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KODIN HOME turvallisuuden safety checklist tarkistuslista Checked on:

Occupant’s name: Address: Next of kin: Next of kin’s telephone number: Type of accomodation:

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Checked by:


EVACUATION SAFETY

1.

Can the occupant evacuate the residence in 2-3 minutes?

Physical and mental fitness in different situations and at different times of the day (medication/intoxicants, etc). Door locks operate easily, quickly and logically. It is possible to get out without keys. The evacuation route is easy to find. There are no obstacles in the way. Where needed, there is a hand rail on the evacuation route and there is no risk of tripping or falling. Fire evacuation instructions have been provided and evacuation has been practised. Are the mobility aids easily available? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Train for situations! • Always take into account the occupant’s state of health. • Consider the impact of a physical disability, illness or medication on the occupant’s functioning and evacuation safety. • If the front door of the residence also has an internal door, make certain that the occupant can open it. • Reflective tape or guide signs. • Removal of obstacles. • Installation of hand rails or guardrails.

CALLING FOR HELP IN EMERGENCIES

2.

Is the occupant able to call for help in an emergency?

Does the occupant know how to act in the situation? Is the emergency number 112 in or near the phone? Can the occupant give their address and guide help to the location or is it possible to use emergency mobile phone positioning to confirm a person’s location? Is the occupant able to call for help at any time of the day, owing to medication, intoxicants, etc? Can a neighbour help?/Is there a neighbour who could help? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Emergency number 112 sticker. • Emergency number 112 phone app. • Make certain that the occupant knows how to make the emergency call. • Knowledge of the exact address. • Emergency Response Centre’s (ERC) location information form. • Contact information of the next of kin. • Using a safety/alarm bracelet.


SMOKE ALARMS, FIRST EXTINGUISHING AND AUTOMATIC FIRE EXTINGUISHERS Does the residence have a sufficient number of functioning smoke alarms that appropriately serve the needs of the occupant? Has the reaction time and audibility of the alarm or other means of detection been confirmed?

3.

The smoke alarm is suitable for the occupant (e.g. hearing defect or memory disorder). The occupant understands what the alarm sound means. The smoke alarm is installed according to the instructions at the correct position in the ceiling. Is the occupant able to test the functioning of the smoke alarm and, when needed, change the battery? Does the smoke alarm have an extension cord and a battery box to make it easier to change the battery? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

4.

Is the occupant able to carry out first extinguishing?

Is the extinguisher or fire blanket readily available? Does the occupant know how to use extinguishers or fire blankets when needed? Is the occupant able enough to carry out first extinguishing? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions

• Install smoke detectors in the entrance hall, in the bedroom and living room. Install smoke alarms in other spaces on every floor at your discretion. • When selecting the smoke alarm the occupant’s ability to function must be taken into consideration. If necessary, the smoke alarm can also be connected to sound an alarm elsewhere (parallel or remote connection, also “smart” alarms and applications). • The functioning of the alarm must be tested. The date of manufacture or the “replace by” date is printed on the alarm. The useful life of a smoke alarm is 5‒10 years. The occupant, if capable, is responsible for testing the functioning of a battery-operated alarm. The housing estate is responsible for the maintenance of smoke alarms connected to the building’s electricity network.

Actions • Instructing/first extinguishing training. • It is also possible to extinguish fires with water or a carpet. • If the occupant is not able enough to carry out first extinguishing, the possibility of evacuating or another person’s presence must be ensured or the occupant must consider alternative living arrangements.


5.

Does the residence have an automatic extinguishing system?

Is the occupant able to evacuate within 2‒3 minutes? Is there a sprinkler system in the residence? If the occupant is unable to evacuate within 2‒3 minutes, and no other people capable of rescuing them in this time frame are present, the only options for them being able to survive a fire are moving to another type of residence or the installation of a sprinkler system. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

COOKER SAFETY

6.

Is it safe to use the cooker? Is the cooker itself safe? Is the cooker fitted with a safety device/ feature?

The occupant is able to safely use the cooker. The cooker is fitted with a timer/guard/alarm. No flammable materials are kept on or near the cooker. Has the cooker been prevented from being unintentionally turned on by, for example, pets, children or the handle of a walker turning the knobs? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Automatic extinguishing system in the apartment or the building. • Possibly moving to assisted living fitted with an automatic extinguishing system.

Actions • Note: Cooker fires frequently result in house fires. They are often caused by a cooker which was accidentally turned on or when the occupant forgot to turn it off. • If it is no longer safe to use the cooker, consider whether it should be disconnected (its fuses removed) or completely removed. • Move any materials that burn easily away from the cooker and from its immediate vicinity. • Evaluate the possibility and benefits of changing to another type of cooker. • Introduce a cooker guard or alarm devices in accordance with the occupant’s needs. •It is possible to retrofit a cooker with a timer or an external power switch, a cooker alarm or a cooker guard. • ) Replace the cooker with a safer model (safety cooker, induction cooker).


Actions

OTHER ELECTRONIC/ELECTRICAL DEVICES

7.

Are there unnecessary electronic/electrical devices in the residence?

There are no unnecessary electronic/electrical devices in the residence. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Get rid of unneeded electronic/electrical devices and space heaters. • Get rid of a possible CRT (cathode ray tube) television or replace it with a modern TV.

Actions

• Consider the age and reliability of electronic/ electrical devices as well as the need for modernisation. • Only use electronic/ electrical devices under supervision! • Read and follow the devices’ manuals.

8.

Are the electronic/electrical devices in the home safe?

Are the devices’ covers, switches and cords intact? Small appliances and their cords look intact (coffee maker and electric kettle, iron, etc). Is there a safe place in the kitchen for using small appliances? Are the cords safely placed and plugged in. Is there a risk of tripping, overheating or breaking? Are refrigerators and freezers regularly cleaned of ice and dust? Do the appliances have sufficient ventilation space around them? Do space heaters and electric radiators have sufficient safety distances? Could a heater or some other device tip over and cause the risk of fire? Are extension cords safely positioned and used? Are extension cords and junction boxes directly plugged into the wall? Electronic devices are being charged in a safe manner. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Huollata sähkölaitteet käyttöohjeen mukaan. • If an electrical device blows a fuse, does not work right or breaks down, unplug the device and get it repaired or remove and replace it. • Extension cords must not be plugged into other extension cords. • Vacuum the space behind refrigerators and freezers once a year. • Do not cover any electrical devices! • Do not run an extension cord from indoors to outdoors. Rather, use the outdoor power sockets. • Do not run an extension cord into the bathroom from another room! • Get rid of broken chargers and batteries. Phones and similar devices should not be left to charge unsupervised at night owing to their fire risk.


9. 9. Are the light fixtures safe and will not tip over?

Light fixtures only have the type of bulbs in them that are meant for them. Is the safety distance sufficient from light fixtures to flammable materials, such as curtains? No flammable materials are kept on or near light fixtures. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • When necessary, replace the light fixture or bulb. • Blinking fluorescent lights must be replaced. • Check the location of light fixtures: keep in mind that they may get hot. • Use LED lights or energy-efficient lightbulbs that will not get hot.

Actions

10. 9.

Are the washing machine and dishwasher only used when supervised by an able-bodied person?

When an appliance is being used, an able-bodied person is present in the residence. When an appliance is being used, an able-bodied person is present so that, should there be a fire or water leak, they can prevent injuries to persons or minimise damage to property by taking immediate actions. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• If a fire breaks out, switch off the power, if possible, and call for help. •If a water leak occurs, turn off the water supply and report the water damage. •Use a water leak detection device. • Get rid of appliances that are in bad condition or malfunctioning. • Get the malfunctioning appliance repaired as soon as the fault appears or replace it with a new one. • Faulty electrical appliances cause the risk of fire. • Monitor the Finnish Safety and Chemicals Agency’s register of dangerous products (http://marek.tukes. fi/), and get rid of possibly dangerous equipment.


OTHER FIRE SAFETY

11.

Does the residence only have a normal quantity of things (only typical fire loading)?

The things kept in the residence fit in the places intended for them. The occupant is able to move inside the residence in all conditions, also with the required mobility aids. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

12.

Tupakointi

Smoking should not be permitted in the residence. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Each item has its own place. Extra material is removed or placed elsewhere in storage. • The renovations needed to make it possible to use a rollator, for example, in the residence have been completed.

Actions • The occupant(s) quit smoking or a suitable, fire-safe, smoking corner is designated either outdoors or indoors.

Actions

13. Are candles being burned in a safe manner? Candles are only being burned under supervision and in places where the candles will not set fire to anything else. Candlesticks or holders are sturdy and non-flammable. Electric candles are used in accordance with their instructions. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Quit burning live-flame candles. • When necessary, candles can be replaced with lights or LED candles. • Keep in mind the risks associated with electric candles such as LED candles: the occupant may mistakenly try to light an electric candle. • Beware of children getting hold of button cell batteries. • If, however, live candles are being used, they must not be left burning unsupervised.


FIREPLACES Is fire, the fireplace and ash being handled 14. 9. in a safe manner? The condition of the fireplace is always checked before use. There is a metal bucket, fitted with a lid, to transport and keep ash and the ash is kept in a safe, non-flammable place outdoors.

Actions • The condition and cleanliness of the fireplace and its surroundings look OK. • No flammable fluids are used for lighting the fire.

The chimney sweep comes once a year.

• Only cold ash is being transported.

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• The ash bucket is not kept near flammable materials. • The chimney sweep is called.

ACCIDENT PREVENTION

15.

Is the risk of slipping and tripping minimised?

Cleanliness and order in the residence. Floor materials and carpets. Thresholds (no superficial nails). Extension cords are kept to a minimum and positioned in such a manner that nobody will trip over them and that they will not create a ‘bird’s nest’ of cables. The required grab bars and handrails are in place (walkways, kitchen, bedroom, bathrooms). Shoes are safe and appropriate to the conditions. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Check how slippery the floor is. Make changes if needed or install non-slip carpeting. • Risk of tripping: remove carpets. • Do not connect an extension cord to another extension cord. • Shoes are the right size and their soles are suitable for their purpose. • Outdoor shoes are used when outdoors. • Winter shoes are used in winter conditions. • The soles of shoes are not slippery or separate anti-slip shoe grips are being used.


16. Is falling being monitored? The occupant has not fallen or tripped within the past year. The occupant has not experienced problems with balance or felt dizziness. The occupant is able to move inside the residence without problems. The occupant is able to move outside the residence without problems. Owing to the fear of falling the occupant avoids moving about and going out. Has the occupant’s muscle fitness been tested within the past year? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Medical consultation. Also check medication with the doctor • Start using the fall risk assessment form https://www. ukkinstituutti.fi/ filebank/3898-KaatumissSeula-fall-risk-assessment-1.pdf • Take good care of your muscle fitness and do balanceimproving exercises.

Actions

TOILET, BATHROOMS AND SAUNA

17. 9. Is the sauna only used for bathing? Do put anything on or near the sauna stove. There is a guardrail around the stove which prevents falling onto it. There is a guardrail leading to the benches and the stools, if any, are sturdy. The sauna stove’s control panel is outside the sauna room at a safe, user-friendly, height. No laundry, etc, is ever dried inside the sauna room. The sauna is not being used as storage space. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Always check the safety of the sauna stove and its surroundings before switching it on. • If required, install guardrails, benches or stools. • The sauna room is not the place for storing things or drying laundry. • The sauna must not be used as a storage space. • If, however, the sauna is used for some other purpose than bathing, - disconnect the (electric) stove’s fuses and tape-mark the fuse box, for example, with the following text: “OUT OF USE”. - If the stove is wood-burning, never start a fire in it.


Are the washing areas and toilets confirmed 18. 9. to be safe? There are enough grab bars in these rooms. It is safe to move in the sauna room and the shower area without the fear of slipping. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • If necessary, install more grab bars. Take care of waterproofing! (If you make renovations in a housing estate, report the work to the manager.) • Make sure that the floor materials are safe. Anti-slip mat.

EVERYDAY SAFETY

19.

Are daily items easily available?

For example, foodstuffs and spices are within reach. There is no need to climb.

Actions • Place the items appropriately or buy the needed aids. 

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

20.

Are the household stepladders sturdy and do they have handles?

Actions • Get the needed aids.

Are the stepladders safe from the viewpoint of the occupant’s physical ability?

• If it is not safe to climb, don’t do it.

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• If the job requires climbing or using stepladders, ask for help when necessary.


21.

Is the lighting sufficient and easily adjustable?

Contrasts are not too strong and the light is not blinding. A safe night light, which is the correct colour and has adjustable brightness, makes it easier to move about. There are enough light switches and they are in the right places. The lighting is also sufficient in the stairways and by the front door. The walkway and stairwell lights stay on long enough.

Actions • When necessary, use night lights or motion sensor lights and bulbs. • Ensure the needed lighting with a motion sensor or timer and make sure that the light stays on long enough.

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

the front door and the yard safe for 22. 22.Ispassage? Sufficient lighting. Level and well-maintained walkways. Anti-slip action/sanding has been taken care of. The front door is easy to open. In wintertime, appropriate footwear is being used, such as anti-slip shoes. Is the building number or the street name sign easily detectable?

Actions • Adjust the lighting. Add more lights when needed. • Monitor anti-slip actions; intensify them when necessary. • Check the size and positioning of building signs.

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

23.

Does the occupant feel safe when moving about in the surroundings?

Is it safe to move about in the surroundings? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Take actions appropriate to the situation.


24.

Are the mobility aids sufficient and suitable?

Mobility aids. Aids for daily functions. Aids for people with sensory impairments (eyeglasses, hearing aid). Correct sizes (e.g. height of furniture). Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Evaluate the need for aids and get hold of the ones needed. • Ensure preventative maintenance of the aids and their rapid repair. • Also remember to regularly check and maintain the rollator. • Make sure that a substitute aid is available while an aid is being maintained.

25.

Is the storage and use of medicines appropriate?

Are the medicines appropriately stored at home? Is the use of medicines appropriate? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

26.

Are chemicals and other dangerous substances and products appropriately stored and used?

• Read the electronic/ electrical aids’ user manuals and follow the safety considerations for charging and using the devices.

Actions • Make sure that the dosage of medicines is correct. Store the medicines appropriately. • Return all unused or expired medicines to the chemist’s. 

Actions

They are stored in accordance with their instructions.

• Get rid of unnecessary and old chemicals (remember to recycle them appropriately).

The necessary chemicals are being used in accordance with their instructions.

• Make sure that they are properly stored.

Only necessary chemicals are stored inside the residence.

Dangerous products are stored appropriately. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Beware of children getting hold of button cell batteries.


MAINTAINING SOCIAL CONTACTS Actions

27.

Is the eyesight sufficient?

Are the eyeglasses undamaged and usable? Has the occupant’s vision been tested within the past three years? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

28.

Is the hearing sufficient?

Is the hearing sufficient for safe living or are hearing aids being used? Has the occupant’s hearing been tested within the past three years?

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

the occupant maintain contact with 29. Does other people? Does the occupant maintain daily contact with a family member or an acquaintance? Is there at least one daily contact? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

• Test vision and renew eyeglasses when needed. • Spare glasses. • Install safety technology suited to visually impaired people, if necessary. 

Actions • Start using appropriate hearing aids: when necessary, buy a hearing aid or a communicator amplifier and install safety technology suited to hearing-impaired people, such as smoke and other kinds of alarms

Actions • Social contacts: call rings, maintaining contact electronically, visits, etc. • Social safety network.


30.

Has the safety and security communication been taken care of?

Personal safety bracelets. Smart devices. Possible personal tracking devices. Does the phone work and does the occupant know how to use the phone? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • Assign the ICE code to the phone number of the next of kin. Note that the code will not necessarily ‘work’ on a locked phone.. • A mobile phone for seniors in which the emergency number 112 and the numbers of family members are stored. • A tablet or separate communication technology is being used. • Different kinds of smart devices.

31.

Are telemarketing and peddling prevented?

Monitor any possible abnormalities. Are banking information and savings safeguarded? Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • The bank or the police will never request bank account information by telephone or by personally visiting your residence! • Telemarketing restriction (tel. 0600 13404, charges apply). • Prevent peddling by locking the doors. Identify the caller through an (electronic) peephole. • The occupant has read the instructions of the police on how to protect against requests for bank account information (phishing) and has the phone number for closing the account.


32.

Are the other things that create a sense of security for everyday life OK?

The occupant gets a balanced, warm meal every day. The occupant has an appropriate home emergency supply for three days. Home insurance policy. Personal hygiene is OK. No such behavioural changes that indicate potential illness.

Actions • The occupant has the required medicines, food, water, heat, lighting and batteries for 72 hours. • Changes in hygiene or behaviour can point to a memory disorder. Request medical consultation when necessary.

Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

In conclusion Does the occupant have the financial resources for guaranteeing safety and buying the needed safety devices and aids? Are the other resources for ensuring safety and taking corrective actions available? Does the occupant know whom to ask for help when it comes to purchasing aids? Note: Disabled people receive aids free of charge on the basis of a professional’s assessment. Jointly agreed actions; who will handle the issue and by when:

Actions • When needed, ask for advice and support from your social services. • Support can also be obtained from - Mobility aid loan services - Your housing estate - Debt counselling - Benefits of the Social Insurance Institution of Finland – Kela - Social assistance (income support). • Home repair advice can be obtained from the Finnish Association for the Welfare of Older People.


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Useful weblinks: www.kodinturvaopas.fi www.spek.fi/OTE www.kylaturvallisuus.fi www.kotitapaturma.fi www.ikäteknologiakeskus.fi www.muistiliitto.fi https://omaishoitajat.fi www.valli.fi www.vtkl.fi

The Finnish National Rescue Association • www.spek.fi

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Kodin turvallisuuden tarkistuslista - Home safety checklist  

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