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A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION

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VOLUME 93 ISSUE 1 S E P T. / O C T. 2 0 1 8

As Latinos living in this country, there is a lifelong feeling of ‘I don’t belong here.’ Speech and debate gave me the courage to get up on stage and say, ‘Actually, we do.’ — Marianna Garcia, Cypress Bay High School, FL Class of 2014

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month


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www.utspeech.net www.utspeech.net www.utspeech.net www.utdebatecamp.com www.utdebatecamp.com www.utdebatecamp.com

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Only Only partially. partially. Success Success is is a product a product of of excellent excellent and and immensely immensely talented talented students, students, incredibly incredibly hard hard working working coaches, coaches, Only partially. Success is a product ofexceptional excellent and immensely talented students, incredibly hard working coaches,It is supportive supportive parents parents and and schools, schools, and and exceptional amounts amounts of of time time that that include include investment investment in in summer summer opportunities. opportunities. It is supportive parents and schools, and exceptional amounts of time that include investment in summer opportunities. It is that that understanding understanding that that makes makes UTNIF UTNIF one one of of thethe largest largest comprehensive comprehensive institutes institutes in in thethe country country year year after after year, year, and and that understanding that makes UTNIF one of the largest comprehensive institutes in the country year after year, and why why wewe have have assembled assembled some some of of thethe brightest brightest forensic forensic minds minds in in thethe nation nation forfor ourour program. program. It is It is also also that that educational educational why we have assembled some of theofbrightest forensic mindsto into the nation our level, program. Ithigh ishigh also that and educational philosophy philosophy that that has has enabled enabled alumni alumni of ourour summer summer programs programs succeed succeed at for at every every level, from from school school and well well into into philosophy that has competition. enabled alumni of our summer programs to succeed at every level, from high school and well into collegiate collegiate forensics forensics competition. collegiate forensics competition.

Passion… Passion…Elegance… Elegance…Excellence Excellence Passion… Elegance… Excellence We Weoffer offerour ourmost mostsincere sincerecongratulations congratulationstotoallallofofthe thestudents studentswho whoattended attendedthe the We offer ourNational most sincere congratulations to all of theAnd students who attended the 2018 2018 NSDA NSDA National Speech Speech &&Debate DebateTournament. Tournament. Andtotoallallof ofthe the students students who who 2018 NSDA National Speech & Debate Tournament. And to all of the students who recognizedwith withawards, awards,congratulations congratulationsonona atask taskwell-done. well-done.ToToallallofofour our were wererecognized recognized with awards, congratulations on a task well-done. To all of our were alumni alumniand andtotoour ourincoming incomingLonghorns, Longhorns,Hook Hook'Em! 'Em! alumni and to our incoming Longhorns, Hook 'Em! The TheUTNIF UTNIFalso alsoextends extendsitsitscongratulations congratulationstotothe theUniversity UniversityofofTexas TexasSpeech SpeechTeam, Team, The UTNIF also extends its congratulations to the University of Texas Speech Team, recipients recipientsofofthe the2018 2018American AmericanForensic ForensicAssociation Associationteam teamchampionship championshipatatthe the recipients of the 2018 American Forensic Association team championship at the National NationalIndividual Individual Events Events Tournament. Tournament. National Individual Events Tournament. UTNIF UTNIF Dept. Dept. of of Communication Communication Studies Studies UTNIF 1 University 1 University Station Station Studies Dept. of Communication Mail Mail Code Code A1105 A1105 1 University Station Austin, Austin, Texas Texas 78712-1105 78712-1105 Mail Code A1105 Austin, Texas 78712-1105

Phone: Phone: 512-471-5518 512-471-5518 Fax: Fax: 512-232-1481 512-232-1481 Phone: 512-471-5518 Fax: 512-232-1481


From the Editor

Board of Directors

Fall is my favorite time of year. I appreciate the fresh start a new school year brings, and there are plenty of exciting new developments in these pages to start your year off right! The cover story of this issue celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month, September 15 through October 15. As someone who celebrates the month, I hope you will join me by using our collection of resources and special posters in your classroom or during practice. Get started on page 18. There is something special in speech and debate that takes the “I” to the “we” and points us all on the same path together (students, coaches, educators, administrators, alumni, and parents) to create an impact in schools, students, and beyond. This issue introduces our new “We Are Speech & Debate” campaign on page 17, which is designed to convey the essence of who we are and what we do to inspire and empower students through competitive speech and debate. You can learn more about our 2018 National Student of the Year Elena Cecil on page 46 and hear from Dr. Richard D. Pineda, Director of the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies, on page 44 about how speech and debate shaped his life and his advice to students just discovering speech and debate. I’m proud to share the stories of these two speech and debate alums! Finally, these pages include important updates from our community. I encourage you to read about our inclusion resources on page 26 to help make your next tournament or practice a safe and welcoming environment for all. Plus, this issue features important information about the proposed changes to Public Forum Debate and instructions for how to share your feedback. Flip to page 16 to learn more. Sincerely,

Pam Cady Wycoff President Minnesota Dr. Tommie Lindsey, Jr. Vice President California Byron R. Arthur Louisiana David Huston Texas Adam Jacobi Wisconsin Jennifer M. Jerome Nebraska Renee C. Motter Colorado

J. Scott Wunn Executive Director

Timothy E. Sheaff Iowa

P.S. Have you renewed your school membership yet? To continue receiving Rostrum magazine and maintain access to your speech and debate resources, visit your Account page at www.speechanddebate.org/account to renew today. I can’t wait to welcome you back for another year of growth and competition!

APPOINTED MEMBERS

Rostrum

A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION

401 Railroad Place, West Des Moines, IA 50265-4730 | Phone (920) 748-6206 J. Scott Wunn, Editor and Publisher Vicki Pape, Assistant Editor Amy Seidelman, Content Editor Deano Pape, Copy Editor Emily Bratton, Graphic Design Assistant Emily Kriegel, Advertising Coordinator

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Rostrum (ISSN 1073-5526), Copyright © 2018 by the National Speech & Debate Association (NSDA), is published five times per year (Sept., Nov., Feb., Apr., and Aug.) by the NSDA, 401 Railroad Pl., West Des Moines, IA 50265-4730. Business and Editorial Offices: NSDA, 401 Railroad Pl., West Des Moines, IA, 50265-4730. Accounting and Circulation Offices: NSDA, 401 Railroad Pl., West Des Moines, IA 50265-4730. Call (920) 748-6206 to subscribe. Periodicals postage is paid at Des Moines, IA 50318, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Rostrum, c/o NSDA, 401 Railroad Pl., West Des Moines, IA 50265-4730. Rostrum provides a forum for the speech and debate community. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own and not necessarily the opinions of the NSDA, its officers, or its members. The National Speech & Debate Association does not guarantee advertised products and services unless sold directly by the NSDA.

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ELECTED MEMBERS

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Robert Runcie Admin Rep Florida Tom Rollins Virginia Monica Silverstein New York

To learn more about the Board and for contact information, please visit www.speechanddebate.org/ meet-the-team.


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In this Issue : VOLUME 93 : ISSUE 1 : SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

From the Cover

Inside

18

2

From the Editor

6

2018-2019 Topics

16

News + Notes

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month

Governance and Leadership 9

Board of Directors Spring Minutes

12

Inclusion Update: Seventeen from ’17

Community

Member Resources 24

Curriculum Corner

14

NSDA National Conference: Looking Back

26

Resource Roundup

17

Introducing “We Are Speech & Debate”

28

30

Policy Debate: Synopsis of the Problems Areas for 2019-2020

The Evolution and Economics of Fundraisers Today by Amy Zucchi

34

USA Debate: Drilling for Success

by Emily Grantham and Leila Saklou 37

Meet the Interns

38

Words from the Hall by Joni Anker

40

Big Questions: Earn Thousands of Dollars for Your Classroom or Team!

Recognition 44

Alumni Angles: Dr. Richard Pineda

46

Student Spotlight: Elena Cecil

48

Coach Profile: Monica Salda

50

Program Profile: Charlottesville Debate League

54

Donus D. Roberts Quad Ruby Coach Recognition

54

Triple Ruby Coach Recognition

Like us on Facebook /speechanddebate Share with us on Instagram @speechanddebate Follow us on Twitter @speechanddebate

OUR MISSION Rostrum shares best practices, resources, and opportunities that connect, support, and inspire a diverse community of speech and debate educators committed to giving youth a voice.

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ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


  

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2018–2019

Topics

Current topics, voting links, and resources available at:

www.speechanddebate.org/topics Member students and one chapter advisor per school are eligible to vote!

Topic Release Information Public Forum Topic Release Dates The PF Wording Committee chooses a number of debate topic areas at its summer meeting to be used throughout the school year. NEW IN 2018-2019: Approximately six weeks before the topic release date, the NSDA will release the topic area. For two weeks, the community can submit a resolution through the NSDA website, together with an explanation and research links/citations demonstrating a robust debatable issue. For the next three weeks, the PF Wording Committee, using community input, will discuss, narrow, and produce two resolutions for that topic. The NSDA will release the resolutions on the 23rd, or one week before the topic release date, so that the community will have an opportunity to vote. The NSDA will release the resolution on the 1st of the month preceding the date for debates on that topic.

October 1 December 1 January 1 February 1 March 1 May 1 June 22 June 22 Aug. 1 - Aug. 7 August 8

November/December PF Topic January PF Topic February PF Topic March PF Topic April PF Topic National Tournament PF Topic List of Potential PF Topic Areas Announced for 2019-2020 2019 September/October PF Ballot Announced Voting for the 2019 September/October PF Topic Occurs 2019 September/October PF Topic Announced

Lincoln-Douglas Topic Release Dates From August 1 through September 11, chapter advisors and member students may vote online for a new slate of LD topics chosen by the LD Wording Committee at its summer meeting. The September/October LD topic (voted on the previous fall) is announced August 8.

October 1 December 1 February 1 May 1 June 22 Aug. 1 - Sept. 11 August 8

November/December LD Topic January/February LD Topic March/April LD Topic National Tournament LD Topic List of Potential LD Topics Announced for 2019-2020 Voting for the 2019-2020 LD Topics Occurs 2019 September/October LD Topic Announced

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Public Forum Debate

Resolved: The United States should accede to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea without reservations.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Resolved: In the United States, reporters ought to have the right to protect the identity of confidential sources. The NSDA also offers a “Civil Disobedience” resolution that may be used during the first two months of a novice season. Coaches are encouraged to check with tournament hosts in their area before exclusively prepping for one topic over another.

2018–2019

Policy Debate

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce its restrictions on legal immigration to the United States.

2019–2020 Policy Debate Topic Voting The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) handles selection of the annual Policy Debate topic where each state organization, the National Speech & Debate Association, the National Catholic Forensic League, and the National Debate Coaches Association all have voting privileges.

• • • •

6

Topic synopsis printed in this issue of Rostrum (pages 30-32) Preliminary voting occurs online in September-October Final voting occurs online in November-December Topic for 2019-2020 released by the NFHS in January 2019

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

2018–2019

Big Questions Debate

Resolved: Humans are primarily driven by self-interest.


THE

1925 SOCIET Y The National Speech & Debate Association is grateful to acknowledge the following 1925 Society members for pledging a generous planned gift contribution. Phyllis Flory Barton

Albert Odom, Jr.

James Copeland

J. W. Patterson

Don and Ann Crabtree

Capt. Joseph L. and Jan Pizzo

Dr. Mike Edmonds

Dr. Polly and Bruce Reikowski

A. C. Eley

Donus and Lovila Roberts

Vickie and Joe Fellers

James Rye, III

David and Judy Huston

Steve and Anna Schappaugh

Jennifer Jerome

David Seikel

Harold Keller Kandi King Cherian and Betsy Koshy

Sandra Silvers Richard Sodikow William Woods Tate, Jr.

Dr. Tommie Lindsey, Jr.

Nicole and Darrel Wanzer-Serrano

Pam and Ray McComas

Cheryl Watkins

H. B. Mitchell

J. Scott and Megan Wunn

Lanny and B. J. Naegelin

Joe and Pam Wycoff

To join the 1925 Society, or to learn more about making a planned gift to the National Speech & Debate Association, please contact Nicole Wanzer-Serrano at nicole@speechanddebate.org.


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA ATTUCKS MIDDLE SCHOOL Cambridge Global Communications Academy Errol A. Evans, Principal 3500 N. 22nd Avenue Hollywood, Florida 33020 Telephone (754) 323-3000 Facsimile (754) 323-3085 attucksms@browardschools.com

The School Board of Broward County, Florida

Nora Rupert, Chair Heather P. Brinkworth, Vice Chair Robin Bartleman Abby M. Freedman Patricia Good Donna P. Korn Laurie Rich Levinson Ann Murray Dr. Rosalind Osgood Robert W. Runcie Superintendent of Schools

Dear Administrator,

When I first took on the role of principal for Attucks Middle School, one of my first goals

When I first took on the role of principal for Attucks Middle School, one of my first goals was to establish a was to establish a debate program for our students. Luckily for me, our school district has debate program for our students. Luckily for me, our school district has an amazing debate community which ancreate amazing debate Debate community thatWith joined to create the Broward County Public joined together to the Broward Initiative. helptogether from the NSDA, Broward County Public Initiative made speech and debate a formal part with of every middle Schools has madeSchool speech Debate and debate a formalwhich part ofhas every middle and high school across Broward and high school across Broward with more and more elementary schools coming more and more elementary schools coming on board each year. The ability to communicate effectively acrosson board year.sought The ability to communicate effectively across cultures is one of the most soughtcultures is one ofeach the most after skills of the 21st century workforce and that is what a formal speech after skills When of theour21st-century workforce and that what a formal speech and debate and debate program teaches. district endured a great tragedy this is past February, our students were able to so eloquently program express teaches.their anger and frustrations through the media in part because of their experiences in these programs.

Beyond public speaking, participating in debate activities teaches students to look at issues

Beyond public speaking, participating in debate activities teaches students to look at issues from multiple from multiple perspectives, engage in the democratic process, seek answers from reliable perspectives, engage in the democratic process, seek answers from reliable and unbiased sources, and most and unbiased sources, andissues mostand of all, requires them to think critically about of all, it requires them to think critically about formittheir own informed opinions about the facts.issues and form their own informed opinions about the facts. The ability to disagree with someone on When I think about the current state of our great nation, I can’t help but think that we could all benefit from issues in an intelligent manner, without to issues personal is one that is critically taking a speech and debate class. The ability to disagree with resorting someone on in anattacks, intelligent manner, students to argue sides of annecessary issue, they are forced without resortingnecessary to personaltoday. attacks,When alternative facts,are or forced “fake news” is oneboth that is critically today. to see the value and support of each argument. This activity opens minds and develops a When students are forced to argue both sides of an issue, they are forced to see the values and evidence in support of each argument. They are obligated tolarge get out of theirissues box and arguewhich a perspective deeper understanding of the societal wepassionately are faced with we can only hope they may not agree with personally. This activity opens minds develops a deeper will lead to an ability to compromise andand build consensus in understanding the future. of the large societal issues we face. As an educator, I can only hope this will lead to an ability to compromise and build consensus inAs thethe future. principal of Attucks Middle School, I wholeheartedly support the efforts of the

NSDA and the Broward Debate Initiative because the result speaks for itself! Speech and

As the principal of Attucks Middle School, I wholeheartedly support the efforts of the NSDA and the Broward debate participants do better academically across participants the board. They become engaged, active Debate Initiative because the result speaks for itself! Speech and debate do better academically their active education and in theireducation community. Our community. school has across the board.participants They become in engaged, participants in their and in their Ourseen great improvements in student culture and spirit since we started our program, and I would highly school has seen great improvements in student culture and spirit since we started our program, and I would recommend joining the NSDA to any administrator looking to make a positive impact on highly recommend joining the NSDA to any administrator looking to make a positive impact on school culture school culture and academic performance. Speech and debate builds leaders. and academic performance. Sincerely, Sincerely,

Errol A Evans Errol A. Evans Principal, Attucks Middle School

2018 NSDA Middle School Administrator of the Year Attucks Middle School, Florida Educating Today’s Students to Succeed in Tomorrow’s World Broward County Public Schools is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access Employer

Find this and other letters of advocacy on our website:

www.speechanddebate.org/resources 8

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


GOVERNANCE

Leadership Board of Directors Spring Minutes

T

May 4-6, 2018 West Des Moines, Iowa

he NSDA Board of Directors held its Spring Meeting May 4-6, 2018, in West Des Moines, Iowa. Present were President Don Crabtree, Vice President Pam Cady Wycoff, Dave Huston, Jennifer Jerome, Dr. Tommie Lindsey, Jr., Pam McComas, Dr. Polly Reikowski, Tom Rollins, Robert Runcie, and Jay Rye. Tim Sheaff joined virtually.

DON CRABTREE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS

President Crabtree called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m.

PROGRAM ORAL INTERPRETATION CLARIFICATION

FUTURE NATIONAL TOURNAMENT HOST SITES

Moved by Huston, seconded by Jerome: “Adopt clarifying language for POI: ‘Pictures, graphics, and/ or illustrations are considered a visual aid, even if included in original manuscript, and may not be displayed.’” Passed: 9-0

Moved by Crabtree, seconded by McComas: “Charge the Executive Director with negotiating the best terms for the Phoenix 2023 National Tournament bid.” Passed: 9-0 The National Tournament will be held in Dallas, Texas (2019) and Albuquerque, New Mexico (2020). The location of the 2021 National Tournament will be Des Moines, Iowa—the headquarters of the National Speech & Debate Association.

SEVERE WEATHER DELAY PROCEDURES AT NATIONALS Moved by Huston, seconded by Crabtree: “Starting with the 2018 National Tournament, adopt the severe weather delay procedures as outlined.” Passed: 9-0 Severe weather delays can cause challenges in the operation of the National Tournament. The Board unanimously approved procedures for how to manage stoppage of rounds in the middle of the tournament. Tab officials were notified of the procedures to follow during the 2018 Nationals.

Moved by Rye, seconded by McComas: “Abide by the Development Committee’s recommendation to name the service citation award for coaches after Don Crabtree.” Passed: 9-0

The use of a manuscript during the performance is required in POI, and visual aids are not permitted. This rule clarifies that even visual aids found within the manuscript itself may not be shown to the audience during a performance.

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER PUBLIC FORUM TOPIC PILOT Moved by Wycoff, seconded by McComas: “In the 2018-2019 school year, pilot a November/December topic for Public Forum Debate as is done for September/ October.” Passed: 9-0 This past year, an ad hoc committee of Public Forum coaches met and discussed the future of PF. The committee recommended that the NSDA provide one topic area for November and December due to the limited opportunities to debate during those months due to holiday breaks. This pilot will be re-evaluated after this school year to determine whether to continue November/December as a singular topic.

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 9


CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE QUALIFIERS

DISTRICT TOURNAMENT SERIES UPDATE

Moved by Wycoff, seconded by Jerome: “Beginning with the 2018-2019 season, alter the structure determining the number of qualifiers in Congressional Debate to allow districts the opportunity to qualify more students to Nationals in the House.” Passed: 9-0 Moved by Wycoff, seconded by McComas: “Beginning with the 2019 National Tournament, adjust the preliminary and elimination round schedule to accommodate the increased field of competitors in the House.” Passed: 9-0

Moved by Huston, seconded by Jerome: “Beginning with the 2018-2019 season, remove the restriction that prohibits the hosting of non-qualifying tournaments alongside the district tournament series (such as a novice division).” Passed: 9-0

Access to the National Tournament is seen as a significant incentive for participation. After reviewing the quotas for determining national qualifiers, it was deemed there was a lack of equity between other events and Congress. A quarterfinalist session will be added to the House. The Executive Director is charged with finalizing a schedule that makes for an efficient National Tournament. More information will be available in the Unified Manual.

INTERNET USE IN DEBATE AND EXTEMP Moved by Huston, seconded by Reikowski: “Adopt language as proposed to allow for the use of internet in debate (Policy, Public Forum, Lincoln-Douglas).” Passed: 9-0 Moved by Huston, seconded by Wycoff: “Adopt language as proposed to allow for the use of internet in Congressional Debate.” Passed: 9-0 Moved by McComas, seconded by Rye: “Adopt as amended the language for use of electronic devices in Extemporaneous Speaking.” Passed: 9-0 An ad hoc committee met to discuss the use of the internet in NSDA competitions. As a result, contestants may use electronic devices to access the internet during Congress, LD, PF, and CX rounds. In Extemp, students may access research stored online and actively research during preparation. In all events, the use of electronic devices to receive information for competitive purposes from noncompetitors is prohibited. Internet access is not guaranteed. See more in “Guidelines for Electronic Device Use” in the Unified Manual.

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ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

This change should allow for additional competition opportunities for more students, which aligns with the mission of our organization. The decision to create additional competition is the autonomous decision of the District Committee. However, any additions may not result in the limiting access of competitors to the district competition participation. It is yet to be determined whether or not this expansion will take place in 2019 or 2020. An official announcement will be made by October 15, 2018.

ROLE OF THE DISTRICT CHAIR AT DISTRICTS Moved by Huston, seconded by Wycoff: “Eliminate the language about the district chair not serving any other role but general supervision at the district tournament.” Passed: 9-0 District Committees are still encouraged to distribute tournament roles and responsibilities to other stakeholders in the district whenever possible. However, this change acknowledges that, in some districts, the District Committee would feel most comfortable with the district chair running the tabulation computer. The district chair should still train others by having them assist with or shadow tabulation procedures.

ELECTION/APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS Moved by Wycoff, seconded by Rollins: “Appoint Robert Runcie to serve as the administrative representative for a two-year term starting August 1, 2018.” Passed: 9-0 In subsequent affirmations by acclamation, Pam Cady Wycoff was named Board President and Dr. Tommie Lindsey, Jr., was named Board Vice President. Both will serve two-year terms beginning August 1, 2018. The meeting adjourned Sunday at 12:00 p.m.


“We produce more than 2,400 awards for the National Tournament alone. Imagine what we can do for your school or — Chad Wagner, tournament!” Trophy Shop Manager for the NSDA

NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION

TROPHY SHOP Order tournament trophies, school awards, plaques, medals, and more from the National Speech & Debate Association’s Trophy Shop!

We have thousands to choose from, or you can create customized awards for your event! As a member, you have access to wholesale prices and early invoicing. Learn more at www.speechanddebate.org/trophyshop


INCLUSION UPDATE COMPETITION EVENTS

Seventeen from ’17 compiled by Amy Seidelman The National Speech & Debate Association Coaches’ Caucuses continue to provide recommendations that the organization can take to be more inclusive. This is an update on progress made during the 2017-2018 competitive season based on ideas formed at Nats17.

NSDA staff participated in inclusion training on understanding differences led by the Faculty Fellow of the University of Iowa’s Chief Diversity Office.

We purposely considered diversity enhancing presenters when deciding who to feature in NSDA webinars.

We utilized a feature through Tabroom.com for Nationals judge registration that enabled individuals to be marked as diversity enhancing. We also allowed for self-nominations of judges for semis and finals, increasing the diversity of our judge panels.

As the first part in a webinar series on issues of identity for students and coaches, Crawford Leavoy hosted a webinar on Gender Identity and Inclusion in speech and debate, available at www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen). Two more are lined up for 2018-2019.

To diversify National Tournament tab rooms, we invited eight new individuals into tab leadership positions and even more to staff tab rooms using information collected from judge nominations and stakeholder input.

To begin efforts to diversify overall leadership, we are creating a baseline of district leadership demographics from our May midterm survey, where 170 of the 209 respondents provided demographic information. 72.2% of respondents identified as White or Caucasian or European American, 3.3% identified as Hispanic or Latina/ Latino/Latinx, 1% identified as African-American or Black, 2.4% identified as Asian or Asian American, and 21.1% left it blank or preferred not to answer.

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ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

We upped promotion of the Caucuses in the Tournament Book, on our Nats18 webpage, and in our Nats18 Guidebook app, and sent caucusspecific emails to membership pre-tournament.

We made an initial attempt at analyzing the gender and ethnicity breakdown of our national finalists going back to 2014. We collected contact information for coaches of those finalists with the intent to inquire about gender and race. We also plan to request more demographic data from all students starting with Nats19.


To use inclusion as a lens when selecting award winners, we ensured that all NSDA awards involve a discussion of individuals under consideration and their public commitments to inclusion, resulting in more purposeful conversations and research on the candidates.

We’ve created a dress code for optional use in team manuals that is not gendered, is inclusive of transgender and intersex students, and is sensitive to racial questions and prejudice, available at www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen).

We created a best practices guide for tournaments concerning gender-neutral restrooms, available at www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen).

We built templates for schools and district leaders to invite superintendents and principals to attend tournaments, with the goal of inviting administrators from underresourced and underfunded schools to attend. We invited the same group of individuals from nearby areas of Florida to the National Tournament ourselves. Find these letter templates online at www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen).

We amended the judge paradigms at Nationals to ask judges their pronouns.

Working with the NFHS, we have included cultural competency as an element of speech and debate judge training resources, available online at www.nfhslearn.com/courses. We’ve also identified candidates to create online and in person workshop opportunities for our adult membership.

We added diversity to online resources by producing, in partnership with Wiley College, an annotated bibliography of nearly 100 black authors for Black History Month. In summer of 2018, we curated additional materials for coaches to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, created in partnership with University of Texas-El Paso, a Hispanic Serving Institution.

Iowa Safe Schools has agreed to write a Rostrum article on gender identity regarding vocabulary terms and pronouns for publication during the 2018-2019 school year.

To enhance the available training on our tab tools for the 2018-2019 season, which should make running and hosting tournaments easier for new audiences, we’ve created a training outline for Tabroom.com that will be available to all schools, and will identify a few districts to conduct training ourselves with help from the caucuses. Amy Seidelman is the Assistant Executive Director for the NSDA.

Find more materials online at www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen)

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 13


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

NSDA National Conference: Looking Back

LaToya Green kicked off the 2018 conference with her engaging keynote address Saturday evening.

O

ur 2018 National Speech & Debate Conference was held in Phoenix, Arizona, this past July and featured some of the most engaging speakers and presentations we’ve had the privilege to host! More than 200 coaches and educators representing 38 states attended this year’s incredible conference. Check out a brief recap of conference highlights below. 2018 CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Keynote Speech from Josh Gad Known for his roles in Frozen, Book of Mormon on Broadway, and the recent Beauty and the Beast film, Josh Gad’s success in acting brought a unique perspective to this year’s conference. As the national

champion in Humorous Interpretation (’99) and Original Oratory (’98, ’99), Josh spoke about how his involvement in speech and debate has led to a fulfilling acting career and stressed the importance of this activity in our society. He even got a chance to reunite with some former mentors and coaches.

Keynote Speech from LaToya Green As the leader of Higher Definition Leadership and Empowerment Coaching, LaToya Green’s speech on how to effectively lead your team through all kinds of traffic was a great instruction on how coaches can handle obstacles and impart crucial life skills in the process.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER 14

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

Keynote Speech from James Copeland and J. Scott Wunn One of the highlights of the conference was learning about the history of the organization from James Copeland, Director Emeritus of the NSDA. His conversation with current Executive Director J. Scott Wunn helped convey what’s changed about the NSDA and what priorities remain the same.

Keynote Speech from Mary Gormley

incredible speech on the power of language and language arts in today’s world. Her experience as an educator facing a declining emphasis on the importance of languages arts education was a unique and critical perspective for coaches and teachers.

Town Hall: The Future of Public Forum Debate Conference attendees were the first to see potential changes coming to Public Forum Debate! The discussion about the future of this rapidly-growing event was a great chance for coaches and educators to give feedback and react to the changes proposed by the Rules Committee.

Our 2018 NSDA National Educator of the Year, Mary Gormley, gave an

| www.speechanddebate.org/conferences


REGISTER TODAY! $249 – Members Super Early Bird Pricing » $299 – Non-Members

Virtual $99 – livestream Access » and recordings

(from top) Debbie Simon from Milton Academy (MA) copresented two sessions with Meg Howell-Haymaker about finding honest and truthful characters in Interpretation events. • Byron Arthur of Holy Cross School (LA) took part in the “Finding Your Voice as a Leader” panel discussion. • Rich Kawolics of Laurel School (OH) spoke about the role of gender in argumentation and analytical speech. • The NSDA, Visit Phoenix, and Visit Mesa staff announced the National Tournament will be hosted in Arizona in 2023.

Thanks to our generous sponsors of the 2018 NSDA National Speech & Debate Conference!

SAVE THE DATE FOR 2019 The 2019 National Speech & Debate Conference will be held August 4-6 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The conference will provide a wide variety of opportunities to discuss new ideas for your team and your classroom with coaches and educators from around the country. We received excellent feedback this year from conference attendees, and we’re already making changes for next year’s conference! Join us for these great professional development opportunities by registering online at www.speechanddebate.org/ conferences. We will accept conference proposals from presenters for the 2019 NSDA National Conference beginning October 1 through November 2. More details will be released online at the end of September. ANNOUNCEMENT

National Tournament Headed to Phoenix and Mesa in 2023 We enjoyed our time in Phoenix so much, we had to go back! During the conference, we revealed Phoenix and Mesa as the location of our 2023 National Speech & Debate Tournament with Meg HowellHaymaker, Mountain View High School speech and debate coach and chair of the local host committee. We were also joined by Jennie Denison of Visit Mesa and Chris Robertson of Visit Phoenix for this exciting announcement. Grace Rogers serves as Marketing Communications Specialist for the NSDA.

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER

| www.speechanddebate.org/conferences ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 15


COMMUNITY

NEWS + NOTES Pilot of Alternate District Qualification System

NFHS Partnership Offers Discounted Liability Insurance to NSDA Members

During the 2018-2019 school year, the NSDA will pilot an alternative district qualification system featuring streamlined rules that, among other changes, eliminate the traditional up/down system. A separate manual for these pilots will be released October 1. Districts that wish to pilot the new rules for speech and/or debate will have the opportunity to indicate that when submitting district dates. Our goals in introducing this change are to make district tournament participation more accessible, make district rules and procedures easier to understand, increase transparency, and make tournament participation a more worthwhile experience for all students involved. This change was first introduced during the 2018 National Speech & Debate Conference.

If you recently joined the National Speech & Debate Association, or if you’ve already renewed your school’s membership, you may have noticed one of the most valuable benefits available to our coach members. The NSDA is pleased to continue its partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) to offer liability insurance at a reduced rate. This coverage is available for coaches and teachers to purchase at a low cost of $14. Working with our partners at Dissinger Reed, the NFHS and the NSDA offer coverage for the following types of incidents: • Personal and advertising injury • Damage to premises rented to you • Premises medical payments • Sexual abuse and molestation • Participant legal liability

Weigh in on the Proposed Changes to Public Forum Debate You are invited to view the proposed rule changes, review feedback from the PF Town Hall at the 2018 National Speech & Debate Conference, and comment with your thoughts. To join the discussion: 1. Go to NSDAConnect.org. 2. Select the “Discuss” tab and join the “PF Changes” discussion. 3. Review materials, and if you want to contribute, create a free account to comment!

• Crisis response • Various accidental medical For added convenience, purchase of the insurance can be bundled with NSDA membership dues. Even if you’ve already joined or renewed, you should see this option when adding individual coach memberships. From the coach roster of your Account page, anyone without NFHS insurance will see a “Buy” link in the NFHS column. James Weaver, NFHS Director of Performing Arts and Sports, encourages all coaches to consider this valuable resource before it’s needed, “because when you need it and don’t have it, that’s when it’s too late.”

“The $14 insurance is wonderful. Since it is sanctioned by the NSDA, my school will pay it. I was personally buying it on my own. THANK YOU!” — Pennsylvania NSDA Coach 16

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


NSDA Member Checklist

WE ARE

SPEECH & DEBATE Make sure you’re getting all of the benefits of your NSDA membership and set up your team for success this season by utilizing the great resources below!

TO-DO’S TO START THE YEAR:  RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP • Visit www.speechanddebate.org/account  PURCHASE LIFETIME NSDA STUDENT MEMBERSHIPS • Your students can earn recognition through competition, community service, public speaking, and leadership.  PURCHASE THE NSDA TEAM RESOURCE PACKAGE • Access resources and lesson plans, 2018 national final round videos, topic updates, recorded webinars, and more!

STAY UP-TO-DATE: EACH TUESDAY: COACH NEWSLETTER EACH QUARTER: ROSTRUM MAGAZINE FOLLOW US:

@SPEECHANDDEBATE

SAVE THE DATES:

 ACQUIRE NFHS INSURANCE/MEMBERSHIP • Get insurance coverage for yourself along with NFHS annual membership.

MARCH 1, 2019: NATIONAL SPEECH AND DEBATE EDUCATION DAY

 SUBMIT BIG QUESTIONS APPLICATIONS • Team fundraising is available by hosting a Big Questions in-school event or tournament.

JUNE 16-21, 2019: 2019 NATIONAL TOURNAMENT — DALLAS, TX • APRIL 24 – MS registration deadline (fees and paperwork due May 10) • MAY 1 – HS fees and paperwork deadline; topics released

NSDA RESOURCES:  JOIN AND EXPLORE ‘CONNECT’ • Access the NSDA’s virtual professional learning community.  DOWNLOAD NSDA CURRICULUM RESOURCES • Plan your curriculum with NSDA resources—access exemplar videos, lesson plans, textbooks, and much more!  PURCHASE SUPPLIES FROM THE NSDA STORE • Items include Interp binders, protective sheets, timers, honor society pins, and other supplies.  GET A FREE QUOTE FROM THE NSDA TROPHY SHOP • Visit www.speechanddebate.org/trophyshop

AUGUST 4-6, 2019: NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE CONFERENCE — COLORADO SPRINGS, CO • Register: www.speechanddebate. org/conferences • NOVEMBER 2, 2018 – Presenter application deadline


Introducing WE ARE

SPEECH & DEBATE.

S

peech and debate is a true community. Behind every successful speech and debate competitor, there are supportive parents, hard-working coaches, and encouraging teammates working to build success and impart critical life lessons. Even in our most individualized events, we’re a village. All of us—students, parents, coaches, educators, administrators, alumni, and more—are on the same path to make a difference for students, schools, and our society. When we work together, we are stronger. The lessons that our community learn as a part of speech and debate set us up for incredible success beyond tournaments or competitions. Together, We Are Speech & Debate— but we are also so much more. We are engaged citizens. We are achievers. We are leaders of tomorrow. We are powerful voices. All of us have our own story—something we owe to this community or a reason that we are passionate about this activity. It’s different for every individual, but the outcome is the same: a sense of togetherness that cannot be replicated in any other middle or high school activity, thanks to our collective passion and dedication. We have a unique community, and now, we have an opportunity to come together, strengthen it, and use our collective voices for

powerful change. We can use our experiences and our passion to share what it is we love about speech and debate, and we’ll be using the 2018-19 NSDA Member Calendar as a starting point. In September, we’ll be doing this by focusing on all of the benefits the NSDA’s Honor Society can bring to students with the phrase “We are Honorable.” After that, we’ll use each month’s calendar theme to highlight different aspects of speech and debate. We hope you’ll work with us this month to show the importance of the honor society to you, your school, and your students. Our voices are stronger together­—and by sharing our stories and the powerful impact that speech and debate can have on people from diverse backgrounds, we can make a big difference in our neighborhoods, cities, and in the world. ‘We are Speech & Debate’ is a movement! We encourage you and your students to join us to improve and empower the individual voices of the entire speech and debate community. We’re excited to embark on this new journey focused on our accomplishments and our strength as a community. We’re just getting started, so you’ll see this movement continue to grow, change, and evolve throughout the year. Get involved with the beginning by following some of the action steps included to the right.

Get Involved! Display Hispanic Heritage Month Posters. Download these

posters for free from our website and print them to hang in your classroom! www.speechanddebate.org/ hispanic-heritage-month

Participate in our monthly theme.

Celebrate September’s theme, We are Honorable, by highlighting the honor society and reasons why the NSDA Honor Code are important to you and your team.

Use our social media profile frame. Show all

of your Facebook friends and Twitter or Instagram followers that you’re a part of the speech and debate community with our We Are Speech & Debate profile frame! Add it to your page by visiting https://twibbon. com/support/we-arespeech-debate.

Get students involved. Share

#WeAreSpeechAndDebate resources with your team members, including the reasons speech and debate is important to you!

Share your story.

Use the hashtag #WeAreSpeechAndDebate to share why you’re proud to be a part of speech and debate!

Stay tuned! We’ll have

more opportunities to get engaged and involved as the year goes on, especially in advance of National Speech & Debate Education Day on March 1. Follow our social media channels (@speechanddebate) and check your email for our weekly coaches’ newsletter to stay up to date.

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 17


SPEECH AND DEBATE OPENED MY EYES TO RADICALLY NEW WAYS OF THINKING AND SET ME ON COURSE TO DO THE ACTIVISM WORK I’M DOING TODAY. IT FOREVER CHANGED MY LIFE, AND THE BENEFITS I HAVE REAPED ARE ALMOST TOO MANY TO NAME . PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, I LEARNED THAT OUR VOICES HAVE THE POWER TO SHAPE THE LANDSCAPE OF POSSIBILITIES AROUND US.

BRITTANY RAMOS DEBARROS Coppell High School, TX - Class of 2007 Activist and Organizer

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org


COVER STORY

SP EE CH AN D DE BATE GAVE MY VO IC E A PU RP OS E.

Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month

S

eptember 15 through October 15

AS LATINOS LIVING IN THIS COUNTRY, THERE IS A LIFELONG FEELING OF ‘I DON’ T BELONG HERE.’ SPEECH AND DEBATE GAVE ME THE COURAGE TO GET UP ON STAGE AND SAY, ‘ACTUALLY, WE DO.’

RICA RDO FLOR ES

Americas High School, TX - Class

of 2017

2017 NSDA National Student of the Year and 2015 Dramatic Interpretation Runner-up

www.spe echandd ebate.or

g

WE ARE SPEE CH & DEBA TE

SPEECH AND DEBATE GAVE ME— A LOW-INCOME, LATINO STUDENT FROM RURAL WEST TEXAS—THE ABILITY TO DREAM BEYOND MY BOUNDARIES. IT ALLOWED ME TO MOVE FROM ‘I COULD NEVER DO THAT’ TO ‘WHAT’S STOPPING ME?’

is National Hispanic

FORENSICS CLUB WAS GOOD TRAINING FOR A LAWYER IN WAYS THAT I BARELY UNDERSTOOD AT THE TIME. YOU NOT ONLY HAD TO SEE BOTH SIDES; YOU HAD TO PREPARE AS IF YOU WERE ARGUING BOTH IN ORDER TO ANTICIPATE YOUR OPPONENT’S MOVES.

Heritage Month! Inspired by recommendations from the Hispanic/Latinx Coaches’ Caucus and in partnership

ETHAN MORELION

MARIANNA GARCIA Cypress Bay High School, FL - Class of 2014

Big Spring High School, TX - Class of 2016

First person to win a national championship at NFA and/or AFA with a performance in another language

Public Interest Law Intern, Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

SONIA SOTOMAYOR Cardinal Spellman High School, NY - Class of 1972 Associate Justice, Supreme Court of the United States

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

with the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies, we have created

AF TER ALL THIS TIME, I STILL CONSIDER MYSELF FORTUNATE TO BE PART OF A FANTASTIC ACTIVITY AND A DYNAMIC, INNOVATIVE , AND SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY.

a series of classroom and

SPEECH AND DEBATE TAUGHT ME AT A YOUNG AGE HOW TO HANDLE SERIOUS ISSUES AND HOW TO PRESENT THEM IN FRONT OF AN AUDIENCE.

AT A TIME WHEN I WAS AFRAID TO SPEAK UP, DEBATE TAUGHT ME HOW TO USE MY VOICE TO FIGHT FOR A BETTER WORLD.

tournament resources to help you celebrate. We invite you to celebrate the month in your school or

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE

Christopher Columbus High School, FL - Class of 2008

Belen Jesuit Prep School, FL - Class of 1997 ABC News Anchor, Chief National Affairs Correspondent

NSDA Coach and Hall of Fame Member

community with our special

CARLOS MAZA

TOM LLAMAS

MARIO HERRERA Eldorado High School, NM - Class of 1986

Video Producer, Vox

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE

www.speechanddebate.org

www.speechanddebate.org

www.speechanddebate.org

posters featuring speech and debate coaches and alumni! In addition, you’ll find other resources to enhance your

I STARTED THE DEBATE TEAM AT MY HIGH SCHOOL AND IT IS THE SINGLE BEST THING I HAVE EVER DONE! SPEECH AND DEBATE TAUGHT ME HOW TO USE MY VOICE AND INSPIRED ME TO PURSUE A CAREER IN PUBLIC POLICY.

SPEECH AND DEBATE OPENED MY EYES TO RADICALLY NEW WAYS OF THINKING AND SET ME ON COURSE TO DO THE ACTIVISM WORK I’M DOING TODAY. IT FOREVER CHANGED MY LIFE , AND THE BENEFITS I HAVE REAPED ARE ALMOST TOO MANY TO NAME . PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, I LEARNED THAT OUR VOICES HAVE THE POWER TO SHAPE THE LANDSCAPE OF POSSIBILITIES AROUND US.

DEBATE CHANGED MY LIFE BY TEACHING ME TO BE A CRITICAL THINKER , AND I TAKE THAT WITH ME IN EVERYTHING I DO.

next practice, classroom, or tournament experience during September and VICTORIA SUAREZ-PALOMO

October and beyond. (For more ideas, see next page.)

Carrolton School of the Sacred Heart, FL - Class of 2001

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

YVANNA CANCELA

BRITTANY RAMOS DEBARROS

Vice President, Policy and Regulatory Affairs at Renovate America

Coppell High School, TX - Class of 2007

Carrollton School Of The Sacred Heart, FL - Class of 2006

Activist and Organizer

First Latina State Senator in Nevada

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 19


PARTICIPAR EN DEBATE SE ME CAMBIÓ MI VIDA PORQUE ME ENSEÑÓ COMO PENSAR CRÍTICAMENTE Y LLEVO ESO CONMIGO EN TODO LO QUE HAGO.

YVANNA CANCELA Carrollton School Of The Sacred Heart, FL - Clase de 2006 La primera senadora latina en Nevada

SOMOS DISCURSO Y DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org


With thanks to the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies at the University of Texas at El Paso, Dr. Richard Pineda, community contributors and NSDA staff, we offer a range of resources focused on National Hispanic Heritage Month themes to help spark critical thinking and relevant conversations.

DI SC UR SO Y DE BATE ME EN SE ÑO CU AN DO ER A JO VE N CO MO RE SO LV ER LO S PROB LE MA S SE RIO S Y CO MO PR ES EN TA RLOS EN FR EN TE DE UN A AU DI EN CIA .

TOM LLA MA S

Belen Jesuit Prep School,

FL - Clase de 1997

Presentador de ABC News, Jefe corresponsal de asunto s nacionales

Poster Series » Commemorate the month in your school or recruit new members for your team with our posters featuring Hispanic/ Latinx speech and debate coaches and alumni.

Literature Collection »

www.s peech andde bate.o

rg

SOM OS DIS CUR SO Y DEB ATE

PARTICIPAR EN DEBATE SE ME CAMBIÓ MI VIDA PORQUE ME ENSEÑÓ COMO PENSAR CRÍTICAMENTE Y LLEVO ESO CONMIGO EN TODO LO QUE HAGO.

Looking for new literature for speech events? Check out the initial list of works in our collection or suggest others for us to add.

Lesson Plans » Use our lesson plans and activities to bring National Hispanic Heritage Month into your classroom or practice! (Visit our website or see page 24 to get started.)

Competition Resources »

POSTER SERIES We Are Speech & Debate (Somos Discurso Y Debate) You can download our complete poster series by visiting our website. Posters are available in both English and Spanish where the featured person speaks both languages. In addition, our web page is translated in both English and Spanish to help increase awareness and accessibility. Turn the page for two more full-size posters you can display in your school, classroom, or squadroom!

PARA MI, UN ESTUDIANTE LATINO DE RECURSOS HUMILDES, NACIDO Y CRIADO EN UNA ÁREA RURAL AL OESTE DE TEXAS, EL DISCURSO Y DEBATE ME DIO LA HABILIDAD DE SOÑAR MÁS ALLÁ DE MIS LÍMITES. ME PERMITIÓ PASAR DE, ‘YO NUNCA PODRÍA HACER ESO’ A ‘QUÉ ME ESTÁ DETENIENDO?’

YVANNA CANCELA

ETHAN MORELION

Carrollton School Of The Sacred Heart, FL - Clase de 2006

Big Spring High School, TX - Clase de 2016 Interno de la interesta publica, defense legal y educación Mexicano-Americana

La primera senadora latina en Nevada

SOMOS DISCURSO Y DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

SOMOS DISCURSO Y DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

DISCURSO Y DEBATE ME DIO UNA VOZ CON PROPÓSITO.

LOS LATINOS QUE VIVIMOS EN ESTE PAÍS SENTIMOS QUE NO PERTENECEMOS A ESTA COMUNIDAD, Y QUE NO DEBERÍAMOS ESTAR AQUÍ. PERO COMPETIR EN EL EQUIPO DE ORATORIA ME DIO EL VALOR DE SUBIR UN ESCENARIO Y DECIR, “SÍ, PERTENECEMOS.”

Download Congress, Extemp, and Impromptu resources to enhance your next practice session.

Find more resources at www.speechanddebate.org/ hispanic-heritage-month

RICARDO FLORES

MARIANNA GARCIA

Americas High School, TX - Clase de 2017

Cypress Bay High School, FL - Clase de 2014

2017 Estudiante del Año de NSDA y 2015 subcampéon de Dramatic Interpretation

La primera persona que ha ganado un campeonato en NFA y AFA con una presentación en otro idioma

SOMOS DISCURSO Y DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

SOMOS DISCURSO Y DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 21


AF TER ALL THIS TIME , I STILL CONSIDER MYSELF FORTUNATE TO BE PART OF A FANTASTIC ACTIVITY AND A DYNAMIC, INNOVATIVE , AND SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY.

MARIO HERRERA Eldorado High School, NM - Class of 1986 NSDA Coach and Hall of Fame Member

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org


FORENSICS CLUB WAS GOOD TRAINING FOR A LAWYER IN WAYS THAT I BARELY UNDERSTOOD AT THE TIME . YOU NOT ONLY HAD TO SEE BOTH SIDES; YOU HAD TO PREPARE AS IF YOU WERE ARGUING BOTH IN ORDER TO ANTICIPATE YOUR OPPONENT’S MOVES.

SONIA SOTOMAYOR Cardinal Spellman High School, NY - Class of 1972 Associate Justice, Supreme Court of the United States

WE ARE SPEECH & DEBATE www.speechanddebate.org


FOR THE CLASSROOM

Curriculum Corner Check out these practical ideas for speech and debate teachers to use in the classroom.

Resources for National Hispanic Heritage Month This set of activities can be used either in the classroom or a team setting as a way to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month and foster relationships between students/teammates. Written by NSDA District Support Manager (and former coach) Erik Dominguez, the activities not only highlight the experiences of students who identify as Hispanic/Latino/a/x* but create a space where students from any background can feel welcomed. * Please be aware that some of your students may prefer terminology Latina/o/x. You may want to speak with your students about which terminology they prefer and edit your materials to match.

Objective To celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month through the promotion of speech and debate activities.

Notes • This lesson plan is for a full classroom setting or an after-school event. • Hosting a potluck, providing snacks, raffling off prizes, or giving minor awards to participating speakers are possible incentives for new students to attend. (Great recipes can be found online at https://goo.gl/3sazuT and https://goo.gl/GCeAnq.) • Use our poster series (www.speechanddebate.org/ hispanic-heritage-month) to promote the event.

• Use your judgment as to what events you want to showcase, depending on your students’ strengths and the time allotted for the event. Because most teams may not have students of Hispanic heritage performing an interpretation event of Hispanic themes, we have suggested a video below that you may show.

Activities • Welcome students and hand out 3x5” notecards. Have students fill out basic contact information about themselves and include answers to the following questions, which can be projected or written on the board: • If you identify as being Hispanic, what is your country of Hispanic heritage? • Regardless of your heritage, what is a tradition that your culture and/or family hold dear? • Provide a history of National Hispanic Heritage Month. A brief explanation can be found online at https://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/about/. • Explain to students that they are now given a chance to share a little bit about themselves and their culture. Have a few returning members model the questions they need to answer, but reserve the rest of the time for any new members. • Briefly introduce the elements of Extemporaneous Speaking and present the speaker. • Suggested follow-up question for brief discussion: Do you agree or disagree with the speaker? Why or why not? • Briefly introduce the elements of Congressional Debate and present the speakers. • Suggested follow-up question for brief discussion: Do you think that this bill/resolution should be passed? Why or why not? • Briefly introduce the elements of Duo Interpretation

Have an idea for our next Curriculum Corner? Email lauren.mccool@speechanddebate.org 24

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


SEEKING NSDA

Find more resources at www.speechanddebate.org/ hispanic-heritage-month

and present the video. You can access the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIZYrhFPh6Y. • Suggested follow-up question for brief discussion: What cultural differences created conflict in this performance? • Present our poster series to demonstrate how speech and debate activities have influenced Hispanic students. Point out the resources (Extemporaneous Questions, Congress Legislation, Interpretation Literature) that have been created to help Hispanic students start their speech and debate journey. • End with emphasizing the NSDA value of inclusion and speech and debate for everyone. Show them one of the following resources to demonstrate student voices: www.youtube.com/watch?v=frcgZtA3WgY or www.speechanddebate.org/membership. • Collect information cards, dismiss attendees, and be available for questions!

Other Considerations • Meet with your Spanish department to incorporate some or all of the activities into their classroom or after-school celebrations. • Follow up with any new students within 48 hours! Provide a little bit more information about your team, and you can ask them the following questions: • What were your impressions of the events that you saw? • Could you see yourself doing any of those events? Why or why not? • What is exciting about the possibility of joining the speech and debate team, and what obstacles do you see in joining the team? We would love to hear your feedback on this lesson! Send success stories or any suggestions for improvement to erik.dominguez@speechanddebate.org.

STATE EDUCATORS OF THE YEAR Nominations will be accepted from fellow educators, administrators, school board members, or parents for the State Educator of the Year awards. Additionally, state speech and debate organizations may nominate an individual from their state who is also an NSDA member. More details can be found on our website.

Criteria for Selection To be eligible, nominees must: • Be high school or middle school coach member of the NSDA. • Be an active classroom teacher in the field of speech and debate. • Have a minimum of five years of classroom experience. • Demonstrate broader contributions to the field of education outside of their own classroom (e.g., presenting at an education conference; writing curriculum and/or education standards for speech and debate; publishing articles on the educational benefits of speech and debate; instructional coaching to non-speech and debate teachers on how to incorporate speech and debate into their curriculum). • Provide significant and ongoing support to others in the field of speech and debate education (e.g., mentorship, peer observation, modeling lessons). • Model the Association’s Coaches Code of Ethics.

Minimum Requirements Each State Educator of the Year will be considered for the national award. State winners will not be announced unless quality nominations that both meet our criteria and demonstrate exceptional standards have been submitted. Incomplete nominations or a lack of competition does not guarantee a state winner.

Submit nominations online by October 30.

www.speechanddebate.org/ educator-of-the-year-nomination-form ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 25


MEMBER RESOURCES COMPETITION EVENTS

Resource Roundup

T

he National

publication guidelines to

can invalidate, disrespect,

students. Some of the work

Speech & Debate

use the singular “they”

or threaten the safety of

we have done to better

Association

pronoun. While making

that person. This creates

understand what dress codes

Coaches’ Caucuses have

changes internally is critical,

an inhospitable classroom

should be like comes from

indicated that we could

our organization also strives

and tournament space

the article “Decoding School

offer our community more

to set standards for the

both in terms of social

Dress Codes” which can be

information on how to

community.

interaction and competitive

found here: https://goo.gl/

be inclusive of the LGBT+

success.

7nLNXd. Please join us in

community. Below we

is a crucial step for making

This guide is a starting

our commitment to make

preview three new guides

the speech and debate

point and is not intended

speech and debate a safer

available online at

community safer and more

to be the only resource

space by updating your team

www.speechanddebate.org/

inclusive. Pronouns are how

consulted. Best practices are

handbook with this dress

resources. Thank you to

we identify others in our

constantly evolving and

code template.

our members of the LGBT+

daily communication, and

require further research,

Coaches’ Caucus and other

they are often associated

examination, and reflection.

community members for

with the gender of the

significant contributions in

person we are referring to,

developing these resources,

e.g., “she,” “her,” “he,” “his.”

with special thanks to Jessica

An individual’s biological

Kurr, Crawford Leavoy, and

sex assigned at birth does

E. Cram.

not determine their gender.

Best Practices for Pronoun Use

Correct pronoun usage

Team Handbook Dress Code Template

Gender Neutral Bathroom Best Practices Starting in 2016, the NSDA began marking gender neutral

However, it is common

Traditionally, dress codes

restrooms for attendees of

that we use pronouns to

prescribe acceptable clothing

the National Tournament.

describe a person based on

options for “men” and

Based on feedback from

their outward appearance

other options for “women.”

Coaches’ Caucuses in 2016

or perceived gender. It is

Some elements of dress

and 2017, this guide suggests

As the NSDA works to be a

important to take a more

codes may also be rooted

best practices for designating

more inclusive organization,

conscious approach to

in and reinforce problematic

gender neutral bathrooms

we have taken steps to

the way that we identify

societal norms in race, class,

at speech and debate

use pronouns in a more

others’ genders in our daily

ability, etc. Additionally,

tournaments to better meet

responsible manner. For

conversation. Mistaking a

common dress codes enforce

the needs of attendees and

instance, we have updated

person’s gender by using

a standard of dress that

create a more meaningful,

our Code of Honor and

the incorrect pronouns

might not be feasible for all

inclusive space.

Have feedback or more ideas? Email us at info@speechanddebate.org.

LEARN MORE 26

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

www.speechanddebate.org/resources (use the “inclusion” filter to the left of the screen)


COMMUNITY

The Evolution and Economics of Fundraisers Today

W

hen you need to raise funds for your team’s expenses throughout the year, your options have been the same for decades. We ask ourselves, What should we sell this time? Baked goods, candy bars, wrapping paper, or candles? Or should we host an event like a car wash, restaurant night, or auction? But how effective are these fundraisers? Stax Inc. helped us survey how people were using fundraisers to analyze NSDA team needs and opportunities. • Speech and debate teams need $17,800 on average per year, but only $5,200 (~30%) comes from fundraising activities. • The biggest hurdles to fundraising are lack of student motivation, the hassle of organizing events, and not having a consistent donor base. • To raise funds, 70% of teams host tournaments, 50% sell products, 36% have restaurant nights—and while only 27% use online fundraising, that number is growing significantly. PLUS, many teams raise funds in multiple ways. Online compliments all traditional forms of fundraising to increase reach.

What’s best for your team?

PRODUCT SALES $$ Medium-High FUNDS RAISED: High BANG FOR YOUR BUCK: LowMedium UPFRONT COST: EFFORT/TIME:

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ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

earn up to $1,000. The return on investment (or ROI) isn’t high with all that goes into it.

AUCTIONS $$$ High FUNDS RAISED: High UPFRONT COST: EFFORT/TIME:

BANG FOR YOUR BUCK:

You’ll have to buy the products you’ll be selling, and you don’t have a guarantee that you’ll sell everything you purchased. You’re typically relying on students to sell for you. You have a hefty task of managing your sales force and process—e.g., giving out the products/sign-up sheets, collecting/tracking all of the money from the sales, and designing/distributing marketing materials. Staying organized during the fundraiser is crucial. Although you can raise thousands of dollars with product sales, remember that if you’re selling a product, you’re splitting your proceeds with the product supplier. Ultimately, you’ll make 50 to 60 cents on the dollar.

Low-

Medium

UPFRONT COST: $

Costs can be high if you need to purchase the items being auctioned verses having them donated. Other high costs are venue rental fees/ service fees, marketing costs, food and beverage, possibly hiring an emcee, etc. If items are to be donated, you’ll have to solicit businesses to donate them. This is very time consuming and requires multiple touch points to acquire a single item for the auction. Once you have the items to be auctioned you have to manage the event—line up the venue, food, marketing efforts—a tall order. An auction can raise tens of thousands if you can get through the logistics beforehand. With associated costs and effort being very high, the overall ROI is low/ medium.

FUNDS RAISED:

High Medium-High BANG FOR YOUR BUCK: Medium

ONLINE FUNDRAISING PLATFORMS

The smart way to run a car wash is to assign your volunteers a supply list and ask everyone to bring an item. This may include some upfront expenses for materials (buckets, hoses, soap, signs, etc.). You’ll want to do some pre-event marketing too, which includes creating and distributing flyers, social media posts, and signage you will need to hang up throughout the neighborhood. This can be very time consuming. You can

UPFRONT COST:

CAR WASH EFFORT/TIME:

None Low FUNDS RAISED: High

POWERING K12 FUNDRAISING

Hundreds of raised more

Start a fundraise

Compiled by Amy Zucchi, Edco

In recent years, online fundraising has been gaining a lot of traction.

REgistrati Training m Membersh Bus HoteL + Food A LOT OF fundr

“With busy students engaged in all sorts of activities, carving out time to fundraise can be a challenge. Edco provided a forum via which students could reach out to prospective donors even given a few minutes a day sandwiched around other activities.” — Paul Wexler, Coach (MA)

EFFORT/TIME:

BANG FOR YOUR BUCK:

the responsibility is no longer JUST with you. Upload contact lists to email potential donors, replicate your campaign for future fundraisers, market on social media, and so on. Over the course of a few weeks, you’ll spend just a few minutes here and there sending out emails and posting on social media. Since you can raise thousands with an online fundraiser, the ROI here is high. Want to learn more about online fundraising? Check out www.ed.co/nsda or email us at hello@ed.co.

High

Fundraising online expands your reach beyond your local community, keeps costs low, and set up is a snap. There are no upfront costs to an online fundraiser. With friends and family all over the country, online platforms make the ask relevant, which increases how much you can raise. Some platforms let you recruit a fundraising team—

“The partnership between Edco and the NSDA has been a huge win for our team’s fundraising the past four years. Edco is a trustworthy platform that we can return to year after year, tools that are easy to use for increasing our outreach, and responsive staff who get things done. Having a consistent platform we can use every year when we start gearing up for Nationals has been huge.”

GET STARTED

TODeAd.Yco!

— Micah Everson, Coach (MS)


POWERING K12 FUNDRAISING

Hundreds of NSDA teams have raised more than $260,000. Start a fundraiser online in under 5 minutes.

s e e f n o i t a r t s REgi ls ia r e t a m g in in a r T s e e f p i h s r e b Mem Bus HoteL + Food A LOT OF fundraising! GET STARTED

TODeAd.Yco!/nsda Edco is a Proud Partner of the NSDA


COMPETITION COMPETITIONEVENTS EVENTS

POLICY DEBATE: Synopsis of the Problem Areas for 2019-2020 From the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Coaches and students, you’re invited to discuss these topics in-depth before casting your vote online by October 15. See page 32 for details!

I

PROBLEM AREA I:

ARMS SALES

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce Direct Commercial Sales and/or Foreign Military Sales of arms from the United States. In the movie Iron Man, upon his triumphant return to the United States, arms dealer Tony Stark reflects upon the world his products helped shape: “I saw young Americans killed by the very weapons I created to defend them and protect them. And I saw that I had become part of a system that is comfortable with zero-accountability…I had my eyes opened. I came to realize that I had more to offer this world than just making things that blow up. And that is why, effective immediately, I am shutting down the weapons manufacturing division of Stark Industries.” Just as Tony Stark faced his day of reckoning, the United States is on the verge of facing a similar fate. President Trump is actively increasing the number of arms contracts offered and authorized by the United States. One must ask whether arms sales make us safer and strengthen our economy, or create blowback which increases terrorism or fuels conflicts in a variety of regions across the globe. Direct Commercial Sales affirmatives would limit the number or type of sales by American companies to foreign militaries. These affirmatives could prohibit the sale of drone technology, reduce small arms sold to nations like Saudi Arabia which are used to perpetrate human rights abuses, or strengthen export controls to prevent future resale of our technology. Foreign Military Sales affirmatives would reduce sales by the Departments of State or Defense to foreign militaries. These affirmatives could prohibit sales of F-35s to Israel which are used for

30

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

bombing raids, prevent Japanese acquisition of Tomahawk missiles which would provoke China or North Korea, or prevent sales to Qatar which may give U.S. munitions to terrorist organizations. Affirmatives addressing either type of sales could net advantages such as: terrorism, proliferation, human rights credibility, hegemony, and increasing stability in the world’s most volatile regions. Negative teams will have access to alliance-based disadvantages highlighting the need for arms sales to create commonly equipped militaries, defending arms sales as a credible deterrent to prevent conflicts, acknowledging the economic impact of reducing the role of one of the largest economic sectors, or arguing countries like Russia or China would fill in and negate solvency. The only constant element of President Trump’s foreign policy is to increase arms sold by the United States, which makes the literature base broad and accessible. We have not embraced the opportunity to debate arms sales since 1983, and the time to rekindle this debate is now.

II

PROBLEM AREA II:

INDIA

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its development and/or military assistance to the Republic of India. India has the second largest population in the world yet has never been the primary focus of a Policy Debate resolution. India is a country on the cusp of becoming a global power but is held back by its growing population and regional competitors. India’s densely packed urban populations face environmental problems, and resource distribution challenges the nation. The rural areas struggle


with poverty, famine, and lack of access to education, healthcare, and the internet. While gaining military strength, India faces many challenges: terrorist groups, sabre rattling with Pakistan, competition with China, and cybersecurity. Development and/or military assistance could ameliorate these problems by increasing poverty aid, sharing clean energy expertise, expanding access to healthcare services, engaging in joint military training exercises, or sharing counter-terrorism intelligence. Negative counterplan strategies could include alternative modes of financing and disadvantages to the topic mechanism (Dutch Disease, Rent-Seeking). Military assistance would provide support to India but also creates negative ground about encroaching on spheres of influence and the consequences of international military engagements. Prime Minister Modi seems willing to work with President Trump, but it is yet to be seen how America will approach the relationship. Affirmatives would be forced to clash with the current foreign policy ideology of “America First,” which magnifies links to disadvantages about political flip-flops. Additionally, India’s government must decide whether to deal with a controversial Trump administration ahead of their own important elections. Critical arguments about the efficacy of development assistance create important debates regarding America’s role in the world, and how we should approach international engagement. Military assistance creates debates over the United States military-industrial-complex that have been a historically rich area of investigation.

III

PROBLEM AREA III:

MIDDLE EAST

bring stability to the region and further the U.S.’s goals of helping Iranians, but affirmatives will have to accept working with a government that is openly hostile to U.S. power. Syria is in the midst of a civil war that threatens great power conflict. Previous regimes have chosen to work with local opposition groups rather than Al Assad’s government, and the current regime seems to have no clear policy regarding how it wants to engage with this critical nation. Affirmatives can argue that stabilizing Syria is key to stopping the refugee crisis, human rights abuses, and ISIS. While engaging these nations may solve major issues, there are plenty of detractors from working with these three nations. From Bashar Al Assaad’s human rights violations, Iran’s hegemonic encroachment in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia’s tendency to overlook terrorism within its borders, these nations offer excellent case debate about whether to engage or shun. Possible affirmative cases include: protecting women’s rights in one or more of the countries, pursuing diplomatic solutions to conflicts, or attempting to engage economically. Negatives can focus on the problems associated with the United States attempting to help countries in the Middle East. Negatives also have a wealth of process CPs, relations DAs, and kritikal arguments to challenge the standing of any affirmative. This topic would give novice debaters the ability to correct misconceptions about the region while also giving them the opportunity to learn the activity on an easily accessible topic. While we have debated these countries as impact scenarios on other resolutions, we haven’t approached this region as a topic area.

IV

PROBLEM AREA IV:

NUCLEAR STRATEGY

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its constructive engagement with one or more of the following: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Syria.

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially change its nuclear weapons strategy.

While the Middle East is comprised of a number of countries, it is important that we limit the scope to these three. Saudi Arabia, an ally in name, is participating in the destabilization of Yemen, has had a dubious record regarding terrorism within its borders, and a shameful record on women’s rights issues. But a strong relationship with Saudi Arabia may also be the key to peace in the Middle East. Iran seems to be inviting conflict by seeking to expand its sphere of influence: Engagement could

The debate over America’s nuclear weapons strategy is essential to our military and diplomatic relations throughout the world. This topic engages debaters on the timely question of: What should our nuclear weapons strategy be? President Trump expresses a strong preference for relying more heavily on the nuclear elements of our deterrent posture. His administration wastes no time in issuing a new Nuclear Posture Review that radically differs from his predecessors. Media coverage of Iran,

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 31


North Korea, and other countries showcase the wide interests and fears in a changing nuclear climate. On the affirmative, debaters will find a variety of cases ranging from negotiating international nuclear arms control, declaring no first use, reducing the U.S. arsenal, reducing U.S. alert status, clarifying deterrence posture regarding non-nuclear attacks, clarifying U.S. deterrence/use posture in different regions such as Asia or the Middle East, or increasing U.S. commitment to nuclear treaties. “Change� is a word that has been absent from Policy resolutions for more than 20 years mostly because of the possibility of creating unlimited, bidirectional topics. The relative narrowness of the content area of this topic, focused on an established nuclear posture review, limits the affirmative to changing course from the existing strategy. On the negative, debaters will find a variety of strategies from which to engage the affirmative and will enjoy core topic arguments that cover all facets of the topic. Specific disadvantages like deterrence and allied proliferation will cover every affirmative regardless of their direction and create vibrant link debates based on the literature on both sides. Specific counterplans would include consultation, condition/quid pro quo, doing a smaller change than the affirmative, excluding components of the strategy change, creating exceptions to the change, actions unrelated to changing the existing nuclear strategy, and taking actions outside the normal means. Specific critical arguments surrounding international relations, the evolution of nuclear weapons (testing, exclusion, securitization, etc.) and other critical approaches will provide plenty of negative approaches.

V

PROBLEM AREA V:

TREATIES

Resolved: The United States federal government should ratify or accede to, and implement, one or more of the following: Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, TransPacific Partnership, United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. In June 2018, the United States withdrew from the United Nations Human Rights Council to join Eritrea, Iran, and North Korea as the only nations who no longer participate in any of its meetings. This action reduced the credibility

32

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

of the United States as an arbiter of international law. Since 1995, the U.S. has ratified only 10 treaties. Ratification of one or more of the treaties in this topic is widely regarded as a prerequisite toward regaining its standing as a defender of international law. Affirmatives on the topic could advocate unconditional ratification of any of the listed treaties or could alternatively advocate ratification with reservations excepting individual provisions. Paris Agreement affirmatives will focus on how the United States can address climate change at the national level. Implementation of the Paris Agreement could include affirmatives which focus on renewable portfolio standards, carbon taxes, cap-and-trade systems or favorable frameworks to increase alternative energy development. Rome Statute affirmatives could focus on why the U.S. should assist in choosing judges and prosecutors, how the ICC could limit drone strikes or other forms of unilateral military action, or how U.S. adherence to the ICC will effectively fight human rights violations. Trans-Pacific Partnership affirmatives could focus on the necessity of the Asia-Pivot strategy, the benefits of free trade on agriculture and alliances, and the U.S. economy. Finally, Law of the Sea affirmatives could focus on the benefits of freedom of navigation, security in the arctic, piracy, or conservation of our oceans. While there are only four treaties included in the topic, there are multiple ways to ratify (or accede to) and implement each one. Those options broaden what might seem a narrow topic. Affirmative cases could leverage the advantages specific to each treaty, and also hold critical and policy-based objections to American exceptionalism and unilateral action. A focused list of treaties allows negatives to develop a variety of strategies against each one to allow rigorous case debates. Counterplan options could include alternate actors and solvency mechanisms as well as reservations against particular provisions of the treaty. There is rich disadvantage ground in the areas of international relations, economic and political leadership, environmental impacts, and human rights. Critical positions arise from issues of American imperialism, exporting capitalist values, flaws in international law and securitization of the environment.

Vote Online! Students and one chapter advisor per school may vote online until October 15 at 4:00 p.m. CT. To access the link, visit www.speechanddebate.org/topics and follow the online ballot instructions. The two most preferred topic areas will be placed on a second online ballot in November. NOTE: The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) handles selection of the annual Policy Debate topic where each state organization, the National Speech & Debate Association, the National Catholic Forensic League, and the National Debate Coaches Association all have voting privileges.


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COMMUNITY

DEBATE

USA Debate: Drilling for Success by Emily Grantham and Leila Saklou

USA Debate members Shreyoshi Das, Leila Saklou, Ella Michaels, Nikhil Ramaswamy, and Emily Grantham traveled to Croatia in July.

A

fter two weeks of intense preparation at the Global Debate Symposium in beautiful Colorado Springs, Colorado, countless online practice debates with occasional technical difficulties, and the consumption of countless slices of pizza, the five selected members of the USA Debate Team were fully prepared to take part in the 2018 Worlds Schools Debating Championships hosted in Zagreb, Croatia. The largest held to date, the tournament included teams from 65 countries. For the last two weeks of July, the USA Debate Team participated in debates

with teams from every part of the globe. Whether it was sparring or debating against teams from Armenia, Canada, China, England, Hungary, Mexico, the Netherlands, the Philippines, Scotland, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland and Wales, the team truly engaged in a cultural and intellectual exchange with the world’s finest debaters. At the opening ceremony and culture night party, the team connected with fellow debaters, trying foods and line dances alike that celebrated the diversity of the nations represented. Throughout the tournament, the content knowledge of

the team was challenged by debates ranging from motions about the harms of China’s One Belt One Road initiative to the benefits of community ownership of professional sports teams—a challenge that united every debater independent of the country from which they hailed.

SIXTH IN THE WORLD After eight days of debates and almost 40 cumulative rounds in a one-month time span, USA Debate finished prelims with a 6-2 record and 19 ballots, finishing their run in the tournament in quarterfinals in a very close and engaging debate

against Team England on a motion about a foreigner’s ability to purchase and own land. Graduating senior and team captain Ella Michaels finished as the 12th speaker in the world out of more than 300 competitors, and juniors Emily Grantham and Leila Saklou both ranked in the top 50 speakers. Wrapping up another successful year with the title of being sixth in the world, all nine students on the USA Debate Team have shared incredible memories and hard earned success, thanks to the efforts and dedication of team manager and coach Cindi Timmons, coach Aaron Timmons, assistant coaches Danny

Follow #USADebate on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter | speechanddebate 34

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


Debois and Aditya Dhar, and Development Team coaches Shane Stafford and Sandy Berkowitz.

The 2017-2018 USA Debate Team enjoyed a number of competitive accomplishments this past year. A key aspect of attaining that success involved a few practice drills that anyone can use to enhance their performance in the World Schools Debate format.

than men, they deserve to be paid more as a form of compensation for economic disenfranchisement. Being able to reframe difficult motions to be the most advantageous for your side of the debate while still engaging with the heart of any given topic is one of the most important skills in the World Schools format. The best way to be prepared for seemingly one-sided motions is to practice thinking critically and evaluating a motion through multiple perspectives.

Impossible Motion Drill

Humanizing a Motion Drill

The team has found this drill very helpful in approaching difficult motions creatively. Lists of past WSDC motions can be found online, many of which might seem rather challenging to defend (https://schoolsdebate. com/resources/motions/). Choose a difficult motion and take five minutes to think of how to approach it and begin generating arguments. For example, opposing the motion, “This house supports equal pay for equal work” seems quite unintuitive at first. One way to approach the opposition side of the motion might be to adopt the stance that because women have been historically paid less

The World Schools format is truly an intersection of speech and debate, and as such can be a vessel for verbally painting a picture of who each side is defending. As put by team member Shreyoshi Das, “Frankly, some motions about topics such as economics and foreign policy can potentially be very dull for both the judges and the audience to listen to for an entire hour. The best way I’ve found to keep everyone engaged is to find the face of the motion— who are the people who are actually going to be affected by this motion? A good place to start is to think about the people

KEY PRACTICE DRILLS

2018-2019 USA Debate National Team Congratulations to this year’s team of debaters who have been selected to represent our country on the global stage!

Ishan Bhatt • Senior from St. Andrew’s Episcopal, MS Michael Bole • Senior from A. W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts, FL Maddie Butler • Senior from Fishers High School, IN

Anh Cao • Junior from

Bentonville High School, AR

Elyse Dewbre • Junior from Northland Christian School – Houston, TX

Emily Grantham • Senior from

Kingwood High School, TX

Jack Johnson • Junior from

The Blake School, MN

Ranen Miao • Senior from Millburn High School, NJ

Leila Saklou • Senior from Kingwood High School, TX Liana Schmitter-Emerson • Sophomore from Campbell Hall, CA Luke Tillitski • Senior from Charlotte Latin School, NC Brian Zhou • Senior from Greenhill School, TX

who are usually forgotten by those in power—these could be low income communities, marginalized groups, or the people who stand to lose the most if the motion fails.” For example, on a motion about the

harms of free trade, this could involve thinking about how certain economic systems affect the mobility of manufacturing workers in the supply chains of multinational corporations. Integrating narratives of

Learn more about the USA Debate Team at www.speechanddebate.org/usa-debate. ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 35


marginalized groups into speeches both helps to increase strategy and style points in a debate round and enables one to take advantage of the platform created by the World Schools format to discuss extremely relevant social issues.

Rebuttal Drill A third drill the USA Debate Team often utilizes to work specifically on rebuttal skills is to listen to and watch the first proposition and first opposition speeches in a WSDC round (available on YouTube) and then pause the video and prep a second speech for the proposition before watching how that speaker approaches the debate. This can help both in practicing coming up with responses on a variety of issues and to understand how other

debaters from all across the world would approach a motion by comparing your responses to theirs.

THANK YOU! The USA Debate Team is grateful for a year filled with spontaneous team singing sessions, fierce-face photos, friendship bracelets, and plenty of shared hard work and determination. The team is prepared to push themselves even further this upcoming year, and is looking forward to continuing a legacy of commitment and camaraderie representing the United States on both a domestic and international stage.

2018-2019 USA Debate Development Team Twelve students will train and practice with USA Debate coaches and alumni to learn more about World Schools Debate.

Arpan Bagui • Junior from King High School, FL

Hannah Heeger • Freshman from Millennium High School, NY

James Hu • Junior from Mira Loma High School, CA

Roopa Irakam • Junior from Watchung Hills Regional High School, NJ Kaitlyn Maher • Sophomore from The Potomac School, VA

Darian McCrary • Junior from Kingwood High School, TX

Tatum Menon • Junior from Palisade High School, CO Maya Miller • Sophomore from Polytechnic School, CA

Emily Grantham and Leila Saklou are seniors at Kingwood High School in Texas. They both currently serve as publications interns for the NSDA.

THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS USA DEBATE SPONSORS!

The Lanier Law Firm, Texas Forensic Association, The Kettles Law Firm, Tom and Vicki Rollins, and Simon Greenstone Panatier Bartlett, PC

MISSION The National Speech & Debate Association connects, supports, and inspires a diverse community committed to empowering students through competitive speech and debate.

Manu Onteeru • Junior from Thomas

Jefferson High School of Science & Tech, VA

Victor Tong • Freshman from

Phillips Academy Andover, MA

Angela Zhong • Junior from Cypress

Woods High School, TX

Luca Zislin • Junior from American Heritage School, FL

VISION We envision a world in which every student has access to membership in the National Speech & Debate Association, providing the educational resources, competitive opportunities, and expertise necessary to foster their communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creative skills.

To learn more, visit www.speechanddebate.org. Questions? Email info@speechanddebate.org or call (920) 748-6206. 36

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


COMMUNITY

Meet the Interns The National Speech & Debate Association is pleased to announce six new Rostrum publications interns for the 2018-2019 school year.

Emily Grantham Emily is a senior at Kingwood High School in Texas. She competes in Public Forum and Extemporaneous Speaking, and currently is a member of the USA Debate Team. She was a finalist in World Schools Debate at the 2017 NSDA Nationals, competing with her district team. Outside of speech and debate, Emily is a passionate advocate for women’s rights and is the co-president of the Kingwood Chapter of Girls Learning International, an organization that aims to promote awareness and advocacy for gender equality. In her free time, Emily enjoys volunteering in her community and with her church to promote Hurricane Harvey relief.

Eleanor Hildebrandt Eleanor is currently a senior at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Iowa. She qualified to the 2017 and 2018 NSDA National Tournament in Congressional Debate and serves as a captain on the Roosevelt speech and debate team. Eleanor is heavily involved in the Des Moines community; she served as a campaign fellow for Hillary Clinton’s Presidential Campaign and is the community outreach intern for the Downtown Des Moines Chamber of Commerce. Her coach Quentin Hardt describes her as a dedicated and talented individual. “She takes everything thrown at her in stride, and consistently exceeds any expectations set in front of her.”

Greyson Koinzan Greyson is a senior at Mountain Vista High School in Colorado. She competes in Poetry, Congressional Debate, and Policy Debate. Mountain Vista’s coach Shannon Vance credits Greyson for the tremendous growth the team has seen under Greyson’s leadership as captain. “Greyson’s enthusiasm, maturity, and tenacity are welcoming qualities; she is responsible for our growth to the top three team in our district and the top eight team in our state.” In her free time, Greyson also serves

as a co-editor of Mountain Vista Media in all three facets: the student print-publication Eagle Eye, the student website MV Media, and with the Aerie yearbook.

Aiden Kwen Aiden is currently a junior at Tenafly High School in New Jersey. He competes in Lincoln-Douglas and Public Forum Debate. This year, Aiden was named Kungus ACTS first ever debate captain because of his leadership skills and passion for mentoring younger team members. His coach David Brown describes Aiden as someone who “inspires those on his team to hold themselves to a higher standard and encourages them to push past their own limits.” Outside of debate, Aiden serves as the senior editor for Tenafly’s online newspaper, The Echo, and is a member of the National Honor Society.

Leila Saklou Leila is a senior at Kingwood High School in Texas. She competes in Public Forum, Extemporaneous Speaking, World Schools Debate, and is a member of the USA Debate Team. Outside of debate, Leila competes in Texas State French Symposium competition in Dramatic Interpretation. She also is co-president of her school’s Girl’s Learning International Chapter and Equality Club, which aims to promote advocacy for women’s rights and gender equality. She is also an officer for her school’s French Club. In her free time, she fundraises for the Global Soap Project to donate soaps to families in developing countries and raise awareness for preventable diseases.

Yash Wadwekar Yash is a freshman at Phoenix Country Day in Arizona. At the 2018 NSDA Middle School Nationals, Yash was a double champion in Prose and Dramatic Interpretation. His coach C. Ryan Joyce is constantly impressed by his maturity. “In my nearly 25 years involved in speech and debate, I have yet to come across a more inquisitive, curious, and self-taught student than Yash Wadwekar.” Outside of speech and debate, Yash is extremely active in his community. This past year after the Stoneman Douglas tragedy, Yash founded an organization called Writers Over Rifles that writes letters, legislation, and articles to advocate for gun control policies.

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 37


COMMUNITY

Words from the Hall Advice from a veteran coach to kick off the new school year by Joni Anker

I

write this article while sitting on the screen porch of my cabin in Northern Minnesota. This process eases me out of vacation mode into preparing for the next school year. Soon like the hummingbirds diving at my feeder, my life will be in constant motion. I can feel the anxiety creeping into my stomach and shoulders. So why after more than 40 years do I return to teaching and coaching speech? The answer is: because it matters. I have been asked to share some words of advice “from the Hall” for new and returning coaches. Most of what I share will be old news to many of you, but maybe something will spark a new thought for some. I have learned a few things over the past several years as I served as a head coach at both Apple Valley High School and Eagan High School. Here are a few thoughts.

A coach/teacher needs to like kids. I realize this is obvious, but I have seen too many professional teachers/ coaches who don’t really like kids. As leaders and head coaches, we need to work to appreciate every student regardless of their quirkiness or negativity. Kids energize me, and I hope they energize you as well.

Some kids need your program more than your program needs them. We know what this activity can do for ALL students. Not all students you work with will be successful, but they will benefit. Several years ago I was recruiting students during lunch duty and I sought out one particular student. One of my captains said to me, “Ms. Anker, you are crazy. He’s a drug dealer.” I responded, “People can change.” And he did. Speech gave him an outlet for his

innate creativity, and today he credits speech for positively redirecting his life. We can change lives.

Time spent on building a supportive team culture is worth the effort. Due to the fact that speech practice and competition is so individual, it is a challenge with a large team for students to connect with everyone. Each year we do an all-night lock in at our local YMCA. I know it sounds crazy, and I certainly wouldn’t do it if it didn’t work. After spending all night engaged in fun team building activities, students leave knowing the other team members. With so many different types of personalities on a team, this activity helps create a supportive team culture.

Promote your program within the school and the community. As we all

know, attention for athletics dominates most schools, so we have to work hard to promote our programs. Most people agree that public speaking skills are important. Try to show off some of your best speakers to the school and community whenever possible. I have taken kids to speak at various community events and people are always impressed. We also host an all school “Speech Day” each year. Students perform all hours in the auditorium for English classes. These kinds of efforts in the school and community increases the visibility of the speech team.

Build relationships with other fine arts and athletic leaders. I have heard too many stories about advisors who refuse to be flexible and share kids. This attitude results in fewer opportunities for students. Often it is difficult to navigate

“Why after more than 40 years do I return to teaching and coaching speech? The answer is: because it matters.” — Joni Anker 38

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


Hall of Fame Nominations

The Founding Class

The highest honor for any high school speech and debate coach is election to the National Speech & Debate Association Hall of Fame. Each year, nominations are sought from member coaches. In the month of April, current Hall of Fame members and coaches with at least three diamonds vote to determine which nominees will be elected members of this most distinguished body. If you are a member coach and would like to nominate a deserving coach, visit www.speechanddebate.org/hall-of-fame.

all of the commitments kids make today, but remaining flexible is a start to keeping some of those top students you want in your program.

Embrace the power of the parent. I learned years ago to find ways for parents to be involved (and take over some of the work load). Many parents are looking for ways to be involved in their child’s high school experience. We train our parents to be judges; this helps our budget and also gives the parents a reason to be at the tournament with their children. A head coach has numerous tasks but parents can take over some of them. Our parents are extensively involved in running the Eagan tournament, planning the banquet, judging, and fundraising. A strong parent group is your best friend!

Learn from all of your resources. The NSDA Resource Package is amazing. I wish it had been available when I first started coaching. Take the time to go through

the plethora of materials; you won’t be disappointed. In addition, learn from other coaches and build positive relationships with them. We have a healthy respect for each other as coaches in Minnesota and we learn from each other.

Take care of yourself. This activity can be all consuming; it can quickly take over your life as many of you know. Draw your boundaries with students; if you are working harder than the student, something is wrong. Success needs to be as important to the student as it is to you. Proper life work balance is not something I have ever mastered during speech season, but for right now, I will submit this article and continue watching the hummingbirds. Questions? Email me at joni.anker@district196.org.

Joni Anker is a five-diamond coach and member of the NSDA Hall of Fame. She recently was named the 2018 James M. Copeland Coach of the Year.

ABOUT THE 1978 INDUCTEES | The 12 initial members were officially inducted at a banquet held during the 1978 National Tournament hosted by Northwestern University. An elegant ceremony was performed at McCormick Place, the Chicago convention hall on the Lake Michigan shore. Each living member spoke, but the premiere speech was delivered by Mr. Jacob. Frail and ill, Mr. Jacob poured out his heart about the meaning of the National Forensic League and the wonderful people who rendered great service to the organization and to the youth involved in speech activities. (pictured from top, left to right) Bruno E. Jacob, Founder; James M. Copeland; John D. Davies; Carmendale Fernandes; L. Day Hanks; James F. Hawker; R. Paul Hibbs; Albert E. James; J. Edmund Mayer; Vernon W. Metz; H. B. Mitchell; and Karl E. Mundt.

Learn More Online JAMES M. COPELAND has compiled more than 100 biographies of past and present Hall of Fame members, which are available online at www.speechanddebate.org/hall-of-fame. In his words, “What I hope is that each member will read all the bios and meet colleagues they never knew, or wanted to know better, and learn the history of their profession by reading the exploits of colleagues in times past.”

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 39


COMPETITION EVENTS

The National Speech & Debate Association Presents

EARN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS FOR YOUR CLASSROOM OR TEAM!

APPLY TODAY! NSDABigQuestions.org Debate Year 2 Success As we begin the third year of Big Questions, we’d like to celebrate the overwhelming success that the National Speech & Debate Association saw in Year 2. In the 20172018 school year, the NSDA awarded $500,000 to more than 500 schools across the country through the support of the John Templeton Foundation. In our second year, more than 17,000 high school and middle school students competed at 611 tournaments in 40 states. A total of 62 students from across the country gathered in Fort Lauderdale for the 2018 National Tournament to compete in Big Questions for $20,000 in scholarships. By the end of the week, Seung Joh Cho from L. C. Anderson High School in Texas was crowned

the national champion and $10,000 scholarship winner. Clare Abboud from Jackson High School in Ohio placed second and earned a $5,000 scholarship.

Looking to Join in Year 3? The NSDA is excited to continue the success of Big Questions as we head into the 2018-2019 school year. More than 160 events are already scheduled for this year! Now is the perfect time to hold an event of your own or attend a Big Questions tournament even if you didn’t participate in Years 1 and 2. We have $450,000 to give out to 600 tournaments this year! Big Questions is more than a fundraiser—it can also be a great way to recruit new students for your team. It is

unique from other debate events in that students have the flexibility to compete individually or with a partner. The topic is easily accessible, and the NSDA provides a wide variety of resources to help students learn about the topic and develop their cases, which makes it a great entry point for novices. As a coach from Wisconsin remarked, “Big Questions was a great way to introduce students to the activity. I have a foreign exchange student who had never debated before, and this format and topic worked great. I hope that the format catches on in the state of Wisconsin. I think it offers a different perspective on debate, one that can appeal to lay judges as well as longtime coaches like myself.”

Get Involved! Interested in using Big Questions with your team, at your tournament, or in your classroom? The application process is easy! • Apply online to host your event! Funding is limited, so apply ASAP. • Next, hold your event! • Have students and judges complete our brief online survey after the tournament and fill out our online reporting form. • Use the money you earn on supplies for your classroom, entry fees for tournaments, to supplement travel costs for your team, and more! To learn more about Big Questions and to apply to host an event, please visit our website at NSDABigQuestions.org or contact us at info@speechanddebate.org.

This publication was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the John Templeton Foundation.

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ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018


ARE HUMANS PRIMARILY DRIVEN BY SELF-INTEREST? ME

ME

APPLY TODAY!

ME

ME

ME

ME

Earn thousands of dollars for your classroom or team!

NSDABigQuestions.org

Contact us at info@speechanddebate.org to get involved today!


WHAT IS BIG QUESTIONS? Big Questions is a debate format in which high school and middle school students will grapple with complex worldview questions. They debate both sides of the topic, Resolved: Humans are primarily driven by self-interest. Schools are eligible to earn thousands of dollars by facilitating Big Questions debates. This past year, Big Questions debate events included 17,000 students in 40 states, and $20,000 in scholarships was awarded at the 2018 National Speech & Debate Tournament. All you need is for at least 15 students to debate three rounds! These debates can be added to your tournament, held during your classroom period, or even done internally amongst your team. FORMAT AND STRUCTURE The Big Questions format involves two opposing sides debating a topic concerning the intersection of science, philosophy, and religion. Students can choose to compete individually or with a partner. GET INVOLVED IN 2018-2019

We made the process easy for you! 1 Apply at NSDABigQuestions.org

to host your event. Apply earlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; funding is limited! Use our free resources to prepare for your tournament.

Competitors are assigned a side, present the case, engage in rebuttal, and participate in question periods. EARN MEMBERSHIP THROUGH BIG QUESTIONS Due to the demand for the Big Questions grant, only NSDA members will be eligible to receive funding. If you currently are a non-member school, you can use part of your Big Questions grant to cover the cost of membership!

2 Promote, hold your event, and

turn in a brief form after your event to provide feedback on the format.

3 Spend the Big Questions grant

award! You can purchase supplies for your classroom or fund speech and debate activities.

Big Questions is presented by the NSDA through a generous grant provided by the John Templeton Foundation. Grant money will be awarded to speech and debate programs across the country who host Big Questions events.

APPLY TODAY! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; NSDABigQuestions.org Contact us at info@speechanddebate.org with questions about how to get involved today!


Does your student have what it takes? Academic All American Pin

No cost to apply!

Coaches, visit our website to access the online nomination form!

www.speechanddebate.org/AAA

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Advertise your speech and debate openings with us!

As a service to member schools, the National Speech & Debate Association offers complimentary employment listings on our website, www.speechanddebate.org/jobs. For $100, you may reserve a custom, third-page print ad in Rostrum magazine. We’ll even help you design your ad! Contact emily.kriegel@speechanddebate.org or call us at (920) 748-6206 to reserve your ad today. Our next issue will be published in mid-November!

LEARN MORE www.speechanddebate.org/jobs


ALUMNI ANGLES

DR. RICHARD PINEDA: On Competition, Gratitude,

and Fearlessness

Dr. Richard D. Pineda is currently a tenured, Associate Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso where he also directs the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies. He is a 1992 graduate of Eastwood High School in El Paso where he primarily competed in Policy Debate and International Extemp.

Why did you join your speech and debate team? I joined the team in the most roundabout way. I had to move high schools when my mom got remarried and I had every intention of signing up for yearbook or newspaper. When I went to register, all of those classes were full and the guidance counselor suggested the speech and debate class. I was so annoyed at the prospect, but had little in terms of options, so off to the speech and debate class I went. The incoming class was summoned to debate practice on a Sunday before school started. My coach, Shawn

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Mena, came into the room barking orders and asking questions; I was terrified! We got settled and four juniors on the team started a practice Policy Debate, and my mind was blown. I was hooked. Watching the debate did not make a lot of sense to me, but I was hooked and I knew I wanted on, all the way!

Tell us about your successes and failures as a competitor, and what you learned from those experiences. Learning to lose, and there was a lot of that for the first couple of years, was an amazing experience in hindsight. Speech and debate gave me confidence and helped me develop intellectually, but I think the most important experience was learning to lose. Losing teaches you grace, empathy, and in my case, made me more competitive and feed the desire to practice and to be excellent. I was on a very competitive high school

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

team, so we experienced success as a team a lot. Sweepstakes awards are a big deal that you don’t think about as a competitor, but they connected you to something bigger than yourself. And learning to celebrate a culture of winning with your teammates was also a huge lesson; you learn to work to help everyone on your team. I had success on the right trajectory. My debate partner and I qualified for the Texas Forensics Association tournament my freshman year; that was a big deal then and we were the only freshman team from El Paso debating that year at state. By my junior year we were pretty tough to beat in Policy Debate locally and I had started hitting my stride in Extemp. My senior year in addition to a strong debate run, I won first at every El

Paso tournament (about 12 or so) in Foreign Extemp. That last accomplishment was fueled by a preseason practice where my coach mentioned casually (or maybe not) that no one had ever “run the table” on an event locally. Her observation (or dare) powered me through the year. We qualified for Nationals in debate and I went in Foreign Extemp also; that was the Fargo nationals and I made it to quarters, which was a huge accomplishment for me.

Do you have any favorite memories from your time as a competitor? The friendships I developed through speech and debate in high school and in college are still some of the best friendships I have in my life. I think in addition to learning grace, speech and

‘‘

As a Mexican American high school student from a Texas border town, I never thought I would see my name on a Nationals’ postings scroll dropped from the second floor.” — Dr. Richard Pineda


‘‘

I am so grateful for being raised in an environment that valued my diversity and championed me in high school, in college, in graduate school, and in life!” — Dr. Richard Pineda

debate sets a high bar for your friendships. You play around with these serious and important ideas and the people in the sandbox with you are equally smart and interesting. I remember losing my first “big” debate and not being angry or sad but wanting to talk to the other team and ask questions about how they figured out ideas and strategy. Those conversations quickly built bonds and then friendships. Two of my best friends now were rivals from two different high schools, and we spent as much time hanging out outside of tournaments as we did at tournaments. I also think that having a coach like Shawn Mena made all the difference in the world for me, not only as a role model and mentor, but as a friend. Shawn ran a tight ship, but she also made sure we were excellent as students and always reminded us that we represented something bigger than just ourselves. I use so much of what she taught me to teach now almost 30 years later; that says a great deal.

How do you think speech and debate has helped you become successful in your career? Every day of my life I use some skill that is inherently connected to my speech and debate training. I do a lot of media interviews on political issues, and I never doubt my ability to be able to connect and offer a perspective that is concise and impactful. I teach a class that usually has about 200 students every semester, and every day that class requires poise, eye contact, and engagement—just like giving an Extemp speech! I can process arguments faster and more efficiently in my professional setting, and I can “flip sides” and argue against my position. In academics this is an unusual skill because people hold their training and ideas to be sacrosanct. And the training I got in thinking strategically has an impact almost every day as well whether that is in how I work or how I approach tasks. Even as an academic writer when I research and

prepare articles, my desk looks like I am “cutting cards” and briefing arguments before a tournament!

What advice would you give to students who are joining speech and debate? First of all, be competitive but be kind and learn from your peers. Speech and debate does have a bad habit of reinforcing some weird ego and superiority issues. Think about all of the standpoints you get exposed to in the activity and learn as much as you can from people who are different than you. Second, be grateful. Speech and debate is an expansive activity that takes a lot of effort to pull off. Thank your coaches and your peers and your fellow competitors. But also think about thanking your administrators and school leaders; it is a big deal to set money aside for you to be able to compete. Third, be fearless! Ask questions, watch extra rounds, and find your people.

You will spend a lot of time doing this activity, maximize the time so that you become better and you help the people around you get better.

Anything else you want to add? I did not realize how much of an impact speech and debate would have on my life. As a Mexican American high school student from a Texas border town, I never thought I would see my name on a Nationals’ postings scroll dropped from the second floor. I never imagined that at university I’d win one of the most important college debate tournaments in the country, or that I would debate in the Cambridge University Union when I was in graduate school, or that the skills I got hooked on one Sunday afternoon would change my life forever. I am so grateful for being raised in an environment that valued my diversity and championed me in high school, in college, in graduate school, and in life!

Dr. Richard Pineda has compiled a series of Impromptu prompts focused on National Hispanic Heritage Month themes to help spark critical thinking and relevant conversations. Visit www.speechanddebate.org/hispanic-heritage-month to learn more. ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 45


STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

ELENA CECIL: Family, Tradition, and

Commitment to Service by Annie Reisener

S

peech and debate has been a part of Elena Cecil’s life for as long as she can remember. In June, Elena was named the 2018 NSDA William Woods Tate, Jr., National Student of the Year. To understand how speech and debate has shaped Elena’s life, we have to begin in 1966, when Elena’s grandfather Garland founded the speech and debate program at Larue County High School. Garland had seen other high school programs from around the state, and he believed the activity would help students become good communicators. He spent the next 25 years building his team into a powerhouse team in Kentucky before turning it over to two of his daughters in turn.

Elena Cecil with her mom (and coach) Katy and dad Eric

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In 2009, Elena’s mom Katy Cecil took over the team and, as a result, Elena was raised surrounded by speech and debate. “For my family, speech isn’t an extra-curricular or a club,” Katy says. “It is a living, breathing entity in our lives; it drives much of our schedule and family time; and it represents an activity that has given us far more than we could ever give to it.” With a family legacy like that, it’s not surprising that Elena’s involvement in speech and debate started early. In third grade, she joined speech Little League, a program where students from Larue County High School introduce speech to younger students. When she reached middle school, she was coached by her mom, Katy, who led both the middle and high school programs at Larue County. From the beginning, Elena was

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

striving to set herself apart from the pack. “Pretty much everyone in my family has done speech and debate,” she says. “I put a lot of pressure on myself to measure up to my mom, my grandpa, my aunt, and my cousins.” Having a family so entrenched in speech and debate was a doubleedged sword. “I had a lot of opportunities, like traveling nationally as a freshman, but I also had to work twice as hard to prove my success wasn’t just because I was the coach’s kid.” Elena wanted to be successful, but competition wasn’t what made her love speech. “It’s not about the trophies,” she says. “I was not the most successful. I never won first place at any tournament in my entire career. Not once. That wasn’t what mattered to me. It was about the people you meet and the way speech helps kids change. Everyone says speech and debate is like a big family, and for me it’s also really my family, but I think that’s true. You find your people.

You meet people from all different backgrounds with all different perspectives and that opens a whole new world of learning. I know that there isn’t a single activity out there that has ever made me feel as at home as speech did. I’ve tried it all and been involved in a lot, and there wasn’t anything out there that does what speech does for kids, that makes them feel as important, or as wanted, or as heard as speech does. I have seen speech and debate change lives. Witnessing that all my life is a privilege I’ve been lucky to have.” Katy has seen speech and debate impact Elena’s outlook far beyond the bounds of the activity. “Elena’s involvement in speech and debate helped her in many ways, but one of the most significant benefits she gained was an ability to see her own privilege and recognize the need that many others have in this world—she has become an infinitely more compassionate person because of her involvement in this activity.”


‘‘

There are all kinds of reasons to be on this earth. I believe my reason, my obligation, is to do what I can to help other people while I’m here.” — Elena Cecil

During Elena’s freshman year, the Larue County Speech team led food, clothing, and toiletry drives for the local food bank. After one of the drives, Elena reached out to the director of the food bank to ask if they needed any goods that the community drives weren’t bringing in. “They had plenty of socks and canned vegetables and stews,” Elena remembers, “What they truly needed was help offsetting some of the costs of Feeding America, the expenses they incurred to ship fresh fruit, veggies, and meat to the food pantry. It was costing them more than what they had.” The speech team began asking members of the community for donations instead of doing drives. “We found that people weren’t as excited to give money as they were to give goods,” Elena says. “So I realized we’d have more success if we gave them the chance to get something in return.” Elena had loved baking her whole life so her solution was simple. She would bake goods,

sell them, and give the proceeds to the food bank. The first bake sale raised $900. “People love cake!” Elena laughs. The food bank had an urgent, clearly defined need, and Elena’s bake sales helped them offset half of their costs. She began to do sales monthly and continued her efforts all four years of high school. She plans to continue the bake sales when she’s home for the holidays, and her younger sister is learning the ropes. “I want to make sure their needs are still taken care of while I’m at school,” Elena says. “This is still my community, even if it’s not where I’m living right now. This is where I grew up. These are my people.” This affinity for giving and service to others is Elena’s defining characteristic. It’s the driving force behind all she does. “There are all kinds of reasons to be on this earth,” Elena says. “I believe my reason, my obligation, is to do what I can to help other people while I’m here. If I can

do something to help someone enjoy their life, why wouldn’t I do that?” Elena’s work with the food bank and service to others are a big part of why she was selected as the 2018 National Student of the Year. When asked what the award means to her, Elena’s answer focuses not on herself, but on her community. “It means so much knowing that the people that I care about—the people in that tiny town that no one has ever heard of, the people that I have been working with for the past four years— that they are known and are important outside of my town. I don’t have an international network or huge organization or raise hundreds of thousands of dollars. But I am making a difference in the lives of my people. To be recognized for that and to know that people value the work that I’m doing is all that I can ask for.”

Annie Reisener serves as Operations Specialist for the NSDA.

CHARACTER, PASSION, AND DEDICATION “Elena shined from the moment she sat down. Her character, passion, and dedication was honest and echoed through every word she spoke. As we sat listening to her, we were often silent and just needed to take in her words because they were so powerful. Her education and background in debate helped foster a difference in her community and truly and tangibly changed the lives of people forever. Her heart allowed her to follow a worthy cause, but it also helped win us over in every single way. As educators and human beings, we hope that everyone we teach and inspire possess only a little bit of Elena’s passion and commitment to service.” Dario Camara NSDA Student of the Year Committee Chair

ROSTRUM | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 47


COACH PROFILE

MONICA SALDA: Transforming Lives In and Out of the Classroom by Katie Hines

S

acred Heart Catholic School is a small school located in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Despite being a school of just over 300, its speech and debate team is known throughout the country. Monica Salda was introduced to speech and debate when her own children joined the activity at Sacred Heart, but she has stayed long after they graduated. In 2012, Monica became a co-coach for the team and took over as the sole coach of the middle and high school programs in 2016 after the other coach retired. This past school year, Monica was nominated by her school principal, district chair, and former co-coach and later selected as the Mississippi Middle School Coach of the Year. This summer, she received the additional honor of being named the 2018 NSDA Middle School Coach of the Year.

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“With the great success of her students, it’s interesting to note that Monica never mentions winning to her team… Her focus is always on learning and improving.” — Paul VanZandt In the six short years since becoming a coach, Monica has found success in and out of the competitive field. Her students are some of the top-ranked competitors in the state and ranked nationally. Seven of her seniors have achieved the status of Academic All American, and one of her students was a finalist for the NSDA’s Exemplary Student Service Award. Additionally, Monica coaches her school’s Mock Trial team. More than half of the team members are also on the speech and debate team. The Mock Trial team won the state championship this past March and went on to compete at nationals. “With the great success of her students, it’s

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interesting to note that Monica never mentions winning to her team. She does talk about doing one’s best and about preparing thoroughly, but her focus is always on learning and improving, never on winning,” explains her former co-coach Paul VanZandt. Within her team, Monica promotes a sense of family and teaches the importance of supporting and helping each other. During the day, Monica teaches Language Arts and Latin at Sacred Heart. Like with her team, in the classroom, Monica pushes her students to be the best they can be and accomplish their goals. Monica strives to help her students grow not only as competitors but also as individuals.

Jerry R. Alliston, parent of a ninth grade student, elaborates: “Middle school, with all the uncertainty that comes with it, included an opportunity to take a speech and debate class. This opportunity did more than teach [my daughter] Brianna speaking skills. Ms. Salda cultivated something very powerful in my young daughter— she taught her to use her voice to impact those around her. In a culture where young girls often hide themselves, Ms. Salda, and the experiences she provides through speech and debate, taught my daughter that her voice, her ideas, matter and that speaking up, being confident, taking chances, working hard—these values matter.”

Katie Hines serves as the Big Questions Grants Administrator for the National Speech & Debate Association.


PROGRAM PROFILE

Why Words Matter in Charlottesville compiled by Amy Seidelman Preliminary round from a November 2017 CDL tournament

I

n the year since the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, erupted in violence and captured the attention of the nation, the Charlottesville Debate League (CDL) continues to give the city’s young people a safe space to engage with their peers in heartfelt discussion regarding the country’s polarized political situation. We asked Caitlin Flanagan, former CDL president and current head teacher, for more insights.

What is the Charlottesville Debate League and how did it get started? The Charlottesville Debate League was founded as a student organization at the University of Virginia in 2014 by Parisa Sadeghi and started to reach the local community as a small program at a local Boys and Girls club. That initial program demonstrated the potential of studenttaught debate classes to cultivate debate in the

Charlottesville area, and the CDL applied for a Jefferson Trust grant. This funding, alongside the work of more UVA students who were passionate about the power of Public Forum Debate to teach critical thinking, responsible research, and academic confidence, supported the expansion of the program into more schools and into running our own tournaments. Since then, the NSDA helped us to advance our mission by providing one

year of free membership in the organization to our schools, as well as providing fundraising advice to our organization’s treasurers as we work towards becoming financially stable in the long term.

How is the CDL structure unique to typical programming in secondary schools? Our founding mission is that of inclusivity. Debate has the power to give anyone a voice in an academic setting,

Participants in one of two 2018 summer workshops hosted by the CDL to sharpen debate skills while school is out

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and the CDL’s structure is designed to be accessible to any student who is able to attend practices. We financially support students who want to attend debate camp in the summer, and during the school year require no fees and provide food at tournaments. We currently run free programs in 10 local public and private middle and high schools. We host tournaments for our middle school teams to participate in here in Charlottesville so that travel is not a requirement to experience competition. In the classroom, we focus on making lesson plans that are accessible for students who may not find success in more traditional academic settings. Additionally, our coaches are comprised solely of UVA students passionate about debate, nearly all of whom participated in high school debate. We have established a relationship with the Curry School of Education here at UVA and offer frequent teacher trainings planned and researched by our Teacher Development Committee.

How did the CDL initially respond to the events of August 2017? When the CDL reentered the classroom in September of 2017, we held an organizationwide meeting where we discussed how our mission is related to the manifold issues our community was

churning over after the white supremacists’ rallies. We chose to allow our students to make personal connections between the work we do as a debate club and these recent tragic events and to ask followup questions that would encourage thinking about their voices as citizens in a nation grappling with fundamental questions. Our topic that fall, constitutionally-protected free speech on college campuses, gave students a space to research and think critically about the definition of free speech.

How is speech and debate a powerful way to help students work through feelings and thoughts created by tragic local events? Debate provides a platform for students to have their voices heard and meaningfully articulate their frustrations. Furthermore, it allows students the space they need to think carefully and conduct research on sensitive topics. When students present their perspective in the classroom, it is meaningful not only for the student who has worked to elegantly synthesize their own ideas, but also for listeners. When the audience includes those who share similar frustrations or those who may have not been previously exposed to such a perspective, a space

for meaningful dialogue is born. This creates a powerful exchange of perspectives that leads to deeper engagement with community, national, and global incidents.

they have seen the pivotal need for coworkers who have learned to articulate their perspectives clearly and open-mindedly.

What would your advice be to a group interested in modeling the CDL format and structure?

We have 20 teachers and 10 schools confirmed for the 2018 season, with five more programs pending. The CDL’s founding group has graduated, but the organization continues to be sustained by UVA students who are passionate about its mission. In the five years since its founding, participation has more than doubled, as many students at the university are interested in supporting its mission through either teaching in the classroom or working on curriculum development, publicity, financial sustainability, or teacher training. We work to sustain the CDL completely via grants, community sponsorships, and donations, accepting donations through the UVA Parents Fund.

In other small cities or more rural areas where there is not an easily accessed national structure for debate, think about who have already experienced the power of debate in their lives and would then be passionate about passing what they’ve experienced on to the next generation. The CDL would never survive without the undergraduate students who take hours each week to bring snacks, full energy, and well-reasoned lesson plans into a local school.

What is the highlight of the CDL experience so far? Our middle school debate competitions. These daylong events, held twice each academic semester, bring together the entire CDL community and show months of hard work and preparation. As teachers, we can see how students have learned to believe in their ability to improve. We often invite speakers, including professors who speak to the power of debate and parents who have worked in law or other fields where

What’s 2018-2019 look like for the CDL?

Answers provided by Caitlin Flanagan, former president of the CDL and current head teacher. Caitlin attended Rockbridge Academy in Millersville, Maryland, and is double-majoring in Political and Social Thought and English at UVA. Because of her experience with the CDL, Caitlin is considering spending more time teaching before going to law school.

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Donus D. Roberts Quad Ruby Coach Recognition The Association is proud to honor coaches who have earned their first 1,000 points.

Joseph Vincent Kalka Charles Bowler Bruce Harris Maryjane Burton Charles Hyatt, Ph.D. Brandon Johnson Brian J Winckler Stevan Jechura Alexander Corzo Tasha Rohlfs Charlie Stokes Jerrod Nelson Lauren Wells Alex Charlambides Chris James Jason Grubb Dawn Tucker Shree Awsare

East Grand Forks Sr. High School, MN Coronado High School, NV Mason High School, OH Choctaw Sr. High School, OK Lambert High School, GA South Albany High School, OR Grain Valley High, MO Maumee High School, OH South Plantation High School, FL Moorhead High School, MN Lakeville North High School, MN Wayzata High School, MN Southland College Prep Charter High School, IL Advanced Math & Science Academy Charter School, MA Leuzinger High School, CA Green River High School, WY Jonesboro High School, AR North Broward Preparatory School, FL

1,300 1,293 1,239 1,202 1,173 1,119 1,116 1,111 1,109 1,096 1,081 1,069 1,068 1,060 1,054 1,048 1,046 1,045

Kris Freitas Susan Jones Kelli Donais Robert Powers Keith George Shauna Wessely Aimee Sann Greg Titman Steven Zelubowski Allison Harmer Kathleen Uhnavy Matt Nagel Anna Frances Carmon Adam Leonard Gia Karpouzis Michael C. Ferguson Arielle Latiolais

Triple Ruby Coach Recognition Celebrating speech and debate coaches who have earned their first 750 points.

Blair Waite Sean Gabaree Jamie Rena Yung Susanne Williams Erin Pack-Jordan Steven Leal Philip Gabriel DiPiazza Rachel Baron Brendan Gorman Tanya Roundy Maclean Andrews Jessie Chen Brett Johnson Cathy Lynn Brown Lauren Sodono Ellen Robinson Thomas Thomsen Amy White Megan Justice Lannette Lahey Bonnie Ballard Heather Stringer Megan Helmick Kasey Ryan Willeby Hannah McCord James Stroud Cassie Doom Hendricks

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Abilene High School, KS Montgomery Blair High School, MD Van Horn High School, MO Nebraska City High School, NE Green Canyon High School, UT BASIS Independent Silicon Valley, CA Ronald Reagan High School, TX Riverdale Country School, NY Xaverian High School, NY Summit Academy High School, UT Gonzaga Prep High School, WA Asia American International Academy, TW Pillager Public Schools, MN Apopka Sr. High School, FL Matawan Regional High School, NJ North Raleigh Christian Academy, NC Mission San Jose High School, CA Muldrow High School, OK William G. Enloe High School, NC Lander Valley High School, WY Ridgeland High School, MS Princeton High School, TX Roseville Area High School, MN Foster High School, TX Cypress Lakes High School, TX W. B. Ray High School, TX Davis High School, UT

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940 862 858 855 855 853 853 850 849 841 832 825 821 819 817 816 808 807 807 799 797 795 790 786 783 781 781

Jenny Moses Jennifer Liddell Tammy Duvanel Unruh Ken Stocks Derek Sturm Jason Gattis Said Dibinga Cheryl Sneddon Jared Daggit Pollyanna Norman Parker Ryan McFarland Hayden Lewis Warren Kathleen Boyle Martene Campbell Peter Zopes Michael R. Sunga Emily Farnham Meredith Manda Skye Morgan Laura Mayberry Lesley Austin Kay Kehoe Dakota McCoy Kimberly A. Moore Deborah Nicholls Justin Kurup Diana Sayre

(March 5, 2018 through August 1, 2018)

Buhach Colony High School, CA Midway High School, TX Eastview High School, MN Cave Spring High School, VA Mankato East High School, MN Milton High School, WI Notre Dame Prep School, MD Danville Area High School, PA Chaminade High School, NY Elk River Sr. High School, MN Eagle Valley High School, CO Park City High School, UT Columbus East High School, IN Hunterdon Central Regional High School, NJ Bonita High School, CA Harding Charter Prep High School, OK Teurlings Catholic High School, LA

1,039 1,033 1,030 1,022 1,018 1,017 1,014 1,010 1,008 1,007 1,007 1,005 1,004 1,003 1,002 1,001 1,000

(March 5, 2018 through August 1, 2018)

Mount Saint Mary Academy, AR Hunter High School, UT Moundridge High School, KS Sanger High School, CA Helena High School, MT Pottsboro High School, TX New Design Charter School-University Park, CA Hillcrest High School, UT Prior Lake High School, MN Rossview High School, TN Kapaun Mount Carmel High School, KS Bingham High School, UT Munster High School, IN Episcopal Collegiate School, AR Chelmsford High School, MA Livingston High School, NJ Mustang High School, OK Los Altos High School, CA Petal High School, MS Corona Del Mar High School, CA Floyd Central High School, IN Wheaton Warrenville South High School, IL Chesterton High School, IN McKeesport Area High School, PA El Dorado High School, CA James Logan High School, CA Fox Chapel Area High School, PA

775 774 772 772 772 771 766 766 766 765 763 763 762 761 761 761 760 759 759 758 758 758 757 755 753 752 750


DEBATE & DEBATE & SPEECH SPEECH

AT IC, YOU WILL: ATCompete IC, YOU WILL: • at the highest levels of national and international • Compete at the highest levels competition. of national and international • competition. Earn scholarships and college credit for participating in speech • Earn scholarships and college and debate. credit for participating in speech debate.in all the available events. • and Participate • in all thewill available events. • Participate Develop skills that help you in your career. • Develop skills that will help you • in Beyour part career. of a close-knit team with

a winning tradition that traces Illinois College was proud to sponsor Lincoln-Douglas • Be part of a close-knit team with Debate at the 2018 NSDA National Tournament. back to Abraham Lincoln. a winning tradition that traces Illinois College was proud to sponsor Lincoln-Douglas Debate at the 2018 NSDA National Tournament. back to Abraham Lincoln. To learn more about competing for the Illinois College Debate and Speech Team, please contact Shawna Merrill, Head Coach of Speech and Debate, at shawna.merrill@ic.edu. To learn more about competing for the Illinois College Debate and Speech Team, please contact Shawna Merrill, Head Coach of Speech and Debate, at shawna.merrill@ic.edu.


The American Legion Oratorical Contest

LOOKING FOR COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS?  LOOK NO FURTHER. As part of the National Speech & Debate Association’s ongoing partnership with The American Legion, the top three finishers from the Legion’s National Oratorical Contest may earn the right to compete in Original Oratory or United States Extemp at the National Speech & Debate Tournament! The first-place finisher is awarded an $18,000 scholarship, second-place $16,000, and third-place $14,000. The scholarships may be used at any college or university in the United States.

Want to get involved? Follow these simple steps! • Visit www.legion.org/oratorical to learn more. • Click “Request Information” or contact your state’s American Legion Department to learn when the first contest will be. • Also click on “Assigned Topics” to learn the extemporaneous topic areas.

Carlissa Frederich of Kentucky placed first at the 2018 Oratorical Contest.

• Prepare your original oration on some aspect of the Constitution with emphasis on the duties and obligations of a citizen to our government.

Watch examples of past winning orations online at www.legion.org/oratorical/videos.


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www.speechanddebate.org Newsstand Price: $9.99 per issue Member Subscription: $24.99 for 5 issues Non-Member Subscription: $34.99 for 5 issues

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EF Hutton is a proud sponsor of the National Speech & Debate Association. Together with the NSDA, we promote communication arts and raise the skill level in the field of debate and speech.

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Profile for Speech & Debate

2018 September/October Rostrum  

Volume 93 Issue 1

2018 September/October Rostrum  

Volume 93 Issue 1

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