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OCTOBER 19

NOVEMBER 1

Vol 48

FREE

VANCOUVER ISLAND UNIVERSITY STUDENT PRESS

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16 12

point of viu

# 31DAYSOFHORROR

ST. Louis, sK: The gHOST train

Students answer: What is the scariest thing that has happened to you?

Every October, for the last three years, I sit down and watch one horror film every day that I have not seen before.

I slowly rationalized that the cloud was a figment of my imagination. I was half-asleep. It was not real.


CONTENTS

NEWS

04

05

06

07

Editorials

VIU climate change symposium a hit --Downtown Nanaimo plays host to photography exhibit

News in a Nutshell --Participants wanted for VIU sustainability mural project

Witness Blanket art installation comes to VIU --Get spooky with Nanaimo Museum’s Lantern Tours

FEATURES

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09

10

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Everyday Earth: A personal note on finding alance between hope and dismay --Bunnies and Stairs

BARK BARK! What is it Lassie? BARK BARK! Timmy fell down a well!?

Dirtyin’ The Nav: Showcasing asexuality --Point of VIU

Standing Rock in Nanaimo

St. Louis, SK: The Ghost Train

ARTS

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Tickled: he strangest film of 2016, a review --Exploring our imaginations: After Alice

Shin Godzilla (2016) review --Author Ian Gibbs on Victoria’s Most Haunted

#31daysofhorror

#31daysofhorror cont’d

SPORTS & LIFESTYLE

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Nanaimo comedy, a growing community

Englishman River Falls

Pyro-safety this Halloween --The Karaoke Challenge --OmTown Yoga

VIU volleyball: set up for success --Quick & easy meatloaf

Comic

CONTENTS

NAVIGATOR

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LETTERS

NAV

.ca

CONTRIBUTORS Zach Altos Clayton Bambrough Dallas Bezaire James Chumsa-Jones Shanon Fenske Bryce Gardiner

Colton Hash Claire Jones Brandon Kornelson Melissa Partee Chantelle Spicer

THE NAVIGATOR TEAM

THE NAVIGATOR WELCOMES READER CONTRIbuTIONS To submit, visit <thenav.ca> or email <editor@thenav.ca>.

Mauly Barrieau Editor-in-Chief

Jessica Pierceson Graphic Designer

Gravery Crossbones Art Director

Zombie Hoskins Graphic Designer

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Elissa Darkson Social Media Sp.

Asylum Cottell News Editor

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All submissions must be original work of the author. Editors reserve the right to refuse submissions, and to edit for space or clarity. Letters to the editor should be no more than 400 words in length. The Navigator does not pay for letters. Opinions expressed in The Navigator are expressly those of the author and/or artist and do not re ect the views of The Navigator staff.

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Podcasts available Saturday

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themastheadradio.wordpress.com #Mastheadradio

DESIGN WORK

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Zombie Hoskins Cover

Zombie Hoskins Spread

900 Fifth St. Bldg. 193, rm. 217 Nanaimo, BC, V9R 5S5

T: 250-753-2225 F: 250-753-2257

NAVIGATOR

Letters

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EDITORIALS

The Scary Movie Title Generator

Molly Barrieau --Editor-in-Chief The Navigator

Natalie Gates --Associate Editor The Navigator

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editorials

Before we can begin toting Santa hats and playing Mariah Carey on repeat, we need to discuss a strange occurrence that has been gathering steam in my overactive pumpkin spiced brain this month. Halloween is upon us, and has all of us craving something spooky as the weather changes. Leaves fall, the Netflix logo shines from our screens, and under the horror category is a long list of possible titles. But then you notice that almost 70 percent of all titles begin with “The”: The Omen, The Cabin in the Woods, The Shining, The Thing, The Birds, The Fly, etc. Has originality gone to the dogs? I mentioned this to my family over the holiday weekend, and they agreed that this trend seemed to gain momentum with the abundance of Stephen King movie adaptations. For a prolific writer, accredited for producing so many popular works, they can appear pretty dull. Or is that the point? Leave them guessing, King, that will gather an audience. Suspense is what we crave, so the unknown factor is appealing enough that simply naming your film a singular noun guarantees a box office smash. I disagree. There have been many times where

my partner and I scroll the Thriller and Horror section only to find the titles soon blur into one, lacking originality and guidance to the movie’s eventual climax. We can’t remember if we’ve seen that one about the family who moves to a farmhouse and eventually succumbs to the omnipresent physical presence in the old creaky house. Sound familiar? That’s because it occurs in about six different films, usually accompanied by a location, and the word “exorcism” or “haunting”. And then I found it: the Horror Movie Title Generator. Someone else encountered this conundrum, and instead of complaining, they let us create our own nonsense titles. Here are a few that I enjoyed: Dawn of the Vampire Phone Call Part V: Or as I prefer, The Calling, because ambiguity is better. By Part V, you’d think someone would have picked up the phone by now. Den of the Wicked Beaver Destroyer: Sounds R-rated, and is the beaver a destroyer or is the beaver destroyed? I’ll let you decide. Bounced Checks of the Dying Beast: Because nothing’s scarier than paying bills. Attack of the Underachieving Sausage from

the Dead: I’m dead serious. I appreciate the clarification that this is not just any sausage, but one that didn’t go anywhere in life, but come from the dead… Talk about originality. Finally, a title that gives me a taste of what I might be enjoying. Unfortunately, the generator avoided the definite article that gave me such trouble earlier, maybe this is the right direction for future films. I’ll leave you here with a few of About Entertainment’s “Ridiculously Awesome Horror Movie Titles” that actually exist. ›The Gingerdead Man ›I Bought a Vampire Motorcycle ›Poultrygeist: Night of the Chicken Dead ›Sometimes Aunt Martha Does Dreadful Things Find the whole list at <horror.about.com>. Find our list of Halloween picks reviewed by resident horror specialist Brendan Barlow. For those who got the “Are you still watching?” call for help from Netflix after eight straight hours, there’s a ghost story on page 12 that doesn’t start with “The”.

Do you believe in ghosts? I have never really considered myself a believer because I haven’t had any especially compelling “sightings” myself. But I also don’t consider myself a non-believer; I welcome the possibility of something existing bigger than our mundane human lives. Fear has a hand in it. Sometimes I double-check behind the shower curtain or feel the tiniest bit of unease when I look in the mirror of a dark room. I believe karma has an influence and I will never speak ill of a ghost when someone insists they exist. I’ve had several friends describe instances that seem unexplainable by conventional science or “the wind”. Jewelry on the floor one moment and on a shelf the next. Fruit that jumps off the counter and ends up in the hallway. Lights that turn on by themselves. Glasses of milk that shatter and explode with no physical trigger. Animals growling at nothing. Detailed visions of deceased relatives. Strangers that suddenly disappear and reappear. I was chatting with fellow Navigator Catherine Charlebois and her parents the other night when the topic of ghosts in their house came up. It’s an old home on Milton St. so there have surely been many different people who’ve lived and died there. Her mom described waking up one night to a strong presence in the hall outside her bedroom.

Standing there was a woman with dark hair parted down the middle and tied up in a bun. She wore a dark dress and a white apron. She wasn’t threatening, she was peaceful. Cat’s mom didn’t mention this to her at the time because she didn’t want to frighten her. Turns out Cat saw a woman that matched that description one night; she stood above her bed and tucked her in peacefully. She described the woman to her mom, who, shocked, said she had seen her before. A ghost? Maybe. Or perhaps these things are caused by a different otherworldly phenomenon. In Cat’s example, perhaps her and her mother share a psychological connection that runs deep into their subconscious, causing them to both dream or imagine the same woman. I know my mother and I have seemed to read each other’s minds in strangely accurate ways many times. Perhaps tension and vibrations we emit can be strong enough to move objects. Maybe it’s reincarnation and former lives that give us the ability to “see the future.” Maybe, some people have a sixth sense that makes them more sensitive to such happenings, or gives them the ability to imagine them vividly. In this issue, you will read about a couple first-

hand encounters with the supernatural in the spread and Point of VIU. Do their stories affect your belief in the paranormal at all? For myself, each time I hear a convincing ghost story, I start to believe a bit more, or at least question the universe further. While some are described as very peaceful and positive spirits, ghosts are largely considered a frightening concept. Yet, part of me can’t help but hope that I experience seeing or feeling one someday—a friendly one, that is. Why do these experiences happen to some but not others? Do some people subconsciously open themselves up to them, while others shut them out without trying? Is it by chance or for a reason? Whether you decide to summon the spirits with a Ouija board or sleep with one eye open and the lights on this Halloween, I encourage you to welcome ghost stories with an open mind. Believer or not, a little bit of perspective can be powerful. It might make you think about the universe and your life a little differently, or, at the least, just make for some stimulating conversation. Boo.

NAVIGATOR

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NEWS

VIU climate change symposium a hit Claire Jones On Saturday October 12, VIU had the honour --of hosting a climate change symposium, Contributor

organized by the VIU group Awareness of Climate Change through Education and Research (ACER), to educate students, staff, and members of the public about the science of climate change and the actions and policies that can help us avoid more extreme climate change. The symposium, called “Climate Change: Policy for a Sustainable Future”, was a clear success, bringing together scientists, business people, activists, elementary school teachers, professors, and VIU students to expand their understanding, exchange ideas, and make new contacts. The first presentation was led by Dr. Jeff Lewis of VIU, and focused on recent updates to the science of climate change. After an enlightening overview of current global temperature records, sea ice loss, and climate projections, Dr. Lewis addressed a topic less well-known among the general public: ocean acidification. Ocean acidification is a direct result of human CO2 emissions; as the ocean absorbs the carbon dioxide, the ocean acidity increases. This has stark consequences for marine life, especially those with calcium-based exoskeletons, which are vulnerable to being dissolved by the increased acidity. Dr. Lewis also discussed how climate change destabilizes the climate, increasing the frequency of extreme weather conditions. Next up was Dr. Tom Pedersen of the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at UVic. Titled “The Rise and Fall of Climate Action in British Columbia”, Dr. Pedersen’s presentation detailed the impressive list of initiatives put forth by the Campbell government in 2008 to combat climate change. Such actions were in part prompted by the destruction of BC’s interior forests by the infamous mountain pine beetle, whose ravenous reign was not being kept in check by the cold temperatures which previously would kill off the majority of the beetles over the winter months. One of the initiatives put in place was the revenue-neutral BC Carbon Tax. This move was controversial at the time, yet academic scrutiny since 2008 has shown that BC suffered no economic downturn as a result, and that the policy has been effective in reducing emissions. BC was hailed worldwide as a leader in emission reduction strategies. Fast forward to 2012, when Christy Clark’s BC Liberals froze the Carbon Tax. Climate action in BC appeared to shift lower

Downtown Nanaimo plays host to photography exhibition #04

on the government’s priority list. Now, in 2016, the BC Liberals refuse to abide by previously agreed-upon emissions control targets, despite an independent panel of scientists, business people, and aboriginal leaders submitting their recommendations to the Provincial Government. BC can no longer claim to be a model for climate leadership. Dr. Pendersen summed it up, stating that “by ducking our responsibility we are transferring the impact of climate change more firmly onto the shoulders of future generations.” During a coffee break, audience members asked questions of the presenters and held discussions amongst themselves. One couple in attendance was Sheri Plummer and Bill Vinton, founders of Communities to Protect Our Coast. “You can never have too much information,” said Bill, explaining the importance of educational gatherings such as this symposium. “Sheri and I got involved five years ago, and attitudes were much different back then. We would try to talk to people, and they would be unreceptive, sometimes downright abusive. People are much more receptive now, there’s more awareness.” “We haven’t been as active this year as in the previous four years,” added Sheri. “We were hoping that the change in federal government would push climate initiatives forward without our help, so to speak, but it looks like we’re going to have to sharpen our swords again.” Trevor Dickenson, ACER member and NDP campaigner, put it well: “Education is critical. It’s the best way we have of turning awareness into action.” Among the concerned citizens and community leaders in attendance were several members of the local chapter of the Council of Canadians, including Lynn Alton, who told us that this was the best symposium she’d ever attended on the subject of climate change and added that this was “a central concern” of hers and others of the Council. Following the break, Rob Lawrence, Parks and Open Space Planner for the City of Nanaimo, shared an overview of the legislative requirements local governments need to meet within their Official Community Plans to sufficiently address climate change. These included better transit systems to encourage citizens to ride public transportation, and equipping municipalities with fuel-efficient public service vehicles. This led into an animated discussion among audience members on the

various initiatives possible or already in action within Nanaimo and the surrounding area. The conversation continued in the lunch room, where pizza was provided for all. The subject of bettering public transportation struck a chord with Graeme Arkell, co-leader of DSS environmental club and member of VIU’s Outdoor Education Committee, who is currently focusing his Master’s on active transportation for students. “One of the issues is local speed limits. If the cars on the roads are moving more slowly, it makes it safer for students to walk or cycle to school. This decreases carbon emissions, fights student obesity and increases learning ability in the classroom.” Set up in the lunch room was a display by Dylan Smith, representative of Cowichan Energy Alternatives, a local co-op that collects waste vegetable oil from restaurants and sells it as affordable bio-fuel for diesel vehicles. Recycled bio-diesel reduces a car’s toxic emissions by 90 percent, reduces harmful diesel exhaust and requires less energy to create than equal units of petroleum-based fuels. The co-op also, through local production and distribution, supports local business owners and reduces dependency on foreign fuels. Last but not least, the ACER Club provided a demonstration of the chemistry of greenhouse gases. Two tanks were placed under sun lamps, both containing a thermometer. One was fed carbon dioxide through a small pipe, and almost immediately the temperature in the tank began to increase as the CO2 absorbed more of the light than the tank with regular air. A digital animation provided a visual aid for explaining how an increase in carbon molecules, despite them comprising less than one percent of Earth’s atmosphere, results in increased temperature through a process known as collisional heating. It is safe to say that nobody left the symposium without an increased awareness of the causes, results, and possible solutions to such a pressing global issue. It was an incredibly hopeful sign to see so many people from so many walks of life participating and showing their support. More than anything, the symposium was a reminder that though climate change poses a very real threat, committed citizens will continue to band together to fight for a sustainable future. For more information about becoming involved, or to arrange to have ACER visit your classroom or group, contact <ACER@viu.ca>.

Bryce Gardiner ---

“This event builds on that, allowing photographers to make valuable real world connections, meet and learn from other artists and gain exposure—all things that are invaluable in an industry that is incredibly difficult to make it in these days.” The event will be held at Hub City Studio in the Downtown quarter. Studio manager Zachary Tanner feels “particularly excited” to be involved with the exhibit as a host. He added his insights, “photography has the incredible power to capture the beauty of the world. There are many photographers on Vancouver Island who showcase the particular beauty of the Island. For those who love beauty, Vancouver Island, and photography, the exhibit will be a delight.” The event is free to attend and there will be complimentary tea and coffee for anyone who wants to view the gallery and enjoy local art.

Nanaimo will be hosting the first annual Vancouver Island Photography Contributor Exhibition on October 21 from 6–9 pm and October 22 from 9 am–5 pm. The exhibition will host numerous contributing artists from across Vancouver Island and provide opportunities to meet with other photographers, artists, and members of the public. Event host and coordinator Shaun Stewart noted, “there are so many talented photographers here on Vancouver Island,” and that “this is a great opportunity to meet and connect with local artists and support the work that we do.” The purpose of the event is not only to share the work of local artists, but also to help build a sense of community and networking within the culture. “Many of the participants in this event have come together through connections on social media, where we have built somewhat of a supportive photography community,” Stewart said.

NAVIGATOR

NEWS

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NEWS

News In a Nutshell Aislinn Cottell | The Navigator

WHAT

WHERE

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

The City of Nanaimo is replacing a water main and FortisBC is replacing a gas line on Wall St. this month.

Wall St., Nanaimo. Construction is expected to be complete by October 28.

all t. will e closed to traffic d ring wor ho rs reopening on evenings and weekends. The public is advised to reroute along Comox Rd. to access the Nanaimo Curling Club, and use Bradley St. to access Pythian Ln. or Park View Ter.

WHAT

WHERE

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

Schmooze Productions is putting on a production of the cult-classic Rocky Horror Show.

Harbour City Theatre 25 Victoria Rd. Nanaimo.

For those already a fan of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, a live performance is a great way to experience the tale anew, with additional twists and turns you just don’t get in the movie version.

Note: The show is rated 18+.

Shows start at 8 pm on November 3, 10, 17, and 24, with a special late night showing at 11 pm on November 12. Tickets can be purchased at <schmoozeproductions.com>.

If you’re completely unfamiliar with the show, Rocky Horror is a classic “hilarious, wild ride” that is an a sol te m st-see for -movie sci-fi horror and rock’n’roll fans especially.

WHAT

WHERE

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

The annual Kris Kringle Craft Market will be returning next month for a four-day “Christmas extravaganza” from November 17– 20.

Beban Park Social Centre, Nanaimo.

The Market hosts over 150 artisans selling a wide variety of items from jewellery and pottery to wooden toys and unique artisan food. There will also be activities including face painting, carriage rides, pictures with Santa, and cookie decorating, plus the opportunity to enter in hourly draws.

WHAT

WHERE

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE

Applications are open with Habitat for Humanity Mid-Vancouver Island for two new partner families to enter their program and become home-owners.

The two four-bedroom houses will be located at 2360 Extension Rd., Nanaimo.

The program allows families ineligible for a conventional mortgage to become home-owners. Selected families will receive a house sold at market value with special provisions, including no down payment and an interest-free mortgage.

To be considered, a family of four must have a gross income between $38K and $55K.

Event tickets are $10/day or $15 for a four-day pass.

Application forms can be found at <habitatmvi.org>. Deadline is November 21 at 4 pm.

Participants wanted for VIU sustainability mural project Aislinn Cottell The VIU Sustainability Advisory Committee --(SAC) has endorsed a project this spring The Navigator

which seeks to express the concept of sustainability through collaborative art. The workshop-style event will result in a piece formed from 24 separate clay tiles, each created by a different individual, which will then be fused to form a full mural that will be installed on campus. Participation in the project is free, and open for application from VIU students, staff, and alumni. SAC hopes a range of people from different backgrounds will sign up, as they would like the piece to span the perspectives of various disciplines, ages, nationalities, and cultures on the theme of sustainability. Most importantly: participants do not need any former experience in art. The process will be guided by professional artist Lynda Faulks, a retired BC art teacher, VIU Art Educator, and winner of various awards including the Prime Minister Award for Teaching Excellence. Faulks has been facilitating mural workshops across Canada for several years, with different themes depending on her focus group, which can range from elementary school to university age students. Her most recent installation was a mural at Memorial University in New Brunswick, focusing on the history of medicine throughout the province’s history. “[Lynda] has taken [her mural construction] a long way,

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News

developed some really great knowledge and skill around it, and has been able to bring out some really excellent work from people who say that they are not artists,” said Margot Croft, Administrative Assistant for Environment and Sustainability at VIU. “She will be the first to say, in fact, that everyone is an artist.” The creation process will have two main stages: Design and Creation, currently to be held over four study days during reading break, February 20–24. The second stage, Antiquing, is planned to be held on two exam study days, April 12 and 13. In the first stage, the group will take an entire day to explore the idea of sustainability and what it means to each individual. The participants will discuss images that represent sustainability, find their inspiration, and each sketch a draft of their tile. They will then transfer their design to clay, learn about working with the medium, and create their piece. In the second stage, the tiles have been fired and participants will add old gold, silver, bronze, and copper colouring to their pieces. The tiles will then be arranged and grouted into place, followed by an unveiling ceremony to present the mural to the community. Some proposed ideas for placement include the half-wall next to the bookstore entrance or the breezeway in-between bldg. 300, but the decision is by no means set in stone. Overall, the project will be a seven-day workshop, with

NAVIGATOR

Lynda Faulks (center front) with workshop group in front of the Memorial University of Newfoundland mural. Memorial University

three to five hours of crafting each day, excluding breaks. Those interested in signing up must be available for every workshop day, for the entire time. Applications should be submitted to <sustainability@ viu.ca>, and include your name, area of interest/study, and a maximum of 100 words on why you would like to be a part of this legacy.

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NEWS

Witness Blanket Art Installation comes to VIU

Media One

Artist Carey Newman with the Witness Blanket in front of Government House.

Aislinn Cottell Worn leather ice skates. Three piano keys, --stained and grey. A lemon-yellow sign The Navigator

warning of “Soiled Linen”, mounted next to a brass door knob and lock. Two cut braids of dark hair, and a crumbling moccasin held together with red ribbon. These are just a few of the 800 artifacts which make up the Witness Blanket, an eight-foot-tall, 40-foot-long installation created by artist Carey Newman to explore the ongoing process of reconciliation with Indigenous people in Canada. Newman collected the items in the Witness Blanket from former residential schools, government buildings, and churches all across the country. Some are actual fragments of the structures: broken concrete, pipes, and lightbulbs. Others are more personal, dolls and clothing weathered with age and use. Photographs and articles are printed on every inch of the 13 wood panels, a subtle roll-call that becomes increasingly overwhelming the longer you look. In the centre of the piece is a wooden door, opening outwards with the words SUNDAY MASS in bold black print above the frame. The door, Newman says, is from the former St. Michael’s Residential School in Alert Bay, and is always kept open to symbolise that the events which occurred behind it will never be forgotten, as well as to encourage the ongoing conversation and mindfulness that true reconciliation requires. First launched in 2014, the installation has toured all across Canada, to small towns and cities alike. Now, through

the prolonged efforts of both those on campus and in the Regional District of Nanaimo (RDN), it has come to stay for a time at VIU. The reception for the Blanket’s installation on October 6 had an amazing turnout. Hundreds attended to listen as several speakers, including VIU Elder and Residential School survivor Gary Manson, touched on the theme of reconciliation and the impact of bringing the Blanket to the university. Newman himself spoke on how creating the Blanket led him to explore the meaning of reconciliation. He says that reconciliation is “different from equality” in that issues of equality, such as clean drinking water, are human rights owed to everyone, regardless of their history. Reconciliation, he says, is about “casting aside the paradigms that brought us here in the first place” and “constant, intentional remembrance” of the atrocity that took place, so as to honour the victims and ensure it never happens again. In the viewing room after the reception, the atmosphere was solemn, with quiet murmurs of conversation filling the space as people took in the piece. Some voices were contemplative, others emotional, as the history on display brought painful memories to the surface. Even for those who don’t have a direct connection to the Residential Schools, it is impossible to see the Blanket and not feel the staggering weight of its message. The longer you look, the more you see: layers and layers of objects, layers

of people, and layers of pain. As VIU Vice-Chancellor Ralph Nilson said, “It’s a stationary piece of work, but when you stand in front of it, you will hear all sorts of things.” Nilson said that he is very grateful for the Snuneymuxw people in Nanaimo for helping install the piece “in the right way.” He said that the university is “all about taking on different dialogues,” and the Blanket is “one of the most powerful installations [he’s] seen.” The Blanket will be on display in the View Gallery (bldg. 330) until November 30, Tuesday to Saturday between 11 am and 5 pm. There will also be a free workshop, called the “Blanket Exercise”, which invites participants to explore the history of treaty-making, colonization and resistance in Canada. There will be several sessions of the workshop over the next month, and those interested can sign up online by searching VIU Blanket Exercise at <eventbrite.ca>. The arrival of the Blanket marks the beginning of a series of events at VIU called Reconciliation Road: Join the Journey with VIU. Other events in the series will include the raising of a third totem pole at Shq’apthut, VIU’s Aboriginal Gathering Place; a concert with Native Canadian singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie at The Port Theatre; the second annual Indigenous Speakers Series with the Laurier Institution and CBC Radio One’s Ideas; and Testify, an installation created by pairing together lawyers and artists, and having them collaborate on the theme of reconciliation.

Get spooky with Nanaimo Museum’s Lantern Tours Catherine Charlebois Halloween is here --and the Nanaimo The Navigator

Museum is getting in the spirit with its October tours and exhibits. Coming back for its fourth year are the Lantern Tours, which explore Downtown Nanaimo’s darker side. The tour, which runs every Friday from October 14 to the 28, takes museum goers on a walk through old Nanaimo’s cobbled streets, with stops at Downtown’s most notorious sites. Back by popular demand, the tour stops by the old provincial jail, the courthouse and the Bastion, and tells stories of grisly events inNanaimo’s history. “The Lantern Tour is a history tour with darker themes like murders and hangings,” said Aimee Greenaway, Nanaimo Museum’s Interpretation Curator.  “It’s a great way to share stories from the past that we don’t normally include in tours.” 

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Inspired by a rising popularity in ghost tours and dark tourism, this years tour includes a new story about a crime connected to seedier parts of 19th century Nanaimo. “We don’t want to give all the juicy details,” said Jamie Franzmann, Museum Sevices Coordinator and Lantern Tour guide. “But the Red Light district crime was a theft involving a teenager, a sex worker and a Madam that made headlines around the province in July 1893.” Other stories on the tour include an ax-murderer on Protection Island, public hangings, and a famous architect with an infamous personal life. The tours run from 6:30 – 8 pmOctober 14, 21, and 28andcost $15 a person. Pre-registration is required for the tour as space is limited. For more information and to register, visit <nanaimomuseum.ca>.

NAVIGATOR

NEWS

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FEATURES

EvEryday Earth:

a PErsonal notE on Finding BalancE BEtwEEn hoPE and dismay Chantelle Spicer Last week I was going through my --typical morning routine of making Contributor

coffee in the creeping light of dawn while listening to CBC Radio, when my precarious balance of hope was shaken. This hope for a healthy earth and society I hold is like a fluttery candle—despite the growing sense of urgency surrounding climate change and its associated disasters, I hope we might somehow come to the realization that the planet and our fellow human neighbours are important and loved. That change will happen. My hope teeters between great relief when something good happens and wild devastation when something bad happens. It is a delicate balance, like a high-wire circus act that I have very little training for. Sometimes I play off my fears real cool and resigned—“I have always just been waiting for the world to end and I will just enjoy it until then” kind of attitude–while inside, my candle sputters in the darkness. The news that shook me this week was a fairly low-key story on Canada’s sovereign rights over the Arctic and the exploration for subsurface minerals. This has been an ongoing, under-reported story over the past few years that most people have heard as background noise in their life or not at all. For me, that morning, I heard it loud and clear–despite the precedent setting agreements in Paris and shouts for climate justice, Canada and other countries are reaching out oilseeking tendrils into fragile ecosystems, and governments are making agreements with companies about the fate of traditional territories. As the CBC reporter calmly discussed “Arctic leadership” and potential resources in this unexplored area, I had to sit down on the kitchen floor to take it in a wave of “how did we get here?!” It seems absurd to me that the thinning of the Arctic ice sheets should work as an economic benefit to anyone—that somewhere, someone is celebrating

this new access to exploitation. This came amid an unrelenting week of news which left me reeling—approval of the LNG pipeline, approval by some First Nations groups of the Kinder Morgan Pipeline, ongoing Donald Trump news, and to top it all off, climate scientists stating we have hit the tipping point of 400ppm and may never return. How to deal with my flickering flame in the face of this emotional devastation? I honestly have no idea, but it is still, miraculously, burning. Perhaps it hasn’t all sunk in yet, or perhaps my mind cannot even comprehend the magnitude of the news. Maybe I do not even want to. I need this hope to exist. So despite this anger, disappointment, grief, dread, and disillusionment, my compass swings back to its true north. Maybe hope exists in the small things, in the seemingly insignificant victories that don’t even make the news but have to be dug out of my Facebook feed, vignettes from my daily life, or obscure web journals. One of these came from Ken Wu of the Ancient Forest Alliance who reported on the BC municipal leaders calling on the provincial government to protect the Island’s remaining old growth forests. Another is a group of young artists from Edmonton who write letters of love and support to the young people of Attawapiskat. On the home front, hope comes from seeing the community support of local farmers at markets, taking personal actions to protect wild bee populations or taking extra steps to love little patches of the earth through organic gardening. I also find great relief in hearing people talk about not just appreciation for nature, but a deep respect for the earth, seeing people find or follow their path not towards society’s standards of success, but towards their love of life. Sometimes I wonder if what I do is enough. I am not a front lines type of person—I do not attend most rallies or protests, or offer myself up for arrest for the greater good. I do

not take grand actions, make moving documentaries, or start organizations that are pitted against the government. I have respect for those that do, such as the thousands who stand at Sacred Stone Camp at Standing Rock (see p. 11) but this is not my path. I make my own declarations and take actions on a more personal level by: writing to you, not buying things in packaging, riding the bus or my bike, contributing small bits of time or money to conservation groups I believe in, and taking part in our local community. Despite these actions, there is a criticizing voice in my head that whispers, “this is not enough…your actions do not matter”. It is hard to know if what you are doing is the right thing, or good enough, especially in the face of something as big as the torrent of news over the past week. The universe and corporate powers—both of which feel vast and unconquerable—have their own interests and seem to strike out at random at the things you hold most dear. It is easy to feel small. What is important, I have learned, is to give credit to those small things and to the communities who support them, and to give credit to yourself for the efforts you make. Breath deep in the moments when the beauty of the world is around you. Remember there are elders who pray for love and the earth with each step they take—and join them. Bad news will continue to come in many forms, reaching out from faraway places into our homes and minds—and there is no stopping it. We have control over little but our own personal reactions to it; so, when the time comes, know what brings you hope and keeps your candle aflame. Hold fast to all of the small joys that find their way into your life and ally yourselves with people who share your love, for they are your teachers and those who learn from you in equal measure. Above all, embrace all the feelings that come for they all teach us a lesson.

Bunnies and Stairs The Navigator

The more the merrier! Submit your bunnies and stairs to The Nav by emailing <editor@thenav.ca> or Tweet us @theNav_VIU. Bunny: Something nice, funny, positive, or sweet that happened in your life. Stair: Something mean, annoying, negative, or gross that happened in your life.

Bunny:

Bunny:

To pumpkin spice.

To the kind man for getting the demon out of me. (Amen.)

Stairs:

Stairs:

To the storm for not being as impressive in Nanaimo as it was wildly claimed.

To the ghost that keeps opening all my cupboards. Rude.

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BARK BARK! What is it Lassie? BARK BARK! Timmy fell down a well!?

Courtesy of <Pinterest.com>

“You are just an orange dog. I am an orangutan-person.” - Chantek

Dallas Bezaire ---

We just love to anthropomorphize animals. From The Lion King to this Contributor summer’s Zootopia, it seems that we can’t get enough of talking animals with feelings and emotions just like our own. This sentiment isn’t new either. Mythology and legend is filled with stories of talking creatures. However, the scientific consensus has taken much longer to come around to the idea. It wasn’t until the middle of the 20th century that scientists started to recognize and acknowledge that animals may be smarter than we give them credit for. Today there is a growing body of knowledge that suggests many animals have some form of consciousness, with some saying they share a very similar consciousness to our own. Recently, the results have taken a step towards the fantastic. It seems that many animals may have language. Now, it isn’t new at all that animals communicate. We have known that wolves communicate through howls, and whales via their singing, for a long time. The major breakthrough is that this speech may qualify as a language, something very different than normal communicative sounds, and possibly very similar to our own. So what makes a language? It has to have a number of different characteristics defined by linguists, such as arbitrariness, where a word doesn’t have to be rationally connected to its meaning (there is nothing desk-y about the word desk); discreteness, where the language is composed of small, repeatable units; and displacement, where something can be talked about without it having to be immediately present. The most famous and well-studied examples of animal language come from our closest relatives, the great apes. Koko the 45-year-old lowland gorilla has repeatedly impressed the scientific and naturalist world by learning over 1000 signed words, creating her own words by combining signs, and learning to understand over 2000 spoken English words. Chantek, an Orangutan raised at the University of Tennessee, is also renowned for his ability to communicate with over 150 modified ASL signs including some of his own making. An incident when he was nine resulted in Chantek being moved to a traditional zoo setting where he developed severe depression, in part due to the loss of his friendships and people to talk to, often referring to himself as orangutanperson and the other orangutans as orange dogs. Chantek has

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since become the poster child of “Project Chantek” aimed at furthering understanding of Orangutan intelligence and pushing for “encultured” apes or apes raised in human cultural and social systems to be recognized as having personhood. Regardless, both Chantek’s, Koko’s, and other apes’ stories show that, given the proper environment and education, apes can learn to understand and use language in a limited but effective capacity. And this begs the question, if our closest relatives have the capacity to understand and use language, what other animals also share this? How about the animal that we spend the most time with and evolved together with: our dogs? Well, it

“It wasn’t until the middle of the 20th century that scientists started to recognize and acknowledge that animals may be smarter than we give them credit for.” turns out that Fido can understand quite a bit of language. A border collie named Chaser has been shown to understand the distinct names for over 1022 objects. Other research using MRI scans of dog brains show that they can distinguish between the meaning of words and the tone they are said in and in fact have audio processing very similar to our own. So the next time you tease your dog by insulting them in a happy tone know that your dog knows full well what you are saying (and they love you anyways—shame on you). Dogs aren’t the only ones to share similarities in language ability. It turns out that dolphins, one of the other highly intelligent species on earth, also love to chat with each other.

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Sound recordings of two Black Sea bottlenose dolphins named Yasha and Yana have shown they speak in sentences of up to five words apiece, although the particular study has been criticized for having a sloppy experimental set up. Not only do dolphins speak in sentences but they also are polite enough to wait for the other to finish as they have their conversations. Many dolphins even have specific names for each other that they use to identify and respond to others in their pod. And it isn’t just even dolphins, dogs, and apes. It seems that in the mammal world language of some form is quite common with everything from whales and sea lions to bats and elephants. The difficult part now is to figure out what they are saying and whether it really constitutes a real language. Luckily we have had a bit of success in a few areas, one being that of prairie dogs. Prairie dogs will makes distinct calls to each other describing a number of different things including the species, size, shape, colour, and direction of movement of a predator as well as specific calls for non-predators. For humans this might be a call saying that a tall, skinny human with a yellow shirt is coming towards the colony. Not only do these calls have a form of grammar but they are also able to make up new calls for novel objects or animals, an ability that had been considered unique to humans up until that point. Outside of mammals, birds also have very complex vocalization, although there is still a lot of doubt as to whether it truly constitutes a language in most cases. Bees have been shown to have a language that they communicate through dance. Even squid and other cephalopods have been shown to communicate in some way through changing the colour of their skin. It seems that some form of language is a very useful system selected by highly social species and may exist in other forms yet unknown to us throughout the animal world. For me, all of this is nothing short of amazing. Already we have the technology to near seamlessly translate human speech from one language to another. It isn’t farfetched at all to see a future where we are chatting with dolphins, speaking with elephants, and having dogs go fetch help when a child falls down a well. As a civilization we are constantly looking outward to the stars for intelligent life that we can converse with. It may turn out that the first intelligent life that we establish communication with won’t be from the stars but instead be one from our very own planet.

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dirtyin' thE nav: showcasing asExuality October 23-29 is Asexual Awareness Week! This annual campaign seeks to educate about asexual, aromantic, demisexual, and grey-asexual experiences and to create materials that are accessible to our community and our allies around the world.

Diana Pearson In my first issue of “Dirtyin’ The Nav”, I --asked the question: “Can it get any better The Navigator

than a sweaty romp in the sack?” While some might say no, for others, the answer is an emphatic yes, yes it can. For still others, this scenario is downright unappealing. In class last week, a peer asked which is better, bungee jumping or sex? Another responded by firmly stating that “bungee jumping wins every time.” We all chuckled at her candid statement. These questions had me wondering, how can sex-positivity and asexuality go hand-in-hand? I first learned about asexuality in 2014 while hiking the El Yunque Rainforest in Puerto Rico with two ladies I’d met at a Women’s Studies Conference. In conversation, they told me they both identified as asexual. I was so curious. They were very patient while I asked ignorant questions like, “Do you feel like you’re missing out?” and “Have you ever had an orgasm?!” It took me time to understand that not all humans are driven by sex, as many of Freud’s theories, and my own wild hormones, might suggest. The conversation was enlightening, and I soon learned that asexuality was much more complicated than I first imagined. An asexual person (ace) is defined by the Asexual Visibility and Education Network (AVEN) as someone who does not experience sexual attraction; “this differs from celibacy because it’s not a choice but an orientation just like being gay, lesbian, [heterosexual,] or bisexual.” Under the asexuality umbrella, you are sure to find a diversity of wonderful individuals all with varying desires, delights, and disgusts. According to the AVEN 2014 census, “21.6 percent

of ace respondents indicated that they felt their sex drive was nonexistent.” Some aces are sex-repulsed, which means they are disgusted by sexual activity. Some are sex-neutral, meaning that although they feel no desire to have sex, they may be willing to have sex with a partner. One ace who identifies as gray-asexual and panromantic, said with a laugh, “some things are fine, as long as it’s not too long or too sticky.” Another ace explained that when she discovered that sex for her was “uninteresting,” it was a bit like hearing she had won the lottery, only to claim her prize and find out the prize had already been given away. A third said they enjoy masturbation, but simply have no desire to have sex with a partner. Although aces may not face as much discrimination as individuals in a visible minority (such as trans individuals), social challenges do come up. I interviewed Bauer, a coordinator of Aces NYC (a community group in New York for asexual people and allies), who has experienced social stigma. She says, “There are definitely people who pathologize [asexuality], say you’re broken, or that your hormones need to be corrected, or that you’ll grow out of it, that you haven’t met the right person, or you may be gay and just haven’t admitted it yet. We have people coming from the other direction, saying, ‘I knew I was gay, I didn’t know that I was also asexual!’” Asexuality is a sexual orientation. By no means should asexuality be seen as a pathology or as being a result of negative sexual experiences. That being said, Bauer says that survivors of sexual trauma have also found support in the Aces NYC community. “There are some people who are survivors of sexual trauma who

oint of viu

Cole Schisler | The Navigator

identify as asexual because of that trauma, and we welcome them.” She says it’s important to make space for all those who identify as asexual, regardless of their path to that decision. It is reported that about one percent of the human population is asexual; however, this percentage might be higher as asexuality education and awareness grows. As I learn more about the ace-spectrum, I find myself thinking more critically about my own sexuality. I’d never considered that only being sexually attracted to someone after developing an intimate bond had its own label (it’s called demisexual); and while labels aren’t necessary to make our sexual preferences valid, these identities are a reminder that sexuality is much more diverse than the hetero-rom-com narrative we continue to see in films. The more we understand about our sexual impulses (or lack thereof), our romantic desires, and our needs for belonging, friendship, and companionship, the more capable we are of asking for what we want and saying no to what we don’t want. Desires can include the desire not to have sex. Sexual orientation is not as simple as the “nature vs. nurture debate” would lead us to believe. Sexuality is a playful mixture of our hormones, past experiences, cultural beliefs, and wonderfully mysterious urges. Questioning your own desires is a great way to better understand your needs and expectations for love, sex, and companionship. As always, I love to hear your sex-related questions, concerns, and curiosities via <column@thenav.ca>. Not to worry–your questions stay anonymous and confidential.

whaT Is The scarIesT ThINg ThaT has happeNed To you?

SheLBy

CRySTAL

DANNy

DANIeL

KeITh

First Nations Studies

Social Services

Psychology

Biology

Business

“When I was really young, I thin fo r or five I was sleeping in my parents’ bed. I remember my mom leaving for work and I was in the bed with my dad still, and I just remember waking up and seeing this h ge fig re of a man standing there, looming over the doorway and staring at me. I looked over and I knew there was no other man in my house other than my Dad. I put my head back down and every single time I would look up it was still there. And it ended up reaching its hand up and throwing something at me and I remember just falling asleep. It’s still something that stays with me today.”

“I went to California and I stayed in a hotel with my aunt and my sister, and they told me all these stories about how cupboards were being left open and stuff, I didn’t believe them, at all. Then the night I stayed there I slept out on the couch in the living room because I didn’t want to share a bed with them and I swear to God, someone whispered in my ear when I was trying to go to sleep. I sat straight up and I yelled, I ran into their room and told them what happened, they were like, ‘Oh yeah, that’s just Jerry the Ghost.’ They had a whole back story for the ghost and everything. I didn’t sleep the whole time I was there.”

“The scariest thing that’s ever happened to me was a shark encounter that I had in Peru while s rfing. I was o t a mile ac from the surf, just chilling on my board, and I thought I saw a dolphin, t I saw the dorsal fin and I knew it was a shark. It checked me out and kept getting closer, at one point it was less than a metre away from me, and I made eye contact with it, then it went into the depths and I never saw it again. The one thing surfers are taught when encountering sharks is to stay very still because sharks react to motion, so I stayed as still as I could until I was sure it went away.”

“I have a pool in my backyard and the cover is stitched on the sides, it’s mechanical, so it opens and closes on its own. One time I forgot something underneath the cover way back, so I went underneath it, swam down, and ran out of breath. I tried to swim back up by the deep end and push up on it to get air, but it wasn’t budging. I had a panic attack, trying to punch it, it was pretty far to swim back. It’s not really that far, but when you’re out of breath, it’s pretty far. Anyway, I swam back, got out and for like twenty minutes I just sat there in shock cause I thought I was gonna die.”

“I went to this camp in grade six. They told stories about this thing named M which was mother earth, so we all had an imagination of this M creature. One night after a big seminar, we were walking back to our rooms and saw a white mas ed fig re up on this cliff out in Kanasnaskis. We all thought it was M and the teachers were like, “Oh yeah, it’s M. Let’s all go back to the rooms, we’re gonna go to sleep early tonight.” I didn’t think much of it until later, but the teachers stayed up all night, freaked out, because there was a guy in a mask running round outside this camp.”

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Standing Rock in Nanaimo

Colton Hash

Protestors outside of TD Canada Trust in Victoria on September 23.

James Chumsa-Jones The long and hard struggle --between the people of Stand Contributor

ing Rock and the multi-billion dollar fossil fuel industry continues in North Dakota. By now you should have already seen the pictures and videos of Native American protestors on horseback, or heard about the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), also known as the Brakken Pipeline. Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners plans to continue with construction of the US $3.8 billion oil pipeline despite protests against it. If built, the DAPL will be around 1900 km long and stretch from the Brakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Illinois. It would also go though a sacred Native American burial site and Lake Oahe which is right near the Reservation of the Standing Rock Sioux Nation. Tribal members of the Standing Rock Sioux have been staunchly opposed to the pipeline ever since the construction threatened their way of life. There is also much concern that the oil could potentially leak into their fresh water supply, as many oil pipelines tend to burst. Those who are confronting the construction crews prefer to call themselves “land defenders” or “water protectors” rather than protesters, and often use the phrase “water is life”. Most importantly, the people of Standing Rock never consented to having an oil pipeline being built near their reservation, yet Energy Transfer Partners has not respected their wishes. It began on April 1 when citizens of Standing Rock and their allies set up the Sacred Stone camp by the Cannonball River, directly in the path of the pipeline’s construction. “This started with a prayer,” said David Archambault, Tribal Chairman of Standing Rock. Soon after, the Red Warrior camp was established nearby to help. What started off as small eventually snowballed in a much larger movement as more and more people joined the camp. Eventually it began to catch the attention of mainstream news networks and stories began to leak out. BBC even reported it as “the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years”. The protectors opposing the pipeline have faced many challenges from private security guards and construction workers. Images of attack dogs with blood on their mouths caught attention on social media last month followed by reports of security guards using them against the people at the camp. Officers in riot gear using tear gas and pepper spray was reported as well. Recently, militarized police have arrived on the scene in armoured vehicles and have even pointed their guns at the land defenders. So far there have been over 100 arrests. Despite the hardships, the camp at Standing Rock has gained support from far and wide. Among the many who have joined the camp are US Green Party leader Jill Stein, Hollywood actress Shailene Woodley, and Nanaimo resident Derrick Manson. Shailene Woodley was recently arrested on

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site for “criminal trespassing”. Other supporters of Standing Rock include members of US Congress and former presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, who on Twitter called the DAPL “dangerous”. Anonymous has even become involved by launching an operation against the pipeline with the hashtag #OpNoDapl. In August a sector in Canada uploaded a YouTube video titled “OpNoDapl Anonymous Message to Obama” declaring that they “stand in solidarity with all tribes of Indigenous people against the Dakota Access Pipeline” and urged the US president to “put forth a direct order” to stop the pipeline. In September the Obama administration did order a temporary halt to construction of the pipeline near the Sacred Stone and Red Warrior Camps. The US Department of Justice, Department of the Army, and The Department of the Interior even released a joint statement urging for further review of the project. In the recent months there has been a movement to boycott TD Canada Trust, and protests have been held outside their branches to show solidarity for the Sioux Nation. The reason for this is because TD is Canada’s largest financial contributor of the DAPL, having invested $365 million into it. Other Canadian banks funding the pipeline are the Royal Bank of Canada and Bank of Nova Scotia, investing $340 million and $100 million respectively. On September 12 of this year, a large crowd gathered outside the Toronto Dominion tower in Vancouver carrying signs and drums. “We are calling on everyone to deactivate their personal and business TD bank accounts and for TD to divest their money from the Dakota Access Pipeline,” said one of the organizers. Another protest was held in Victoria on September 23. A sizable crowd gathered by the entrance of the TD branch on 1080 Douglas St., right in the heart of downtown Victoria. The branch closed for three business hours due to the protest and there were no arrests. There will be more protests outside branches of TD Canada Trust; VIU’s Student Organization for Social Change (SOSC) is hosting one on October 22 outside the branch in Nanaimo on 9 Nichol St and another the day after in Duncan on 351 Island Highway, both starting at 1 pm. The struggle at Standing Rock is now one of the largest movements in North America and has gained international recognition. This is the first time since 1875 that all the Lakota tribes have come together at the Cannonball River, and Indigenous people from across the globe have travelled to Standing Rock to join in on the action. Tribal leaders of the camp plan to continue with non-violent means and civil disobedience. As cold weather approaches the protectors of the Sacred Stone Camp have dug their heels in the ground and are preparing for a long legal battle.

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St. ouis, s : Shanon Fenske ---

The first time I saw the St. Louis Ghost Light I didn’t know what I was Contributor looking at. One of my earliest childhood memories was of a strange cloud in the basement of our home. The room had inexplicably filled with a greenish fog that slowly rolled together and transformed into a human-like shape. My ears rang and my body froze. I tried to breathe. It was something I did not want to see. Somehow, I broke the spell and ran. My mom told me I was imagining things, but I learned as an adult she had also seen similar things herself. Over the years, I sometimes woke to see that green cloud hovering over me. Not just in one home either. I would close my eyes and hide beneath the cover of my blankets. As I grew older, I slowly rationalized that the cloud was a figment of my imagination. I was half-asleep. It was not real. It would be years before someone else saw it at the same time as me.

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When I was 17, I stopped believing in ghosts. I thought I had grown up—but really, I was just naive. The St. Louis Ghost Light is one of Canada’s most famous ghost stories. Most of the people I grew up with in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan have seen it. Whole groups of us saw it at the same time. In 2014, Canada Post featured the haunting on one of their stamps and posted the story online. The legend was that a railway worker had been killed on the tracks near the town of St. Louis close to the South Saskatchewan River. The area is mostly farmland, but there is a tree-lined dirt road where the tracks had once been. Nowadays, fences with “No Trespassing” signs restrict access, but back then the road was wide open. The St. Louis Ghost Light site has appeared in documentaries, newspapers, magazine articles, books, YouTube videos, and on the news. Groups have studied the ghost phenomenon and have proposed theories ranging from swamp gas to headlights in the distance.

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I have seen this light 100 times or more. At times, it looks like a large, single headlight. At others, it sways back and forth and is red. This is said to be the conductor looking for his head. I have witnessed these lights during the day, and I have seen them walking along the road in both directions. I have seen them in the distance and I have seen them up close. It is not headlights and there are no swamps nearby. To me, the explanations are even more whimsical than one’s belief in spirits of the dead. Some sacred spaces incite peacefulness, such as temples of worship, well-tended gardens, and New Age rooms of healing. The St. Louis Ghost Light has the opposite effect. Something feels unsettling. Car stereos turn on or off by themselves. Vehicles sometimes won’t start. The air burns electric. Like many places reputed to be haunted, the old road became a place for parties. The location was remote, so we’d light fires and drink whatever we could get our hands on.

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Pretty girls would come to impress us, and we’d be there to show them how fearless we really were. Adults came too. Curious first-daters. People bored of the bar. Sometimes the police would arrive. They would pour out our drinks and tell us to put out the fire and leave. These gatherings were spontaneous. There would usually only be one or two cars at a time. If there were several people, it would be the same group of friends hoping to see the light together. On a few occasions, there were a couple of parties taking place at the same time. This usually meant separate bonfires a short distance apart from one another. Being rural, the place was otherwise dark and quiet. The stars were bright and the sounds of civilization were far. The first time I saw the light up close was a night when several of us had come to build a fire. As usual, music spilled out of a nearby car while the crackling flame kept us warm. We hadn’t learned yet that the spot on the road where we built our fire was a bad one; it was less visible to authorities

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in the distance, but it wasn’t a good place to see the light. Once we started to build the flame on higher ground we saw the ghost light more often. It would appear and disappear over and over again. It became so common, that eventually it was just a recurring curiosity. It was more than that in the beginning, of course, and always more than that when one of us left the safety of the fire. That night was the beginning. Three of us had never seen the light, so we left the fire to seek it out. We were brave on the outside, because we listened to hard music, fought, and shot guns. We were also brave because we didn’t believe the stories were real. We thought some of our friends were ahead of us on the old trail, trying to scare us, as an intensely bright flashlight kept shining in our faces. It looked like a motorcycle headlight at 10 feet away. It would be there for several seconds and then go out. We were annoyed because the light was jarring and it hurt our eyes.

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“Turn that fucking thing off!” I yelled after the third or fourth time. Eventually, I figured the prank got old and they stopped. We became bored ourselves and headed back to the fire, wondering who had been ahead of us. “Did you see it?” someone asked when we returned. My two friends and I looked back and forth at one another in disbelief. There were thick shrubs on either side of us, so we knew that no one had passed us. There had been no one ahead of us. I had become a believer once more. For more ghost stories by Shanon Fenske, check out his blog <livinglibraryblog.com>.

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TICKLED: The sTrangesT film of 2016, a review

youtube.com

<tickledmovie.com>

Brendan Barlow When New Zealand filmmaker and --journalist David Farrier stumbled across The Navigator

a bizarre video of three men tickling a fourth who was strapped to a table, he did a little digging and found himself staring down the world of competitive endurance tickling. When Farrier reached out to the production company behind the videos, Jane O’Brien Media, he was met with an ice-cold reception and told that Jane O’Brien was not interested in dealing with “homosexuals”. Thus began Farrier’s journey into the world of competitive endurance tickling, and the world of Jane O’Brien. All of this is documented in bizarre and terrifying detail in his 2016 documentary Tickled. If you were a fan of last year’s HBO documentary series The Jinx, which chronicled the life and murders committed by Robert Durst, or the 2010 documentary Catfish, and still haven’t found yourself an opportunity to watch Tickled, then you’ve been missing out. It’s hard to dive too deep into this without spoiling it entirely, but I will do my best to keep the reveals to a minimum. Immediately after Farrier began his quest for answers, he is visited by representatives from Jane O’Brien Media who have agreed to meet with him. This meeting turns out not to be what it seems, and starts off a barrage of legal threats aimed at David. These threats loom heavy over the entirety of the film, and even bring the filmmakers close to shutting down production. They battle with whether or not these legal threats are legitimate, and

eventually decide to face down the bullies at Jane O’Brien Media, and tell to this story no matter what. The resulting documentary is one of the most heartpounding experiences I’ve had watching a movie this year. More than once, the documentarians move to confront someone in scenes that had my heart racing, and made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Tense moments aside, you also get the true stories of men featured in these tickling videos and the abuse that they suffered at the hands of Jane O’Brien when they attempted to leave her organization. You also learn about a disturbed man named David D’Amato, who becomes the focus of the film, and start to realize how long these tickling videos have been around. Once you finally begin to understand the scope of Jane O’Brien Media, it becomes a genuinely frightening film. You are taken into a tickle-cell based in a poor neighbourhood, and learn how dependent these men become on the money and benefits they receive from O’Brien. According to the documentary, Jane O’Brien seems to have a limitless amount of money and resources to ensure that the men become dependant. It appears that the agreements made do not include the public release of the tickling videos, which are released once the men try to leave. There is also an assertion that these videos are completely non-sexual in nature, and only heterosexual men are considered to participate. In the end, a bizarre and intricate conspiracy is exposed,

with no consequence to Jane O’Brien Media. Jane O’Brien Media actually continues to operate—you can visit them on Facebook or at their own website. I won’t be sharing links because, frankly, what they do is abhorrent and not deserving of additional attention. According to an interview the filmmaker did with MTV, Farrier has been sued a number of times by D’Amato, none of which have been successful. D’Amato also showed up at a screening of the film to publicly confront Farrier about the film. Footage of that particular confrontation is available online, and is something to behold. There is so much to unpack about this film, and it really does need to be seen to be believed. I found myself saying “Wait, what?” out loud more times than with any other film I’ve watched. I haven’t had such an intense visceral reaction to a film before or since the ending of The Jinx. If you haven’t checked out this documentary, or have some aversion to documentaries, it’s time to get on this. As a documentary and a film, Tickled ranks among the best of the year. The combination of a fascinating subject, the great editing, and pacing throughout the film are a testament to Farrier’s abilities as a filmmaker and a documentarian. Tickled is available to purchase on iTunes, and via other means that shall not be named.

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exploring our imaginations: After Alice Chantelle spicer I recently designated some time to --read a novel before the pressures of Contributor

midterms, research, and paper writing took all of the joy out of reading. I wanted it to be something I had not read before and it needed to be worth it. So as not to disappoint myself, I chose one of my favourite authors, Gregory Maguire. He had already won my heart with the Wicked series, which is a reimagining of Oz from the point of view of the Wicked Witch , alongside a personal essay on the roots of evil in humanity. He has since stretched his imagination into many famous characters including Cinderella (Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister) and Snow White (Mirror, Mirror). Most recently he has taken on one of the greatest feats of the imagination in children’s literature, and one of my all-time favorites—Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. Never have I enjoyed any type of retelling or even a visual portrayal of the original story as thoroughly as I did in After Alice. It is a meta-style journey through two equally confounding and captivating worlds—Victorian England and Wonderland—through the lens of formally marginal characters Ada and Lydia. Ada, made momentarily infamous

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by her perfect ringlets in Carroll’s version, is fleshed out into a pitiable character by Maguire, forced into an iron corset to correct her unrefined posture and cast aside by a family who has recently acquired a new and more valuable son. In an attempt to discover her own freedom, she places her foot in the wrong place and finds herself tumbling into someone else’s fantasy, following in the footsteps of Alice. All the while Lydia, Alice’s older sister, is finding herself emerging into an equally confusing world of adolescent girls—half child, half woman. She cavorts in the shadows of humanity’s understanding of their own place in the world as her family receives a visit from an aging Charles Darwin. Also present for the journey is a young American boy named Siam, freed from slavery by a well-intentioned gentleman—both navigating the world of racism at the turn of the century and society. Once in Wonderland, Ada and Siam navigate through the beloved characters—Cheshire Cat, the Hatter and his party, the murderous Queen of Hearts and surprisingly wise White Queen—as well as new characters such as the Tin Bear and Ballerina who are ruled over by Humpty Dumpty. Each is a shadow of characters encountered in the “real” world, offering

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satirical, trickster lessons through riddles and nonsense poems equal to those of the original story. Maguire leads us into multiple worlds and moves between each effortlessly, as we explore the internal lives of women and men, children and adults, and those who sit upon many steps of the English class system. In elegant fashion, the author explains through Lydia that “our private lives are like a colony of worlds expanding, contracting, breathing universal air into separate knowledges,” poignantly highlighting the value of story in allowing us passports into these worlds. The world we live in today is no less confusing than that which Alice, or now Ada and Siam, have stepped into. It is no wonder that a man with such an imagination as Maguire could so easily enter that of Carroll, by inspiration from our own befuddled world. In fact, it would be brilliant to see him take on a retelling of Alice in a modern setting—perhaps a sequel? I encourage everybody with an interest in Victorian times, children’s literature, or hidden meanings to find their way through this story and their own sense of reality.

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ShIn GoDzILLA (2016) review Clayton Bambrough I am a huge Godzilla fan. I’ve seen --all of the Japanese films, as well Contributor

as the two American remakes, so when I heard Toho was producing a new movie for the first time in 12 years, and it was getting a theatrical release in North America this October, I was more than a little excited. The 2014 Godzilla production by Legendary was the second attempt at creating a western version of the monster, and was successful. I was mostly satisfied with it, but it still didn’t feel like a real Godzilla movie. Only Toho can produce that indescribable feeling, and I got that feeling watching their latest entry in the long-running franchise. Released in Japan back in July as Shin Gojira, it was retitled Godzilla Resurgence for its limited North American release, but then changed to Shin Godzilla (I suspect to avoid any similarity to this summer’s Independence Day Resurgence), and is the firstever total reboot by Toho. Anytime Toho brings Godzilla back, whether in Godzilla (1985) or Godzilla 2000 (1999), it’s always a sequel to the original 1954 Gojira (aka Godzilla: King of the Monsters, as it was re-titled for America), but Shin Godzilla is almost a remake, in the sense that it retools Godzilla’s origins and tells a story about his initial arrival and Japan’s attempts to defeat him. The plot and tone is quite similar to the original. Godzilla is treated as a force of nature, and the response to his attack is depicted in a very realistic manner. While Gojira was inspired by the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Shin Godzilla very clearly pulls from the more recent Fukushima disaster in 2011. There are also a lot of political undertones, which makes it feel more unique compared to previous Godzilla films, and that’s the key word here: unique. In a series that’s over 60 years old, Shin Godzilla proves there are still ways to make the series feel new while also paying tribute to what came before. It takes a different approach than most giant monster movies, by following a large group of characters—top government officials, scientists, military strategists—who work together to solve the problem, instead of a few main characters who are caught in the mayhem or simply watching Godzilla fight another monster. The pacing is paradoxical, in that it feels both fast and slow. There are lots of quick cuts and brief scenes of people talking, but the build-up to Godzilla’s arrival is deliberate, and time is taken to establish the group of characters before any action occurs.

<japanesetimes.com>

The visual effects are inconsistent but, for the most part, they work. No longer is Godzilla a man-in-a-suit, which made me a little sad at first, knowing the method is now officially a thing of the past, but the design still retains that overall aesthetic and movement. When Godzilla first appears on-screen, someone sitting behind me burst out laughing. Without spoiling too much, I’ll say Godzilla has an initial form that’s quite a departure from the giant monster we’re all familiar with, and it may trigger laughter, confusion, pity, or a mixture of feelings, but his next form is more like the traditional Godzilla (as seen on the poster). Godzilla’s mythology is updated and expanded, in all the right ways. When Godzilla is on-screen, he’s excellent, but viewers who thought the 2014 Godzilla was a little too shy and didn’t appear frequently enough will likely be disappointed again, since he’s featured even less in Shin Godzilla, although his appearances are better spread throughout. Unlike Godzilla (2014), the human characters are actually interesting enough to carry the monster-free scenes, up to a point. As it builds up to the climax, it ramps up nicely, but then it plateaus for a few scenes, robbing the third act of some tension, and this is one area of the movie I thought could have been improved. There were a few too many talking scenes before the climax—had these been trimmed and the movie clocked in at 105 minutes instead of two hours, it may have moved along better in the final act. The climax, too, is very reminiscent of Gojira’s, which I appreciated, but I still couldn’t help but feel

it was a little anti-climactic. Another minor issue is the subtitles. For some reason, every single person and location is given extremely specific on-screen information, with the English subtitles in yellow text laid over white Japanese text. Often the dialogue will be on the bottom of the screen, with the character or location title at the top, and it’s near-impossible to read it all with the quick cuts, nevermind actually looking at the characters’ faces as they speak. These hard to read subtitles may be a big turn off for some viewers—personally I found it jarring for the first 15 minutes or so, but adjusted soon after and by the end no longer noticed. It didn’t feel necessary to know the name of every person and place, and it’s not something that the older films did (to this degree, anyway), so I’m not sure why the filmmakers felt it was necessary. In the end, Shin Godzilla was made for the true fans of the series. I’m not sure how well it will connect with general audiences here, but I really enjoyed it. My initial reaction was to say it’s not as fun as Godzilla (2014), but is a better made film. However, the more I think about Shin Godzilla, the more I like it, unlike Godzilla (2014). So if you didn’t like that film, you probably won’t like this one, but if you’re a fan of the original Japanese films, or even if you used to be as a kid, it’s worth checking out in theaters. Shin Godzilla is playing at Landmark Cinemas (Avalon) on Wednesday, October 19 and Monday, October 24, both at 7 pm.

Author Ian Gibbs on Victoria's Most Haunted shanon fenske When speaking of his upcoming book, --Victoria’s Most Haunted, author Ian Gibbs

Contributor says his intention isn’t to prove whether or not ghosts are real—he knows they are. “I want to tell the story,” Gibbs says. “I don’t need proof.” Gibbs was born in the United Kingdom. He was adopted, and came to Canada with his family when he was four years old. He has lived in several Canadian features, and has lived in Victoria for the past 16 years. “When I was a kid,” Gibbs says, “I would often experience strange things.” His mother would tell him that he was imagining the incidents, so he grew up wondering if he was “crazy”. As a teenager living in Calgary, Gibbs met the Anglican Church’s “official unofficial” exorcist. This was the man the church called when there were “problems,” Gibbs says, although the church wouldn’t readily admit this profession existed. For Gibbs, the meeting felt validating as he discovered the priest had been to some of the same places he had. “‘You’re not crazy,’ he told me, ‘that was totally happening and you picked up on it.’” Gibbs worked for the church for 15 years, mostly with youth on Vancouver Island. He describes himself as a spiritual person, but says he hasn’t been to church for a very long time. “[The Anglican Church] is a strange organization,” Gibbs says, “dedicated to spirituality and things we can’t see, yet it is so reluctant to acknowledge them.” Gibbs has had a lot of paranormal experiences in churches over the years.

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“A friend of mine once said: ‘they’re either people who have found comfort here, or people who are pissed off because they didn’t get what they were promised.’ I thought that was pretty profound.” Since leaving the Church seven years ago, Gibbs has worked with the Saanich Police. His current title is Coordinator of Volunteer Services and Crime Prevention Programs. He is also a tour guide for Victoria’s Ghostly Walks. “I’ve always loved history,” Gibbs says, “I’ve always loved ghost stories.” He got the job after going on one of Victoria’s ghost tours with friends. The walk was led by storyteller and historian John Adams, a man who has authored books on ghosts, been interviewed by news outlets, investigators and reporters, and even appeared on the television show Creepy Canada–which ran from 2002 to 2006. Adams is also the owner of the company giving the tours. Gibbs asked Adams if he needed any more guides, was interviewed, and went through an application process, which included telling a ghost story in public to passers-by. He’s been guiding tours ever since. According to Gibbs, Adams has been very supportive of the book, saying that one of his guides publishing a book is positive for business. Some of the book’s locations—like the Empress Hotel—are stops on the tour as well. Gibbs believes there are two different types of ghosts. “There’s the kind that are just merely an imprint on the environment, they’re the ones like the ghost that walks

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across a certain floor, at a certain time, in a certain set of circumstances—almost like a looped playback. There’s no recognition there, because they’re sort of residual energy. The second kind, I think, are conscious energy.” These second types of spirits are the ones that Gibbs says he has encountered the most. By reading his book, he hopes people who have similar experiences won’t be as freaked out, that their first reaction will be curiosity instead of fear. “As soon as someone knows whatever is there isn’t going to hurt them,” Gibbs says, “or trouble them, they’re usually pretty cool with it.” One of the stories in the book is of a woman whose apartment was haunted. The haunting was very “defined.” It was the spirit of a soldier who had taken a liking to the woman who was living there. When she finally moved out of the apartment she found that she missed the entity’s presence. That same woman also led Gibbs to Ray Shipka, her husband, who has provided the images that will be used in the book. Ghosts of Victoria will be released in April or May 2017 by Touchwood Editions, and will be available in bookstores and at many tourist destinations around Victoria. Gibbs hopes to write a second volume, which will also focus on hauntings in the Victoria area. He can be reached at <ghoststoryguy.com>.

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#31Daysofhorror Part 1

Brendan Barlow --The Navigator

Every October, for the last three years, I take on a rather large project. Each day I sit down and watch one horror film that I have not seen before. While I try to watch movies from before the current year, it’s inevitable that some do sneak in. I decided, this year, to share the films I watch with you, dear readers. This

october 1: Witchboard (1986)

is the first part of that little experiment, with the first 15 films that I have seen this month so far. I will follow up in the next issue with the remaining films, but you can also follow along, and read the full reviews over at my horror review website <barleydoeshorror.wordpress.com>.

october 2: My Little Eye (2002)

october 3: Ils (2006)

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Beginning the month, I dove right in with the 1986 disappointment Witchboard. It’s a pretty uninspired horror film that doesn’t offer up a whole lot, unfortunately. There are some great ’80s stock characters—the psychic in particular cracks me up. It does have a few hilarious special effects and goofy moments, but it doesn’t manage to strike the balance that might call it “so bad it’s good”. The story is simple: woman plays with Ouija board, gets possessed, tries to kill people. Pass.

Released the same year as Feardotcom and Ghost Ship, My Little Eye oozes with early 2000s sensibilities and hairstyles. Sadly, even with a surprise-cameo from a young Bradley Cooper, My Little Eye doesn’t have a whole lot in the way of genuine entertainment. A group of 20-somethings are participating in an internet reality show which requires them all to stay in a house for six months, with a prize of one million dollars, if they all stay. A reasonable set up, but it falls victim to overstylish editing, and breaking the format it sets up more than once. Pass.

Finally, things are starting to look up this month. This 2006 French home-invasion(ish) movie was a genuine breath of fresh air, especially considering the two duds that started off this month. It’s easy to write this off as a mean-spirited film, and you might be right. That said, Ils offers more in the way of creativity and tension than one might expect. Essentially, you follow a couple who live in an isolated home and are tormented by hooded hooligans. It’s mean, it’s tense, and it’s entertaining. recommend.

october 4: noroi: The Curse (2005)

october 5: Lights out (2016)

october 6: neon Maniacs (1986)

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There was so much potential in this movie, and there’s still plenty to enjoy. A Japanese found-footage mockumentary, Noroi’s biggest issue is its run-time of nearly two hours. There are a number of different story lines, all of which seem to interact and inform each other. The trouble is that they become really convoluted and a little hard to follow by the time the finale comes around. The basic story is that of a documentary filmmaker exploring the legend of Kagutaba, and the curse associated with it. It’s got some pretty scary moments, and does work in some places. Unfortunately it’s just a bit long and needlessly complex. light recommend.

Lights Out is a perfect scary movie for this season. The premise is set up and executed really well, creating one of those scary movies that is fun to watch and offers up some thrills and chills. I’d call this one a good “date-night movie”, but it’s still satisfying on your own, or with a group of friends. The story is a bit weak, and some of the plot conveniences are a bit stupid, but it worked for me overall. The story is simple: a girl and her family are tormented by a ghost that can only be seen when the lights are off. It’s simple and it’s a bunch of fun to watch. recommend.

Neon Maniacs is the movie you didn’t know you wanted, but is absolutely missing from your life. A bunch of monsters who live in the Golden Gate Bridge emerge at night and start murdering people for no clear reason. There are a huge variety of bizarre themed monsters, including “hang-man”, “soldier”, “cave-man”, and “lizard cyclops”. The one real problem is that it needed to be gorier. The exact same premise with more over-the-top kills would have made a significantly better experience. That said, this is great, and captures everything we love about ’80s B-movies. recommend.

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october 7: Abattoir (2016)

october 8: Dead of night (1945)

october 9: The Fair haired Child (2006)

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There’s really not much to say about this one, other than to say it’s not worth your time. An eccentric man collects the rooms that murders were committed in, and is building some kind of impossible house out of them. It’s a bit too dense for its own good. It is clearly trying to set up a cinematic universe that isn’t going to happen, and it was directed by Darren Lynn Bousman (Repo! The Genetic Opera), who really isn’t a terribly good filmmaker. Not great, not horrible, not worth your time. Pass.

I loved this movie. Easily one of the earliest examples of a horror anthology that I’ve ever had the pleasure of seeing. In short, a man arrives at a house to do some work, and immediately recognizes the people in the house from a dream he had. Inspired by his seeming supernatural connection to them, the others in the home begin to share their own tales of the supernatural. This really is a great film, and while it absolutely has some of the cheesiness you would expect in a film from the ’40s, there are also some great spooky moments that make this stand out. strong recommend.

I fell behind a little at this point in the month, what with Thanksgiving and all of that, so I dipped into my box set of the television program Masters of Horror. The Fair Haired Child is surprisingly scary, but that comes primarily from the design of its monster. The costume is unsettling, and the movements of the actor (with the help of some editing) really bring it together. Another simple story: a girl is kidnapped as a sacrifice by a family who wants to resurrect their son. While the ending is pretty dissatisfying, the movie as a whole is entertaining. recommend.

october 10: Cigarette Burns (2005)

october 11: Stage Fright (1987)

october 12: Blood Creek (2009)

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Another episode of Masters of Horror, this time directed by the legend himself, John Carpenter. That alone should be enough to sell you on it, but then that would be a lazy review. The episode features a pre-Walking Dead Norman Reedus, and the always haunting Udo Kier. Reedus plays a man who hunts down rare film prints, and Kier plays a rich eccentric who wants his services to hunt down a film that is alleged to make viewers violent. It’s a great episode with a simple premise, and offers up enough mystery and enough gore to satisfy any kind of horror fan. It was enough to ensure that I’d be finishing off the box set that I have. recommend.

This fun, and underrated ’80s slasher was shot in Italy, and I’m fairly certain uses a lot of Italian actors who are speaking English phonetically. A lot of the dialogue seems to have been dubbed, for some reason, and this actually makes the movie more endearing. It’s the story of a group of actors who lock themselves in their practice space, unaware that a murderer is in there with them. The plot is simple, but loaded with goofy conveniences that had me rolling my eyes. That said, the kills are entertaining, and the design of our killer is very memorable. If you’re a fan of ’80s slashers check this out. recommend.

It’s a genuine surprise to me that more people don’t know about this film. It was directed by the now infamous Joel Schumacher (Batman and Robin), and stars Superman himself, Henry Cavill, as well as the always fantastic Michael Fassbender. With such huge names attached, it’s surprising that it hasn’t received more attention. Fassbender plays a Nazi who manages to find himself some magic runes that give him the power to bring things back from the dead, and makes him somewhat immortal as well. It’s bloody, entertaining, and has a zombie horse. What more do you need to get excited about something? recommend.

october 13: Eyes Without a Face (1960)

october 14: From Beyond (1986)

october 15: Don’t Breathe (2016)

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I’ll say right now, the less you know about this one going in the better, so I’m going to keep this particular review short. A doctor becomes obsessed with getting his daughter a new face after it is completely disfigured in an accident that he caused. The movie is beautiful to look at, the black and white makes it striking and unique, and offers up some creepy and disturbing scenes that caught me by complete surprise. strong recommend.

Based on an H.P. Lovecraft short story, From Beyond offers up everything that that statement might imply. The story: two scientists have invented a device called “the resonator” which seems to allow them to see creatures from another dimension. After this costs one of the scientists his life, and the other his sanity, a psychiatrist attempts to have the living doctor replicate the experiment. What follows is a whole lot of body-horror, trans-dimensional monsters, and a healthy dose of blood, guts, and sex to make this a quintessential ’80s horror movie, and one that is a blast from start to finish. recommend.

While I had some problems with the shallow characters, and the at times plain stupid dialogue, it’s hard to deny that Don’t Breathe is an effective and entertaining horror film. When a trio of young thieves enter the home of a blind veteran in order to steal money from him, they find themselves in a deadly game of cat and mouse, and uncover a shocking secret about the resident. It works, and it’s pretty simple. Be ready for The Blind Man (as he’s credited) to have the teleportation powers of Jason Voorhees, and revel in the sound of his gravel-andglass-gargle voice. It’s a fun movie, but absolutely far from a perfect one. recommend.

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Nanaimo Comedy, A Growing Community

Peter Hudson performing stand up.

Cole Schisler ---

Peter Hudson’s Facebook Page

Peter Hudson has been a comedian for five years. He has toured across Western The Navigator Canada with the likes of Jake the Snake Roberts, Jon Lovitz, Everlast, Platinum Blonde, Bif Naked, and Super Troopers. Now Hudson is focused on bringing world-class comedy to Nanaimo. “It’s been growing,” Hudson says. “We’ve always had a steady scene, a few of us would do shows here and there. I’d do a show every three months, but then I was like, ‘you know what? Nanaimo is in dire need.’” Hudson created a show for mental health awareness a few years ago. Hudson brings top talent to Nanaimo and donates the proceeds to the Nanaimo Crisis Centre and suicide prevention through a series of shows from September to March. “When I started doing comedy I had a childhood friend who had done comedy in Vancouver. We hadn’t talked in 15 years, then all the sudden he moved to Nanaimo and we reunited. I told

him I started doing stand up comedy, and I was working away in Alberta, I said ‘Dude, we should do a show together when I get back.’ Just two weeks before I came back his Mom called me and told me he had taken his own life.” Hudson feels that he is giving back to his friend and keeping his legacy alive through doing shows and helping people. He also believes comedy is a great way to combat seasonal depression in Nanaimo. “We have an overcast from October ‘til March, people get seasonal depression. Nobody’s Superman, a lot of people get it,” he says. “The best thing you can do is laugh.” The next mental health awareness show is November 19 at the Queen’s with Canadian comedy award winner, Graham Clark. There will also be a show at Millers Pub on October 22, with James Kennedy, winner of the 2014 Vancouver Yuk Off. Clark and Kennedy will be accompanied by a few local comedians. Nanaimo comedians have a chance to try out their material

every other Tuesday night at Millers Pub by the Departure Bay ferry terminal. While there is a steady group of regular comedians, Hudson says a new comedian has stepped up to the mic every time. The open mics have been happening for two and a half months, Hudson welcomes all aspiring comedians to come to the open mics and try to get a laugh. “Just do it,” Hudson says. “Just write and get on the stage. Just do it. There is no better feeling than when you go up there and rip a show.” Hudson hopes to have a Nanaimo comedy festival in the future and is focusing on getting students more involved in the Nanaimo comedy scene. “I would love to have students coming to the open mics and us coming up there, and just get some youth involved,” Hudson says. “We’re a university town now.”

theoxypub@outlook.com

Daily Drink and Food Specials $4.99 breakfast ‘til 2pm every Saturday and Sunday Karaoke every Thursday and Friday $0.40 Wings after 4pm every Thursday and Saturday Music Trivia every Saturday

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Englishman River Falls Cole Schisler The Englishman River Falls --Provincial Park, located just The Navigator

outside of Parksville, is a must-see destination for all Islanders. The park boasts two stunning waterfalls that run the length of a canyon, bordered by a dense old-growth forest. It gives the feeling of being lost in scenic rainforest filled with firs, hemlock, maple, and arbutus, the forest floor dotted with ferns and fallen logs. When the river runs low, you can hop across rocks and explore the head of the upper waterfall. Use caution, as the rocks are slippery

and the falls are treacherous. The lower falls lead to a calm pool, ideal for a swim in the icy river water. If you intend to swim, make sure to bring a towel, a change of clothes, and pick a warm day. The park is open year round for day adventures. It is great for picnics, bike rides, and hikes along the various trails. The park asks that all visitors remain on designated trails to preserve plant life and the park also has a beautiful campground with 55 reservable campsites. The campground has closed for the winter season, and reopens April 29.

Katie Howald, Vanessa Kay, and Alina Colina crossing river rocks.

Zach Altos

A view of the lower Englishman River Falls.

Alana Colina looking over the upper Englishman River Falls.

Cole Schisler sitting at the head of the falls.

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Zach Altos

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Pyro-safety this Halloween Molly Barrieau ---

Halloween slowly approaches, and brightly painted trailers advertising the The Navigator best selection of fireworks pop up off the highway, ready to sell dangerous concoctions of chemicals to brighten your spooky night. Before you go out and grab roman candles and cherry bombs, The Nav wants to share some safety tips gathered from our licensed fireworks technician and friend Alyssa Morton. Morton works at the “bomb site” with a fireworks operator, shooting off multiple shows a year. Her dad is a licensed operator, and works with Morton to put on shows in Calgary. “The reason we constantly refer to it as a bomb site, is because that’s what fireworks are,” Morton said. “They have the same components as any other explosive weapon, the only difference is that they look pretty.” Many think that because fireworks are handheld and give off much less noise than those we see on Canada Day, they can use any means to light them; however, according to Morton, the recreational ones purchased off the side of the road have the same mix of chemicals as the larger industry fireworks. Here are our tips for a safe Halloween: efore you choose your firewor s, it s important to choose the area you will be enjoying the sights away from

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o

trees and outside the city. hec the ity ylaws on firewor s hint it s all prohibited within the city boundaries . emember that loud noises will scare dogs and children, so finding somewhere away from residential neighbourhoods can prevent complaints. hen you ve purchased your firewor s, chec them over carefully, loo ing for even the slightest manufacturers defect, where the tube is partially bloc ed, because the explosion will come out the sides, orton said. ave buc ets of sand around in case of fire, not water. ecreational companies are constantly coming up with new chemical concoctions and you never now how these will react to water. lways be aware of where your body is. hen you re lighting, be low, lean away from the firewor , and use a long reach lighter. e aware of weather conditions li e wind and rain as well. ig a hole for your firewor and point it away from you ma e sure it doesn t fall and shoot sideways. Lastly, enjoy yourself this Halloween, and check out Natural Resources Canada website for consumer fireworks safety at <nrcan.gc.ca/explosives/fireworks/9905>.

n

lyssa

Cole Schisler Located downtown at 43 --Commercial St., OmTown The Navigator

From October 20 to December 15, Millers Pub will be hosting karaoke nights every Thursday The Navigator from 9 pm to midnight. Every week, three winners will be chosen by fan decision to advance to the semi-finals on December 8. From there, 10 finalists will compete for singing supremacy and a chance to receive over $500 in cash and prizes. While there is a competitive element, it is secondary to the main point of the karaoke nights, which is to have fun. “Anyone who wants to have fun, anyone who thinks that they’re a star should come to karaoke,” said Kelly Campbell, kitchen manager at Millers Pub. On karaoke nights Millers will be offering food and drink specials, as well as 20 percent for students who show their student ID. Millers Pub is located at 1840 Stewart Dr., by the Departure Bay ferry terminal.

20

sports

LIFESTYLE

elly

orton hotography

OmTown Yoga

OmTown Yoga studio.

Cole Schisler ---

orton left lighting off firewor s d ring a show.

Yoga offers classes in a variety of yoga styles every day of the week. “Every week instructors have a set schedule,” said Katherine Boere, manager of OmTown. “Our weekly schedule is usually pretty consistent; it doesn’t change that much month-to-month. Every month we have special events and workshops where we bring in instructors from town or other places on Vancouver Island, and occasionally other places in Canada.” OmTown has an emphasis on community and strive to create a connection between people in Nanaimo. They are involved with charitable organizations like Big Brothers Big Sisters, and they host by donation yoga classes every Thursday 7:15 – 8:15 pm, where all donations are put toward local charities.

NAVIGATOR

ole chisler

Regular drop-in fees are $18.90 and $15.75 after tax for students. A two-month unlimited membership is $108 and a student semester pass for four months unlimited is $250. Students also receive 10 percent off on all the passes. “A membership pass allows you to try out all the different instructors, all the different classes to see what works for your schedule, and also get to really feel in your body what a consistent yoga and meditation practice can feel like,” Boere said. Boere says that yoga is an excellent tool for students to keep themselves grounded, and combat stress during the school year. She encourages everyone to come down to OmTown and experience the “amazingly funny and welcoming community.”

#04


SPORTS & LIFESTYLE

VIU VOLLEYBALL: SET UP FOR SUCCESS Cole Schisler The VIU Volleyball home --opener got off to an emotional The Navigator

start with the raising of the 2015-16 CCAA National Women’s Volleyball Championship banner. Fired up by last year’s success, the Mariners women took to the courts against the College of the Rockies Avalanche. They came out strong, taking the first set 25–18. In the second set, the Mariners replicated their success, controlling the court with formidable defense and precise serves to end the second set 25–15. The Avalanche attempted to claw their way back in the third, but ultimately fell to the Mariners 25–23, allowing the Mariners success in three straight sets. “There was emotion with the banner raising and the first league game of the year,” said Head Coach Shane Hyde. “Our setter Chantal Cumming did very well for us, same with Andrea Cankovic and Mikayla Wagner—they were awesome.” Moving forward, the Mariners are focused on further developing their skills to continue their success. “As much as we were crisp tonight, and we played pretty well, I think we let off the gas a little bit in the third set,” said Hyde. “I want to be able to substitute anybody in and not really change the flow we have. I’m excited we are continually improving.” The Mariners men stormed the court amid

booming fanfare, firing up the confident crowd. The first set against the Avalanche was a battle. At the first time-out, the Mariners led 18–16. The teams were evenly matched, trading explosive rallies, but the Mariners took the first set 25–18. The Mariners were dominant in the second set, burying the Avalanche 25–11. The Mariners kept the pace through the third set; however, late in the game after a series of substitutions, the Avalanche came close to taking the set. Ultimately, however, the Mariners won the third set 25–22. “It was nice to get the bugs out at the start and see some of our veteran guys control the pace,” said Head Coach Abe Avender. “I think Zach Grigg had one of the best games I’ve ever seen him play, he was really impressive. Ryan Evans our setter put on a good show. I think everybody on that starting seven guys contributed in a good way.” Avender stresses consistency for the Mariners moving forward. “One thing I always try to take pride in with this group is having a routine with everything. Today’s over, it’s a new day tomorrow. Gotta get back at it with food, water, rest, and that kind of stuff so we can continue to build on where we’re going and where we hope to be at the end of the year, hosting provincials here.”

eft ide ower

itter ach

rigg st ffing a spi e.

orthfield hotography

Mid Natalie Crews goes in for a spike.

orthfield hotography

Cattie Hegglin, Mikayla Wagner, Andrea Cankovic, Kelsey Hutt, and Chantal Cumming celebrate a point.

orthfield hotography

Quick & easy meatloaf Melissa Partee It’s getting colder outside, --and the time for comfort Contributor

food has arrived. This quick and tasty meatloaf is exactly what you’re looking for. You can use whatever meat you’d like, or even try it out with a vegetarian meat substitute. Whatever you choose, you’ll be sure to enjoy this; especially if you pair it up with some mashed potatoes, steamed broccoli, and your choice of tasty libation.

I would do anything for loaf.

rendan arlow

You’ll need:

Directions:

Pro-Tips for fantastic mashed potatoes

1 package of ground meat (500g-750g) 1 o tove op st ffing 1 egg 1 1/2 tbsp BBQ sauce 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce 1/2 tbsp Italian seasoning 1/2 tsp no-salt seasoning blend Fresh ground pepper to taste A pinch of salt

1. Preheat the oven to 375° F. 2. Mix up all of your ingredients in a bowl. 3. Pop the mixture into an ungreased loaf pan. 4. Smush the mixture down so it’s even. 5. Drizzle or brush with extra BBQ sauce or ketchup. 6. Pop it in the oven for 45–55 minutes, depending on ...... the size of your loaf.

While it seems simple enough to just boil your potatoes and smash them up, you could be enjoying mashed potatoes even more with a few easy tricks.

#04

NAVIGATOR

1. Boil the water before you put the potatoes in. 2. The smaller the potato bits, the faster they cook. 3. Season the water with salt and whole garlic cloves. 4. Smash up your potatoes with plain yogurt, butter, salt, and pepper.

SPORTS

LIFESTYLE

21


PAGE 22

Brandon Kornelson is a Sociology and History student. He hopes to become a journalist.

22

page

NAVIGATOR

#04


OCTOBER/NOVEMBER

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

19

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21

22

Happy Humpday Acoustic Wednesdays

Diana Pearson Live

Bite of Nanaimo Gourmet Food Festival

VIU Mariners Soccer vs. Capilano Blues

Beban Park Auditorium 2300 Bowen Rd.

Nanaimo Turf Fields 2235 Dorman Rd.

4 – 9 pm

Women’s, 1 pm, men’s 3:30 pm

The Corner Lounge 121 Bastion Rd. Starts 8 pm By donation

The Nanaimo Bar 75 Front St. 9:30 pm $5

$20

FREE

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

Cedar Farmers Market

The Witness Blanket

WordStorm Open Mic

Halloween Bash

The View Gallery Vancouver Island University

Tandoori Junction 489 Wallace St.

Milner Gardens Fall Opening

Lantern Tours

Crow and Gate Pub Field 2313 Yellowpoint Rd.

Sketches: Here and There Art 10 Gallery 4750 Rutherford Rd.

Nanaimo Museum 100 Museum Way

The Queen’s 34 Victoria Cres.

10 am – 2 pm

11 am – 5pm

6:30 – 8 pm

Starts 10 pm

FREE

FREE

Milner Gardens & Woodland 2179 West Island Hwy., Qualicum

$15, pre-registration required

Tickets $8

Starts 6:30 pm Door $5

10 am – 6 pm FREE

11 am – 3:30 pm Free to VIU students

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1

Abandoned Art Sale

Happy Halloween!

Glow in the Dark Skate

Island Girl Art Studio 3019 Hammond Bay Rd. 1 – 4 pm FREE

Frank Crane Arena 2300 Bowen Rd. 6:30 – 8 pm Admission $7, Skate rentals $3.75

JOIN THE NAVIGATOR ONLINE

THENAV.CA /THENAVIGATORNEWSPAPER @THENAV_VIU

#04

NAVIGATOR

CALENDAR

23


Notice of Election

Notice of AGM

Nominations: October 19 at 4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 25 at 4 p.m.

Annual General Meeting Friday, October 28 at 4:30 p.m. Bldg. 193, rm. 217

Campaigning: October 25 at 4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 28 at 4 p.m. Polling: Thursday, October 29 from 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. orms availa le at he avigator s ofďŹ ce 193, rm. 217 olling stations will e at he bldg. 193, rm. 217.

ldg.

avigator s ofďŹ ce

Agenda: Managing Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report Counting of the ballots for board election New business o read the speciďŹ c ylaw amendments prior to the election/meeting, please email <editor@ thenav.ca>. To add anything to the agenda, please email <editor@thenav.ca>.

Positions: President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Minister of Internal Affairs em ers at arge p to ďŹ ve

All VIU students, faculty, staff, administration, alumnus, or community members who have paid membership fees to the society are members of The Navigator Newspaper Society and are eligible to run for a position on the Board of Directors and vote in the election.

For more information, or to organize the drop-off of a nomination form, email <editor@thenav.ca>. All VIU students, faculty, staff, administration, alumnus, or community members who have paid membership fees to the society are members of The Navigator Newspaper Society, and are eligible to run for a position on the Board of Directors and vote in the election.

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The Navigator Vol 48 Issue 4  
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