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Rostrum A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION

VOLUME 89 ISSUE 1 SU M M E R 2014

National Speech & Debate Tournament JUNE 15-20, 2014 • OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS

Circle of Champions!

Spark Leaders


FORENSICS Our 2014 Tournaments 12.06.14 Junior Hilltopper

offering competition in 11 jr. events!

12.12-13.14 Hilltopper Classic

our largest tournament of the year!

HILLTOPPER CLASSIC The 2013 Hilltopper Classic was a great experience which brought schools from all over the country. The 2014 Hilltopper Classic will be even better.

Hilltopper Classic events - Broadcast, Cong., Dec., DI, Duo, Ext., HI, Improv. Duo, Imp., OO, Poetry, POI, Prose, Pub. Forum, & Storytelling. || Junior Hilltopper events - Broadcast, Dec., Duo Act., Ext., Interp. of Lit., Improv. Duo, Poetry, Prose, Pub. Speaking, Solo Acting, & Storytelling. SemiďŹ nals for events with large entries. The Hilltopper Classic remains an NIETOC qualiďŹ er. Only a few tournaments across the country allow students to qualify for the NIETOC. We host both individual events and debate, over a two-day schedule!

WKU TEAM AUDITIONS Want to be a member of WKU Forensics? Auditions held Fri. morning, 2/12. Contact Ganer Newman at ganer.newman@wku.edu for a reservation.

Last year, team member auditions were a great success. Several students were selected to become WKU competitors, and some received scholarships.

I n t e r e s t e d i n H e a r i n g M o r e A b o u t W K U Fo r e n s i c s ? E m a i l g a n e r. n e w m a n @ w k u. e d u o r v i s i t w w w. w k u f o r e n s i c s. co m P h o n e ~ 2 7 0 . 7 4 5 . 6 3 4 0 Fo l l o w u s o n Tw i t t e r : @ w k u f o r e n s i c s


University of Texas University of Texas National Institute in Forensics National Institute in Forensics

!

 

Congratulations  on  another  fantastic  National  Tournament!   !"#$%&'()&'*"#+,,"#,&#"'-.%, /&#'&+'*! ,#/),#&'*"#&)+0 ,

The UTNIF would like to once again congratulate all of the very fine competitors and The UTNIF would like again congratulate all of the very fine competitors coaches who gave their alltoatonce last summer’s National Speech & Debate Tournament.

and coaches who gave their all at last summer’s NFL National Tournament in

As the culmination of all the passion, dedication, and hard work of the season, the Indianapolis, Indiana. National Tournament truly represents the best of our community. In the 2014-2015 As the the culmination ofcontinue all the passion, and hard of the season, season, UTNIF will to do its dedication, part in contributing to work the Association’s long tradition of excellence and integrity in speech and debate education. the NFL tournament truly represents the best of our community. In 2013, the

UTNIF will continue to do its part in contributing to the NFL’s long tradition of

As you beginand theintegrity new competitive year, wedebate encourage you to keep us in mind. Consider excellence in speech and education. joining us in the summer of 2015 to see for yourself why last summer’s UTNIF was one of largest and speech and debate workshops we’ve last 20 Asthe you begin themost newsuccessful competitive year, we encourage you to keeprun us in inthe mind. years. Join us next summer and see for yourself why the UTNIF is one of the largest

and most successful speech and debate workshops in the country. Our alumni

Our alumni have championships won national championships and advanced to final rounds in the House, have won NFL and NFL final rounds in the House, the Senate, the Senate, Public Forum, Policy Debate, U.S. Extemp, Extemp Commentary, Impromptu Public Forum, Policy Debate, US Extemp, Extemp Commentary, Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Poetry, and more.

Speaking, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Poetry and more.

UTNIF UTNIF Dept. Dept.of ofCommunication Communication Studies Studies 11University UniversityStation, Station, A1105 A1105 Austin, Austin,TX TX78705 78705

www.utspeech.net www.utspeech.net www.utdebatecamp.com www.utdebatecamp.com phone: (512) (512)471-5518 471-5518 phone: jvreed@austin.utexas.edu jvreed@austin.utexas.edu


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In this Issue : V o l u m e 8 9 : I s s u e 1 : SUMME R 2 0 1 4

From the Cover

Inside

38

4

From the Editor

5

2014-2015 Topics

23

Get With the Program

2014 National Tournament Photos and Results

Features 9

Board of Directors Spring Minutes

12

IPPF Kicks Off 14th Annual Competition

16

Go All In: Highlights from the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference

20

Website Update: A Tour of Your Custom Dashboard

30

2015-2016 Policy Debate Topic Synopsis

36

Help Us Share Your Stories!

96

Middle School Nationals Results

108 Coach Profile:

Jan Friedman-Pizzo and Lynn Pizzo 110

Alumni Spotlight: Saeed Jones

102 In Memoriam – Richard B. Sodikow: A Life Well-Lived by James M. Copeland 104 In Memoriam – Frank Sferra: “I’m In This For Kids” by James M. Copeland

Like us on Facebook /speechanddebate Share with us on Instagram /speechanddebate Follow us on Twitter @speechanddebate

Editor’s Note As a reminder, Rostrum has moved to a quarterly publication cycle (Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring). Watch for each issue to arrive in September, November, February, and April—or check us out online! If you would like to submit an article or advertise with us, see our submission guidelines at www.speechanddebate.org/rostrum.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 3


From the Editor

Board of Directors

The National Speech & Debate Tournament returned to the state of Kansas in June—this time hosted by the East Kansas and Three Trails Districts—and once again, we were not disappointed! We owe much of the tournament’s success to the support and dedication of our local hosts, led by co-chairs Steve and Cathy Wood. Their entire committee put in a tremendous amount of hard work, and I wish to commend them on a job well done. We also cannot forget the countless coaches, tournament officials, and national office staff who put in long hours behind the scenes, leading up to and during the event, to run another smooth and efficient tournament. Most importantly, I want to thank our student competitors for their outstanding contributions throughout the week. Whether on or off the big stage, I am continually amazed at the many accomplishments of our talented young people. It is because of our students that we do what we do—and I am honored to say that, together, we are giving youth a voice. With the tournament not far behind us, staff and coaches began preparing for the fourth biennial Summer Leadership Conference in July. We were thrilled to meet with regional leaders from across the country to share best practices and discuss exciting new efforts on the horizon. We have big plans for this year, some of which are highlighted in this issue—including the development of many more member resources, a new partnership to help preserve the history of our activity, and the creation of helpful new tools to foster a culture of engagement and build community at the local level. Thanks again to everyone involved in making this summer an enjoyable and memorable one! I look forward to seeing all of you June 14-19, 2015, when the National Tournament returns to Dallas, Texas. Until then, I wish you the best of luck as a new competition season gets underway. Sincerely,

J. Scott Wunn Executive Director National Speech & Debate Association

A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION 125 Watson Street, PO Box 38, Ripon, WI 54971-0038 | Phone (920) 748-6206 | Fax (920) 748-9478

Vicki Pape, Assistant Editor Emily Bratton, Graphic Design Assistant

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES Individuals: $15 for one year | $25 for two years Member Schools: $15 for each additional subscription

(USPS 471-180) (ISSN 1073-5526) Rostrum is published quarterly (Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring) by the National Speech & Debate Association, 125 Watson Street, PO Box 38, Ripon, WI 54971. Periodical postage paid at Ripon, WI 54971. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to National Speech & Debate Association, 125 Watson Street, PO Box 38, Ripon, WI 54971. Rostrum provides a forum for the speech and debate community. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own and not necessarily the opinions of the Association, its officers, or its members. The National Speech & Debate Association does not guarantee advertised products and services unless sold directly by the Association.

4

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014

Pam Cady Wycoff, Vice President Apple Valley High School 14450 Hayes Road Apple Valley, MN 55124-6796 (952) 431-8200 Pam.Wycoff@district196.org Polly Reikowski, Ph.D., Admin Rep Eagan High School 4185 Braddock Trail Eagan, MN 55123 (651) 683-6902 polly.reikowski@district196.org Kandi King 6058 Gaelic San Antonio, TX 78240 (210) 641-6761 mamakjking@yahoo.com Tommie Lindsey, Jr. James Logan High School 1800 H Street Union City, CA 94587 (510) 471-2520, Ext. 4408 Tommie_Lindsey@nhusd.k12.ca.us Pamela K. McComas PO Box 5078 Topeka, KS 66605 (785) 231-7414 pmcco@cox.net David Huston Colleyville Heritage High School 5401 Heritage Avenue Colleyville, TX 76034 (817) 305-4700, Ext. 214 david.huston@gcisd.net

Rostrum

J. Scott Wunn, Editor and Publisher

Don Crabtree, President Park Hill High School 1909 6th Avenue St. Joseph, MO 64505 (816) 261-2661 crabnfl@gmail.com

James W. “Jay” Rye, III The Montgomery Academy 3240 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36106 (334) 272-8210 jay_rye@montgomeryacademy.org Jon Cruz The Bronx High School of Science 75 West 205th Street Bronx, NY 10468 (718) 817-7700 cruz@bxscience.edu Jennifer Jerome, Alternate Millard West High School 5710 S. 176th Avenue Omaha, NE 68135 (402) 715-6000 (school office) (402) 715-6092 (classroom) jjerome1984@gmail.com


www.speechanddebate.org

2014–2015

Topics

Current topics and resources are available at:

www.speechanddebate.org/topics

Topic Release Information Public Forum Topic Release Dates August 15

September/October Topic

October 1

November Topic

November 1

December Topic

December 1

January Topic

January 1

February Topic

February 1

March Topic

March 1

April Topic

May 1

National Tournament Topic

Lincoln-Douglas Topic Release Dates August 15

September/October Topic

October 1

November/December Topic

December 1

January/February Topic

February 1

March/April Topic

May 1

National Tournament Topic

2015–2016 Policy Debate Topic Voting • • • •

Topic synopsis printed in this issue of Rostrum (pages 30-31) Preliminary voting occurs online in September-October Final voting occurs online in November-December Topic for 2015-2016 released by the NFHS in January 2015

September/OCTOBER 2014

Public Forum Debate

Resolved: On balance, public subsidies for professional athletic organizations in the United States benefit their local communities.

September/October 2014

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Resolved: A just society ought to presume consent for organ procurement from the deceased.

2014–2015

Policy Debate

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its nonmilitary exploration and/or development of the Earth’s oceans.

2014–2015 PARTNER CONTEST

International Public Policy Forum Remember, chapter advisors and member students are eligible to vote online for debate topics! The Association also suggests a NOVICE Lincoln-Douglas Debate topic that may be used during the first two months of a novice season. For details, visit www.speechanddebate.org/topics.

Resolved: Mass surveillance is not a justified method of governmental intelligence gathering. 2014–2015 PARTNER CONTEST

American Legion Oratorical Contest See page 8 for details.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 5


Special thanks to all of our exhibitors at the 2014 National Tournament Expo in Overland Park, Kansas! • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3P Speech, LLC Always Writing 4 U American Legion Beyond Resolved Bickel & Brewer The Black Book Depot Champion Briefs Colorado College Council on Foreign Relations ExtempRelief Florida Forensic Institute The Forensics Files George Mason University Gustavus Adolphus College Illinois State University The Institute for Speech and Debate The Interp Store The Joy of Tournaments Kansas State University Marian University Missouri State University Missouri Western State University Nebraska Debate Institute NFHS Oklahoma City University Ozark Delight Candy The Perfect Performance Pi Kappa Delta Randall McCutcheon Ripon College Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation Simpson College SpeechGeek Southwest Speech & Debate Institute Trinity University The University of Alabama UTNIF Victory Briefs Western Kentucky University William Carey University


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American Legion Oratorical Contest As part of the National Speech & Debate Association’s ongoing partnership with the American Legion, the top three finishers from the Legion’s National Oratorical Contest may earn the right to compete in Original Oratory or United States Extemporaneous Speaking at the National Speech & Debate Tournament! The first-place finisher is awarded an $18,000 scholarship, second-place $16,000, and third-place $14,000. The scholarships may be used at any college or university in the United States.

 Want to get involved? Follow these simple steps! • Visit www.legion.org/oratorical to learn more. • Click “Request Information” or contact your state’s American Legion Department to learn when the first contest will be. • Also click on “Assigned Topics” to learn the extemporaneous topic areas. • Prepare your original oration on some aspect of the Constitution with emphasis on the duties and obligations of a citizen to our government.

Ashwath Kumar of Missouri placed first at the 2014 Oratorical Contest, hosted in Indianapolis.


Leadership Board of Directors Spring Minutes

T

he National Speech & Debate Association Board of Directors held its spring meeting in Overland Park, KS on April 13-15, 2014. Present were President Don Crabtree, Vice President Pam Cady Wycoff, Kandi King, Pam McComas, Tommie Lindsey, Jr., David Huston, Steven Schappaugh, and alternate Jay Rye. Directors Timothy Sheaff and Brother Kevin Dalmasse, FSC were also present for portions of the meeting. President Crabtree called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m.

National Tournament Procedures Moved by Huston, seconded by King: “In supplemental and consolation events, if the threshold for utilizing judges from a state is too high to maximize judge assignments, a state may be divided geographically to meet the needs of the tournament. If this occurs, priority one will be to place two students from geographically diverse parts of the state together in a section with a neutral judge to adjudicate; and second, a student from a separate part of the state will be judged by an adjudicator from another geographical location within the state.” Passed: 9-0 Aye: McComas, Wycoff, Sheaff, King, Huston, Lindsey, Crabtree, Schappaugh, Rye Due to the high volume of competitors from particular states at the National Tournament, it may become necessary at times (depending on re-registration numbers) to pair students and judges from geographically different parts of the same state in the same section of a supplemental or

www.speechanddebate.org

April 13-15, 2014 Overland Park, Kansas

consolation event to maximize the use of available judges. This practice only applies to supplemental speech events, not Extemporaneous Debate or main events, and will occur only as needed.

Governance Moved by Lindsey, seconded by Huston: “Increase annual school membership fees to $149 per year and increase the lifetime individual membership fee to $20.” Passed: 7-1 Aye: McComas, Wycoff, Sheaff, King, Huston, Lindsey, Crabtree No: Rye For more information on the fee increases for the 20142015 school year, please go to www.speechanddebate.org/ FeeFAQ.

Moved by Wycoff, seconded by Lindsey: “The Association will initiate a specific program, designed to promote and facilitate financial support to assist with chapter fees, membership fees, or resource packages for schools in need.” Passed: 8-0 Aye: McComas, Wycoff, King, Huston, Lindsey, Crabtree, Schappaugh, Rye In addition to grant dollars provided by the Association from its own external fundraising efforts, this program would create avenues for individuals, businesses, charitable groups, Association members, alumni, and chapters to

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 9


Spring Minutes (continued) provide opportunities and resources for programs in need starting in the 2014-2015 school year. A session at the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference has been designated for district leaders, staff, and Board members to develop a framework for a program that will provide the most benefit to schools in need of assistance.

Moved by Rye, seconded by McComas: “The Governance Committee will come forward with a recommendation for an administrative representative to fill the seat of Brother Kevin Dalmasse.” Passed: 9-0 Aye: McComas, Dalmasse, Wycoff, King, Huston, Lindsey, Crabtree, Schappaugh, Rye The Board would like to thank Brother Kevin Dalmasse for his four years of commitment and service as the Boardappointed administrative representative on the Board of Directors. A new representative, chosen by the Board, will serve a two-year term beginning September 1, 2014.

Competition and Membership Rules and Procedures Moved by Wycoff, seconded by Rye: “Move that the implementation of new evidence rules scheduled for 2014-15 school year be postponed for one year to allow survey feedback solicited from the membership to be reviewed sufficiently and revisions adopted if needed.” Passed: 7-0-1 Aye: Wycoff, Crabtree, McComas, Huston, Schappaugh, King, Rye Abstain: Lindsey Over the next three months, an ad hoc committee of Board-appointed coaches and Board members will revise the current draft of evidence rules utilizing the extensive member feedback received. During the 2014-2015 district competition season, districts will again have the autonomy to use and test the newest version of pilot evidence rules. Feedback from that round of pilot testing will be used by

10

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014

the ad hoc committee to develop a proposed set of final policies with a goal of Board approval in the Spring of 2015 and full implementation in the Fall of 2015. The current evidence rules will remain in place for the 2014 and 2015 National Tournaments.

Moved by King, seconded by McComas: “Any behavior unbecoming a member of the honor society of the National Speech & Debate Association may result in restriction of participation in Association competition, temporary deactivation of membership, and/or removal of membership in the organization. All violations will result in notification to chapter adviser and school administration.” Passed: 8-0 Aye: McComas, Wycoff, King, Huston, Lindsey, Crabtree, Schappaugh, Rye The Board of Directors has now reaffirmed the importance of Association members upholding the tenets of the Code of Honor and clarified the potential results of violations.

Ad Hoc Committees Established The Board agreed to establish three ad hoc committees with the following goals: • Discuss and review policies and procedures regarding non-profit and for profit after-school educational programs, home schools, online schools, and hybrid programs, and how each of those entities relates to membership. The committee will report its recommendations to the Board at the Fall meeting. • Revise the draft evidence rules incorporating current and conceptualized future feedback from members. • Finalize the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference workshop topics and agenda.

The meeting adjourned Tuesday afternoon.


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International Public Policy Forum (IPPF) Kicks Off 14th Annual Competition by Katherine Leal Unmuth, Media & Community Relations Coordinator, Bickel & Brewer Hamilton High School from Arizona was named the 2013-14 IPPF World Champion, receiving a $10,000 grand prize and the “Bickel & Brewer Cup.” They are seen here with Bickel & Brewer Partner William Brewer (right).

Nuclear weapons proliferation. Climate change. Space exploration. These are just a few of the topics that students participating in the International Public Policy Forum (IPPF) have tackled over the years. Sponsored by the Bickel & Brewer Foundation and New York University, the IPPF is the only competition in which high school students from around the world are able to debate urgent public policy questions in both the written and spoken form. “The IPPF challenges students to delve deeply into issues of critical importance,” said William A. Brewer III, a partner at Bickel & Brewer law firm and a founder of the IPPF. “They must employ strong analytical, writing and speaking skills as

12

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014

they debate their counterparts from around the world.” Teams compete for the chance to be part of the “Elite 8” and win an allexpenses-paid trip to the IPPF Finals in New York City. The IPPF Champion wins a $10,000 grand prize, half of which goes toward the school debate program and half toward student scholarships. All public and private high school students are welcome to participate, free of charge. The 2014-15 topic is “Resolved: Mass surveillance is not a justified method of governmental intelligence gathering.” The qualifying round essay, limited to 2,800 words, must affirm or negate the topic resolution. Judges evaluate each

essay, and the top 64 teams advance into a single-elimination, written debate competition. Essays for the 14th annual competition are due on Wednesday, October 22. Sarah Burgess coached the 2013-14 IPPF Champion team from Hamilton High School in Chandler, Arizona, and the runner-up team the year before. She is familiar with what it takes to advance in the competition’s written rounds. “IPPF topics involve a broad range of science, ethics, and issues relating to current events that are often rapidly changing,” she said. “You have to do your research through scholarly articles, but you have to keep up with the news in the world, too.” Burgess has advice for students entering the IPPF competition. “There has to be an interest in the topic itself and a willingness to put in the intensive research, which I think is the real key,” she said. “It also takes a willingness to work together to write and rewrite and rewrite—until your arguments are clear.” Last year, 266 teams representing 37 U.S. states and 29 countries participated in the contest. In the 2013-14 competition, for the first time since its founding, the IPPF featured a “Top 64” round,


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allowing more teams than ever before to participate in the written debate rounds of the competition. In the round of 64, schools volley essays back and forth via email. Judges review the essays in the order they are presented (affirmative constructive, negative constructive, affirmative rebuttal, negative rebuttal) and select the advancing teams. The written debate process continues for several rounds, as the teams advance to the “Top 32,” and “Sweet 16” rounds of competition. The “Elite 8” teams go on to compete in oral debates at the IPPF Finals in New York City. The 2013-14 competition topic was “Resolved: As a last resort, unilateral military force is justified to minimize nuclear weapons proliferation.” Five students were on the IPPF Champion Hamilton High team, including three who took part in the oral debate portion in New York. All the students reviewed white papers, government releases, news stories, and other research while working on their essays. On weekends, students often would meet to work on writing and rewriting their essays. The students also prepped for oral debates with Burgess, who peppered them with tough questions challenging their arguments. Hamilton team member Gokul Ramadoss, 17, stressed the importance of staying on top of current events

throughout the competition. He recalled that after the team submitted its qualifying paper, students had to shift gears when the United States and Iran signed an agreement, in which Iran pledged to scale back its nuclear program. Their first paper had focused almost entirely on Iran being a major nuclear threat. “That made us really cautious for the rest of the tournament,” Ramadoss said. “We were constantly fact-checking ourselves with updated evidence, making

sure that what was true a few weeks ago was still true. There were constant news developments.” Working as a team was key. Some team members had debate experience, and others were beginners. “Everyone should specialize in a different part of the process,” Ramadoss advised. “We all had different strengths. Finding out how the team is going to work together with their different strengths is something you need to determine early on.”

IPPF @ DDI This July, the Debate Institutes at Dartmouth (DDI) held its first summer workshop devoted to the International Public Policy Forum (IPPF). The IPPF session was offered to beginner debaters, in hopes of utilizing the IPPF to hone their writing and advocacy skills. The week-long IPPF session focused on helping students develop argumentation, writing and public speaking skills necessary to succeed in the IPPF format. Students also conducted research on the 2014-2015 IPPF topic, “Resolved: Mass surveillance is not a justified method of governmental intelligence gathering,” and began writing their qualifying round essays. “It was great to be able to discuss the basics of argumentation and give them a competition that is immediately due,” DDI co-director Nicole Wanzer-Serrano said. “The best part is that we knew it was in a form each of the students could engage in at home.” In addition to working on their essays, students participated in verbal debates on the topic. Following the oral debates, they revised and added to their essays.

One of many photos instructors at the Dartmouth Debate Institutes posted on Twitter during the IPPF Beginners Workshop. The camp focused on preparing students to compete in the IPPF.

“The end result is that they walked away with a better potential essay in the fall,” Wanzer-Serrano added. DDI sessions are held at Dartmouth University in Hanover, New Hampshire, and are considered among the most prestigious debate workshops in the country.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 13


In addition to focusing on good writing, Hamilton team member Jessica Li, 17, emphasized the importance of logical writing. “In high school we had to write persuasive papers, but I never had to go into as much depth and specificity as in our IPPF essays,” Li said. “It was a departure from our normal school essays because everything had to be very clear and concise. With that word limit you didn’t have words to waste.” Team member Andy Yuwen, 17, also had some words of advice on the qualifying round. “Don’t wait until the last moment to complete your papers,” he said. “Especially with the qualifying paper; you need to finish it well ahead of time. Then you have time to get peoples’ opinions and change it and really perfect it to make sure you qualify. Make sure you scrutinize every last word in your paper and that you mean what you say and can defend every last point.” In March, the “Elite 8” teams are announced. These teams receive an allexpenses-paid trip to New York City to compete in the IPPF Finals during the oral debate rounds at the Harold Pratt House. In last year’s competition, the teams competing in the “Elite 8” represented schools in five U.S. states, Slovakia, Singapore, and Taiwan. “It was cool to see how countries view not only debate, but international politics,” Ramadoss said. “Any time a competition is international you’re going to get a lot of different perspectives. It’s

definitely going to be more rewarding because you learn a lot more.” Thousands of people from 39 different countries also watched the debates online last year. The oral debate proceedings are judged by experts in law, business, debate, politics, and academia. The students are posed questions by judges who are experts in the fields they are studying, challenging them to explain the nuances of their arguments. Past judges have included NYU President John Sexton; Bickel & Brewer Partner William A. Brewer III; Ret. General Wesley Clark; National Speech & Debate Association Executive Director Scott Wunn; former New York City Deputy Mayor Howard Wolfson; and NASA astronaut Mike Massimino; to name a few. Yuwen said that students found deep meaning through the contest, knowing that they were addressing topics that are being debated at the highest international level, among presidents of countries. “We were really debating real life issues and real policymaking,” he said. “That prepares you for real life beyond high school and college.” Students can register for the 2014-15 competition online by visiting www.ippfdebate.com. The website features a topic primer, sample essays, and an MLA formatting guide. Those interested can also visit the IPPF Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ IPPFdebate or follow on Twitter at @IPPF1.

(above) Held on the NYU campus, the IPPF Welcome Reception gives “Elite 8” teams a chance to meet and mingle before the Saturday debates. • (below) The team from Hathaway Brown School in Ohio poses with NYU President John Sexton (left) and Bickel & Brewer Partner William Brewer (right) before the final debate.

(below left) Students from Plano West Sr. High School in Texas attend a Welcome Reception on the NYU Campus during IPPF Finals Weekend. • (below right) Students from Hamilton High School respond to questions from the judges during the final debate. The team won the 2013-14 competition, taking home a $10,000 grand prize.

For more information or to register, visit www.IPPFdebate.com.

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TOP 64 TEAMS EARN CASH AWARDS. TOP 8 TEAMS EARN ALL-EXPENSES-PAID TRIPS TO NEW YORK CITY. IPPF CHAMPION TAKES HOME $10,000.

ARE YOU READY TO TAKE ON THE WORLD?

Register today at: www.ippfdebate.com


Highlights from the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference

T

he Summer Leadership

Building Community

Conference is many things. It

To get started toward those goals, the

is a gathering of individuals

conference began with sharing ideas for

committed to their teams, to their

engaging more local coaches and other

districts, and to the activity of speech and

community members, including parents,

debate. It is an opportunity to connect

teachers, businesses, and alumni. The

the thoughts, experiences, ideas, and

staff presentation, “Building Community

future goals of those individuals, piecing

at the District Level,” provided ideas for

together a collage of overlapping but

districts to share the work of running

very diverse backgrounds, challenges, and

tournaments, obtaining financial and

outlooks. Perhaps most importantly, it

volunteer support, developing regional

is a momentum-builder—an energizing

resources, and recruiting and mentoring

reminder of the power of our activity

schools with people outside the district

and the opportunity to see how both the

committee.

things that motivate us and the things

Initial Conference Goals

that challenge us are universal—you are

As a national office staff and Board,

out there we can tap into through our

not alone in this work!

we wanted to:

volunteer structure. At the national

• Explore and identify ways to

office, we’re creating new resources

The theme of this year’s conference was “Go All In.” This was not a suggestion

collaborate further with district

specifically designed for districts to

to put it all on the line at the poker table

leadership, and, by extension, with

accomplish many of those things.

at the Golden Nugget (though some did!).

coaches across the country.

The Building Community Toolkit is

• Learn how we can continue to

available to all coaches by logging in

Our sessions were designed to create opportunities for further engagement,

support member programs, coaches,

to our website and selecting “District

and to identify how our members want to

and students through resources,

Leader Resources” on your dashboard.

be engaged. This brief article is designed

recognition, and opportunities.

If something there sparks your interest,

to remind us of the great work we have to

• Spend some time defining all of our

please reach out to your district

do moving forward, while having a little

roles, including staff and district

committee and express your desire to

fun along the way. So let’s get started!

leadership, in direct relation to our

help out!

mission and vision.

16

There is a lot of talent and passion

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Conference Attendee Goals

network, build enthusiasm, meet new

This year, 80 coaches representing 47

coaches, experience mutual support,

districts were in attendance. We asked each of these leaders to tell us what

and connect with friends. • Our leaders were particularly

they were looking for at the start of the

interested in learning about the new

conference. Their answers were telling!

website, fundraising tips, evidence and

We learned:

rules, rural and small school support,

• Our leaders are adaptable. They were

and growing programs in their district.

very eager for new ideas, strategies, insights, direction, and purpose. • Our leaders like each other! Several mentioned the opportunity to

• Our leaders wanted to see Executive Director Scott Wunn dressed up as Elvis. (Unfortunately, that didn’t happen.) continued on next page »

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 17


Go All In (continued)

Below are just a few of the many testimonials we received from district leaders following the conference.

Some Takeaways We have several ideas and subjects to further explore, implement, and follow-up on. Some highlights include: • Creating dedicated resources for middle school programs • Facilitating a committee to address diversity and gender inequity in speech and debate

“I love this conference. The enthusiasm is contagious and the connections are priceless!” — Jan Heiteen, Illini District “I liked the balance of ‘district administration’ and ‘team administration’ sessions. In addition, the discussions of rules, evidence, and events really made us feel empowered as leaders and change agents in the organization.” — David Yastremski, New Jersey District

• Building press release and newsletter templates and collecting best practices about communication strategies • Exploring the use of eReaders in interpretation events • Incorporating guidance from leaders on the suggested updates to the piloted evidence rules for debate • Including leaders’ ideas related to future features in our next phases of

“I got so much more than I expected from this conference. Every session offered something I could take home and use with my students as well as my district!” — Christy Briggs, Sagebrush (NV) District “I found so much inspiration and new friendships. I felt cared about. I took a fresh look at the importance of what I do. It was amazing to be surrounded by other coaches who share my passion.” — Suzanne Terry, Tennessee District

website improvement

Watch  THE  Video:

Building Community at the District Level

See For Yourself! All coaches can view videos of the conference sessions and access related materials by logging in to your account at www.speechanddebate.org, then selecting “District Leader Resources” on your dashboard.

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We invite all coaches to view the Summer Leadership Conference presentation that introduced the concept of community-building and the various roles designed to help share work at the local level (communications, programs, operations, support, and engagement). You may also check out the other resources available— everything from tournament logistics and hospitality guides to tips for fundraising and hosting a fall workshop! Log in to your account at www.speechanddebate.org and select “District Leader Resources” on your dashboard.


Website Update: A Tour of Your Custom Dashboard

A

www.speechanddebate.org

s the largest interscholastic speech and debate organization in the world, the National Speech & Debate Association provides an extensive wealth of resources, opportunities, professional support, and development to students, coaches, teachers, and alumni. As a member of the Association, you gain access to a vast array of tools, programming, and training developed by veterans in the speech and debate community. We encourage you to take advantage of these resources by creating an account on our website, www.speechanddebate.org. From there, you’ll be able to manage your profile, track standings, register for webinars, watch hundreds of instructional and performance videos, and so much more! Check out the opposite page for a quick tutorial on getting started. Whether you’re launching a new program at your school or advancing your skill set as a longtime coach—we’re here to support you every step of the way!

Questions? Don’t hesitate to contact us at info@speechanddebate.org or call (920) 748-6206.

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www.speechanddebate.org

Our Website

www.speechanddebate.org

Student Login To access resources, attend webinars, watch final round videos, vote on topics, and more, students need to create an account on our website at www.speechanddebate.org. Creating a login is quick and easy:

1.

From our home page, click "Current and Alumni Members" in the top bar. Then, select "Create An Account" in the drop down menu to view the "Sign Up" page.

2. On the Sign Up page, select "Student" role. 3. Choose your state or region. 4. Choose "High School" or "Middle School" and then find and select your school in the list.

5. Find and select your name in the drop down list. If you cannot find your name, please type it in the field below.

6. Fill out the other required information fields on the 7.

bottom of the page and submit your information. Once you have activated your account, your registration is complete! Log in and you will be taken to your dashboard where you can find all of your resources.

Your Custom Dashboard Accessing Resources Logging in to our website will automatically take each user to a custom dashboard based on your role. Coaches and students are presented with links to content specifically designed for their needs. The coach dashboard is a gateway to:

1. Enter points 2. See upcoming webinars 3. Access resources 4. Manage your team 5. View important alerts 6. Quick access to useful links . . . and MORE!

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Have a Speech or Debate Coaching Position to Fill? This ad space could be yours! As a service to member schools, the

Association offers complimentary employment listings in Rostrum and also on our website at www.speechanddebate.org/jobs. For $100, you may reserve a third-page print ad with custom font, images, and more. We’ll even help you design your ad!

Contact Emily at emily.bratton@speechanddebate.org or call (920) 748-6206 to reserve your ad today!


www.speechanddebate.org

SPARK INSIGHT

Get With the Program: New Resources, Call for Volunteers, and More!

A

s the 2014-15 school season comes into full swing, the National Speech & Debate Association is thrilled to have already released some exciting materials for members of our organization. More importantly, we are energized by the plans we have in place as the season continues. Here’s a sneak peek into our Programs & Education division. This year our programming emphasis is on answering the question “How?” Instead of merely explaining what something is, or what something looks like, we want to go deeper. The goal is to create a platform of resources that assists coaches, students, and judges in gaining a more comprehensive understanding of a multitude of topics. New coaches can expect insights from previous new coaches, coaching guides, enhanced competition events materials, and more. Returning coaches can expect access to more webinars, more lesson plan materials, more practicespecific resources, and more. Students can expect thorough topic analyses for debate, works cited pages to guide research, literature reviews for Interp selections, sample Congress legislation, practice Extemp

Meet some of the coach volunteers providing resources to our community! WHO: David Abel WHAT: Offering a webinar about best practices for returning district chairs David Abel has been a member of the National Speech & Debate Association from his high school days of 1972-75. As the chapter advisor for Goddard High School, David has been a district committee member in the Sunflower Kansas district from its creation in 1999 and has served as the chair of the Sunflower district since 2008. In 2011, he was named District Chair of the Year, and in 2014 was awarded Best District Chair Communications.

WHO: Bryan Gaston WHAT: Hosting a webinar with his thoughts on the 2014-15 Policy Debate topic In his 11 year tenure at Heritage Hall, Bryan Gaston has qualified numerous Policy teams to the TOC, 16 teams to the National Speech & Debate Tournament, and won the Oklahoma state Policy title six times. He was the Assistant Debate Coach at the University of Central Oklahoma for two years while completing his M.Ed. While earning a B.S. in Speech Communication at Middle Tennessee State University, Bryan was a successful member of the Policy Debate team and an All American debater.

To get involved, email Steve Schappaugh, Director of Programs & Education, at steve.schappaugh@speechanddebate.org.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 23


questions, insights from past champion-caliber alumni of the Association, Oratory insights from champion-caliber coaches on topic selection and keeping a topic fresh, and more. Judges can expect enhanced judge training materials, sample performances with commentary, sample ballots, and more. We are promising a great deal! We are confident we will be able to meet these objectives (and more) during the 2014-15 school year. One of the main reasons we will be able to produce all of these wonderful resources is because of you! The National Speech & Debate Association is a collection of the best and brightest minds in speech and debate. You can be an incredibly valuable resource to this entire process. Ask yourself what you are passionate about in speech and debate. Ask yourself what others could learn from you. As a member of the Association, you are part of a vast network. Imagine if every coach provided one resource! Imagine if every kid, from programs without the resources of some schools, had increased access to resources. Imagine if an administrator saw something his or her school should do, and it led to more opportunities for speech and debate. Now imagine how you can be instrumental to this possibility. Additionally, coaches should feel free to ask themselves what the organization can do better! What is the organization missing? What could be enhanced? We want to know that, too! The Programs & Education Department is going to work extremely hard at providing many quality resources throughout the year.

Meet some of the coach volunteers providing resources to our community! WHO: Father Michael Tidd, OSB WHAT: Providing monthly topic analysis for Public Forum Debate Father Michael Tidd, OSB is a Benedictine of Saint Mary’s Abbey in Morristown, NJ and a teacher of History at Delbarton School. He has coached speech and debate since 1988. Father Michael serves on the Association’s Public Forum Topic Committee, and he also teaches at the Institute for Speech and Debate in Charlotte, NC. Since 2010, at least one Delbarton PF team has placed in the top 14 at the National Speech & Debate Tournament, with a national champion team in 2011.

WHO: Jacquelyn Young WHAT: Offering a webinar on interpretation for students and coaches Jacquelyn Young is beginning her 37th year of teaching with 32 years in the Blue Springs, MO school district. She has a teaching degree in speech and dramatic education and advanced degrees in English and at-risk education. Her coaching accomplishments include several state finalists and 14 state champions. Jacci has coached many elimination round participants at the National Speech & Debate Tournament including six finalists and national champions in Duo Interpretation and Poetry Reading. Her team has won a School of Honor and two School of Excellence awards.

Not only that, but we are committed to being responsive to our membership. We’ve already begun producing new resources in-house. However, through discussions at the Summer Leadership Conference, survey results, and other face-to-face communication, we know that coaches want to help! We know you have things to offer, and we want you to know we’re excited to partner with you! That partnership can be in

the form of submitting resources to be shared, or giving us ideas of where gaps exist in our current materials. We look forward to an exciting year of increased quantity and quality of resources for our membership. Together, we can make a positive difference in giving youth a voice through competitive speech and debate.

To get involved, email Steve Schappaugh, Director of Programs & Education, at steve.schappaugh@speechanddebate.org.

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New Items are Here!

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store.speechanddebate.org

visit us online


DEBATE - SPEECH

FUNDRAISER

Sample Fundraising Page

Fundraising for your Debate Team just got easier!

Give For Growth provides team members with their own personal online fundraising page. Coaches easily oversee the entire process with no accounting or logistics required. View a sample fundraiser at GiveForGrowth.org/727

Contact Dr. Phyllis Pacilli – National Representative 888-985-GIVE (4483) Debate@GiveForGrowth.com

3.

1.

4.

Contact us today to set up your schools’ Debate Team Fundraiser. • We make it easy with a five day payment turnaround and one report breakdown of what each student raised. • Great fundraising returns with no startup fees or investment required. • Hassle free implementation with our provided postcard explainer and student sign up page at GiveToDebate.com.

2.

Powered by 4. Message describes purpose of fundraiser

Congratulations to our winners from the 2014 National Tournament program book!

Best District Ads New England (MA & NH) District Chair: Marc Rischitelli

Louisiana

District Chair: Cheryl Gilmore

Contact Emily Bratton at emily.bratton@speechanddebate.org or (920) 748-6206 for more information about advertising in the 2015 National Tournament program book.


Policy Debate Primer

(for Policy Debate coaches who are virtually clueless about Policy Debate)

By Glenda Ferguson, Coppell HS, TX (who once didn’t have a clue either)

Former National Speech & Debate Association Executive Board Member National Speech & Debate Association Four-Diamond Coach Emory Barkley Key Coach National Speech & Debate Association Hall of Fame NDCA Educator of the Year 2009 National Debate Coaches Association Board Member This is a manual/text on DVD which can be changed as needed. The table of contents is listed below. The cost is $35. Please send checks to: Glenda Ferguson, 1707 Turtle Rock Court, Carrollton, Texas 75007. The DVD will be sent immediately. Please send your name and address where you would like to have the DVD mailed and your check. If you have any questions, email gferguson@coppellisd.com. There are explanations and ideas for assignments as well as tests and answers.

Some of the Contents: • What Is Debate? • Resolution And Affirmative Cases • Definition Briefs • The Affirmative Case • Desalination Case • All Cross-Examination Speeches with Examples • The Disadvantage • All Stock Issues

• Different Types Of Topicality • Topicality Examples • The Counterplan • The Kritik • The Negative Arguments • The Affirmative Responsibilities and Answers • Brief Writing • Argument Labels • Judging and Writing a Ballot

• Judging Scenarios • Words Your Kids Need to Know • Sources Delivery • Partners • Filing • Win 10 More Rounds • Flowing • Public Forum Debate • Example Tests With Answers


Beyond Resolved:

A Public Forum Debate Manual By Ashley Artmann “an indispensable addition to the library of both debate coach and student� Nicholas Sevano 10 Year Debate Coach

Ashley has had a successful debate and coaching career. She won two State PF titles, 7th at 2007 Nationals in PF, and the 2008 Berkeley Invitational. While at Stanford Ashley coached at St. Francis HS and has taught at the Stanford National Forensics Institute since 2009.

From the perspective of a coach, judge, and debater, Beyond Resolved explains the workings of Public Forum debate. Beyond Resolved is written for debaters of all levels, whether you want to learn about Delivery or more advanced topics like Framework and Judge Adaptation.

You can purchase the Manual & find other resources at

beyondresolved.wordpress.com

Use the code 6SPGFBDU for $5 off! Expires 9/30/14


Policy Debate: Synopsis of the Problem Areas for 2015-2016 I

PROBLEM AREA I: INCOME INEQUALITY

The United States federal government should increase progressive taxation, the federal minimum wage or regulation of predatory lending to substantially decrease income inequality in the United States.

A central philosophical question among economists pertains to the role of government in promoting economic equality. While this is a timeless issue, it has recently returned to the forefront of our political discourse through the Occupy movements that began in 2011 and more recently as a central focus of President Obama’s State of the Union Address in 2014. This proposal looks at specific means by which the federal government can address this issue. Possible affirmative cases include the regulation of predatory lending, increases in the federal minimum wage, and a range of taxrelated policies, including but not limited to the following: Earned Income Tax Credit, higher income taxes for wealthy Americans, negative income tax, Social Security taxes, and capital gains taxes. Possible negative arguments include a defense of the free market system, impacts on job creation, economic competitiveness, and business confidence.

Cast Your Vote Online!

II

PROBLEM AREA II: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Resolved: The United States federal government should significantly reform its non-military criminal procedure in the areas of grand juries, plea bargaining, admissibility of evidence and/or sentencing.

The federal criminal justice system is anchored by federal criminal procedure. Criminal procedure governs the conduct of criminal trials; it is designed to protect society from criminal perpetrators but also to ensure the constitutional rights of suspects and defendants. While criminal procedure includes numerous elements, the four areas highlighted by the resolution are grand juries, plea bargaining, admissibility of evidence, and sentencing. Possible affirmative cases include increased access to attorneys during grand jury proceedings, changes in prosecutorial guidelines for plea bargaining, limiting the admissibility of certain types of evidence (such as evidence gathered by drone surveillance), and increased judge discretion in sentencing. Negative arguments in favor of existing criminal procedures could include efficiency, protection of victims’ rights, public safety, and facilitating effective law enforcement.

III

PROBLEM AREA III: IMMIGRATION

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its legal protection of economic migrants in the United States.

Defenders of immigration reform argue that America is a nation of immigrants and that a progressive immigration policy will strengthen the economy and ensure fundamental fairness. Opponents believe that immigrants take jobs from Americans and threaten public safety. The resolution uses

Voting ends Tuesday, October 15, at 4 p.m. CT. To access the link, visit www.speechanddebate.org/topics and follow the online ballot instructions. The two most preferred topic areas will be placed on a second online ballot in November.

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www.speechanddebate.org

the term “economic migrants” in order to create a distinction from “refugees.” Economic migrants move from one country to another in order to improve the future prospects for themselves and their families, but they are able to return to their country of origin. Refugees are forced to move to save their lives or their freedom. Examples of possible affirmative cases include the following: providing a path to citizenship for economic migrants already living in the United States, reversing restrictive state laws such as those in Arizona and Georgia, treating economic refugees from Haiti the same as those from Cuba, passing the DREAM Act, providing health care for immigrant families, more generous provision of work permits for immigrants with special skills in medicine or engineering, providing legal representation for detainees, providing food stamps for impoverished immigrant families, and managing the current influx of children crossing the border, among others. Negative positions could focus on the economic and employment harms of increased immigration, increased risk of a terrorist attack, federalism positions, and the political implications of immigration reform.

IV

PROBLEM AREA IV: SURVEILLANCE Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially curtail its domestic surveillance.

The controversy between national security objectives and privacy became a hot one for debate since it was disclosed in June of 2013 by former defense contractor Edward Snowden (supported by journalist and former debater Glenn Greenwald) that the NSA is engaging in extensive surveillance inside the United States in order to fight crime and reduce the threat of terrorism. The magnitude of the disclosure shocked many people, including elected representatives, who were unaware of the extent of the surveillance. Many civil rights advocates view the surveillance as an assault on liberty while law enforcement and national security officials see the programs as essential weapons in the war on terror, the fight against nuclear weapons proliferation, and the general protection of U.S. national security. Possible affirmative cases include establishing general probable

cause and reasonable suspicion requirements, banning the collection of metadata, restricting the collection of email or chat content, limiting the amount of time that information can be stored, elimination of Section 215 of the Patriot Act, and FISA Court reforms as they apply to the domestic arena. Advantages will focus on privacy, totalitarianism, commerce, and racism. Negative positions can focus on terrorism, nuclear proliferation, crime, and kritiks of reform-based approaches.

V

PROBLEM AREA V: INDIAN COUNTRY

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially decrease its authority within Indian Country.

More than five million American Indians and Alaskan Natives reside within the United States—a number constituting 2% of the American population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2011). American Indians and Alaskan Natives live in every state in our union, with five U.S. states containing federally recognized tribal reservations or corporations within their boundaries. The links between American Indians and Alaskan Natives and the history of our nation are deeply entwined and the subject of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of pages of research. This topic will allow affirmative teams to explore the potential benefits of removing federal authority over one or more aspects of life in Indian Country. Possible affirmatives could explore these benefits in one or more areas, including commerce, criminal justice, education, environmental regulation, land use, health and welfare, and also the concept of giving Natives total sovereignty. Affirmatives would also be able to explore transitioning from federal to state control, allowing for an exploration of issues like federalism and other state-specific arguments. Negative arguments include disadvantages based on modeling, funding, federalism, rights, sovereignty, movements, funding; critical arguments will include discussions of the image of Native Americans in our society, the concept of federal control, specific language arguments, and environmentalism often using literature from native writers. “Indian Country” is a proper legal term used in nearly every legal writing about Native Americans, and a phrase commonly used by tribal councils themselves.

NOTE: The NFHS Speech, Debate & Theatre Association handles selection of the annual Policy Debate topic where each state organization, the National Speech & Debate Association, the National Catholic Forensic League, and the National Debate Coaches Association all have voting privileges. Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 31


Help Us Share Your Stories! A new project co-sponsored by Pi Kappa Delta and administered by MediaLab at Pacific Lutheran University aims to celebrate the rich history of speech and debate for future generations. Here’s how you can help.

O

ver the last year, the National

MediaLab at Pacific Lutheran University.

membership in our Association. We want

Speech & Debate Association

The site will contain videos, photographs,

to capture the historical highlights of our

has been part of an effort to

and other artifacts that celebrate the

activity in general!

establish an online National Forensics

rich history of speech and debate in the

Oral History Archive (NFOHA). The goal

United States.

of the archive is to become a resource

We currently are accepting submissions

Remember that what happens today will someday be history, so don’t feel like you need to go way back in time to find

and repository for use by anyone—

of documents, photos, film, and audio

any content for submission. Though our

educators, current students, alumni, and

that offer some perspective on the

immediate intent is to capture what is

parents—interested in and supportive of

history of speech and debate at your

currently considered history on the site,

speech and debate.

school, in your city, in your state/district,

we will want to collect for the future, as

at the National Tournament, and beyond.

well.

This joint venture is co-sponsored by Pi Kappa Delta and administered by

Your experience need not be specific to

If you have content you believe is suitable for this site, please contact info@nfoha.org with a brief description of the content you wish to submit. You’ll receive further instructions on delivering the content to us from there! Submission Guidelines 1. All materials should pertain, directly or indirectly, to the practice of speech and debate in the United States and other parts of the world. 2. To ensure quality, consistency, and appropriateness of submissions, all materials will be mediated and curated by the National Forensics Oral History Archives.

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www.speechanddebate.org

3. To the extent possible, all submissions, regardless of medium, should be accompanied by contextual information that will permit easy explanation, identification, and significance of the people, places, dates, events, documents, artifacts, and occurrences portrayed by or connected with the submitted content. Copyrighted material must be properly acknowledged and may not be displayed without appropriate permissions. Audio Recordings Audio recordings are encouraged and welcomed. Ideally, such materials should be converted to a common, presentday, digital format such as MP3 prior to being submitted to NFOHA, preferably on DVD. Under some circumstances, however, and after consultation with the NFOHA, other provisions for file transfers and conversions might be possible. Please contact the NFOHA for more information. Documents and Photographs Both black and white and color images are welcome. Ideally, photographs should be scanned and digitized—prior to submission—using the highest possible resolution. Doing so will aid

greatly in processing and reproducing

Under some circumstances, however,

images online. Depending on file size

and after consultation with the NFOHA,

and type, such digitized files may be

other provisions for file transfers

submitted to the NFOHA via email,

and conversions might be possible.

Dropbox, or on disc. If, for whatever

Please contact the NFOHA for more

reason, digitization of documents is not

information.

possible, originals may be sent to the NFOHA for scanning. If documents are

Questions?

to be returned, however, valid addresses

Those who have questions, or are in

to which originals should be sent must

need of assistance or advice, should

be provided.

email info@nfoha.org.

Historical Film and Video Depending upon the content and historical significance, videos created in early video formats, such as 35mm film, or “home movie” quality equipment, may be acceptable. Ideally, such materials should be converted to a common, present-day, raw digital format prior to being submitted to NFOHA, preferably on DVD.

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NATIONAL TOURNAMENT HIGHLIGHTS

Exclusive photos, results, and more!

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Heartland


Pride

Overland Park, Kansas | 2014

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Sunday

Registration – Overland Park Convention Center

Sunday Registration was a bit like a tailgating party before the big game—thousands congregated to enjoy food and fun before the main event. As coaches picked up materials and completed the registration process, students talked to representatives from colleges and universities, visited sponsor tables, purchased National Speech & Debate Association merchandise, and socialized with their friends from all over the country! Coaches also enjoyed the festive atmosphere as they attended receptions for new schools and first-time coaches, as well as showed appreciation for district leadership.

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www.speechanddebate.org

Monday

Hall of Fame Banquet – Mahaffie Stagecoach Stop & Farm Heritage Center

The day everyone was waiting for finally arrived—competition got underway in all of the main speech and debate events. The National Speech & Debate Association also honored its newest members of the Hall of Fame at a special banquet Monday evening. The Association was proud to induct Darrel Harbaugh of Kansas, Tommie Lindsey, Jr., of California, Lisa Miller of Florida, Randy Patterson of Mississippi, and Jay Stubbs of Texas in a true celebration of excellence and dedication to the activity we all love. Everyone had the opportunity to celebrate at the official induction ceremony Thursday night during the Donus D. Roberts Diamond Coach Assembly at the Overland Park Convention Center.

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www.speechanddebate.org

Monday Competition Begins – Area Schools

Thousands of contestants, dressed for success, were dropped off at eight different competition venues on Monday: Blue Valley West High School, Pleasant Ridge Middle School, Cedar Hills Elementary School, Shawnee Mission North High School, Shawnee Mission East High School, Overland Trail Middle School, Overland Trail Elementary School, and the Sheraton Overland Park Hotel. The nerves and anxiety quickly turned into laughter and excitement featuring outstanding hospitality by the East Kansas and Three Trails Districts!

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Tuesday Top 60 Results – Area Schools

Competition for the main events continued Tuesday as the first set of elimination rounds were posted in the afternoon. Emotions ran high after months of hard work and dedication were poured into the final preliminary rounds. Tears, some in disappointment and many others in joy, were displayed throughout the halls of our host schools. There is nothing like watching the faces of the competitors and coaches as the posters reveal the winning three-digit codes!

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www.speechanddebate.org

Re-registration and Local Host Posting Party – Prairiefire

While many students eagerly awaited the reveal of those advancing to the next round of competition, still others were excited to re-register for supplemental events to begin new competition the next day. All students and coaches were able to enjoy huge Cinetopia theaters, play bocce ball or bowl at Pinstripes, or watch a special screening of the 2009 documentary Speak Easy in which a group of quirky teenagers vies for high school glory in the world of competitive speech and debate.

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WEdnesday Competition – Area Schools

Main events continued to advance through elimination rounds on Wednesday as the field of competitors eventually dwindled to the very best in the country. Supplemental events found students in rounds of Poetry, Prose, Expository, Commentary, and Extemporaneous Debate. At this stage of the game, it’s all about poise, drive, and leaving nothing on the table.

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www.speechanddebate.org

Middle School Competition – Shawnee Mission North HS Nationals isn’t just a celebration of high school excellence. Our middle school competitors joined us Wednesday to give it their all in events that ranged from Prose Interpretation to Policy Debate and everything in between. Some high school students gave of their time and talents to judge middle school speech and debate so that excellence in competition could be passed on from one generation of performers to the next.

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Thursday

Final Rounds – Overland Park Convention Center

One of the greatest shows on earth began Thursday evening as final rounds kicked off with the interpretation events. Thousands were moved by Dramatic Interpretation, entertained by Humorous Interpretation, and engaged by the partnerships that form Duo Interpretation. Meanwhile, the debaters continued their march to finals throughout the day, while still others competed in supplemental events or began one last time with the consolation events of Impromptu and Storytelling. Competition in the House and Senate also took place throughout the week, concluding Thursday evening with the annual Congressional Banquet.

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www.speechanddebate.org

Diamond Assembly – Overland Park Convention Center

Students are not the only ones recognized for their achievements at Nationals. Numerous coaches also received honors for excellence at the annual Donus D. Roberts Diamond Assembly—including a milestone Tenth Diamond awarded to Ron Underwood of California. (For additional photos of this year’s award recipients, see pages 80-85.) Those in attendance also broke the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS® title for the most people sending a text message simultaneously! A total of 2,193 people sent the text message, “Spark leaders. Support speech and debate” to family members and friends to raise awareness about the value of our activity.

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Friday

Final Rounds – Overland Park Convention Center

Final rounds continued with Original Oratory, United States Extemporaneous Speaking, and International Extemporaneous Speaking. Generous sponsors were recognized with a special luncheon. Meanwhile, students who advanced to finals in all of the supplemental and consolation events competed for awards. Policy, LincolnDouglas, and Public Forum Debate finals rounded out the competition.

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www.speechanddebate.org

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Friday

Awards Assembly – Overland Park Convention Center The top Senators and Representatives were rewarded for their outstanding work in Congressional Debate on the main stage Friday evening. Middle school students also advanced to final rounds and celebrated their success at an exclusive awards ceremony before the champions had the opportunity to march in front of the entire National Speech & Debate Association for special recognition. (For middle school results, see pages 96-99.)

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www.speechanddebate.org

Awards Assembly – Overland Park Convention Center

The Awards Ceremony concluded an amazing week of incredible competition and dedication to speech and debate activites. Thousands of students and coaches celebrated school and individual success stories. After four years of competition, we said goodbye to our seniors and offered best wishes in the next stage of their success. Speech and debate will stay with those students forever! For additional photos, visit us online at www.facebook.com/ speechanddebate.

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National Tournament Sponsors

The National Speech & Debate Association is grateful to all of our National Tournament sponsors. Thank you for your ongoing support in giving youth a voice!

$100,000 +

$25,000 +

$10,000 +

Up to $10,000

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Lanny D. Naegelin Memorial

Willam Woods Tate, Jr., Memorial

Richard B. Sodikow Memorial

Donus and Lovila Roberts

Carmendale Fernandes

Jason Mehta and Family

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! u o y Thank

www.speechanddebate.org

2014 • OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS

National Speech & Debate Tournament

National Event Sponsors

Bickel & Brewer Foundation........................................Richard B. Sodikow Memorial Policy Debate The Lanier Law Firm........................................................Lincoln-Douglas Debate Arthur N. Rupe Foundation.........................................Public Forum Debate Stennis Center for Public Service Leadership.........Sen. John C. Stennis Congressional Debate Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation Auxiliary.............Original Oratory Carmendale Fernandes..................................................United States Extemporaneous Speaking Council on Foreign Relations......................................A.C. Eley Memorial International Extemporaneous Speaking Western Kentucky University.....................................Humorous Interpretation Ripon College.....................................................................Lanny D. Naegelin Memorial Dramatic Interpretation Colorado College.............................................................Sandra Silvers Memorial Duo Interpretation Colorado College.............................................................Donus D. Roberts Diamond Assembly Colorado College.............................................................Extemporaneous Debate Western Kentucky University.....................................Brother René Sterner Memorial Commentary Western Kentucky University.....................................Expository Western Kentucky University.....................................Poetry Reading Western Kentucky University.....................................Prose Reading Western Kentucky University.....................................Impromptu Western Kentucky University.....................................Storytelling Pi Kappa Delta....................................................................Bruno E. Jacob / Pi Kappa Delta Trophy Gustavus Adolphus College........................................William Woods Tate Jr., Memorial National Student of the Year Award Mr. and Mrs. Donus D. Roberts..................................President’s Bowls (OO, USX) Jason Mehta and Family................................................Mehta Bowl (IX) The University of Alabama..........................................Bama Bowls (DI, HI, DUO) Harland B. Mitchell Memorial....................................Harland B. Mitchell Trophy (Policy Debate Champions) Phyllis Flory Barton Memorial....................................Phyllis Flory Barton Trophy (Policy Debate Top Speaker)

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Bring Home the Excitement of Nationals! Order your copy today:

store.speechanddebate.org


@ ALL FINALISTS in EX, OO, DI, HI, DUO and OI (Poetry/Prose combined) AT THE FOLLOWING TOURNAMENTS will receive invitations to compete in this year’s UK TOC Speech Divisions.

Apple Valley Bellaire Berkeley Bobcat Bonanza Columbia University Cypress Bay Crestian Tradition Cypress Creek Cypress Woods & Cypress Fair Denver East/Geo. Washington (CO) Emory University Federal Way Florida Blue Key George Mason University Finalists and Champions from other tournaments may also be invited to compete, and we will consider applications to compete based on in-season record.

April 25 – 27, 2015 at the University of Kentucy

IE

TOC

Glenbrooks Grapevine Harvard Houston Lamar Isidore Newman James Logan Laird Lewis Mountain View New York City Invitational Nova Titan Parish Episcopal Park Hill

FULL DIVISIONS ROUND ROBINS

(We will run RRs in small divisions).

Princeton University Spring Woods St. James Stanford Sunvitational Sylvania Invitational University of Pennsylvania University of Puget Sound Villiger Wake Forest Earlybird Winston Churchill Wooster Yale University

FOR INFORMATION on the IE Divisions go to https://cis.uky.edu/toc/ or contact William Cooper at uktocspeech@gmail.com


Four-Time Qualifiers (listed in alphabetical order by state, then school, then last name)

Carlos Ochoa Mitchell Grove Danny Lovato Brett Curtis Eric Hale Paul Curry Aaron Clarke Sidarth Singh Jan D. P. Tompkins Sam Scarlato Adam M. Stromme Dylan Adelman Aunika Schraw Cody Goodchild Jedadiah Rothstein Juhee Won Sebastian Startz Thomas Startz Allison Scott Jessi Green Matthew Nicholas Davenport Eric Wang Lawrence Zhou Quentin Michael Nida Ansari Lorenzo Barberis Keren K. Kabambi Conner N. Monsees Christian Kimbell Sarah May Gregory Ross Kristen Chapa Alex Sapadin John Ahn Mihir Trivedi

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Brophy College Prep Liberty High School Kent Denver School Michael Krop High School Bettendorf High School West High School - Iowa City Evanston Twp High School Munster High School Bangor High School Chanhassen High School Eagan High School Lakeville South High School St. Cloud Tech High School St. Michael Albertville High School St. Michael Albertville High School Terry Sanford High School Fargo Shanley High School Fargo Shanley High School Summit High School East Mountain High School Jemez Mountain Home School Solon High School Bartlesville High School Sprague High School Riverside High School Canonico Riverside High School Harrisburg High School Harrisburg High School Cypress Creek High School George Ranch High School Lamar High School – Houston Princeton High School Snohomish High School Appleton East High School Brookfield East High School

Arizona California Colorado Florida Iowa Iowa Illinois Indiana Maine Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota North Carolina North Dakota North Dakota New Jersey New Mexico New Mexico Ohio Oklahoma Oregon South Carolina South Carolina South Dakota South Dakota Texas Texas Texas Texas Washington Wisconsin Wisconsin


www.speechanddebate.org

William Woods Tate, Jr., Memorial National Student of the Year presented by

Six finalists participated in an interview process with the national panel of judges who selected the 2014 William Woods Tate, Jr., Memorial National Student of the Year, one of the most prestigious individual student honors presented by the National Speech & Debate Association. Walter Paul was awarded a $1,000 scholarship and will represent the Association in various public capacities throughout the 2014-2015 academic year.

Walter Paul Creighton Preparatory School, NE Coached by: Richard D. Brown

The other finalists, in alphabetical order, include Michael Chavez from Albuquerque Academy, NM; Carlos Ochoa from Brophy College Preparatory School, AZ; Abigail Onwunali from Hastings High School, TX; Jiayan (Lisa) Peng from Laurel School, OH; and McKinley Rodriguez from Lincoln High School, OR. The group is pictured below with sponsor Kristofer Kracht of Gustavus Adolphus College.

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National Winners Richard B. Sodikow Memorial

Policy Debate

Policy Debate Top Speakers

presented by the Bickel & Brewer Foundation

presented in memory of Phyllis Flory Barton

1st – Alaina Walberg Olathe Northwest High School, KS Coached by: Eric Skoglund

2nd – Myka Yamasaki College Prep, CA Coached by: Lexy Green, Jonathan Hines, and Sam Haley-Hill 3rd – Henry Walter Shawnee Mission East, KS Coached by: Trey Witt 4th – Curtis Wang Loyola High School, CA Coached by: Michael Overing

1st – Christopher W. Callahan and Brent E. Mitchell Glenbrook South High School, IL Coached by: Tara Tate and Jonathan Voss

5th – Mollie Fiero College Prep, CA Coached by: Lexy Green, Jonathan Hines, and Sam Haley-Hill 6th – Ajay Mayer The Bronx High School of Science, NY Coached by: Jon Cruz, Nick Fiori, and Flynn Makuch

2nd – Connor Munsinger and Jaedon Kroger Roosevelt High School, SD Coached by: Luke Cumbee 3rd – Kevin Gay and Andrew Durkin La Salle College High School, PA Coached by: Raymond T. Shay and Michael V. McCabe

Harland B. Mitchell Trophy

4th – Karl Walter and Henry Walter Shawnee Mission East High School, KS Coached by: Trey Witt 5th – Blaize DePass and Haley Larson Wayzata High School, MN Coached by: Sheila Peterson 6th – Thomas Donovan and Natalie Knez Glenbrook North High School, IL Coached by: Michael Greenstein

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The national champion Policy Debate team receives the Harland B. Mitchell Trophy, named after the Association’s legendary debate coach.


www.speechanddebate.org

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Public Forum Debate

presented by The Lanier Law Firm

presented by the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation

1st – Lawrence Zhou Bartlesville High School, OK Coached by: Linda Shipley

1st – Tim Perevozchikov and Ron Lubarsky Hawken School, OH Coached by: Robert H. Shurtz and Steve Ingrassia

2nd – Nicky Halterman Norman High School, OK Coached by: Kasey Harrison

2nd – Justin Katz and Will Ruff Durham Academy, NC Coached by: Robert Sheard

3rd – Katie Hughes Immaculate Heart High School, CA Coached by: Naemah Morris

3rd – Dani Herman and Ali Herman Stow-Munroe Falls High School, OH Coached by: Suzanne E. Theisen

4th – Jamie Franzese Edmond North High School, OK Coached by: Jana Harrison

4th – Gavin Martin and Dylan Berens Lamar High School - Houston, TX Coached by: Eloise Weisinger Blair

5th – Ben Dobbins Falmouth High School, ME Coached by: Michelle Jodoin LaFond and Karen Wolf

5th – Tyler Pierce and Jacob Colman Natrona County High School, WY Coached by: Mary Hoard

6th – Omkar Savant Bellarmine College Prep, CA Coached by: Kim Jones

6th – Allegra Simon and Liam Glass The Dalton School, NY Coached by: Frederic Enea

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National Winners

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Senator John C. Stennis

Senator John C. Stennis

Congressional Debate House

Congressional Debate Senate

Top Presiding Officer (House)

Top Presiding Officer (Senate)

Rep. Kerry Yan Riverside High School, SC

Coached by: David Dejesa, Mel Gaddy, Greg Cook, Stuart Cook, Pete Martin, and Jeff Schmauch

Sen. Oliver Sherren The Parish Episcopal School, TX Coached by: Jason Warren and John Adcox

Leadership Bowl (House)

Leadership Bowl (Senate)

Rep. Nic Gerard Shrewsbury High School, MA Coached by: Marc Rischitelli and Susan Marianelli

Sen. Ryan Fedasiuk Desert Vista High School, AZ Coached by: Brittany Stanchik, Brendan Porter, and Kevin Berlat

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www.speechanddebate.org

Senator John C. Stennis

Senator John C. Stennis

Congressional Debate House

Congressional Debate Senate

1st – Rep. Abigail Marone Notre Dame High School, PA Coached by: Kimberly Marone and Sal Rizzo

1st – Sen. Will Mascaro Hawken School, OH Coached by: Robert H. Shurtz

2nd – Rep. Connor Meckfessel Miramonte High School, CA Coached by: Kristen Plant and Sandra Maguire

2nd – Sen. Oliver Sherren The Parish Episcopal School, TX Coached by: Jason Warren and John Adcox

3rd – Rep. Nic Gerard Shrewsbury High School, MA Coached by: Marc Rischitelli and Susan Marianelli

3rd – Sen. Azhar Hussain Carroll High School - Southlake, TX Coached by: Diane Forbes

4th – Rep. Marina Finley Bellaire High School, TX Coached by: Jay Stubbs

4th – Sen. Max Klein Lake Highland Preparatory, FL Coached by: Christopher Sprouse

5th – Rep. Nick J. Danby Bangor High School, ME Coached by: Joseph Pelletier and Jennifer Page

5th – Sen. Raymond Rif Nova High School, FL Coached by: Lisa Miller, Jared Blinderman, and Jeff Hannan

6th – Rep. Joseph DiPietro Iona Preparatory, NY Coached by: Charles Sloat, Joseph Madonna, and Frank Ricobono

6th – Sen. Abhimanyu Gupta Shrewsbury High School, MA Coached by: Susan Marianelli and Marc Rischitelli

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National Winners Original Oratory presented by the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation Auxiliary

Karl Mundt Trophy The Karl Mundt Trophy is presented each year to the school who has accumulated the most National Congress participation points, awarded as follows: 1. One point for each legislative day. 2. Two points for advancing, or for being elected Presiding Officer in a session. 3. Three points for placing 4th, 5th, or 6th. 4. Four points for placing 2nd or 3rd. 5. Five points for the national champion in the Senate or the House. 6. Upon earning this award, a school’s total resets to zero. The 2014 Karl Mundt Trophy was presented to Nova High School in Florida.

1st – Andrea Ambam Raymore-Peculiar High School, MO Coached by: Todd Schnake

2nd – Laurel Scott Eagan High School, MN Coached by: Joni Anker 3rd – Lexie Harvey Brentwood Academy, TN Coached by: Ryan Hubbard 4th – Aunika Schraw St. Cloud Tech High School, MN Coached by: Karmin Schraw 5th – Moti Begna Apple Valley High School, MN Coached by: Scott Voss and Kathleen Johnson Nova High School Florida Coached by: Lisa Miller, Kathleen D. Hamm, Jared Blinderman, and Jeff Hannan  

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6th – Walter N. Paul Creighton Preparatory School, NE Coached by: Richard D. Brown


www.speechanddebate.org

A.C. Eley Memorial

International Extemp presented by the Council on Foreign Relations

United States Extemp presented by Carmendale Fernandes

1st – Miles I. Saffran Trinity Preparatory School, FL Coached by: Michael J. Vigars and Dean Rhoads

1st – Arel Rende Tulsa Washington High School, OK Coached by: Meredith Deaton and Kelly R. McCracken

2nd – Dylan Adelman Lakeville South High School, MN Coached by: Andrew Charrier

2nd – Cosmo Albrecht Robert E. Lee High School - San Antonio, TX Coached by: Nichole Connor

3rd – Rohan Dhoopar Bellarmine College Prep, CA Coached by: Deirdre Sullivan

3rd – Joshua Wartel Lake Braddock Secondary High School, VA Coached by: Duane Hyland

4th – Lily Nellans Des Moines Roosevelt High School, IA Coached by: Harry W. Strong

4th – Jasper Shea Primack Newton South High School, MA Coached by: Felisa (Lisa) T. Honeyman and James E. Honeyman

5th – Isabella Paretti Cypress Bay High School, FL Coached by: Megan Loden West and Ben Miller 6th – Gabe Slater Denver East High School, CO Coached by: Matthew Murphy and Susan McHugh

5th – Brian Yu Monte Vista High School - Danville, CA Coached by: David Matley 6th – Joe Russell Brophy College Prep, AZ Coached by: Steven Ebensberger

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National Winners Humorous Interpretation

Dramatic Interpretation

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Ripon College

1st – Benjamin M. Gruenbaum Lee’s Summit North High School, MO Coached by: Rachel Russell

1st – Abigail Onwunali Hastings High School, TX Coached by: Lillian Ogunbanjo and Brian Darby

2nd – Blake Knapp Blue Springs High School, MO Coached by: Jacquelyn Young

2nd – Tyler Tippings Schurr High School, CA Coached by: Joseph A. Ugalde

3rd – Sarah Brashear Marian High School, NE Coached by: Luke Ostrander and Bryan Hagg

3rd – Reuben Hoyle Blue Springs South High School, MO Coached by: Katie Rucinski

4th – Noah Jermain Savannah R3 High School, MO Coached by: Michael Pittman, Daniel Strang, and Carl Stafford

4th – Luke Stodghill South Grand Prairie High School, TX Coached by: Forrest Denbow

5th – John Mitchell Burns Bishop McGuinness High School, OK Coached by: Ryan J. Swartz 6th – John Biebighauser Grapevine High School, TX Coached by: Grant Hahn

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Lanny D. Naegelin Memorial

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5th – Renny Weeden Seven Lakes High School, TX Coached by: Terrick Brown and Charli Lennon 6th – Spencer Krumholz St. Thomas High School, TX Coached by: John Augillard, III


www.speechanddebate.org

Sandra Silvers Memorial

Duo Interpretation presented by Colorado College

1st – Matt Wisenden and Jordan Hartjen Moorhead High School, MN Coached by: Rebecca Meyer-Larson

2nd – Lyric Davis and Samuel Moore Blue Springs High School, MO Coached by: Jacquelyn Young 3rd – Jarrius Adams and Isreal Lyons Hattiesburg High School, MS Coached by: Raphael Scott Waldrop 4th – Branden Lindsay and Jarrett Williams Southside High School, SC Coached by: Erickson L. Bynum 5th – Christin Villalobos and Victoria Villalobos Gabrielino High School, CA Coached by: Derek Yuill, Pear Kasrirarat, and Stephanie Sy 6th – Stephen Durosaiye and Manuela Reyes Bronx Preparatory Charter School, NY Coached by: Sarah Rosenberg

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Final Round Winners 2014 President’s BowlS sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Donus D. Roberts

President’s Bowl (USX)

President’s Bowl (OO)

Arel Rende Tulsa Washington High School, OK Coached by: Meredith Deaton and Kelly R. McCracken

Andrea Ambam Raymore-Peculiar High School, MO Coached by: Todd Schnake

2014 Mehta International bowl sponsored by Jason Mehta and Family

Mehta International Bowl (IX) Dylan Adelman Lakeville South High School, MN Coached by: Andrew Charrier

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www.speechanddebate.org

2014 BAMA BowlS sponsored by The University of Alabama

Bama Bowl (Humorous)

Bama Bowl (Dramatic)

Blake Knapp Blue Springs High School, MO Coached by: Jacquelyn Young

Abigail Onwunali Hastings High School, TX Coached by: Lillian Ogunbanjo and Brian Darby

Bama Bowl (Duo) Branden Lindsay and Jarrett Williams Southside High School, SC Coached by: Erickson L. Bynum

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National Winners Extemporaneous Debate

Unger Cup

presented by Colorado College

presented by the James J. Unger Memorial The Unger Cup, named in honor of one of America’s finest debaters and coaches, former Georgetown Director of Forensics, Professor James J. Unger, is awarded each year at the National Tournament by Professor Unger’s alumni and friends to the Policy Debate program which has placed the highest, cumulatively, at six great national debate tournaments: International Public Policy Forum, NAUDL Nationals, NCFL Grand, NDCA Nationals, the Tournament of Champions, and the Association’s National Speech & Debate Tournament. An antique silver, three-handled loving cup, created by Tiffany at the turn of the century, remains at the national office with a professionally designed base to hold all future names. The winning team each year receives a replica trophy to honor this accomplishment. This year, the 2014 Unger Cup was awarded to Glenbrook South High School in Illinois.

1st – Sinan Ozbay Princeton High School, NJ Coached by: John O. Bathke and Renee Szporn

2nd – Brandon Roth Sprague High School, OR Coached by: Michael Curry 3rd – David Slater Dripping Springs High School, TX Coached by: Christy Spruiell-Trussell 4th – Myra Gupta Mason High School, OH Coached by: Rebecca Bogard 5th – Alexander Marchal Green River High School, WY Coached by: Carina Stulken

Christopher W. Callahan and Brent E. Mitchell Glenbrook South High School, Illinois Coached by: Tara Tate and Jonathan Voss

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6th – Jonah Ragsdale Monett High School, MO Coached by: Gary Cook


www.speechanddebate.org

Brother René Sterner Memorial

Commentary

Expository

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

1st – Will Thompson Charles Page High School, OK Coached by: Brittany Hayes

1st – Amanda East Brentwood Academy, TN Coached by: Ryan Hubbard

2nd – Nicholas Billings Thunderbird High School, AZ Coached by: Benjamin Carroll

2nd – Vivek Srivats Millard North High School, NE Coached by: Sabrina Denney Bull

3rd – Jason Fisher Highlands Ranch High School, CO Coached by: Brent C. Oberg and Erin Tuttle

3rd – Haley Brown Liberty Sr. High School, MO Coached by: Mick Turpin

4th – Asher Kalman Miramonte High School, CA Coached by: Kristen Plant

4th – Jeff Heithmar Natick High School, MA Coached by: Sarah Donnelly and Amanda Parker

5th – Matt Greydanus Grand Rapids Christian, MI Coached by: Nancy Fitzgerald and Brian Karsten

5th – Claire Lamman Canon City High School, CO Coached by: Bill Summers

6th – Bobby Tech Salina High Central, KS Coached by: Nicholas Owen

6th – Carol Lee Riverside High School, SC Coached by: McGregor Cook and David Dejesa

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National Winners Poetry Reading

Prose Reading

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

1st – Fernando Rojas Fullerton Joint Union High School, CA Coached by: Sal Tinajero and Pricilla Merritt

1st – Nia Clark Munster High School, IN Coached by: Jordan Mayer

2nd – Brett Curtis Michael Krop High School, FL Coached by: Ruthie W. Metcalfe

2nd – Yianni Kinnas Hinsdale Central High School, IL Coached by: Paul Woods

3rd – Swayde Watson Muldrow High School, OK Coached by: Billy Elles

3rd – Rebecca Pockrus Harlingen High School South, TX Coached by: Lee Ann Ince, Maegan De La Rosa, and Julia Brebner

4th – Michael Debose Klein Oak High School, TX Coached by: Angie Richard 5th – Adia McLaughlin Pinecrest High School, NC Coached by: Christina Speiser 6th – Thomas Linden Cypress Creek High School, TX Coached by: Scott Baker

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4th – Camila Kaplunov Glenbrook North High School, IL Coached by: Sarah H. Ilie 5th – Michael Chavez Albuquerque Academy, NM Coached by: Sheridan Johnson 6th – McKenna Kelley St. Josephs High School, NY Coached by: David Risley


www.speechanddebate.org

Impromptu

Storytelling

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

1st – Michael Everett Chaminade College Prep, CA Coached by: Robert Lebeda and Marianne Rosen

1st – Sam Scarlato Chanhassen High School, MN Coached by: James Fedje and Jessica Fedje

2nd – Aric Floyd Hawken School, OH Coached by: Robert H. Shurtz

2nd – Jami L. Richea Chesterton High School, IN Coached by: Eric J. Schaefer

3rd – Milan Amritraj Campbell Hall High School, CA Coached by: Susan Foley

3rd – Micah Spieldenner Chanhassen High School, MN Coached by: Greg Berman and Joe Stodola

4th – Haley Brahmbhatt Chanhassen High School, MN Coached by: Zachary Prax

4th – Cale Harper Monett High School, MO Coached by: Marilyn Mann

5th – Jacob Wisda Crescenta Valley High School, CA Coached by: Christina Manukyan

5th – Stephanie Butler Lakeville North High School, MN Coached by: Jennifer Baese, Chloe Radcliffe, and Natalie Sintek

6th – Alexander Blaine Hall Olympus High School, UT Coached by: Wesley J. Felice

6th – Jessie Sadlon O’Gorman High School, SD Coached by: Teresa Fester

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Honors and Awards

Richard B. Sodikow Memorial Policy Debate presented by the Bickel & Brewer Foundation

Christopher W. Callahan and Brent E. Mitchell Glenbrook South High School, IL Coached by: Tara Tate and Jonathan Voss

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Public Forum Debate

presented by The Lanier Law Firm

presented by the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation

Lawrence Zhou Bartlesville High School, OK Coached by: Linda Shipley

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Tim Perevozchikov and Ron Lubarsky Hawken School, OH Coached by: Robert H. Shurtz and Steve Ingrassia (not pictured)


www.speechanddebate.org

Harold Keller Public Service Leadership Award Steven E. Grubbs was presented with the Harold Keller Public Service Leadership Award at the 2014 National Tournament in Overland Park, Kansas. The honor, named for longtime Hall of Fame coach Harold C. Keller, recognizes former Congressional Debate participants who have made significant contributions to their community, state, or nation through public service leadership. Mr. Grubbs competed in the National Senate in 1982, earning election as a presiding officer. He went on to earn degrees in law and finance from the University of Iowa. While earning his juris doctorate, Grubbs was elected a representative to the Iowa State Legislature. After serving three terms, Grubbs was elected chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa, and later formed Victory Enterprises, Inc., a

company that provides political and corporate consulting and communications, including such innovative services as mobile app development, social media management, and opinion research. He gives generously of his time and funds to support speech and debate at both the middle and high school levels. In addition to assisting at his alma mater, Davenport West, he helped start a program at Davenport Assumption, which is now a charter chapter in the National Speech & Debate Association. According to Joe Rankin, Grubbs “is a full-time business owner who opens his workplace Sunday nights to coach students.” He also connects students to realworld political internships to apply what they’ve learned in debate.

2014 Keller Award honoree, Steven E. Grubbs, spoke Thursday evening during the Congressional Debate Banquet, sponsored by the Stennis Center for Public Service Leadership.

Senator John C. Stennis Congressional Debate–House

Senator John C. Stennis Congressional Debate–Senate

Outstanding Representative

Outstanding Senator

Abigail Marone Notre Dame High School, PA Coached by: Kimberly Marone and Sal Rizzo (not pictured)

Will Mascaro Hawken School, OH Coached by: Robert H. Shurtz

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Honors and Awards

Original Oratory

United States Extemp

presented by the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation Auxiliary

presented by Carmendale Fernandes

Andrea Ambam Raymore-Peculiar High School, MO Coached by: Todd Schnake

Arel Rende Tulsa Washington High School, OK Coached by: Kelly R. McCracken and Meredith Deaton

A. C. Eley Memorial International Extemp presented by the Council on Foreign Relations

Miles I. Saffran Trinity Preparatory School, FL Coached by: Michael J. Vigars and Dean Rhoads (not pictured)

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www.speechanddebate.org

Humorous Interpretation

Lanny D. Naegelin Memorial Dramatic Interpretation

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Ripon College

Benjamin M. Gruenbaum Lee’s Summit North High School, MO Coached by: Rachel Russell

Abigail Onwunali Hastings High School, TX Coached by: Lillian Ogunbanjo and Brian Darby (not pictured)

Sandra Silvers Memorial Duo Interpretation presented by Colorado College

Matt Wisenden and Jordan Hartjen Moorhead High School, MN Coached by: Rebecca Meyer-Larson

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Honors and Awards

Heartland Pride In addition to the traditional Hawaiian leis, each national champion was given an authentic Kansas sunflower, presented by the East Kansas and Three Trails District Students of the Year. The sunflowers were compliments of the local hosts and extended the “Heartland Pride” theme.

Extemporaneous Debate presented by Colorado College

Sinan Ozbay Princeton High School, NJ Coached by: John O. Bathke and Renee Szporn (pictured with Mary T. Gormley)

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Brother René Sterner Memorial Commentary

Expository

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

Will Thompson Charles Page High School, OK Coached by: Brittany Hayes

Amanda East Brentwood Academy, TN Coached by: Ryan Hubbard

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Poetry Reading

Prose Reading

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

Fernando Rojas Fullerton Joint Union High School, CA Coached by: Pricilla Merritt and Sal Tinajero

Nia Clark Munster High School, IN Coached by: Jordan Mayer

Impromptu

Storytelling

presented by Western Kentucky University

presented by Western Kentucky University

Michael Everett Chaminade College Prep, CA Coached by: Robert Lebeda and Marianne Rosen (not pictured)

Sam Scarlato Chanhassen High School, MN Coached by: James Fedje and Jessica Fedje (not pictured)

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Spark Excellence 2014 Circle of Champion Coaches

(left to right) Rachel Russell, Missouri (Humorous Interpretation) Todd Schnake, Missouri (Original Oratory) Jonathan Voss, Illinois (Policy Debate) Tara Tate, Illinois (Policy Debate) Ryan Hubbard, Tennessee (Expository) Robert H. Schurtz, Ohio (Public Forum Debate and Congressional Debate–Senate) Jordan Mayer, Indiana (Prose Reading) Michael J. Vigars, Florida (International Extemp) Robert Lebeda, California (Impromptu) Kimberly Marone, Pennsylvania (Congressional Debate–House) James Fedje, Minnesota (Storytelling) Brittany Hayes, Oklahoma (Commentary) Meredith Deaton, Oklahoma (United States Extemp) Linda Shipley, Oklahoma (Lincoln-Douglas Debate) Kelly R. McCracken, Oklahoma (United States Extemp) Lillian Ogunbanjo, Texas (Dramatic Interpretation) Rebecca Meyer-Larson, Minnesota (Duo Interpretation) Sal Tinajero, California (Poetry Reading) Pricilla Merritt, California (Poetry Reading)

Champion coaches received a commemorative plaque in the shape of the state of Kansas.

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James M. Copeland Coach of the Year

Principal of the Year

Harry W. Strong Iowa

Paulette (Polly) Reikowski, Ph.D. Minnesota

Tenth Diamond Award Ron Underwood California

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Honors and Awards

Seventh Diamond Award Pamela K. McComas Kansas

Sixth Diamond Award Steven Davis Kansas

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Seventh Diamond Award Jan Heiteen Illinois

Sixth Diamond Award Eric DiMichele New York


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Alumni Lifetime Achievement Award

Brother Gregory “René” Sterner Lifetime Service Award

David Manasche Florida

William Mark Ferguson Illinois

Pelham Commendation Lisa Miller Florida

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Honors and Awards

Communicator of the Year Congressman Kevin Yoder U.S. Representative for the 3rd Congressional District of Kansas

Ralph E. Carey Award for Distinguished Career Service Steven Wood Kansas

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Ted W. Belch Coach Award Tara Tate Illinois

Director’s Commendation Byron Arthur Louisiana


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Honors and Awards

Bruno E. Jacob / Pi Kappa Delta Trophy The top trophy at the National Tournament is named after the Association’s founder, Bruno E. Jacob, who served as executive director for more than 40 years. Endowed by the collegiate speech society, the Bruno E. Jacob / Pi Kappa Delta Trophy is presented to the school that has accumulated the greatest number of main event rounds at the National Tournament. Nova High School in Florida earned this year’s award with a championship total of 1,554 rounds.

Top 5

Bruno E. Jacob Commendation and Albert S. Odom, Jr., Commendation Total Rounds

1. Nova High School, FL

1,554

2. Plano Sr. High School, TX

1,548

3. West High School - Iowa City, IA

1,537

4. Parkview High School, MO

1,536

5. Leland High School, CA

1,534

Lisa Miller Florida

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Points and Results

PreliM Rounds Debate: Win (2 judges) = 10 points • Split (1-1) = 8 points • Loss (0-2) = 7 points Speech: Two judge total of...

Schools of Outstanding Distinction Top 10 schools after combining both debate and speech points (must score points in both divisions).

= 10 points = 9 points = 8 points = 7 points = 6 points

ELIM Rounds Debate:

School Awards

2 or 3 4 or 5 6 or 7 8 or 9 10+

Win = 10 points

Loss = 7 points

Speech:

1st 10 points

2nd 9 points

3rd 8 points

4th 5th/6th/7th 7 points 6 points

Supplemental:

6 points

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

CONGRESS Average of points awarded by official scorers, on a scale of 3-9 points per speech and complete hour of presiding.

Speech Schools of Excellence

Top 20 schools in total speech points that did not win a School of Outstanding Distinction Award.

Debate Schools of Excellence

bonus points Champion: Runner-up: Third place:

15 points 10 points 5 points

Top 20 schools in total debate points that did not win a School of Outstanding Distinction award.

Formula for Determining School Awards Speech Schools of Honor

Top 21-40 schools in total speech points that did not win a School of Outstanding Distinction award.

Debate Schools of Honor

Top 21-40 schools in total debate points that did not win a School of Outstanding Distinction award.

Outstanding School Achievement

School administrators of the top six individuals or teams in each main event are sent an Outstanding School Achievement plaque following the National Tournament. The plaques are personalized with students’ names, school, event, place, and year.

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Speech .................................................................................................................. Round 7/8 6 points Round 9/10 + 4 points (Total 10) Round 11/12 + 4 points (Total 14) Round 13 + 6 points (Total 20) Debate .................................................................................................................. Round 7/8 6 points Rounds 9 through 12 + 2 points per round (Total up to 14) Top 6 Place Winner + 6 points (Total 20) Congress .............................................................................................................. Semifinalist 6 points Finalist + 4 points (Total 10) Top 7-14 + 4 points (Total 14) Top 6 Place Winner + 6 points (Total 20)


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2014 School Awards Schools of Outstanding Distinction Bellarmine College Prep, CA Cypress Bay High School, FL Desert Vista High School, AZ Eagan High School, MN James Logan High School, CA

Miramonte High School, CA Munster High School, IN Newton South High School, MA Nova High School, FL Plano West Sr. High School, TX

Speech Schools of Excellence

Debate Schools of Excellence

Apple Valley High School, MN Blue Springs High School, MO Brophy College Prep, AZ Denver East High School, CO Fullerton Joint Union High School, CA Gabrielino High School, CA Grapevine High School, TX Hattiesburg High School, MS Hinsdale Central High School, IL Jackson High School, OH Leland High School, CA Monte Vista High School - Danville, CA Moorhead High School, MN Ridge High School, NJ Riverside High School, SC South Grand Prairie High School, TX Trinity Preparatory School, FL Tulsa Washington High School, OK University School, FL Wadsworth City School, OH Winston Churchill High School, TX

Aberdeen Central High School, SD Bellaire High School, TX Cherry Creek High School, CO Cy-Fair High School, TX Delbarton School, NJ Durham Academy, NC Edina High School, MN Evanston Twp High School, IL Falmouth High School, ME Hawken School, OH La Salle College High School, PA Lake Highland Preparatory, FL Lamar High School - Houston, TX Miami Beach Sr. High School, FL Norman High School, OK Ridge High School, NJ Shawnee Mission East High School, KS Shrewsbury High School, MA Stow-Munroe Falls High School, OH Wayzata High School, MN Wooster High School, OH

Speech Schools of Honor

Debate Schools of Honor

Beavercreek High School, OH Bishop McGuinness High School, OK Brentwood Academy, TN Buffalo Grove High School, IL Chanhassen High School, MN Clovis East High School, CA Dougherty Valley High School, CA Hastings High School, TX James Madison Memorial High School, WI Kent Denver School, CO Larue County High School, KY Liberty Sr. High School, MO Millburn High School, NJ Montville High School, NJ Plano Sr. High School, TX Prospect High School, IL Schurr High School, CA Seven Lakes High School, TX Sioux Falls Lincoln High School, SD Southside High School, SC

Ardrey Kell High School, NC Bangor High School, ME Carroll High School - Southlake, TX Coppell High School, TX Edmond North High School, OK Glenbrook North High School, IL Glenbrook South High School, IL Green Valley High School, NV Immaculate Heart High School, CA Iona Preparatory, NY Natrona County High School, WY Notre Dame High School, PA Plano Senior High School, TX Roosevelt High School, SD Spring Woods High School, TX The Dalton School, NY The Parish Episcopal School, TX West Lafayette High School, IN

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WHO BROKE AND WHY — MAIN DEBATE EVENTS Below is a summary of what it took for high school contestants to advance at the 2014 National Tournament.

Policy Debate

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

At the end of round 6, a total of 78 teams advanced to round 7-8 with 8 or more winning ballots.

At the end of round 6, a total of 80 debaters advanced to round 7-8 with 8 or more winning ballots.

A total of 63 teams advanced to round 9.

A total of 58 debaters advanced to round 9.

A total of 39 teams advanced to round 10.

A total of 40 debaters advanced to round 10.

A total of 24 teams advanced to round 11.

A total of 25 debaters advanced to round 11.

A total of 14 teams advanced to round 12.

A total of 16 debaters advanced to round 12.

A total of 8 teams advanced to round 13.

A total of 9 debaters advanced to round 13.

A total of 4 teams advanced to round 14.

A total of 6 debaters advanced to round 14.

A total of 2 teams advanced to round 15.

A total of 4 debaters advanced to round 15. A total of 2 debaters advanced to round 16.

Public Forum Debate At the end of round 6, a total of 95 teams advanced to round 7-8 with 8 or more winning ballots. A total of 67 teams advanced to round 9. A total of 48 teams advanced to round 10. A total of 32 teams advanced to round 11. A total of 19 teams advanced to round 12. A total of 12 teams advanced to round 13. A total of 7 teams advanced to round 14. A total of 5 teams advanced to round 15. A total of 3 teams advanced to round 16. A total of 2 teams advanced to round 17.

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Congressional Debate Cumulative rank totals determined advancement and placing at each level. After four preliminary sessions, the top 6 senators and top 5 representatives advanced to semifinals from each chamber. After semifinals, the top 6 students from each chamber advanced to finals.


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WHO BROKE AND WHY — MAIN SPEECH EVENTS Below is a summary of what it took for high school contestants to advance at the 2014 National Tournament.

Humorous Interpretation

Original Oratory

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 contestants advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 37. Four contestants were tied. One of those students advanced with at least 5 ones.

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 contestants advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 37. Five contestants were tied. One of those students advanced with at least 4 ones.

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 contestants advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 20 (clean break)

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 contestants advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 21. Five contestants were tied. One of those students advanced with at least 3 ones.

At the end of round 10, a total of 14 contestants advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 37. Two contestants were tied. One of those students advanced with at least 3 ones and 3 twos. At the end of round 12, a total of 6 contestants advanced to round 13 with a cume of 68 (clean break).

At the end of round 10, a total of 14 contestants advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 37 (clean break). At the end of round 12, a total of 6 contestants advanced to round 13 with a cume of 67 (clean break).

Dramatic Interpretation

United States Extemporaneous Speaking

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 contestants advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 35. Five contestants were tied. Three of those students advanced with at least 2 ones.

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 contestants advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 35. Four contestants were tied. Two of those students advanced with at least 3 ones.

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 contestants advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 21. Six contestants were tied. Three of those students advanced with at least 1 one. At the end of round 10, a total of 14 contestants advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 38. Five contestants were tied. Four of those students advanced with at least 1 one and 4 twos. At the end of round 12, a total of 6 contestants advanced to round 13 with a cume of 68 (clean break).

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 contestants advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 21. Four contestants were tied. Three of those students advanced with at least 2 twos. At the end of round 10, a total of 14 contestants advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 34. Three contestants were tied. Two of those students advanced with at least 4 ones. At the end of round 12, a total of 6 contestants advanced to round 13 with a cume of 69 (clean break).

Duo Interpretation

International Extemporaneous Speaking

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 teams advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 35. Seven teams were tied. Three of those teams advanced with at least 3 ones.

At the end of round 6, a total of 60 contestants advanced to rounds 7-8 with a cume of 36. Four contestants were tied. Three of those students advanced with at least 3 ones.

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 teams advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 21. Four teams were tied. Two of those teams advanced with at least 1 one, 1 two, and 1 three.

At the end of round 8, a total of 30 contestants advanced to rounds 9-10 with a cume of 22. Three contestants were tied. Two of those students advanced with at least 1 two.

At the end of round 10, a total of 14 teams advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 36 (clean break).

At the end of round 10, a total of 14 contestants advanced to rounds 11-12 with a cume of 33 (clean break).

At the end of round 12, a total of 6 teams advanced to round 13 with a cume of 68 (clean break).

At the end of round 12, a total of 6 contestants advanced to round 13 with a cume of 67 (clean break).

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MAIN DEBATE EVENTS – FINAL RESULTS Place

Name / School / State

RICHARD B. SODIKOW MEMORIAL POLICY DEBATE presented by the Bickel & Brewer Foundation 1. Christopher W. Callahan and Brent E. Mitchell Glenbrook South High School, IL

RD 13

RD 14

FINAL

W W W

W W W W W

NEG (11-2)

2. Connor Munsinger and Jaedon Kroger Roosevelt High School, SD

L W W

W W W L L

AFF (2-11)

LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATE presented by The Lanier Law Firm 1. Lawrence Zhou Bartlesville High School, OK

RD 14

RD 15

FINAL

W W L

W W W W W

NEG (8-7)

2. Nicky Halterman Norman High School, OK

W W W

W W W L W

AFF (7-8)

PUBLIC FORUM DEBATE presented by the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation 1. Tim Perevozchikov and Ron Lubarsky Hawken School, OH

RD 15

RD 16

FINAL

W L W

B B B B B

CON (8-7)

2. Justin Katz and Will Ruff Durham Academy, NC

W W L

W W W L L

PRO (7-8)

WORLD SCHOOLS DEBATE Team Korea defeated Team USA in a 3-2 decision during the final round of the USA Debate World Schools Debate Invitational hosted at the National Speech & Debate Touranment in Overland Park, Kansas. Team Korea (pictured at right) consisted of Jihoon Kim, JhangKyu Lee, Lauren Ahn, and Chan Par. Team USA consisted of Nikolas Angelopoulos, Danny Debois, Sara Evall, Jane Irons, and Amelia Miller. JhangKyu Lee of Korea was the top speaker.

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MAIN SPEECH EVENTS – FINAL RESULTS Place

RD 7-10

Name / School / State Cume

Semi

Semi

RD 11

RD 12

61236 41772 42622 12653 27341 54131

12121 22272 14141 21412 33643 33736

531466323321514 112153111112645 245242455563323 366334636254131 454615244636252 623521562445466

88 90 99 102 112 114

71176 11121 32513 34265 23313 15742

15123 23315 21537 55223 72114 34741

241364122253151 455412461132444 366135316515322 122241244424265 613553555641633 534626633366516

80 87 94 97 109 118

32411 11122 64436 31317 46624 23143

22533 51534 43313 16177 11412 54361

623341451251555 145152532425222 432634125313141 311423243134314 264215314562463 556566666646636

87 93 96 97 107 128

32333 71741 11211 64155 24522 47174

34716 41216 14152 11651 66323 25237

311121112131324 133362221216615 526516453663262 452235345355443 664654534544131 245443666422556

85 85 97 106 109 115

21765 32112 21121 64537 35212 62435

111311134111261 232253225643323 425132551432144 553666612365512 366524443526656 644445366254435

78 85 86 115 116 117

FINAL Total

HUMOROUS INTERPRETATION presented by Western Kentucky University 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Benjamin M. Gruenbaum, Lee’s Summit North High School, MO Blake Knapp, Blue Springs High School, MO Sarah Brashear, Marian High School, NE Noah Jermain, Savannah R3 High School, MO John Mitchell Burns, Bishop McGuinness High School, OK John Biebighauser, Grapevine High School, TX

28 32 32 33 32 32

lanny d. naegelin Dramatic Interpretation presented by Ripon College 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Abigail Onwunali, Hastings High School, TX Tyler Tippings, Schurr High School, CA Reuben Hoyle, Blue Springs South High School, MO Luke Stodghill, South Grand Prairie High School, TX Renny Weeden, Seven Lakes High School, TX Spencer Krumholz, St. Thomas High School, TX

17 30 24 28 35 30

sandra silvers MEMORIAL duo interpretation presented by Colorado College 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Matt Wisenden and Jordan Hartjen, Moorhead High School, MN Lyric Davis and Samuel Moore, Blue Springs High School, MO Jarrius Adams and Isreal Lyons, Hattiesburg High School, MS Branden Lindsay and Jarrett Williams, Southside High School, SC Christin Villalobos and Victoria Villalobos, Gabrielino High School, CA Stephen Durosaiye and Manuela Reyes, Bronx Preparatory Charter School, NY

22 35 29 31 36 33

original oratory presented by the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation Auxiliary 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Andrea Ambam, Raymore-Peculiar High School, MO Laurel Scott, Eagan High School, MN Lexie Harvey, Brentwood Academy, TN Aunika Schraw, St. Cloud Tech High School, MN Moti Begna, Apple Valley High School, MN Walter N. Paul, Creighton Preparatory School, NE

32 21 31 28 27 25

United States Extemporaneous speaking presented by Carmendale Fernandes 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Arel Rende, Tulsa Washington High School, OK Cosmo Albrecht, Robert E. Lee High School - San Antonio, TX Joshua Wartel, Lake Braddock Secondary High School, VA Jasper Shea Primack, Newton South High School, MA Brian Yu, Monte Vista High School - Danville, CA Joe Russell, Brophy College Prep, AZT

27 29 23 28 30 34

35321 44151 73642 14243 35716 52323

A. C. Eley Memorial International Extemporaneous speaking presented by the Council on Foreign Relations 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Miles I. Saffran, Trinity Preparatory School, FL Dylan Adelman, Lakeville South High School, MN Rohan Dhoopar, Bellarmine College Prep, CA Lily Nellans, Des Moines Roosevelt High School, IA Isabella Paretti, Cypress Bay High School, FL Gabe Slater, Denver East High School, CO

16 24 24 33 32 22

21413 14331 33356 14125 76712 23443

13341 32713 11311 41152 22233 35562

523312525451615 251155463215221 644531252126353 166243311342566 415424144534442 332666636663134

76 84 89 98 106 108

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MAIN SPEECH EVENTS – SEMIFINAL RESULTS

RD 7-10 Place Name / School / State Cume

Semi RD 11

Semi RD 12 Total

HUMOROUS INTERPRETATION presented by Western Kentucky University

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Natasha Prosek, Downers Grove South High School, IL Rigel Robinson, Parkway West High School, MO Philip Mackenzie, Desert Vista High School, AZ Stephanie Kahle, Apple Valley High School, MN Rohan Chatterjee, Munster High School, IN Nick Siano, Munster High School, IN Andrew Pittman, Prospect High School, IL Doug Walker, Parkview High School, MO

LANNY D. NAEGELIN Dramatic Interpretation presented by Ripon College Jhamalia Williams-Perry, Bradley Tech High School, WI James Rodriguez, Winston Churchill High School, TX Morgan Papesh, Munster High School, IN Dylan Price, Rocky Mountain High School, CO Mina Hoffman, Wadsworth City School, OH Ke’Lea Wilkins, Clovis East High School, CA Bailey Paterson, Kelly Walsh High School, WY Dawnelle Brown, Bellevue East High School, NE

sandra silvers MEMORIAL duo interpretation presented by Colorado College

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Rish Arhant-Sudhir and Neil Bhagat, Leland High School, CA Drew Swenson and Karina Twedt, Moorhead High School, MN Francisco Sierra and Josue Flores, James Logan High School, CA Alyssa Miller and Andy Gordon, Ravenwood High School, TN Danny Lovato and Bailey Walker, Kent Denver School, CO Jonathan Huang and Giselle DeSilva, Gabrielino High School, CA Kyra Mickens and Jessica James, Hattiesburg High School, MS William Kachi and Jerome Lee, South Grand Prairie High School, TX

original oratorY presented by the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation Auxiliary

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Billy Tate, Plano Sr. High School, TX Anh Le, Madison West High School, WI Patrick Johnson, Brophy College Prep, AZ Kenon Brinkley, Andover High School, KS Stephanie Bernstein, Nova High School, FL Bridget D. Kim, Rowan County Sr. High School, KY Jonathon Santos, James Logan High School, CA Jacob T. Savage, Van High School, TX

United States Extemporaneous speaking presented by Carmendale Fernandes

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Vishal Narayanaswamy, James Madison Memorial High School, WI Chase Harrison, Millburn High School, NJ Adam M. Stromme, Eagan High School, MN Christopher Jordan, Brophy College Prep, AZ Jad Hamdan, Jackson High School, OH Nida Ansari, Riverside High School, SC Ash Maholtra, Plano Sr. High School, TX Brian Anderson, Larue County High School, KY

34 33 32 26 37 33 37 31

14453 77214 33167 66345 76514 35467 23526 55775

71357 65623 56356 57565 46414 45264 74535 67777

74 76 77 78 79 79 79 94

30 38 22 38 36 37 38 38

52742 24251 47657 63337 56424 47665 66576 75434

62254 33652 46366 46532 17745 64471 51466 77677

69 71 76 80 81 87 90 95

28 31 30 33 32 35 34 35

52571 17262 26753 47646 53575 65234 74367 75755

74622 62256 35175 25441 63724 37765 47247 76656

69 70 74 76 79 83 85 94

30 29 30 37 29 32 31 36

22372 53646 43566 37423 66465 16217 55634 75757

37445 23661 53164 56334 72723 65577 77545 42472

69 71 73 77 77 79 82 86

29 29 32 32 29 32 33 34

51575 26465 61534 43764 22417 76152 67636 17277

15651 43346 56426 43344 77767 56574 14653 77273

70 72 74 74 79 80 80 84

A. C. Eley Memorial International Extemporaneous speaking presented by the Council on Foreign Relations

92

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Vaikunth Balaji, Ridge High School, NJ Dylan Dickens, Friendswood High School, TX Alex Doan, Bellarmine College Prep, CA Charles Michael Hinman, Miramonte High School, CA Cara Clark, Beavercreek High School, OH Will Walker, Fullerton Joint Union High School, CA Phoebe Lin, Plano West Sr. High School, TX Alex Ye, Gabrielino High School, CA

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30 28 33 31 28 31 33 28

41254 65527 32165 42734 57541 76272 65667 57676

64464 74126 55537 56745 47477 63654 27275 76626

70 73 75 78 79 79 86 86


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SUPPLEMENTAL AND CONSOLATION EVENTS – FINAL RESULTS Place

Name / School / State

RD 12

RD 13

FINAL

W W W W W L

B B B B B W W W L L

AFF (6-1) NEG (1-6)

Name / School / StatE

PRELIM CUME

SEMIS

PROSE READING presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Nia Clark, Munster High School, IN 2. Yianni Kinnas, Hinsdale Central High School, IL 3. Rebecca Pockrus, Harlingen High School South, TX 4. Camila Kaplunov, Glenbrook North High School, IL 5. Michael Chavez, Albuquerque Academy, NM 6. McKenna Kelley, St. Josephs High School, NY

12 13 14 14 16 13

111 352 223 512 111 451

5333343 3121126 1255432 2544611 6616254 4462565

31 32 37 38 42 47

POETRY READING presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Fernando Rojas, Fullerton Joint Union High School, CA 2. Brett Curtis, Michael Krop High School, FL 3. Swayde Watson, Muldrow High School, OK 4. Michael Debose, Klein Oak High School, TX 5. Adia McLaughlin, Pinecrest High School, NC 6. Thomas Linden, Cypress Creek High School, TX

9 13 13 15 15 15

621 116 622 213 141 115

2155112 1332234 3514321 5243443 4421556 6666665

29 34 36 39 41 52

EXTEMPORANEOUS DEBATE presented by Colorado College

1. Sinan Ozbay, Princeton High School, NJ 2. Brandon Roth, Sprague High School, OR

PLACE

FINAL Total

EXPOSITORY presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Amanda East, Brentwood Academy, TN 10 2. Vivek Srivats, Millard North High School, NE 13 3. Haley Brown, Liberty Sr. High School, MO 15 4. Jeff Heithmar, Natick High School, MA 11 5. Claire Lamman, Canon City High School, CO 10 6. Carol Lee, Riverside High School, SC 13 BROther rené sterner memorial COMMENTARY presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Will Thompson, Charles Page High School, OK 13 2. Nicholas Billings, Thunderbird High School, AZ 9 3. Jason Fisher, Highlands Ranch High School, CO 12 4. Asher Kalman, Miramonte High School, CA 9 5. Matt Greydanus, Grand Rapids Christian, MI 12 6. Bobby Tech, Salina High Central, KS 13

111 122 322 121 242 413

4111235 1542641 5326113 3433566 6265424 2654352

24 34 36 36 39 40

243 614 613 152 432 331

1111111 2252525 5435232 3563646 6324464 4646353

27 36 39 41 42 42

IMPROMPTU presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Michael Everett, Chaminade College Prep, CA 2. Aric Floyd, Hawken School, OH 3. Milan Amritraj, Campbell Hall High School, CA 4. Haley Brahmbhatt, Chanhassen High School, MN 5. Jacob Wisda, Crescenta Valley High School, CA 6. Alexander Blaine Hall, Olympus High School, UT

8 9 7 6 7 7

132 121 512 243 125 211

3312222 1221665 4153351 2435433 5644114 6566546

25 29 31 32 33 39

STORYTELLING presented by Western Kentucky University 1. Sam Scarlato, Chanhassen High School, MN 2. Jami L. Richea, Chesterton High School, IN 3. Micah Spieldenner, Chanhassen High School, MN 4. Cale Harper, Monett High School, MO 5. Stephanie Butler, Lakeville North High School, MN 6. Jessie Sadlon, O’Gorman High School, SD

4 6 3 5 5 4

211 152 152 234 144 422

2441331 3155123 1563442 4314516 6222655 5636264

21 28 29 31 34 36

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SENATOR JOHN C. STENNIS CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE RESULTS

94

HOUSE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 F F F F F F F F F F

Abigail Marone Connor Meckfessel Nic Gerard Marina Finley Nick J. Danby Joseph DiPietro Michael Solomentsev Taylor Bennington Sophia Zupanc Simon Essig Aberg Abhinav Sridharan Laela Zaidi David Burnett Matthew Magee Kishan Srikanth Chris Rice Ben Kilano Kerry Yan Noah Goldstein Junyuan Tan Abrianna Means Jacob Kramer Calvin Robert Maynard Oliver Niklas Trapp

Notre Dame High School Miramonte High School Shrewsbury High School Bellaire High School Bangor High School Iona Preparatory Desert Vista High School Wooster High School Gilmour Academy Desert Vista High School Plano Sr. High School Joplin High School Wooster High School Chapin High School Plano Sr. High School Spring Woods High School Desert Vista High School Riverside High School Miramonte High School Kerr High School Southside High School Summit Int’l Preparatory Good Shepherd School Trinity Preparatory School

PA CA MA TX ME NY AZ OH TX AZ TX MO OH TX TX TX AZ CA CA TX SC TX TX CA

SENATE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 F F F F F F F F F F

Will Mascaro Oliver Sherren Azhar Hussain Max Klein Raymond Rif Abhimanyu Gupta Ethan Miles Prianka Kumar Yuran Chen Avery Reinhart Kang Di Li Gregory Fantin Jonathon Shapiro Ted Waechter P.J. Nyland Lorenzo Barberis Canonico Carlos Ochoa Nick Verderame John Trezza Ryan Fedasiuk JD Richardson Eric Gray Moeller Isaiah Rodriguez Cameron Connelly

Hawken School The Parish Episcopal School Carroll High School - Southlake Lake Highland Preparatory Nova High School Shrewsbury High School Miramonte High School Desert Vista High School Sylvania Southview High School Spring Woods High School Bellaire High School Plano West High School Beachwood High School Cary Academy East Mountain High School Riverside High School Brophy College Prep Charlotte Latin School Roslyn High School Desert Vista High School Green River High School Geneva School Of Boerne Northbrook High School Carlsbad High School

OH TX TX FL FL MA CA AZ OH TX TX TX OH NC NM SC AZ NC NY AZ WY TX TX CA

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014

Leadership Bowl

Presiding Officer

Presiding Officer

Leadership Bowl


www.speechanddebate.org

SENATOR JOHN C. STENNIS CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE

HOUSE

SENATE

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Middle School Results The fifteenth annual Middle School National Speech & Debate Tournament was held June 18-20, 2014, in Overland Park, Kansas. More than 700 students from 100 schools across the country competed at the event!

Schools of Excellence (Top performing middle schools in speech and debate events) Speech

Debate

Overall

Forensics of Oakland County, MI Milton Academy K-8, MA Ockerman Middle School, KY Saint Mary’s Hall, TX Wilshire Academy, CA

Academy of Higher Learning, CA Capitol Debate, MD Knox Jr. High, TX Kudos College/Leadership, CA The Kinkaid School, TX

Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX The Brooks Academy, CA The Harker Middle School, CA

Debate Results Congressional Debate Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestant

School

Prelim Ranks

Elim Total

Vishnu Sajit Averi Suk Aidan Shev Michael Xiao Mogi Taylor John Nahas

Knox Jr. High, TX Academy of Higher Learning, CA New West Charter School, CA Windemere Ranch Middle School, CA Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX Nova 42 Academy, CA

2 3 6 7 4 8

10 19 22 22 26 31

Contestants

School

Prelim Record

Elim Place

Anish Odhav Sam Segal Kyle J. Lee JJ Kapur Lavanya Singh David Liang

The Kinkaid School, TX The Kinkaid School, TX Academy of Higher Learning, CA West Des Moines Valley, IA The Brooks Academy, CA The Kinkaid School, TX

4-1 3-2 3-2 4-1 4-1 4-1

Co-Champion Co-Champion Semifinalist Semifinalist Quarterfinalist Quarterfinalist

Contestants

School

Prelim Record

Elim Place

Devesh Kodnani and Akush Swarnakar Lyle Derden and Lekha Sunder Abhishek Shah and Avi Patel Christy Lee and Annie Chang Claire Silberman and Polly Moser Ishika Chawla and Robert Chen

The Brooks Academy, CA Sindey Lanier Middle School, TX The Brooks Academy, CA BC Academy, Canada Capitol Debate, MD The Brooks Academy, CA

5-0 4-1 4-1 4-1 5-0 4-1

Champion Runner-Up Semifinalist Semifinalist Quarterfinalist Quarterfinalist

1 4 3 2 7 6

2 5 4 1 6 3

4 3 7 9 2 9

1 4 2 3 7 5

Lincoln-Douglas Debate Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Public Forum Debate Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

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www.speechanddebate.org

Policy Debate Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestants

School

Prelim Record

Elim Place

Aliesa Bahri and Meghan Huynh Chaney Bearden and Lauryn Falkenstein Madison Huynh and Avi Gulati Michelle Pantoja and Lisbeth Reynoso Anusha Kuppahally and Millie Lin Jonathan Lin and Jennifer Chiang

The Harker Middle School, CA

5-0

Champion

Calhoun Middle School, GA

4-1

Runner-Up

The Harker Middle School, CA Emiliano Zapata Academy, IL The Harker Middle School, CA Morrison Academy - Taichung, Taiwan

5-0 5-0 3-2 4-1

Semifinalist Semifinalist Quarterfinalist Quarterfinalist

Lincoln-Douglas Debate Speaker Awards 1 2 3

Alan Hughes John Henry Stearns Devin Metzger

The Harker Middle School, CA Marvin Baker Middle School, TX Knox Jr. High, TX

146 pts 145.5 pts 145 pts

The Harker Middle School, CA Calhoun Middle School, GA The Harker Middle School, CA

145 pts 144.5 pts 144.5 pts

Policy Debate Speaker Awards 1 2 3

Madison Huynh Lauryn Falkenstein Avi Gulati

Public Forum Debate Speaker Awards 1 2 3

Avi Patel Aarushi Sahejpal Nick Moore

The Brooks Academy, CA The Brooks Academy, CA Capitol Debate, MD

147.5 pts 147 pts 146 pts

Speech Results † Tied speech cumulative rank totals were broken on judge preference, then sum of reciprocal fractions, then number of firsts, seconds, thirds, etc., then adjusted final rank total, after dropping high and low ranks, and finally, lowest semifinal rank total.

Declamation Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestant

School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

Corrion “Corey” Davis Molly McDermott Arian Raje Maggie Nate Esteban Gutierrez Ravitej Chilukuri

Wirt-Emerson Vis./Perf. Arts, IN Mt. Prospect Middle School, IL The Brooks Academy, CA Lincoln Jr. High School, IN Milton Academy K-8, MA Ivy GuruKul, NJ

2 3 1 5 4 6

10 13 14 15 26 27

1 4 3 2 6 5

1 3 2 5 4 6

3 2 4 1 6 5

3 1 4 2 6 5

Dramatic Interpretation Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestant

School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

JT Garcia Arin Champati Philip Clement Alexandra Upton Lavanya Singh Steele Schoeberl

Saint Mary’s Hall, TX Forensics of Oakland County, MI Saint Mary's Hall, TX Milton Academy K-8, MA The Brooks Academy, CA Lakewood Middle School, TN

1 6 2 4 3 5

8 12 16 19 22 28

2 1 4 3 5 6

1 2 5 4 3 6

3 1 2 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 6 5

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Middle School Results The fifteenth annual Middle School National Speech & Debate Tournament

was held June 18-20, 2014, in Overland Park, Kansas. More than 700 students Duo Interpretation from 100Contestant schools across the country competed at the event! Place School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

1 Jimmy DeLano and Jack Weiler Milton Academy K-8, MA 2 Aman Agarwal and Ayush Agarwal The Brooks Academy, CA 3 Philip Clement and Mary Barnett Saint Mary's Hall, TX 4 Jeremy Craig and Debra Moraitis Forensics of Oakland County, MI Schools of Excellence 5 JT Garcia and Claire Ramos Saint Mary's Hall, TX (Top performing middle schools in speech and debate events) 6 Lucy Ding and Lucy Wu Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX

6 1 3 2 4 5

12 16 17 18 † 18 † 24

Speech

Debate

Forensics of Oakland County, MI Extemporaneous Speaking Milton Academy K-8, MA Place Contestant Ockerman Middle School, KY 1 Arian Raje Saint Mary’s Hall, TX 2 Lyle Derden Wilshire Academy, CA

3 4 5 6

Devesh Kodnani Ankush Swarnakar Ishan Lakhani Tyler Kennedy

Place Contestant Place Contestant

11 2 23 34 45 56

Vishnu Sajit Devan Kumar Averi Suk Arin Champati Aidan Shev Jack Weiler Michael Xiao Mogi MaryTaylor Barnett John Nahas Philip Clement

Place

Contestants

2 Sam Segal Place Contestant 3

Kyle J. Lee

14 Arian Raje JJ Kapur 25 Sierra Dilworth Lavanya Singh David 36 NicciLiang Mattey 4 Crystal Xue Public Forum Debate 5 Jack Pacheco Place Contestants 6 Nilo Tehrani

1 Devesh Kodnani and Akush Swarnakar 2 Lyle Derden and Lekha Sunder 3 Abhishek Shah and Avi Patel Original Oratory 4 Christy Lee and Annie Chang Place Contestant Claire Silberman and Polly Moser 156 Nikhil Dharmaraj Ishika Chawla and Robert Chen

2 3 4 5 6

Nikki Goldin Nalin Gardilla Candilla Park Claudia Witcher Andrew Chan

3 4 6 1 2 5

1 4 2 6 3 5

Overall

The Brooks Academy, CA The Brooks Academy, CA The Brooks Academy, CA Ockerman Middle School, KY

School

School

Prelim Ranks

Knox Jr. High, TX 2 1 2 4 1 Saint Mary’s Hall, TX Academy of Higher Learning, CA 3 4 5 3 4 Forensics ofCA Oakland County, New West Charter School, 6 3 4 MI 7 2 Academy WindemereMilton Ranch Middle School,K-8, CA MA7 2 1 9 3 Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX TX 4 7 6 2 7 Saint Mary's Hall, Nova 42 Academy, CA 8 6 3 9 5 Saint Mary's Hall, TX

6 Trevor LaBree Lincoln-Douglas Debate 1 Anish Odhav Impromptu Speaking

1 2 4 5 6 3

Academy of Higher Learning, CA Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX Capitol Debate, MD The Brooks Academy, CA School Final Round Ranks Knox Jr. High, TX The Harker Middle School, CA The Brooks Academy, CA 2 1 1 1 1 Kudos College/Leadership, CA Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX 3 3 2 2 5 The Kinkaid School, TX

Debate Results

CongressionalInterpretation Debate Humorous

1 5 2 4 3 6

Ockerman Middle School, KY School

Prelim Record

The Kinkaid School, TX 4-1 The Kinkaid School School, TX 3-2 Academy of Higher Learning, CA 3-2 The Brooks Academy, CA4 - 1 West Des Moines Valley, IA ForensicsCAof Oakland County, The Brooks Academy, 4 - 1 MI The Kinkaid Saint School,Mary's TX 4-1 Hall, TX

School

Clay Middle School, IN Milton Academy K-8, MA PrelimMI Record Forensics of Oakland County,

The Brooks Academy, CA Sindey Lanier Middle School, TX The Brooks Academy, CA BC Academy, Canada School Capitol Debate, MD The Harker School, CA The Brooks Academy, CA

5-0 4-1 4-1 4-1 5-0 4-1

Sidney Lanier Middle School, TX Ivy GuruKul Online, NJ Wilshire Academy, CA Drakes Creek Middle School, KY Milton Academy K-8, MA

5 1 4 6

2 6 5 4

3 4 5 6

3 4 6 5

3 2 4 6

Elim Total Final Round Ranks

2101 19 1222 4224 5263 3315 6 6

5 4 2 3 1 6

2 1 4 3 5 6

1 4 2 3 5 6

Rank Total

6 15 16 17 24 27

Rank Total

11 12 16 17 19 30

Elim Place

Co-Champion Co-Champion Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

1Semifinalist 2 4 1 3 2Quarterfinalist 6 1 4 1 3Quarterfinalist 1 6 2 4 4 3 3 3 5 5 4 2 5 2 6Elim 5 5Place 6 6

11 14 16 18 † 18 † 28

Semifinalist

Champion Runner-Up Semifinalist Semifinalist Final Round Ranks 1Quarterfinalist 1 1 3 2 Quarterfinalist

4 2 6 3 5

2 3 4 6 5

6 2 5 4 3

4 5 1 2 6

1 5 3 6 4

Rank Total

8 17 † 17 † 19 21 23

Poetry Interpretation Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

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Contestant

School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

Mycah Butler Mary Barnett Arin Champati Sanya Verma Alexandra Upton Lillie Zuniga

Forensics of Oakland County, MI Saint Mary's Hall, TX Forensics of Oakland County, MI Forensics of Oakland County, MI Milton Academy K-8, MA Marvin Baker Middle School, TX

1 2 3 4 6 5

6 11 20 † 20 † 23 25

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1 2 5 6 3 4

1 3 4 2 5 6

1 3 5 2 4 6

2 1 3 6 5 4


www.speechanddebate.org

Prose Interpretation Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestant

School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

Soleil Devonish Mycah Butler Nilo Tehrani Jerome Vainisi Alex Chon Emmy Hickman

Milton Academy, MA Forensics Of Oakland County, MI Forensics Of Oakland County, MI Milton Academy K-8, MA Wilshire Academy, CA Brentwood Academy, TN

1 3 5 4 2 6

9 12 17 19 20 28

2 1 4 3 5 6

1 5 2 6 3 4

1 2 3 4 5 6

4 1 3 2 5 6

Storytelling Place

1 2 3 4 5 6

Contestant

School

Final Round Ranks

Rank Total

Melisa Kreismanis Michael McCullom Sarah Bryant Debra Moraitis Sanya Verma Isaac Martinez

The Pike School, MA The Pike School, MA Brentwood Academy, TN Forensics of Oakland County, MI Forensics of Oakland County, MI Kudos College/Leadership, CA

1 2 5 3 4 6

12 13 15 18 20 27

1 3 2 5 4 6

5 2 3 1 4 6

3 5 1 4 2 6

2 1 4 5 6 3

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Parting Glance:  Behind the Scenes with David Sedaris

Popular author and guest finals judge David Sedaris addressed the crowd Thursday evening at the Overland Park Convention Center after being presented with a special recognition plaque. Backstage, he surprised each of the Humorous Interpretation finalists with a copy of his book, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls.

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Florida Forensic institute

led the way to Kansas city and the result:

t t t

FI F the FFi staFF Ft. Lauderdale

NatioNal ChampioNships aNd fiNalists iN Numerous debate aNd speeCh eveNts! experience our students’ success... joiN us for aN ffi summer

FFI 2014 Feedback

after coaching at another speech and debate camp, I realized that FFI offers both students and coaches the creative space to take risks and challenge themselves in ways that others don’t.” - Oratory Staff Member

FFI provides a lot of resources you wouldn’t get elsewhere. the coaches here are high school and collegiate champions and can provide all the tools to succeed.” - Congressional Debate Student, California

I love FFI because I work with the best people in the event I love doing. the freedom and fun of FFI makes it unbeatable.” - Interp Student, Ohio

the loNe star state will be Crowded with stars iN juNe wheN ffiers head to dallas!

Don Crabtree (Curriculum Director) is the current President of the National Speech & Debate Association and an eight-diamond coach from Park Hill HS in Missouri. With 40 years of educational experience, Mr. Crabtree brings the Florida Forensic Institute his incomparable expertise.

FFI is unique from other camps at which I teach because students get individual attention in a large camp atmosphere.” - Public Forum Staff Member

at FFI you learn more about the application of techniques instead of just being given information. It’s the whole package.” - Extemporaneous Speaking Student, Michigan

the instructors work as hard as they can to provide the support to become a better debater. the curriculum covers a wide variety of topics and has the perfect balance between debate skills and content.” - Public Forum Student, Texas

www.ffi4n6.com July 17 - 31, 2015 • Extension August 1 - 3, 2015


IN MEMORIAM

Richard B. Sodikow: A Life Well-Lived by James M. Copeland

On May 4, 2014, the speech and debate community mourned the loss of Mr. Richard B. Sodikow, beloved coach and mentor from New York. Below, Mr. Copeland pays tribute to his colleague and friend.

R

ichard’s favorite author

cast (aide de camp Robert Levinson,

William Shakespeare

adviser Kirby Chin, longtime

wrote, “The heavens

companion Ann Shapiro, and

themselves blaze forth the death

poet Brother John McGrory, who

of princes.”

chronicled Richard’s adventures in

Make no mistake, Richard B.

double dactyl verse). In the chorus

Sodikow was indeed a prince:

were a motley group of fools and

Shakespeare scholar, New York

foils who kept Richard aggravated

State Teacher of the Year,

and amused—one of whom was I.

conversant in several languages,

To all of us in the troupe, Richard

renowned coach of debate

dispensed wit, advice, admonitions,

champions. His many honors

arguments, and critiques. It was

include the Barkley Forum Key, a

they have their exits and their

a privilege to play a small part in

rare seventh coaching Diamond,

entrances; and one man in his time

Richard’s life—and what a life it

and election to the National

plays many parts.” That was fine

was!

Speech & Debate Association Hall

with Richard, as long as he played

of Fame.

the leading role. Like Sheridan

scientist, Richard’s love was the

Whiteside, “The Man who Came to

English language. He was a popular

the Bard of Avon, “and all the men

Dinner,” Richard stood center stage,

and award winning teacher and had

and all the women merely players:

surrounded by a loving supporting

no equal at the use of English. In an

“All the world’s a stage,” wrote

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Rostrum | SUMMER 2014

Although he was trained as a


www.speechanddebate.org

earlier era, Richards’s sharp repartee

Richard served with distinction

students, attending their weddings

and clever bon mots would

on the National Speech & Debate

and following their careers.

have earned him a place at the

Association Board of Directors. He

Students and friends returned his

Algonquin roundtable, no doubt

supported expansion of debate

love.

leaving Dorothy Parker speechless.

opportunities and the creation of

As an oral reader of Shakespeare,

Last spring, his former students

new debate events. Former Board

honored him with a trip back

Richard rivaled Orson Welles.

President Donus Roberts lauded

to the Emory tournament. And

Picture Richard as Falstaff or King

Richard as “an extraordinarily good

when it was announced that the

Lear, roles he read with zest.

councilor: a true advocate for

National Tournament Policy Debate

debate.”

event was to be named Richard

But it was as a debate coach that Richard found his true metier.

Richard was a superb

B. Sodikow Policy Debate, all who

Richard had many opinions, on

tournament director, and attending

knew him were overjoyed that

many subjects—and he was eager

his Bronx Science tournament

they would see Richard in June and

to argue them all, at great length.

was a must for all teams traveling

celebrate his honor with him.

Richard was born to debate, and

the national debate circuit. At

to coach debate, and he became

the National Tournament, Richard

left us suddenly, and far too soon.

America’s premier debate coach.

served as ombudsman, ruling

We would not see him again.

His Bronx Science teams were

on protests with the wisdom

The movie Life of Pi teaches us,

continually in the final rounds at

of Solomon. Richard was very

“The whole of life becomes an act

national debate events.

officious, working long hours

of letting go. . . but what always

without meals or rest.

hurts the most. . . is not taking a

But what was unique was that

Alas, it was not to be. . . Richard

Richard, unlike other great coaches,

He was also very generous.

did not use the star system. Many

When anyone admired one of the

coaches would concentrate on

elegant neckties Richard always

Stratford man sum up the life of

a few bright students. Richard

wore, like Beau Brummel, Richard

Richard B. Sodikow.

coached the largest debate

removed his tie and presented it to

program in America. The Varsity

his admirer as a gift.

team might be winning the famous

Richard had very intense feelings

moment to say goodbye.” Now, as we say goodbye, let the

Shakespeare wrote: “His life was gentle. . . and elements so mixed in him. . . that nature might stand up

Barkley Forum in Atlanta, while at

for people. He loved his mother

and say to all the world. . .‘this was

the same time, ten JV teams would

Lillian, his aunt Nettie, and his very

a man.’”

be competing in the Mid-Hudson

special nieces Sarah, Lois, Jane, and

League in New York. Richard

their extended family of grand

believed every idea was debatable

nieces and nephews.

and that everyone should have the opportunity to debate.

Richard would do anything for a friend. He doted on his former

James Copeland is Director Emeritus for the National Speech & Debate Association.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 103


IN MEMORIAM

Frank Sferra: “I’m In This For Kids” by James M. Copeland

Our community lost another coaching great, Mr. Frank Sferra of Colorado, on July 30, 2014. Here, Mr. Copeland remembers his longtime friend and illuminates his storied career.

A

t the 1991 Speech

words. Disappointed, Frank continued

Communication Association

competing in speech events and

convention in Chicago,

earned the Degree of Excellence. But debate was not through with

Frank Sferra, Lowell Sharp, and I were waiting in a meeting room for our

Frank, and Frank was not through

panel to begin, when Frank told us

with debate! While in college, Frank

how he got into debate.

returned to help coach at Regis. After college graduation, he founded the

Frank hated high school. He was

104

a shy, overweight boy who was

debate program at Bishop Machebeuf

overwhelmed by Regis High School

High School. Later, Frank would begin

and felt alone. But a kindly teacher

his tenure as debate coach at Mullen,

talked Frank into joining the speech

which would span half a century. Not smart enough? Frank would

team. Frank found friends and an

in tournaments; and he hoped that

activity he enjoyed. He was especially

soon he could debate! Finally he did

go on to qualify 75 students to the

fascinated by debate, but as a

debate, but Association records show

National Tournament and 30 students

novice, he was placed in Humorous

he was unsuccessful: only one win

to the National Congress. He coached

Interpretation with a cutting from Dr.

and five losses. His coach told him,

two Mullen debate teams to the

Seuss: “Horton Hatches an Egg” (cruel

“Frankie, you are not smart enough

national championship final round,

typecasting by today’s standards). Yet

to debate.” Thirty years later, at the

a national champion orator, and the

Frank was excited. He was part of a

pinnacle of his outstanding career,

team that won the Karl E. Mundt

team; he would be representing Regis

Frank could still recall those cutting

National Legislative Debate Trophy.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Not smart enough? Frank became

friend. The popular Frank could have

the most honored man in debate

served as long as he chose, but Frank

education, earning election into the

was interested in teaching kids, not

National Speech & Debate Association

holding office.

Hall of Fame, the Colorado High

How does one explain such

School Activities Association Hall

a brilliant career? How does one

of Fame (the first debate coach so

understand such an extraordinary life?

honored), and the National High

Did a cutting comment to a shy

School Hall of Fame (also the first

15- year-old, “You’re not smart

debate coach so honored). Emory

enough to debate,” create the

University presented Frank with the

impetus to drive Frank’s successful

Thomas Glenn Pelham Award for his

career? I think not!

“devotion to the forensic arts.” Frank

I believe all of Frank’s great work

earned the Association’s Distinguished

occurred because the adult Frank

Service Key and Plaque, as well as

never forgot the young Frankie: shy

seven coaching Diamonds. He also

and alone, hating school, but finding

won the Ralph E. Carey Trophy for

a family and a purpose on the Regis

distinguished service as a district chair.

speech team.

But awards meant very little to

Frank knew there were thousands

Frank. “I’m in this for kids,” Frank

of shy, unhappy kids who could

often said, and indeed he was! Frank

benefit being on a debate and

coached plenty of winners, but

speech team. Frank knew there were

he never coached the star system.

thousands of kids who were eager to

Mullen was not a large school, but

learn the skills that only debate and

Frank coached a large program.

speech can teach. Frank wanted to

Perhaps remembering his youth, Frank

find those kids and teach them. And

welcomed shy, unhappy, school-

for more than 50 years, he did just

loathing students to his program. He

that.

constantly encouraged those kids who had won no trophies. His students responded by earning

“As a member of the National Speech & Debate Association, I pledge to uphold the highest standards of integrity, humility, respect, leadership, and service in the pursuit of excellence.”

Frank lived for his family, his church, his school, his students, and debate. . . Smart choices for a career of teaching

Mullen four Leading Chapter Awards.

and service to others. Smart choices

Because of his integrity, Frank was

for a life of integrity and purpose.

elected President of the National

Code of Honor

Very smart!

Speech & Debate Association and served for a decade before relinquishing the Presidency to a

James Copeland is Director Emeritus for the National Speech & Debate Association.

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 105


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COACH PROFILE

Jan Friedman-Pizzo and Lynn Pizzo

How did you become involved in speech and debate? Jan: in 1977, I caught the speech and debate bug when I joined the Cherry Creek High School Speech Team in Denver, Colorado. My competitive career was life-changing; I found my passion. After graduation, I started judging and did some assistant coaching. Soon I realized that I wanted to support other teenagers in an activity that I found so rewarding at their age. Lynn: I got involved in 1989 because of my wife, Jan. I decided to become a coach because I know the value of speaking well and understand that logic is our most important intellectual tool. Did you have any speech and debate mentors? If so, who were they, and what did they teach you? Jan: Speech and debate competitors teach me about perseverance, commitment, loyalty, friendship, and life. Additionally, four individuals are huge influences on my coaching career. My high school coach, Gary Addington, has been a mentor and supportive friend for more than 35 years. He believed in me as a competitor and after I graduated from college, he gave me the opportunity to be an assistant coach at Cherry Creek. From Gary I learned the

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intricacies of managing a team, the importance of giving back, and the value of participation, over winning. Jane Berry-Eddings of Sprague High School is an exemplary role model. Jane is the director of the Oregon State Speech and Debate Championships. In this capacity, she works hard to demystify the competition, and to make the attending schools feel wanted and important. South Oregon District Chair Rob Moeny of North Valley High School is a wonderful mentor. He has a calm demeanor and is an effective problem-solver. He engenders a spirit of collaboration and is committed to doing what is right for the competitors. Finally, the Head Coach of the Butte Falls Team, Marcia StewartWarren, taught me about coaching and teaching in a small rural community. She is an exceptionally talented educator who exemplifies the virtues of integrity, dedication, and perseverance. Lynn: My wife, Jan, showed me the value of competitive speech and debate. Dr. David Frank at the University of Oregon challenged me to articulate in written form how speech and debate applies in the real world. Dr. Kevin Kuswa, currently at Whitman College, taught me about

the great philosophers. Our students constantly provide me with invaluable insight throughout the season. Tell us a little about your school and the features that make your program unique. Jan and Lynn: Butte Falls Charter School is an extremely small school with approximately 70 students, many of whom are living at or below the poverty line. The school is located in a rural Southern Oregon community of fewer than 500 inhabitants. Butte Falls is 30 minutes from the nearest urban area. Our speech program is unique because it is one of only two academic teams available to Butte Falls students. Additionally, we have three coaches who have distinctive perspectives and more than 40 years of coaching experience. The head coach of the program, Marcia StewartWarren, started the team more than 15 years ago, adopting us in 2005. What challenges do you face as coaches and educators? Jan and Lynn: One of our biggest challenges is access to the team. We live approximately three hours away from the school; therefore, we have to find creative ways to coach from afar. Economic constraints significantly limit the competitive opportunities available to the team. Most of our students cannot afford summer


www.speechanddebate.org

camps and in ten years, we have only attended one out-of-state invitational. Because the school is so small, the pressure to engage in activities is immense. For example, just one student choosing to compete at a speech meet, over participating in a sports event, might disqualify the school from competing in the sport because the team is now too small.

How has coaching changed you? Jan: Coaching speech and debate has given me an invaluable opportunity to associate with talented and inspirational young people who remind me every day that the future is bright. Coaching affords me the ability to appreciate teenagers and the challenges that they face in life. Lynn: Coaching has changed me because I see what our students give up in the short-term for life-changing skills and abilities.

What would your advice be to a new coach? What advice would you give to a coach who is feeling burned out? Jan and Lynn: One thing that can be a big help for both a new coach and a veteran who is feeling burned out is to develop a coaching team. Sharing the responsibilities, having another person to talk to about issues, or to generate ideas is extremely helpful. Even if everyone is new to the activity, the learning curve will be smaller and the available energy greater on a team. What aspects of speech and debate participation are most attractive to your students? Jan: Obviously, our students like to win trophies, but they also appreciate how the skills they learn cross-apply to their other academic endeavors. Essays and term papers become easy. Giving oral presentations in class is no

problem. When non-team members see how effortlessly speech students speak in class and complete written assignments, they start to think that maybe there is something valuable in competing in speech and debate. Lynn: They love the ability to be able to talk others into almost anything. I stop them on the street on their way to or from lunch, and ask them to join the team. When they observe the skills gained through speech and debate by fellow students, they want to join.

How does participation in speech and debate change your students? Jan: Speech and debate exposes participants to the world outside of their rural community. Team members often graduate at the top of their class, and realize that they can go to college. They gain confidence and realize that they can dream big. Lynn: They are better able to look at both sides of all situations and decide upon proper course of action. What goals would you have your students set for the coming year? Jan and Lynn: Butte Falls requires students to write goals for the school year. We expect that the team members will challenge themselves to do what seems difficult, be it competing in a new event, mentoring a younger student, or qualifying to state or to nationals. We hope each student makes new friends, visits new places, learns new things, and has fun as part of the team. Tell us about your favorite memory of the activity or an experience that left a lasting impact on you. Jan and Lynn: In September 2013, the Butte Falls team, along with two other schools, participated in a community debate about a real problem in

front of actual stakeholders. The idea came from a former Eugene debater and Medford coach, Matthew Eldridge. Because of his experiences in the world of competitive speech, Matthew explained to the hosting organization that high school debaters would illuminate the discussion because of their training in developing logical arguments based on evidence and reasoning. Local citizens wrote the resolutions, and Matthew modified the debate format to allow the audience to ask questions. At the end of the day, adults who knew nothing about competitive debate were amazed at the thoughtfulness and clarity of high school students. What is the most important thing you want your students to take away from this activity? Jan: The confidence to handle whatever happens in their lives. Lynn: We hope that when students finish their high school competitive careers, that they take with them the realization that they have gained lifelong skills, and the confidence to compete in an ever-changing world.

Jan Friedman-Pizzo joined the National Speech & Debate Association in 1977 as a competitor at Cherry Creek High School in Colorado. She served as President of the Oregon High School Speech League Coaches Association. Joseph Lynn Pizzo is a retired U.S. Army Military Intelligence Officer who joined the Association as a coach in 1989. Jan and Lynn are the 2012-13 Co-Oregon Speech Educators of the Year and future inductees into the Oregon Speech Hall of Fame. They both hold Master’s Degrees in Liberal Arts from Texas Christian University. They are volunteer assistant coaches at Butte Falls Charter School in Butte Falls, Oregon, and reside in Bend, Oregon.

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Saeed Jones

Saeed Jones is the LGBT editor at BuzzFeed and author of When the Only Light is Fire. He competed for Lewisville High School in Lewisville, Texas. As a senior in 2004, he won the final round of Original Oratory at the National Speech & Debate Tournament, placing second overall, and was coached by Sally Squibb and Liana Massengale. His latest collection of poems, Prelude to Bruise, was published this month.

What inspired you to become a writer? My mother’s bookshelf. It

wake up at 4:45 a.m.

was in the center of our living room

and write for about 45

and had books by writers like Toni

minutes every morning.

Morrison, Alice Walker, and James

About two years ago, I

Baldwin. I started reading them when

decided I actually had

I was in middle school, and it felt like

a book rather than just

I was suddenly breathing a cleaner,

a pile of poems, which

fresher kind of air. Those books saved

meant it was time to

my life. They taught me how to

start creating a coherent

make a way forward for myself in this

manuscript—something

world. I was and still am so grateful

that would take the

for those writers. I aspire to have a

reader on a journey. The

similar impact on my readers. I want

experience of working on

to write the poem that’s going to

these poems for six years

save your life.

has been a delight, really. I’ve had

said, “the ear is a wonderful editor,”

great teachers, mentors, and editors

and I absolutely agree. Reading the

along the way, too. Being able to

poem out loud while I’m writing it

poetry. What was that process like?

publish the book now feels like the

brings all of the rhythms (expected

I’ve been working on the poems that

completion of a journey.

and unexpected) to the surface. It

You just wrote a new book of

school English. I would

tells me what’s working, what isn’t

appear in Prelude to Bruise since 2008. Many of them started in the

Do any of the skills you learned

workshops I took in graduate school

from speech come into play while

upon. Speech and debate taught

at Rutgers University-Newark. Others

working on your poetry? When

me to speak, of course, but most

I wrote when I was teaching high

I’m further along in the process of

valuably, it taught me how to listen.

writing a poem, I start reading it out loud. Poet Yusef Komunyakaa

110

working, and what should be seized

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Why did you join speech and

impact on my writing. Reading my

Are you still involved in the

debate? It just seemed inevitable,

poems out loud is a natural part

activity? If so, how? Not really,

honestly. Short of the whole

of my editing process, and I know

to be honest. It was a wonderful

business about having to wear a

where that comes from. When I

eight years and I’m deeply grateful.

suit (which I absolutely loathed and

do poetry readings, I’m drawing

But I also believe that the point of

have pretty much avoided since

on my experience in speech, as

forensics is what comes next and

I graduated from college), all of

well. It’s always with me. I’m also

what you do with everything you’ve

the skills and values that forensics

the LGBT editor at BuzzFeed, and

learned. I do think it’d be really cool

celebrates are values that I deeply

I work with a team of five amazing

to be able to support a scholarship

believe in and aspire to embody.

writers and journalists. I’m editing,

fund for speech students one day.

Also, I love to talk! Delivering

writing, managing, doing interviews,

speeches feels good. There’s just no

and speaking on panels, all of

other way to say it.

which draw upon skills I picked up

now, what memories come to

and honed during the eight years

mind? I’ll never forget how normal

I competed in speech and debate.

it felt to talk to a wall in the middle

How did speech and debate shape

When you think about speech

your high school (and college) experience? Competing in speech and the debate was the first time I felt like I was doing something I was born to do. That’s a powerful feeling, and one that I hope all young people are able to experience at one point or another. I received

“Competing in speech and the debate was the first time I felt like I was doing something I was born to do. That’s a powerful feeling.”

a full scholarship to compete for Western Kentucky University’s speech and debate team, and that’s huge. Speech changed my life.

More broadly, lately I’ve been

a high school on Saturday mornings.

thinking a great deal about learning

I’ll never forget being curled up

how to speak across the distance of

in the back seat of a van headed

the activity, what kind of impact

our various identities as Americans.

to one tournament or another. I’ll

has speech and debate had on

And that begins with learning about

never forget walking onto the stage

your life? In general, I have a

communication and putting that

during the National Tournament

better (though still imperfect)

knowledge into practice.

final round and seeing that amazing

Now that you’re an alumnus of

understanding of how to listen

audience. I said “wow” out loud.

to others, express myself, and

Couldn’t help myself.

engage in productive dialogues. Speech also had a tremendous

Rostrum | SUMMER 2014 111


le Schednu a n! auditio Western Kentucky University

Austin Groves, class of 2015 and Lily Nellans, class of 2018.

THIS IS WKU FORENSICS To the University, Forensics is an opportunity to demonstrate academic excellence, to excel in competition of the intellect, and to extend the academic atmosphere. To the student, Forensics is an opportunity to cultivate life-long friendships, travel the country, and do what you love.

PASSION • HUMILIT Y • UNIT Y • SERVICE • GR ATITUDE SAVE THE DATE! The WKU SUMMER FORENSIC INSTITUTE will be held July 5-16, 2015! Check our website for details on our new intensive summer camp experience.

WKU Forensics; Ganer Newman 1906 College Heights Blvd. #51084 Bowling Green, KY 42101-1084 phone: 270-745-6340

email: ganer.newman@wku.edu www.wkuforensics.com Follow us on Twitter: @wkuforensics


THE SPIRIT OF ENGAGED EXCELLENCE

WE ARE

HONORS

The Honors College at WKU provides a unique educational experience combining the benefits of a small, prestigious, liberal arts institution with the resources and affordability of a mid to large size public university. With more than 1,200 scholars, our students embody the spirit of engaged excellence through scholarship, active citizenship, and international engagement. We are Honors!

Visit the Honors College today: www.wku.edu/honors facebook.com/wkuhonors

@WKUHonors

@WKUHonors


www.facebook.com/speechanddebate www.instagram.com/speechanddebate www.twitter.com/speechanddebate

Our Mission We believe communication skills are essential for

Code of Honor

empowering youth to become engaged citizens,

“As a member of the National

skilled professionals, and honorable leaders in our

Speech & Debate Association,

global society. We connect, support, and inspire

I pledge to uphold the highest

a diverse community of honor society members

standards of integrity, humility,

committed to fostering excellence in young people

respect, leadership, and service

through competitive speech and debate activities.

in the pursuit of excellence.�

Our Vision We envision a world in which every student has access to competitive speech and debate activities. We are the leading voice in the development of resources, competitive and ethical standards, curricular and co-curricular opportunities,

Learn more about how you can help give youth a voice!

and recognition systems for our vast network

www.speechanddebate.org

of student, coach, and alumni members.

info@speechanddebate.org


2014 Summer Rostrum