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Page 1

Aunt Mar


!ediaAc(
ve:
,llustrated
2ooks
5roject An
ini(
a(
ve
of
Thomas
Adams
School=s
!edia
Arts
5rogramme
and
 delivered
in
partnership
with
Qube
Arts,
this
project
has
established
 new
opportuni(
es
for
young
people
to
develop
a
series
of
illustrated
 books
that
reE
ect
their
interests,
concerns
and
crea(
vity. The
young
people
have
worked
with
the
support
of
ar(
sts,
designers,
 and
a
crea(
ve
writer,
making
full
use
of
digital
media
resources
in
 North
Shropshire
to
research,
plan
and
produce
the
books.
They
have
 determined
the
themes,
generated
the
ideas,
created
original
wri(
ng
 and
artworks,
and
H
nally,
designed
the
layout
and
construc(
on
of
the
 books. The
project
has
worked
with
I
groups,
has
produced
I
dis(
nc(
ve
books
 and
has
involved
key
partners:
Loppington
House,
Thomas
Adams
SEN
 Department,
Shropshire,
Telford
and
Wrekin
Youth
Off
ending
Service
 and
the
West
!idlands
Ronsor(
um
Services
for
Travelling
Rhildren,
 Schools
and
Families.

Thanks
go
to
Sherel
and
Jamie
for
all
of
their
hard
work
on
 A
Travellers’
Life.


Jamie

My name is Jamie. I am 12 years old and I live at a Travellers’ site in Oswestry. Before living here, I used to travel up and down the country with no fixed place to stay, along with other Travellers. My mam is called Jamie, the same as me, and my father is called Edmund. I have no brothers and no sisters but I do have a lot of animals including; twenty chickens, two dogs, one cat and also two horses. My mam’s mam and dad are called Rose and Guy. They live at a caravan site in Southport along with lots of other travellers.

Jamie’s Mam


My
dad’s
mam
and
dad
are
called
Mizelle
and
Edmund.

They
 live
at
the
Oswestry
site
too,
directly
across
from
my
plot.
I
 have
an
enormous
amount
of
friends
and
family,
just
like
all
 Travellers.
 Me aged 3

Aunt Mary

Me with some of my family

Great Grandad

I
don’t
go
to
school
because
I
prefer
to
stay
at
home
and
 help
my
mam
do
the
house
work,
like
cleaning
the
shed,
the
 caravan,
and
the
plot.
On
Friday
morning
my
friend,
Sherel
 and
I
go
to
college.


Sherel My
name
is
Sherel
and
I
am
 11
years
old.

I
also
live
at
the
 Travellers
site
in
Oswestry.
I
have
 three
brothers
who
are
called
Billy,
 Harry
and
Levi
and
no
sisters.
My
 mum
is
Nicola
and
my
dad
is
Bill.

As
well
as
my
mum,
dad
and
brothers,
my
Nan
and
grandad
 !"#$%"&'(%$)%*+(%#&*(,%-%+!'(%"$*#%$.%/$0#&)#1%!0)2(#%!)3%0)/"(#% close
by
and,
of
course,
all
of
my
friends. 












I
like
doing
my
schoolwork
and
drawing.
I
have
two
dogs
 called
Patch
and
Lady.
My
brother
has
two
horses
and
a
dog
 (he
loves
his
animals). My Brother with Norbit

My Mum

On
Friday
I
go
to
 college
and
go
on
the
 computer
to
do
some
 schoolwork.
Most
 Travellers
do
not
go
to
 secondary
school
as
 My Brother they
stay
at
home
and
 get
home‐tutored.

Girls
help
their
mums
do
 the
cleaning
and
boys
go
with
their
dads
to
work.




Oswestry
Travellers’
site. Oswestry
is
a
council‐run
site.
The
Gypsy
Liason
Offi 

cer
who
 is
involved
with
us
is
a
man
called
Roy.
There
are
13
plots
and
 we
are
all
one
big
family.
We
all
work
together,
sharing
what
 we
have
and
taking
care
of
each
other.

We
support
each
 other
in
many
ways.

We
learn
from
each
other
and
are
like
 8a9ily
‐

e:en
i8
we
are
not
;loo<
rela=
:es.


Old
Travellers
are
very
diff
erent
to
Travellers
these
days.
Old
 Travellers
learned
the
hard
way.
They
made
their
livings
by
 selling
charms,
telling
fortunes,
making
pegs,
buying
and
 selling,
trading
and
whatever
other
manual
work
they
came
 across.

Nowadays
however,
some
of
our
rights
have
been
taken
 away
and
we
have
had
to
adapt
to
a
diff
erent
way
of
life.
 67aw8ing:
is
illegal
and
there
are
not
eno;gh
sta<
c
sites
 for
families
to
stay
on.

As
a
result,
these
old
skills
have
had
 to
be
replaced
with
other
jobs,
for
example,
plastering
and
 pain<
ng
and
decora<
ng.


Old
Travellers
lived
in
old‐fashioned
wagons
that
were
made
 from
wood.
Inside,
they
had
a
Queen
Anne
stove
where
 they
would
+urn
old
ro.en
wood
/ro.en
wood
was
+e.er
 because
it
was
easier
to
collect
and
quicker
to
burn).
There
 was
one
bed
at
the
back
and
the
top
of
the
wagon
was
 covered
over
with
a
green
sheet
to
make
it
water‐proof.

Old
Travellers
were
treated
very
differently.
They
could
stop
 wherever
they
wanted
and
people
would
ta:e
no
no;ce.
<t
 is
more
common
nowadays
for
people
to
hate
the
Traveller
 community.
This
is
another
reason
why
Travellers
don’t
travel
 around
=uch
any
=ore.

O>en?
co==uni;es
@ust
wonAt
let
 them
stay. Bduca;on
was
no
=a.er
to
the
old
Travellers
+ecause
the
 teachers
did
not
want
the
Travellers
to
a.end
their
schools



!"#$%&'()$%)!#(*$+"!,$-.(,,-$'!)"%$%&'/$!$#'0'"%$,(1("23$$4+-%$ modern
Travellers
do
go
to
school
now
because,
in
modern
 -+0('%56$%&')'$(-$!$,+%$+7$0+/8'*$*$+"$7+)$9+:-$!"#$/+"'5$!"#$ you
need
to
read
to
get
on.

Young
Travellers
always
hear
stories
from
the
olden
days
 and
know
their
history.

They
know
all
the
places
that
their
 7!/(,('-$%)!1',,'#$%+$:'7+)'$-';$,("2$+"$%&'$-%!*$0$-(%'-3$$$$$


Our
mums
do
these
jobs
everyday: •
 •
 •
 •
 •
 •
 •
 •
 •


Washes
up Cleans
everything
inside
the
trailer Cleans
the
wash
room,
kitchen
and
bathroom Washes
the
slab Does
the
washing Ironing
 Cooks Takes
the
children
to
and
from
school Goes
to
the
shops

It
is
really
important
for
Travellers
to
keep
everything
 spotless.

To
be
clean
is
high
priority.


!"#$%&#'$((%")*+#,-#./0-#0-&+#*&/1)2#$"/3#&$3-45##6.-#(-"# go
out
to
work
and
the
women
and
girls
stay
at
home
to
do
 *.-#.$%4-,$&7#/"1#3$$7#/8#-&#*.-#'.)31&-"5


Travellers
like
to
 buy
and
collect
 good
quality
china,
 glass
and
jewellery.
 Crown
Derby
is
very
 precious
to
Travellers
and
 we
collect
it
to
decorate
our
homes.
 At
the
fairs
there
are
many
diff
erent
examples
to
add
to
our
 collec;
ons
or
trade
for
diff
erent
items.
We
save
it
and
sell
it
 to
other
Travellers
if
we
need
to
make
more
money.
 Waterford
Crystal
is
also
very
popular
and
we
are
proud
of
 our
collec;
ons. Travellers
collect
 Waterford
Crystal
in
 the
same
way
that
they
 collect
Crown
Derby.

 They
sell
it
or
they
swap
 it
for
another
piece.



Many
Travellers
have
diff
erent
skills.

 Historically,
Travellers
have
been
very
 344d
at
h5n6
n3.
They
5sed
a
la78
t4
see
 in
the
night
and
of
course
they
had
to
 have
a
dog
like
a
greyhound,
terrier,
or


a
whippet.

Snares
were
made
 to
use
on
the
fens
so
when
 the
rabbits
went
through
 they
were
caught.

This
is
not
 common
nowadays. 
 Also,
Travellers
like
to
cut
 and
carve.

This
skill
was
 5sed
4ri3inally
t4
7ake
their
9a34ns
74re
de:4ra6
ve
9ith
 :arved
se:6
4ns
and
is
s6
ll
5sed
t4day
4n
9a34ns
that
a88ear



at
Appleby
and
Stow.
Travellers
are
also
skilled
in
carving
 slingshots.

!"#$%%&'#(")#*+$,-..-+/#$+-#(0#-"#1&21.3#/4&..-%#&"# horsemanship
and
like
to
race.
They
put
their
best
horses
in
 /5--%#6$+7/#$"%#+$6-#/(8-'#8-/#9(+#-"(+8(:/#$8(:"7/#(9# money.

Whoever
wins
takes
the
lot!


Appleby

BBC
Cumbria/Mark
Robertson

Appleby
Fair
has
to
be
the
biggest
horse
fair
in
Travellers’
 history. Millions
of
Travellers
meet
up
every
year
to
buy
and
sell
 horses,
birds,
Crown
Derby,
Waterford
Crystal,
carpets,
and
 more.

The
horses
are
taken
into
the
river
to
swim
which
is
a
 fantas7
c
si8ht
to
see9




Horses
are
very
important
to
Travellers.
Historically,
they
 pro$ided
essen+
al
transport.

0o1adays,
they
s+
ll
play
an
 important
part
in
Travellers’
lives
and
are
taken
to
fairs,
like
 Appleby
and
Kenilworth,
for
others
to
look
at. Also,
Travellers
use
horses
for
selling,
trading
and
buying.
 There
are
lots
of
diff
erent
types
and
breeds,
such
as
ponies,
 Shire
horses,
Shetland
ponies,
Irish
draught
horses,
mares,
 foals,
;elsh
sec+
on
<
 cobs
and
many
more. Young
and
old
 Travellers
put
their
 horses
on
a
wagon
or
 a
cart.
This
is
mainly
 done
at
the
Travellers’
 fairs. =orses
are
$ery
hard
1ork
to
look
a?
er
because
you
ha$e
 got
to
shoe
them,
give
them
food
(like
corn,
hay
and
water)
 exercise
them
and
muck
them
out
regularly.
Also,
in
summer,
 they
need
washing.


Speaking
Romany
is
very
important
to
the
Traveller
 community)

+t
is
mainly
the
older
genera4
ons
who
spea7
it
 the
most.

 Romany
is
used
alongside
English
and
is
quite
diffi 

cult
for
 others
to
understand
(especially
when
spoken
quickly). Some
examples
of
our
diff
erent
words
are; 
 Griye
‐
a
horse
 Drum
‐
road
 Varder
‐
caravan

 Jell
on
‐
come
on Kichama
‐
the
pub
 Mawey
‐
a
moth
 Yoks
‐
eyes Tud
–
milk Our
language
originates
from
India
and
is
derived
from
 Sanskrit.


The
%rod)c+
on
of
.his
1oo2
has
1een
s)%%or.ed
1y
lead
ar+
s.s6
 Mar+
n
S9i.h
and
:erry
;avies6
=i.h
.he
assis.ance
of
>ane.
Mill=ard6
 Advisory
Teacher
for
Travelling
Children
WMCSTCSF.


!ome%
mes,
the
words
Gypsy
and
Traveller
are
6onsidered
in
 a
nega%
ve
way
by
non:Travellers.

 As
young
Travellers
ourselves,
we
would
like
to
end
our
book
 by
explaining
what
these
two
words
mean
to
us.
 Gypsy
= Traveller,
Aomany,
Ai6h
Culture,
Family,
!haring,
Deau%
Eul
 Language.

Traveller
=
 Family
Galues,
!trong
Community,
Celebra%
ons,
An6ient
 Culture,
Forgive
and
Forget.

Thomas Adams School

Profile for Spencer Whalen

A Travellers Life  

Illustrated books project funded by Media Box

A Travellers Life  

Illustrated books project funded by Media Box

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