £180 £170 £110 £520 £110 £140 £40 £500 £700 £350 £260 £800 £380 £480 £380 £400 £90 £380 £600 £580 £350 £190


TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR BUYERS These conditions set out the terms on which we (Spink and Son Limited of 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury London WC1B 4ET (company no. 04369748)) contract with you (Buyer) either as agent on behalf of the Seller or as principal if we are the Seller. You should read these conditions carefully. 1

DEFINITIONS The following definitions in this condition apply in these conditions.

2

3

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme

means a VAT margin scheme as defined by HM Revenue & Customs;

Buyer’s Premium

means the charge payable by you as a percentage of the Hammer Price, at the rates set out in clause 5.1 below;

Certificate of Authenticity

means a certificate issued by an Expert Committee confirming the authenticity of a Lot;

Expert Committee

means a committee of experts to whom a Lot may be sent for an extension in accordance with clause 3.4.3;

Forgery

means a Lot constituting an imitation originally conceived and executed as a whole with a fraudulent intention to deceive as to authorship, origin, age, period, culture or source where the correct description as to such matters is not reflected by the description in the catalogue and which at the date of the auction had a value materially less than it would have had if it had been in accordance with the description in the catalogue. Accordingly, no Lot shall be capable of being a Forgery by reason of any damage and/or restoration work of any kind (including re-enamelling);

Hammer Price

means the amount of the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer in relation to a Lot;

Lot

means any item deposited with us for sale at auction and, in particular, the item or items described against any Lot number in any catalogue;

Reserve

the amount below which we agree with the Seller that the Lot cannot be sold;

Seller

means the owner of the Lot being sold by us;

Spink Group

Spink and Son Limited, our subsidiaries and associated companies.

VAT

value added tax chargeable under VAT and any similar replacement or additional tax; and

VAT Symbols

means the symbols detailing the VAT status of the Lot details of which are set out at the back of the catalogue.

SPINK’S ROLE AS AGENT 2.1

All sales undertaken by us either at auction or privately are undertaken either as agent on behalf of the Seller or from time to time, as principal if we are the owner of the Lot. Please note that even if we are acting as agent on behalf of the Seller rather than as principal, we may have a financial interest in the Lot.

2.2

The contract for the sale of the Lot will be between you and the Seller.

3.4

3.4.1 If you wish to obtain an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity on any Lot (other than a mixed Lot or Lot containing undescribed stamps) you must notify us in writing not less than forty-eight hours before the time fixed for the commencement of the first session of the sale. If accepted by us, such request shall have the same effect as notice of an intention to question the genuineness or description of the Lot for the purposes of clause 5.13 of these Terms and Conditions and the provisions of clause 5.13 shall apply accordingly.

BEFORE THE SALE 3.1

3.2

3.4.2 Notice of a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity must give the reason why such opinion is required and specify the identity of your proposed expert which will be subject to agreement by us.

Examination of goods You are strongly advised to examine personally any goods in which you are interested, before the auction takes place. Condition reports are usually available on request. We provide no guarantee to you other than in relation to Forgeries, as set out in clause 5.13 of these Terms and Conditions.

3.4.3 If we accept a request for an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity we will submit the Lot to the Expert Committee.

Catalogue descriptions 3.4.4 We will not normally accept a request for an extension on account of condition. Any Lot described in the catalogue as having faults or defects may not be returned even if an expert opinion or Certificate of Authenticity cites other faults or defects not included in the catalogue description, other than in the case of a Forgery.

3.2.1 Statements by us in the catalogue or condition report, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, regarding the authorship, origin, date, age, size, medium, attribution, genuineness, provenance, condition or estimated selling price of any Lot are merely statements of opinion, and are not to be relied on as statements of definitive fact. Catalogue illustrations are for guidance only, and should not be relied on either to determine the tone or colour of any item or to reveal imperfections. Estimates of the selling price should not be relied on as a statement that this price is either the price at which the Lot will sell or its value for any other purpose. 3.2.2 Many items are of an age or nature which precludes their being in perfect condition and some descriptions in the catalogue or given by way of condition report make reference to damage and/or restoration. We provide this information for guidance only and the absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others.

3.4.5 Should Spink accept a request for an extension under the foregoing provisions of this paragraph, the fact may be stated by the Auctioneer from the rostrum prior to the sale of the Lot. 3.4.6 It should be noted that any stamp accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity is sold on the basis of that Certificate only and not on the basis of any other description or warranty as to authenticity. No request for an extension will be accepted on such a stamp and the return of such a stamp will not be accepted. 4

AT THE SALE 4.1

3.2.3 Other than as set out in clause 5.13, and in the absence of fraud, neither the Seller nor we, nor any of our employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement as to the authorship, origin, date, age, attribution, genuineness or provenance of any Lot nor for any other errors of description or for any faults or defects in any Lot. Your Responsibility You are responsible for satisfying yourself as to the condition of the goods and the matters referred to in the catalogue description. Spink Uni (12/09) (20)

Refusal of admission Our sales usually take place on our own premises or premises over which we have control for the sale, and we have the right, exercisable at our complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or attendance at an auction.

4.2 3.3

Extensions – Stamps only

Registration before bidding You must complete and sign a registration form and provide identification before making a bid at auction. Please be aware that we usually require buyers to undergo a credit check.


4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

Bidding as Principal When making a bid (whether such bids are made in person or by way of telephone bids operated by Spink, commission or online or email bids), you will be deemed to be acting as principal and will be accepting personal liability, unless it has been agreed in writing, at the time of registration, that you are acting as agent on behalf of a third party buyer acceptable to us. Commission Bids If you give us instructions to bid on your behalf, by using the form provided in our catalogues or via our website, we shall use reasonable endeavours to do so, provided these instructions are received not later than 24 hours before the auction. If we receive commission bids on a particular Lot for identical amounts, and at auction these bids are the highest bids for the Lot, it will be sold to the person whose bid was received first. Commission bids are undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the sale, and the conduct of the auction may be such that we are unable to bid as requested. Since this is undertaken as a free service to prospective buyers on the terms stated, we cannot accept liability for failure to make a commission bid. You should therefore always attend personally if you wish to be certain of bidding. On-line Bidding We offer internet services as a convenience to our clients. We will not be responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on the internet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i) a loss of internet connection by either party for whatever reason; (ii) a breakdown or problems with the online bidding software and/or (iii) a breakdown or problems with your internet connection, computer or system. Execution of on-line internet bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the auction and we do not accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or for errors or omissions in connection with this activity. Telephone Bids If you make arrangements with us not less than 24 hours before the sale, we shall use reasonable endeavours to contact you to enable you to participate in bidding by telephone, but in no circumstances will we be liable to either the Seller or you as a result of failure to do so. Currency Converter At some auctions, a currency converter will be operated, based on the one month forward rates of exchange quoted to us by Royal Bank of Scotland or any other appropriate rate determined by us, at opening on the date of the auction. Bidding will take place in a currency determined by us, which is usually sterling for auctions held in London. The currency converter is not always reliable, and errors may occur beyond our control either in the accuracy of the Lot number displayed on the converter, or the foreign currency equivalent of sterling bids. We shall not be liable to you for any loss suffered as a result of you following the currency converter.

4.8

Video images At some auctions there will be a video screen. Mistakes may occur in its operation, and we cannot be liable to you regarding either the correspondence of the image to the Lot being sold or the quality of the image as a reproduction of the original.

4.9

Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in the following order although the auctioneer may vary the bidding increments during the course of the auction. The normal bidding increments are: Up to £100 by £5 £100 to £300 by £10 £300 to £600 £320-£350-£380-£400 etc. £600 to £1,000 by £50 £1,000 to £3,000 by £100 £3,000 to £6,000 £3,200-£3,500-£3,800-£4,000 etc. £6,000 to £20,000 by £500 £20,000 and up Auctioneer’s discretion

4.10 Bidding by Spink 4.10.1 We reserve the right to bid on Lots on the Seller’s behalf up to the amount of the Reserve (if any), which will never be above the low estimate printed in the auction catalogue. 4.10.2 The Spink Group reserves the right to bid on and purchase Lots as principal. 4.11 The Auctioneer’s Discretion The auctioneer has the right at his absolute discretion to refuse any bid to advance the bidding in such manner as he may decide to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots and, in the case of error or dispute, to put an item up for bidding again. Spink Uni (12/09) (20)

4.12 Successful Bid Subject to the auctioneer’s discretion, the striking of his hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid, provided always that such bid is higher than the Reserve (where applicable), and the conclusion of a contract for sale between you and the Seller. 4.13 After Sale Arrangements If you enter into any private sale agreements for any Lot with the Seller within 60 days of the auction, we, as exclusive agents of the Seller reserve the right to charge you the applicable Buyer’s Premium in accordance with these Terms and Conditions, and the Seller a commission in accordance with the terms of the Seller’s agreement. 5

AFTER THE AUCTION 5.1 Buyer’s Premium In addition to the hammer price, you must pay us the Buyer’s Premium of 20% on the final hammer price of each Lot. 5.2

Value Added Tax Other than in respect of Zero-rated Lots (o) (see VAT Symbols for details), VAT is payable on the Buyer’s Premium and on the Hammer Price, if the Lot has been marked with a sign to that effect in the catalogue (see VAT Symbols for details).

5.3

VAT Refunds General 5.3.1 As we remain liable to account for VAT on all Lots unless they have been exported outside the EU within 3 months of the date of sale, you will generally be asked to deposit all amounts of VAT invoiced. However, if a Spink nominated shipper is instructed, then any refundable VAT will not be collected. In all other cases credits will be made when proof of export is provided. If you export the Lot yourself you must obtain shipping documents from the Shipping Department for which a charge of £50 will be made. 5.3.2 If you export the Lot you must return the valid proof of export certificate to us within 3 months of the date of sale. If you fail to return the proof of export certificate to us within such period and you have not already accounted to us for the VAT, you will be liable to us for the full amount of the VAT due on such Lot and we shall be entitled to invoice you for this sum. 5.3.3 To apply for a refund of any VAT paid, the proof of export certificate must be sent to our Shipping Department clearly marked ‘VAT Refund’ within 3 months of the date of sale. No payment will be made where the total amount of VAT refundable is less than £50 and Spink will charge £50 for each refund processed. VAT Refunds - Buyers from within the EU 5.3.4 VAT refunds are available on the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium of Daggered (†) and Investment Gold (g) Lots. You must certify that you are registered for VAT in another EU country and that the Lot is to be removed from the United Kingdom within 3 months of the date of sale. 5.3.5 Where an EU buyer purchases a Lot on which import VAT has been charged, no refund of VAT is available from us. It may be possible to apply directly for a refund on form VAT 65 to HM Revenue & Customs Overeseas Repayment Section, Londonderry. VAT Refunds – Buyers from outside the EU 5.3.6 Where a Lot is included within the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT element included within the Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. 5.3.7 Where the Lot is marked as a Daggered (†) or Investment Gold (g) Lot the VAT charged on the Hammer Price may be refunded where evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer. 5.3.8 Where the Lot is marked as an Omega (Ω) Lot or an Import VAT (x) Lot and evidence of export from the EU is produced within 3 months of the date of sale, the VAT charged on both the Hammer Price and Buyer’s Premium may be refunded. Where required, we can advise you on how to export such Lots as a specific form of export evidence is required. Where we advise you on the export of the Lots, please be aware that the ultimate responsibility in respect of obtaining a valid proof of export certificate will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to obtain such certificate.


Payment 5.4.1 You must provide us with your full name and permanent address and, if so requested, details of the bank from which any payments to us will be made. You must pay the full amount due (comprising the Hammer Price, the Buyer’s Premium and any applicable VAT) within seven days after the date of the sale. This applies even if you wish to export the Lot and an export licence is (or may be) required. 5.4.2 You will not acquire title to the Lot until all amounts due to us have been paid in full to us, even in circumstances where we have released the Lot to you. 5.4.3 Payment should be made in sterling by one of the following methods: II(i) Direct bank transfer to our account details of which are set out on the invoice. All bank charges shall be met by you. Please ensure that your client number is noted on the transfer. i(ii) By cheque or bank draft made payable to Spink and Son Ltd and sent to Spink at 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET. Please note that the processing charges for payments made by cheques or bank drafts drawn on a non-U.K bank shall be met by you. Please ensure that the remittance slip printed at the bottom of the invoice is enclosed with your payment. (iii) By Visa or Mastercard. A charge of 2% will be applied. Payments exceeding £5,000 can normally only be made by the card holder in person whilst on our premises. 5.4.4 Payments should be made by the registered buyer and not by third parties, unless it has been agreed at the time of registration that you are acting as an agent on behalf of a third party. 5.5 Invoices Invoices may consist of one or more pages and will show: Zero rated Lots (o); no symbol Lots sold under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme; Lots marked (g) special scheme Investment Gold; Daggered Lots (†), imported Lots marked (x) and (Ω), (e) Lots with Zero rated hammer for EU VAT registered buyers. 5.6 Collection of Purchases 5.6.1 Unless we specifically agree to the contrary, we shall retain items sold until all amounts due to us, or to the Spink Group, have been paid in full. 5.6.2 Unless we notify you to the contrary, items retained by us will be covered in accordance with our policy which is available for inspection at our offices from the date of sale for a period of seven days or until the time of collection, whichever is sooner. After seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is the earlier, the Lot will be entirely at your risk. 5.6.3 Our policy will not cover and we are unable to accept responsibility for damage caused by woodworm, changes in atmospheric conditions or acts of terrorism. 5.7 Notification We are not able to notify successful bidders by telephone. While Invoices are sent out by mail after the auction we do not accept responsibility for notifying you of the result of your bid. You are requested to contact us by telephone or in person as soon as possible after the auction to obtain details of the outcome of your bids to avoid incurring charges for late payment. 5.8 Packing and handling We shall use all reasonable endeavours to take care when handling and packing a purchased Lot but remind you that after seven days or from the time of collection, whichever is sooner, the Lot is entirely at your risk. Our postage charges are set out at the back of the catalogue. 5.9 Recommended packers and shippers If required our shipping department may arrange shipment as your agent. Although we may suggest carriers if specifically requested, our suggestions are made on the basis of our general experience of such parties in the past and we are not responsible to any person to whom we have made a recommendation for the acts or omissions of the third parties concerned. 5.10 Remedies for non-payment or failure to collect purchases 5.10.1 If you fail to make payment within seven days of your stipulated payment date set out in your invoice, we shall be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies: 5.10.1.1 to charge interest at the rate of 2% per month compound interest, calculated on a daily basis, from the date the full amount is due; 5.10.1.2 to set off against any amounts which the Spink Group may owe you in any other transaction the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by you; 5.10.1.3 we may keep hold of all or some of your Lots or other property in the possession of the Spink Group until you have paid all the amounts you owe us or the Spink Group, even if the unpaid amounts do not relate to those Lots or other property. Following fourteen days’ notice to you of the amount outstanding and remaining unpaid, the Spink Group shall have the right to arrange the sale of such Lots or other property. We shall apply the proceeds in discharge of the amount outstanding to us or the Spink Group, and pay any balance to you;

5.4

Spink Uni (12/09) (20)

5.10.1.4 where several amounts are owed by you to the Spink Group in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not you so direct; 5.10.1.5 to reject at any future auction any bids made by you or on your behalf or obtain a deposit from you before accepting any bids. 5.10.2 If you fail to make payment within thirty-five days, we shall in addition be entitled: 5.10.2.1 to cancel the sale of the Lot or any other item sold to you at the same or any other auction; 5.10.2.2 to arrange a resale of the Lot, publicly or privately, and, if this results in a lower price being obtained, claim the balance from you together with all reasonable costs including a 20% seller’s commission, expenses, damages, legal fees, commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise, incurred in connection with your failure to make payment; or 5.10.2.3 take any other appropriate action as we deem fit. 5.11 Failure to collect Where purchases are not collected within seven days after the sale, whether or not payment has been made, you will be required to pay a storage charge of £2 per item per day plus any additional handling cost that may apply. You will not be entitled to collect the Lot until all outstanding charges are met, together with payment of all other amounts due to us. 5.12 Export Licence 5.12.1 If required we can, at our discretion, advise you on the detailed provisions of the export licensing regulations. Where we advise you in relation to export licensing regulations the ultimate responsibility in respect of any export will lie with you and we will not be responsible for your failure to apply for any necessary licences. 5.12.2 If the Lot is going to be hand carried by you, you may be required to produce a valid export licence to us or sign a waiver document stating that a licence will be applied for. 5.12.3 You should always check whether an export licence is required before exporting. Export licences are usually obtained within two or three weeks but delays can occur. 5.12.4 Unless otherwise agreed by us in writing, the fact that you wish to apply for an export licence does not affect your obligation to make payment within seven days nor our right to charge interest on late payment. 5.12.5 If you request that we apply for an export licence on your behalf, we shall be entitled to recover from you our disbursements and out of pocket expenses in relation to such application, together with any relevant VAT. 5.12.6 We will not be obliged to rescind a sale nor to refund any interest or other expenses incurred by you where payment is made by you despite the fact that an export licence is required. 5.13 Refund in the case of Forgery 5.13.1 A sale will be cancelled, and the amount paid refunded to you if a Lot (other than a miscellaneous item not described in the catalogue) sold by us proves to have been a Forgery. We shall not however be obliged to refund any amounts if either (a) the catalogue description or saleroom notice at the auction date corresponded to the generally accepted opinion of scholars or experts at that time, or fairly indicated that there was a conflict of opinions, or (b) it can be demonstrated that the Lot is a Forgery only by means of either a scientific process not generally accepted for use until after publication of the catalogue or a process which at the date of the auction was unreasonably expensive or impracticable or likely to have caused damage to the Lot. Furthermore, you should note that this refund can be obtained only if the following conditions are met: 5.13.1.1 you must notify us in writing, within seven days of the auction date, that in your view the Lot concerned is a Forgery; 5.13.1.2 you must then return the item to us within fourteen days, in the same condition as at the auction date; and 5.13.1.3 as soon as possible following return of the Lot, you must produce evidence satisfactory to us that the Lot is a Forgery and that you are able to transfer good title to us, free from any third party claims. 5.13.2 In no circumstances shall we be required to pay you any more than the amount paid by you for the Lot concerned and you shall have no claim for interest.


5.13.3 The benefit of this guarantee is not capable of being transferred, and is solely for the benefit of the person to whom the original invoice was made out by us in respect of the Lot when sold and who, since the sale, has remained the owner of the Lot without disposing of any interest in it to any third party. 5.13.4 We shall be entitled to rely on any scientific or other process to establish that the Lot is not a Forgery, whether or not such process was used or in use at the date of the auction. 6

11 Law and Jurisdiction 11.1 These Terms and Conditions and any dispute or claim arising out of or in connection with them or their subject matter, shall be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the law of England and Wales. 11.2 The parties irrevocably agree that the courts of England and Wales shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle any dispute or claim that arises out of, or in connection with, Terms and Conditions or their subject matter.

LIABILITY Nothing in these Terms and Conditions limits or excludes our liability for:

7

8

6.1

death or personal injury resulting from negligence; or

6.2

any damage or liability incurred by you as a result of our fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation.

COPYRIGHT 7.1

We shall have the right (on a non-exclusive basis) to photograph, video or otherwise produce an image of the Lot. All rights in such an image will belong to us, and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit.

7.2

The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material relating to a Lot is and shall remain at all times our property and we shall have the right to use it in whatever way we see fit. You shall not use or allow anyone else to use such images, illustrations or written material without our prior written consent.

Prices for books (items sent by this method are not covered by insurance) Weight Up to 1kg Up to 2kg

UK £8 for any weight £8 for any weight

EU £12 £18

Rest of the World £15 £25

Prices for all other items including postage, packaging and insurance Invoice Value Up to £1,500 Above £1,501*

UK £10 £20

EU** £15 £30

Rest of the World £20 £40

VAT You shall give us all relevant information about your VAT status and that of the Lot to ensure that the correct information is printed in the catalogues. Once printed, the information cannot be changed. If we incur any unforeseen cost or expense as a result of the information being incorrect, you will reimburse to us on demand the full amount incurred.

9

Postal Charges

NOTICES All notices given under these Terms and Conditions may be served personally, sent by 1st class post, or faxed to the address given to the sender by the other party. Any notice sent by post will be deemed to have been received on the second working day after posting or, if the addressee is overseas, on the fifth working day after posting. Any notice sent by fax or served personally will be deemed to be delivered on the first working day following despatch.

***Minimum courier cost please contact auctionteam@spink.com for actual cost. ***Certain countries may incur £30 extra charge when courier services are required by our insurance policy. Value Added Tax (VAT) The information shown on this page sets out the way in which Spink intends to account for VAT. i.

1. Where possible, we will offer Lots for sale under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. Such Lots can be identified by the absence of any symbol next to the Lot number in the catalogue and will not be subject to VAT on the Hammer Price.

10 ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS

2. Where Lots are sold using the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme to VAT–registered businesses, the VAT included within the Buyers’ Premium is not recoverable as input tax. Upon request on sale day, we will issue invoices that show VAT separately on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium. This will enable VAT-registered businesses to recover the VAT charged as input tax, subject to the normal rules for recovering input tax.

The following provisions of this clause 10 shall apply only if you are acting for the purposes of your business. 10.1 Limitation of Liability Subject to clause 6, we shall not be liable, whether in tort (including for negligence or breach of statutory duty), contract, misrepresentation or otherwise for any: 10.1.1 loss of profits, loss of business, depletion of goodwill and/or similar losses, loss of anticipated savings, loss of goods, loss of contract, loss of use, loss of corruption of data or information; or

ii.

10.2 Severability

10.3 Force majeure We shall have no liability to you if we are prevented from, or delayed in performing, our obligations under these Terms and Conditions or from carrying on our business by acts, events, omissions or accidents beyond our reasonable control, including (without limitation) strikes, lock-outs or other industrial disputes (whether involving our workforce or the workforce of any other party), failure of a utility service or transport network, act of God, war, riot, civil commotion, malicious damage, compliance with any law or governmental order, rule, regulation or direction, accident, breakdown of plant or machinery, fire, flood, storm or default of suppliers or subcontractors.

iii.

10.4.2 Unless specifically provided otherwise, rights arising under these Terms and Conditions are cumulative and do not exclude rights provided by law. Spink Uni (12/09) (20)

Daggered Lots 1. Lots which are Daggered (†) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 20% on both the Hammer Price and the Buyer’s Premium.

iv.

Starred and Omega Lots 1. Lots which are marked (x) in the catalogue are subject to VAT at 5% on the Hammer Price and 20% on the Buyer’s Premium which is shown as inclusive of VAT. Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) are subject to VAT at 20% on the Hammer Price and on the Buyer’s Premium. Such Lots bear VAT because the Lot is liable for VAT at this rate on importation into the EU.

v.

Investment Gold Lots 1. Lots marked (g) in the catalogue are exempt from VAT on the Hammer Price and are subject to VAT at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium. A refund of VAT charged on the Buyer’s Premium can also be made on receipt of proof of business as a collectibles dealer.

10.4 Waiver 10.4.1 A waiver of any right under these Terms and Conditions is only effective if it is in writing and it applies only to the circumstances for which it is given. No failure or delay by a party in exercising any right or remedy under these Terms and Conditions or by law shall constitute a waiver of that (or any other) right or remedy, nor preclude or restrict its further exercise. No single or partial exercise of such right or remedy shall preclude or restrict the further exercise of that (or any other) right or remedy.

Zero-Rated Lots 1. Limited Categories of goods, such as books, are Zero-rated (o) for VAT in the United Kingdom. Such Lots are offered under the Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme. In these circumstances no VAT element will be included within the Buyer’s Premium.

10.1.2 any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs, damages, charges or expenses. If any part of these Terms and Condition is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law.

Auctioneers’ Margin Scheme

vi.

Imported Lots 1. Lots which are marked (x) and Lots which bear the Omega symbol (Ω) have VAT charged on the Hammer Price and Buyers’ Premium because they have been imported into the United Kingdom from outside the EU. In these cases we have used a temporary importation procedure, which in effect means that the point of importation is deferred until the Lot has been sold. At this point the Buyer is treated as the importer and is liable to pay the import VAT due. We will collect the VAT from you and pay it to HM Customs and Excise on your behalf.


Coins, Stamps, Banknotes, Medals, Bonds & Shares, Autographs & Books

Olivier D. Stocker Group Chairman & CEO SPINK UK Timothy Hirsch Director Anthony Spink Non-Executivc Director Monica Kruber Executive Assistant to CEO Auction and Client Management Team Emily Johnston Miroslava Adusei-Poku Luca Borgo Phillipa Brown Finance Alison Bennet Mina Bhagat Alison Kinnaird Shyam Padhiar James Willan IT & Administration Berdia Qamarauli Segun Magbagbeola Liz Cones Curlene Spencer John Winchcombe

James McGuire

SPINK USA Charles F. Shreve President Tracy L. Shreve Chief Operating Officer John Herzog Chairman Emeritus Finance Dennis Muriu Ingrid Qureshi Sam Qureshi Auction Administration Rick Penko Patricia Lou Gardner Marketing & Design Emily Cowin William Jackson Shawn Barnes Administration Marcy Gottberg

Clyde Townsend

SPINK ASIA Gary Tan SPECIALISTS Banknotes Barnaby Faull Matthew Orsini Jim Fitzgerald Francesca Girelli Stamps David Parsons Nick Startup Neill Granger Paul Mathews Guy Croton Dominic Savastano Chris Anderson Charles Shreve Tim Hirsch George Eveleth Ed Robinson Coins Richard Bishop Paul Dawson John Pett William MacKay Julie-Morgane Lecoindre Jim Fitzgerald Arthur Bryant Matthew Orsini Thomas Tesoriero Normand Pepin Bonds & Shares Mike Veissid Autographs Robert Litzenberger Orders, Decorations, Medals & Militaria Mark Quayle Oliver Pepys Books Philip Skingley Rebecca Mason

AUCTION CALENDAR 2011 Stamps 24/25 March 12 April 5 May 24/25 September

Philatelic Collector’s Series Sale Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Spring Collector’s Series Sale Fine Stamps & Covers of South East Asia

New York Dallas London Singapore

Banknotes 12 April 12 April 13 April (am) 13 (pm)/14 April 20/21 May 24/25 September 27/28/29 September 8 December

The Laurence Pope Collection of World Banknotes Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale The Peter Griffiths Collection of World Banknotes World Banknotes Texas Numismatic Association Sale Banknotes & Bonds of South East Asia World Banknotes World Banknotes

London Dallas London London Fort Worth Singapore London London

11017 11019 11020

Bonds and Shares 12 April 20/21 May 20 May 21 October

Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Texas Numismatic Association Sale Bonds & Share Certificates of the World Bonds & Share Certificates of the World

Dallas Fort Worth London London

11006 11022

Coins 24 March 12 April 20/21 May 23 June 6 October 1 December

Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Civil War Sesquicentennial Sale Texas Numismatic Association Sale Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and Ancient, English & Foreign Coins and

London Dallas Fort Worth London London London

11009 11023 11024

Medals 21 April 21 July 24 November

Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria

London London London

11007 11010 11011

Commemorative Medals

Commemorative Medals Commemorative Medals Commemorative Medals

The above sale dates are subject to change Our Environmental Commitment: Paper from Sustainable Forests and Non Hazardous Ink For centuries Spink and its employees have been preserving and curating collectable items. We now wish to play a modest role in preserving our planet, as well as the heritage of collectables, so future generations may enjoy both. We insist that our printers source all paper used in the production of Spink catalogues from FSC registered suppliers (for further information on the FSC standard please visit fsc.org) and use inks containing non hazardous ingredients. Spink recycle all ecological material used on our premises and we would encourage you to recycle your catalogue once you have finished with it.

Spink offers the following services Valuations for insurance and probate for individual items or whole collections. Sales on a commission basis either of individual pieces or whole collections.

11018 11016

11015 11014 11004

11008


Spink London Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals and Militaria THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011

COINS STAMPS BANKNOTES MEDALS BONDS & SHARES AUTOGRAPHS & BOOKS 69 Southampton Row, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 4ET

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7563 4000 Fax: +44 (0)20 7563 4066

ÂŁ25

11007

spink.com

ORders, Decorations, campaign medals and militaria LONDON, THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2011


Orders, Decorations, Campaign Medals & Militaria