Issuu on Google+

Rostrum A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

VOLUME 89 ISSUE 2 FA L L 2 0 1 4

Meet the USA Debate Team | What We’re Reading Student of the Year Spotlight | Year in Review | And More!

PLUS

In Focus:

Building Community Circle of Champion Coaches

Learn about our efforts to increase engagement at the local level!


T h e S p i r i T o f e n g ag e d e xc e l l e n c e

I want to make a difference. Making a difference in the lives of children is Janniqua’s ultimate goal. Her experiences in the Honors College and with WKU Forensics, the world champion speech and debate team, are preparing her to do just that. At WKU, she is more than a number or a grade. She’s part of a close-knit community that has taught her that hard work leads to great success! JANNIQUA DAWKINS

Miami, FL

www.wku.edu/honors facebook.com/wkuhonors @wkuhonors @wkuhonors


University of Texas University ofin Texas University of Texas National Institute Forensics National in Forensics Forensics National Institute Institute in

 

!

Join  us  at  the  UTNIF  in    Austin,  Texas  in  2014  

Come to!"#$%&'()&'*"#+,,"#,&#"'-.%, Texas and see foruyourself whyTthe UTNIF one of the largest and /&#'&+'*! ,#/),#&'*"#&)+0 , most Join   s  in  Austin,   exas   this  sis ummer!   successful speech and debate workshops in the country. Our alumni have won Forensic League championships and National Forensic League The UTNIF would like to once again congratulate allinofthe thesummertime very fine competitors ItNational is never too early to begin thinking about where to go tofinal advance rounds in the House, Senate, Forum, Policy Debate, U.S. Extemp, your and debate training. the season chugs along, we’d like andspeech coaches who gavethe their allAs atPublic lastcompetitive summer’s NFL National Tournament in to Extemp Commentary, Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous encourage you to keep the UTNIF in mind. Indianapolis, Indiana. Interpretation, Poetry, and more. Asnational, the culmination all the passion, dedication, and hard work of thehave season, At state, andof local tournaments across the nation UTNIF students already the NFL truly represents the best community. In 2013, the racked up tournament tremendous successes this season. And,ofinour previous years, UTNIF alumni have wonwill national championships and final rounds in the House, the Senate, UTNIF continue to do its part innational contributing to the NFL’s long tradition of Public Forum, Policy Debate, U.S. Extemp, Extemp Commentary, Impromptu Speaking, excellence and integrity in speech and debate education.

Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Poetry, and more.

2014year, Program Dates As you begin the new competitive we encourage you to keep us in mind. Join us next summer and see for yourself why the UTNIF onerecord. of the largest UTNIF offers students a great training regimen with a proven is track Consider Individual Events June – July 12 joining us insuccessful the summer of 2015 to debate see for workshops yourself whyinlast UTNIF was one and most speech and thesummer’s country. 28 Our alumni ofIndividual the largest and championships most successful speech and debate workshops we’ve run the16 last 20 have won NFL and NFL final rounds in the House, the Senate, Events with extension June 28 – in July years. Public Forum, Policy Debate, US Extemp, Extemp Commentary, Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation,June Poetry more. CX Session 1 26 and – July 16 CX Session 2

July 18 – August 7

Public Forum (experienced)

June 26 – July 3

Public Forum (advanced)

July 5 – July 12

Lincoln-Douglas

July 19 – August 2

Lincoln-Douglas with extension

July 19 – August 6

UTNIF Dept. of Communication Studies 1UTNIF University Station, A1105 Austin, 78705 Dept. ofTX Communication Studies UTNIF 1 University Station, A1105 Dept. of Communication Studies Austin, TX 78705 1 University Station, A1105 Austin, TX 78705

www.utspeech.net www.utdebatecamp.com phone: (512) 471-5518 www.utspeech.net jvreed@austin.utexas.edu www.utdebatecamp.com www.utspeech.net phone: (512) 471-5518 www.utdebatecamp.com jvreed@austin.utexas.edu phone: (512) 471-5518 jvreed@austin.utexas.edu


le Schednu a n! auditio Western Kentucky University

Austin Groves, class of 2015 and Lily Nellans, class of 2018.

THIS IS WKU FORENSICS To the University, Forensics is an opportunity to demonstrate academic excellence, to excel in competition of the intellect, and to extend the academic atmosphere. To the student, Forensics is an opportunity to cultivate life-long friendships, travel the country, and do what you love.

PASSION • HUMILIT Y • UNIT Y • SERVICE • GR ATITUDE SAVE THE DATE! The WKU SUMMER FORENSIC INSTITUTE will be held July 5-16, 2015! Check our website for details on our new intensive summer camp experience.

WKU Forensics; Ganer Newman 1906 College Heights Blvd. #51084 Bowling Green, KY 42101-1084 phone: 270-745-6340

email: ganer.newman@wku.edu www.wkuforensics.com Follow us on Twitter: @wkuforensics


In this Issue

www.speechanddebate.org

: V o l u m e 8 9 : I s s u e 2 : F A LL 2 0 1 4

From the Cover 20

In Focus – Building Community at the District Level

Features 7

Board of Directors Fall Minutes

10

Evidence in Debate: An Overview

14

Debate Evidence Rules: A Dialogue by David Huston

17

New Pilot in 2014-15: World Schools District Team for Nationals

43

Meet the 2014-15 USA Debate Team

66

National Student of the Year Spotlight: A Competition for Change by Walter N. Paul

70

Opinion – An Activity At Risk: A Call for Topic-Centered Debate by Dr. Michael Greenstein

124 In Memoriam – Carmendale Fernandes:

Shattered Glass by James M. Copeland

Year in Review: 2013-14 91

Century Society Report

92

Point Leaders

96

All State Awards

104 Largest Schools 105 Largest Number of New Degrees 106 Chapter Honor Societies 113

Charter Chapter Report

122 New Degrees Summary

Inside 4

From the Editor

5

2014-15 Topics

28

What We're Reading

30

From Our Community

34

District in Detail: Eastern Missouri

41

Get with the Program

48

Alumni Spotlight: Virginia Brazier

52

Diamond Coach Recognition

60

Donus D. Roberts Quad Ruby Coach Recognition

62

Coach Profile: Aaron Smith

74

Academic All Americans

80

Student Service Citations

88

Welcome New Schools

Like us on Facebook /speechanddebate Share with us on Instagram /speechanddebate Follow us on Twitter @speechanddebate

Rostrum | FALL 2014 3


Board of Directors

From the Editor While the 2014 calendar year may be winding to a close, our member schools and coaches from across the country are just beginning to ramp up their efforts of bringing competitive speech and debate activities to more and more young people. As part of those efforts, this issue of Rostrum expands upon the concept of community-building at the district level, which was first introduced at the Summer Leadership Conference and in the Summer Rostrum. It is our hope that the tips and resources featured here and in our Building Community Toolkit online will inspire more collaboration and engagement in your local area. We're especially excited to announce a new District Building Community Grant, being offered in partnership with the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation, in which districts can receive up to $1,500 in additional funds to serve a variety of needs for schools, students, and programs in their district. To learn more, please turn to page 20. We also explore two pilot programs being offered in 2014-15—the optional use of revised debate evidence rules for Policy, Lincoln-Douglas, and Public Forum Debate, as well as suggested ways for districts to select a World Schools District Team for Nationals. We hope many districts will take part in these opportunities and send us their feedback! Finally, in this month of giving thanks, we celebrate our countless students, coaches, and alumni whose energy and talents are insurmountable. Our "Year in Review" section highlights notable rankings and other accomplishments from the 2013-14 school year. Congratulations to all and best wishes for a safe and happy holiday season!

J. Scott Wunn Executive Director National Speech & Debate Association

A PUBLICATION OF THE NATIONAL SPEECH & DEBATE ASSOCIATION 125 Watson Street | PO Box 38 | Ripon, WI 54971-0038 | Phone (920) 748-6206 | Fax (920) 748-9478

Emily Bratton, Graphic Design Assistant

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES Individuals: $10 for one year | $25 for two years Member Schools: $15 for each additional subscription

(USPS 471-180) (ISSN 1073-5526) Rostrum is published quarterly (Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring) by the National Speech & Debate Association, 125 Watson Street, PO Box 38, Ripon, WI 54971. Periodical postage paid at Ripon, WI 54971. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to National Speech & Debate Association, 125 Watson Street, PO Box 38, Ripon, WI 54971. Rostrum provides a forum for the speech and debate community. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own and not necessarily the opinions of the Association, its officers, or its members. The National Speech & Debate Association does not guarantee advertised products and services unless sold directly by the Association.

4

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Polly Reikowski, Ph.D., Admin Rep Eagan High School 4185 Braddock Trail Eagan, MN 55123 (651) 683-6902 polly.reikowski@district196.org Kandi King 6058 Gaelic San Antonio, TX 78240 (210) 641-6761 mamakjking@yahoo.com Tommie Lindsey, Jr. James Logan High School 1800 H Street Union City, CA 94587 (510) 471-2520, Ext. 4408 Tommie_Lindsey@nhusd.k12.ca.us

David Huston Colleyville Heritage High School 5401 Heritage Avenue Colleyville, TX 76034 (817) 305-4700, Ext. 214 david.huston@gcisd.net

Rostrum

Vicki Pape, Assistant Editor

Pam Cady Wycoff, Vice President Apple Valley High School 14450 Hayes Road Apple Valley, MN 55124-6796 (952) 431-8200 Pam.Wycoff@district196.org

Pamela K. McComas PO Box 5078 Topeka, KS 66605 (785) 231-7414 pmcco@cox.net

Sincerely,

J. Scott Wunn, Editor and Publisher

Don Crabtree, President Park Hill High School 1909 6th Avenue St. Joseph, MO 64505 (816) 261-2661 crabnfl@gmail.com

James W. “Jay” Rye, III The Montgomery Academy 3240 Vaughn Road Montgomery, AL 36106 (334) 272-8210 jay_rye@montgomeryacademy.org Jon Cruz The Bronx High School of Science 75 West 205th Street Bronx, NY 10468 (718) 817-7700 cruz@bxscience.edu Jennifer Jerome, Alternate Millard West High School 5710 S. 176th Avenue Omaha, NE 68135 (402) 715-6000 (school office) (402) 715-6092 (classroom) jjerome1984@gmail.com


www.speechanddebate.org

2014–2015

Topics

Current topics and resources are available at:

www.speechanddebate.org/topics

Topic Release Information Public Forum Topic Release Dates August 15

September/October Topic

October 1

November Topic

November 1

December Topic

December 1

January Topic

January 1

February Topic

February 1

March Topic

March 1

April Topic

May 1

National Tournament Topic

Lincoln-Douglas Topic Release Dates August 15

September/October Topic

October 1

November/December Topic

December 1

January/February Topic

February 1

March/April Topic

May 1

National Tournament Topic

2015–2016 Policy Debate Topic Voting • • • •

Topic synopsis printed in the Summer Rostrum Preliminary voting occurs online in September-October Final voting occurs online in November-December Topic for 2015-2016 released by the NFHS in January 2015

november 2014

Public Forum Debate

Resolved: On balance, the benefits of genetically modified foods outweigh the harms.

november/december 2014

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Resolved: The "right to be forgotten" from Internet searches ought to be a civil right.

2014–2015

Policy Debate

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its nonmilitary exploration and/or development of the Earth’s oceans.

2014–2015 PARTNER CONTEST

International Public Policy Forum INTERP: Online publishing sources

Submissions for online publishing sources for the 2015-2016 school year will be accepted November 1 through March 1. To access the application form and view the list of approved websites for the current school year, visit www.speechanddebate.org/approvedwebsites.

Resolved: Mass surveillance is not a justified method of governmental intelligence gathering. 2014–2015 PARTNER CONTEST

American Legion Oratorical Contest See page 18 for details.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 5


Season of Giving Become More Tervis Cup

Speech & Debate Hooded Sweatshirt

Drawstring Backpack

Black Coffee Mug

Men’s Textured Stripe Polo

‘tis the

Find the perfect gift for your students, fellow coaches, teachers, volunteers, or administrators at the National Speech & Debate Association’s Online Store! From apparel to DVDs, textbooks, pins, and keys, there’s something for everyone on your list. Happy shopping!

store.speechanddebate.org


Leadership Board of Directors Fall Minutes

T

he National Speech & Debate Association Board of Directors held its fall meeting in Des Moines, IA on September 25-27, 2014. Present were President Don Crabtree, Vice President Pam Cady Wycoff, Kandi King, Pam McComas, Tommie Lindsey, Jr., David Huston, Jon Cruz, and alternate, Jennifer Jerome. Staff members in attendance at various times throughout the meeting included Executive Director J. Scott Wunn, Amy Seidelman, Cherian Koshy, Nicole Wanzer-Serrano, Steven Schappaugh, Matt Delzer, Deano Pape, Shelby Young, Vicki Pape, and Sarah Brazier. President Crabtree called the meeting to order at 8:45 a.m.

Election of Officers Moved by Cruz, seconded by Wycoff: “Ratify Polly Reikowski, Ph.D., as the Board Administrative Representative.” Passed: 9-0 In addition to choosing a new Admin Rep, the Board conducted officer elections. The group elected Don Crabtree for a two-year term as President. Subsequently, Pam Cady Wycoff was elected for a two-year term as Vice President.

Dr. Polly Reikowski, Admin Rep, joined via conference call at 9:30 a.m.

www.speechanddebate.org

September 25-27, 2014

Des Moines, IA

Budget Moved by King, seconded by Wycoff: “Approve the National Tournament budget for 2014-15.” Passed: 9-0 Moved by King, seconded by Lindsey: “Approve the Honor Society budget for 2014-15.” Passed: 9-0 Executive Director Wunn provided a thorough assessment of the previous year’s final budget and presented proposed National Tournament and Honor Society budgets for the 2014-15 school year. Key staff members provided overviews and information on programs affecting the strategic plan and budget. The Board reviewed the budget and asked questions regarding appropriations of funding. The budget passed with minor adjustments.

Governance Moved by Wycoff, seconded by Rye: “Accept the proposed Board Committee Roles as outlined.” Passed: 9-0 Vice President Wycoff presented a report describing the role of each standing board committee in detail, providing ground rules for board committee meetings, and specifying roles for the committee chairs and staff liaisons in relation to the committee. After the discussion, the Board approved the descriptions, norms, and roles outlined as guiding documents for its committee work.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 7


Fall Minutes (continued) Dr. Polly Reikowski, Admin Rep, arrived.

Programs and Education Department Update Steven Schappaugh presented current projects, shortand long-term goals, and objectives of the Programs and Education Department for the 2014-15 year.

Marketing and Communications Department Update Shelby Young highlighted current projects, short- and long-term goals, and objectives of the Marketing and Communications Department for the 2014-15 year.

Membership Department Update Matt Delzer and Deano Pape presented current projects, short- and long-term goals, and objectives of the Membership Department for the 2014-15 year.

Development Department Update Cherian Koshy and Nicole Wanzer-Serrano highlighted current projects, short- and long-term goals, and objectives of the Development Department for the 2014-15 year.

National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Update Board Member McComas shared her plans to represent the Association at the National Council of Teachers of English annual convention in November. McComas and Renee Motter of Air Academy High School (CO) will co-present "Telling a Story Through Argument," a session providing classroom activities and best practices focused on telling and understanding a story through argument: how to find, interpret, make, and refute the argument. McComas urged the group to continue to find and formalize ways to share curricular best practices among the organization's membership and volunteered to help lead that effort.

8

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Competition and Rules Moved by Wycoff, seconded by McComas: “Create the Inclusion Advisory Committee, an ad hoc committee designed to address barriers to access for meaningful participation.” Passed: 9-0 President Crabtree and Executive Director Wunn will select individuals for service on an Inclusion Advisory Committee, to be assisted by staff liaison Steven Schappaugh. Inclusion involves examining the active and passive barriers to access and meaningful participation. Inclusion must target a multitude of populations, including (but not limited to) individuals from diverse socioeconomic and geographic backgrounds, as well as individuals who self-identify in all racial, gender, sexual orientation, abilities, and other categories—especially where those backgrounds and categories are underrepresented. Other barriers to access may be further defined by the appointed committee.

Moved by Huston, seconded by King: “Adopt the updated Debate Evidence Rules and plan for implementation as proposed.” Passed: 9-0 The Board voted to submit the updated debate evidence rules to district chairs as an option to use at district tournaments and to provide the piloting districts an effective mechanism to share feedback with the Association within two weeks after completion of the tournament. Results will be evaluated and recorded to determine if changes to the proposed rules are needed.

Moved by Wycoff, seconded by McComas: “Create an ad hoc committee to review evidence rules in Congressional Debate.” Passed: 9-0 The Board voted to appoint an ad hoc committee to address Congressional Debate evidence rules. The ad hoc committee will also be served by a staff liaison.


www.speechanddebate.org

Moved by Huston, seconded by Cruz: “Accept the proposal to pilot, for one year, a World Schools district team at the National Tournament beginning in Dallas 2015. Districts would follow one of two plans proposed to select their team.” Passed: 7-1-1 Aye: Huston, Lindsey, Reikowski, King, Cruz, Wycoff, Crabtree No: McComas Abstain: Rye At the Summer Leadership Conference, coaches expressed an interest in expanding access to the National Tournament. Given widespread support for the World Schools format of debate, which the organization began sponsoring last year, the Board discussed a proposal to create district teams eligible to compete at Nationals in World Schools Debate. Districts will have two options for selecting participants for their World Schools Team, which are outlined in the District Tournament Operations Manual.

Moved by King, seconded by Huston: “Create a survey to gauge the interest of the adoption of Informative Speaking and Program of Oral Interpretation (POI) as future main events.” Passed: 9-0 The Association will appoint an ad hoc committee to define a specific set of questions geared to obtain membership feedback related to the creation of POI and Informative Speaking events, including rules for events and choices for adoption, with a goal of providing education and implementing the new events within two to three years, pending a favorable response from members.

Moved by Rye, seconded by Huston: “Delay action on middle school alignment for further investigation by the Competition and Rules Committee and refer it to the club ad hoc committee.” Passed: 9-0 High school membership rules do not permit clubs to participate in District and National Tournament events. However, the current middle school practice has been different, and clubs have been actively participating in the Middle School Honor Society and competing at the Middle School National Speech & Debate Tournament. An ad hoc committee will meet to discuss these issues and make recommendations to the Board.

Moved by Wycoff, seconded by King: “Create an ad hoc interpretation committee to review digital manuscript rules regarding electronic retrieval devices.” Passed: 9-0 A session at the Summer Leadership Conference sought initial feedback on policy questions related to interpretation events, including whether or not the definition of "published" should be expanded to include electronically published material and whether the use of electronic devices such as e-readers, Kindles, and iPads should be allowed. An ad hoc committee will review the rules and offer an initial set of recommendations to the Competition and Rules Committee.

The meeting adjourned Saturday at 11:45 a.m.

Send us your suggestions for PF topic areas and LD resolutions! You can access the online submission forms by visiting our website:

www.speechanddebate.org/topics

Rostrum | FALL 2014 9


RULES UPDATE

DEBATE EVIDENCE Timeline » Fall 2012 – Board of Directors establishes the Competition and Rules Committee

Evidence in Debate: An Overview

Fall/Winter 2012 – Competition and Rules Committee receives requests for items to address; debate evidence concerns are a primary issue raised by numerous coaches and tab room directors

T

Summer 2013 – Board meets during Strategic Planning session and drafts new debate evidence rules

he National Speech & Debate Association has revised the piloted rules for evidence governing Policy, LincolnDouglas, and Public Forum Debate. The new rules can be found on page 11 and are open to district tournaments and invitationals to use during the 2014-15 school year. No one is required to use these rules; however, the hope is that a number of tournaments will choose to use them. We are asking all districts and invitationals to consider implementing these piloted rules at their events this year. If more people use the new rules, the Board of Directors and national office staff will benefit from more comprehensive feedback. Writing and revising rules is a complicated process and a responsibility that the Competition and Rules Committee has taken very seriously. Your input has been extremely helpful in drafting the initial piloted rules as well as the revisions found in the latest version. As we continue to work through this process, we want you to know your feedback is not only welcomed—it is critical to the successful revision of our debate evidence rules. The organization wants to do everything possible to ensure: • Coaches have adequate information about the proposed rules to share with students and judges; • Tournament officials have adequate information about procedures to resolve issues; • We set standards of accountability to help ensure the integrity of our events; • We respect the Association's Code of Honor by implementing rules that more accurately represent those tenets. Given the various methods of researching, judge experiences, and academic standards expected of our students outside of speech and debate, the organization is taking the lead to provide enhanced standards of accountability. We are committed to providing the best possible arena for competitive speech and debate activities. Evidentiary standards are a crucial element in that mission. You can be of great assistance to the organization. Please consider using these rules and providing feedback to the Association!

Spring 2013 – Survey is sent to a focus group of debate coaches; Board discusses issues and concerns raised in the survey

Summer/Fall 2013 – Board continues work on new debate evidence rules Fall 2013 – Board approves an initial version of debate evidence rules to be piloted and publishes them in Rostrum Fall 2013 to Spring 2014 – Board receives feedback, questions, and concerns from coaches and tab room directors Spring 2014 – Survey is sent to the original focus group, plus district leaders and other coaches who sent in concerns Spring 2014 – Board creates an Ad Hoc Committee to meet at Nationals to review the debate evidence rules and draft revisions based on feedback from the survey Summer 2014 – Ad Hoc Committee meets at Nationals Summer 2014 – Ad Hoc Committee’s work is presented at the Summer Leadership Conference Summer/Fall 2014 – Ad Hoc Committee reconvenes and provides additional recommendations based on feedback received at the Summer Leadership Conference Fall 2014 – Board passes the proposed revisions to the piloted debate evidence rules for Policy, Lincoln-Douglas, and Public Forum Debate Fall 2014 – Board establishes an Ad Hoc Committee to review Congressional Debate standards and procedures for evidence

DEBATE EVIDENCE Committee Members » Aracelis Biel – Collegiate School, NY Bryan Gaston – Heritage Hall, OK Maryrose Kohan – George Washington High School, CO Justin Seiwell – Clayton High School, MO Greg Stevens – Okoboji/Spirit Lake High School, IA Cort Sylvester – Rosemount, MN Megan West – Cypress Bay High School, FL David Huston – Colleyville Heritage High School, TX – Board Liaison Steven Schappaugh – National Office Staff Liaison

We want to hear from you! Are the Piloted Debate Evidence Rules being used in your area? Do you have questions, suggestions, or concerns? Please contact Steven Schappaugh, Director of Programs and Education, by emailing steve.schappaugh@speechanddebate.org. We look forward to working with you on this important topic! 10

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Piloted Debate Evidence Rules The National Speech & Debate Association is piloting, for the second year, updated evidence rules for Policy, Lincoln-Douglas, and Public Forum Debate. District Committees may choose to use these at their district debate tournament, provided 60 days' advance notice is given to the community. Coaches are encouraged to check with local tournament officials to see which set of rules will be used in their area. 7.1. Responsibilities of Contestants Reading Evidence A. Evidence defined. Debaters are responsible for the validity of all evidence they introduce in the debate. Evidence includes, but is not limited to: facts, statistics, or examples attributable to a specific, identifiable, authoritative source used to support a claim. Unattributed ideas are the opinion of the student competitor and are not evidence. B. Oral source citation. In all debate events, contestants are expected to, at a minimum, orally deliver the following when introducing evidence in a debate round: primary author(s)’ name (last) and year of publication. Any other information such as source, author’s qualifications, etc., may be given, but is not required. Should two or more quotations be used from the same source, the author and year must be given orally only for the first piece of evidence from that source. Subsequently, only the author’s name is required. C. Written source citation. To the extent provided by the original source, a written source citation must include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Full name of primary author and/or editor Publication date Source Title of article Date accessed for digital evidence Full URL, if applicable Author qualifications Page number(s)

D. Paraphrasing, authoritative source versus general understanding. If paraphrasing is used in a debate, the debater will be held to the same standard of citation and accuracy as if the entire text of the evidence were read. If a debater references a specific theory by a specific author, s/he must also be able to provide an original source. For example, if a debater were to reference social contract theory in general, it would not be an authoritative source that would require citation. However, if s/he references “John Locke’s Social Contract,” evidence would need to be available. E. Ellipses prohibited. In all debate events, the use of internal ellipsis (…) is prohibited unless it is a replication of the original document. Debaters may omit the reading of certain words; however, the text that is verbally omitted must be present in the text of what was read for opposing debaters and/or judges to examine. The portions of the evidence read including where the debater begins and ends must be clearly marked as outlined in 7.1(G)(2).

F. Availability of original source. 1. When challenged, the original source or copy of the relevant (as outlined in 7.2) pages of evidence read in round must be available to the opponent and/or judge during and/or at the conclusion of the round. In all debate events, for reference, any evidence that is presented during the round must be made available to the opponent during the round if requested. 2. Original source(s) defined. Understanding that teams/ individuals obtain their evidence in multiple ways, the original source for evidence may include, but is not limited solely to, one of the following: a. Accessing the live or displaying a copy of a web page (teams/individuals may access the Internet to provide this information if requested). b. A copy of the pages preceding, including, and following or the actual printed (book, periodical, pamphlet, etc.) source. c. Copies or electronic versions of published handbooks (i.e., Baylor Briefs, Planet Debate, etc.). d. Electronic or printed versions of the webpage for a debate institute or the NDCA sponsored Open Evidence Project or similar sites. 3. Debaters, even if they have acquired the evidence other than by original research, are still responsible for the content and accuracy of the evidence they present and/or read. G. Distinguishing between which parts of each piece of evidence are and are not read in a particular round. In all debate events, debaters must mark their evidence in two ways: 1. Oral delivery of each piece of evidence must be identified by a clear oral pause or by saying phrases such as “quote/ unquote” or “mark the card.” The use of a phrase is definitive and may be preferable to debaters. Clear, oral pauses are left solely to the discretion of the judge. 2. The written text must be marked to clearly indicate the portions read in the debate. In the written text the standard practices of underlining what is read, or highlighting what is read, and/or minimizing what is unread, is definitive and may be preferable to debaters. The clarity of other means of marking evidence is left to the discretion of the judge. H. Private communication prohibited. Private, personal correspondence or communication between an author and the debater is inadmissible as evidence.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 11


Piloted Debate Evidence Rules (continued) 7.2. Definitions of Evidence Violations A. “Distortion” exists when the textual evidence itself contains added and/or deleted word(s), which significantly alters the conclusion of the author (e.g., deleting ‘not’; adding the word ‘not’). Additionally, failure to bracket added words would be considered distortion of evidence. B. “Non-existent evidence” means one or more of the following: 1. The debater citing the evidence is unable to provide the original source or copy of the relevant pages when requested by his/her opponent, judge, or tournament official. 2. The original source provided does not contain the evidence cited. 3. The evidence is paraphrased but lacks an original source to verify the accuracy of the paraphrasing. 4. The debater is in possession of the original source, but declines to provide it to his/her opponent upon request. C. “Clipping” occurs when the debater claims to have read the complete text of highlighted and/or underlined evidence when, in fact, the contestant skips or omits portions of evidence. D. “Straw argument” A “straw argument” is a position or argumentative claim introduced by an author for the purpose of refuting, discrediting or characterizing it. Reliance on a straw argument occurs in a debate round when a debater asserts incorrectly that the author supports or endorses the straw argument as his or her own position. Note: A debater who acknowledges using a “straw argument” when verbally first read in the round, would not be misrepresenting evidence. However, if the debater fails to acknowledge the use of a “straw argument” and his/her opponent questions the use of such an argument, then that debater has committed an evidence violation. 7.3. Procedures for Resolving Evidence Violations A. Judges are responsible for resolving disputes between debaters regarding oral citations (7.1(B)); written source citations (7.1(C)); distinguishing between what parts of each piece of evidence are and are not read in a particular round (7.1(G)). When the judge(s) have such a dispute in the round, they must make a written note on the ballot or inform the tabulation committee of the dispute. They must do so particularly if it impacts the decision in the debate. These decisions may not be appealed. B. An appeal can only be made if the issue has been raised in the round with the exception of the issues listed in 7.3(C). Appeals may only be made if judge(s) have misapplied, misinterpreted, or ignored a rule. C. A formal allegation of violation of the evidence rules is permitted during the round only if the debater(s) allege a violation of 7.2(A) (distortion); 7.2(B) (nonexistent evidence); 7.2(C) (clipping). If a formal allegation of violation of these rules

12

Rostrum | FALL 2014

is made during a round, the following procedures must be followed (see Section 7.3(D) for procedures for making a formal allegation after the conclusion of the round): 1. The team/individual alleging a violation must make a definitive indication that they are formally alleging a violation of an evidence rule. 2. The team/individual alleging the violation of the evidence must articulate the specific violation as defined in 7.2(A), 7.2(B), and/or 7.2(C). 3. The judge should stop the round at that time to examine the evidence from both teams/individuals and render a decision about the credibility of the evidence. a. If the judge determines that the allegation is legitimate and an evidence violation has occurred, the team/ individual committing the violation will be given the loss in the round. Other sanctions may also apply as articulated in 7.3(E). b. If the judge determines that the allegation is not legitimate and that there is no violation, the team/ individual making the challenge will receive the loss in the round.

Note: Teams/individuals may question the credibility and/or efficacy of the evidence without a formal allegation that requires the round to end. Teams/ debaters may make in-round arguments regarding the credibility of evidence without making a formal allegation of violation of these rules. Such informal arguments about the evidence will not automatically end the round, and will be treated by the judge in the same fashion as any other argument.

D. The tabulation committee is authorized to hear: (1) appeals, pursuant to 7.3(B), claiming that a judge ignored, misinterpreted or misapplied rules other than those from which no appeal is permitted pursuant to 7.3(A); (2) appeals from a judge’s decision, pursuant to 7.3(C), on a formal in-round allegation of distortion or non-existent evidence (note: judge decisions regarding clipping may not be appealed); and (3) a formal allegation of distortion or nonexistent evidence that is made for the first time after conclusion of the debate. E. The procedures for making an appeal or post-round formal allegation are as follows: 1. A coach or school-affiliated adult representative must notify the tabulation committee of intent to submit an appeal or formal post-round allegation within 20 minutes of the end of the debate round. The 20-minute time period begins once the last ballot from all rounds (if flighted, both flights) has been collected by the tabulation committee. 2. The coach must submit the post-round formal allegation to the tabulation committee within ten minutes of the formal notification of the intent to appeal. The allegation must be in writing and articulate the specific evidence violation that is being challenged. The challenged contestant and coach will then be notified.


www.speechanddebate.org

3. If the tabulation committee determines the original protest has merit, the coach or school-affiliated adult and contestant(s) being challenged will be given 20 minutes to provide evidence denying, or to the contrary of the claim. If such evidence cannot be offered, the challenged debater(s) will be given the loss in the round and may be subject to additional penalties (see Section 7.4.D). If the tabulation committee determines the allegation is not legitimate and there is no violation, the team/individual making the challenge will receive the loss in the round. 4. The tabulation committee has the discretion of extending the time limits for these actions if circumstances do not allow a coach or school-affiliated adult to be available within the prescribed time limits. F. The tabulation committee’s decision to disqualify a student can be appealed by the coach or school-affiliated adult. The procedures below should be followed: 1. The appeal must be submitted in writing to the tabulation committee within ten minutes of the notification to disqualify. 2. The tabulation committee will then submit the appeal to the national office referee(s). The committee will contact the national office referee once the written appeal has been received. Both sides will be able to provide written explanations and supporting evidence to defend their individual side. 3. A decision will be rendered in a timely manner. The decision of the national office shall be final and cannot be appealed. 4. No more than one round may occur between the round being protested and the decision of the national office referee. 5. If the appeal is successful and the contestant(s) may now continue in the tournament, they will be put into the appropriate bracket for pairing the debates. G. If appeals are made in rounds in which multiple judges are being used, normal procedures should be followed to ensure each judge reaches his/her decision as independently as possible. Judges will be instructed not to confer or discuss the charge and/or answer to the potential violation. It will be possible for one judge to determine an evidence violation has occurred and the other judge(s) to determine no violation has occurred. The tabulation committee will record the panel's decision in the same fashion as a normal win or loss; the outcome is thus tabulated in the same fashion as a round in which an evidence violation has not occurred. If the majority of the panel finds an evidence violation did not occur, no sanction may be applied to the team/individual charged with the violation. If the majority finds a violation has occurred, the appropriate penalties will be administered. 7.4. Penalties for Evidence Violations A. If the judge determines that an entry has violated one of the rules listed in 7.3(A) and 7.1(H) (oral citation, written citation,

indication of parts of card read or not read, use of private communication), the judge may at his or her discretion disregard the evidence, diminish the credibility given to the evidence, take the violation into account (solely or partially) in deciding the winner of the debate, or take no action. B. If a debater(s) commits an evidence violation for “clipping” (7.2(C)), the use of a “straw argument” (7.2(D)) or the use of “ellipses” (7.1(E)) such action will result in a loss for the debater(s) committing the evidence violation. The judge should award zero speaker points (if applicable) and indicate the reason for decision on the ballot. C. If a debater(s) commits an evidence violation of “distortion” (7.2(A)) or uses “nonexistent evidence” (as defined by 7.2(B)) the offending debater(s) will lose the debate and be disqualified from the tournament. However, if a debater(s) loses a round due to a “non-existent evidence” (7.2(B)) violation during an in-round formal allegation, but can produce it after the round within 20 minutes to the tabulation committee, the committee may decide not to disqualify the entry. The loss that was recorded by the judge may not be changed. D. Evidence infractions violate the Code of Honor. Depending on the severity, an offense may result in the notification of said offense to the contestant’s high school administration and chapter sponsor, loss of all District and/or National Tournament merit points, including trophy and sweepstakes points for the offending student(s), and/or revocation of Association membership. These decisions would be left to the national office and not the individual tabulation committee. 7.5. Tournament Adjustments A. Under no circumstance will a tournament or part of a tournament be re-run because of a violation of these rules. B. In the case of a disqualification of a debater(s), all ranks and decisions of other debater(s) made prior to the start of the round being protested stand and no revision of past round ranks will take place. Penalties listed in 7.4 will be applied. C. When a round has been held between the round being protested and a final decision regarding the protest, the result of that round will be recorded as follows: 1. If the protest is upheld, and a debater is disqualified, the opponent of the disqualified debater will receive a forfeit win. 2. If the protest is overruled, and the protesting debater won the protested round, no revision of the result on the ballot will take place. 3. If the protest is overruled, the protesting debater lost the protested round, and had no previous losses, no revision of the result on the ballot will take place. 4. If the protest is overruled, the protesting debater lost the protested round, and had a previous loss, the opponent will receive a forfeit win regardless of the result on the ballot.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 13


Evidence in Debate: A Dialogue by David Huston A recent, light-hearted conversation with a local coach helps illustrate some of the latest changes to the piloted debate evidence rules.

T

here are a number of coaches who have very well established, thought out, and understandable feelings regarding the standards we set for evidence in debate. As we continue to work through our process of drafting the best possible rules for the National Speech & Debate Association, it is important to be responsive to our members. That is the goal of having the piloted rules—to answer a well-stated concern by our member coaches, but also to avoid rushing into implementing rules without proper vetting. As we work through the next iteration of the piloted rules, please know that we are here to listen to you. Given that, and our desire to have these conversations, let me share with you an experience I had recently. Being in a decision-making position means you also get asked a lot of questions about those decisions. So, I was sitting in the judges’ lounge at a recent tournament, long enough to get some food to sustain me for the rest of the tournament. One of our local coaches, one to whom many look for inspiration, pulled back a chair and sat at the table where I was sitting. The conversation began. “I have a bone to pick with you,” said the coach in a very quiet, reasonable voice. (Well, maybe not so quiet and maybe not so reasonable.)

14

Rostrum | FALL 2014

“And what issue might you have?” I replied in an equally respectful and professional tone. “These new evidence rules are terrible. What were you people thinking? There is no way debaters are going to be able to meet these new guidelines. What was wrong with the old rules? Why do we need to make all of these changes?” “Whoa, slow down there," I replied. "Let me deal with these concepts one at a time. What is your first concern?” “Whose idea was this in the first place? What were these people thinking? Who do they think they are?” “Well, let me explain the process. The Competition and Rules Committee, as part of the Board of the Directors, began the process a couple of years ago in examining debate evidence rules. They did so because a number of coaches had expressed concerns about whether or not the old rules addressed current practices of evidence use. More specifically, coaches expressed concern over behavior they felt was not only unethical, but increasing in regularity. The committee published the rules last year in September. The response was significant! After getting anecdotal feedback about the piloted rules, the Board of Directors decided to send a survey to all district leaders. We were extremely pleased 125 coaches took

the time to provide valuable feedback. (Images of torches and pitchforks were prevalent) After reviewing the survey data, the Board of Directors established an ad hoc committee of seven coaches, two board members, and a national office staff person to review survey results and recommend changes to the piloted rules. The members of the ad hoc committee worked for more than three days at Nationals, which resulted in the new rules that were then presented at the Summer Leadership Conference in Las Vegas and approved by the Board at their last meeting.” “Aren’t these already being used? Aren’t we expected to use them this year?” “No, my friend. The Board decided to postpone the full implementation of these rules until the 2015-16 school year. That means that the rules this year will be tested and piloted by a number of districts and a select number of invitational tournaments. We will also poll district leaders again to get additional feedback and insights about this version of the pilot. Finally, we hope to make a final decision for implementation at the Spring Board Meeting.” “Well, I still don’t like the rules! I mean, look at the original source rules. My debaters are going to have to carry numerous tubs to have all of the original sources that they are supposed to have.”


www.speechanddebate.org

“Well, it’s interesting that you mention that. In the original rule changes last year, that phrase was left over from the old rules. However, the committee this summer created a laundry list of possible original sources. They can be found in Section 7.F.2. The sources don’t have to be on paper. You can supply an electronic version for proof if challenged. You can get your evidence not only from direct sources, but also from online debate camp and Open Evidence project evidence. Remember, though, debaters are still accountable for what they read. If they are challenged, and the evidence is misrepresented or doesn’t exist, the debater is still accountable. In short, as long as you can access the evidence when challenged, you don’t need to carry every original source with you.” “But, that doesn’t seem fair. If I get my evidence from someplace else, like a handbook, why should I be held accountable for it?” “Such sources need to be held to the same standards and accountability as evidence debaters might research themselves. Handbooks and workshops that don’t have good quality control standards should be held accountable for that lack of quality. Those that do have good standards should be rewarded. We need to protect the integrity of the evidence read.” “But what about how we quote those sources? My debaters don’t want to have to read all of that source stuff in the round. Don’t the new rules require that?” With a laugh, I replied, “No, they don’t. That’s just an urban myth. In the three types of debate—Policy, LD, and PF—the debater needs only to say the author’s name and the year of publication. However, if the cite is requested, and evidence is requested, debaters must supply that to their opponents.” “Oh, so there it is. If my kids don’t give that to the debaters and also don’t let the judge see it, then they get the loss and are disqualified from the tournament, right?”

With an even bigger laugh, I reply, “Again, that’s another urban myth, like alligators in the New York sewage system. Section 7.4.A, which explains the penalties for those types of violations, states that all of those violations are left to the discretion of the judge. The judge may decide that the violation is egregious enough to warrant a loss. They may also choose to ignore or diminish the weight of the evidence and evaluate the argument without it. They may also decide that the claim of violation is not valid and therefore, merely ignore the claim.” “So, what about other serious violations? Are judges also given sole discretion? Can they just ignore the violation or just pretend that the challenge didn’t happen?” “Okay, let me clarify your question. Are you asking what happens if a debater makes the claim that a team or individual is reading evidence that is misrepresented, is non-existent, or a team is “clipping” evidence—in other words, they haven’t read all of the evidence that they are claiming to have read?” “Yeah, what happens then?” “Now, that process is much more detailed and serious. First, start with Section 7.3.C of the rules section. The team making the claim of violation must clearly indicate that they are making a formal challenge. They must articulate which violation they are contesting. The judge then is to verify that they are indeed making a formal challenge and that the outcome of the round hinges on the decision of that challenge. If the team making the challenge chooses to proceed, they then must present evidence to support the challenge. The team being challenged then is allowed to respond. The judge will then determine if a violation has occurred. If it has, the judge will then vote for the team making the challenge and award no speaker points to the violating team. If the judge determines that the violation has not occurred, then they would give a loss to the team making the challenge and award the speaker points that they would have

awarded if the round had continued. In short, a formal challenge means that the round will be over once the judge has reached a decision.” “If that happens, is there an appeal process? Shouldn’t the tabulation committee make that decision instead of the judge?” “That sounds like a good idea. However, based upon the feedback we received, most of our coaches want the judge to make the decision in the round. In the case of clipping, the judge is the sole arbiter of that decision. The judge was the one in the room who witnessed the act, and it’s tough to prove the violation otherwise. If coaches want to question violations after the round, there is an appeal process outlined in Section 7.3.D and 7.3.E. The appeal must be made in a timely fashion and can’t delay the tournament. No more than one round can take place between the appeal and the final decision of the tabulation committee. The goal is to allow the tournament to proceed while the decision is being made and then make any adjustments. If the time limits are followed, no significant delays should happen.” “So, what if a judge chooses to ignore a challenge? Your rules don’t allow for us to appeal that, do they?” “First, they are not my rules—they are rules that are a direct response to feedback received by our membership. People should feel that the rules are there to assure the fair and equitable use of evidence by all debaters. Additionally, there are provisions set forth in the rules to appeal a decision of a judge should s/he ignore or misapply the rules when rendering a decision.” “But, wait, we have panels of judges. Do all of the judges need to agree for the violation to have occurred? That could get really messy.” “I’m glad you asked about that. That was something the committee hadn’t really thought about, and we discovered that omission at the Las Vegas conference. Between that conference and

Rostrum | FALL 2014 15


the Fall Board Meeting, the committee developed language to deal with that occurrence. Each judge is treated as a separate entity. Judges are not to confer with one another, but make an independent decision about the violation challenge. Whatever the majority believes, that will be the outcome of the round. That whole process is outlined in Section 7.3.G.” “Well, you’ve answered some of the questions I had. But, I’m still not convinced that these are good ideas. It just seems like a lot of changes in a short period of time.” “I couldn’t agree more. The rules are more detailed and specific. While they can appear daunting, they are not as overwhelming if you take some time to read through the rules. We need people to ask questions. We need to be able to provide answers. However, we are taking some steps to help with that process. For example, we are in the process of developing a set of casebook questions...” “What’s that supposed to mean?” the coach interrupted. “Well, we have a list of possible scenarios that could occur. The question is posed and then an official interpretation is then provided. That should help committees consistently interpret rules from one district or national tournament to another. Finally, we are asking several districts and some invitational tournaments to pilot the rules this year. We will get feedback from them and make changes or adjustments, if necessary, based on that feedback.” “What’s up with the rules applying to Policy, LD, and PF, but not Congress?” “That’s a great question. While each of the debate events are unique, Policy, LD, and PF share some commonalities in the structure of a round that enable them to share a set of rules. We recognize there is a need for evidence rules in Congressional Debate, too, which is why the Board of Directors agreed to establish an ad hoc committee to examine what procedures should be in place for that event.”

16

Rostrum | FALL 2014

“Does my district have to use the pilot rules this year?” the coach asked. “No, they don’t. However, if these rules work out well, and there are no major problems with them, the Board of Directors will have the option of putting them into effect next year. Remember, the Board won’t know if they are making a good decision unless they get a number of districts to try these out to see if they work. The Board needs as much information as necessary to do that. We need the help of our member districts to volunteer to use the rules. Believe me, our national staff and others will be around to help. We want to make sure the pilot is successful. The more districts we get, the better.” “Not saying we want to be a part of that, but just in case, who would we need to talk to about that?” “I’m glad you asked. You can contact Steve Schappaugh (steve.schappaugh@ speechanddebate.org) at the national office or me (david.huston@gcisd.net), the chair of the Competition and Rules Committee, for more information.” “Well, I’m still not yet ready to get excited over these rules, but maybe with time I will. But, hey, they just put out some great food. I’m going to check that out. I do appreciate your time and your willingness to explain these things. Despite what people say, you’re an okay person.” “I appreciate it. However, I’m serious about the piloting of the rules. We need districts willing to try them out. Please consider doing that. But, now, go have a piece of cake. Talk to you soon.”

David Huston is a three-diamond coach from Colleyville Heritage High School in Texas. He is a member of the National Speech & Debate Association Board of Directors and Chair of the Competition and Rules Committee.

JOIN US! David Huston will lead three webinars in December and January with a brief overview of the piloted debate evidence rules, plus time for questions and answers afterward.

Monday, December 15 7:30 p.m. CT Thursday, December 18 4:00 p.m. CT Thursday, January 8 6:30 p.m. CT To register, log in to your dashboard and select the session you hope to attend.


www.speechanddebate.org

NEW PILOT IN 2014-15

World Schools District Team For Nationals

A

t the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference, attendees expressed an interest in expanding access to the National Tournament. Members also expressed widespread excitement and support for the World Schools format of debate, which the Association began sponsoring in 2013-14. Given this enthusiasm, combined with the acknowledgement of our members that expanding access to the National Tournament is good, the Board of Directors adopted a pilot proposal to create district teams that can compete at Nationals in World Schools Debate. Methods to Select the World Schools District Team Teams are comprised of three to five members from each district opting to participate. After the entire district tournament series (speech, debate, congress) is complete, any student who competed at districts but did not qualify to Nationals would be eligible for participation on the World Schools District Team. The established criteria of the district should be made available to all coaches attending the district tournament. This could be done via the tournament invitation or through an email announcement. A district has two options for selecting its members:

Option A – Districts may invite alternates to be on the team. To provide an objective method of selecting the team members, districts would do the following:

• Invite the highest point earners that are senior, 1st alternates to serve on the team. • If a student turns down the opportunity, go to the next name on the list of senior, 1st alternates by merit points. • If you get through all senior, 1st alternates, then go to senior, 2nd alternates by merit points. • Keep working through the senior alternates (3rd, 4th, 5th, etc.). If there are no seniors left, go to junior, 1st alternates by merit points, then sophomores, and then freshmen. Joy of Tournaments can produce this report for any district that uses the JOT software to tabulate the district tournament series.

Option B – Any district participant would be given the opportunity to apply for consideration. The district would select a committee to examine the applications and make decisions to field the team. The selection committee may consist of active coaches, retired coaches, community members, administrators, and more. Selection committee members should recuse themselves from scoring their own student applicants. The national office will provide applications for districts to use. In addition to the above criteria suggested in option A, the selection committee might also consider additional criteria, but are not bound to them: • Give preference to applicants who are from schools that did not qualify to the National Tournament.

• Give preference to applicants from schools with fewer than three entries. • Give preference to new schools to the district. • Give preference to schools with new coaches in the district. Note: If your state association prevents hybrid teams, a district may select entries all from one school to enable a participating team to attend Nationals. Coach of the World Schools District Team The coach of the district team could be selected by the District Committee. This person would be the main point of contact between the national office and the district team. Entry to the National Tournament The cost of entering a team to the World Schools competition is $50 per student. As with any entry to Nationals, the cost of travel and lodging is the responsibility of the participants. Districts need to provide a judge to evaluate preliminary and elimination rounds. Additionally, there will be a waiting list for Nationals to grant additional entries to the National Tournament. Priority will be given based upon overall district tournament participation. Participation in Supplemental and Consolation Events World Schools contestants are eligible to pre-register for supplemental and consolation events.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 17


Looking for college scholarships?

Look no further.

American Legion Oratorical Contest As part of the National Speech & Debate Association’s ongoing partnership with the American Legion, the top three finishers from the Legion’s National Oratorical Contest may earn the right to compete in Original Oratory or United States Extemporaneous Speaking at the National Speech & Debate Tournament! The first-place finisher is awarded an $18,000 scholarship, second-place $16,000, and third-place $14,000. The scholarships may be used at any college or university in the United States.

 Want to get involved? Follow these simple steps! • Visit www.legion.org/oratorical to learn more. • Click “Request Information” or contact your state’s American Legion Department to learn when the first contest will be. • Also click on “Assigned Topics” to learn the extemporaneous topic areas. • Prepare your original oration on some aspect of the Constitution with emphasis on the duties and obligations of a citizen to our government.

Ashwath Kumar of Missouri placed first at the 2014 Oratorical Contest, hosted in Indianapolis.


Florida Forensic institute

led the way to Kansas city and the result:

t t t

FI F the FFi staFF Ft. Lauderdale

NatioNal ChampioNships aNd fiNalists iN Numerous debate aNd speeCh eveNts! experience our students’ success... joiN us for aN ffi summer

FFI 2014 Feedback

after coaching at another speech and debate camp, I realized that FFI offers both students and coaches the creative space to take risks and challenge themselves in ways that others don’t.” - Oratory Staff Member

FFI provides a lot of resources you wouldn’t get elsewhere. the coaches here are high school and collegiate champions and can provide all the tools to succeed.” - Congressional Debate Student, California

I love FFI because I work with the best people in the event I love doing. the freedom and fun of FFI makes it unbeatable.” - Interp Student, Ohio

the loNe star state will be Crowded with stars iN juNe wheN ffiers head to dallas!

Don Crabtree (Curriculum Director) is the current President of the National Speech & Debate Association and an eight-diamond coach from Park Hill HS in Missouri. With 40 years of educational experience, Mr. Crabtree brings the Florida Forensic Institute his incomparable expertise.

FFI is unique from other camps at which I teach because students get individual attention in a large camp atmosphere.” - Public Forum Staff Member

at FFI you learn more about the application of techniques instead of just being given information. It’s the whole package.” - Extemporaneous Speaking Student, Michigan

the instructors work as hard as they can to provide the support to become a better debater. the curriculum covers a wide variety of topics and has the perfect balance between debate skills and content.” - Public Forum Student, Texas

www.ffi4n6.com July 17 - 31, 2015 • Extension August 1 - 3, 2015


Your Building Community Staff Liaisons DISTRICT OPERATIONS and DISTRICT SUPPORT Cherian Koshy Director of Development cherian.koshy@speechanddebate.org

DISTRICT SUPPORT Nicole Wanzer-Serrano Director of Alumni and Community Impact nicole.wanzer-serrano@speechanddebate.org

DISTRICT COMMUNICATIONS

JOIN OUR MONTHLY DISTRICT WEBINARS OPEN TO ALL COACHES! Register online by logging in to your dashboard and clicking the session you hope to attend.

1st Monday District Support (Fundraising and Volunteerism)

5:00 p.m. CT 1st Monday

Shelby Young Manager of Marketing and Communications shelby.young@speechanddebate.org

District Operations (Tournaments and Events)

7:00 p.m. CT DISTRICT PROGRAMS/RESOURCES Steven Schappaugh Director of Programs and Education

1st Tuesday District Communications

7:00 p.m. CT

steve.schappaugh@speechanddebate.org

1st Wednesday DISTRICT ENGAGEMENT Matt Delzer Manager of Membership Support matt.delzer@speechanddebate.org

District Programs/Resources

8:00 p.m. CT 1st Thursday District Engagement (Mentoring and Recruiting)

5:00 p.m. CT

DISTRICT CHAIRS J. Scott Wunn

1st Thursday

Executive Director director@speechanddebate.org

District Chair Webinar

8:00 p.m. CT

QUESTIONS? We’re here to help! Supporting materials can be found at www.speechanddebate.org by logging in to your dashboard and clicking the District Leader Resources tab—or contact your National Speech & Debate Association staff liaison for more information.

20

Rostrum | FALL 2014

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!


www.speechanddebate.org

In Focus:

Building Community T

he summer issue of Rostrum introduced everyone to the Building Community Toolkit, a series of materials and staff-led webinars created to increase engagement and provide more how-to resources suitable for district level activities. That effort received a boost this fall, thanks to a generous grant from the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation.

To support your local efforts, we’re happy to offer the District Building Community Grant. Part of the Rupe Foundation grant provides funding for districts to build community by creating a more robust volunteer infrastructure at the local level. By creating leadership roles to spearhead district communications, new school recruitment and mentoring, fundraising and volunteer support, tournament operations, and local speech and debate programming, districts become automatically eligible for a $500 grant from the National Speech & Debate Association. Districts that raise an additional $500 through our Give Youth A Voice platform will receive $500 in matching funds—creating up to a $1,500 influx in district operations to serve a variety of needs for schools, students, and programs in the district! We’re excited to see many districts already taking part in our District Building Community Grant program, and we hope every district takes advantage of this opportunity this school year.

What’s happening in your district? To learn more about your district’s efforts or to share your willingness to serve a supportive role in district operations, log in to your school’s profile page in the Points Application, click "My District Contacts" in the left menu, and reach out to your district chair or another member of the leadership committee.

The Arthur N. Rupe Foundation exists because it wishes to bring about an improvement in society, to be a positive influence on American life. In the founder’s words, the Foundation exists "to shine the light of truth on critical and controversial issues through the support of scholarly studies, education, research, and public debates, and by the dissemination of the results via a variety of media to all segments of the public. This should accrue to society’s benefit and further fulfillment of universal individual freedom and its promise of true democracy." The Foundation believes that debate forms the core of a healthy American democracy. Over the years, the Arthur N. Rupe Foundation has provided grants to support an array of debate programs, including the Association’s Rupe Scholars and scholarships for the top 14 Public Forum teams in our National Tournament. The foundation is committed to advancing civil and structured debate as a means of discussing the vital issues of our time.

Read on for additional information about community-building at the district level—including sample resources!

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 21


Building Community: A New Look at Speech and Debate Districts What makes great nonprofits great? Leslie Crutchfield and Heather McLeod Grant ask that question in their book, Forces for Good, which borrows from Jim Collins’ work in Good to Great to outline the qualities of an effective nonprofit organization. According to Crutchfield and Grant, high-impact nonprofits (i.e., those who have “created real social change... have come up with innovative solutions to social problems, and have spread these ideas nationally or internationally”) demonstrate all or most of six practices. They: 1. Advocate what is urgently needed and commit resources in response to that need (programs) 2. Are “pragmatic idealists” who combine social values with business “smarts” to “make markets work” (communications) 3. Build a community of evangelists as a powerful force for social change by communicating their mission, vision, and values as well as creating meaningful experiences (engagement/communications) 4. Adopt and maintain a network mind-set to share resources and empower other organizations (support/operations) 5. Constantly adapt and modify their tactics and initiatives while maintaining “the balance between stifling bureaucracy and unbridled creativity” (district chairs) 6. Support growth by developing high-impact leadership internally, widely distributing authority as well as responsibility among those involved in the given enterprise (district chairs) Furthermore, according to Peter Drucker’s analysis of successful nonprofits in the Harvard Business Review, the people who volunteer for such organizations devote their time because: • They believe in the mission. • They are given responsibility for and held accountable to meaningful tasks. • They are rewarded with training and the chance to take on more demanding assignments.

22

Rostrum | FALL 2014

As Crutchfield and Grant explain, great nonprofits are great because they are “working with and through others, as counterintuitive as that might seem. It’s about leveraging every sector of society to become a force for good... highimpact organizations bridge boundaries and work with others to achieve greater levels of change than they could accomplish alone. “The best of these organizations take advantage of their unique role and their unprecedented opportunity to create greater impact. To win at the social change game, it’s not about being the biggest or the fastest or even the best-managed, nonprofit. The most powerful, influential, and strategic organizations transform others to become forces for good.”

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!


www.speechanddebate.org

IN FOCUS

Building Community at the District Level Ways to Increase Involvement

District Chairs The chair is the most public face of the speech and debate community and serves as its chief spokesperson, promoting it through special events, competitions, face-to-face conversations, and in the media. The chair drives discussion about the vision, purpose, and goals of speech and debate, encourages involvement, and teaches others to take on leadership responsibilities.

Communications The goal of district communications is to increase awareness about speech and debate in the local community. The goal of the communications team is to distribute information effectively and in a timely way to relevant audiences using letters, email, press releases, and other collateral to promote the community. In addition to a director, who can set and guide strategy for communications, possible roles in communications include an internal communications manager, responsible for communications within the district, and a marketing manager, responsible for external communications, media releases, event promotion, and identifying any marketing materials that would be helpful to the district.

Programs/Resources Many districts might benefit from an organized approach to assessing resources, customizing them to meet local needs, and sharing them throughout the district. Creating district roles in programming can help ease the burden on individual coaches by improving collective efforts and utilizing national resources adapted to the needs of your local community. In addition to a director, who can strategize and coordinate a districtwide assessment to determine and fill needs, programs team roles could include tasks like judge training and recruitment, curriculum, and workshops.

Operations (Tournaments and Events) District operations include running the district tournament, hosting other public events, and managing financial resources. The goal of creating roles in operations is to increase volunteer participation in tournaments and events. In addition to a director, who is responsible for the strategy and coordination of these items throughout the year, operations roles might include: a tournament manager, responsible for the administration of the district contest; a public events manager, in charge of at least one community-wide event that is open to the public; and a finance manager, who ensures accurate reporting, receipting, budgeting, and oversight of financial matters. There are numerous roles available during the district tournament that serve as good starter roles to get more coaches and community members involved.

Creating Meaningful Roles CONNECT. SUPPORT. INSPIRE.

Support (Fundraising and Volunteerism) Fundraising is most effective at the local level. A support team can take responsibility for obtaining financial and in-kind resources to benefit the collective district and then provide resources to schools that need them. This team can be led by a director, who will guide strategy and implementation for fundraising efforts, and is boosted by the recruitment of an advisory committee, which is charged with distributing resources fairly and effectively. This advisory committee should include at least five individuals from different schools or school affiliations and should not include more than two members of the district leadership team. Individuals from outside the speech and debate community such as parents, business owners, government officials, members of the media, or school board officials may serve roles on this team.

Engagement (Recruiting and Mentoring) The more people involved in the effort to provide speech and debate to every young person in your community, the better. There are numerous opportunities to involve other coaches and community members in engagement efforts. In addition to a director, who guides strategy for utilizing available human resources in the community in engagement efforts, potential roles on this team include a mentorship manager, who focuses on working with brand new schools and schools with new coaches; a recruitment manager, who focuses on starting new high school and middle school programs in the area; and an alumni manager, who will work to connect with speech and debate alumni in the area to assist with programs through judging, coaching, or supporting the community in other ways. These tasks are so large in nature they can easily be split to involve even more individuals—e.g., mentoring new schools vs. new coaches, and recruiting high schools vs. middle schools.

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 23


Team: Support Owner: Support Director

District Community Building Toolkit

How to Involve Alumni

Questions? nicole.wanzer-serrano@speechanddebate.org

Editor's Note: The following pages illustrate just one of the many handouts available to coaches as part of our Building Community Toolkit. Log in to your dashboard at www.speechanddebate.org to find more!

OVERVIEW With some careful planning, alumni can become agents of change for your district. Their experience with speech and debate generally means they have the talent and love for the activity needed to make them all-star volunteers and supporters. Creating systems to channel their volunteer efforts will involve them in meaningful activities that will help build the lasting relationships that will guarantee you have their support for years to come. This document will walk you through steps to organize volunteer roles for alumni and simple ways to stay in contact.

PREPARATION Step 1: Appoint someone to handle generic alumni communication. At first, the support director most easily conducts this role. As the support director, you’re in-tune with the needs of the general district and best positioned to handle alumni carefully. If it is a “generic” communication (e.g., not one to their own coach), it is important for alumni to have a reliable contact with whom to build a relationship. As you progress in this process and more alumni become involved, you’ll want to keep an eye out for an alumni coordinator. Don’t forget that an involved alumnus would make an excellent alumni coordinator! You’ll want to consider this as an option when you have more than five to ten active alumni who are coordinating their efforts through you and not exclusively with schools. Step 2: Survey your district for volunteer needs. Be creative and think of various positions that can add value and allow individuals with a variety of talents and experiences to meaningfully contribute to your district. In order to come up with a robust list, here are a few questions to ask of yourself and others in your district. 1. What tournaments occur in the area that may need volunteers? What volunteer roles would be helpful at those events? (Think beyond just judging!) 2. Are any schools interested in volunteers to come in and hear practice speeches/performances after school? 3. Does your district, or members of your district, do any fundraisers that may need volunteers? Bake sales, car

24

Rostrum | FALL 2014

washes, silent auctions, phonathons, etc., all are events that may be more successful by having a little extra help! 4. Does your district committee need administrative help during the year? Perhaps you’ve always wanted a strong Facebook presence, but don’t have the time. Or perhaps your district would like some of its history documented. Be creative about what may be helpful to delegate to someone. 5. Are there any special events where alumni turnout would make a difference? Do schools ever present their awards to administrators where an alumni testimonial might help? Are there public performances or public debates where having an audience would make a difference?

IMPLEMENTATION Step 1: Create an alumni volunteer engagement packet. After you’ve collected the answers from the last section, create a list of all of the types of volunteer roles. Include relevant dates for the role and necessary requirements. See the sample packet at the end of this document. Although it is formatted to include areas where experience is not needed, it is still appropriate for alumni. Many alumni feel uncomfortable performing a task that require speech and debate experience. Whether it is because it’s been a long time since they have competed, or because they did not have high levels of success, alumni will feel anxious about their inexperience. By providing options described as “no experience is necessary,” alumni are more likely to volunteer in these areas. Step 2: Say hello to alumni! This may seem obvious, but the first step to involving alumni is friendly and prompt responses. If they see you at a tournament, go up and say hi and ask them what they enjoyed about speech and debate. If they send an email, respond within 24 hours to introduce yourself. This email can be a form letter, and it can even say that you will be in more communication in a few days, but it is important to respond promptly. Step 3: Collect and keep track of alumni contact information. When an alumnus reaches out, you’ll want to ask him/her a few questions in order to best guide your communication.

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!


www.speechanddebate.org

IN FOCUS

District Community Building Toolkit

How to Involve Alumni

(continued)

A sample email for your first response appears below:

Hello <Name>, Thanks so much for reaching out! The speech and debate community is better for alumni like you who want to stay connected. You mentioned that you may be interested in volunteering. I’m attaching our volunteer engagement packet. After you’ve looked it over, please email me with answers to the following questions: • • • • • • •

Which high school did you compete for? What college did you attend? Did you compete in college? In what events did you compete? If you coached, what events did you coach and where? After reading through the volunteer engagement packet, how would you like to be involved? Is there anything else we should know? Could we have your mailing address to send you our district newsletter?

Step 5: Thank volunteers! Make sure that all volunteers are thanked promptly after the event. A short email that is personalized is a quick and easy way to accomplish this. If you have their mailing address, a written thank you note will make you stand out as someone who really took the time to make a thoughtful gesture. Promptness in the personalization of your thank you will determine their likelihood of volunteering again. If they donated goods or money, the quality of the thank you becomes even more important for stewarding them as a donor. If written notes would take longer than a week, send an email. The industry consensus is that individuals thanked within 48 hours are significantly more likely to volunteer or give again. A potential short thank you could be:

Dear <Name>, Thank you so much for volunteering with us as a judge for the Apple Mound Invitational. As you know, quality judging is so important for the speech and debate experience for our competitors. By volunteering to judge you helped us provide that quality experience to more students. On behalf of all of the students, thank you! <Your Name>

If you have any questions, please let me know. I apologize if I am a bit slower at email over this coming weekend—I will be traveling with my team to a speech and debate tournament and so will have limited access to email. I look forward to reconnecting and, again, thank you for reaching out! <Your Name>

It is helpful to create a spreadsheet to then track all of this information as it comes in. This will help you place and/or guide the alumni to the appropriate opportunities. It will also give you their mailing address, which is crucial for stewarding your relationship with them. Step 4: Set up training/orientation sessions. It is almost always helpful to have a thorough job description with time expectations. Your volunteer engagement packet should include as many details as possible to help make sure everyone is on the same page. After someone has signed up for a shift, however, it is important to think about a training or orientation session. These can occur on the day of the event (unless you’ll be too busy) or in advance. They can also occur over the phone. If at all possible, face-to-face orientations are preferable; they are more effective at communicating information and also a way to build a personal relationship with the alumnus.

Note that the thank you includes the word “you” often and ties the volunteer experience back to the overall mission of the organization. If they canceled at the last minute, reach out to them and send them a thank you for volunteering and let them know you hope they’ll be able to engage in the future. Many factors cause people to be unable to complete volunteer duties. Staying positive and giving them a graceful way to reengage will not only gain you a volunteer, but will make them significantly more likely to become an excellent volunteer. A sample note for either a cancelation or a no-show could be:

Dear <Name> Thanks so much for offering to supervise the bake sale yesterday. I understand you wanted to be there very much, but sometimes there are things that just pop up at the last minute. I hope you’ll be able to join us in the future. Your help would be so appreciated—the bake sale helps us raise funds for scholarship students to compete at the upcoming tournaments. I hope all is well. Thanks, <Your Name>

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 25


District Community Building Toolkit

APPENDIX: SAMPLE VOLUNTEER ENGAGEMENT PACKET

(continued)

If something negative occurred, the thank you note is not the time to mention it. If the incident was serious, presumably it was addressed immediately at the time of the event. Otherwise, it may be a reason to steer him/her to other volunteer roles or to provide additional training. For example, if the volunteer awarded low speaker points, the next time s/he signs up to judge, let him/her know that you’re speaking to all of the judges proactively about the community norm to ensure speaker points are distributed accordingly. If students said the volunteer didn’t pay attention as a judge, but the alumnus volunteers to judge again, you could thank him/her and ask them if he or she would be willing to help hand out food since that is your biggest need for the weekend. If you want to have a talk with him/her about the behavior, doing so in any form other than the initial thank you will help ensure the volunteer is in a position to hear it as constructive criticism and not as ungratefulness. Step 6: Communication Make sure that any alumni who have reached out receive some level of communication. If your district has a Facebook group, invite them to follow that for updates. If you do a newsletter, include them on the list. Any time your district prepares a press release, have a mailing list and send it to alumni to keep them informed of the successes in the area they are supporting. Keep in mind, communication with alumni might be a great role for an active alumnus volunteer!

EVALUATION Measuring Success There are three areas to measure for the year: Number of alumni who reach out Individuals ask to volunteer for causes in which they believe and to organizations they think are doing valuable work. The number of alumni who reach out to volunteer is most often a factor of their knowledge of how much of a difference your district is making on the area community. Celebrate each new contact! Number of volunteers Perhaps the most obvious metric, this metric is one that is often forgotten. Keep track of the number of individuals who volunteered at any event. If you can, estimate the number of hours they volunteered. Keep track of this number, and you can set goals of ways to increase this each school year.

Thanks for reaching out to volunteer with the Southern East Central District of the National Speech & Debate Association! You can make a major difference in our community. Below are several opportunities to get involved.

Become a Volunteer Judge Speech and debate competitions are a great place to volunteer and connect with area teams. For many of our schools, judging is a limiting factor in their ability to send students to compete. By volunteering to judge, you will directly be responsible for more students being able to compete that day. Experience required: No experience in speech and debate is required, but all judges must participate in a judge training in advance of the competition. Judge trainings are available the morning of the tournament. Commitment level: We ask volunteers to judge a full day of competition (usually a Friday from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. or Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.). Please note, our schools also require us to background check all judges. The background check is free and easy, but must be completed at least one week in advance. For information, please contact ourdistrictsupportdirector@ ourdistrict.org. Dates: Tournaments are held several times in the area. Below are the dates, tentative times, and contact info for the tournament directors who have requested volunteers. Please contact the appropriate tournament director(s) if you are interested in volunteering for a particular tournament.

SAMPLE

How to Involve Alumni

Volunteer Tournament Staff Speech and debate competitions are a great place to volunteer and connect with area teams. With hundreds of high school competitors, schools are always looking for individuals to help hand out meals, run concessions, maintain the judges’ hospitality lounge, or run judge check-in. By volunteering as tournament staff, you are helping tournaments run on time and smoothly. Your presence will positively impact every participant! Experience required: No experience in speech and debate is required. Commitment level: Very flexible; usually two-hour shifts.

Number of communications with alumni How many thank you notes did you send out? How many newsletters were passed on to alumni? Consistent communication is an important metric to track because it is often the indicator of whether you will have continued engagement.

26

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Dates: Please see the tournament dates under “Become a Volunteer Judge” for dates and contact info.

BUILDING COMMUNITY — Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!


www.speechanddebate.org

IN FOCUS

Volunteer Mentor Speech and debate competitors practice after school on a weekly basis. They strive for feedback to improve from individuals like you! Your feedback will not only produce future award winners, but also empowers students to find ways to overcome challenges. Experience required: Experience in speech and debate is required.

SAMPLE

Commitment level: Varies as described below.

BUILDING COMMUNITY TOOLKIT

Below are some of the additional resources you will find online as part of our Building Community Toolkit. Our staff will be adding to this list as the year progresses, so be sure to check back often!

Fundraising Help Volunteering to help in this area would make a dramatic impact for students who cannot otherwise afford to participate in speech and debate. Team fundraisers help to bring down the costs for all participants and scholarship recipients for whom the cost would be prohibitive. Please help us bring speech and debate to more students! Experience required: No speech/debate experience needed. Commitment level: Very flexible!

SAMPLE

Dates: Below is a tentative list of fundraisers with related contact information.

Facilitating an Effective Meeting Guiding Novices for Their First District Tournament Hosting a Fall Workshop Hosting a Vision Gathering Event Tournament Hosting: Hospitality Tournament Hosting: Logistics Recruiting an Advisory Board

BUILDING COMMUNITY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Visit the District Leader Resources tab on your dashboard for more information!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 27


What We're Reading In the spirit of Building Community, our staff offers up several good reads on the topics of leadership, fundraising, volunteerism, and more!

Leading with the Heart by Mike Krzyzewski and Donald Phillips In his more than 20 years of coaching the Blue Devils, Coach Mike Krzyzewski has made his program the most admired in the nation, with back-to-back national championships in '91, '92, and again in 2001, and ten Final Four appearances since 1986. Now, in Leading with the Heart, Coach K talks about leadership—how you earn it, how you practice it, and how you use it to move your organization to the top. From the importance of trust, communication, and pride, to the commitment a leader must make to his or her team, this inspiring book is a must-read for anyone who loves college basketball—or who simply wants to win in any competitive environment today. Readers might also consider Coach K’s second book, The Gold Standard: Building a WorldClass Team, published in 2009. — Recommended by Scott Wunn, Executive Director

Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools by Jonathan Kozol This has long been one of my favorite books. I first read it as part of an undergraduate course, and it has had an impact on me ever since. As the Director of Programs and Education for the National Speech &Debate Association, I'm passionate about providing resources for all of our members to assist them in finding their voice through competitive speech and debate activities. Savage Inequalities provides alarming insights into the vast disparities that exist in some of our public schools. Through Programs and Education, we can work to provide the same quality resources to students in all schools. As you consider how to "build community," give Kozol's book a look. It's a quick read and will motivate you to think about how you can make a difference in every student's life in your district and beyond. — Recommended by Steven Schappaugh, Director of Programs and Education

28

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Achieving Excellence in Fundraising by Eugene Tempel This book is an excellent roadmap for anyone engaged in fundraising— and if you're the coach of a speech and debate program, you're almost certainly involved in some way. From the importance of good stewardship and relationships to understanding donor interests and planning special events, this work builds on the legendary work of Hank Rosso to deliver a contemporary and extremely relevant book for all of us. Whether you're asking alumni or talking to the school board about your budget, considering running or improving your fundraising event (e.g., tournaments), I'd highly suggest you take a look at this book. — Recommended by Cherian Koshy, Director of Development


www.speechanddebate.org

Content Rules by Ann Handley and C.C. Chapman It's no secret that good marketing— whether it's promoting a business, a school, or even a speech and debate program—is about publishing great content. This book provides ideas on how to create that content! Producing great stories is just half the fun. Learn the best tips, tricks, and content rules! — Recommended by Shelby Young, Manager of Marketing and Communications

Chicken Soup for the Volunteer's Soul by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Arline McGraw Oberst, John T. Boal, Tom Lagana, and Laura Lagana A series of unique stories from the perspective of volunteers, this book offers insight into the heroic act of every day actions. Because it is a compilation of short stories, this book is wonderful for speech and debate coaches with tiny pockets of time. For anyone in volunteer management, it's a true glimpse into the motivations of our volunteers and the kind of meaningful rewards that make a difference. — Recommended by Nicole WanzerSerrano, Director of Alumni and

Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard

The Ten Faces of Innovation

by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

by Tom Kelley

Switch asks the question: Why is it so hard to make lasting changes in our organizations, our communities, and our own lives? Brothers Dan and Chip Heath trace the root of this difficulty to an inherent conflict between the rational and emotional parts of our brain. The rational mind wants to change, while the emotional mind craves the comfort of the existing routine. Overcoming that tension enables change. Switch is narrative-driven, using stories to illustrate the Heaths' finding that transformative change relies on our ability to see and capitalize on the "bright spots" in our lives and our work. Instead of focusing on what's broken, we need to ask: "what's working?" Taking on new roles and involving new people in district activities can be challenging, but by reflecting on what strategies have worked well in your district in the past, you can better plan for the future. Also cool: applications in the education field are numerous, and the Heaths offer many free resources to augment the book, including a change workbook, on their website www. heathbrothers.com.

If you've ever found that obstacles get in the way of accomplishing your goals, you should read this book. No matter your personality, there is a role you can play to accomplish your objectives. Speech and debate coaches often battle against the odds to make sure our students succeed. Whether you're a "hurdler," who jumps over barriers put in place by a stifling bureaucracy, or the "collaborator," who wants to work with others to get great work done, you will find a match in this book. Using short narratives in every chapter, you will learn the stories of those who have developed ideas to accomplish seemingly insurmountable challenges. These stories do not just come from world-famous CEOs. Low-level managers, engineers, founders of non-profit organizations, and consumers with odd ideas dominate the pages. If you want to be inspired, just read a few pages before the next challenge is put in your path. — Recommended by Deano Pape,

— Recommended by Amy Seidelman,

Manager of Collegiate and

Manager of Strategic Alignment

Organizational Partnerships

We want to know what you're reading! Email editor@speechanddebate.org with your own recommendations, and you might see your favorite book highlighted in the next issue of Rostrum magazine!

Community Impact

Rostrum | FALL 2014 29


FROM OUR COMMUNITY Top Ten Songs for Intense Concentration The next time you're seeking razor sharp focus, try listening to this playlist of instrumental music to keep you in the zone! – compiled by Charles Olney

• • • • • • • • • •

Angelo Badalamenti – “Twin Peaks Theme” Balmorhea – “March 4, 1831” Hammock – “Frailty (For the Dearly Departed)” Hildur Gudnadottir – “Iridescence” Jon Hopkins – “Immunity” Jonsi and Alex – “Happiness” Julianna Barwick – “Labyrinthine” Port Royal – “Anja: Sehnsucht” Stars of the Lid – “Even If You're Never Awake (Deuxième)” Windy & Carl – “The Same Moon and Stars”

Tournament Tea

Charles Olney, an alumnus of the National Speech & Debate Association, debated at Oak Harbor High School (WA) and Whitman College, where he was the Top Speaker at the 2003 National Debate Tournament. He is currently a graduate student in politics at UC-Santa Cruz and a debate coach at Dartmouth College. He writes about music, politics, and other things at www.heartachewithhardwork.com.

From Leeann Solice (TX)

There are many reasons to serve tea as the main beverage for a tournament meal. It is very cost-effective per serving compared to soda, your guests can control their sugar content, it is environmentally friendly (especially if you cold brew), and it is more convenient than dozens of soda cans or large bottles. Most importantly, it is also simple enough to delegate this preparation to students with even the most basic kitchen skills! The Method For a casual hospitality room or snack bar, use a large cylindrical cooler with a spigot and your favorite brand of cold-brew tea bags. You will need approximately 4 family-size tea bags per gallon. The tea will “brew” in tap water in only about 5-10 minutes. Create flavored teas by adding a fruity or minty herbal tea, easily brewed in a microwaveable cup, with two bags per cup for stronger flavor. Add one cup of herbal tea per gallon. Favorite flavor additions are Celestial Seasonings Peppermint or Raspberry Zinger. (Note: You may want to provide a decaffeinated version instead, especially if serving to students, so as to not dry out their vocal chords!) The Alternative Use large, two-gallon plastic water containers with spouts to make sun tea. This is a convenient solution if your snack bar does not have access to a kitchen. Use a sharp knife to gently slice a 2-3 inch slit in the top of each container. Insert 4-6 family sized tea bags into the water, and place in the sun for several hours—or use cold-brew bags for only 5-10 minutes. Lemon slices may be inserted through the slit for extra flavor.

30

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

RECIPES Looking to spice up your next hospitality lounge? Check out these tried and true recipes submitted by coaches from across the country. Ingredients can be doubled or tripled to feed large groups. These ideas also work great for potluck team gatherings, parent meetings, and more! For other tips on providing the best tournament hospitality, log in to your dashboard and check out our Building Community handouts ("Tournament Hospitality Guide" and "Tournament Hosting Logistics"), located under the District Leader Resources tab.

Peanut Butter, Kidney Bean, and Yam Stew From Carol Green Dennis (CA) This vegetarian dish is sure to please every time! Ingredients • 2 medium yellow onions, peeled and chopped • 2 red bell peppers, deseeded and chopped • 3 yams, cubed (I keep the skin on and scrub them well before cutting them) • 5 cups water • 2 cubes of vegan/vegetable bouillon (you can also replace these and the water with 5 cups vegetable broth) • 1 can (15 oz.) kidney beans, rinsed and drained • 1 can (15 oz.) diced tomatoes • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter • 1 Tbsp. minced garlic • 1 tsp. minced ginger • 1 tsp. cumin • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon • 1 Tbsp. brown sugar • 1/2 tsp. chili powder • 1/2 tsp. sea salt Directions Mix all ingredients in slow cooker and cook for 8 to 11 hours on low heat. (Serves 10)

Quick and Easy Taco Salad From Fred Robertson (NE) I usually prep the meat the night before, then take everything else with me to the tournament the next day. Directions Brown 2 lbs. of lean ground beef. Stir in 2 packages of Old El Paso taco seasoning mix. Add one bottle of corn bean salsa and one bottle of chunky tomato salsa, plus a little water and garlic salt to taste. Cook it down with a little Emeril "bam" (optional), then refrigerate overnight. The Fixins • 2 (16 oz.) bottles of thousand island dressing • 2 (8 oz.) packages of shredded sharp cheddar • 12 roma tomatoes, chopped • 2 bags of regular toasted corn Doritos chips, crushed • 1 large or 2 small heads of iceberg lettuce, chopped Chop and crush everything. Mix together with the meat and put an extra covering of crushed chips and cheese on top.

Cowboy Stew Aunt Carol Gammon Edsall's Recipe From Jane Boyd (TX) This stew is quick, hearty, and delicious! Ingredients • 2 lbs. ground beef • 1 can (16 oz.) mixed vegetables • 2 cans (16 oz.) ranch style beans • 2 cups water • 2 cans (8 oz.) tomato sauce • 2 cans (16 oz.) tomatoes, chopped and drained • 1/2 tsp. basil • 1/4 tsp. thyme • 1 large can of beef stock Directions In a large pot, brown ground beef and drain. Add everything else to the same pot. Cover and simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. (Serves 10-12)

Do you have a sweet or savory recipe you'd like to share with us? Email us at editor@speechanddebate.org— your ideas might be featured in our next issue!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 31


Encourage your students to participate in our spoken word poetry contest and they could win a college scholarship and a FREE trip to perform at the 2015 National Speech & Debate Tournament! Students must write and record an original spoken word poem. The performance must be submitted as a YouTube video, and be no longer than three minutes in length. Entries will be accepted March 2-20, 2015. Full contest rules and details can be found at www.LightTheStage.org. The top six performers will win a college scholarship and be invited to perform in front of thousands at the 2015 National Speech & Debate Tournament in Dallas, Texas.

For more information, visit www.LightTheStage.org.


CLAREMONT  SUMMER  

EXCEPTIONAL  NATIONAL   AND  INTERNATIONAL   DEBATE  &  LEADERSHIP   INSTRUCTION   2015  SUMMER  PROGRAMS      

3  sessions  for  middle  school  debate;  3   high  school  programs  for  national  and   international  debate,  leadership  and   professional  communication.  Join  more   than  500  hundred  national  and   international  students  in   residential/commuter  programs.    

 

INFORMATION  AND  APPLICATION  FORMS  –  October  15   CLAREMONTSUMMER.ORG    

National  Middle  School  and  High  School  Debate  Programs  (MS/HSPDP  &  CHSSA)   The   Public   Debate   Program   is   the   fastest   growing   educational/competitive   debate   outreach   network,   with   class   and   tournament   programming   in   20   countries.   More   than   100,000   teachers   and   students   will   participate   this   year;   the   program   expansion   plan   is   designed   to   reach   more   than   50,000   students   within   the   next   3   years.   Public   Debate   Program   secondary   school   instructional   materials  are  integrated  in  national  and  international  curricula.  Major  non-­‐profit  organizations  and   universities  use  PDP  resources  to  teach  civil  rights,  professional  communication,  girl’s  and  women’s   empowerment,   business   law,   and   argumentation.   The   Middle   School/High   School   Public   Debate   Program  (MS/HSPDP)  proprietary  competitive  debate  formats  were  developed  to  maximize  student   educational   outcomes,   accelerating   standards-­‐based   learning   and   promoting   sophisticated   public   speaking,  critical  thinking,  research,  argumentation,  and  refutation  skills.  Summer  instruction  offers   appropriate   training   for   elite   debating,   including   MS/HSPDP   competition   and   other   events   (PDP   debaters   have   won   NSDA   L-­‐D   and   TOC   Policy   championships,   for   example).   There   is   also   training   for   the  California  High  School  Speech  Association  (CHSSA)  parliamentary  debate  format,  an  impromptu   model  developed  at  Claremont.    

International  High  School  Debate  (Multiple  Formats)   The  International  Public  Debate  Program  offers  extraordinary  opportunities  for  high  school  debate   students.   Planning   is   now   underway   for   2015-­‐16   events   in   10   countries.   Summer   instruction   prepares   students   for   competition   in   3   popular   international   debate   formats.   Programming   includes   an   audition   for   2015-­‐16   US   IPDP   traveling   teams;   the   summer   session   includes   a   multi-­‐format   tournament.      

Leadership  and  Professional  Communication  Program   Using  the  curricular  materials,  methods,  and  individual  and  group  presentation  exercises  developed   for  businesses,  non-­‐profit  organizations,  and  higher  education  faculty  and  students,  the  Leadership   and   Professional   Communication   Program   provides   training   in   extemporaneous   speaking,   roundtable   discussion   and   negotiation,   multimedia   presentation,   project   management,   interviewing   and   resume   writing,   and   social   professional   networking.   Students   prepare   school   and   community   projects   for   evaluation   by   field   professionals,   including   university   faculty,   lawyers,   financial   analysts,   and   non-­‐profit   organization   staff   from   the   nation’s   leading   academic   institutions,   businesses,   and   social   support   organizations.   Students   are   eligible   to   audition   for   the   2015-­‐16   Civics   in   Action   program,   a   social   and   political   advocacy   initiative   promoting   innovative   ideas   and   workable,   sustainable  educational  and  community  policies.      

The  Claremont  Difference   Format   and   summer   program   certification   required   for   all   institute   faculty   and   judges   •   Staff   includes   founders   of   MS/HSPDP   and   CHSSA   Parliamentary   Debate   formats,   authors   of   16   debate   textbooks,  coaches  of  a  score  of  national  debate  champions  •  4-­‐1  student-­‐faculty  ratio  •  Small  group   instruction  with  elective  options  for  high  school  students  (student-­‐directed  learning)  •  Cutting-­‐edge   theory  and  practice  •  Coaches  of  US  teams  for  more  than  30  major  international  tournaments  •  All   programs  –  Essay  training  with  college  writing  consultants;  meetings  with  college  admission  staff.  

 

MIDDLE  SCHOOL  DEBATE   Three  sessions  featuring  instruction  in  the  MSPDP   format,  the  largest  and  fastest  growing  debate   th th model  for  5 -­‐8  grade  students  –  The   Supersession  includes  a  summer  championship   tournament.  

 

HIGH  SCHOOL  DEBATE   One  session  featuring  instruction  in  the   HSPDP/CHSSA  debate  formats  

 

INTERNATIONAL  HIGH  SCHOOL   DEBATE  &  AUDITION  FOR  US   INTERNATIONAL  PUBLIC  DEBATE   PROGRAM  (IPDP)   Training  for  US  students  interested  in  participating   in  international  debating  in  multiple  formats;   integrated  tournament  and  audition  for   tournament  travel.  The  IPDP  sponsors   participation  at  10  major  tournaments  and   international  exchanges  each  year.    

 

LEADERSHIP  AND  PROFESSIONAL   COMMUNICATION     Public  speaking,  interviewing,  roundtable   discussion,  team  building,  resume  design,  program   management,  and  leadership  skill  development  –   Students  complete  civic  action  projects  

 

PROGRAM  DIRECTOR   John  Meany   Director  of  Forensics   Claremont  McKenna  College   Claremont  Colleges  Debate  Union   john.meany@cmc.edu      


District in Detail

District Committee

Eastern Missouri

Justin Seiwell, Chair Clayton HS – Clayton, MO

Omar Abdel-Hamid Parkway South HS – Manchester, MO

Molly K. Beck Ladue Horton Watkins HS – St. Louis, MO

Cara Borgsmiller Parkway West HS – Ballwin, MO

Robyn Haug Brentwood HS – Brentwood, MO

compiled by Justin Seiwell Tell us a little about your district and what makes it unique. Our district is relatively large and spread out. While the concentration of programs can be found in St. Louis, we also have a substantial number of schools that actively participate in weekend and district competitions from midMissouri. For the longest time, many of us thought we were on the small to average size of a district tournament; it wasn’t until we saw numbers provided by the national office that we discovered we actually host one of the largest district tournaments in the nation! But the fact that we felt it was so small is a natural consequence of what makes our district so special: We act like a close-knit family. The majority of coaches in our area actually competed here as students. Speaking from my own personal experience, I know that as a student I fell in love with Eastern Missouri. It felt like home. Why? Because there’s a huge sense of camaraderie among the coaches and the students that crosses school lines. We’re competitive with each other, yes, but the reality

34

Rostrum | FALL 2014

is that the competition is, for most of us, the least important aspect of what we do. We’re teachers first, mentors second, and colleagues third. If you listen to our coach meetings or pop in to a hospitality room at any local tournament, you’ll hear coaches sharing ideas about how to best educate the students. You’ll hear coaches providing feedback to other coaches about their students. You’ll see the exchange of lesson plans, practice techniques, and best practices even when our students may be competing against each other right down the hall. Walk down the hallways, and you’ll see coaches and students from competing schools helping one another. The students, especially the experienced ones, seem to take a hint from the coaches and support each other; they take pride in cheering each other on. Competitions are kept friendly most of the time, and then there’s the friendships. The reality is, when we have a weekend without a tournament, you’ll find that our coaches meet together—birthdays, community events, or just to socialize. The same applies to the students. I can’t think of

any other activity in which students who know they’ll be competing against each other (even for a coveted spot to Nationals) will form meaningful friendships. They spend their off-weekends together, and the friendships that emerge are easy to see. Look at the cafeteria during any tournament, and you’ll have a really hard time figuring out which team is sitting where. The kids intermingle so much that they sit together during their down times. As coaches, we’re truly astounded and inspired by what we see in all of our students on a weekly basis. Those of us who competed here as students will attest, this really is a very extended family—one focused heavily on supporting each other and mutual growth.

What challenges do you face as a district? Because we are so focused on mutual support, tournaments for many of our students are more of a social experience rather than a competitive one. That’s not inherently a bad thing, and few coaches would change it, but it frequently can be a


www.speechanddebate.org

challenge to get students to strive for competitive success. We struggle to strike that balance, but the reality is it's a good struggle, and we’d much rather have it than the alternative. A hypercompetitive, dog-eat-dog community just doesn’t sound like a pleasant work or educational environment. We also struggle to build up a solid judging pool for our district tournament. None of our member

We’re also just now coming out of a series of staff changes. Those of us who “grew up” in the Eastern Missouri district can remember the coaching giants. These were the individuals who worked tirelessly to establish the district in the 1970s, grow speech and debate in St. Louis, grow speech and debate outside of St. Louis, and had fought, successfully, for classes and resources from their school

even today, none of the District Committee members have more than seven years of coaching experience, and the five of us represent some of the more experienced coaches in the district. That created challenges, especially when it came to the National Tournament and our success there, but we’re steadily gaining experience and getting better at what we do.

“We’re competitive with each other, yes, but the reality is that the competition is, for most of us, the least important aspect of what we do. We’re teachers first, mentors second, and colleagues third.”

schools are equipped with a budget that would allow us to charge district dues. Even the base entry fee to our district tournament can be a stretch for many schools, and since we’re so driven to provide educational opportunities for students, we are always very hesitant to increase prices on entries. So, we’re unable to pay judges. We have a lovely group of regular volunteers—current and former speech and debate parents who eagerly show up every year to judge—but that is a small group and the vast majority of our judges are parents who will stop judging once their children have graduated. That makes it difficult to build and retain a knowledgeable judge pool. As many districts are experiencing, we’re also seeing more and more students who are trying to “do everything” in high school because they want to bolster their college applications. Some of our programs have dropped in size, or have retained the same physical number of students, but those students attend fewer tournaments. It seems like the days where “speech and debate are what these kids do” are gone.

districts to support the community. Unfortunately, most of these coaches all retired within a few years of each other. So much institutional memory was lost almost all at once, and more troubling was the number of school districts that used retirements to then cut funding and positions. After all, much of this occurred during the economic recession. That left district leadership in a bit of a vacuum;

What are some best practices you would like to share with other district leaders? First, our coach meetings—we hold one right at the beginning of the year and a second at the end of the year. At these meetings, we get together, share our own points of pride, concern, and needs with each other, and the various leaders then look at how to best support coaches. Our District Committee develops a (continued on page 37)

Rostrum | FALL 2014 35


Additional Insights

We asked the Eastern Missouri District Committee members to share some of their tips for new coaches, along with any recommended services or resources they find especially helpful when joining the National Speech & Debate Association.

“Ask questions. Don’t be afraid to engage

rounds—judging allowed me to develop

like when we were getting started. Your

with the seasoned coaches in your area.

opinions and insight into each event.

voice matters, and is so vitally important

I think all coaches desire to grow their

Reading ballots before giving them

to be heard; that’s the only way we

district and improve quality competition.

to your students is also important. I

get better at what we do. Go to coach

This can only come from retaining

actually learned a lot about giving quality

meetings, go to tournaments, judge lots

willing coaches and schools. No other

feedback by reading ballots done by

of rounds (which is the very best way to

coach will find your questions silly or

coaches I respect. Most importantly,

improve as a coach), and ask questions

unwelcome.”

ask questions and take any opportunity

whenever anything seems unclear.

— Cara Borgsmiller, Parkway West HS

given to you.

“Don’t be afraid to jump right in to competition. It can be pretty intimidating initially, especially with the wide variety of events each tournament offers, but the best way to get yourself as a coach, and more importantly your students, to learn is by diving in and experiencing everything tournaments have to offer. Your students will learn a great deal about competition, winning and losing gracefully, and professionalism, even in the rounds where they lose. As a coach, there’s no better way to improve your skills than by judging, and learning from your fellow coaches.” — Omar Abdel-Hamid, Parkway South HS

“Ladue uses the final round videos

The webinar series for coaching, topic

analysis, and holding practices, along with

frequently—we use them to show an

the briefs and downloadable textbooks

excellent example of each event, and we

provided by the Association, are

also use them before major tournaments

fantastic for both students and coaches,

to watch for best practices. The webinars

especially when they’re just starting out!”

have proven to be extremely useful. I

— Justin Seiwell, Clayton HS

watch some of them, and I encourage my team captains to watch them, as well. I’ve noticed their ability to teach concepts to novices has improved greatly. We also use the debate resources to help teach novices and to add to our topic analysis discussions and activities.

"On the curricular

side, I used the advocacy “I would recommend reaching out to coaches in the area. When I was a new coach, I really relied on coaches in the district who could give me resources, explain best practices, and answer questions at tournaments. I also think it’s important to take advantage of every opportunity you can to learn more,

articles and papers provided by the Association in a presentation to our district’s administrative team. The articles were extremely helpful in convincing the leaders of our school district to invest in a long-term K-12 speech and debate curriculum.” — Molly Beck, Ladue Horton Watkins HS

round videos as performance exemplars. We have also used the Oratory webinar on topic selection, the Interp webinars on characterization, as well as the Public Forum topic analysis videos. It is very difficult in a debate class to teach everyone at once since there are so many levels, and they are often doing

whether it’s the webinars put out by

36

“Brentwood frequently uses the final

different events, so I divide out and work

the Association, watching experienced

“Ask questions and be honest about

coaches provide feedback, watching

what you think. We’re all in this together,

final rounds of the National Tournament,

but it’s easy for those of us who have

website works with the other group.”

and so on. It is really important to judge

been in it for years to forget what it was

— Robyn Haug, Brentwood HS

Rostrum | FALL 2014

with one group while the Association's


www.speechanddebate.org

work agenda each year of things we hope to accomplish to help coaches— both experienced and new—based entirely off that feedback. That helps us target what’s really needed by our member coaches. For example, two years ago, we received a large number of requests to explain the nuances of the district tournament. With a relatively young coaching community, many simply don’t know why things are set up the way they are, why the schedule falls the way that it does, etc. So much of what we do comes from a certain rhythm we’ve developed over the years; new coaches don’t see it or know how it all works. That’s a place where we as the District Committee needed to explain things better. So, when I was elected district chair, I developed a “Guide to National Speech & Debate Association Districts” that is shared with coaches a few weeks prior to the tournament. We then solicit feedback so we can improve it rather than simply “update” it each year. I would argue our best practice is how we as a district handle the National Tournament. We really do stop acting like different teams and start to become one team as soon as the State Tournament ends in

April. In May and early June, coaches start working with students from other schools based on their own strengths and interests. For example, I am not very strong when it comes to coaching Oratory, so when I have a student advance in Oratory, he or she will work with a coach who loves Oratory. I’ll sit in on those practices so that I can learn, too. I’ll reciprocate by working with students who qualified in Congress, since I love Congress and have substantial experience coaching it. Once schools let out for the summer, all the qualifiers and coaches will meet up at different high schools for practice. Then, when Nationals week comes, we travel together, room together, carpool to tournaments together, and share meals with each other. If the need arises, we also “swap coaches” for the week. if I have a small group of qualifiers, I may have my assistant coaches serve as the judges for my school, and I may serve as the judge for a different school. For coaches, it’s a solid week of professional development. For students, it’s a solid week of friendship-making and mutual support. We supervise each other's students at the different tournament sites, we save a bunch of money by

splitting hotel costs, and we spend evenings in the hotel lobby helping each other digest the day. This has proven invaluable to new coaches (I know from experience), and then translates to how we interact with one another throughout the next year. Each student has around 20 different coaches they can reach out to at any time during the week. We say that Eastern Missouri is an extended family; perhaps that stems from the fact that we all share the same space— literally—for an entire week straight. Perhaps the greatest testament to the sense of community we have comes from the conversation we’ve all had to have—that dreaded conversation when a senior doesn’t advance to Nationals. Ask coaches in our district, many times the students aren’t upset that they’ve ended their careers. After all, they knew that going in. They’re upset because they won’t spend “one last week” hanging out with their peers and their coaches! I also shared a number of practices I used when I took over as district chair last year in a recent webinar, which may help new district chairs get settled in. (Editor's Note: A recording of Justin's webinar titled "Tips for Success in the First Year" is available at http://goo.gl/mf9inD. You can find this and other great webinars by logging in to your dashboard!)

This issue of Rostrum talks about our community-building efforts at the district level, which were first introduced at the 2014 Summer Leadership Conference. How have you been implementing some of these ideas in your district? Honest answer: Slowly. The reality is, when the District Committee met in late summer after the conference, we realized that we’re already been doing

Rostrum | FALL 2014 37


a lot of this, we just haven’t used the same vocabulary. We’re very eager to try new things and look at the community-building resources as a chance to build upon the work we’re already doing. We’re taking time to study it and implement it in our district. Our hope is that the resources provided will help us grow the number of coaches involved in leadership beyond the five Committee members. We’re also hoping that it can help us support and retain new coaches, supporting students, and increase community involvement.

Do you have personal anecdotes of how speech and debate has transformed the lives of your students? Tons. Speech and debate coaches everywhere could (and probably should) publish a book about the transformations we see. One story in particular comes to mind—probably because all five of us worked with this student in one way or another: I had a student who struggled to keep up with the academic rigor asked of our students. When he came to our school, he was enrolled in some remedial classes and rarely, if ever, spoke in class. He ended up in Public Speaking during the second semester of his sophomore year.

38

Rostrum | FALL 2014

“We’re very eager to try new things and look at the community-building resources as a chance to build upon the work we’re already doing.” After that class, for which the final is a Public Forum round, he decided to join the speech and debate team. He completely changed. He became an involved and engaged student who would volunteer frequently in class. He was answering questions, sharing ideas, and writing at an exceptional level. Teachers began to comment on his intelligence, hard work, and ability to challenge himself and the class. He was also very successful in speech and debate; however, he took his success in speech and debate and used it to become a leader in RISE, a support and mentoring program for African-American students, and to work with the NAACP on the Dred Scott campaign. He was chosen as a commencement speaker and won multiple awards from the faculty at senior award night. He graduated two years ago, and teachers continue to comment on his remarkable turnaround and new confidence. He now competes on a college team. He continues to credit his high school

Public Speaking class with leading him to join the team and often speaks of the influence it has had on his life.

What's the best way to get to know and learn from other district leaders in the organization? Honestly, attending the Summer Leadership Conference is well worth the investment. The conference brings district leaders from across the country—all of whom volunteer their time to making speech and debate better—together in one room. The conversations that flow are phenomenal. The more we share, the more we improve. I encourage district leaders to reach out—phone calls and emails are welcome. One of the best things I’ve found is that by reading the way other district leaders articulate the information about their district tournaments, I can find ways to improve the way we talk about our own tournament. We all benefit when we share ideas and opinions.


Submit Your 2015 Hall of Fame Nominations! Who is eligible? Coaches with 25 years of Association membership, or who are retired, are eligible for this honor. Keep in mind, your identity as nominator will remain confidential. Therefore, your statement of nomination and coach biography (300 words or less) should be written in the third person and focus on the coaching history and qualifications of your candidate. Some topics you might include are awards, accolades, accomplishments, career highlights, character, and personal contributions. See the sample biography below as a general guide.

SAMPLE BIOGRAPHY and debate for the past 30 years. A fiveJane Smith has been a dedicated coach of speech the epitome of integrity and dedication to the diamond coach from Blank High School, Jane is National Speech & Debate Association. nts to the National Speech & Debate Competitively, Jane has qualified more than 25 stude to the final rounds and has captured three Tournament. Her team has sent seven students career, Blank High School has won the national championships. During Jane’s coaching es Award several times. Largest Chapter Award and the District Sweepstak level, directing her team to five State Jane also has had an outstanding career at the state won the Outstanding Speech, Debate, and Championships in speech competition. In 2005, she ded her the Outstanding Individual in Speech Theatre Award from ABCDE. In 2007, XYZ awar e inducted Jane into its Hall of Fame. and Theatre. In 2009, the State High School Leagu extensive service to the Association and Jane is generous with her time, evidenced by her ict chair. She is co-director of her state’s her state. For nine years, she has served as distr l tournament for the last 15 years. debate camp. Jane has also hosted an invitationa snapshot of the important role that Jane Her team’s awards and achievements are only a ss hours not only to improve her students’ plays in the lives of her students. Jane spends tirele ing her students to be responsible citizens skills, but also to be a mentor and role model teach the true spirit of the Association’s mission to as well as worthy competitors. Jane exemplifies to the youth of our country. bring lifetime skills of language and communication ing, and service, Jane Smith richly With three decades of exemplary coaching, teach te Association Hall of Fame. deserves induction into the National Speech & Deba

Nominations must be RECEIVED by February 3, 2015. Please email nominations with coach biographies to Emily Bratton at

emily.bratton@speechanddebate.org.


www.speechanddebate.org

SPARK INSIGHT

Get With the Program:

Resources for Tournament Hosts

T

ournament hosts are seemingly masters of what feels like an impossible number of tasks. From planning for rooms to hospitality to student workers to parent volunteerism to hired judges— the details can be exhausting. Despite the stress coaches and schools may endure, hosting tournaments is worthwhile, serving as a fundraiser and/or service to the community. Regardless of the motivations behind a tournament, there is an overwhelming number of details a host is responsible for addressing. The National Speech & Debate Association is committed to making the lives of its member coaches easier. We are excited about several new opportunities that coaches can take advantage of when hosting tournaments. Our goal is to make the stress of hosting a tournament easier and increase the overall quality of tournament experiences across the country! The National Speech & Debate Association’s Building Community program has led to the development of text-based resources to assist coaches in tournament hosting. District leaders have access to these materials through their dashboard and can share it with member coaches. The handouts ("Tournament Hospitality Guide" and "Tournament Hosting Logistics") outline a number of considerations and potential solutions for a tournament host/planning committee. If you've never hosted a

tournament before, these are great go-to resources to begin the planning process. Also new this year—our Extemp questions service is available to invitational tournaments for a fee (see pricing chart below). Tournaments hosted by Resource Package subscribers receive a reduced rate for the Extemp questions. Additionally, any district tournament may request Extemp questions for FREE! District chairs should indicate this preference when they register their district tournament dates. If you use this new service, we commit to providing the following: • A list of Extemp topic areas to post prior to your tournament. (Requests will be taken for topic areas, but cannot be guaranteed.) • A minimum of 10 questions per round. • Electronic access to the questions by the Thursday before your tournament. (After the tournament, questions may be posted publicly by the Association only.) • Clearly stated, easy to understand questions crafted by knowledgeable Extemp coaches.

Congressional debate dockets are another FREE resource added as a benefit for all members. By the first Monday of each month, the Association will release a docket of ten pieces of legislation. You can access this docket by visiting us online at www.speechanddebate.org/topics. The docket will provide coaches with neutral legislation to be used for district tournaments, final rounds, or to supplement agendas. The legislation will be timely, properly formatted, and cover issues of international and domestic significance. As a supporting resource to this docket, each month William Mascaro, the 2014 Senate national champion, will host a webinar offering a topic analysis relevant to the issues presented within the docket. These webinars will be the second Monday of each month at 8:00 p.m. CT. Resource Package subscribers may access a recording of the webinars if they are unable to attend the live presentation. For more information about these and other great services, please email steve.schappaugh@speechanddebate.org.

Extemp Questions Service

Non-Resource Package Subscribers

Resource Package Subscribers

District Tournaments

Single Division of Extemp

$35 per round

$100 flat fee for up to 7 rounds of questions

FREE

Double Division of Extemp

$50 per round

$150 flat fee for up to 7 rounds of questions

FREE

Rostrum | FALL 2014 41


Our Professional Accreditation Program is a Great Member Benefit! The following coaches earned accreditation from the National Speech & Debate Association in 2013-14:

The National Speech & Debate Association offers four levels of accreditation. Coaches and educators must be active members of the Association to be eligible. To learn more about our program, visit us online at www.speechanddebate.org.

Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

Advanced Professional Speech & Debate Educator (APSDE)

Professional Speech & Debate Coach (PSDC)

Advanced Professional Speech & Debate Coach (APSDC)

Molly K. Beck – Ladue Horton Watkins High School, MO • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

Lisa Bompiani-Smith – Greater Latrobe High School, PA • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE) Gavin Couvelha – Valley Center High School, KS • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

Minnia Curtis – Carlsbad High School, CA

• Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

Candy B. Gleason – Edward Little High School, ME

• Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE) • Professional Speech & Debate Coach (PSDC) • Advanced Professional Speech & Debate Coach (APSDC)

Ellen Hawkes Howard – Bandon High School, OR

• Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

Kristine Lapierre – Vista Murietta High School, CA • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)

LeAnne Schmidt – Notre Dame Preparatory, MI • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE) • Professional Speech & Debate Coach (PSDC) Jeri Connors Willard – Oak Park High School, MO

• Advanced Professional Speech & Debate Educator (APSDE)

Rodney Wren, Sr. – Wichita Collegiate Upper School, KS • Professional Speech & Debate Educator (PSDE)


www.speechanddebate.org

2014-2015

T

DEBATE

Meet the Team!

welve students of the National

2014-2015 USA Debate Team

Speech & Debate Association

Milan Amritraj Nikolas Angelopoulos Sara Evall Nicky Halterman Jane Irons Abby Marone Mitali Mathur Tiana Menon Amelia Miller Jasper Primack SunHee Simon Matthew Zheng

Junior from Campbell Hall in Los Angeles, CA Junior from Polytechnic School in Pasadena, CA Senior from Harvard-Westlake School in Studio City, CA Senior from Norman High School in Norman, OK Senior from Marlborough School in Los Angeles, CA Senior from Notre Dame High School in Easton, PA Senior from Greenhill School in Addison, TX Senior from Palisade High School in Palisade, CO Senior from Harvard-Westlake School in Studio City, CA Senior from Newton South High School in Newton, MA Senior from Science Park High School in Newark, NJ Sophomore from Mira Loma High School in Sacramento, CA

Coaches Aaron Timmons Dr. Alfred Snider

Director of Debate, Greenhill School in Addison, TX Director of Debate, University of Vermont in Burlington, VT

Team Manager Cindi Timmons

Greenhill School in Addison, TX

have been selected as members of the prestigious 2014-2015 USA Debate Team after completing a rigorous application process. The American team comprises students from across the country. Together they will compete in a series of global debate competitions against teams from six different continents. Their unique experience culminates in July and August with the world championship in Singapore.

Mission of USA Debate USA Debate will join the global promotion of free and civil discourse, foster international cooperation and education, as well as demonstrate competitive excellence and national pride.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 43


Milan Amritraj – Junior from Campbell Hall in Los Angeles, California

Milan has been competing in speech and debate since the eighth grade, and has been champion of the Stanford National Invitational, the California Invitational at UC Berkeley, and the CSUF Bruschke Invitational. As an underclassman, he won third place at the National Speech & Debate Association’s National Tournament in Impromptu Speaking and reached the semifinals in Congressional Debate–Senate. At the state level, Milan placed third in Parliamentary Debate and was a finalist in Impromptu Speaking. Apart from debate, Milan is student council president for his class and captain of his tennis team. He also volunteers every summer in India with Sisters of the Poor, a charity designed to help the elderly.

Nikolas Angelopoulos – Junior from Polytechnic School in Pasadena, California

Nikolas has been debating for five years in the MS/HSPDP parliamentary style and has been champion of the Chandler, Campbell Hall, and Polytechnic tournaments. Additionally, he won first place speaker and first place team at Nationals in this format. Nik has competed in World Schools Debate since his freshman year and won third place team in China, second in Slovenia, and competed in Thailand at the World Championship. Nikolas is the founder and co-coach of his school's HSPDP debate team, which in its first year won two of the top three team awards at Nationals. When not competing, Nik is the lead singer, guitarist, and composer in a funk-rock band and holds a patent-pending for a new type of electromagnetic pickup.

Sara Evall – Senior from Harvard-Westlake School in Studio City, California

Sara has been competing in debate since the fifth grade and has debated internationally since her freshman year. Over the past three years, she competed at tournaments in Turkey, the Czech Republic, Dallas, Kansas City, and Slovenia. She has been a finalist and won multiple tournaments and numerous speaking awards. Sara also coaches middle school debate for Harvard-Westlake and worked at Claremont McKenna College’s Middle School Debate Camp. When not participating in debate activities, Sara is active in Model United Nations, serves as one of four senior leaders of her school’s Student Ambassadors program, is a leader in her school’s “Peer Support” program, and a teen buddy for Operation Mend. The charity provides reconstructive surgery to members of the armed services wounded in combat or training.

Nicky Halterman – Senior from Norman High School in Norman, Oklahoma

Nicky has been competing in Lincoln-Douglas Debate and International Extemp since he was a freshman. He has been state champion in LD as well as placing second and 15th at the National Speech & Debate Association’s National Tournament. He has also placed in Extemp at the Oklahoma state tournament, as well as participating in competitive acting events. Outside of debate, Nicky is a cross country runner and an active member in a number of school organizations, including president of the Norman High School Young Democrats.

Jane Irons – Senior from Marlborough School in Los Angeles, California

Jane has participated in speech and debate for four years, competing in Parliamentary Debate, Congressional Debate, Lincoln-Douglas Debate, World Schools Debate, Extemporaneous Speaking, Impromptu Speaking, and SPAR, and is the captain of her school’s speech and debate team. Jane’s World Schools career includes third speaker and third place team at the Chinese National Debate Tournament, first speaker at the Slovenian National Debate Tournament, and first speaker at the Old Parkland Invitational, among other team awards with USA Debate in Slovenia and at Nationals. She also coaches debate privately and as a volunteer for both middle school and high school students. Outside of debate, Jane does biochemistry research at a lab affiliated with Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Abby Marone – Senior from Notre Dame High School in Easton, Pennsylvania

Abby has competed in Congressional Debate since her freshman year, has been debate captain of her high school team since her sophomore year, and is now team president. Abby has won a state championship, placed fifth at the TOC, placed fourth at NCFL Nationals, and won the National Speech & Debate Association's Congressional Debate–House championship, as well as numerous other local and national awards. Outside of speech and debate, Abby is very active in community service and has most recently completed her Girl Scout Gold Award by partnering with a local pediatric hospital to assist in their Sensory Integration program. She also participates in mock trial, National Honor Society, French Honor Society, her school's peer support group, and Future Business Leaders of America where she won PA states and placed top 15 in the nation for business ethics. DEBATE


Mitali Mathur – Senior from Greenhill School in Addison, Texas

Mitali was born in Texas and has also lived in Hong Kong and Singapore. Mitali has been competing in LincolnDouglas Debate for four years with success on the local, state, and national level. Outside of debate, Mitali plays the piano, is a student volunteer at the International Rescue Committee, and is president of her school's Social Justice Club. Mitali has a passion for helping causes related to literacy programs for children around the world. She loves to debate, spend time with her family, learn Mandarin, travel, and enjoys exploring diverse foods and cultures.

Tiana Menon – Senior from Palisade High School in Palisade, Colorado

Tiana has been active in speech and debate for four years, competing in Congressional Debate, Public Forum, International Extemporaneous Speaking, and World Schools. She is a three-time qualifier to both the Colorado state tournament and National Tournament in International Extemp. Currently, she is the founder and chair of the region’s middle school debate district. When not competing, Tiana finds herself delving into politics. She interned locally for U.S. Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado and was a Fall Fellow for President Barack Obama’s Organizing for America. She recently completed a summer internship for Senator Bennet in Washington D.C. She is currently interning for Senator Mark Udall’s re-election campaign. Last summer, Tiana volunteered at a municipality school in India where she taught English to primary school children. She is currently in the process of coordinating and organizing a partnership between that school and Palisade High.

Amelia Miller – Senior from Harvard-Westlake School in Studio City, California

Amelia has been active in debate since middle school, competing in the Parliamentary, Lincoln-Douglas, and World Schools formats. Her personal accomplishments include the National Middle School Debate Championships where Miller’s team won the tournament and she was awarded the gavel for first place speaker. Amelia has also won the USC Junior Varsity Lincoln-Douglas Debate Tournament, and reached the finals in the Pan American World Schools Debate Championships in Chile and the Heart of Europe Championships in the Czech Republic. In this past year, Amelia's team won a national World Schools tournament in Slovenia and reached the finals of the National Speech & Debate Association’s national World Schools division. When she’s not competing, Amelia coaches the middle school debate team and is active in her school's technology council. She also participates on the Youth Leadership Team for the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.

Jasper Primack – Senior from Newton South High School in Newton, Massachusetts

Jasper has been competing in Extemporaneous Speaking for four years, during which he has won the Yale Invitational, the George Mason University Patriot Games, and the Columbia Invitational. Jasper has also placed in the final rounds of the Yale, Villiger, and Harvard Invitationals. At the 2014 National Speech & Debate Tournament, Jasper placed fourth in United States Extemp. Jasper has also competed in Impromptu Speaking and Public Forum Debate. Outside of speech and debate, Jasper volunteers for several political organizations, writes a political column for his school newspaper, and is co-president of the Massachusetts Speech and Debate League Student Advisory Board.

SunHee Simon – Senior from Science Park High School in Newark, New Jersey

SunHee has participated in debate since the seventh grade and has been active in both Lincoln-Douglas and Policy Debate events with a strong focus on LD. She won numerous awards at national tournaments, including Yale, Emory, Harvard, and Greenhill. In debate, she prides herself with being able to adapt to all types of judges. SunHee is also a captain of the Science Park High School debate team. She loves the city of Newark and continues to give back to her community as an active participant in the Newark Debate Academy.

Matthew Zheng – Sophomore from Mira Loma High School in Sacramento, California

This is Matthew’s fourth year debating in Parliamentary, second year in Public Forum and International Extemp, and second year in the World Schools format. Matthew has competed at the PanAmerican Championships where he was a quarterfinalist, and the China National Debate Tournament, where he was a Grand Finalist and also attended the National Speech & Debate Assocation’s National Tournament, NCFL Nationals, and CHSSA States in his freshman year. Matthew is the vice president of his speech and debate team and assistant coach for his former middle school team. He also competes on Mira Loma's Science Bowl team and Model United Nations. He is active in his school's public health organization and HOPE, the service team for students in Puri, India.

Follow the team and learn more at www.speechanddebate.org/USAdebate!

DEBATE


Help your team make the case for speech and debate at your school!

Speech & Debate Team Graduation Rates

We invite you to take five minutes to fill out our simple survey.  We're looking for graduation rates from your speech & debate team and schoolwide. The information will be compiled into a research paper to be published this Spring! The deadline for completing the survey is January 12, 2015.

Schoolwide Graduation Rates

8 www.surveymonkey.com/r/graduationrate

ibu

te

Contrestions anns

d qu sio mes submis eos. o c l nd we id box ideas, a s, and v p a o o y S ion hot stor miss at nts, rticles, p b e u s m us get com of a hts, se email .org. g u o th te lea your more, p anddeba e r a h h d To s ines, an @speec x el guid soapbo

Soapbox is published under the direction of the Student Leadership Committee (SLC), a group of several hundred civically engaged young people who help us fulfill our mission. Soapbox is different from Rostrum magazine—it is a solely web-based publication. Online publishing allows content to be updated as it becomes available, so it’s as fresh possible. Online content is also easy to comment on, share, and re-blog!

www.studentsoapbox.org


Support the International Mission of the International Debate Education Association! We help thousands of young people around the world find opportunities to learn how to debate and become better citizens capable of empowering themselves and strengthening democracy!

Programs • Debate in the Neighborhood in underserved communities in New York, London, and Amsterdam • Media Literacy Camps in Tunisia and Southeast Europe • Debate Training in Kyrgyzstan

Go to idebate.org/donate to help support IDEA’s international effort today.

Discovering the World through Debate: A Practical Guide to Educational Debate for Debaters, Coaches, and Judges! • Providing the very best resource in learning debate and international debate formats since 2001 • Newly revised version has been completely rewritten • Emphasis on British and Asian Parliamentary, World Schools, and Karl Popper formats Visit publications.idebate.org to check out this and our other great titles for debaters!

The University of Mississippi proudly announces its Spring 2015 Invitational March 27 - 28, 2015 hosted by the Trent Lott Leadership Institute Speech and Debate Team. Students advancing to bid rounds of this tournament will earn one official bid for the 2015 NIETOC hosted at Lincoln Southwest HS on May 8-10, 2015. Online registration will occur via Joy of Tournaments - contact JoAnn Edwards for more information at jedwards@olemiss.edu.


ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Virginia Brazier

Why did you join your speech and debate team? All the way up through eighth grade, I had been homeschooled. For as long as I can remember, I always had a love for performing on stage. It started with ballet at a young age and transitioned into performing at local theatres in musicals. In ninth grade, I enrolled in public high school and attempted to make my mark in the high school drama productions. Unfortunately, I never was given the performing opportunities on stage I had hoped for at my high school. As my father always said, "Life isn't fair." Sometimes, despite our best efforts, politics, teachers, bosses, and people in general don't always aid our goals for unknown reasons. Obviously this can be a sharp pain to our egos and identities when our labors of love go unheard and recognized. At the time, not being recognized in my high school’s drama productions felt like the end of the world. The previous spring (my sophomore year), I saw a Duo performance (featuring the now legendary coach Sam Zulia) at my high school’s fine arts assembly. Up until that point, I thought speech and debate was just a bunch of nerdy guys who fought over political issues on the weekends. Boy was I wrong! I had no idea speech was a major platform for performing artists—and, oh, soooo much more. The following fall (my junior year), I auditioned once more for my school’s drama production and was shot down (again!). When I learned the disappointing news, I marched over to

48

Rostrum | FALL 2014

the speech team's first get-together that very same day—and the rest is history! You were clearly a very successful competitor. Tell us about your successes and failures and what you learned from those experiences. Thank you! I was very fortunate to experience the recognition speech awarded me during my career in the National Speech & Debate Association. Successes... Well, let's see. My very first meet I placed first and won the coveted "Perry Chair" in our district. I went on to place at every tournament thereafter. At the end of the year, I placed first at state and became the Ohio State Champion in Dramatic Interp! Needless to say, I was over the moon. Gaining these successes (for me) solidified the notion, my voice mattered. The drive and passion I had always felt toward performing was validated in these victories.

As for failures, I didn't have any setbacks in the sense of placing while competing. The true failure in my experience was failing to see the big picture. I was so selfobsessed at proving to myself and those around me I could deliver a great performance that I never fully recognized my team and coaches who helped get me there! I learned that it takes a team supporting one another to push forward and deliver results together. I learned that, without my coaches, I wouldn't have had the performance I delivered or the successes that we achieved. Recognizing my failures and applying these lessons down the road as an adult in my career has helped me become a leader and influencer—which wouldn't have been possible if I continued to dwell on my personal self-interest. How did your high school competitions prepare you for musical theatre later? In speech, I was accepted and given affirmation I couldn't find anywhere else. This lesson gave me the confidence to audition and pursue a degree in a very competitive musical theatre program. The college I went to cut students from the program every year. Every time I faced self-doubt, I reminded myself, my voice deserves to be heard. I was able to relax, knowing that even if I was rejected at some point, it was only a matter of me finding another opportunity with a platform to perform to continue onward with my goals. If


www.speechanddebate.org

I had not had the experience I had in high school with speech, and had only experienced rejection, I don't know if I would have had the grit and absolute understanding I am capable of demanding my goals be met. I made it through my college’s program and was one of seven graduates to receive a BFA in Musical Theatre in my graduating class. How do you think speech has helped you become successful in your positions at Samsung and now Microsoft? I could write a book on the lessons speech taught me and how I apply them to my career on a daily basis. It's funny, coming from a musical theatre and performance background, I don't know exactly how I ended up working for two of the top IT companies in the world! However, it doesn't take too much effort to draw the parallel between communication (which is what speech is all about) and the fact we humans use IT nearly every moment of every day to communicate personally and in business. With both Samsung and currently Microsoft, I oversee the business accounts in the Los Angeles region, and have to give presentations regularly. Speech has given me the skill set and confidence to speak under pressure to some of the most powerful people and companies in the world. In fact, I had the opportunity to be the speaker at CES (a major electronics convention in Las Vegas) for Samsung Home Appliances last year, which was pretty exciting. While working in my field, there are plenty of times when I'm faced with rejection and an

account decides not to embrace my product or presentation. When this happens, I hear that little voice in my head I found through speech recall, "my voice matters!" When I face rejection, I'm able to jump forward and find an account that will embrace my company’s product/message, and this results in me closing a sale. Nothing is more motivating to me than a shut door. It just means another opportunity is around the corner waiting to hear what I have to say. The constant drive and excitement of seeking out a customer who embraces what I have to say has given me the persistence needed to develop my market into one of top performing regions in the country!

Be open to the criticism from your judges, even if you think they're crazy and you strongly disagree. If you try out their critiques and they work, that's a fantastic victory. If you try out their notes and it's still not working, ask yourself why. Whatever the answer is to that question, try applying it to your piece and see what happens. Placing at a speech tournament shouldn't be the goal. Of course it's nice, and you'll feel like a million bucks. Walking onto a stage to receive a medal is simply a victory in those 90 seconds. It's just one moment, then it's over, then it's on to the next thing life places before you. Learning how to collaborate and apply the advice of others, repurposing your self-doubt into

While working in my field, there are plenty of times when I'm faced with rejection and an account decides not to embrace my product or presentation. When this happens, I hear that little voice in my head I found through speech recall, "my voice matters!" What advice would you give to students who are joining speech and debate? I would advise students to be OPEN to anything—meaning, take every idea into consideration. If your coach wants you to stick to a piece you don't feel connected to for one more weekend: do it! If you still don't feel connected to your piece, be open to bringing other cuttings to the table. Don't just identify when something isn't working for you with complaints; be prepared to offer solutions you've researched. Your voice matters! Seek out and offer possible answers, even if this means spending every weekend in the library scouring through every book for a new cutting. You are your best advocate!

self-intuition, is a life triumph far greater than any monetary award you'll ever receive. This is the true gold you'll be able to apply toward any goal you have in your life journey. You will achieve at a far greater level than you'd ever imagine, and trust me, this kind of life-lesson "trophy" you'll acquire brings a level of tenacity that won't go unnoticed! Anything else you want to add? YOUR VOICE MATTERS! Use it, bring it, own it... SPEAK! Virginia Brazier is a 2005 graduate of Wadsworth High School in Ohio. She competed in Dramatic Interpretation, winning the OHSSL State Tournament in 2004.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 49


Heartland Pride Circle of Champion Coaches


(left to right) Rachel Russell, Missouri (Humorous Interpretation); Todd Schnake, Missouri (Original Oratory); Jonathan Voss, Illinois (Policy Debate); Tara Tate, Illinois (Policy Debate); Ryan Hubbard, Tennessee (Expository); Robert H. Schurtz, Ohio (Public Forum Debate and Congressional Debateâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Senate); Jordan Mayer, Indiana (Prose Reading); Michael J. Vigars, Florida (International Extemp); Robert Lebeda, California (Impromptu); Kimberly Marone, Pennsylvania (Congressional Debateâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;House); James Fedje, Minnesota (Storytelling); Brittany Hayes, Oklahoma (Commentary); Meredith Deaton, Oklahoma (United States Extemp); Linda Shipley, Oklahoma (Lincoln-Douglas Debate); Kelly R. McCracken, Oklahoma (United States Extemp); Lillian Ogunbanjo, Texas (Dramatic Interpretation); Rebecca Meyer-Larson, Minnesota (Duo Interpretation); Sal Tinajero, California (Poetry Reading); and Pricilla Merritt, California (Poetry Reading).


Diamond Coach Recognition

Sixth Diamond Steven Davis began his coaching career at Kansas City Southwest High School in Missouri in 1967. During his 45-year coaching career, Mr. Davis has coached in ten different states including his current role as Assistant Debate and Forensics coach at Washburn Rural u SIXTH DIAMOND u High School in Steven Davis Kansas. Glenbrook North HS, IL Mr. Davis February 18, 2014 has enjoyed 13,001 points an incredibly successful coaching career. His teams have attended 28 National Tournaments and have qualified to 12 National Congresses. During this time, he coached one national champion and two runner-up teams in Policy Debate, plus numerous final round contestants in Extemporaneous Speaking. ln addition, his teams earned District Trophies in 197780, 1987, 1991-1992 & 1995 and District Plaques in 1976, 197879, 1980-84, 1986, 1989-90, 1992-94 and 1998. Also, he has led his teams to 13 Largest Chapter Awards and Leading Chapter Awards in 1979, 1984, 1987, 1993-2002. Mr. Davis has been a recognized leader of the National Speech & Debate Association. He received District Service Plaques in 1977, 1999, and 2003. Furthermore, he served as District Chair in 1975-88 and 2000-03. In 2002, Mr. Davis received a Bronze District Chair Award for his outstanding leadership. Mr. Davis has logged in a long history of commitment and service to the National Speech & Debate Tournament, serving on the Judging Committee yearly since 1990. Additionally, Mr. Davis was recognized by his peers for his commitment to the National Speech & Debate Association by being inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

52

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Fifth Diamond Doug Springer was a policy debater for four years as an undergraduate of Bradley University. He completed a B.A. in speech in 1968. He became Director of Forensics at Pekin Community High School in the fall of 1968. He coached speech and debate there for 26 years. u Fifth DIAMOND u During that time, Douglas Springer he finished an Glenbrook North HS, IL M.A. at Bradley in February 18, 2014 Speech in 1971, was 13,001 points installed as chair of the Department of Speech and Theatre in 1972, was elected chair of the Illinois Speech and Theatre Association State Debate Tournament Commission in 1972, and president of I.S.T.A. in 1976. He moved to New Trier Township High School in 1994 as Debate Coach. Doug completed an M.A. for Leadership in Educational Administration in 1999. He was elected president of New Trier’s teachers’ association in 2002. He is currently a five-diamond coach of the National Speech & Debate Association, co-author of the textbook Basic Debate, a Key Coach of the Barkley Forum in Debate of Emory University in Atlanta, and was the founding chair of New Trier’s Faculty Senate Ethics Committee. In 2011, Doug received the Citation Award from the National Federation of State High School Associations. At New Trier, Doug coached Policy Debate, LincolnDouglas Debate, Congressional Debate, and Speech Individual Events. He taught New Trier’s freshman course in Public Speaking and Argumentation, as well as Media Workshop, Discussion, and Debate. Doug coached 14 of New Trier’s commencement speakers (the president of each year’s class presents the commencement address at graduation). Doug retired from New Trier in 2008. Doug continues to do private consulting in speech and debate, establishing The Speaker’s Edge in 1988. Since 2013, Doug has been a coach of Speech Individual Events at Glenbrook North High School in Northbrook, IL.


www.speechanddebate.org

Diamond Coach Recognition

Congratulations! Fifth Diamond Max began his teaching career 40 years ago. He has coached many students to the National Speech & Debate Tournament, and in 2011, he received the National Speech & Debate Association's James M. Madison Coach of the Year award in Dallas. He has coached forensics and taught theatre in the Blue Valley School district for the last 28 years.

u Fifth DIAMOND u Max Brown Blue Valley North HS, KS March 31, 2014 13,001 points

Fifth Diamond No awards have meant as much to Charlotte E. Brown as each of the diamonds she has received from this organization. They represent the incredible talent of her beloved students at Gregory-Portland and the years since the mid-80s when she has shared in their points. Below are the highlights of her academic life: • She taught every year (except one) since 1960 when she graduated from Trinity University. Since then she's taught at only two schools: Edison High in San Antonio, TX and Gregory-Portland in Portland, TX. • Her students have won the UIL State One Act Play Championship seven times and competed 18 times at UIL State. She has had nine Samuel French award winners for top performer.

u Fifth DIAMOND u Charlotte E. Brown Gregory Portland HS, TX September 24, 2014 15,853 points

• She coached more than 20 state UIL Interp Champions. • She coached six TFA state champions, one Poetry national champion, and two second place national finalists, as well as more than ten students who have placed in national final rounds. • Gregory-Portland has had at least one or more students qualify for Nationals every year since 1980. • She was named to the Texas Forensic Association Hall of Fame. • She won the University of Texas Teaching Excellence Award. • Her team is the subject of a documentary called “Rise and Shine” that followed their competitions for a year and is shown all over the United States by teachers who want to show their students what speech contests are all about!

Rostrum | FALL 2014 53


Diamond Coach Recognition

54

u Fourth DIAMOND u Joseph Buzzelli Saint Ignatius HS, OH January 31, 2014 10,001 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u Chris Riffer Blue Valley HS, KS February 9, 2014 27,123 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u Doris Sexton West Bend East HS, WI March 15, 2014 10,000 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u Linda Shipley Bartlesville HS, OK April 21, 2014 10,001 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u Janice Caldwell Lindale HS, TX April 24, 2014 11,137 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u Karen Wilbanks Plano Sr. HS, TX May 4, 2014 10,024 points

u Fourth DIAMOND u David Williams Newton HS, KS July 19, 2014 15,886 points

u Third DIAMOND u Todd Schnake Raymore-Peculiar HS, MO March 12, 2014 6,003 points

u Third DIAMOND u Barbara McCain Claudia Taylor Johnson HS, TX March 22, 2014 6,001 points

Rostrum | FALL 2014


Diamond Coach Recognition

www.speechanddebate.org

u Third DIAMOND u Jeffrey Plinsky Lawrence HS, KS March 29, 2014 6,000 points

u Third DIAMOND u James Fedje Chanhassen HS, MN April 1, 2014 6,238 points

u Third DIAMOND u Robert Shepard Creekview HS, TX April 11, 2014 6,001 points

u Third DIAMOND u Clifton Davis Shelley HS, ID April 16, 2014 6,564 points

u Second DIAMOND u Steve Kennedy Munster HS, IN January 27, 2014 3,002 points

u Second DIAMOND u Dale Schilling Cuyahoga Valley Christian Acad., OH January 29, 2014 3,000 points

u Second DIAMOND u Karla Penechar Raymore-Peculiar HS, MO February 27, 2014 3,209 points

u Second DIAMOND u Scott Sieling Bloomington Jefferson HS, MN March 16, 2014 3,274 points

u Second DIAMOND u Daniel Sapir Sacred Heart HS, MA March 23, 2014 3,656 points Rostrum | FALL 2014 55


Diamond Coach Recognition

56

u Second DIAMOND u Charles Donovan Loyola-Blakefield HS, MD March 25, 2014 3,601 points

u Second DIAMOND u Jennifer Bell Paul R. Wharton HS, FL April 3, 2014 3,026 points

u Second DIAMOND u Brett Young Westmoore HS, OK April 30, 2014 3,144 points

u Second DIAMOND u Bret Hemmerlin Roseville Area HS, MN May 2, 2014 3,000 points

u Second DIAMOND u Joel Underwood Seattle Academy Of Arts & Science, WA May 4, 2014 3,437 points

u Second DIAMOND u William Swafford Lee County HS, GA May 4, 2014 3,363 points

u Second DIAMOND u Sabrina Denney Bull Millard North HS, NE May 23, 2014 15,284 points

u Second DIAMOND u Einar Johnson West HS - Torrance, CA June 7, 2014 3,000 points

u Second DIAMOND u Greg Holtschneider Marshfield HS, MO October 13, 2014 4,207 points

Rostrum | FALL 2014


Diamond Coach Recognition

www.speechanddebate.org

u First DIAMOND u Jennifer Moore Stow-Munroe Falls HS, OH June 4, 2013 3,000 points

u First DIAMOND u Thom Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke Nanjing Foreign Language School, CH November 21, 2013 1,504 points

u First DIAMOND u Andrea Folsom Austintown Fitch HS, OH January 22, 2014 1,501 points

u First DIAMOND u Matt Reichle Ronald Reagan HS, TX February 11, 2014 2,588 points

u First DIAMOND u Shawn Matson Whitefish Bay HS, WI February 12, 2014 2,448 points

u First DIAMOND u Scott Coats Hillcrest HS, ID February 13, 2014 1,501 points

u First DIAMOND u Tami Parker Lovejoy HS, TX February 21, 2014 1,501 points

u First DIAMOND u Rick Dorn Worland HS, WY February 22, 2014 1,501 points

u First DIAMOND u Danielle Trainer-Smallwood Seymour HS, TN March 9, 2014 1,500 points Rostrum | FALL 2014 57


Diamond Coach Recognition

58

u First DIAMOND u Terry Wunder Girard HS, KS March 9, 2014 1,503 points

u First DIAMOND u Kenneth Rohrbach Three Rivers HS, TX March 11, 2014 1,501 points

u First DIAMOND u Robert Wieckowski Myers Park HS, NC March 16, 2014 1,540 points

u First DIAMOND u Ed Jodlowski Olympia HS, IL March 24, 2014 1,513 points

u First DIAMOND u Shari Dodd Pine View School, FL March 26, 2014 5,751 points

u First DIAMOND u John Augillard, III St. Thomas HS, TX April 10, 2014 1,848 points

u First DIAMOND u Tim Cook Salado HS, TX April 10, 2014 1,500 points

u First DIAMOND u Joella Reid Pittsburg HS, KS April 18, 2014 1,500 points

u First DIAMOND u Allison Huntley California HS - Whittier, CA May 20, 2014 1,814 points

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Diamond Coach Recognition

u First DIAMOND u Andrew Dennis Cheyenne Central HS, WY August 27, 2014 4,174 points

u First DIAMOND u Julie Roos Canyon Springs HS, NV September 11, 2014 1,651 points

u First DIAMOND u Daniel Dawson Lyons HS, KS September 21, 2014 1,761 points

u First DIAMOND u Rory McKenzie Lindale HS, TX September 13, 2014 2,582 points

u First DIAMOND u Antionette Ishmael St James Academy, KS October 13, 2014 1,517 points

Want to write for Rostrum? Email editor@speechanddebate.org with your ideas or comments!

8

Rostrum | FALL 2014 59


Donus D. Roberts Quad Ruby Coach Recognition The Association is proud to honor coaches who have earned their first 1,000 points.

Jason Moore

Lawrence Free State High School, KS

1,361

John Foy

Saint Francis High School, CA

1,061

Rachel Krause

Torrey Pines High School, CA

1,310

Andrew Bauer

Buhler High School, KS

1,057

Jason Dart

Madison County High School, VA

1,306

Kasi McCartney

Benton High School, LA

1,054

Carl Schwartz

Schaumburg High School, IL

1,283

Timothy Ellis

Washburn Rural High School, KS

1,052

David Olson

James Madison Memorial High School, WI

1,271

David B. Wright

Riverfield Country Day School, OK

1,050

Chris Rothgeb

Parkview High School, MO

1,270

Jennifer Manion

Hoover High School, OH

1,050

Ronald Dixon

Maple Grove Senior High School, MN

1,268

Julian Crown

Leland High School, CA

1,047

Brad Trevathan

The Culver Academies, IN

1,221

Karen Joshi

Archbishop Mitty High School, CA

1,042

Terri Egan

Enderlin High School, ND

1,208

Kathy Ingles

Olathe Northwest High School, KS

1,042

David Cooper

North Platte High School, NE

1,190

Berna Dette Orr

Whitesboro High School, TX

1,039

Ben Fagan

Dougherty Valley High School, CA

1,184

Darrell Kinney

Skyline High School, CA

1,037

Jonathan Waters

Grovetown High School, GA

1,179

Stephanie Owen

Widefield High School, CO

1,031

Sue Ellen Gray

HARC, NC

1,151

Ursela Hemman

Hutchinson High School, KS

1,030

Jessica Johnson

Bear Creek High School, CO

1,134

Tricia Maxson

St. Helena High School, CA

1,028

Jon C. Price

Taravella High School, FL

1,119

Tara Ward

John Marshall High School, TX

1,026

Tim Royers

Millard West High School, NE

1,109

Evan Manning

Eisenhower High School, KS

1,026

Robert Davis

Metro Christian Academy, OK

1,099

Anthony Coe

John Connally High School, TX

1,024

Jason Newhouser

Jefferson High School, IN

1,094

Kathy Lyons

The Woodlands College Park High School, TX 1,021

James Frazier

Pattonville High School, MO

1,092

Joshua Seematter

Northridge High School, CO

1,016

Kim Boyer

North Platte St. Patrick's, NE

1,091

Jennifer Akers

Cabot High School, AR

1,016

Mark Skoglund

Olathe Northwest High School, KS

1,091

Sarah Donnelly

Natick High School, MA

1,014

Peggy Sue O'Donnell

Sunrise Christian Academy, KS

1,089

Carrie Baker

Ronald Reagan College Prep High School, WI 1,011

Christopher Fielder

Ridge High School, NJ

1,083

David Risley

St. Josephs High School, NY

1,010

Jordana Sternberg

Westminster Schools-Atlanta, GA

1,073

Linda Ann Outhier

Enid High School, OK

1,010

Layne Carter

Morgan High School, UT

1,072

Colleen G. Averill

Lenawee Christian School, MI

1,009

Kristen Stout

Republic High School, MO

1,070

Lynne Damaty

Potomac Falls High School, VA

1,007

Luis Louie Chavez

Rio Grande High School, NM

1,065

Pedro Rampolla

Cheyenne South High School, WY

1,004

Kim Jeral

Hawley Public Schools, MN

1,063

Michael Quinn

West Allegheny High School, PA

1,001

$ 60

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

Raise Money For Your Team Âť We've partnered with Causecast to help more than 70 schools raise nearly $150,000 through the Give Youth A Voice campaign. As a member coach, you have exclusive access to this service! Complete our online form and you'll be invited to set up an account. Visit www.speechanddebate.org/GiveYouthAVoice to learn more.

Rostrum | FALL 2014


COACH PROFILE

Aaron Smith

"Students need something to give them a reason to get out of bed Monday morning. They need something that matters. They need something that makes them matter. That’s what our activity does for kids."

What was your first experience in speech and debate? My earliest experience was as a competitor in Domestic Extemporaneous Speaking. I still recall those first tournaments, speaking on AIDS (I was a contemporary of Ryan White) and steroids in baseball, and I fondly remember the camaraderie among our group of extempers. The excitement of competition, the energy of the cafeteria between rounds, and the bus ride home made the experience for me. How did you decide to become a coach? By the end of my sophomore year in high school, I had become passionate about the activity. I was so determined to be a coach, in fact, that I set out to compete in every category I could by graduation! While I coach now for a multitude of reasons, that initial decision was simply because it made me happy. I served my high school team as a peer coach and was smitten with the role. In college, my best friend (Gabrielino’s Derek Yuill) and I started our own program at the only school in the county without a forensic program. Once that happened, there was no turning back. I was addicted and sought teaching jobs with the plan to coach, as well.

62

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Did/do you have any speech and debate mentors? If so, who were they, and what did they teach you? My own high school coach, Denise Walker, was instrumental in fueling my passion and showing me what it means to be a great coach. Later in my career, I leaned on and learned from Logansport’s B.J. Siefert, Chesterton’s Jim Cavallo, and Kokomo’s Chris Stepp. All of them taught me so many things, but I can identify one lasting lesson from each. Mrs. Walker taught me, by example, how much it matters to sincerely care for students. For all four years of my participation at Lafayette Jefferson, she demonstrated concern for my academic and personal growth. She had a passion for teaching and for young people that inspired me a great deal. B.J. taught me that some kids need the team more than the team needs them. That is, this activity is for the kids. It fills a need—for expression, for community—for many of our students. Though some kids may not score points on Saturday, the activity is still valuable. The accumulation of tournament trophies is not why a team exists. Jim, aside from answering my many questions as a new debate coach 12 years ago and modeling excellence, has continued to remind me of the importance of life outside of debate.

On many occasions, he shared his own experience of being a dad/ teacher/coach, and although we see each other less often these days, he always asks me about my family and encourages me to be excellent outside of speech and debate. Chris is my model for that delicate balance between seriousness of purpose and a sense of humor. She is tough. She respects the activity and has high standards. She makes me sit up straight in the tab room. She makes sure I know debate matters. Yet, she can laugh at herself and find the funny in forensics. She brings joy when it’s needed most. Tell us a little about your school and the features that make your program unique. West Lafayette is a junior and senior high school with a 7-12 enrollment of about 1,100. Debate is one of the most popular activities in the school, and the community is fairly supportive of our program. A lot of that is due to the decades of service by my predecessor, Bob Deutsch. Because the school is only a few blocks from Purdue University, many of my former students, who didn’t leave town for their studies, regularly keep in touch and stay connected to the team.


www.speechanddebate.org

When you think about the future of speech and debate as an activity, what excites you? Likewise, what challenges do you foresee? I am excited by the commitment our organization has to building people, students and coaches alike. The available resources, the emphasis on outreach, and the values featured in the code of honor affirm the organization is on the right path. What discourages me, at least from a debate coach perspective, is the challenge to appeal to those who are not already hooked. When “lay judge” has a negative connotation, we should be concerned. When our activity rewards speaking styles that confound the newcomer or curious administrators, we need to be concerned. You’ve recently been named Operations Director for the Hoosier Heartland District. How will that build on what you’ve already been doing to help your district committee? For years, our district, Hoosier Heartland, has collaborated with our neighbors, Hoosier Crossroads, on the district qualifiers. Most obviously, we host them in conjunction. Our district committees communicate with each other in selecting dates and venues, and we come together to run the meets. One major advantage is this cooperation creates a bigger, more diverse judging pool. It also allows for an efficient tab room. While the tournaments are distinct and each district has unique leadership, sharing an office streamlines the process a bit. There is one ballot collection table, data entry is a shared responsibility, troubleshooting can be handled by twice the administrators, to name a few of the logistical perks. If geography precludes doing this, we still work together as a committee to divide up duties. Each of the three qualifying tournaments (debate, speech, and congress) sometimes has a different director. That person

is responsible for communication, Association membership checks, preparations, and tournament administration. Another goal of our tournament is to provide transparency. While the tab room needs limited interruption to be most effective, our office is accessible to coaches. Coaches have ready access to ballots and tournament staff. We make an effort to clearly communicate rules and procedures that seem confusing or peculiar. This spirit of collaboration creates a pretty positive district tournament experience, despite the stress one would expect of a qualifying meet. In what ways has the National Speech & Debate Association helped you as a coach? The Association has provided me with a myriad of resources and networking opportunities. It has also provided recognition. I certainly don’t do this for accolades, but it is satisfying to have some affirmation of my efforts. Having that passed along to my administrators is nice, too.

What would your advice be to a new coach? What advice would you give to a coach who is feeling burned out? I always advise a new coach, especially if he or she is beginning a program, to start with a manageable workload. Rather than coaching every event the activity has to offer, select a few and add events to your coaching repertoire down the road. The same holds true for the season. You don’t have to go out every weekend. I would also advise a new coach to connect to people. Find people of integrity and an earnest desire to help kids and seek their counsel. For coaches feeling burned out—and we have all felt that, I suspect—I suggest much the same thing. Draw new lines. Cut back. That’s hard to do, I know. Twelve years ago, I did that very

thing. I cut about eight tournaments out of my year. I limited after school sessions. I operated that way for a couple of years. I filled that gap with other valuable pursuits, and I emerged a few seasons later feeling grounded and fresh. How does three or four years of speech and debate change your students? This activity profoundly changes students. It fosters academic and social growth for all. That’s its beauty. The same activity provides rigor and relevance for inexperienced novices and the most talented varsity team members alike. What’s more, like so many valuable endeavors, the more you invest, the greater your return. In addition, it provides an opportunity for students like me. I was a mediocre soccer player who was lukewarm toward the sport and a merely decent trumpet player who enjoyed music, but had no zeal for band. Until I found speech and debate, I didn’t have a thing. Students need a thing! They need something to give them a reason to get out of bed Monday morning. They need something that matters. They need something that makes them matter. That’s what our activity does for kids.

Aaron Smith and his wife Amy have been married for 20 years. They have two sons, Daniel, a junior, and Thomas, a freshman. Aaron has taught English and Speech for 21 years, beginning at Evansville North High School before teaching at Logansport High School for five years. He is currently in his thirteenth year at West Lafayette. Away from school and debate, he loves working outdoors: landscaping, gardening, particularly water gardening, and home repair are very relaxing for him. Many of his debaters may be surprised to learn he qualified for the 1989 National Tournament in Golden, Colorado, in Humorous Interpretation.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 63


5 55 111

REASONS REASONS REASONS TO TOATTEND ATTENDCAPITOL CAPITOLDEBATE DEBATESUMMER SUMMERCAMP CAMP TO ATTEND CAPITOL DEBATE SUMMER CAMP

TOP TOPFACULTY FACULTY TOP FACULTY

222

WE WEPRODUCE PRODUCECHAMPIONS CHAMPIONS WE PRODUCE CHAMPIONS

www.capitoldebate.com www.capitoldebate.com www.capitoldebate.com


INCREDIBLE CURRICULUM CURRICULUM 3 INCREDIBLE INCREDIBLE CURRICULUM CURRICULUM 33 3INCREDIBLE 3 INCREDIBLE CURRICULUM

5

NORTH CAROLINA

S S U E E SU U SM M UM MM M ER R ER R2 20 02 2 110 05 511 5 5 P P U L B F F O R U S MIIL MII C E R 5 The of O North Carolina PU U PB B UUniversity L B LC C C F O FR R O2U U R0M M U1M M PUBLIC FORUM

DatDE EBHillBAATTEE Chapel D E- A A C C M P P JulyB10M CJune C 28A A A M MT PE P INSPIRING ADVENTURES

LIFELONG FRIENDSHIPS FRIENDSHIPS 4 LIFELONG LIFELONG FRIENDSHIPS FRIENDSHIPS 44 4LIFELONG 4 LIFELONG FRIENDSHIPS

C

A

M

P

MASSACHUSETTS MASSACHUSETTS MASSACHUSETTS MASSACHUSETTS Babson Babson College College Babson Babson College College JulyMASSACHUSETTS July 26 -26 August - August 7 7 JulyJuly 26 -26 August - August 7 7 Babson College July 26 - August 7

MARYLAND MARYLAND TEXAS MARYLAND MARYLAND

Loyola Loyola University University Maryland Maryland Loyola Loyola University University Maryland Maryland JulyMARYLAND July 12 -12 July - July 24 24 JulyJuly 12 12 July July 24 24 Loyola University Maryland July 12 - July 24

University of Houston JuneILLINOIS 7 - June 19 ILLINOIS

ILLINOIS ILLINOIS Loyola Loyola University University Chicago Chicago Loyola Loyola University University Chicago Chicago JuneILLINOIS June 27 -27 July - July 9 9 JuneJune 27 -27 July - July 9 9 Chicago Loyola University June 27 - July 9

NEW NEW JERSEY JERSEY NEW NEW JERSEY JERSEY TheThe Lawrenceville Lawrenceville School School TheThe Lawrenceville Lawrenceville School School JulyNEW July 25 -25 August -JERSEY August 6 6

CALIFORNIA

JulyJuly 25 -25 August - August 6 6 School The Lawrenceville July 25 - August 6

University of San Diego June 21 - July 3

NORTH NORTH CAROLINA CAROLINA NORTH NORTH CAROLINA CAROLINA TheThe University University of North of North Carolina Carolina TheNORTH The University University of North of North Carolina Carolina CAROLINA at Chapel at Chapel Hill Hill INSPIRING ADVENTURES ADVENTURES 5 INSPIRING INSPIRING ADVENTURES ADVENTURES 55 5INSPIRING 5 INSPIRING ADVENTURES

CALL TODAY!

at Chapel at Chapel Hill Hill of North Carolina JuneThe June 28 University -28 July - July 10 10 JuneJune 28 28 July 10 10 at Chapel- July Hill June 28 - July 10

TEXAS TEXAS TEXAS TEXAS University University of Houston of Houston University University of Houston of Houston JuneTEXAS June 7 - June 7 - June 19 19

800.450.5012 JuneJune 7 - June 7 - June 19 19 University of Houston June 7 - June 19

CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA University University of San of San Diego Diego University University of San of San Diego Diego JuneCALIFORNIA June 21 -21 July - July 3 3

capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com

JuneJune 21 -21 July - July 3 3 Diego University of San June 21 - July 3

or

CALL CALL TODAY! TODAY! CALL CALL TODAY! TODAY! EMAIL US CALL TODAY! or or

or or EMAIL EMAIL US US EMAIL EMAIL US US or EMAIL US

800.450.5012 800.450.5012 800.450.5012 800.450.5012 800.450.5012 capitoldebate.com capitoldebate.com capitoldebate.com capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com capitoldebate.com enroll@capitoldebate.com


Spotlight William Woods Tate, Jr., Memorial

National Student of the Year presented by

Walter N. Paul Creighton Preparatory School, Nebraska Coach: Richard D. Brown

A Competition for Change by Walter N. Paul

A

s ironic as it sounds, I was never the conversationalist among my colleagues, friends, and family. I was the epitome of reclusiveness, the antonym of fun, and the definition of introversion. I was certain speaking in front of crowds only exposed me. It illuminated my weaknesses and tore my confidence into incorrigible pieces. I felt alone in the world, as if I took Hester Prynne’s place on the pedestal and faced a crowd that laughed at my humiliation. I can recall a moment in fourth grade where my classmates and I were supposed to present a research project we’d worked on for weeks. As my time to present came closer, my heart painfully pounded in my chest as if it wanted to escape the situation as much as I did. My tense nerves disabled me in front of my classmates. My mouth glued itself tight, refusing to let any words out. Something was wrong, nothing seemed right. I didn’t

66

Rostrum | FALL 2014

know what to do, so I embarrassingly sat down. As humans, we’ve been bestowed the most distinct ability given to any species—the power to speak and communicate through words. This distinguishable capability gives us the indelible power to express our feelings, connect with others, and most importantly, share ideas. It’s clear that in fourth grade, I was not cognizant of this, which made it so difficult. I didn’t realize that, fundamentally, speaking is sharing and a means of building strong connections with one another. Throughout my speech and debate career, I came to realize this essential purpose of forensics and the message it entails. I’ve learned that speech and debate goes far beyond the elementary classroom. It entails a mission that transcends the luxury of gold or silver

hardware. Speech and debate is a means through which we foster engagement with our community and build inclusive and wide-ranging communities. Realizing this made speaking in front of a class not as difficult as it seems. From President Abraham Lincoln to Martin Luther King, Jr., history has shown us that through words, we can spark great events such as the emancipation of slaves and the destruction of an injustice system of segregation. However, both of these leaders started off by speaking to small groups within their respective communities. In fostering engagement and building a community around one common goal, both these leaders were able to achieve an unparalleled objective unimaginable during their times. Such examples unveil the beauty of speech. As speech and debate students, our goals are to use our talents to surpass the basic words and strive to achieve


www.speechanddebate.org

great objectives within our communities. Competitors can easily overlook this mission. I remember as a novice sophomore, all I could think about was beating the person who defeated me at the previous tournament. I hung on to my team’s motto of “liberating hardware” too hard, downgrading speech and debate to just a way of attaining fame, prestige, and recognition. In thinking this way, I turned myself into a competitive robot lacking the perceptive acknowledgement of my vocation to better my community. Perhaps it was a daunting realization my junior year that demonstrated how important personal engagement and helping one’s community really is. I’m an immigrant from Uganda, a descendant of Sudanese parents. When we moved to Omaha, Nebraska, in 2004, a big Sudanese community welcomed us. The community extended to every facet of our lives, from my parents’ workplace to my church youth group. Even my grade school, All Saints Catholic School, had a big Sudanese population. All of us were or descended from immigrants who came to the United States to find a new home to foster our hopes for a better education, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. However, our economic statuses hindered such freedom. To get by, Sudanese parents had to work night shifts in order to keep a roof over their families’ heads. A painful struggle to balance work and family life forced them to sacrifice more than they have ever had before. Their vision of being worry free in the United States disappeared, allowing for depressive reality to settle. The students felt such a paradoxical reality, as well. Conditions at home didn’t allow them to explore all the wonders about which they became curious. I remember students who wanted to go to a trip to the White House but couldn’t because of their parents’ financial situations. One student with whom I became close outside of school wanted to join a chess program but couldn’t

because he had to go home and take care of his sisters, as his parents would be at work at that time. The lack of freedom and overload of responsibility led to revolting behavior and a backlash among the kids. They lacked the parental guidance at home, so they relied on the guidance of their friends and themselves. Teachers couldn’t help; they didn’t understand the underpinning problem. All they saw was the surface of a deeply rooted problem: students misbehaving. During a discussion of this matter with my father, I realized my role in addressing this issue. If I couldn’t walk with them every step of the way, I could do something that involved guiding the students in the right direction. My

protect one another in the depths of chaos. However, the best part about it was that we didn’t have to tell each other this; we expressed it through our actions. Whether it was the courageous steward who saved my sisters and me from a burning house, or the mother who cleaned the blood off my bruised leg, these little moments of support were ones that were memorable and led to the further development of the community. This is what it’s all about—micro contributions of love to our community that can have great impacts. It all begins with realizing our role as essential components of our communities and the world as a whole. And so I challenge you to go out and foster engagement by building your

"Beyond speech and debate, there lies a greater competition in life, in which we are all winners—a competition for change." father encouraged me to speak to the parents to raise this issue. At the time my speaking ability was known around the Sudanese community. Such recognition made it easier to speak to them. Although it was a small group of about 25 parents, I knew such engagement could probably lead to something greater. In the speech, I shared my observations with the parents: the lack of guidance the students had, and its effects on them. I didn’t tell them to do something beyond their capacities. In a nutshell, I just told them to speak to their children. I fostered engagement with the goal of building a newfound community of hope in the future. As an immigrant of war, one of the things I recall having an everlasting impact on me was the communities we built in the refugee camps in Uganda. There seemed to have been an unequivocal solidarity of kinship among us that was inextricably beautiful. We vowed to

own communities under the context of solidarity, understanding, and love. Your speech and debate career will be memorable in as much as you use it to transcend the luxuries of fame, prestige, and recognition. You should instead use your talent to better your communities. You’re no longer the nervous fourth grader in a classroom; you’re a member of a community longing for your help. Beyond speech and debate, there lies a greater competition in life, in which we are all winners—a competition for change. Mahatma Gandhi challenged us to “be the change we hope to see in the world.” Such power is right in our hands. Grab it, go out, and make a difference. The competition begins now. Ready, set, go! Walter N. Paul is a graduate of Creighton Preparatory School in Omaha, NE. He is currently attending Carleton College in Northfield, MN.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 67


the modern link to legal history

— The National Speech & Debate Association is proud to partner with William S. Hein & Co. to provide all League members with access to HeinOnline—an outstanding source of legal scholarship normally only available to law students and legal professionals—at no additional cost!

According to Hein: “HeinOnline is Hein’s premier online research product with more than 80 million pages of legal history available in a fully searchable, image-based format. HeinOnline bridges the gap in legal history by providing comprehensive coverage from inception of more than 1,600 law and law-related periodicals, and much more.” Perfect for debaters and extempers, HeinOnline is available as yet another benefit of Association membership!

Students and coaches—sign in and access HeinOnline by visiting:

www.speechanddebate.org/aspx/heinonline.aspx

Spark Success


IE —

FULL DIVISIONS ROUND ROBINS

(We will run RRs in small divisions).

ALL FINALISTS in EX, OO, DI, HI, DUO and OI (Poetry/Prose) at the listed tournaments will receive invitations to compete in this year’s UK TOC Speech Divisions. Finalists and Champions from other tournaments may also be invited to compete, and we will consider applications to compete based on in-season record.

FOR INFORMATION on the IE Divisions go to https://cis.uky.edu/toc/ or contact William Cooper at uktocspeech@gmail.com

April 25 – 27, 2015 at the University of Kentucky

TOC

Apple Valley Bellaire Berkeley Bobcat Bonanza Bradley Columbia University Cypress Bay Crestian Tradition Cypress Creek Cypress Woods & Cypress Fair Denver East/Geo. Washington (CO) Emory University Federal Way Florida Blue Key George Mason University Glenbrooks Grapevine Harvard Houston Lamar Isidore Newman James Logan Laird Lewis @ Myers Park Mountain View New York City Invitational Nova Titan Parish Episcopal Park Hill Pennsbury Princeton University Ridge Spring Woods St. James St. Mark’s Southwestern Championships Sunvitational Stanford Sylvania Invitational Truman Independence University of Pennsylvania University of Puget Sound Villiger Wake Forest Earlybird Westfield Winston Churchill WKU Hilltopper Wooster Yale University


Opinion An Activity At Risk: A Call for Topic-Centered Debate PEER PERSPECTIVES

by Michael Greenstein, Ed.D.

O

ur activity is at risk. Our once flourishing pedagogical space is being overtaken by ad hominem attacks in an attempt to gain competitive success. The bedrock of Policy Debate centers on whether or not the adoption of a federal government policy is a good idea. In fact, in the modern era, every Policy Debate resolution has asked debaters to affirm and negate a topic that includes the phrase “…the United States federal government should…” Debating the annual topic is such a fundamental part of Policy Debate that most tournament invitations include a copy of the resolution and state competitors are expected to debate the resolution at the tournament. While there are very few set rules in debate, one that has stood the test of time is that debates need to be about the annual topic—that is, until now. During the 2013-14 Policy Debate season, regardless of the geographic location of the tournament, I can write with near certainty that the percentage of debates students on the team had about the merits and consequences of the federal government engaging Mexico, Cuba or Venezuela (which was the 2013-14

70

Rostrum | FALL 2014

national Policy topic) was lower than 50%. From talking to our students, the reality is that it was likely lower than 25%. In non-topic centered debates, affirmative teams often will not discuss anything related to the topic or even will actively negate the topic when their burden as the affirmative is to endorse it. Why does this matter? Most of the skills Policy Debate affords students are a result of debating an agreed upon topic. Knowing the topic ahead of time allows students to prepare the best arguments; it encourages clash because people know partially what to expect; after losses it gives students the chance to innovate and improve their arguments because they know the range of arguments their opponent may make in future debates; and it motivates students to engage in robust high quality topic research providing them with a wealth of information about a different topic every year. Without debating a pre-arranged, agreed-upon topic, all those skills are lost. Imagine debate if the team who spoke first could speak about anything: students would likely not have applicable research; students would not have thought about and developed arguments ahead of time;

during the debate there would not likely be any clash; and students would never learn about various topics. This does not do much, if anything, to aid our students in developing critical thinking ability, analytic skills, or other benefits debate can provide. Instead of discussing the topic, some students talk about personal experiences, mostly focusing on how they are marginalized by their life circumstances, as well as argue how the current structure of debate oppresses them—all the while using these arguments as justifications for why their experience warrants them winning the debate. These debates about personal experience and social location often devolve into personal attacks where students accuse other students, coaches, or even entire institutions of being racist and/or sexist. These are serious accusations, yet judges willingly let students throw them around, vote for the team that makes them, and that becomes the end of the discussion. If people made those types of claims about people without substantial proof at a place of employment, the accusers would be fired. Operating in a system that is so out of touch with reality is not the message or skill set we


www.speechanddebate.org

want to teach and cultivate in students. Closer examination of the introduction of personal experience into a competitive forum also demonstrates its flaws. In any other mode of competition, winning and losing is only based on what happens in the competition, not what a person does outside of it or what happens to a person outside of it. For example, there are some professional athletes who make millions of dollars more than their team contract via endorsement deals. However, their ability to generate extra wealth cannot cause them to lose a game; and it should not—that would make no sense and ruin the point of the competition. Likewise, in debate, judges are supposed to evaluate who wins a debate based only on arguments made in a debate, not based on something an individual did or may have done outside of a debate round. The notion that debaters should win or lose a debate just because some debaters or teams are more or less privileged does not make sense. Moreover, since debate is a competition, when the discussion involves comparing the value of different personal experiences, the potential for psychological damage to students is real. In every single debate, there is a winner and a loser. This means that in every debate about personal experience, a judge votes against someone’s identity, oppression, and potential life struggle. Part of the reason why there is an established process to choose the annual resolution is to ensure the topic is appropriate for high school students to debate. No educator would put their students in a situation that is potentially damaging to their emotions. If students are able to debate about anything, there is no limit to what might be debated (appropriate or not) and the pedagogical value of the activity will be diminished or even ruined. Perhaps the strongest argument against debate that is not topic-centered is that it does not adequately prepare

students to be effective advocates in the real world. There are two recent examples that demonstrate this point. There was a student who competed in high school Policy Debate, but did not engage in topic-centered debate. The student frequently argued that a rule requiring students to debate a set topic (especially topics where one side mandates students defend action by the federal government) was bad. According to an April 15, 2014, article in The Detroit News, this high school senior applied and was denied admission to the University of Michigan. After denial of admission, the student was then “…protesting the decision not only for herself but for other prospective African-American and Latino students.” 1

government action (and as a result not gaining knowledge afforded by research centered on federal policy), this student’s debate training had not provided her with a winning real world strategy; only the falsehood that protesting rules and arguing systems are racist guarantees success or change. A second example involves a very competitively successful Policy Debate team who did not engage in topiccentered debate, but instead often challenged the rules of debate. This team not only qualified for the prestigious Tournament of Champions as juniors, but they made it to elimination debates (or the top 16) at the tournament. Their senior year, they qualified to the tournament again, earning more than

“While there are very few set rules in debate, one that has stood the test of time is that debates need to be about the annual topic—that is, until now.” The problem with this strategy is that the University of Michigan “ended a formal appeals process in 2012-13,” which means her protest had no chance of resulting in her admission. Moreover, a little research reveals that the Supreme Court recently ruled on the question of affirmative action in undergraduate admissions in a case about the University of Michigan where the Supreme Court indicated “Michigan’s use of racial preferences in undergraduate admissions violate[d] both the Equal Protection Clause and Title VI.” 2 Therefore, the only way this student had a chance to be admitted to the University of Michigan would have been to go through legal channels and work within the system by engaging the government in the hope the Supreme Court would reverse its previous decision. Instead, by skirting topics about federal

enough bids to reserve them a spot in the competition. However, right before the tournament, it became public knowledge that both students did not attend the same high school. In fact, for the entirety of their junior and senior year, they misrepresented that they attended the same high school. Many tournaments, including the Tournament of Champions and the Association’s National Speech & Debate Tournament, require students who engage in activities with two-person teams to both attend the same high school. Part of the reason is to prevent students from forming super duos or powerhouse hybrids in order to win more debates at the expense of strengthening their own school’s programs. Other reasons range from liability issues (where tournament directors need to know that teams are traveling under the permission

Rostrum | FALL 2014 71


of their high school and that those schools are liable for their students) to some state athletic and activities associations not allowing their students to compete at contests with hybrids. Regardless of the reason(s) for the no hybrid rule, the aforementioned team violated it their junior and senior year at tournaments throughout the country. Instead of doing what most academic institution’s honor codes would require, admitting they lied and withdraw from the competition, they instead vigorously protested the rule. This protest did not result in this team’s acceptance into the tournament; the Tournament of Champions did not let the team compete because they did not both attend the same high school. Just like in the first example, a form of debate that encouraged students to ignore the topic and instead seek victory by breaking and protesting rules resulted in those students trying to succeed in the real world by using the same tactics—where again, they failed. Perhaps because this team’s entire strategy in debates centered on arguing against rules, they saw their misrepresentation of not attending the same high school as another layer of their argument. Nevertheless, when it comes to the real world where there are rules, policies, procedures, and laws, it is important that students learn the strategy of operating within those structures—or at the very least, learning that protests against the system will not always (really, rarely) result in a win. This is not to say topic-centered Policy Debate is perfect; it too has its problems. However, if people want to change debate, they should do so outside of the competitive arena. Tying

a serious struggle to wins and losses only serves to make that struggle seem disingenuous. We teach (or should teach) our students that winning is not (and should not be) everything. If the need for reform is serious, it need not be (and should not be) advanced by wins and stopped by losses. If people’s arguments are authentic, that they believe debate as it exists is problematic or oppressive, then those people should take the time to try to change it. Students or coaches with these beliefs could come to the topic meeting to help ensure the topic will encompass the relevant issues; or better yet, students or coaches with these beliefs could write and advocate for a topic paper about the issues they seek to discuss. Those who want to increase diversity in the activity are also ignoring the biggest barrier to participation: cost. The cost of traveling around the country, hiring coaches, procuring hotel rooms, and paying entry fees into tournaments is what denies some access to the activity; it’s not that there is a set topic about what the federal government should do. If advocates of changing debate were sincere, instead of using wins in a debate to try to change the system, they would instead engage in efforts to change the economics of the activity. After all, even if debaters were not constrained by debating a set topic, that would not aid more people in joining the activity if the costs to compete were the same. Some of the aforementioned situations are not just unique to debate at the high school level, but also exist in the college debate community. In fact, the dynamic seems to be worse at the college level. One of the most unfortunate parts of the changes or

End Notes

72

1

Kozlowski, K. 15 April 2014. The Detroit News. http://www.detroitnews.com/ article/20140415/SCHOOLS/304150030

2

Gratz v. Bollinger. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 16 April 2014. http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2002/2002_02_516

Rostrum | FALL 2014

perceived changes in debate is that now high school students no longer want to debate in college. While nearly 100% of our seniors were ready to debate in college at the end of last year, now the percentage has plummeted to almost zero. This is not only true for our team, but the example of our team is endemic to the larger high school debater attitude toward college debate. Sadly, all the skills and opportunities college debate could provide students will now not reach nearly as many individuals as it otherwise would have. Some may say this article overstates the impact to students and their education given status quo developments in debate. Others might think this fear is analogous to the fear many had when spreading (speed reading) or kritiks slowly entered into the realm of Policy Debate. Many will likely view what is happening in debate as a hiccup; that the activity’s resilience will allow it to bounce back as it has a few times throughout its history. However, the current state of debate is on a collision course with potentially irreversible consequences. If debate continues to turn into an arena where anything goes, it will become increasingly difficult to justify the activity to the powers that make participation possible, be it school administrators or boards. I fear that the life of an event that for so long has done so much for so many could soon come to an end.

Dr. Michael Greenstein is the Director of Debate and a social studies teacher at Glenbrook North High School where students on the debate team choose to engage in debate about the topic.

We invite you to join this and other conversations online. Comment on our Facebook page or email ideas to editor@speechanddebate.org. We want to hear your perspective! www.facebook.com/speechanddebate


Education First Nationally Successful Faculty Proven Student Success The 2015 SWSDI Faculty Includes:

-Coaches from nationally recognized programs -Lab leaders who have been successful locally and nationally -Top current competitors from across the college circuit

What do our students think SWSDI does best? “The close knit environment of the lab, and the consistent effort of the lab leaders.”

Southwest Speech & Debate Institute Tournament March 6-7, 2015 Mesquite High School 500 S. McQueen Road Gilbert, AZ 85233

Join us for the one of the last stops on the road to TOC and NIETOC!

NIETOC bids in all IEs TOC bids in Public Forum, Lincoln-Douglas & Congressional Debate JoyofTournaments.com

“The mix of instructors. We had people with a lot of experience, as well as the perspectives of judges, coaches, and competitors.” “There was a lot of communication and help among everyone. There was a very comfortable feeling that I really liked & hope to feel again next year.” “SWSDI sparked a passion for forensics in our daughter. They strike the perfect balance between rigor and fun.”

2015 Summer Institute

July 2015 at Arizona State University Learn more about us & apply at:

www.swsdi.org


ACADEMIC ALL AMERICANS The Academic All American award recognizes students who have earned the degree of Superior Distinction (750 points); earned a GPA of 3.7 on a 4.0 scale (or its equivalent); received an ACT score of 27 or higher, or SAT score of 2000 or higher; completed at least 5 semesters of high school; and demonstrated outstanding character and leadership.

74

ALABAMA Venkata Macha Nikhil Mantha Ruchir Rastogi

Lamp High School Hoover High School Lamp High School

ALASKA Nicole M. Eldred

South Anchorage High School

ARKANSAS Kari Marie Jahnsen Dylan Joseph DeLuca

South Anchorage High School Bentonville High School

CALIFORNIA Lindsay Allen Kelsey Allen-Niesen Rohan Anand Kayla Bach Anand Balaji Andew Brown Amberish Chitre Jacob Chorches Jessica Chung Luiza Coelho Abel DeCastro Rohan Dhoopar Ayya Elzarka Michael Everett Pranathi Gutala Anish Haris Noah Hashmi Yaseen Hashmi Jacqeuline Hwang Thomas Kadie Sai Sumana Kaluvai Cameron Keegan Daniel Knudsen Sanika Kulkarni Jackson Lallas Alec Lenamond Francis Lin Anita Mathias Spencer McCall Patrick Margulies McDonnell Sharon Musa Jonathan Ngo Elyse O'Neill Alexis Pracar

Presentation High School Brentwood School Arcadia High School Fairmont Preparatory Academy Mission San Jose High School Claremont High School Claremont High School Brentwood School Fairmont Preparatory Academy Carlsbad High School Arcadia High School Bellarmine College Prep Presentation High School Chaminade College Prep Presentation High School Palo Alto High School Palo Alto High School Carlsbad High School San Marino High School Miramonte High School Granite Bay High School Analy High School Claremont High School Presentation High School Brentwood School Citrus Valley High School Alhambra High School Claremont High School Helix Charter High School Bentley School Claremont High School Milpitas High School Carlsbad High School Bentley School

Rostrum | FALL 2014

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

CALIFORNIA (continued) Shreya Ramesh Micah Rosen Satvir Saggi Jaisel Sandhu Sharika Saraf Dominic Schnabel Rami Shahatit William Sirski Andrew Solano Sweta Sridhar Yudi Sun Anna Waters Alex Ye Younwoo Yi Erik Zhao Henry L. Zhu

Presentation High School Brentwood School Milpitas High School Palo Alto High School Presentation High School Claremont High School Citrus Valley High School Claremont High School Woodcreek High School Presentation High School Gabrielino High School Presentation High School Gabrielino High School Honor Academics Arcadia High School San Dieguito Academy

COLORADO Amanda Burton Haley Donathan Cindy Dou Carolyn Given Sean Moore Emma Oosterhous Chloe Pradeau Morgan Smith Andrew Wixson

Smoky Hill High School Delta High School Centennial High School Air Academy High School Fairview High School Air Academy High School Fairview High School Air Academy High School Valor Christian High School

FLORIDA Tyler Anderson Grant Besner David Branse Madison A. Dalton Jessica Dolberg Devin Faulhaber Liam Fineman Alejandro Frydman Daniel Greene Brian Herskowitz Cristian Llop Luke Longhofer Rohan Rajan Yourui Ruan Shana Sandborn Casey Smith

Christopher Columbus High School University School University School Wellington High School University School Pine View School Suncoast Comm High School University School University School University School Christopher Columbus High School Suncoast Comm High School University School Wellington High School Pine View School Lake Mary Preparatory School

GEORGIA Grant Farsi Nive Gupta Deanna Snellings Liam Torpy Katie Trimm

Alpharetta High School Alpharetta High School Grovetown High School Marist School Grovetown High School

HAWAII Sarah Matsunaga

Punahou School


www.speechanddebate.org

Spark Leaders IDAHO Katriina Adams Cole Hammond Regan Muir

Madison High School Idaho Falls High School Madison High School

ILLINOIS Daniel Balsamo Matthew Bondy Annie Cappetta Aaron Charous Mariah Copeland Jing Gao Lian Lucansky Michael Maloney Zach Mellow Rose Murphy Michael Onyszczak Tracy Preza Natasha Prosek Jared Sawyer Divya Surabhi Austin Tolentino Kristen Trandai Saeeda Zaman

Downers Grove South High School Glenbrook North High School Hinsdale Central High School Glenbrook North High School Downers Grove South High School Hinsdale Central High School Downers Grove South High School Downers Grove South High School Buffalo Grove High School Downers Grove South High School Wheeling High School Buffalo Grove High School Downers Grove South High School Glenbrook North High School Hinsdale Central High School Downers Grove South High School Buffalo Grove High School Downers Grove South High School

INDIANA Thomas Kelly St. Claire Adams Daniel Azar Anand Balar Abigail Burke Connor Devine Salman S. Lakhani Corinne A. Leopold Brian Mickel Layla K. Mooradian Chandler Nielsen Mandy Ploetz Elizabeth Wehren Gavin White

Valparaiso High School Valparaiso High School Valparaiso High School Chesterton High School Valparaiso High School Chesterton High School Chesterton High School Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School Chesterton High School Valparaiso High School Valparaiso High School Valparaiso High School Valparaiso High School

IOWA Jacob Appel Theodore Appel Wyatt James Carson Michael Cummings KANSAS Dominique Allen Chloe Bridge Ali Dastjerdi LaTara Demery Eleanor Dunlap Alex Easton Katie L. Gaches Mylan Gray Shrushti Mehta

Des Moines Roosevelt High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School Columbus Community High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School

Bishop Miege High School Piper High School Shawnee Mission East High School Sumner Academy Lawrence High School Seaman High School Lawrence High School Sumner Academy Shawnee Mission East High School

KANSAS (continued) Richard Moser Sharad Richardet Daniel Saunders Christian J. Smith Aaron Turner Alexander Wilson

Seaman High School Andover Central High School Andover Central High School Emporia High School El Dorado High School Maize South High School

KENTUCKY Cloe Anderson Megan Louise Armstrong Austin Barringer Laurel Payne William Kyle Powers

Danville High School Rowan County Sr. High School Danville High School Danville High School Rowan County Sr. High School

MARYLAND Michael Fiocco Reena Goswami Jack Scaletta

Loyola-Blakefield High School Loch Raven High School Loyola-Blakefield High School

MASSACHUSETTS Miriam George Abhimanyu Gupta Nathan Kashdan Catherine Zhang

Shrewsbury High School Shrewsbury High School Shrewsbury High School Shrewsbury High School

MINNESOTA Andrea Aguilar Sarah Anderson David Bock Haley Brahmbhatt Rebecca Crepeau Chaz Elliot Aisha Mohammed Maddy Ober Annie Pottorff McKenna Risch

Apple Valley High School Walker High School Lakeville North High School Chanhassen High School Apple Valley High School Apple Valley High School Rosemount Sr. High School Apple Valley High School Chanhassen High School Chanhassen High School

MISSISSIPPI Dylan Fink Karnessia Georgetown Anna Lam Elizabeth Liu Pratik Rout

Sacred Heart Catholic School St. Andrew's Episcopal School Madison Central High School Madison Central High School Madison Central High School

MISSOURI Morgan Abbey Irish Amundson Luce-Virlynn Apollon Colby Carlson Amos Chen Brian Cheng Yunli Chu Jesse Comeau Shaye Davis Andrew Dong

Nixa High School Willard High School Liberty North High School Blue Springs South High School Parkway West High School Parkway South High School Ladue Horton Watkins High School Carthage High School Independence Truman High School Parkway South High School

Rostrum | FALL 2014 75


ACADEMIC ALL AMERICANS

76

MISSOURI (continued) Jesse Edington Emma Givens Kiersten Harper Ben Hoover Jennifer Keeton Zachary A. Kelsay Mariah Ketchum Josiah Klassen Sean Kleffner Alexandra Klein Katie Kohler Neil Maitra Vincent Marinaro Tarek Masri Sicily Mathenia Dylan McCloskey Sydney Montague Shira Morosohk Jeremy Nowak Cassidy Oitker Cherith Parnell Raj Patel Lucas Peterson Andrew Rausch Derek Rogers Clayton Rolf Josiah Ruiz-Esparza Ellie Sona Emma Sona David M. Steiner Carson Trent Olivia Weigl Caitlyn Wicks Victoria Yonter Yasmin Younis Hou Zhang Kevin Zheng

Raymore-Peculiar High School Raytown High School Monett High School Carthage High School Oakville Sr. High School Blue Springs South High School Blue Springs High School Nixa High School Oakville Sr. High School Liberty North High School Oakville Sr. High School Parkway West High School Oakville Sr. High School Monett High School Independence Truman High School Liberty North High School Oakville Sr. High School Ladue Horton Watkins High School Nixa High School Nixa High School Carthage High School Liberty North High School Liberty Sr. High School Monett High School Liberty North High School Diamond High School Summit Christian Academy Oakville Sr. High School Oakville Sr. High School Maryville R-II High School Carthage High School Oakville Sr. High School Independence Truman High School Marshfield High School Parkway West High School Ladue Horton Watkins High School Parkway South High School

MONTANA Raegan Bunting Ramon Antonio Andres Chin Rachel Devine Maren Lundgren Antara J. Mason Meredith Stolte

Skyview High School Hamilton High School Corvallis High School Skyview High School Hamilton High School Columbia Falls High School

NEBRASKA Alayna Collins Katherine Ford Palmer Haasch Brooke Hartman Apurva Kunte Erin Lukin Nathan Mann Hunter Maude

Gothenburg High School Millard North High School Millard North High School Millard North High School Millard North High School Lincoln Southwest High School Creighton Preparatory School Lincoln Southwest High School

Rostrum | FALL 2014

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

NEBRASKA (continued) Abbie Mazour Mattison Merritt Dominic Nguyen Suzanne Polzkill Betsy Potter Rachel Rice Emma Michelle Sawyer Andrew J. Schilling Ben Sukup Jon Frederick Thoene Brandon Welch Eddie Welles

Gothenburg High School Lincoln Southwest High School Millard North High School Lincoln Southwest High School Gothenburg High School Gothenburg High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Creighton Preparatory School Norfolk High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Millard North High School Lincoln Southwest High School

NEVADA Muhammad Bhatti Ariel Higuchi Amelia Lamp Mackenzie Leavitt Persiana Saffari Victoria Sandoval Sabrina Singh Jonathan Teague Emma Taylor Trent Phalguni Vetrichelvan Noah Yaffe Laura W. Yuan

Green Valley High School Green Valley High School Elko High School Spring Valley High School Sage Ridge School Elko High School Green Valley High School Spring Valley High School Arbor View High School Advanced Technologies Acad Green Valley High School Green Valley High School

NEW JERSEY Thomas Abel August Atencio Aaron Bennett Mark Bufanio Christina Costeas Michael Cuppari John Fitzgerald Abhinav Karale James Min Michael Mumma Braeden Reinoso Alison Shim Claire Sullivan William Sun Ryan Teehan Harry Townsend Adin Vashi Noah Weinflash Kelly Xiang Derrick Yao

Delbarton School Delbarton School Randolph High School Delbarton School Montville High School Delbarton School Delbarton School Delbarton School Montville High School Delbarton School Delbarton School Ridge High School Montville High School Montville High School Delbarton School Delbarton School Montville High School Montville High School Montville High School Delbarton School

NEW MEXICO Daniel Ahrens Alexandra Berl Hallie Jane Brown Robert Fielder Mary Spanjers

Los Alamos High School Los Alamos High School East Mountain High School East Mountain High School East Mountain High School


www.speechanddebate.org

Spark Leaders NORTH CAROLINA Nathaniel Brooke Casey Goggin Elizabeth Kingaby Scotty Pruitt

Durham Academy Pinecrest High School Central Cabarrus High School Pinecrest High School

OHIO Rayann Atway Christopher Benson Abhishek Bhargava William Brown Yuran Chen Ben Cochran Aaron Dalton Matthew Depero Hannah Doan Stephen Gant Julie Gemmel Jensen Hykes Alyssa Kerensky Samantha R. Lechner Linda S. Li Kevin Min Ryan Moore Billy Quirk Sedona Rosenberg Darin Soat Kareem Soliman Arjun Subramanyam Gary Zamary Matthew Zianni

Canfield High School Wadsworth City School Jackson High School Canfield High School Sylvania Southview High School Mount Vernon High School Beavercreek High School Wadsworth City School Wooster High School Canfield High School Canfield High School Austintown Fitch High School Canfield High School Perry High School Stow-Munroe Falls High School Canfield High School Wadsworth City School Canfield High School Gahanna-Lincoln High School Beavercreek High School Canfield High School Canfield High School Canfield High School Gahanna-Lincoln High School

OKLAHOMA Ryann Alonso Karis D'Alessandro Nicholas Hartman Peter Simmons

Bishop Kelley High School Cascia Hall Preparatory Riverfield Country Day School Bishop Kelley High School

OREGON Suyash Sharma

Westview High School

PENNSYLVANIA Kayla Badamo Surabhi Beriwal Drew Bjorklund Marisa DelSignore Erica Fan Lindsay McCracken James Patrick Miller Sarah Ricci Vishu Saravanan Annie Sippel Michael Tai Hemanth Venkatesh

North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School West Allegheny High School Upper St. Clair High School North Allegheny Sr. High School West Allegheny High School North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School North Allegheny Sr. High School

SOUTH CAROLINA Lorenzo Barberis Canonico Nikhil Gandhi Jinsoo Kim Alexander Koo Hiba Kouser Stephen Michael Leung Katie Potter Bryce Safrit Jonathan Allen Savoy

Riverside High School Riverside High School Riverside High School Riverside High School Riverside High School Bob Jones Academy Riverside High School Riverside High School Bob Jones Academy

SOUTH DAKOTA Christian Bedard Rebecca Desens Haylee Grismer Annika Hindbjorgen Angela Liu Kyle McKee Zachary Person Bailey Quanbeck Matthew Van Beek Tyler Wilson

Sturgis Brown High School Aberdeen Central High School Aberdeen Central High School Brandon Valley High School Washington High School Washington High School Washington High School Brandon Valley High School Aberdeen Central High School Washington High School

TENNESSEE Emily Cullum Amanda East Brittany Garcia Andy Gordon Saad Khalid Bethany Kirkpatrick Matt Kubis Matthew Lisanby Jacqueline Lunsford Julio Salazar Eamon Smith Valerie Tewell Andrew Wilson Kirk Wolff

Ravenwood High School Brentwood Academy Ravenwood High School Ravenwood High School Brentwood High School Battle Ground Academy Morristown West High School Brentwood Academy Brentwood Academy Morristown West High School Battle Ground Academy Brentwood Academy Brentwood Academy Morristown West High School

TEXAS Perry Alagappan Zaki Alattar Jasmyn Benavides Ruchika Bengani Blake J. Bergeron Andrew Boushka Ishani Desai Anthony Doak Marissa Dusek Alex Embry Matthew Feng Madi Gackenbach Sina Ghodsi Patrick Gibbens

Clear Lake High School James E. Taylor High School Princeton High School Clear Brook High School Magnolia High School Strake Jesuit College Preparatory James E. Taylor High School Holy Trinity Catholic High School Royse City High School Strake Jesuit College Preparatory Plano West Sr. High School Byron Nelson High School Clear Lake High School Douglas MacArthur High School

Rostrum | FALL 2014 77


ACADEMIC ALL AMERICANS TEXAS (continued) John Giuffrida Joshua Graham Jessica Green Hanna-Mae Greenfield Ali Haider Mirage Hamdy Alex Hernandez Fariha Jawed Kushal Kadakia Gunalan Karun Samiya Khan Sung Yeon Joel Kim Amogh Kulkarni Albert Li Phoebe Lin Deric McCurry Anthony Nguyen Cean Park Keith Phillips Andrew Poovey Naina Rao Ethan Ryden John Sasso Armin Shariatmadari Melanie Shi J P Stuckert Hasan Syed Lucca Timmerman Joseph Paul Trahan Ashwin Varma Devon James Von Miller Duncan Voyles Vishal Vusirikala Samuel Wang

Byron Nelson High School Plano West Sr. High School Montgomery High School Plano West Sr. High School Amarillo High School James E. Taylor High School Sudan High School Stratford High School Clear Lake High School James E. Taylor High School Plano West Sr. High School James E. Taylor High School Clear Brook High School James E. Taylor High School Plano West Sr. High School Sudan High School Plano West Sr. High School James E. Taylor High School All Saints Episcopal School Plano West Sr. High School Plano West Sr. High School Geneva School Of Boerne Strake Jesuit College Preparatory Clear Brook High School Flower Mound High School Strake Jesuit College Preparatory Plano West Sr. High School Clear Creek High School Hamshire-Fannett High School Clear Lake High School San Marcos High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Plano West Sr. High School Plano West Sr. High School

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

TEXAS (continued) Osmond Wen William Wu Andy Yu Edward Yu Farah Zaman Jonathan Zapeta

Plano West Sr. High School Clear Lake High School James E. Taylor High School Plano West Sr. High School Plano West Sr. High School Spring Woods High School

UTAH Spencer Barlow Jillian Combs Samuel Li Claire Wang Eliza Wells

Lone Peak High School Waterford School Hillcrest High School Rowland Hall-St. Mark Waterford School

VIRGINIA Rahul Ravindra

John Champe High School

WASHINGTON Cindy Park Jina Yi

Thomas Jefferson High School Thomas Jefferson High School

WISCONSIN Monica Hellmer

Madison West High School

WYOMING Alexandra Christine Arment Heather Baker Jacob Colman Laurie Jennifer DeMillard Shelby Lewis Austin Morgan Kaitlin Slagle Cole Smith Kianna Elizabeth Smith Jeffrey Wen

Rawlins High School Cheyenne East High School Natrona County High School Rawlins High School Cheyenne East High School Cheyenne East High School Natrona County High School Cheyenne East High School Natrona County High School Natrona County High School

Spark Leaders Do you have what it takes?

No cost to apply!

Visit our website to download the official application:

www.speechanddebate.org/AAA 78

Rostrum | FALL 2014


EMORY NATIONAL DEBATE INSTITUTE BARKLEY FORUM CENTER FOR DEBATE EDUCATION

In the last fifty years the Barkley Forum has taught policy debate to over 5000

students from diverse debate backgrounds.

More information and application at:

UNIQUENESS of ENDI Atlanta is the Cradle of the Civil Rights Movement. Students will have an opportunity to explore the

POLICY DEBATE WORKSHOP

National Civil and Human Rights Museum & the Martin Luther King Center.

An optional college information session with representatives from Emory Admissions.

IMPACT for YOUNG

LEARN with the BEST! ENDI staff are diverse: college coaches, high school teachers and trained college student assistants. ENDI focuses debate skills for competitive success, academic enhancement, and community engagement.

Two Sessions Available June 7-20, 2015: 2-Week Residential $1700 June 7-27, 2015: 3-Week Residential $2550 Discounts Available for: early registration, four or more students from one school, and commuters.

http://www.emory.edu/BF/ institutes/index.html

DEBATERS The Barkley Forum is a pioneer in creating debate opportunities for middle schools. Our staff has taught middle school students and helped them transition to high school and college debate since 1995.


rvice e C S i t t n a e t i d ons u t S The following students have received Student Service Citations from the National Speech & Debate Association in recognition of outstanding service to speech and debate education. Students receive a citation for every 100 service points earned through activities such as community speaking or outreach. A single act of service usually garners between two and five service points.

80

Student Service Citation, 5th Degree (500+ points) Amit Dodani Chaminade College Prep Plymouth High School Emily McKenzie

CA IN

577 530

Student Service Citation, 4th Degree (400+ points) Stephen Michael Leung Bob Jones Academy Alyssa Mendoza Bixby High School Brook Becker Bixby High School Chaminade High School Nicholas DiBartolo Jacob Link Hereford High School Plymouth High School Christie Gorka Alex Giolito Brophy College Prep Brianna Poe Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Arroyo High School Jesse Payan Nick Sundberg Stevensville High School

SC OK OK NY TX IN AZ TX CA MT

450 440 438 438 423 421 420 403 401 400

Student Service Citation, 3rd Degree (300+ points) Allegra Hardin David City High School Haley Blackwell Bixby High School Francesca Chavez Buffalo Grove High School Kelsey Johnson Bixby High School Samantha Garcia Rio Grande High School Thomas Edward Hanlon Jemez Mountain Home School Daniel J. Smith West Lafayette High School Nijole Laverd Buffalo Grove High School Guillermo Rascon Rio Grande High School Abishek Stanley Pineville High School Liam Fineman Suncoast Comm High School Michael Everett Chaminade College Prep Jack Coborn Ellis Orono High School Rory Spillane Chaminade High School Christopher Renninger Monticello Central High School Giovanni Guzman Arroyo High School

NE OK IL OK NM NM IN IL NM LA FL CA MN NY NY CA

374 372 365 360 345 342 330 320 320 313 310 308 305 305 303 301

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Student Service Citation, 2nd Degree (200+ points) Caleb Jones Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Emma Michelle Sawyer Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Kickapoo High School Connor Rothschild Kyle Chong The Bronx High School Of Science Michelle Feigler Buffalo Grove High School Chad Jurado Rio Grande High School Jimmy McDermott Prospect High School Marshall High School Dustin Blankenship Miguel Martinez The Bronx High School Of Science Chaminade College Prep Jeremy Marsh Michael Lo Arroyo High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Austin Ross Valeria Perez Buffalo Grove High School Gwynedd Mercy Academy Mary Breen Cecelia Porter Academy Of The Holy Names Truman High School Daphne Werz Jackson P. M. Reed Centennial High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Ashlyn McMillon Brooke Wagner Plymouth High School Buffalo Grove High School Randy Trubitt Timothy Baker Trinity Valley School Plymouth High School Brittine Jo K. Martin Mariah L. Mohler Lincoln High School William Tennent High School Kaitlyn O'Connor George Sawyer Truman High School Skyline High School Max Cline Micaela Murphy Truman High School Jonathon Shapiro Beachwood High School Matawan Regional High School Ananya Joshi Summer Davis Madison County High School Kennedy Niska-Burja Virginia High School Campbell Hall High School Mia Ehrenberg Kirin Heftye Arroyo High School Downers Grove North High School Thomas Marszewski Kierra D. Willis Plymouth High School Jacky Ye Arroyo High School Buffalo Grove High School Christian Yi Patrick Zimmon Chaminade High School Columbus Community High School Wyatt James Carson Nicholas Ketchum Randolph-Henry High School Phylicia S. Brown Lincoln High School Michael Igert Bixby High School Donald Robinson Stanhope Elmore High School Nick Furlong Lakeville North High School Arroyo High School Henry Huynh Leo Kim Chaminade College Prep Linda Katelyn Gillis Connersville Sr. High School Charity Ann Dodge Mountain Home High School Carolyn Herrera Summit Christian Academy Meghan Laengle Chanhassen High School Robert E. Naffziger Jemez Mountain Home School Anders Osterling Downers Grove North High School Sydney Judilla Mercy High School

TX NE MO NY IL NM IL MO NY CA CA TX IL PA NY PA CO TX IN IL TX IN IA PA PA UT PA OH NJ VA MN CA CA IL IN CA IL NY IA VA IA OK AL MN CA CA IN ID MO MN NM IL CA

280 280 272 270 270 268 267 265 265 264 260 259 257 256 255 250 248 247 244 243 240 240 240 240 240 237 235 234 231 230 226 225 221 221 220 220 220 220 219 219 218 216 215 212 211 211 210 208 206 205 205 205 204

Rostrum | FALL 2014 81


82

Student Service Citation, 2nd Degree (200+ points) Sarah Ricci North Allegheny Sr. High School Nicole E. Ramirez Lincoln High School Lakeville North High School Sami Peick Terra Maslak Central High School - Springfield Leah Tancer Suncoast Comm High School Casie Benitez Marshall High School Courtney Chambers Marshall High School Marshall High School Cassie Farris Alexander Gasman Valley International Prep Denmark High School Bailee B. Harper Johnathan Bryan Joyner East Carteret High School Plymouth High School Jacob LaFree Malia Lukomski Sioux Falls Lincoln High School East Carteret High School Ethan Bryant Lynk Kaden Mendenhall Plymouth High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Hunter Miller Kaitlyn Moore Plymouth High School Blaine High School Maya C. Richardson Abigail Shepherd Antioch Community High School Louisiana School For Math Science & The Arts Timothy Shertzer Steven Sims Marshall High School Lake Mary High School Alexandra Smith-Farina Madison Woolsey Marshall High School Plymouth High School Natalie Wright Craig Yount Hillcrest High School

PA IA MN MO FL MO MO MO CA WI NC IN SD NC IN TX IN MN IL LA MO FL MO IN SC

204 203 202 201 201 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200

Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Pompano Beach High School Camille Pierre-Louis Ivan Syritsyn Westminster School - Augusta Norman High School Alexis Lanzo Riley Poynter Noblesville High School Palmer Stroup Paducah Tilghman High School Morristown West High School Dallas McCash Katherine Boone Norman North High School Paducah Tilghman High School Meg Hancock Raymond Barry Maranatha High School Richard L. Naffziger Jemez Mountain Home School Maggie Unruh Garden City High School Davis Simpson Bixby High School Ayron Smith Marshall High School Zoe Zapatero Round Rock Christian Academy Madison Lukomski Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Brianna Lee Wolf Wrenshall School ISD #100 Jarrod Griffin Nixa High School Kennedy Blankenship Bixby High School Brennan Canon Norman High School Sara Huang The Bronx High School Of Science Caleb Hennigan Norman High School Allison Draheim Norman High School William Kyle Powers Rowan County Sr. High School Blake Robinson Noblesville High School Noblesville High School Lily Schwab Bryan Welsh Cathedral Prep School

FL GA OK IN KY TN OK KY CA NM KS OK MO TX SD MN MO OK OK NY OK OK KY IN IN PA

190 190 185 185 180 179 177 174 173 171 171 170 170 170 169 168 167 166 166 166 163 161 161 160 160 160

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Ashlunn Spoon Oak Ridge High School Amanda Deweil Bixby High School Hall High School Ayiana Houston-Hay Kevin McSorley Chaminade High School Josie Rykhus Brookings High School Carlos Nathanael Santiago Lincoln High School Andrew Stern Wayzata High School Southeast High School Jenna Gilley Hannah Grillot Norman High School Rowan County Sr. High School Monica Shae Bailey Roberto Montero The Bronx High School Of Science Salina High Central A.J. Dix Ryan Kirby Wheaton Warrenville South High School Norman High School Joey Kitchen Eric Maxwell Garden City High School Norman High School Ellen Melton Cindy Dou Centennial High School Carroll High School Daniel Schumick Telyse S. Masaoay Central High School - Springfield Whitmer High School Lauren Ashley Mitten Katelynn Wilson Willard High School Hoover High School Hayley Fatzinger Erin Hartford Centennial High School Abington Heights High School Matthew Klucher Austin Nestor Norton High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Lacey White Isaac Reynolds Norman High School Clarissa But'ierries Scottsdale Preparatory Academy Norman North High School Veena Muraleetharan Gavin Muscha Richland High School Nathan Ferrell Norman High School Norman North High School Andrew LaFramboise Ali Younis Suncoast Comm High School Penn High School Chase Andreae Brooke Lauren Eddy Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Stephanie Gall Canterbury High School Garden City High School Austin Godfrey Xan M. Mattek Salina High Central Shrewsbury High School Nithya Pathalam Kenji Yeoh The Bronx High School Of Science Landon Mays El Dorado Springs High School Jonathan Benison Grand Rapids City High School Bethany Kirkpatrick Battle Ground Academy Hilda R. Velasquez-Galvez El Camino Real Charter High School Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Daniel Bergeson David Ehmcke Sioux City East High School Antoinette F. Gray Wellington High School Brianna Bryan Chaminade College Prep Natalie Carioti Prospect High School William DePoutiloff Bethel Park High School Karlee Kopp Noblesville High School Cristina Rivas Norman High School Kristie Sham Alhambra High School

TX OK AR NY SD IA MN FL OK KY NY KS IL OK KS OK CO IN MO OH MO OH MN PA OH NE OK AZ OK ND OK OK FL IN NE IN KS KS MA NY MO MI TN CA SD IA FL CA IL PA IN OK CA

157 155 155 155 155 155 155 153 152 151 151 150 150 150 150 150 149 149 148 148 148 146 145 145 145 145 144 143 143 142 141 141 141 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 139 138 138 138 137 137 137 135 135 135 135 135 135

Rostrum | FALL 2014 83


Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Bryanna Smith Madison County High School Toni DiPietro Hoover High School Paducah Tilghman High School Micheal Hassel Grady Milligan Westmoore High School Adam Harder Norman North High School Alyssa Marckx Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Joshua Robbins Norman North High School The Bronx High School Of Science Victor Yeung Giovonni Bahena Lincoln High School Westmoore High School Samantha Manning Kitra Moeny Grants Pass High School Morgan High School Madison Russell James Burnett Montville High School Bishop McGuinness High School Luke Ray Kurtis Asante Bronx Preparatory Charter School Ursuline High School Kyle Correia Breanna Rae Dawe Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Jessica Ruth Domeier Will Foster Randolph-Henry High School North Hall High School Paulina LoCicero Allison L. Meyer Harrisburg High School El Dorado Springs High School Hannah Robertson Brittany Kay Rocheleau Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Elizabeth Faye Sears Joshua Zakharov The Bronx High School Of Science Westmoore High School Christian Davis Jonathan Huang Gabrielino High School Monica Propst Lincoln College Prep Randolph High School Aaron Bennett Katie Bruggeman El Dorado Springs High School Kait Patrice-Marie Petter Assumption High School Columbus Community High School Erin Rush Elisha Jaeke Hartford High School Skyline High School Andrew Shapiro Shannon Nicole Cantrell Sunrise Christian Academy Elizabeth K. Lee Central High School - Springfield Montville High School Noah Weinflash Billie Bennett Penn High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Samuel Betts Tatum DeBlieck Centennial High School Kimberly Jones Willard High School Bethany Lauren Pace Rowan County Sr. High School Madeline Pomeroy Ursuline High School Michaela Sabbah Yucaipa High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Emily Marie Sartain Ian Walls Milwaukee High School Of The Arts Dakota Weisbecker Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Sydney Robertson El Dorado Springs High School Katherine Lane Hedrick Rowan County Sr. High School Sharon Lee Gabrielino High School Diganta Rashed The Bronx High School Of Science Anushka Sirimane Gabrielino High School Anthony Wingfield Wichita Heights High School Raegan Marie Davis Assumption High School

84

Rostrum | FALL 2014

VA OH KY OK OK TX OK NY IA OK OR UT NJ OK NY OH NE NE VA GA SD MO NE NE NY OK CA MO NJ MO KY IA WI UT KS MO NJ IN TX MN MO KY OH CA NE WI SD MO KY CA NY CA KS KY

135 134 134 134 133 133 133 133 132 132 132 132 131 131 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 129 129 129 128 128 128 128 127 127 126 126 126 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 125 124 123 123 123 123 123 122


www.speechanddebate.org

Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Carol Gao Leland High School Ashley C. May Lincoln High School Sunrise Christian Academy Cynthia Elin Matson James Anthony Mullen Highland High School Natalie Zavoral Lakeville North High School Molly Black McPherson High School Sarah Harter Klein High School Salina High Central Samantha Highsmith Conner Kocks Alpharetta High School Bangor High School Sydney V. McDonald Ciara Moore Norton High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Samantha Ann O'Neal Jorge Rojas-Ortega Trinity High School The Bronx High School Of Science John Staunton Ronald Jacob Sykes Norton High School Norman North High School Louisa Fulkerson Noah Gray Carrollton High School Bixby High School Nicole Lueker Zachary Osborn Bixby High School Lincoln Academy Alexandra Welch Amanda Wheelock Norman High School Holy Ghost Prep John Henry Katheryn Alice Lohmeier Mountain Home High School Norman North High School Lynette Long Courtney Cummins Central High School - Springfield Kimball Area High School Holly Dahlinger Myka Schober Liberty Sr. High School Cailee VanSickle Lakeville North High School LaMoure High School Katie Aberle Hannah Isakson LaMoure High School Luke Kirk John Paul The Great Academy University School Itiel Wainer Emily Augustine Bethel Park High School Norman High School Conor Austin Cassie Deaner Antioch Community High School Mason Dredge Maryville R-II High School Belleville West High School Bailey Guinn Austin Heinlein Hutchinson High School Munster High School Rachel Jamrose Victoria Jones Campbell County High School Adrienne Lee Chanhassen High School Logan Mahan Alpharetta High School Megan Alexix Ono Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Sarah Royse Norman High School Ridgefield High School Jackson D. Taylor Casey Terry Munster High School Jordan Uecker Centennial High School Casandra Willams Gilmour Academy Molly B. Hennig Luther Preparatory School Nicole Riegert Dilworth Glyndon Felton High School Aubrey Crynes Norman North High School Evan Jones Union High School Sara Joslyn Wheaton Warrenville South High School Alex Millard Independence Truman High School

CA IA KS ID MN KS TX KS GA ME OH NE KY NY OH OK OH OK OK ME OK PA ID OK MO MN MO MN ND ND LA FL PA OK IL MO IL KS IN WY MN GA NE OK WA IN MN OH WI MN OK OK IL MO

122 122 121 121 121 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 120 119 119 119 119 119 119 118 118 118 117 117 117 117 116 116 116 116 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 115 114 114 113 113 113 113

Rostrum | FALL 2014 85


Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Brandon Tramontana St. Frederick High School Baine Dikeman Mulvane High School Kimball Area High School Danielle Helgeson Krista Henderson Norman High School Jake Mazeitis Park Hill South High School Kayti Alvarez Norman High School Kalee DuBois La Junta High School Lincoln High School Zach Feldt Christian Harrington Ridgefield High School Penn High School Bailey Hayes Stephen Jones Valley Center High School La Junta High School Benjamin Meiklejohn Hillary Mitchell Campbell County High School Newton High School Louisa Nickel Tate Rehklau Alpharetta High School Bishop Ward High School Rachel Rocha Eshel Rosen Lake Mary High School Buffalo Grove High School Gina Russo Zach Stone Pratt High School Ames High School Ben Sulzberger Jackson Zimmerman Maryville R-II High School Berea-Midpark High School Sarah H. McKissock Alicia Sapirman Lake Mary High School Walker High School Grace Steward Magdalena Yeakey Bethany Christian High School Suncoast Comm High School Shamshad Ali Elise Dumont Lincoln Academy Kayla Grainger Berkeley High School Cherry Creek High School Connor Sendel Ellen Baker Lincoln College Prep Francis Genusa St. Frederick High School West Plains High School Caleb Gill Desmond Hanan Brookings High School Mulvane High School Blake Overman LaKiyah Sain Hutchinson High School Tyler Sheets Towanda Jr.-Sr. High School Towanda Jr.-Sr. High School Blakely Watkins Alex Ye Gabrielino High School Holy Ghost Prep Julian Lutz John Murphy Walker High School Olivia Prost Luther Preparatory School B.J. Sudhoff Maryville R-II High School Samuel P. Beck Salina High Central Richard Cassidy Bishop Ward High School Morgan High School Francis Fukofuka Chloe Haroldson Bixby High School Jonathan Henderson Bixby High School Nathaniel Charles Keck Sunrise Christian Academy Claire Kelly Paducah Tilghman High School Sarah Lardy Eagan High School Brent Mercado North Platte High School Brian Mrowiec Antioch Community High School

86

Rostrum | FALL 2014

LA KS MN OK MO OK CO IA WA IN KS CO WY KS GA KS FL IL KS IA MO OH FL MN IN FL ME SC CO MO LA MO SD KS KS PA PA CA PA MN WI MO KS KS UT OK OK KS KY MN NE IL

113 112 112 112 112 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 109 109 109 109 108 108 108 108 107 107 107 107 107 107 107 107 107 106 106 106 106 105 105 105 105 105 105 105 105 105 105


www.speechanddebate.org

Student Service Citation, 1st Degree (100+ points) Alexandra Munoz Suncoast Comm High School Katie Ploetz Valparaiso High School Lakeville North High School Katie Rider Donna Safa Buffalo Grove High School Madeline Sell Eagan High School Noelle Trahan Bixby High School Preston White Plano Sr. High School St. Frederick High School Christian Amy Jasmyn Benavides Princeton High School Chaminade College Prep Shivan Lala Ryan Largent Willard High School Scott High School Brianna Parsons Cameryn Lynn Rasmussen Sunrise Christian Academy Walker High School Sarah Anderson Ibet Payan Braddock High School Pratt High School Jacob Schaefer Kathryn Welker Highland High School Luther Preparatory School Christian Willick Cameron Collins El Dorado Springs High School East Grand Forks Sr. High School Brooklyn Leigh Garnett Larree Janssen LaMoure High School Desoto Central High School Atticus Nelson Quinlan E. Pulleyking Central High School - Springfield Gwynedd Mercy Academy Clare Reckner Daniel Williams Holy Cross School Canterbury High School Aliza Adhami Nandini Ajmera The Bronx High School Of Science Tabi K. Aplin Lincoln High School Valparaiso High School Patrick Azar Riley Beckett Antioch Community High School Laurel Blake Campbell County High School Luther Preparatory School Alex Brown Rachel Devine Corvallis High School Chaminade High School Shane Dolan Stephen Durosaiye Bronx Preparatory Charter School Evan Hart Sequoia High School Belleville West High School Nathanael Hirst Lacey Hobbs Garden City High School Burwell Jr.-Sr. High School Keaton John Klemek Davis Larkin The Parish Episcopal School Emily Madden Grants Pass High School Dominick A. Miles Ridgefield High School Lexi Morris McAllen High School Braeden Murphy American Falls High School Boca Raton Community High School Joshua Schulster MaKenzie Shofner Orono High School Tristan Smit Gig Harbor High School Jack Spellman Garden City High School Tristan M. Spicer Salina High Central Chelsea Thiessen Norman High School Olivia Vaughan Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Alienna Worthen Penn High School

FL IN MN IL MN OK TX LA TX CA MO KY KS MN FL KS ID WI MO MN ND MS MO PA LA IN NY IA IN IL WY WI MT NY NY CA IL KS NE TX OR WA TX ID FL MN WA KS KS OK TX IN

105 105 105 105 105 105 105 104 104 104 104 104 104 103 103 103 103 103 102 102 101 101 101 101 101 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Rostrum | FALL 2014 87


Welcome New Schools Helena High School

AL

Osceola High School

FL

McGill-Toolen Catholic High School

AL

Riverview High School

FL

Pell City High School

AL

Riviera Preparatory School

FL

Conway High School

AR

Sheridan Technical High School

FL

Searcy High School

AR

Somerset Academy

FL

BASIS Ahwatukee

AZ

Venice Christian School

Benjamin Franklin High School

AZ

Arabia Mountain High School

AZ

Lithonia High School

Notre Dame Prep High School

88

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

FL GA GA

American College Of Sofia

Bulgaria

Southern Christian Academy

Aprilov National High School

Bulgaria

Marsh Valley High School

ID

Baba Tonka High School Of Mathematics

Bulgaria

Collinsville High School

IL

Bertolt Brecht Language Academy

Bulgaria

Minooka Community High School

IL

Ekzarh Yosif I

Bulgaria

Pritzker College Prep

IL

English Language School Geo Milev Russe

Bulgaria

Central Noble Jr.-Sr. High School

IN

FLS Asen Zlatarov

Bulgaria

Gambold Preparatory Magnet High School

IN

Geo Milev Dobrich

Bulgaria

Cheongna Dalton School

Korea

Ivan Vazov Language School

Bulgaria

Phillips Andover Academy

Korea

Lyudmil Stoyanov Fi FLHS

Bulgaria

Rock Creek High School

Romain Rolland

Bulgaria

Al Bayan Bilingual School

Second English Language School

Bulgaria

International School Of Boston

Simeon Radev Language School

Bulgaria

Alakhawayn School Of Ifrane

Morrocco

Tsar Simeon Veliki Vidin

Bulgaria

Casablanca American School

Morrocco

Yordan Radichkov FLS

Bulgaria

Crossland High School

MD

Guam

KS Kuwait MA

BASIS Independent Silicon Valley

CA

Eleanor Roosevelt High School

MD

Centennial High School - Corona

CA

Frederick Douglass High School - Upper Marlboro

MD

Deer Valley High School

CA

Long Reach High School

MD

Independent Learning Academy

CA

Kasson Mantorville High School

MN

Indians Springs High School

CA

Lincoln High School

MN

Mountain House High School

CA

Pequot Lakes High School

MN

Orthopaedic Medical Magnet High School

CA

Sauk Centre High School ISD 743

MN

St. Elizabeth High School

CA

UNC-Sebeka/Menahga Schools

MN

St. Monica Academy

CA

Spokane High School

MO

Temple City High School

CA

Thomas Jefferson School

MO

The Cambridge School

CA

North Forrest High School

MS

Valley International Prep

CA

Fergus High School

MT

BASIS DC PCS

DC

Power High School

MT

Thurgood Marshall Academy PCHS

DC

Freedom Christian Academy

NC

Washington Latin PCS

DC

Hoke County High School

NC

Bell Creek Academy

FL

Lakeview High School

NE

Clewiston High School

FL

York High School

NE

Morningside Academy

FL

John P. Stevens High School

NJ

North Bay Haven Charter Academy

FL

Alpine Academy

Rostrum | FALL 2014

NV


www.speechanddebate.org

Welcome New Schools

(March 15, 2014 through October 15, 2014)

Southeast Career And Tech

NV

Int'l Bilingual School At Hsinchu-Science

Taiwan

Central Valley Academy

NY

Int'l Bilingual School Of South Tainan

Tawain

Riverdale Country School

NY

Calhoun Homeschool

TX

Success Academy High School Of The Liberal Arts

NY

Cross Roads High School

TX

The Montfort Academy

NY

Fort Worth Country Day

TX

Alternative Conflict Resolution

OH

Grandview High School

TX

Hydro-Eakly High School

OK

Independence High School

TX

Peace Academy

OK

McMillen High School

TX

Harbor Creek Sr. High School

PA

Northeast Christian Academy

TX

Logos Academy

PA

Valley View High School

TX

Accueil Lycee Francais De Saint Domingue

PR

Grantsville High School

UT

Colegio Babeque Secundaria

PR

Utah Military Academy

UT

Colegio Continental

PR

Venture High

UT

Colegio Dominico Americano

PR

Falls Church High School

VA

New Horizons Bilingual School

PR

George Mason High School

VA

St. Michael's School

PR

Peninsula Catholic High School

Austin East Magnet High School

TN

Delta High School

Bartlett High School

TN

Audubon High School

WI

Monterey High School

TN

Golda Meir High School

WI

VA WA

2013-14 POSTAL REPORT

Rostrum | FALL 2014 89


2013-2014

Year in Review 91

Century Society Report

92

Point Leaders

96

All State Awards

104 Largest Schools 105 Largest Number of New Degrees 106 Chapter Honor Societies 113

Charter Chapter Report

122 New Degrees Summary


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 CENTURY SOCIETY REPORT ALL TIME TOP POINT LEADERS Student

Lily Nellans Christian Kimbell Allison McKibban Robert K. Tissot Gregory Ross Sebastian Startz Carunya Achar Thomas Startz Nathan Leys Alex Sapadin Emma Ruffin McIntyre Branden Lindsay Sara Morgan Danny DeBois Teagan Alexander Lende Austin Craft Lyubov Kapko Kyle Hendrix Joseph Vincent Kalka Tyler J. Bieber Carver Hodgkiss Linda Pei Tyler Blake Ryan Smith Jamis Barcott Chris Rice Jacob T. Savage Tushar Madan Michaila K. Nate Erik Bakke Cody Goodchild Zachary Perry Stewart Pence Aleksander Eskilson Jedadiah Rothstein Blake J. Bergeron Drayton Willey Shania Hunt Tristan C. Chasing-Hawk Josh Roberts Richard Diurba Adam Kinkley Cyrus Ghaznavi Drew Heugel Emily K. Martin Liam Feroli Josette C. Bisbee Brian Anderson William Wildman Joe Russell

State

IA TX KS WA TX ND TX ND IA WA MO SC MN NY ND IN AZ WA ND WA TX KS KS TX WA TX TX TX IN VA MN MO MO KS MN TX KS TX SD TX NE WA TX TX KY FL WA KY MS AZ

Points

6,108 5,083 4,938 4,512 4,498 4,374 4,283 4,243 4,240 4,217 4,125 4,071 4,013 3,984 3,971 3,940 3,903 3,875 3,793 3,783 3,756 3,750 3,644 3,622 3,579 3,568 3,552 3,540 3,514 3,497 3,465 3,401 3,389 3,372 3,371 3,369 3,366 3,364 3,334 3,314 3,313 3,295 3,291 3,291 3,286 3,239 3,224 3,198 3,196 3,185

Student

Fred Whitman Jordan Thomas Mecom Brett Johnson Thomas Lloyd Jamie L. Welch Dylan Slinger Kanan Boor Eric Trey Mueller Matthew Meyer Bushra Rahman Simon Sheaff Jami Tanner Daniel Lyon Jake Seaton Jan Soto Nicole Vital Andrew Shaughnessy Baker Weilert Amit Bhatla Bryton Hiatt Jhon F. Huachaca Lavanya Sunder Dominic Hernandez Foster Honeck Andy Eleazar Renteria Michael Buse Jacob Custer Deonte Minor Maisie Baldwin Colin Waters John Holt Samantha Nichols Alessandro A. Pauri Liam Murphy Kelsey Glenn Nida Ansari Grayson Clark Rylan Schaeffer Dakota Yates Matthew Nicholas Davenport Chris Carey Matt Ross Kristofer E. Lewis Davin Curtis Danny Lovato Alice Huang Sheelah Bearfoot Sydney E. Scott Jacob Kirksey Tony Trent

State

WY KS ND NY KS MN KS KS LA TX IA TX KS KS TX TX KS KS KS IN KS TX MO MO KS TX IL KS MO KY WA KS TX KS CA SC TX CA KS NM KS NY KS CA CO WA CA TX TX KS

Points

3,175 3,174 3,172 3,172 3,158 3,156 3,156 3,125 3,123 3,117 3,102 3,102 3,100 3,087 3,072 3,067 3,063 3,059 3,046 3,029 3,023 3,016 3,013 3,009 3,004 3,001 3,000 2,991 2,984 2,984 2,981 2,974 2,967 2,965 2,963 2,962 2,958 2,956 2,955 2,951 2,946 2,937 2,936 2,929 2,924 2,918 2,912 2,910 2,909 2,906

Rostrum | FALL 2014 91


2013-14 POINT LEADERS

Spark Legacy

Christian Kimbell

Robert K. Tissot

Cypress Creek High School, TX 5,083 points

Ridgefield High School, WA 4,512 points

Lily Nellans Des Moines Roosevelt High School, IA 6,108 points

92

Gregory Ross

Sebastian Startz

Lamar High School - Houston, TX 4,498 points

Fargo Shanley High School, ND 4,374 points

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 ALL AMERICANS Beginning in 2011-12, standards for determining the Top 25 All Americans are based on a combination of competitive points and service points, of which no more than 25% of the point total can include service. In order to qualify, a student must have competed once at Nationals.

TOP 25 ALL AMERICANS Student

School

State

Lily Nellans Christian Kimbell Robert K. Tissot Gregory Ross Sebastian Startz Carunya Achar Thomas Startz Alex Sapadin Branden Lindsay Danny DeBois Lyubov Kapko Chris Rice Jacob T. Savage Cody Goodchild Jedadiah Rothstein Blake J. Bergeron Drayton Willey Shania Hunt Tristan C. Chasing-Hawk Richard Diurba Brian Anderson Joe Russell Fred Whitman Jamie L. Welch Matthew Meyer

Des Moines Roosevelt High School Cypress Creek High School Ridgefield High School Lamar High School - Houston Fargo Shanley High School Cypress Creek High School Fargo Shanley High School Snohomish High School Southside High School Harrison High School Tempe Preparatory Academy Spring Woods High School Van High School St. Michael Albertville High School St. Michael Albertville High School Magnolia High School Salina High Central Northland Christian School Harrisburg High School Millard West High School Larue County High School Brophy College Prep Green River High School Campus High School Isidore Newman School

IA TX WA TX ND TX ND WA SC NY AZ TX TX MN MN TX KS TX SD NE KY AZ WY KS LA

Points

6,108 5,083 4,512 4,498 4,374 4,283 4,243 4,217 4,071 3,984 3,903 3,568 3,552 3,465 3,371 3,369 3,366 3,364 3,334 3,313 3,198 3,185 3,175 3,158 3,123

HONORABLE MENTION Student

School

State

Jami Tanner Jan Soto Jhon F. Huachaca Dominic Hernandez Andy Eleazar Renteria Michael Buse Colin Waters Nida Ansari Dakota Yates Matthew Nicholas Davenport Danny Lovato Jackson Crawford Alyssa Turk Brett Krambeer

Klein High School Harlingen High School South Emporia High School KC Oak Park High School Emporia High School Centennial High School Boone County High School Riverside High School El Dorado High School Jemez Mountain Home School Kent Denver School Klein High School American Heritage High School - Delray Beach Hutchinson High School

TX TX KS MO KS TX KY SC KS NM CO TX FL KS

Points

3,102 3,072 3,023 3,013 3,004 3,001 2,984 2,962 2,955 2,951 2,924 2,860 2,842 2,829

Rostrum | FALL 2014 93


2013-14 ALL AMERICANS Alaina Walberg Jonah Ragsdale Patrick Lyons Stephanie Hong McKinley Rodriguez Mihir Trivedi Henry Walter Ademali Sengal Tyler Julian Robert L. Youel Brett Curtis Curtis Milby Austin Edens Andrew William Urevig Raj Patel Calvin Clark Gentry C. Carter Kang Di Li Tyler Slinkard Christopher Jordan Oliver Sherren Chris Esparaza Ashleigh C Tucker LaKiyah Sain Theo Noparstak Alon Handler Keegan Tucker James Davis Chase Harrison Dylan Dickens Jared Sutton Carlos Ochoa Jonas Trevethan P.J. Nyland John Ahn Murphey Burke Telyse S. Masaoay Mason Wenzel Lorenzo Barberis Canonico Nazifa Mim Morry Kolman Mackenzie Luman Marc Lacognata Claire Robinson Joseph Nabil Robillard Mallory Diane Copeland Tanvir Dhami Kyle McKee Mackenzie Marquess Gabriel Levine

94

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Olathe Northwest High School Monett High School Creekview High School Riverside High School Lincoln High School Brookfield East High School Shawnee Mission East High School Lamar High School - Houston Newport High School Campus High School Michael Krop High School Larue County High School El Paso Coronado High School Robbinsdale Armstrong High School Liberty North High School Mountain View High School Blackfoot High School Bellaire High School Fort Scott High School Brophy College Prep The Parish Episcopal School Harlingen High School South Central High School - Springfield Hutchinson High School Niles West High School The Bronx High School Of Science Jefferson County High School Newton High School Millburn High School Friendswood High School American Heritage School - Plantation Brophy College Prep Turlock High School East Mountain High School Appleton East High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School Central High School - Springfield Mitchell High School Riverside High School Cypress Falls HS The Bronx High School Of Science Olathe Northwest High School Trinity Preparatory School Raytown High School Trinity Preparatory School Shawnee Heights High School Cheyenne South High School Washington High School Van High School Lamar High School - Houston

KS MO TX SC OR WI KS TX WA KS FL KY TX MN MO WA ID TX KS AZ TX TX MO KS IL NY TN KS NJ TX FL AZ CA NM WI IA MO SD SC TX NY KS FL MO FL KS WY SD TX TX

2,828 2,823 2,771 2,770 2,767 2,764 2,750 2,741 2,724 2,721 2,718 2,715 2,715 2,693 2,689 2,675 2,674 2,672 2,671 2,670 2,667 2,666 2,653 2,645 2,643 2,638 2,625 2,624 2,623 2,620 2,619 2,613 2,608 2,605 2,604 2,600 2,586 2,581 2,581 2,573 2,571 2,569 2,568 2,568 2,565 2,559 2,549 2,547 2,541 2,540


11th Annual Patriot Games Classic December 6-7, 2014 Register online at www.speechwire.com/patriotgames Featured events: Dramatic Humorous Poetry Prose Duo Storytelling Declamation Impromptu Original Oratory Public Forum Extemporaneous Lincoln-Douglas Congress

            

Competitors from over 100 schools nationwide!

Individual Events Round Robin: Dramatic Performance & Extemporaneous December 5, 2014

George Mason Institute of Forensics Sign up and pay in full before January 1, 2015 to get a $200 discount on GMIF tuition! For more information visit: gmif.gmuforensics.org team.gmuforensics.org Assistant Director of Forensics

Jeremy Hodgson jhodgso1@gmu.edu

GMIF Alumni have already had an amazing start this season! WAKE FOREST EARLY BIRD INVITATIONAL 7 Finalists 5 Semifinalists YALE INVITATIONAL 1 Champion 14 Finalists 12 Semi Finalists

50% of the Final Rounds were compromised of GMIF Alumni!


2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS The National Speech & Debate Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All State Awards recognize the top 1% of point earners in each state. Standards are based on a combination of competitive points and service points, of which no more than 25% of the point total can include service.

96

ALABAMA Allison Young Scott Carl Erin Ross Ruchir Rastogi Maya Smith Meagan Ashner Benton Hughes

Mars Hill Bible School Lamp High School Mars Hill Bible School Lamp High School Saint James School Saint James School The Montgomery Academy

1,646 1,627 1,619 1,531 1,346 1,312 1,284

ALASKA Nicole M. Eldred Terek Robert Rutherford

South Anchorage High School South Anchorage High School

2,191 1,980

ARIZONA Lyubov Kapko Joe Russell Christopher Jordan Carlos Ochoa Jay Lusk Alex Keating Patrick Johnson Michael Solomentsev Brecken Devon Denler William Neibergall Jim Welty

Tempe Preparatory Academy Brophy College Prep Brophy College Prep Brophy College Prep BASIS Flagstaff High School Brophy College Prep Brophy College Prep Desert Vista High School Mountain View High School McClintock High School Brophy College Prep

3,903 3,185 2,670 2,613 2,363 2,002 1,824 1,702 1,618 1,615 1,598

ARKANSAS Dylan Joseph DeLuca Alex Zhang Sarthak Garg Wesley Wayne Wiechman Sean Joseph Madson

Bentonville High School Little Rock Central High School Little Rock Central High School Rogers Heritage High School Rogers Heritage High School

1,660 1,278 950 875 829

CALIFORNIA Jonas Trevethan Alec Lenamond Tyler Tippings Jaewon Chris Kim Michaela Posner Saksham Jain Lauren Tucker Blair Rohring Arjun Tambe Anthony Zhu Mollie Fiero Jonathon Santos Andrew Quach Kendra Marsh Sabrina Gonzalez Akhil Jalan David J. Munoz Chad Burgess Ann Nguyen Brian Yu Aron Berger Travis Chen Amberish Chitre Dylan Bruce Bryant Vikram Sastry

Turlock High School Citrus Valley High School Schurr High School Oxford Academy La Reina High School Oxford Academy Fullerton Joint Union High School Carlsbad High School Palos Verdes Peninsula High School Alhambra High School College Prep James Logan High School Alhambra High School James Logan High School Bonita Vista High School Palos Verdes Peninsula High School Damien High School Turlock High School Arroyo High School Monte Vista High School - Danville Notre Dame High School - Sherman Oaks Palo Alto High School Claremont High School Centennial High School Milpitas High School

2,608 2,405 2,303 2,266 2,017 2,015 2,006 1,999 1,885 1,810 1,804 1,774 1,759 1,739 1,734 1,719 1,703 1,700 1,690 1,687 1,681 1,679 1,659 1,651 1,650

Rostrum | FALL 2014

CALIFORNIA (continued) Nikhil Sharma Sean Trinh Connor Meckfessel Amy Delmore Chris Kymn Joebert Rosal Jackson Lallas Ryan Le Jose Sicairos Ajjit Narayanan Rohan Dhoopar Justin Hernandez Rachel Brase Pranay Patni Richard Charles Young Diana Zhao Nicolas P. Ontiveros Daniel Knudsen Haley Hayashi Kathryn Davis Ankur Mahesh Jesse Payan Reed DJ Klaeser Jeffrey Lee Meghan Weston Kevin Zhang Mitchell Grove Zian Hu Andrew Wang Jason Hu Ariel Shin Luiza Coelho Katie Hughes Francisco Sierra Nilai Patel Riley Giller Harry Aaronson Jessica Cotta Jacob W. Goldschlag Nadia Perl Charlotte Lawrence Garrett Chan Ian Buckman Sam M. Safari Jae Jung Andrew Lopez Jithin Vellian Francisco Javier Reyes Nathan Lam Donghun Kang Rohan Deshmukh Corrina Fuller Pavan Muddukrishna Kayla Bach Joseph Ludmir Omkar Savant Eileen Tan Sahej Randhawa

Carlsbad High School James Logan High School Miramonte High School Centennial High School Loyola High School Bonita Vista High School Brentwood School James Logan High School Edison Computech High School James Logan High School Bellarmine College Prep James Logan High School Everest Public High School Milpitas High School St. Vincent De Paul High School Claremont High School Granite Bay High School Claremont High School Edison Computech High School Claremont High School Bellarmine College Prep Arroyo High School Granite Bay High School Carlsbad High School Fullerton Joint Union High School Alhambra High School Liberty High School Leland High School The Harker School San Marino High School Immaculate Heart High School Carlsbad High School Immaculate Heart High School James Logan High School James Logan High School Loyola High School Notre Dame High School - Sherman Oaks St. Mary's High School La Costa Canyon High School Bishop O'Dowd High School College Prep Gabrielino High School Leland High School Clovis North High School Redlands High School Claremont High School The Harker School Damien High School San Marino High School Leland High School Carlsbad High School Yucaipa High School Carlsbad High School Fairmont Preparatory Academy North Hollywood High School Bellarmine College Prep Gabrielino High School Bellarmine College Prep

1,643 1,641 1,640 1,636 1,632 1,616 1,598 1,586 1,577 1,574 1,569 1,569 1,566 1,533 1,533 1,532 1,525 1,500 1,495 1,482 1,482 1,465 1,462 1,443 1,436 1,428 1,427 1,427 1,423 1,418 1,418 1,414 1,414 1,411 1,403 1,402 1,389 1,386 1,386 1,383 1,380 1,379 1,375 1,371 1,370 1,367 1,365 1,361 1,360 1,357 1,350 1,349 1,345 1,344 1,343 1,343 1,332 1,331


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS CALIFORNIA (continued) Brian Xie Bailey Wong Loren Park Sarah Osuna Josue Flores Kevin Duraiswamy Miranda Le Jake Riggs

Claremont High School San Marino High School Oxford Academy Citrus Valley High School James Logan High School The Harker School Milpitas High School Bakersfield Christian High School

1,331 1,329 1,327 1,326 1,318 1,316 1,316 1,309

COLORADO Danny Lovato Anthony Adu Bailey Walker Eliana Wackerman Haley Donathan Alex Vidmar Serene Singh Margaret Schaack Brandon Fisher Natasha Pivovar Allen Zhou Ridge Green Alexis Kristan Michael J. Tyrrell-Ead Siyu Wu Gabe Slater Connor Sendel Tiana Menon Michael Hudson Jacob Sloan Michelle Zhu Morgan Perry Emma Miles Kelly Pollard Hunter Neary Tyler Schad Davis J. Anderson Kyla Koury Suzanna Steele Matthew Heery

Kent Denver School Overland High School Kent Denver School St. Mary's High School Delta High School Overland High School The Classical Academy George Washington High School Greeley Central High School Overland High School Poudre High School Delta High School Pueblo West High School Golden High School Poudre High School Denver East High School Cherry Creek High School Palisade High School Kent Denver School Pueblo West High School Poudre High School Pueblo West High School Pueblo West High School Rocky Mountain High School Air Academy High School Woodland Park High School Cherry Creek High School Pueblo West High School George Washington High School St. Mary's High School

2,924 2,517 1,938 1,853 1,689 1,686 1,678 1,611 1,598 1,528 1,524 1,513 1,470 1,452 1,405 1,400 1,379 1,362 1,361 1,357 1,322 1,315 1,310 1,307 1,292 1,284 1,280 1,279 1,266 1,245

CONNECTICUT Grace Isford

Convent Of The Sacred Heart

532

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Luke Trinity

Woodrow Wilson High School

168

FLORIDA Alyssa Turk Brett Curtis Jared Sutton Marc Lacognata Joseph Nabil Robillard Miles I. Saffran Stephanie Bernstein Jacob Stern Raymond Rif Nikhil Nandu Max Budowsky Valerie Jean Cameron James Bonnewell

American Heritage HS - Delray Beach Michael Krop High School American Heritage School - Plantation Trinity Preparatory School Trinity Preparatory School Trinity Preparatory School Nova High School Ransom Everglades Upper School Nova High School Lake Highland Preparatory Nova High School Nova High School Lake Highland Preparatory

2,842 2,718 2,619 2,568 2,565 2,378 2,273 2,189 2,133 2,087 2,071 2,070 2,002

FLORIDA (continued) Mathew D. Pregasen Sam Azbel Daniel Greene Megan Hirsh Liam Thomas Philiben Sagun Viewly Delisa Stephenson Grant Wishner Sebastian De Armas Jared Blinderman Jonathan Hutton Nicholas Anderson Brian Herskowitz Troy Thisler Ethan Singer Rachel Wallack Max Klein David Branse Saahil Jain William Turk Michael Hunschofsky Chris Berros Ben Wexler Stephanie Maravankin Benjamin Sandler Natalia Castro Vishal Harpalani Xavier Ortega Alec Goldberg Nicholas Rodriguez Jose Martinez Hamza Rashid

Trinity Preparatory School Lake Highland Preparatory University School Cypress Bay High School Trinity Preparatory School Western High School Royal Palm Beach High School Western High School Trinity Preparatory School Nova High School Nova High School Christopher Columbus High School University School Ft. Lauderdale High School Ft. Lauderdale High School University School Lake Highland Preparatory University School University School American Heritage HS - Delray Beach American Heritage School - Plantation St. Thomas Aquinas High School Nova High School Wellington High School Cypress Bay High School Jupiter High School Suncoast Comm High School Timber Creek High School Miami Beach Sr. High School Nova High School Ft. Lauderdale High School American Heritage School - Plantation

1,991 1,983 1,967 1,963 1,936 1,925 1,885 1,816 1,793 1,768 1,720 1,714 1,708 1,677 1,655 1,653 1,648 1,645 1,585 1,578 1,572 1,569 1,546 1,539 1,533 1,521 1,517 1,508 1,506 1,501 1,492 1,459

GEORGIA Anshuman Nishith Parikh Lenora Ryanne Popken Chandler Apple Eileen Li Colin Basco Sam Heller Alexandra Necolettos Erik Walker Howard Dillon Hall Liam Torpy

Pace Academy Warner Robins High School Marist School Westminster Schools-Atlanta Westminster Schools-Atlanta Henry W. Grady High School Lassiter High School Pace Academy Westminster Schools-Atlanta Marist School

1,658 1,479 1,414 1,392 1,347 1,343 1,327 1,325 1,308 1,281

HAWAII Kenneth Daniel Lee Sarah Matsunaga Ayami Hatanaka Hannah Logan

Iolani School Punahou School Iolani School Kamehameha Schools

1,180 776 749 696

IDAHO Gentry C. Carter Blake A. Dewveall Josh Mansfield Sarah McDonagh Erin Miller Sam Hunt Brooke Erickson Brandon Biggs Mikkel Sutorius

Blackfoot High School Blackfoot High School Highland High School Centennial High School Highland High School Madison High School Lake City High School Bonneville High School Highland High School

2,674 2,512 2,105 2,048 2,047 2,031 1,983 1,972 1,842

Rostrum | FALL 2014 97


2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS IDAHO (continued) Adelle Kincel Chase Leavitt Justin Tirrell Timothy D. Menhart Katie Damron Franklyn Stumbo Quinton Cheney Alex Regner Tasia Fullmer

98

Lake City High School Highland High School Hillcrest High School Mountain Home High School Highland High School Shelley High School Madison High School Eagle High School Shelley High School

1,800 1,752 1,723 1,686 1,681 1,660 1,642 1,634 1,554

ILLINOIS Theo Noparstak Natalie Knez Vinay Patel Christopher W. Callahan Mariah Copeland Aniket Biswas Thomas Donovan Brent E. Mitchell Tracy Preza Ethan Matlin Miranda Kang Natasha Prosek Parth Patel Aaron Clarke Michael Maloney Katie Portman Vinesh Kannan Healy Gier Vinay Basti Laura Nelson Brendan Du Lian Lucansky Nicole Smith Harrison W. Kenner Derek Choi Christopher T. Coleman Zach Mellow Sara Zubi Kris Trivedi D'Angelo Oberto-Besso Pando Breana Brill Gershom Chan Emma Lazar Lia Isono

Niles West High School Glenbrook North High School Niles West High School Glenbrook South High School Downers Grove South High School Buffalo Grove High School Glenbrook North High School Glenbrook South High School Buffalo Grove High School Glenbrook North High School Niles West High School Downers Grove South High School Huntley High School Evanston Twp High School Downers Grove South High School Downers Grove North High School IL Math And Science Academy Schaumburg High School Hinsdale Central High School Hinsdale Central High School Schaumburg High School Downers Grove South High School Downers Grove North High School Glenbrook South High School Glenbrook North High School Glenbrook South High School Buffalo Grove High School Granite City Sr. High School Niles West High School Niles North High School Niles West High School Niles West High School Niles West High School Niles West High School

2,643 2,337 2,164 1,983 1,976 1,893 1,849 1,833 1,826 1,802 1,736 1,733 1,722 1,707 1,655 1,653 1,608 1,605 1,575 1,570 1,542 1,537 1,529 1,528 1,508 1,461 1,457 1,457 1,456 1,438 1,424 1,418 1,414 1,382

INDIANA Mikaela Meyer Nick Siano Rohan Chatterjee April E. Bowen Katherine Anne Peters Sidarth Singh Travis A. Tredway Judie Muhrez Andrew J. Caratini Rathnam Venkat Pete Freeman Morgan Papesh Kylee Elizabeth Rippy Shelby Pratt Nathan Meyers

Chesterton High School Munster High School Munster High School Plymouth High School Plymouth High School Munster High School Plymouth High School Munster High School Chesterton High School Munster High School Noblesville High School Munster High School Plymouth High School Plymouth High School Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School

2,493 1,966 1,841 1,810 1,719 1,662 1,631 1,610 1,573 1,569 1,558 1,465 1,424 1,365 1,357

Rostrum | FALL 2014

INDIANA (continued) Bernie Becker Colleen Kifer Josh Shalen Daniel Schumick Kristen Pimley Zachary Vermilion Sammy Guinn

Carroll High School Munster High School Munster High School Carroll High School Noblesville High School Maconaquah High School Carroll High School

1,354 1,343 1,329 1,322 1,303 1,290 1,267

IOWA Lily Nellans Murphey Burke Luke Theuma Jason Smith Benjamin Weinhardt Amelia Moser Kai Yan Paul Curry Adrian James Mitchell Johnathan Brett Dubois Julianna Courard-Hauri

Des Moines Roosevelt High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School West Des Moines Valley High School Dowling Catholic High School West High School - Iowa City West High School - Iowa City West High School - Iowa City Lincoln High School Lincoln High School Des Moines Roosevelt High School

6,108 2,600 2,529 2,049 2,029 1,979 1,925 1,793 1,783 1,736 1,722

KANSAS Drayton Willey Jamie L. Welch Jhon F. Huachaca Andy Eleazar Renteria Dakota Yates Brett Krambeer Alaina Walberg Henry Walter Robert L. Youel Tyler Slinkard LaKiyah Sain James Davis Mackenzie Luman Mallory Diane Copeland Ada Throckmorton Dayton Lamunyon Kellor Yde LaTara Demery Joshua M. Schroeder Roberto Lara Sydni Huxman Ali Dastjerdi Alexander Wilson Reed Crater Lisa Zhu Brennan Schartz Caleb F. Kampsen Chace Owen Justin James Loy Tamara Hill Karl Walter Aaron Turner Jessica Markley Bryce Harner Mercedes Trent Trevor Bashaw Haley Uttley Jessica D. Parks Vijay Ramasamy Robert Kobza

Salina High Central Campus High School Emporia High School Emporia High School El Dorado High School Hutchinson High School Olathe Northwest High School Shawnee Mission East High School Campus High School Fort Scott High School Hutchinson High School Newton High School Olathe Northwest High School Shawnee Heights High School Shawnee Mission East High School Hutchinson High School Maize High School Sumner Academy Silver Lake High School Emporia High School Hutchinson High School Shawnee Mission East High School Maize South High School Hutchinson High School Manhattan High School Hutchinson High School Silver Lake High School Caney Valley High School Shawnee Heights High School Hutchinson High School Shawnee Mission East High School El Dorado High School Southeast High School - Cherokee Buhler High School Olathe Northwest High School Manhattan High School Pittsburg High School Emporia High School Blue Valley North High School Manhattan High School

3,366 3,158 3,023 3,004 2,955 2,829 2,828 2,750 2,721 2,671 2,645 2,624 2,569 2,559 2,422 2,411 2,409 2,407 2,369 2,340 2,251 2,246 2,203 2,194 2,194 2,172 2,140 2,139 2,138 2,133 2,084 2,069 2,052 2,047 2,010 2,000 1,991 1,958 1,945 1,927


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS KANSAS (continued) Yash H. Kamath Ren Dashner Nathan Jin Riley Crane Ethan Hawn Matthew Miller Hannah June Johnson Mylan Gray Parker Mitchell Jenny L. Miller Luke F. Mohr Katie Super Nathan E. Cunningham Taylor Clemmons Emily Kondziola Eric Harrison Jonathan B. Ralston Jared G. Smith Arjun Prakash

Wichita East High School El Dorado High School Wichita East High School Hutchinson High School Pittsburg High School Newton High School Shawnee Heights High School Sumner Academy Shawnee Mission East High School Washburn Rural High School Maize High School Blue Valley Southwest High School Silver Lake High School Olathe South High School Newton High School Eisenhower High School Emporia High School Caney Valley High School Blue Valley High School

1,919 1,899 1,892 1,887 1,886 1,883 1,859 1,858 1,819 1,812 1,787 1,785 1,784 1,782 1,769 1,753 1,740 1,740 1,731

KENTUCKY Brian Anderson Colin Waters Curtis Milby Clay Edwards Elijah Thomas William Kyle Powers Grant Matthew Markwell

Larue County High School Boone County High School Larue County High School Boone County High School Larue County High School Rowan County Sr. High School Rowan County Sr. High School

3,198 2,984 2,715 2,485 2,352 2,240 2,200

LOUSIANA Matthew Meyer Daniel Garrison Mathew Koshak Abishek Stanley Daniel Williams David Samuel Gustavson

Isidore Newman School Holy Cross School Christ Episcopal School Pineville High School Holy Cross School C E Byrd High School

3,123 2,266 2,217 2,118 1,934 1,758

MAINE Malik Robinson Jan D. P. Tompkins Nate Wolf Ben Dobbins

Bangor High School Bangor High School Falmouth High School Falmouth High School

1,933 1,835 1,431 1,204

MARYLAND Jack Scaletta Aleks Jaunzemis Joseph Gaylin Michael Fiocco Peymaan Motevalli Elliot William Queale MASSACHUSETTS Nic Gerard Adam Tomasi Keith S. Henzer Hattie Gawande David Wexler Abhimanyu Gupta Jeff Heithmar Sophie F. Hill Jasper Shea Primack

Loyola-Blakefield High School Loyola-Blakefield High School Baltimore City College High School Loyola-Blakefield High School Baltimore City College High School Loyola-Blakefield High School

Shrewsbury High School Sacred Heart High School Newton South High School Newton South High School Needham High School Shrewsbury High School Natick High School Newton South High School Newton South High School

2,383 1,733 1,620 1,211 1,175 1,070

2,223 2,202 1,736 1,695 1,557 1,527 1,519 1,503 1,500

MICHIGAN Amelia Sadler Jacob Maxey James A. Colburn Demitrius Heard

Dexter High School Dexter High School Holland High School Detroit Loyola High School

2,017 1,578 828 822

MINNESOTA Cody Goodchild Jedadiah Rothstein Andrew William Urevig Dylan Adelman Adam M. Stromme Bailey C. Rung Lauren E. Hince Sam Scarlato Zach Anderson Talha Ahsan Ruby Debellis Nikhil Venkatasubramanian Miriam Pritschet Anant Naik Matt Wisenden Ruben J. Flores Nurullah E. Goren Hayley Pierce-Ramsdell Ryan .J Lowder Megan A. Johnson Emerald Egwim Nicole Riegert Grace Hoffa Jack Coborn Ellis Mollie E. Clark Margaret Gadek Aditya Parikh Aldrin Clement Alexandra R Rosati Nissi Kunjummen Abe Stauber Jacob Kinnen Annie Pottorff Nick Kinnen Claire Kueffner

St. Michael Albertville High School St. Michael Albertville High School Robbinsdale Armstrong High School Lakeville South High School Eagan High School Blaine High School Blaine High School Chanhassen High School Chanhassen High School Eagan High School Bloomington Jefferson High School Eastview High School Brainerd High School Eastview High School Moorhead High School East Grand Forks Sr. High School Eagan High School Blaine High School Eagan High School Blaine High School Eagan High School Dilworth Glyndon Felton High School Apple Valley High School Orono High School Eagan High School Lakeville South High School Maple Grove Senior High School Maple Grove Senior High School Eagan High School Eagan High School Chanhassen High School Dilworth Glyndon Felton High School Chanhassen High School Dilworth Glyndon Felton High School Hopkins High School

3,465 3,371 2,693 2,503 2,480 2,438 2,425 1,945 1,898 1,798 1,725 1,725 1,669 1,648 1,648 1,611 1,601 1,574 1,560 1,559 1,536 1,511 1,498 1,491 1,468 1,463 1,463 1,461 1,460 1,457 1,449 1,419 1,407 1,394 1,386

MISSISSIPPI Albert Nabiullin Currie Blackwell Jarrius Adams Elizabeth Liu Ian Hennington Tyler Gatewood Robert Tatum

Sacred Heart Catholic School Petal High School Hattiesburg High School Madison Central High School Madison Central High School Laurel Christian School Madison Central High School

1,928 1,696 1,640 1,620 1,574 1,546 1,505

MISSOURI Dominic Hernandez Jonah Ragsdale Raj Patel Ashleigh C. Tucker Telyse S. Masaoay Claire Robinson Brent Rosenauer Connor P. Hayes Peter Choi Rigel Robinson

KC Oak Park High School Monett High School Liberty North High School Central High School - Springfield Central High School - Springfield Raytown High School Savannah R3 High School Republic High School Central High School - Springfield Parkway West High School

3,013 2,823 2,689 2,653 2,586 2,568 2,270 2,256 2,228 2,213

Rostrum | FALL 2014 99


2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS

100

MISSOURI (continued) Hosea Born Hayley A. Miller Hannah Haynes Keerthi Gondi Drew Cox Garrett John Sauer Cole Culp Paris Nichols Paige Keeton Kelsey Barnes Payton Englert Caitlyn Wicks Melissa Pittman Jessica Pittman Adam Somers Laela Zaidi Haley Ferguson Tucker McCoy Makayla Jordan Sophia Marsh Quinn Mars Caleb Gill Jake Mazeitis Brendan Smith Brandon Splitter Elizabeth Triplett Sam Gaither Tom Younker Johnathan Christy Hussain Rao Mercer Martin Kynan Justis Saniya Ablatt Brady Daugherty Kendra Henggeler Samuel Willoh Elias Garcia Brian Kantanka Alexandra Klein Ashleigh Pearce Paige Yarnell Victoria Michael Matthew Gregory Gibson Zack Dunn Lyric Davis

Neosho High School Central High School - Springfield Parkview High School Parkway West High School Joplin High School Blue Springs South High School Neosho High School Savannah R3 High School Raytown High School Liberty North High School Savannah R3 High School Independence Truman High School Liberty North High School Liberty North High School Kickapoo High School Joplin High School Liberty Sr. High School Savannah R3 High School Jefferson City High School El Dorado Springs High School Liberty North High School West Plains High School Park Hill South High School Blue Springs South High School Carthage High School Lee's Summit West High School KC Oak Park High School Monett High School Lee's Summit High School Parkview High School Willard High School Park Hill South High School Joplin High School Neosho High School Maryville R-II High School Jefferson City High School Blue Springs High School Park Hill High School Liberty North High School Blue Springs High School Gloria Deo Academy Neosho High School Central High School - Springfield Savannah R3 High School Blue Springs High School

2,108 2,097 2,092 2,060 2,029 2,005 1,981 1,978 1,939 1,936 1,923 1,892 1,888 1,853 1,850 1,826 1,817 1,814 1,812 1,804 1,796 1,787 1,775 1,743 1,735 1,701 1,693 1,693 1,676 1,674 1,672 1,669 1,659 1,657 1,651 1,629 1,624 1,623 1,621 1,615 1,565 1,564 1,563 1,559 1,543

MONTANA Karissa Chouinard Lynn Davis Rachel Devine Jed Syrenne Antara J. Mason Mason Gedlaman Wyatt McGillen Mariah Ancell Seth Henderson Ramon Antonio Andres Chin

Hamilton High School Corvallis High School Corvallis High School Hellgate High School Hamilton High School Columbia Falls High School Flathead High School Corvallis High School Corvallis High School Hamilton High School

1,669 1,392 1,260 1,228 1,171 1,170 1,158 1,119 1,111 1,110

NEBRASKA Richard Diurba Alan Davis

Millard West High School Millard North High School

3,313 2,368

Rostrum | FALL 2014

NEBRASKA (continued) Vivek Srivats Mattison Merritt Sarah Brashear Soreti Teshome Daniel Carraher Walter N. Paul Carlo Daniel Eby Jacob Berggren Tayler Sundermann Rachel Fuxa Carlin Daharsh Jacob Ferry Hunter Maude Sarah DiMagno Arria Lakha

Millard North High School Lincoln Southwest High School Marian High School Lincoln High School Lincoln East High School Creighton Preparatory School Creighton Preparatory School Millard West High School Millard West High School David City High School Gothenburg High School Millard West High School Lincoln Southwest High School Lincoln High School Norfolk High School

2,232 2,176 2,165 2,151 2,145 2,140 2,022 1,918 1,847 1,819 1,810 1,757 1,755 1,709 1,692

NEVADA Patrick Gonzales Muhammad Bhatti Ariel Higuchi Sabrina Singh Miranda Rosen Yujin Seo Mackenzie Leavitt Jeffrey Horn Victor Monson Rebekah Krum Shelby Spainhour Ashlyn Earl Neil Banerji Andrew Frost Alec D. Rogers

Spring Valley High School Green Valley High School Green Valley High School Green Valley High School Coronado High School Green Valley High School Spring Valley High School Green Valley High School Reno High School Spring Creek High School Spring Valley High School Palo Verde High School Palo Verde High School Douglas High School Foothill High School

2,350 2,166 1,895 1,731 1,639 1,573 1,558 1,524 1,387 1,262 1,245 1,219 1,212 1,191 1,182

NEW HAMPSHIRE Michael Gregory Demers

Bishop Guertin High School

2,234

NEW JERSEY Chase Harrison Sam Hoffman Michael Cervino Nathaniel Schwamm Connor Murphy Luke Tolman Mahaksh Kotdawala Ryan Teehan Joshua Feldman Noah Weinflash Deeptanshu Singhvi Gabriella Schnell

Millburn High School Ridge High School Ridge High School Millburn High School Ridge High School Millburn High School Freehold Township High School Delbarton School Montville High School Montville High School Ridge High School Ridge High School

2,623 2,144 1,976 1,916 1,797 1,775 1,723 1,717 1,695 1,683 1,681 1,672

NEW MEXICO Matthew Nicholas Davenport P.J. Nyland Connor Schultz Hallie Jane Brown Anand Macherla Jessi Green

Jemez Mountain Home School East Mountain High School Jemez Mountain Home School East Mountain High School La Cueva High School East Mountain High School

2,951 2,605 2,162 1,830 1,759 1,699

NEW YORK Danny DeBois Alon Handler

Harrison High School The Bronx High School Of Science

3,984 2,638


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS NEW YORK (continued) Morry Kolman Alexander Petrillo Julian Adler Ajay Mayar Christian Pavlakos Naima Drecker-Waxman Andrew O'Donohue Navin Gopaul Lucas Smith Lizzie Speed William Smith John Trezza Dale Li Joe Salmaggi Charlie Blatt Lucy Shen David Millstein

The Bronx High School Of Science Regis High School The Bronx High School Of Science The Bronx High School Of Science Regis High School The Bronx High School Of Science Collegiate School The Bronx High School Of Science Monticello Central High School The Bronx High School Of Science Monticello Central High School Roslyn High School The Bronx High School Of Science The Bronx High School Of Science Scarsdale High School The Bronx High School Of Science The Bronx High School Of Science

2,571 2,140 2,051 2,043 2,026 2,000 1,914 1,876 1,840 1,800 1,777 1,771 1,767 1,736 1,731 1,721 1,689

NORTH CAROLINA Jacob McHugh Alex Snyder Justin Katz Andrea Zhang Will Ruff Elaine Kearney Sam Lewis Scotty Pruitt Connor Hees Casey Goggin Matt Couch Hunter Hammond Mason Magruder John Carroll Pujith Adusumilli Gabe Pohl-Zaretsky

Ardrey Kell High School Pinecrest High School Durham Academy Ardrey Kell High School Durham Academy Pinecrest High School Pinecrest High School Pinecrest High School Pinecrest High School Pinecrest High School Myers Park High School Ardrey Kell High School Pinecrest High School Ardrey Kell High School Cary Academy Asheville High School

2,531 2,470 2,444 2,420 2,299 2,263 2,129 2,128 2,103 2,014 1,805 1,595 1,580 1,566 1,564 1,561

NORTH DAKOTA Sebastian Startz Thomas Startz Bethany Berntson Noah Knutson Hannah Keogh

Fargo Shanley High School Fargo Shanley High School Valley City High School Central Cass High School Fargo Shanley High School

4,374 4,243 2,099 1,794 1,721

OHIO Tim Perevozchikov Ron Lubarsky Brian Duricy Will Mascaro Zach Kirsch Elena Sokoloski Joseph Gorman Eric Wang Varun Jambunath Victor Mezacapa Sam Weitzman Matthew Depero Grant Bent Hayley Cargill Abhishek Bhargava Yuran Chen Kevin Pucci

Hawken School Hawken School Howland High School Hawken School Hawken School Maumee High School Wooster High School Solon High School Beachwood High School University School University School Wadsworth City School Gilmour Academy GlenOak High School Jackson High School Sylvania Southview High School Saint Ignatius High School

2,248 2,016 2,005 1,821 1,733 1,678 1,671 1,647 1,592 1,573 1,556 1,551 1,545 1,539 1,510 1,490 1,478

OHIO (continued) Mitchell Felan Anshika Niraj Dan Duran Aric Floyd Jonathon Shapiro Daniel Brazier Colin Rody Scott Lear Melissa Eperjesi London Christian Julie Gemmel Clara Cogianno Rayann Atway Josh Pittman Ali Herman

Stow-Munroe Falls High School Beachwood High School Poland Seminary High School Hawken School Beachwood High School Wadsworth City School Poland Seminary High School Vermilion High School Cardinal Mooney High School Solon High School Canfield High School Central Catholic High School Canfield High School Austintown Fitch High School Stow-Munroe Falls High School

1,456 1,424 1,420 1,399 1,370 1,366 1,359 1,356 1,348 1,343 1,337 1,335 1,332 1,324 1,302

OKLAHOMA Lawrence Zhou Ben Parker Arel Rende Will Thompson Allison Hopfer Gabi Glidewell Hannah Connery Nathan Thompson Nicky Halterman Liuyi Chen Grant Bumgarner Kylie Anderson Sophia Alvarez Mitchell Bibelheimer Eli Hobbs John Mitchell Burns Brittany Plange Jessie Hearn

Bartlesville High School Norman High School Tulsa Washington High School Charles Page High School Bishop McGuinness High School Moore High School Norman High School Norman High School Norman High School Union High School Tulsa Washington High School Norman High School Tulsa Washington High School Haskell High School Haskell High School Bishop McGuinness High School Moore High School Muldrow High School

2,247 2,085 2,015 1,868 1,742 1,730 1,700 1,633 1,606 1,571 1,446 1,396 1,340 1,331 1,309 1,292 1,245 1,220

OREGON McKinley Rodriguez Griffin Gonzales Quentin Michael Austin Ewing Joel Kwartler Alex Parini Chris Meabe Olivia Mann Lorena Colcer Luke Kuykendall Brielle Preskenis

Lincoln High School Cleveland High School Sprague High School McMinnville High School Lake Oswego High School Clackamas High School Woodrow Wilson High School Southridge High School Glencoe High School Butte Falls Charter School Ashland High School

2,767 2,471 2,052 1,730 1,730 1,696 1,547 1,494 1,481 1,416 1,415

PENNSYLVANIA Maria LaBella Abigail Marone Molly Graham Michael Pronin Daniel Spinelli Zachary Javorsky Reed Karsh James Patrick Miller Benjamin Lee Stalnaker Jason Hu Lindsay McCracken

North Allegheny Sr. High School Notre Dame High School Bethel Park High School William Tennent High School La Salle College High School Pittsburgh Central Catholic High School McDowell High School Upper St. Clair High School Upper St. Clair High School North Allegheny Sr. High School West Allegheny High School

2,174 1,994 1,756 1,753 1,726 1,670 1,620 1,544 1,544 1,526 1,498

Rostrum | FALL 2014 101


2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS

102

PENNSYLVANIA (continued) Jarrod Cingel Mary Breen Catherine Zhang Joe Pinto Julia Kerr Edward Jing Erin Shay Anthony Kuntz Daniella Snyder Zane Stiles

Bethel Park High School Gwynedd Mercy Academy North Allegheny Sr. High School McDowell High School E L Meyers High School Unionville High School Gwynedd Mercy Academy Quigley Catholic High School Shikellamy High School Pittsburgh Central Catholic High School

1,456 1,390 1,385 1,378 1,376 1,366 1,362 1,266 1,238 1,237

SOUTH CAROLINA Branden Lindsay Nida Ansari Stephanie Hong Lorenzo Barberis Canonico Harrison Stall Kerry Yan

Southside High School Riverside High School Riverside High School Riverside High School Southside High School Riverside High School

4,071 2,962 2,770 2,581 2,203 2,028

SOUTH DAKOTA Tristan C. Chasing-Hawk Mason Wenzel Kyle McKee Keegan Paugh Maggie O'Brien Zachary Person Keren K. Kabambi Conner N. Monsees Cuchulane Speirs Matthew Van Beek Lucas Bartl Kate McCoy Morgan Jones Tyler Wilson Jackson Shriver Emily Meier

Harrisburg High School Mitchell High School Washington High School Stevens High School Watertown High School Washington High School Harrisburg High School Harrisburg High School Spearfish High School Aberdeen Central High School Mitchell High School Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Milbank High School Washington High School Watertown High School Aberdeen Central High School

3,334 2,581 2,547 2,379 2,303 2,216 2,185 2,169 2,166 2,095 2,065 1,960 1,947 1,780 1,753 1,732

TENNESSEE Keegan Tucker Anna Lee Hawkins Morgan Tate Alyssa Miller Kirk Wolff Matthew Lisanby Julio Salazar Sofia Tosches

Jefferson County High School Jefferson County High School Jefferson County High School Ravenwood High School Morristown West High School Brentwood Academy Morristown West High School Collierville High School

2,625 2,250 2,169 2,029 1,803 1,615 1,581 1,558

TEXAS Christian Kimbell Gregory Ross Carunya Achar Chris Rice Jacob T. Savage Blake J. Bergeron Shania Hunt Jami Tanner Jan Soto Michael Buse Jackson Crawford Patrick Lyons

Cypress Creek High School Lamar High School - Houston Cypress Creek High School Spring Woods High School Van High School Magnolia High School Northland Christian School Klein High School Harlingen High School South Centennial High School Klein High School Creekview High School

5,083 4,498 4,283 3,568 3,552 3,369 3,364 3,102 3,072 3,001 2,860 2,771

Rostrum | FALL 2014

TEXAS (continued) Ademali Sengal Austin Edens Kang Di Li Oliver Sherren Chris Esparaza Dylan Dickens Nazifa Mim Mackenzie Marquess Gabriel Levine Anthony Doak Peter Oathout Abigail Onwunali Michael Ferguson Josh Hirsh Avery Reinhart Fariha Jawed Diamond Wakim Nathan Hiransomboon Kevin Kehl Victoria Semaski Seis Steves Jocelyn Hernandez-Vazquez Delaine Tubbs Paige Robles Cosmo Albrecht Renny Weeden Hailey Medrano Dylan Berens Matthew Almaguer Berryman Toler Xixiang Xiong Madalyn Mikkelsen Davis Larkin Samuel Wang Ashley Lance Saif Ghori Nehali Vishwanath Caroline Builta Izckra Palma James Rodriguez Azam Baig Aidan Barker Daniel Morgan Thomas Linden Danielle Garcia Travis Tiffany Mikaila Rushing Matthew Feng David Ratnoff Reece Thompson Matthew Magee Hunter Robert Hall Ian McEntee Rachel Mukweyi Cameron Joseph Littleton Jacob Kramer Austin Partridge Zachary McNeal Jadon Hatley Andrew Hansen

Lamar High School - Houston El Paso Coronado High School Bellaire High School The Parish Episcopal School Harlingen High School South Friendswood High School Cypress Falls High School Van High School Lamar High School - Houston Holy Trinity Catholic High School Lamar High School - Houston Hastings High School Creekview High School El Paso Coronado High School Spring Woods High School Stratford High School Cypress Woods High School Bellaire High School Creekview High School Cypress Falls High School Saint Mary's Hall High School Robert E. Lee High School- San Antonio Klein High School Harlingen High School South Robert E. Lee High School- San Antonio Seven Lakes High School Winston Churchill High School Lamar High School - Houston Harlingen High School South Richardson High School Cypress Woods High School Athens High School The Parish Episcopal School Plano West Sr. High School Crosby High School Cypress Falls High School Klein High School L C Anderson High School Ysleta High School Winston Churchill High School IH Kempner High School Plano Sr. High School St. Thomas High School Cypress Creek High School Ysleta High School Hendrickson High School Three Rivers High School Plano West Sr. High School Lamar High School - Houston Vanguard College Prep School Chapin High School Midway High School James Bowie High School Princeton High School Clear Creek High School Summit Int'l Preparatory Gregory Portland High School Cypress Woods High School Seminole High School John H. Guyer High School

2,741 2,715 2,672 2,667 2,666 2,620 2,573 2,541 2,540 2,527 2,522 2,512 2,476 2,461 2,436 2,433 2,399 2,395 2,378 2,375 2,362 2,332 2,321 2,302 2,289 2,272 2,244 2,236 2,227 2,212 2,208 2,189 2,183 2,180 2,160 2,154 2,141 2,124 2,114 2,104 2,103 2,055 2,049 2,014 2,011 2,000 1,999 1,998 1,994 1,986 1,979 1,975 1,973 1,971 1,970 1,958 1,945 1,944 1,941 1,927


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 ALL STATE AWARDS TEXAS (continued) Neel Yerneni Max Rombado Vishal Vusirikala Danielle Edmonds Julian Advani Prescott Osuchukwu Jonathan Kumar Brittany Scofield Kelsey Preston Deric McCurry Kristen Chapa Meridith McDonald John William Van Der Schans Arun Sharma Paola Martinez Hatim Younus Lauren Champion Rachana Jadala Courtney Pool Jordan Rojas Shawn Barndollar Michael Hansen Adam J. Laicer Shilo Creswell Natalie Walker John Sasso Efren Rayos Thomas Mosmeyer

James E. Taylor High School Spring Woods High School Plano West Sr. High School Richard B. King High School Bellaire High School Richardson High School Lamar Consolidated High School Seven Lakes High School North Lamar High School Sudan High School Princeton High School Athens High School Centennial High School William B. Travis High School Princeton High School Cy-Fair High School John H. Guyer High School Stony Point High School Byron Nelson High School Hendrickson High School Seminole High School John H. Guyer High School Van High School Big Spring High School Creekview High School Strake Jesuit College Preparatory Franklin High School Holy Trinity Catholic High School

UTAH Dylan Wootton Casey Hunt Jacob Smith Morgan Ewing James Tyler Adams Morgan Lunt Nate Roundy Sean Robinson Jack L. Brimhall Kaitlin Bradley Yotam Ardon Julia Goldman Tyler J. Roberts Deanna Wilcox Ciera White Elise Clark Thomas Phung Jessica Fisk Calen Smith Caleb Christiansen Brandon Elwell Alexander Blaine Hall Heechan Han Eliza Wells

Logan High School Sky View High School Beaver High School Intermountain Christian School Hunter High School American Fork High School Bountiful High School Karl G. Maeser Preparatory Academy Woods Cross High School Highland High School Highland High School Rowland Hall-St. Mark Skyline High School Skyline High School Sky View High School Sky View High School Bingham High School American Leadership Academy Logan High School Beaver High School Murray High School Olympus High School Hillcrest High School Waterford School

VERMONT Meghan Jameson Owens

Homespun And Hands-On

1,898 1,897 1,878 1,873 1,865 1,865 1,863 1,862 1,860 1,853 1,839 1,834 1,830 1,819 1,796 1,788 1,787 1,787 1,787 1,770 1,764 1,752 1,744 1,743 1,741 1,736 1,734 1,730

1,813 1,681 1,658 1,646 1,612 1,575 1,432 1,421 1,397 1,352 1,340 1,309 1,296 1,287 1,276 1,250 1,228 1,211 1,178 1,176 1,165 1,157 1,143 1,136

893

VIRGINIA Rahul Nanchahal Joshua Wartel Tristan James Olivia Adams Robert Wimberly Tyler Kemp Jonah Scharf Summer Davis Jenneca Graber-Grace Shannon Blow

Freedom High School Lake Braddock Secondary High School Madison County High School Sherando High School Dominion High School Madison County High School Lake Braddock Secondary High School Madison County High School Madison County High School Madison County High School

2,359 1,965 1,903 1,745 1,567 1,561 1,443 1,367 1,308 1,178

WASHINGTON Robert K. Tissot Alex Sapadin Tyler Julian Calvin Clark Alexander Helman Zachary Southwell-Peace Jina Yi Grant Mathers Ashley Hartson Ansh Sehgal Scott Hutchins Kellen Potocsnak Harrison Kwik Shad Strehle Jacob Anderson-Kester

Ridgefield High School Snohomish High School Newport High School Mountain View High School Glacier Peak High School Ridgefield High School Thomas Jefferson High School Mountain View High School Snohomish High School University High School Eastside Catholic High School Snohomish High School Newport High School Snohomish High School Ridgefield High School

4,512 4,217 2,724 2,675 2,523 2,266 2,179 2,004 1,954 1,950 1,703 1,613 1,590 1,586 1,571

WEST VIRGINIA Gabe Ingram

Parkersburg South High School

WISCONSIN Mihir Trivedi John Ahn Luke Gangler Jonas DeMuri-Siliunas Archit Baskaran Akshaya Trivedi Mackenzie Birkey James Broomfield Quinn Kelly-Miller Maddeline Friend Troy Wildenberg Anh Le Cole Kostelny Cierra Reed

Brookfield East High School Appleton East High School James Madison Memorial High School Brookfield East High School Brookfield East High School Brookfield East High School Sheboygan South High School Whitefish Bay High School Rufus King High School Middleton High School Appleton East High School Madison West High School Appleton East High School Rufus King High School

2,764 2,604 2,408 2,214 2,074 2,072 1,987 1,929 1,846 1,745 1,732 1,683 1,661 1,566

WYOMING Fred Whitman Tanvir Dhami Garrett Young Dallas Coursey Tyler Pierce Austin Morgan Cormac Mullin Chayton Galloway Natalie Palmquist

Green River High School Cheyenne South High School Green River High School Green River High School Natrona County High School Cheyenne East High School Jackson Hole High School Cheyenne South High School Jackson Hole High School

3,175 2,549 2,289 2,243 2,138 2,009 1,996 1,940 1,853

864

Rostrum | FALL 2014 103


2013-14 LARGEST SCHOOLS

104

School

ADVISOR

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 11 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 30 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 41 43 44 44 46 47 48 49 49

Leland High School The Bronx High School Of Science Nova High School Gabrielino High School Blue Valley North High School Regis High School Central High School - Springfield Cherry Creek High School North Allegheny Sr. High School Eagan High School Millard North High School Ridge High School Valley Center High School George Washington High School The Harker School Liberty Sr. High School James Logan High School Bellaire High School Dougherty Valley High School Glenbrook North High School Highland High School Olathe Northwest High School Alhambra High School Munster High School William P. Clements High School Glenbrook South High School Liberty North High School Eastview High School Sanger High School Blue Valley High School Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Chesterton High School Shawnee Mission East High School Chanhassen High School Valparaiso High School Dowling Catholic High School Syosset High School Miramonte High School Downers Grove South High School Neosho High School Desert Vista High School Newton South High School Lincoln Southwest High School Arroyo High School Green Valley High School Southside High School Canfield High School Lake Highland Preparatory Claremont High School Plymouth High School

Gay Brasher Jon Cruz Lisa Miller Derek Yuill Max H. Brown Eric DiMichele Jack D. Tuckness Martha Benham Sharon Volpe Christopher McDonald Sabrina Denney Bull David A. Yastremski Gavin Couvelha Maryrose Kohan Carol Green Tim Baldwin Tommie Lindsey, Jr. Jay Stubbs Jonathan MacMillan Michael Greenstein Angela Stephens Josh Anderson Kevin Tong Jordan Mayer Renita Johnson Tara Tate Sean Nicewaner Todd W Hering Karson B. Kalashian Chris Riffer Ashley Griese Robert Kelly Trey Witt Travis Rother Chriselle Waters Timothy E. Sheaff Lydia Esslinger Kristen Plant Jan Heiteen David L. Watkins Victor Silva Felisa (Lisa) T. Honeyman Matt Heimes Terry L. Colvin Scott Ginger Erickson L. Bynum Jeremy M. Hamilton George S. Clemens David Chamberlain David McKenzie

Rostrum | FALL 2014

State

Strength

CA NY FL CA KS NY MO CO PA MN NE NJ KS CO CA MO CA TX CA IL ID KS CA IN TX IL MO MN CA KS SD IN KS MN IN IA NY CA IL MO AZ MA NE CA NV SC OH FL CA IN

1,041 1,021 915 904 874 795 676 635 633 620 578 578 570 568 563 555 547 543 535 531 525 524 510 505 496 491 472 470 461 451 451 450 448 433 418 417 416 413 412 409 408 408 402 400 400 399 392 391 390 390


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 LARGEST NUMBER OF NEW DEGREES

School

ADVISOR

1 2 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 26 26 26 30 31 31 31 34 34 36 37 37 39 40 41 42 43 43 45 46 46 48 49 50

The Bronx High School Of Science Nova High School Leland High School Gabrielino High School Blue Valley North High School Regis High School Cherry Creek High School Highland High School Millard North High School North Allegheny Sr. High School Eagan High School Central High School - Springfield Munster High School Dougherty Valley High School Lincoln Southwest High School Denver East High School Cabot High School Bellaire High School Valley Center High School Cypress Bay High School George Washington High School Olathe Northwest High School Chesterton High School Glenbrook North High School Glenbrook South High School Eastview High School Alhambra High School Carlsbad High School Lansing Sr. High School Schaumburg High School Ridge High School James Logan High School Palo Verde High School Liberty Sr. High School Canfield High School Liberty North High School Perry High School Blue Springs High School Blue Valley High School Whitefish Bay High School Shawnee Mission East High School Washburn Rural High School Apple Valley High School Blue Springs South High School William P. Clements High School Western High School The Harker School Blue Valley West High School O'Gorman High School Ft. Lauderdale High School

Jon Cruz Lisa Miller Gay Brasher Derek Yuill Max H. Brown / Steven Wood Eric DiMichele Martha Benham Angela Stephens Sabrina Denney Bull Sharon Volpe Christopher McDonald Jack D. Tuckness Jordan Mayer Jonathan MacMillan Matt Heimes / Toni Heimes Matthew Murphy Jennifer Akers Jay Stubbs Gavin Couvelha Megan Loden West Maryrose Kohan Josh Anderson / Eric Skoglund Robert Kelly Michael Greenstein Tara Tate / Afrodite Skaouris Todd W. Hering Kevin Tong Minnia Curtis Carolyn E. Cook Darrell H. Robin David A. Yastremski Tommie Lindsey, Jr. Shiela Berselli Tim Baldwin Jeremy M. Hamilton Sean Nicewaner Kathy A. Patron Jacquelyn Young / Adam Higgins Chris Riffer Shawn Matson Trey Witt Cynthia A. Burgett Pam Cady Wycoff / Colin Goodson Kelli Morrill / Katie Rucinski Renita Johnson Nancy Dean Carol Green Arianne G. Fortune Teresa Fester James Wakefield

State

NY FL CA CA KS NY CO ID NE PA MN MO IN CA NE CO AR TX KS FL CO KS IN IL IL MN CA CA KS IL NJ CA NV MO OH MO OH MO KS WI KS KS MN MO TX FL CA KS SD FL

DEGREES

394 363 363 349 281 277 275 256 247 234 230 229 226 216 216 210 208 203 199 196 193 191 187 184 182 176 176 176 176 175 172 172 172 170 170 169 168 168 167 166 161 159 158 158 157 156 156 155 154 152

Rostrum | FALL 2014 105


2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n MILLENNIUM SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 1,000 or more degrees) Leland High School Gay Brasher CA 1,041 The Bronx High School Of Science Jon Cruz NY 1,021 n NOBLE 9 SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 900 or more degrees) Nova High School Lisa Miller FL 915 Gabrielino High School Derek Yuill CA 904 n ELITE 8 SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 800 or more degrees) Blue Valley North High School Max H. Brown KS

874

n LUCKY 7 SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 700 or more degrees) Regis High School

Eric DiMichele

NY

795

n PINNACLE SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 600 or more degrees) Central High School - Springfield Cherry Creek High School North Allegheny Sr. High School Eagan High School

Jack D. Tuckness Martha Benham Sharon Volpe Christopher McDonald

MO CO PA MN

676 635 633 620

n PENTAGON SOCIETY (Recognizing chapters achieving 500 or more degrees) Millard North High School Ridge High School Valley Center High School George Washington High School The Harker School Liberty Sr. High School James Logan High School Bellaire High School Dougherty Valley High School Glenbrook North High School Highland High School Olathe Northwest High School Alhambra High School Munster High School

Sabrina Denney Bull David A. Yastremski Gavin Couvelha Maryrose Kohan Carol Green Tim Baldwin Tommie Lindsey, Jr. Jay Stubbs Jonathan MacMillan Michael Greenstein Angela Stephens Josh Anderson Kevin Tong Jordan Mayer

106

Rostrum | FALL 2014

NE NJ KS CO CA MO CA TX CA IL ID KS CA IN

578 578 570 568 563 555 547 543 535 531 525 524 510 505


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n SOCIETÉ DE 400 (Recognizing chapters achieving 400 or more degrees) William P. Clements High School Renita Johnson TX Glenbrook South High School Tara Tate IL Liberty North High School Sean Nicewaner MO Eastview High School Todd W Hering MN Sanger High School Karson B. Kalashian CA Blue Valley High School Chris Riffer KS Sioux Falls Lincoln High School Ashley Griese SD Chesterton High School Robert Kelly IN Shawnee Mission East High School Trey Witt KS Chanhassen High School Travis Rother MN Valparaiso High School Chriselle Waters IN Dowling Catholic High School Timothy E. Sheaff IA Syosset High School Lydia Esslinger NY Miramonte High School Kristen Plant CA Downers Grove South High School Jan Heiteen IL Neosho High School David L. Watkins MO Victor Silva AZ Desert Vista High School Newton South High School Felisa (Lisa) T. Honeyman MA Lincoln Southwest High School Matt Heimes NE Arroyo High School Terry L. Colvin CA Green Valley High School Scott Ginger NV

496 491 472 470 461 451 451 450 448 433 418 417 416 413 412 409 408 408 402 400 400

n SOCIETÉ DE 300 (Recognizing chapters achieving 300 or more degrees) Southside High School Canfield High School Lake Highland Preparatory Claremont High School Plymouth High School University School Cypress Bay High School Washburn Rural High School Perry High School The Montgomery Academy Blue Springs South High School Hendrickson High School Lawrence High School Palo Verde High School Cary Academy Hutchinson High School Carlsbad High School Blue Springs High School Nixa High School Montville High School Riverside High School Chaminade High School O'Gorman High School

Erickson L. Bynum Jeremy M. Hamilton George S. Clemens David Chamberlain David McKenzie Steve Schappaugh Megan Loden West Cynthia A. Burgett Kathy A. Patron James W. Rye, III Kelli Morrill Kirsten Nash Jeffrey D. Plinsky Shiela Berselli Carole L. Hamilton Kelly Michael Thompson Minnia Curtis Jacquelyn Young John Horner Mary T. Gormley David Dejesa John McGrory Teresa Fester

SC OH FL CA IN FL FL KS OH AL MO TX KS NV NC KS CA MO MO NJ SC NY SD

399 392 391 390 390 388 386 385 385 379 379 378 375 375 374 372 370 370 368 366 365 364 362

Rostrum | FALL 2014 107


2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n SOCIETĂ&#x2030; DE 300 (continued) San Marino High School Matthew T. Slimp CA Emporia High School Scott Bonnet KS Manhattan High School Shawn Rafferty KS Apple Valley High School Pam Cady Wycoff MN Salina High Central Nicholas Owen KS Green River High School Carina Stulken WY Western High School Nancy Dean FL Lee's Summit West High School Matthew R. Good MO Carl Sandburg High School Dan Sackett IL St. Thomas Aquinas High School Jennifer Kwasman FL West Des Moines Valley High School David McGinnis IA Independence Truman High School Christine M. Adams MO Trinity Preparatory School Michael J. Vigars FL Bingham High School Carol Shackelford UT Millard West High School Jennifer M. Jerome NE Plano Sr. High School Cheryl Potts TX Sky View High School Jody Orme UT James Wakefield FL Ft. Lauderdale High School Niles West High School Eric M. Oddo IL Bellarmine College Prep Kim Jones CA Scarsdale High School Joseph Vaughan NY Aberdeen Central High School Kerry Konda SD Scott Walker SD Watertown High School West Allegheny High School Michael L. Shaffer PA Ashley Novak CA Arcadia High School Garden City High School Russ Tidwell KS Lamar High School - Houston Eloise Weisinger Blair TX Brian Eanes TX Winston Churchill High School Whitefish Bay High School Shawn Matson WI Westview High School Patrick Johnson OR Gilmour Academy Gay Janis OH Hinsdale Central High School Paul Woods IL Ross Eichele MN Blaine High School Grapevine High School Jane G. Boyd TX Henry W. Grady High School Mary (Lisa) E. Willoughby GA Hoover High School Missy Stertzbach OH Lansing Sr. High School Carolyn E Cook KS Lakeville North High School Jennifer Baese MN David Childree FL American Heritage School - Plantation Park Hill South High School Jennifer Holden MO Bozeman High School Adam Thane MT Wooster High School Bill Franck OH Brophy College Prep Elizabeth Clarke AZ Monte Vista High School - Danville David Matley CA Campus High School Robert D. Nordyke KS Appleton East High School Michael Traas WI Schaumburg High School Darrell H. Robin IL Brookings High School Sally Pies SD

108

Rostrum | FALL 2014

354 353 353 351 350 349 348 348 344 341 340 340 339 339 337 337 336 335 331 330 330 330 330 327 326 324 324 321 321 317 315 313 312 312 311 311 310 310 309 309 309 309 307 307 304 302 300 300


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n THE 200 CLUB (Recognizing chapters achieving 200 or more degrees) Pine View School Shari Dodd FL Denver East High School Matthew Murphy CO Moorhead High School Rebecca Meyer-Larson MN Shrewsbury High School Marc Rischitelli MA Lawrence Free State High School Jason Moore KS Buffalo Grove High School Tracey L. Repa IL Millburn High School Edison Sanon NJ Jackson High School Leslie Muhlbach OH El Dorado High School Megan L. Hagaman KS Blue Valley West High School Arianne G. Fortune KS Shawnee Heights High School Aaron Matthew Dechant KS Oxford Academy Jon Williamson CA Solon High School Dan Ceci OH New Trier Township High School Aaron Vinson IL Blue Valley Southwest High School Jared Zuckerman KS Stockdale High School Mark Regier CA Jon Marc Baney MO Kickapoo High School Ardrey Kell High School Krista K. Casey NC Rowan County Sr. High School Kala Cookendorfer KY Stow-Munroe Falls High School Suzanne E. Theisen OH Mountain Home High School John Petti ID Travis Dahle SD Washington High School Morristown West High School Suzanne W. Terry TN Christina Speiser NC Pinecrest High School Flathead High School Shannon O'Donnell MT Wellington High School Paul L. Gaba FL Nancy E. Wedgeworth MO Parkview High School Delbarton School Michael Tidd, OSB NJ Glacier High School Gregory Adkins MT Mason High School Lorri Allen OH Presentation High School Dan Meyers CA Bryan Whyte MO Carthage High School Yucaipa High School John D. Eichman CA Fishers High School Matthew (Matt) Rund IN Des Moines Roosevelt High School Harry W. Strong IA Sumner Academy Jamelle M. Brown KS Savannah R3 High School Daniel Strang MO Terrick Brown TX Seven Lakes High School Gig Harbor High School Chris Coovert WA Olathe South High School Catherine Smith KS Austintown Fitch High School Andrea Folsom OH Needham High School Paul J. Wexler MA Freehold Township High School Phillip John Drummond NJ Jen Gonda OH Cardinal Mooney High School Saint Francis High School Douglas Dennis CA Alpharetta High School David Gay GA Shawnee Mission West High School Rosanne Lawler KS Timber Creek High School Beth Eskin FL Tulsa Washington High School Kelly R. McCracken OK

298 297 295 294 293 292 291 290 289 288 288 287 286 283 282 278 278 278 277 277 276 276 273 271 270 269 269 267 266 264 262 261 260 260 259 259 259 257 257 256 254 252 252 250 249 249 249 248 248

Rostrum | FALL 2014 109


2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n THE 200 CLUB (continued) Milpitas High School Topeka High School Monett High School Norman North High School Hillcrest High School Wichita East High School Eden Prairie High School Cheyenne Central High School Bixby High School Norman High School Coppell High School Brookfield East High School Cheyenne East High School Wheaton North High School Willard High School Centennial High School College Prep Ravenwood High School Jenks High School Park Hill High School Skyline High School Suncoast Comm High School Bishop Miege High School Raytown South High School Summit High School Newport High School Chaminade College Prep Joplin High School Cypress Woods High School Michael Krop High School Prospect High School Penn High School Cypress Creek High School Cooper City High School Raymore-Peculiar High School St. Paul Academy & Summit School Braddock High School Coral Springs High School Hathaway Brown School Wadsworth City School James E. Taylor High School Princeton High School Oak Ridge High School Ronald Reagan High School West Lafayette High School Durham Academy Coronado High School Hawken School Palos Verdes Peninsula High School Belton High School Ladue Horton Watkins High School La Cueva High School

110

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Charles Schletzbaum Pamela K. McComas Marilyn Mann Jim Ryan Mark Doherty Vickie Fellers Jason Meyer Andrew R. Dennis Betty Fisher Kasey Harrison Glenda Ferguson Steve Sexton Michael E. Starks Stan Austin Katherine Tobin Wendi N. Brandenburg Lexy Green Kelly A. Duyn Gregg C. Hartney Tyler Unsell Judie Roberts Traci Lowe Melissa Reynolds Maureen Woods Anne Poyner John Julian, Sr. Marianne Rosen Bobby Stackhouse Heath Martin Ruthie W. Metcalfe Jeremy Morton David Dutton Scott Baker Melvin Tanner Todd Schnake Thomas M. Fones Carol Lynne Cecil Justin Charles Weaver Jason Habig Victoria Mathews Gay Hollis Jimmy L. Smith Deanne Sue Christensen Matt Reichle Aaron P. Smith Robert Sheard Carmen Johnson Robert H. Shurtz Judi Lemons Steven Ellis Molly K. Beck Leigh M. Arnett

CA KS MO OK UT KS MN WY OK OK TX WI WY IL MO TX CA TN OK MO UT FL KS MO NJ WA CA MO TX FL IL IN TX FL MO MN FL FL OH OH TX TX TX TX IN NC NV OH CA MO MO NM

245 244 244 244 244 242 242 242 241 241 241 241 241 240 240 239 238 238 237 236 235 233 233 233 233 233 232 232 232 231 231 231 231 230 230 228 227 227 227 227 227 227 226 226 225 225 225 225 223 222 222 222


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 CHAPTER HONOR SOCIETIES n THE 200 CLUB (continued) Glenbard West High School Maize High School Fullerton Joint Union High School Fort Scott High School Notre Dame Academy Roosevelt High School Palo Alto High School Parkway West High School Broad Run High School Memorial High School - Houston Richardson High School Maple Grove Senior High School Torrey Pines High School Newton High School Pittsburg High School Downers Grove North High School Lindale High School Kent Denver School Pueblo West High School Coeur D'Alene High School Lincoln East High School Lee's Summit High School Norfolk High School Centerville High School Asheville High School Princeton High School Bonneville High School Homewood-Flossmoor High School St. Michael Albertville High School Spring Woods High School Central Valley High School Boca Raton Community High School Madison High School Seaman High School Chaska High School Houston Acad For Intl Studies Lowell High School Renaissance Magnet High School Lee's Summit North High School Hamilton High School Olathe North High School Rockhurst High School Harlingen High School South Raytown High School Andover Central High School Jefferson City High School GlenOak High School Cheyenne South High School Manchester Essex Regional High School Myers Park High School Albuquerque Academy Kingwood High School

Erin Henry Curtis Neil Shephard Sal Tinajero Amber Toth Patricia (Trish) Sanders Jennifer S. Bergan Gabor Mimi Park Cara Borgsmiller Ron Richards Cecil M. Trent III Michael Bolen Ronald Dixon Rachel Krause David Williams Julie Laflen Missy Carlson Janice Caldwell Kurt D. Macdonald Paulette Frye Stephanie Lauritzen Matt Davis Nate Smith Chris Begeman Marie A. Dzuris Keith Pittman John O. Bathke Robert Clayton Jacob Schoeneman Molly Leuthner Victoria Beard Brad Thew Phyllis T. Pacilli Bruce Benson David C. Ralph Beverly Diles Cameron Secord Terence Abad Richard Zuercher Benjamin D. Jewell Christina Vail Richard M. Belske Donald Ramsey Lee Ann Ince Mark Harris Jodee Hobbs Chris Rothgeb Tom Mosberger Joalyne Steinhausen Jennifer Coleman Andrew G. West Susan Ontiveros Audra Langston

IL KS CA KS OH SD CA MO VA TX TX MN CA KS KS IL TX CO CO ID NE MO NE OH NC NJ ID IL MN TX WA FL ID KS MN TX CA ID MO AZ KS MO TX MO KS MO OH WY MA NC NM TX

221 220 218 218 218 218 217 216 216 214 214 213 212 212 212 211 210 209 209 209 209 208 208 208 207 207 206 206 206 206 206 205 205 205 205 205 204 204 204 203 203 203 203 202 201 201 201 201 200 200 200 200

Rostrum | FALL 2014 111


National Speech & Debate Association Trophy Shop

Experience Our World-Class Service. The National Speech & Debate Association Trophy Shop has the answers to all of your award needs! Our selection offers custom award options at affordable, competitive rates. Chad Wagner, our trophy specialist, will work with you to replicate your existing designs or create a personalized look all your own. Visit our online store or email Chad at chad.wagner@speechanddebate.org to discover the possibilities for your next tournament.

Chad Wagner is the best! The

awards are thoughtfully designed,

beautifully executed, and arrive

on time in perfect condition. Chad helps us stay within budget but still produces a product our guests are excited to take home. I would highly recommend his services to any tournament director!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Megan Loden West, Director of Speech and Debate, Cypress Bay High School, Florida

store.speechanddebate.org


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 CHARTER CHAPTER REPORT This report summarizes the number of new members and degrees added by each charter chapter during the school year 2011-12. It does not reflect the current strength of each chapter. The “total” column indicates accumulated members and degrees since the chapter founding or the Leading Chapter Award. The column marked '14 designates the chapter rank as of August 31, 2014. The column '13 designates the chapter rank the previous year.

LEGEND:

DEEP SOUTH (AL) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + The Altamont School 1 2 3 Mars Hill Bible School ('04) 21 5 Trinity Presbyterian School 38 3 4 6 Prattville HS ('08) 55 5 9 Vestavia Hills HS ('10) 51 6 7 Spain Park HS 5 10 Saint James School ('09) 68 7 14 The Montgomery Academy ('12) 136 8 9 8 Grissom HS ('79) 12 10 11 Ramsay HS 20 12 Mountain Brook HS ('11) 33 11 12 13 Hoover HS ('03) 34 6 Prattville Christian Academy 23 13 14 -- # Decatur Heritage Christian 7 1 Lamp HS ('13) 39 15 -- # UMS-Wright Preparatory School 10 16 ARIZONA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Hamilton HS 109 3 McClintock HS ('98) 60 2 3 4 Mesquite HS 44 5 Salpointe Catholic HS ('90) 26 4 5 6 Chandler HS ('96) 37 6 7 Tempe Preparatory Academy 30 8 Shadow Mountain HS ('95) 3 7 8 12 Desert Vista HS ('11) 123 10 Dobson HS ('09) 15 9 10 11 Catalina Foothills HS 79 11 11 Thunderbird HS 24 14 Chandler Preparatory Academy 50 12 13 -- # Perry HS 41 -- # Phoenix Country Day School 34 14 15 15 River Valley HS ('07) 28 16 20 Brophy College Prep ('12) 125 17 16 North Pointe Preparatory 30 18 18 Chaparral HS ('08) 44 19 17 Horizon HS ('94) 36 20 19 Sunnyslope HS ('05) 12 21 24 BASIS Scottsdale HS 57 22 22 Cactus HS 0 23 23 BASIS Flagstaff HS 41 24 -- # Desert Ridge HS 26 25 25 Red Mountain HS ('10) 2 26 1 Mountain View HS ('13) 36 ARKANSAS '14 '13 New 2 + Little Rock Central HS 58 1 2 3 Southside HS 14 3 4 Monticello HS 21 4 6 Bentonville HS ('12) 88 5 5 Rogers Heritage HS 16 6 -- # Hall HS 37 7 -- # Episcopal Collegiate School 18 8 1 Fayetteville HS ('13) 44 BIG VALLEY (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 2 + Bear Creek HS ('05) 47 1 2 3 Turlock HS ('10) 56 3 4 Lodi HS ('09) 46

Each year the top chapter in accumulated members and degrees, not more than one in a district, receives the Leading Chapter Award; then its accumulated total returns to zero and it begins a new record. The symbol ('05) indicates the last time a chapter won the Leading Chapter Award. A school may not receive the Leading Chapter Award unless it has been a member for five years or five years have passed since last

+ Leading Chapter Award

Total 426 382 340 316 268 249 244 240 237 182 151 140 68 49 39 10 Total 801 708 692 624 616 577 526 472 455 452 358 344 319 315 291 265 239 218 217 169 119 109 105 88 42 36 Total 642 421 196 154 132 96 85 44 Total 365 317 233

# New or Restored Chapter

BIG VALLEY (CA) (continued) 4 5 St Mary's HS ('07) 13 7 James Enochs HS ('12) 67 5 6 -- # Stockton Collegiate International Schools 43 -- # Stockton Early College Academy 7 7 8 Central Catholic HS ('11) 17 8 9 1 Delta Charter HS ('13) 45 CALIFORNIA COAST '14 '13 Charter New 5 + Bellarmine College Prep ('07) 127 1 2 2 Saratoga HS ('01) 41 4 Palo Alto HS 66 3 4 6 Mission San Jose HS 55 5 3 Monta Vista HS ('00) 36 6 7 Mountain View HS 49 8 Los Gatos HS ('95) 35 7 10 Lynbrook HS ('09) 49 8 9 9 Westmont HS ('96) 11 10 11 Los Altos HS 46 12 Saint Francis HS ('10) 114 11 12 16 The Harker School ('12) 156 1 Leland HS ('13) 363 13 14 15 Milpitas HS 92 15 13 Notre Dame HS 43 17 Presentation HS ('11) 95 16 17 18 Archbishop Mitty HS 97 19 Washington HS 25 18 19 -- # South San Francisco HS 29 20 20 Gunn Sr HS 12 -- # Summit Prep HS 6 21 22 21 Everest Public HS 7 CAPITOL VALLEY (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 2 Granite Bay HS ('10) 50 1 2 6 + CK McClatchy HS ('02) 24 3 8 Mira Loma HS ('11) 106 4 5 Sacramento Jesuit HS ('97) 20 5 4 St Francis HS - Sacramento 11 6 7 Woodcreek HS 46 7 9 Kennedy HS ('06) 18 8 10 Rocklin HS 16 9 11 El Dorado HS ('08) 13 10 12 Oak Ridge HS ('09) 13 11 -- # Antelope HS 32 13 Ponderosa HS ('12) 24 12 13 3 Davis Senior HS ('13) 21 EAST LOS ANGELES (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 Gabrielino HS ('10) 349 2 3 + Schurr HS ('98) 70 3 4 San Gabriel HS ('01) 60 4 6 San Marino HS ('09) 116 5 5 Polytechnic School 24 6 7 Garfield HS 10 7 10 Alhambra HS ('11) 176 8 9 California HS - Whittier 27 9 12 Mark Keppel HS ('07) 20 10 13 Damien HS ('08) 51 11 14 Arcadia HS ('12) 105 12 15 La Puente HS 31 13 16 Maranatha HS 72

198 169 53 51 46 45 Total 999 961 939 923 918 765 563 468 451 413 409 393 363 332 315 313 227 123 115 88 49 45 Total 319 241 240 238 232 190 141 123 117 93 62 57 21 Total 1,365 771 753 644 609 525 514 394 331 294 261 151 146

receiving the award. If a school loses its charter status, becomes suspended or expelled, or fails to add new members and degrees during the school year, it is ineligible to receive the Leading Chapter Award. A tie in the accumulated total for the Leading Chapter Award is broken in favor of the school which enrolled the greater number of new members and degrees during that school year. This report does not contain the records of provisional or member schools.

* Lost or Suspended Charter

EAST LOS ANGELES (CA) (continued) 14 1 Arroyo HS ('13) 125 17 South East HS 28 15 SAN FRAN BAY (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 3 + James Logan HS ('09) 172 1 2 5 Miramonte HS ('07) 134 2 Sonoma Valley HS 17 3 8 Dougherty Valley HS 216 4 5 4 Analy HS 45 6 6 George Washington HS ('93) 18 7 Mercy HS 10 7 8 9 Lowell HS ('06) 93 10 Bishop O'Dowd HS 93 9 10 11 St Vincent De Paul HS ('03) 49 12 El Cerrito HS ('00) 51 11 12 16 Monte Vista HS - Danville ('11) 137 13 13 Sacred Heart Cathedral Prep 28 14 Bentley School 40 14 15 17 Windsor HS 44 18 Pinole Valley HS ('10) 33 16 17 19 San Ramon Valley HS ('08) 28 18 22 College Prep ('12) 82 20 Sonoma Academy 46 19 20 21 Albany HS 0 -- # Skyline HS 64 21 22 1 Head-Royce School ('13) 22 SIERRA (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 2 + Stockdale HS ('04) 128 1 4 Bullard HS ('01) 53 2 3 3 Ridgeview HS 22 4 5 Sanger HS ('11) 74 5 7 Clovis North HS 142 6 6 Edison Computech HS ('07) 54 7 8 Clovis HS ('93) 19 9 Clovis East HS ('09) 57 8 9 10 Centennial HS ('10) 29 10 11 Bakersfield HS ('08) 20 11 12 East Bakersfield HS ('05) 31 12 14 Frontier HS 1 13 16 Independence HS 30 14 17 University HS - Fresno 35 15 15 Bakersfield Christian HS 2 16 18 North HS - Bakersfield ('12) 36 17 1 Liberty HS ('13) 44 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Helix Charter HS ('75) 69 2 3 Carlsbad HS 176 6 Oxford Academy 146 3 4 5 Yucaipa HS ('05) 120 5 4 Redlands East Valley HS 34 6 7 Carter HS 72 7 8 Bonita Vista HS ('94) 61 8 -- # Rancho Bernardo HS 51 9 9 San Dieguito Academy ('08) 44 10 10 El Modena HS 33 11 11 Redlands HS ('10) 40 12 12 Diamond Ranch HS 15 13 14 Citrus Valley HS 66

125 101 Total 1,082 955 942 939 922 838 776 655 653 495 422 374 362 301 235 208 195 153 145 89 75 22 Total 758 623 618 564 543 485 399 391 317 302 245 187 141 135 135 54 44 Total 859 832 680 662 632 529 485 394 367 298 297 266 257

Rostrum | FALL 2014 113


2013-14 Charter Chapter Report

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (continued) 14 13 Los Osos HS 40 15 16 La Costa Canyon HS ('11) 54 15 Mount Miguel HS ('01) 0 16 17 -- # Cajon HS 45 18 21 Torrey Pines HS ('12) 95 19 -- # Vista Murrieta HS 88 20 1 Claremont HS ('13) 129 17 J W North HS 2 21 22 20 Fairmont Preparatory Academy 40 23 -- # Northwood HS 52 24 19 Heritage HS 15 25 18 Great Oak HS 3 22 Encore HS 6 26 WEST LOS ANGELES (CA) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Granada Hills Charter HS ('05) 60 5 West HS - Torrance 74 2 3 4 Sherman Oaks CES ('00) 51 4 6 Palos Verdes Peninsula HS 85 5 8 Chaminade College Prep ('06) 85 -- # El Camino Real Charter HS 34 6 7 7 Narbonne HS 47 8 9 Notre Dame HS - Sherman Oaks ('99) 37 9 10 Brentwood School 27 11 Arroyo Grande HS ('04) 14 10 11 12 Foothill Technology HS 33 13 La Canada HS ('84) 40 12 13 14 Torrance HS 32 14 15 Immaculate Heart HS ('03) 7 -- # Harvard-Westlake School ('97) 2 15 16 16 Oaks Christian School 12 19 Crescenta Valley HS 56 17 18 22 Loyola HS ('12) 74 19 20 La Reina HS ('11) 34 21 Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy 21 20 21 -- # Oakwood School - North Hollywood 42 22 1 Fullerton Joint Union HS ('13) 52 23 Burbank HS ('10) 0 23 COLORADO '14 '13 Charter New 1 -- + # Heritage HS ('86) 13 11 Cherry Creek HS ('12) 275 2 3 2 Chaparral HS 22 4 Kent Denver School ('09) 69 4 5 3 Aurora Central HS ('93) 13 6 5 Douglas County HS ('04) 28 6 Cherokee Trail HS 37 7 8 7 Grandview HS 32 9 Eaglecrest HS ('02) 30 9 10 8 Chatfield Senior HS ('98) 5 10 Arapahoe HS ('06) 31 11 12 12 Columbine HS ('05) 52 13 14 Overland HS ('11) 72 13 Castle View HS 41 14 16 Highlands Ranch HS ('08) 28 15 16 15 Rock Canyon HS 14 17 1 Smoky Hill HS ('13) 60 COLORADO GRANDE '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 + Pueblo West HS 89 2 2 Woodland Park HS ('98) 26 3 3 St Mary's HS 35 4 5 Widefield HS ('03) 40 5 8 East HS - Pueblo ('93) 32 6 6 Doherty HS 0 7 -- # Hoehne School 6 8 10 The Classical Academy 75 9 9 Pine Creek HS 25 10 -- # Cheyenne Mountain HS 31 11 11 Canon City HS ('09) 43 12 12 Alamosa HS 17 13 13 Air Academy HS ('10) 74 14 15 Centennial HS ('12) 54 15 14 La Junta HS ('11) 36 1 Mesa Ridge HS ('13) 41 16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN-NORTH (CO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Northridge HS 27 2 3 Battle Mountain HS 32 3 5 Niwot HS ('03) 42 4 4 Poudre HS ('93) 12 5 8 Longmont HS ('06) 27 6 6 Strasburg HS 6

114

Rostrum | FALL 2014

252 222 182 177 159 143 129 124 112 100 88 77 64 Total 640 596 593 562 478 470 453 427 406 379 341 304 292 251 247 180 159 139 127 105 76 52 45 Total 519 493 456 434 426 376 372 351 313 306 272 250 214 195 164 155 60 Total 621 573 572 477 447 426 398 352 351 314 268 235 226 107 103 41 Total 537 530 516 487 288 286

ROCKY MOUNTAIN-NORTH (CO) (continued) 7 Moffat County HS ('07) 14 7 8 9 Peak To Peak Charter School 34 9 11 Fort Collins HS ('08) 45 10 10 Silver Creek HS 20 15 Eagle Valley HS 43 11 12 14 Alexander Dawson School 33 13 13 Centaurus HS ('04) 5 14 16 Fossil Ridge HS 31 18 Rocky Mountain HS ('12) 54 15 16 17 Erie HS 17 17 19 Monarch HS ('10) 43 18 1 Fairview HS ('13) 73 21 Union Colony Preparatory School 23 19 20 20 Greeley Central HS ('11) 16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN-SOUTH (CO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 1 + George Washington HS ('09) 193 2 3 Lakewood HS ('05) 64 4 Mountain Vista HS 18 3 4 5 Mullen HS ('01) 26 5 6 Summit HS 17 6 7 Standley Lake HS ('03) 43 8 Valor Christian HS 53 7 8 9 Bear Creek HS ('07) 68 11 Denver School Of The Arts 47 9 10 10 Wheat Ridge HS ('04) 5 11 2 Denver East HS ('13) 210 12 Golden HS ('10) 65 12 13 13 Regis Jesuit HS ('12) 70 14 Pomona HS ('11) 32 14 WESTERN SLOPE (CO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Delta HS ('06) 22 3 Montrose HS ('08) 37 2 3 4 Palisade HS ('04) 14 5 Ouray HS 13 4 5 8 Central Of Grand Junction HS ('12) 43 6 7 Grand Junction HS ('11) 13 1 Fruita Monument HS ('13) 27 7 FLORIDA MANATEE '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + University School ('05) 141 5 Cypress Bay HS 196 2 3 3 Stoneman Douglas HS ('06) 45 6 Taravella HS ('07) 93 4 5 7 American Heritage School - Plantation 128 6 4 Pine Crest School ('00) 19 8 Ft Lauderdale HS ('10) 152 7 8 9 Cooper City HS 101 11 Western HS ('11) 156 9 10 1 Nova HS ('13) 363 11 13 Coral Springs HS ('09) 120 14 St Thomas Aquinas HS ('12) 152 12 13 10 Coral Glades HS 4 14 12 North Broward Prep School 23 15 -- # Charles W Flanagan HS 94 16 15 Monarch HS 18 17 16 Pembroke Pines Charter HS 73 18 -- # Archbishop McCarthy HS 44 19 -- # Sheridan Hills Christian School 16 FLORIDA OCEANFRONT '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 + Wellington HS ('05) 83 2 3 Lake Worth Community HS 19 3 -- # Palm Beach Gardens HS 18 4 7 Jupiter HS ('06) 46 5 Atlantic Community HS ('95) 20 5 6 10 Boca Raton Community HS 116 7 9 Suncoast Comm HS ('09) 69 8 12 Martin County HS ('01) 23 15 Palm Beach Central HS 32 9 10 16 American Heritage HS - Delray Beach 31 11 19 Royal Palm Beach HS ('10) 64 12 17 Jensen Beach HS 26 13 22 William T Dwyer HS 47 14 20 Seminole Ridge Community HS 22 15 24 Dreyfoos School Of The Arts ('12) 57 16 -- # Oxbridge Academy Of The Palm Beaches 52 17 -- # Clark Advanced Learning Center 10 FLORIDA PANTHER '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Trinity Preparatory School ('08) 108

283 266 247 232 172 172 155 146 126 114 107 73 56 54 Total 902 641 446 442 410 409 382 356 215 215 210 201 132 80 Total 261 249 222 193 100 82 27 Total 896 757 682 654 614 581 563 446 409 363 333 293 287 269 262 142 115 103 38 Total 609 574 574 542 521 469 429 372 343 326 249 226 208 205 102 62 44 Total 678

FLORIDA PANTHER (continued) 2 6 Timber Creek HS 82 3 14 Lake Highland Preparatory ('11) 125 4 8 Lake Brantley HS 1 5 13 Lake Mary HS 42 11 Winter Springs HS 13 6 7 21 Lake Mary Preparatory School 48 8 18 Paul J Hagerty HS 28 9 23 Legacy HS 13 10 -- # Wekiva HS 20 1 Buchholz HS ('13) 20 11 FLORIDA SUNSHINE '14 '13 Charter New 1 1 + Pine View School ('09) 102 2 3 Academy Of The Holy Names ('03) 3 3 5 Berkeley Preparatory School 18 4 -- # Tampa-Jesuit HS ('97) 32 6 Sarasota HS ('06) 26 5 6 8 Southeast HS 26 10 St Petersburg HS ('08) 44 7 8 9 Niceville HS ('07) 3 13 King HS ('10) 62 9 10 11 Palm Harbor University HS 28 11 12 Hillsborough HS ('11) 14 14 Newsome HS 24 12 13 15 Paul R Wharton HS ('12) 31 14 2 Gulf Breeze HS ('13) 14 SOUTH FLORIDA New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Miami Beach Sr HS ('91) 93 4 Christopher Columbus HS ('04) 60 2 3 5 Belen Jesuit Prep School ('08) 60 4 3 Miami Southridge Senior HS ('99) 5 5 6 North Miami Senior HS ('97) 0 7 Ransom Everglades Upper School ('11) 31 6 7 8 Michael Krop HS ('12) 53 1 Braddock HS ('13) 111 8 9 11 Immaculata-LaSalle HS 12 10 Miami Palmetto HS ('09) 8 10 11 12 Coral Gables Sr High ('10) 1 GEORGIA NORTHERN MOUNTAIN '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 Henry W Grady HS ('11) 97 2 2 + Westminster Schools-Atlanta ('07) 38 3 5 McEachern HS 20 11 Alpharetta HS ('12) 109 4 5 8 St Pius X Catholic HS ('00) 25 9 North Hall HS 15 6 7 10 Wheeler HS 36 8 13 Central Gwinnett HS ('10) 8 1 Pace Academy ('13) 30 9 10 15 Centennial HS ('09) 0 GEORGIA SOUTHERN PEACH '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Warner Robins HS ('01) 27 2 5 Marist School 58 3 4 Lee County HS ('00) 24 4 6 Woodward Academy ('99) 56 5 7 Fayette County HS ('09) 27 6 8 Carrollton HS ('11) 59 7 13 Grovetown HS 110 8 9 Westminster School - Augusta ('08) 36 9 14 Starrs Mill HS ('12) 72 10 10 McIntosh HS ('03) 0 11 12 Houston County HS ('10) 17 12 11 Jackson HS 3 13 1 Lincoln County HS ('13) 0 PACIFIC ISLANDS '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 Marianas HS 50 2 2 CheongShim Int'l Academy 21 3 5 Marianas Baptist Academy 9 4 1 Harvest Christian Academy ('13) 25 HAWAII '14 '13 Charter New 1 6 Kamehameha Schools ('10) 58 2 2 + St Andrew's Priory School 13 3 7 Parker School 41 4 3 University Laboratory School ('04) 27 5 4 Maryknoll HS 17 6 5 Kahuku High & Intermediate School ('06) 14 7 9 Iolani School ('09) 43

582 443 390 377 364 226 214 109 60 20 Total 581 316 295 236 213 194 181 167 156 154 122 116 60 14 Total 469 384 368 354 303 223 139 111 88 84 31 Total 370 330 255 230 222 202 196 99 30 20 Total 320 313 283 274 224 215 164 159 114 107 102 95 0 Total 359 349 252 25 Total 263 255 246 238 227 221 153


www.speechanddebate.org

LEGEND:

HAWAII (continued) 8 8 Leilehua HS ('90) 12 9 10 Sacred Hearts Academy ('07) 4 1 Punahou School ('13) 55 10 11 -- # Trinity Christian School 28 12 11 Damien Memorial School ('12) 17 13 12 President William McKinley HS ('11) 11 IDAHO GEM OF THE MOUNTAIN '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Capital HS ('94) 40 2 4 Mountain View HS 57 3 5 Eagle HS ('07) 71 3 Weiser HS 16 4 5 6 Skyview HS 42 6 -- # Borah HS 18 7 7 Bishop Kelly HS 45 8 8 Rocky Mountain HS 72 11 Renaissance Magnet HS 75 9 10 10 Wood River HS ('05) 60 11 9 Vallivue HS 20 12 12 Mountain Home HS ('11) 84 13 Meridian HS ('06) 18 13 14 15 Kuna HS ('09) 18 15 16 Columbia HS 38 14 Boise HS ('10) 5 16 17 17 Nampa Sr HS ('08) 28 18 Centennial HS ('12) 69 18 19 1 Timberline HS ('13) 15 IDAHO MOUNTAIN RIVER '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Skyline HS ('02) 92 3 Madison HS ('00) 95 2 3 4 Rigby HS 21 4 5 Century HS 73 5 12 Highland HS ('09) 256 6 Twin Falls HS ('92) 24 6 7 7 Jerome HS 28 13 Shelley HS 69 8 11 Pocatello HS ('99) 47 9 10 15 Bonneville HS ('08) 75 11 14 Kimberly HS 32 12 16 Hillcrest HS ('11) 68 17 American Falls HS 39 13 14 18 Sugar Salem HS ('10) 31 15 19 Idaho Falls HS ('12) 43 1 Blackfoot HS ('13) 91 16 GREATER ILLINOIS '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Granite City Sr HS ('07) 45 7 University HS ('11) 72 2 3 6 Normal Community West HS ('10) 43 10 Pekin Comm HS ('12) 51 4 5 9 Glenwood HS 25 1 Belleville West HS ('13) 83 6 ILLINI (IL) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Oak Park & River Forest HS ('05) 122 2 -- # Wheaton Warrenville South HS 105 3 3 Naperville Central HS 12 4 7 Hinsdale Central HS 134 5 5 Glenbard West HS ('07) 85 6 4 Thornwood HS ('98) 34 7 6 Amos Alonzo Stagg HS 19 8 7 Thornridge HS ('97) 43 9 9 Homewood-Flossmoor HS ('10) 129 10 8 Downers Grove North HS ('08) 92 12 Dwight D. Eisenhower HS 53 11 12 11 Reavis HS ('99) 26 13 13 Thornton Township HS ('09) 56 14 14 Wheaton North HS ('11) 106 15 15 Downers Grove South HS ('12) 142 16 16 Whitney Young Magnet HS 9 17 17 IL Math And Science Academy 21 18 21 Southland College Prep Charter HS 54 19 1 Carl Sandburg HS ('13) 117 20 20 CICS - Ralph Ellison HS 2 21 22 Leyden HS 20 NORTHERN ILLINOIS '14 '13 Charter New 3 + Glenbrook South HS ('08) 182 1 2 2 Adlai Stevenson HS 79 3 4 Fenwick HS 44 4 5 Evanston Twp HS ('83) 51

+ Leading Chapter Award

133 88 55 51 39 30 Total 666 589 588 567 516 437 426 415 365 364 335 327 237 186 182 177 168 135 15 Total 1,032 973 771 756 721 661 610 518 518 382 364 233 196 115 104 91 Total 329 207 188 120 108 83 Total 943 825 783 708 699 654 601 574 499 478 385 384 318 312 305 171 127 122 117 90 70 Total 1,046 952 875 867

# New or Restored Chapter

NORTHERN ILLINOIS (continued) 5 11 Schaumburg HS 175 6 9 New Trier Township HS ('07) 113 8 Wheeling HS ('95) 34 7 8 6 Barrington HS 9 9 7 Elk Grove HS ('88) 18 10 Lake Forest HS 0 10 11 12 Loyola Academy ('90) 7 12 16 Prospect HS ('96) 102 13 15 Maine East HS ('04) 59 14 Rolling Meadows HS ('99) 24 14 15 19 Buffalo Grove HS ('11) 127 16 18 William Fremd HS 79 17 20 Highland Park HS ('09) 66 18 21 Niles North HS ('92) 63 19 24 Niles West HS ('12) 121 20 25 Huntley HS 71 21 1 Glenbrook North HS ('13) 184 22 23 Lena-Winslow HS 31 23 26 Maine South HS ('10) 20 24 -- # Antioch Community HS 36 25 -- # Auburn Creative And Performing Arts HS 11 HOOSIER CROSSROADS (IN) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Kokomo HS ('04) 26 2 3 Jefferson HS ('92) 56 5 Cathedral HS 53 3 4 5 Maconaquah HS ('06) 30 4 Oak Hill HS ('99) 15 5 6 7 North Central HS ('09) 34 7 8 Carmel HS ('07) 6 8 9 Perry Meridian HS ('03) 10 15 Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School ('11) 62 9 10 11 Floyd Central HS 21 11 12 Central HS - Evansville ('05) 10 14 Hamilton Heights HS ('08) 21 12 13 16 New Castle HS ('10) 17 14 17 Warren Central HS ('12) 0 15 1 Lawrence North HS ('13) 56 HOOSIER HEARTLAND (IN) '14 '13 Charter New 1 5 + West Lafayette HS ('08) 86 2 2 Park Tudor School 10 3 3 Columbus East HS 39 4 Mater Dei HS ('97) 0 4 5 8 Noblesville HS 72 6 6 Signature School 22 7 7 Burris Laboratory School 22 10 Ben Davis HS ('10) 52 8 9 Southport HS ('07) 6 9 10 13 Fishers HS ('12) 111 11 11 McCutcheon HS ('04) 23 12 15 Logansport HS ('11) 36 # Westfield HS 22 13 14 1 Connersville Sr HS ('13) 10 NORTHEAST INDIANA New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Northrop HS ('05) 25 2 3 Fort Wayne North Side HS ('96) 0 3 4 Canterbury HS ('07) 39 4 6 Carroll HS ('09) 88 5 5 Homestead HS ('02) 9 6 7 Columbia City HS ('06) 11 7 1 Chesterton HS ('13) 187 8 8 Howe Military Academy ('91) 0 9 9 South Side HS ('11) 42 10 10 Bishop Dwenger HS 22 11 Concord HS ('12) 41 11 NORTHWEST INDIANA '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 Plymouth HS ('10) 99 2 2 + Elkhart Central HS ('93) 4 3 5 The Culver Academies ('08) 85 4 8 Munster HS ('12) 226 5 7 Penn HS ('09) 113 6 6 Westview HS 10 7 9 Elkhart Memorial HS ('02) 11 8 10 La Porte HS ('11) 48 9 1 Valparaiso HS ('13) 135 10 11 Bethany Christian HS 33 11 -- # Wirt-Emerson Vis Perf Arts 12

852 849 800 787 786 726 577 480 466 447 314 311 250 238 236 185 184 148 105 101 66

Total 634 545 303 280 279 276 214 212 150 148 131 127 102 84 56

Total 504 498 475 420 360 358 327 285 263 248 246 98 42 10

Total 472 375 312 301 256 191 187 180 174 121 111

Total 628 596 522 459 355 310 167 159 135 125 37

* Lost or Suspended Charter

EAST IOWA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Burlington Community HS ('98) 14 -- # Davenport-Assumption HS 35 2 3 4 Bettendorf HS ('05) 40 4 3 Clarke Community HS 13 5 5 Iowa City HS ('02) 15 6 6 Muscatine HS ('04) 27 7 West HS - Iowa City ('11) 48 7 8 8 Marshalltown HS ('09) 11 9 10 Waterloo East HS ('10) 26 10 9 Grinnell HS 19 11 11 West HS - Davenport ('07) 12 12 Columbus Community HS 19 12 13 13 Washington HS - Cedar Rapids ('12) 13 14 1 Indianola HS ('13) 12 WEST IOWA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Lincoln HS ('97) 78 2 4 East HS - Des Moines ('86) 29 5 Ames HS 52 3 4 3 Ankeny HS ('00) 6 6 Bishop Heelan HS ('02) 50 5 6 7 North HS ('90) 10 7 8 Okoboji Community School ('04) 28 8 9 West Des Moines Valley HS ('11) 133 12 Des Moines Roosevelt HS ('12) 104 9 1 Dowling Catholic HS ('13) 147 10 11 10 CAM HS ('06) 16 12 11 Atlantic HS ('08) 12 -- # Johnston HS 45 13 EAST KANSAS New '14 '13 Charter 1 13 Lansing Sr HS ('12) 176 2 2 + Shawnee Mission West HS ('03) 87 3 3 Shawnee Mission East HS ('09) 161 4 4 Sumner Academy ('05) 132 5 Shawnee Mission Northwest HS ('97) 5 67 6 6 Bishop Miege HS ('05) 81 7 Lawrence Free State HS ('08) 148 7 8 8 Paola HS 10 12 Lawrence HS ('11) 130 9 10 11 Olathe South HS ('10) 99 11 10 Shawnee Mission South HS ('07) 67 9 Shawnee Mission North HS ('06) 31 12 13 15 Piper HS 85 14 De Soto HS 0 14 15 1 Olathe Northwest HS ('13) 191 KANSAS FLINT-HILLS New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Junction City HS ('96) 52 2 3 Topeka HS ('04) 97 3 6 Emporia HS ('08) 110 7 Manhattan HS ('09) 121 4 8 Seaman HS ('06) 96 5 6 5 Silver Lake HS ('02) 10 7 9 Topeka West HS ('05) 41 8 10 Shawnee Heights HS ('12) 97 9 1 Washburn Rural HS ('13) 159 10 11 Hayden HS ('11) 56 11 12 Baldwin HS ('10) 11 SOUTH KANSAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Field Kindley Memorial HS ('03) 55 2 3 Augusta HS 20 3 4 Southeast HS - Cherokee 36 4 8 Derby HS ('08) 38 5 7 Girard HS 30 6 5 St Mary's Colgan HS ('07) 17 7 6 Winfield HS ('04) 22 8 9 Caney Valley HS ('10) 46 9 11 Fort Scott HS ('12) 63 10 10 Independence HS ('09) 29 11 -- # Cherryvale Middle HS 14 12 12 Parsons HS ('11) 35 13 1 Pittsburg HS ('13) 88 SUNFLOWER (KS) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + El Dorado HS ('01) 96 2 3 Maize HS ('04) 65 3 4 Bishop Carroll Catholic HS 9 4 5 Andover Central HS 77 5 8 Wichita East HS ('08) 85

Total 425 387 347 346 233 207 205 118 116 116 100 47 33 12 Total 700 562 558 550 533 468 415 339 192 147 147 103 86 Total 1,162 1,015 920 823 714 706 591 428 414 404 375 351 220 206 191 Total 950 918 725 680 631 631 399 198 159 137 52 Total 695 570 487 270 270 266 264 180 155 152 142 95 88 Total 960 904 668 598 581

Rostrum | FALL 2014 115


2013-14 Charter Chapter Report

SUNFLOWER (KS) (continued) 6 7 Southeast HS - Wichita ('06) 49 6 Goddard HS ('07) 36 7 8 9 Wichita Heights HS ('00) 39 9 10 Trinity Academy 40 11 Andover HS ('05) 53 10 11 13 Valley Center HS ('12) 199 12 Mulvane HS 57 12 13 15 Maize South HS 86 14 14 Wichita Collegiate Upper School 40 17 Kapaun Mount Carmel HS ('11) 95 15 16 Wichita Northwest HS ('09) 51 16 17 19 Eisenhower HS 62 18 Bluestem HS 4 18 19 20 The Independent School 15 20 21 Sunrise Christian Academy 38 21 1 Campus HS ('13) 81 22 Remington HS ('10) 18 22 THREE TRAILS (KS) '14 '13 Charter New 2 Blue Valley North HS ('11) 281 1 2 3 + Olathe East HS ('04) 44 3 4 Spring Hill HS 33 5 Blue Valley West HS ('09) 155 4 5 6 St Thomas Aquinas HS ('07) 55 6 7 Blue Valley Southwest HS 73 7 9 St James Academy 45 8 Blue Valley Northwest HS ('10) 21 8 9 11 Olathe North HS ('12) 103 1 Blue Valley HS ('13) 167 10 11 10 Bishop Ward HS 34 WEST KANSAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + McPherson HS ('01) 56 3 Hutchinson HS ('03) 111 2 3 4 Salina High Central ('08) 142 5 Newton HS ('06) 72 4 6 Moundridge HS ('98) 14 5 7 Sacred Heart Jr/Sr HS 21 6 7 8 Hays HS ('02) 25 8 9 Liberal HS 12 13 Garden City HS ('11) 128 9 10 10 Great Bend HS ('04) 32 11 11 Salina South HS ('09) 63 12 12 Buhler HS ('10) 37 14 Haven HS ('07) 4 13 15 Lyons HS ('12) 56 14 15 -- # Halstead HS 21 16 1 Pratt HS ('13) 71 KENTUCKY '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Boone County HS ('04) 38 3 Calloway County HS ('01) 24 2 3 4 Assumption HS 51 4 5 Beechwood HS 19 5 6 Larry A Ryle HS 36 7 Kentucky Country Day 29 6 8 DuPont Manual HS 48 7 8 11 Henry Clay HS ('93) 72 9 9 Harrison County HS ('94) 15 10 10 Paul Laurence Dunbar HS 7 11 13 Paducah Tilghman HS ('08) 44 12 12 George Rogers Clark HS ('67) 11 13 14 Danville HS ('11) 70 14 15 Murray HS ('00) 43 15 1 Rowan County Sr HS ('13) 89 16 17 Hazard HS 8 17 19 Larue County HS ('12) 37 18 18 Lafayette HS ('09) 0 19 -- # Highlands Latin School 8 LOUISIANA New '14 '13 Charter 1 -- + # Cecilia HS 24 2 3 Isidore Newman School ('93) 41 3 5 Holy Cross School 51 4 2 C E Byrd HS ('76) 19 5 4 Abbeville HS 19 6 6 Pineville HS ('91) 20 7 8 Jesuit New Orleans HS ('97) 25 8 12 St Thomas More HS ('09) 40 9 13 Ruston HS ('08) 23 10 10 Airline HS 16 11 15 John Paul The Great Academy 54 12 9 Bolton HS ('04) 1

116

Rostrum | FALL 2014

560 556 514 512 508 475 474 322 303 244 236 173 147 121 119 81 51 Total 959 659 647 640 498 363 223 219 178 167 59 Total 1,002 950 887 695 530 525 420 391 348 342 312 262 110 90 82 71 Total 483 422 417 352 341 314 312 300 273 255 230 225 212 176 89 78 74 52 30 Total 564 501 493 486 464 435 289 209 190 188 184 182

LOUISIANA (continued) 13 10 Caddo Magnet HS ('02) 1 14 14 Acadiana HS ('07) 14 15 16 Teurlings Catholic HS ('10) 21 18 Comeaux HS ('12) 83 16 17 17 Saint Augustine HS ('11) 7 18 -- # St Frederick HS 29 19 19 Christ Episcopal School 12 1 Lafayette HS ('13) 31 20 MAINE New '14 '13 Charter 1 3 + Falmouth HS 68 2 4 Scarborough HS ('98) 19 5 Brunswick HS ('02) 25 3 4 6 Lincoln Academy 22 9 Maranacook Community School ('01) 14 5 6 7 Edward Little HS ('05) 5 7 8 Dirigo HS 0 11 Cape Elizabeth HS ('12) 77 8 9 10 Orono HS ('07) 7 10 1 Bangor HS ('13) 70 11 12 Cheverus HS ('10) 7 13 Poland Regional HS ('11) 10 12 13 14 Deering HS ('09) 10 CHESAPEAKE (MD) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Walter Johnson HS ('09) 85 -- # Richard Montgomery HS 18 2 3 2 Catonsville HS ('00) 6 4 4 Charles E Smith Jewish Day Sch 35 5 -- # Wilde Lake HS 23 6 Westminster HS 0 6 -- # Thomas S Wootton HS ('92) 23 7 8 7 Walt Whitman HS ('11) 39 9 8 Notre Dame Prep School 20 9 Loyola-Blakefield HS ('12) 42 10 11 1 Baltimore City College HS ('13) 66 10 Reservoir HS 14 12 13 11 Winston Churchill HS ('10) 3 MICHIGAN '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Dexter HS ('08) 25 2 Lenawee Christian School 8 2 4 Portage Northern HS ('11) 75 3 4 6 Grand Rapids Christian ('12) 51 5 5 Plymouth Educational Center Prep HS 16 6 7 Detroit Loyola HS 19 9 Portage Central HS ('10) 23 7 8 8 North Branch HS 0 9 1 Holland HS ('13) 48 10 Grand Rapids City HS ('09) 13 10 CENTRAL MINNESOTA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Henry Sibley HS ('73) 12 3 South HS - Minneapolis 23 2 3 4 Blaine HS 126 8 Apple Valley HS ('08) 158 4 5 7 Roseville Area HS ('05) 91 6 6 Stillwater Area HS ('90) 61 7 9 St Paul Academy & Summit School ('04) 130 8 11 Chanhassen HS 139 9 5 Highland Park Senior HS 19 10 10 Central HS - Minneapolis 23 11 15 Prior Lake-Savage School-ISD719 95 12 -- # Minnetonka HS 63 13 13 Como Park HS 8 14 16 Cottage Grove Park HS ('06) 74 15 14 Anoka HS ('95) 24 16 17 South St Paul HS ('03) 39 17 23 Eastview HS ('12) 176 18 18 St Anthony Village HS ('82) 21 19 20 Southwest HS 34 20 21 Shakopee Sr HS 52 21 19 Harding HS 15 22 26 East Ridge HS 142 23 22 Orono HS 46 24 24 Centennial HS ('11) 58 25 25 Washburn HS ('79) 19 26 1 Forest Lake Sr HS ('13) 91 NORTHERN LIGHTS (MN) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Staples Motley HS 22 2 3 Brainerd HS ('95) 49

173 161 132 127 53 51 47 31 Total 303 253 223 214 178 176 170 136 83 70 63 62 50 Total 298 284 276 220 179 147 137 124 104 93 66 64 16 Total 208 193 167 114 104 81 75 55 48 43 Total 903 902 901 773 746 739 735 701 697 613 479 438 430 425 421 384 368 360 316 312 302 285 250 213 169 91 Total 648 629

NORTHERN LIGHTS (MN) (continued) 3 7 Moorhead HS ('09) 119 5 Champlin Park HS 14 4 5 6 Bemidji HS 33 6 8 Walker HS ('05) 29 7 9 Grand Rapids HS ('02) 19 11 Andover HS 32 8 9 10 Buffalo HS 6 10 15 Maple Grove Senior HS 85 12 St Francis HS ('10) 32 11 12 13 East Grand Forks Sr HS 32 13 16 Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa HS 39 14 St Cloud Tech HS ('07) 13 14 17 Hawley Public Schools 23 15 16 18 Denfeld HS ('08) 24 17 20 Eagle Valley HS 10 18 19 Cass Lake Bena HS 6 -- # Rocori HS 16 19 20 22 St Michael Albertville HS ('12) 61 21 21 Duluth East HS ('11) 22 22 -- # Kimball Area HS 42 1 Dilworth Glyndon Felton HS ('13) 62 23 -- # New York Mills HS 23 24 25 -- # Cromwell-Wright HS 5 SOUTHERN MINNESOTA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Edina HS ('01) 115 3 The Blake School ('87) 51 2 3 4 Benilde-St Margaret's School ('02) 50 4 5 Mankato West HS ('92) 4 7 Lakeville North HS ('08) 124 5 6 6 Worthington Sr HS ('78) 31 12 Eagan HS ('11) 230 7 8 10 Chaska HS ('97) 95 8 Robbinsdale Cooper HS 32 9 10 9 Mankato East HS ('93) 25 11 11 Lakeville South HS 26 15 Eden Prairie HS ('09) 101 12 13 Dassel Cokato HS ('99) 49 13 14 14 River Valley HS 26 16 Rosemount Sr HS ('06) 76 15 16 18 Bloomington Jefferson HS ('07) 76 17 Fairmont HS 31 17 18 19 Robbinsdale Armstrong HS 49 20 Hopkins HS ('04) 14 19 20 22 Marshall HS ('12) 88 21 Maple River HS 25 21 22 1 Wayzata HS ('13) 76 23 Buffalo Lake-Hector-Stewart HS 7 23 MAGNOLIA (MS) New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Brookhaven HS ('03) 41 2 3 Petal HS ('06) 21 3 4 Ridgeland HS 10 4 7 Murrah HS 51 6 Laurel Christian School 42 5 8 Oak Grove HS ('10) 68 6 7 5 Long Beach HS 0 9 Pascagoula HS 39 8 9 11 Madison Central HS 64 10 10 Oxford HS 20 11 13 Sacred Heart Catholic School 38 12 12 Presbyterian Christian School 16 13 17 St Andrew's Episcopal School ('12) 75 14 15 St Joseph Catholic School ('09) 20 15 14 Tupelo HS 0 16 -- # Mississippi School/Mathematics & Science 2 17 16 St Stanislaus HS 1 18 1 Hattiesburg HS ('13) 64 19 -- # Olive Branch HS 58 20 18 Jackson Prep School ('11) 19 CARVER-TRUMAN (MO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Seneca HS 36 2 3 Diamond HS 26 3 4 Republic HS ('96) 95 4 5 Cassville HS ('00) 27 5 6 Nevada HS ('01) 24 6 7 Joplin HS ('08) 65 7 10 Monett HS ('09) 88 8 9 Webb City HS ('06) 38 9 8 Purdy HS 30 10 -- # Lamar HS ('92) 5 11 11 El Dorado Springs HS 35 12 13 McDonald County HS ('04) 32

582 527 514 405 378 309 304 286 285 260 231 227 195 193 151 150 138 123 119 85 62 62 49 Total 1,227 1,087 883 793 792 790 733 660 660 615 545 528 516 483 471 420 398 337 272 179 131 76 73 Total 409 337 305 303 303 294 287 257 239 219 197 184 139 139 121 112 88 64 59 55 Total 773 720 714 569 550 506 417 387 380 373 312 213


www.speechanddebate.org

LEGEND:

CARVER-TRUMAN (MO) (continued) 13 14 Carl Junction HS ('10) 39 12 Clever HS 1 14 15 -- # Reeds Spring HS ('03) 31 16 17 Carthage HS ('12) 81 17 15 East Newton HS 22 18 16 Exeter R-6 HS 13 1 Neosho HS ('13) 126 19 20 18 Aurora HS ('11) 26 EASTERN MISSOURI '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Parkway Central HS ('94) 58 2 Marquette HS ('01) 54 2 3 4 Rock Bridge HS 71 4 5 Clayton HS ('96) 76 5 6 Mexico HS 30 6 7 Jefferson City HS ('05) 61 7 8 Parkway West HS ('06) 76 9 Cape Girardeau Central HS ('80) 8 8 9 11 Columbia-Hickman HS ('99) 17 12 Brentwood HS 42 10 11 14 Howell North HS ('04) 51 12 13 Oakville Sr HS ('08) 20 -- # De Smet Jesuit HS 7 13 14 16 Parkway South HS ('11) 46 17 Ladue Horton Watkins HS ('12) 72 15 16 15 St Charles West HS 1 17 -- # Metro Academic & Classical HS 38 18 -- # Hallsville HS 32 19 1 Pattonville HS ('13) 70 HEART OF AMERICA (MO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Maryville R-II HS 31 3 Savannah R3 HS ('02) 78 2 3 5 Independence Truman HS ('07) 112 4 8 Liberty Sr HS ('10) 170 5 4 Smith-Cotton HS ('76) 20 6 6 Central HS - St Joseph ('00) 44 7 7 Platte County HS 16 8 11 Independence Chrisman HS ('04) 80 9 9 KC Oak Park HS ('03) 46 10 Saint Pius X HS 25 10 11 12 Park Hill South HS ('08) 110 12 13 Park Hill HS ('06) 92 13 16 Liberty North HS 169 14 14 Salisbury R-4 HS 11 15 15 Excelsior Springs HS 10 16 17 Pleasant Hill HS 25 17 -- # Van Horn HS 17 18 18 Fort Osage HS ('09) 54 19 19 Henry County R-1 HS 8 20 Kearney HS 12 20 21 21 Staley HS 56 22 22 Smithville R-II School District 33 23 -- # Lathrop R-2 HS 7 24 23 North Kansas City HS ('11) 31 25 1 Marshall HS ('13) 66 26 24 Lafayette Co C-1 HS 3 27 25 Winnetonka HS ('12) 21 OZARK (MO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Willard HS 122 2 3 West Plains HS ('93) 38 3 4 Hillcrest HS ('98) 15 4 5 Waynesville HS ('92) 13 5 6 Bolivar R 1 HS ('95) 51 6 14 Central HS - Springfield ('11) 229 7 7 Branson HS 32 8 -- # Lebanon HS 45 9 9 Marshfield HS 64 10 8 Houston HS 0 11 10 Parkview HS ('09) 69 12 11 Ozark HS ('01) 39 13 12 Greenwood Laboratory School 25 14 13 Logan Rogersville HS 25 15 16 Glendale HS ('07) 122 16 15 Marion C Early R5 HS 17 17 19 Kickapoo HS ('12) 142 18 17 Buffalo HS ('03) 28 19 18 Camdenton HS ('10) 41 20 20 Gloria Deo Academy 62 21 1 Nixa HS ('13) 108 22 -- # John F Hodge HS ('09) 6

+ Leading Chapter Award

202 190 183 175 140 128 126 66

Total 792 791 772 752 671 632 619 400 335 295 222 192 173 161 157 125 121 77 70

Total 1,039 956 919 895 880 834 794 764 753 712 703 636 608 510 504 443 352 291 242 242 223 189 131 86 66 56 48

Total 971 807 761 751 718 683 667 664 658 631 617 564 519 480 354 336 251 225 213 155 108 58

# New or Restored Chapter

SHOW ME (MO) '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 + Blue Springs South HS ('07) 158 2 2 The Pembroke Hill School 88 3 Harrisonville HS 84 3 4 9 Blue Springs HS ('08) 168 5 7 Raytown South HS ('06) 97 6 10 Lee's Summit West HS 142 5 Notre Dame De Sion HS 27 7 8 8 Raytown HS ('03) 57 9 6 The Barstow School 26 10 11 Lee's Summit HS ('02) 63 12 Ruskin HS ('91) 4 11 12 13 Raymore-Peculiar HS ('04) 74 15 Rockhurst HS ('10) 76 13 14 14 Lincoln College Prep 32 16 Grandview Sr HS ('09) 49 15 16 17 Belton HS ('11) 70 17 18 Lee's Summit North HS ('12) 134 19 Summit Christian Academy 13 18 1 Warrensburg HS ('13) 44 19 MONTANA New '14 '13 Charter 2 + Hamilton HS 63 1 2 3 Capital HS 47 3 4 Butte HS ('98) 47 4 7 Glacier HS 121 8 Flathead HS ('07) 141 5 6 5 Big Sky HS 41 6 Great Falls Russell HS ('00) 31 7 8 9 Sentinel HS ('04) 73 9 10 Billings West HS ('03) 70 11 Columbia Falls HS 57 10 11 13 Great Falls HS ('05) 64 12 Havre HS ('01) 21 12 13 14 Skyview HS ('09) 78 14 16 Corvallis HS ('10) 58 15 Billings Sr HS ('08) 20 15 16 17 Stevensville HS 65 18 Hellgate HS ('11) 73 17 18 -- # Whitefish HS 4 19 1 Bozeman HS ('13) 136 19 Helena HS ('12) 43 20 NEBRASKA New '14 '13 Charter 1 3 Millard North HS ('10) 247 2 + Marian HS ('99) 68 2 4 Raymond Central HS ('02) 46 3 4 5 Fremont HS ('06) 51 5 8 Norfolk HS ('07) 94 6 11 Millard West HS ('11) 145 10 David City HS 39 7 8 9 Grand Island Senior HS ('04) 12 11 Kearney Sr HS ('09) 97 9 10 1 Lincoln Southwest HS ('13) 216 13 Northwest HS 26 11 12 -- # Arapahoe HS 48 NEBRASKA SOUTH '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Lincoln Southeast HS ('01) 73 2 3 Bellevue West HS ('03) 48 3 4 Pius X HS 37 4 6 Ralston HS ('96) 42 5 5 Millard South HS ('05) 40 6 7 Lincoln North Star HS 42 7 8 Crete HS 43 8 9 Lincoln HS ('95) 43 9 10 Lincoln Northeast HS ('75) 12 10 11 Westside HS ('06) 16 11 13 Lincoln East HS ('10) 69 12 Bellevue East HS ('07) 27 12 13 14 Norris Public Schools 12 14 15 Creighton Preparatory School ('08) 42 15 16 Papillion-La Vista South HS 16 16 17 Papillion-La Vista HS ('11) 13 17 19 Mount Michael Benedictine HS ('12) 26 18 1 Hastings Senior HS ('13) 35 19 18 Omaha Mercy HS ('09) 0 GOLDEN DESERT (NV) '14 '13 Charter New 2 + The Meadows School ('05) 65 1 2 3 Foothill HS ('06) 47 3 4 Spring Valley HS 84 4 5 Moapa Valley HS 47

Total 1,000 993 984 961 920 877 864 863 860 712 610 585 372 365 292 288 247 106 44 Total 901 882 862 837 822 819 770 727 710 465 376 352 338 274 238 223 212 138 136 91 Total 834 685 538 470 429 369 369 345 321 216 118 98 Total 673 588 562 520 518 498 494 485 345 329 325 297 233 196 166 112 53 35 34 Total 587 545 529 473

* Lost or Suspended Charter

GOLDEN DESERT (NV) (continued) 5 7 Silverado HS ('04) 68 6 6 Dixie HS 30 7 10 Canyon Springs HS 56 8 11 Coronado HS ('10) 66 9 Virgin Valley HS 48 9 10 8 Arbor View HS 17 11 14 Palo Verde HS ('12) 172 12 12 Bishop Gorman HS ('02) 25 13 13 Clark HS ('99) 43 15 Advanced Technologies Acad ('09) 50 14 15 1 Green Valley HS ('13) 137 16 -- # Rancho HS 53 17 16 Desert Hills HS 14 18 17 Valley HS ('11) 12 SAGEBRUSH (NV) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Reno HS ('08) 70 2 3 Elko HS ('05) 57 4 Carson HS ('97) 31 3 4 5 Douglas HS ('04) 23 5 6 Carson Valley Middle School ('06) 17 6 9 Sage Ridge School 40 8 Spanish Springs HS 14 7 8 10 Damonte Ranch HS 8 13 Spring Creek HS ('11) 54 9 12 Bishop Manogue Catholic HS ('10) 18 10 11 15 Pau Wa Lu Middle School ('12) 32 -- # Northern Nevada Home Schools 19 12 13 1 Galena HS ('13) 7 NEW ENGLAND (MA & NH) New '14 '13 Charter 1 3 + Newton South HS ('07) 146 2 Milton Academy ('03) 85 2 3 4 Shrewsbury HS ('08) 95 4 5 Lincoln-Sudbury Regional HS 47 7 Natick HS ('81) 26 5 6 Bancroft School 20 6 7 9 Catholic Memorial School ('10) 56 12 Needham HS ('11) 96 8 8 Bishop Guertin HS ('04) 14 9 10 11 Waring School 32 11 13 Revere HS 19 12 14 Sacred Heart HS ('09) 28 16 Acton-Boxborough Regional HS ('12) 74 13 14 15 Chelmsford HS 20 15 1 Manchester Essex Regional HS ('13) 53 NEW JERSEY '14 '13 Charter New 2 Ridge HS ('10) 172 1 2 7 + Millburn HS ('08) 132 4 Elizabeth HS ('98) 51 3 4 3 Matawan Regional HS ('88) 28 6 Randolph HS ('05) 54 5 6 5 Ridgewood HS 25 7 9 Summit HS 124 8 Montville HS ('09) 115 8 9 10 Princeton HS 108 10 11 Science HS ('06) 19 11 12 University HS 2 12 13 Newark Central HS 22 13 -- # Livingston HS 53 14 -- # Phillipsburg HS 42 15 20 Freehold Township HS ('12) 100 16 19 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional HS ('11) 66 17 17 Timothy Christian School 10 18 18 Hanover Park HS ('07) 16 19 -- # Montclair Kimberley Academy 13 20 1 Delbarton School ('13) 96 21 -- # The Pingry School 20 NEW MEXICO '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Los Alamos HS ('07) 88 2 1 East Mountain HS 60 3 4 Rio Grande HS ('05) 41 4 5 Taos HS ('06) 24 5 6 La Cueva HS ('11) 76 6 7 Eldorado HS ('09) 36 7 9 Santa Fe Preparatory School 45 8 2 Albuquerque Academy ('13) 67 9 -- # Desert Academy 40 10 -- # Zuni HS 10 11 -- # V Sue Cleveland HS 23 12 10 St Pius X HS ('12) 11

389 374 347 345 343 336 332 287 252 178 137 131 107 69 Total 418 379 351 262 219 162 160 126 125 109 63 35 7 Total 750 704 570 480 308 306 267 251 246 196 146 137 136 94 53 Total 767 635 600 590 565 562 546 540 464 322 294 278 248 235 179 167 167 155 113 96 72 Total 466 453 294 268 256 186 134 67 67 63 62 27

Rostrum | FALL 2014 117


2013-14 Charter Chapter Report

IROQUOIS (NY) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Mount Mercy Academy ('01) 16 5 Sayre Area HS ('05) 29 2 3 2 Oneonta HS 2 4 4 Unatego Central School 10 5 -- # Delaware Academy 23 -- # Walton Central HS 9 6 7 -- # McQuaid Jesuit HS 45 7 Woodstock Union HS 11 8 9 8 R L Thomas HS ('08) 0 10 Canisius HS ('11) 16 10 11 1 Towanda Jr-Sr HS ('13) 37 12 11 Franklin Central School ('12) 9 NEW YORK CITY '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Syosset HS ('02) 142 3 Chaminade HS ('05) 126 2 3 11 The Bronx High School Of Science ('12) 394 4 5 Roslyn HS ('94) 44 5 6 Loyola School 24 7 Fordham Preparatory School ('58) 18 6 7 8 The Mary Louis Academy ('00) 22 9 Monsignor Farrell HS 48 8 12 Brooklyn Technical HS 57 9 10 10 Berkeley Carroll School 29 11 -- # Poly Prep Country Day School 67 12 14 Bronx School For Law Govt & Justice 2 15 Collegiate School 49 13 1 Regis HS ('13) 277 14 15 17 Stuyvesant HS ('11) 99 16 18 Bronx Preparatory Charter School 56 16 Half Hollow Hills HS East ('06) 2 17 18 19 Cathedral Prep Seminary ('09) 37 21 Notre Dame Academy 48 19 20 20 Hunter College HS ('10) 27 21 22 UA School For Law & Justice 4 -- # The Dalton School 19 22 23 -- # Maspeth HS 31 NEW YORK STATE '14 '13 Charter New 1 5 Scarsdale HS ('11) 145 2 3 + Iona Preparatory ('06) 38 7 Harrison HS 43 3 4 6 Monticello Central HS ('10) 25 5 -- # Academy Of The Holy Names ('04) 7 -- # Lakeland HS ('08) 83 6 7 8 Convent Of The Sacred Heart 16 2 Newburgh Free Academy ('13) 34 8 9 10 Shenendehowa HS ('12) 0 CAROLINA WEST (NC) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Asheville HS ('07) 94 2 2 Bishop McGuinness HS ('08) 49 3 6 Myers Park HS ('10) 92 4 Chase HS ('03) 24 4 5 Marvin Ridge HS 31 5 6 7 Northwest Guilford HS ('09) 78 7 8 Providence HS ('06) 60 8 11 Calvary Baptist Day School 40 9 10 Phillip O Berry Academy Of Technology 11 10 13 North Mecklenburg HS ('11) 47 11 1 Ardrey Kell HS ('13) 117 12 12 The Early College At Guilford 1 13 # Charlotte Catholic HS 49 14 15 Charlotte Latin School ('12) 86 15 14 School Of Inquiry & Life Sciences At Asheville (SI) 0 16 # University Christian HS 1 TARHEEL EAST (NC) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Pinecrest HS ('09) 100 2 4 Massey Hill Classical HS 48 3 2 Seventy First HS ('94) 13 4 5 South View HS ('00) 11 5 6 East Chapel Hill HS ('08) 41 7 NC School Of Science & Math 11 6 7 8 Terry Sanford HS ('06) 26 8 9 Durham Academy ('11) 60 9 13 East Carteret HS ('10) 55 10 11 HARC 31 11 14 Cary HS 44 12 11 E E Smith HS ('05) 7 13 1 Cary Academy ('13) 118 14 15 William G Enloe HS ('04) 24

118

Rostrum | FALL 2014

Total 194 193 182 176 127 109 94 82 59 52 37 20 Total 1,265 1,013 798 762 717 648 537 490 449 443 345 342 302 277 260 210 175 171 160 144 102 94 40 Total 332 305 166 154 141 111 97 34 16 Total 409 367 330 321 316 284 214 159 138 124 117 116 103 101 42 31 Total 495 419 418 375 341 306 264 234 190 189 159 159 118 112

TARHEEL EAST (NC) (continued) 15 16 SandHoke Early College 39 16 17 Jack Britt HS ('12) 46 -- # Cumberland International Early College HS 48 17 -- # Grays Creek HS 20 18 19 -- # Cape Fear Academy 12 NORTH DAKOTA ROUGHRIDER '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Central Cass HS 8 2 3 Devils Lake HS 42 4 Red River HS ('95) 23 3 4 5 Grand Forks Central HS ('07) 66 5 7 Fargo Shanley HS ('08) 78 6 9 Valley City HS ('05) 32 7 8 Washburn HS ('03) 15 8 10 Enderlin HS 39 12 West Fargo HS ('10) 78 9 10 11 Fargo North HS ('06) 41 11 13 Fargo South HS ('09) 56 12 14 North Sargent Public School 25 13 15 Oak Grove Lutheran HS 12 18 Fargo Davies HS 50 14 15 16 Milnor Public School 15 16 17 Mott-Regent HS 17 17 20 Richardton-Taylor HS ('11) 46 18 21 Mandan HS ('12) 47 19 19 Kindred Public School District 3 -- # LaMoure HS 24 20 21 1 Richland HS ('13) 7 EASTERN OHIO '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + GlenOak HS ('02) 74 2 4 Wooster HS ('05) 98 3 5 Jackson HS ('07) 113 3 Canton McKinley HS ('92) 24 4 5 6 Wadsworth City School ('01) 75 7 Revere HS ('69) 0 6 7 8 Norton HS ('91) 57 8 9 Cuyahoga Valley Christian Acad 14 9 11 Highland HS 84 10 10 Carrollton HS ('04) 31 13 Hoover HS ('10) 143 11 12 12 Medina Senior HS 56 13 16 Stow-Munroe Falls HS ('11) 118 14 Louisville Senior HS ('09) 38 14 15 15 Copley HS ('06) 36 16 1 Perry HS ('13) 168 17 -- # Tuscarwaras Valley HS 17 18 17 Central Catholic HS ('12) 20 NORTH COAST (OH) '14 '13 Charter New 3 + Gilmour Academy ('07) 129 1 2 6 Solon HS ('08) 109 2 Beachwood HS 43 3 4 4 Laurel School 39 5 7 Chagrin Falls HS 59 5 Brecksville Broadview Hts HS 22 6 7 8 Hathaway Brown School 75 9 Magnificat HS ('01) 21 8 9 10 Vermilion HS ('05) 35 10 13 Hawken School ('09) 93 11 11 Berea-Midpark HS ('84) 28 12 12 Mentor HS 16 13 15 Saint Ignatius HS ('06) 24 14 16 Kenston HS 22 15 17 Rocky River HS ('11) 18 16 19 Edison HS ('12) 50 17 18 Olmsted Falls HS ('10) 16 18 1 University School ('13) 54 19 -- # Lutheran HS West 27 NORTHERN OHIO '14 '13 Charter New 2 + Poland Seminary HS ('04) 58 1 2 3 Cardinal Mooney HS ('06) 77 3 4 Niles McKinley HS ('05) 41 4 5 Liberty HS 35 5 6 Columbiana HS 54 6 7 Austintown Fitch HS ('10) 102 7 13 Canfield HS ('12) 170 8 8 Boardman HS ('09) 31 9 10 South Range HS 36 10 11 Howland HS ('11) 53 11 12 John F Kennedy HS ('08) 39 14 Champion HS 40 12 13 1 Ursuline HS ('13) 27

109 85 74 68 40 Total 488 443 411 403 347 289 274 273 267 259 243 190 152 136 131 125 124 92 87 52 7 Total 883 854 851 828 806 644 626 572 517 499 420 355 323 298 290 168 156 56 Total 619 555 543 517 489 478 459 400 349 332 321 302 221 168 107 96 79 54 40 Total 653 652 555 498 350 346 280 226 213 203 152 92 27

WESTERN OHIO '14 '13 Charter New 2 + Sylvania Southview HS ('98) 59 1 2 3 Gahanna-Lincoln HS ('03) 53 3 4 Notre Dame Academy ('04) 65 4 5 Upper Arlington HS ('88) 37 5 7 Centerville HS ('08) 79 8 Middletown HS ('94) 62 6 7 6 Whitmer HS ('95) 37 8 10 Beavercreek HS ('06) 53 9 9 Perrysburg HS ('05) 41 10 11 Wauseon HS ('07) 34 12 Bexley HS 1 11 12 13 Mount Vernon HS 39 13 16 Oakwood HS ('11) 67 14 14 Sylvania Northview HS ('10) 24 15 15 Princeton HS ('09) 14 1 Mason HS ('13) 94 16 17 17 Dublin Jerome HS 13 18 18 Maumee HS ('12) 31 EAST OKLAHOMA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Union HS 76 2 3 Tulsa Washington HS ('04) 85 4 Charles Page HS ('95) 21 3 4 7 Jenks HS ('08) 69 5 5 Owasso HS 19 6 Mannford HS 11 6 -- # Muskogee HS ('81) 19 7 8 9 Wilburton HS 14 10 Oologah HS ('99) 24 9 10 11 Broken Arrow HS ('07) 44 15 Bixby HS ('11) 116 11 12 12 Bartlesville HS ('05) 61 13 16 Skiatook HS 23 14 Bristow HS ('88) 6 14 20 Haskell HS 43 15 16 17 Verdigris HS 4 17 18 Keys HS 20 18 23 Muldrow HS ('09) 64 21 Metro Christian Academy 35 19 20 22 Sapulpa HS ('06) 13 24 Riverfield Country Day School 20 21 25 Claremore HS ('10) 14 22 23 26 Bishop Kelley HS ('12) 42 24 -- # Tulsa School Arts & Sciences 18 25 1 Cascia Hall Preparatory ('13) 30 WEST OKLAHOMA '14 '13 Charter New -- + Comanche HS 27 1 5 Norman North HS ('08) 90 2 3 Westmoore HS 61 3 4 4 Okarche HS 18 5 6 Enid HS ('01) 21 9 Norman HS ('09) 82 6 7 8 Cordell HS 17 8 Guymon HS ('04) 50 8 9 7 Edmond Memorial HS ('95) 21 10 Cherokee HS ('87) 24 10 11 13 Edmond North HS ('06) 67 12 11 Choctaw Sr HS 35 13 12 Bethany HS 7 14 14 Classen SAS 10 15 15 Okeene HS 3 16 19 Southmoore HS 56 17 16 Moore HS ('11) 50 18 17 Edmond Santa Fe HS ('10) 18 19 21 Casady School 32 20 18 Heritage Hall School ('07) 14 21 20 Kingfisher HS ('05) 5 22 24 Bishop McGuinness HS ('12) 47 23 22 Quinton HS 10 24 23 Harding Charter Prep HS 18 25 -- # Crossings Christian School 14 26 2 Putnam City North HS ('13) 7 NORTH OREGON '14 '13 Charter New 3 + Westview HS ('06) 141 1 2 2 Century HS 38 3 -- # West Linn HS 21 4 4 McMinnville HS 19 5 5 Forest Grove HS 7 6 6 Canby HS ('97) 19 7 7 Southridge HS 35 8 9 Clackamas HS ('03) 31

Total 697 672 651 601 492 467 457 347 342 302 222 208 166 136 114 94 80 73 Total 687 654 529 520 518 503 453 410 390 378 321 309 226 219 211 204 203 170 165 125 123 110 90 56 30 Total 639 637 626 575 477 469 456 448 446 397 362 355 314 273 215 187 187 150 149 146 135 93 88 87 40 7 Total 668 605 563 543 496 429 419 389


www.speechanddebate.org

LEGEND:

NORTH OREGON (continued) 9 11 Lincoln HS ('00) 79 10 8 Oregon City HS ('98) 7 10 Cleveland HS 0 11 12 13 Lake Oswego HS 64 13 12 Centennial HS 10 14 14 Glencoe HS ('08) 38 18 Gresham-Barlow HS ('10) 81 15 16 15 Woodrow Wilson HS 26 16 Sprague HS ('11) 30 17 18 19 Blanchet Catholic School 9 21 Tigard HS ('12) 50 19 20 20 Beaverton HS ('09) 4 21 -- # La Salle Catholic College Preparatory 17 22 1 Silverton HS ('13) 28 SOUTH OREGON '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Summit HS 9 4 Marshfield HS ('03) 47 2 3 3 North Bend Sr HS ('95) 25 4 5 Grants Pass HS ('98) 32 7 Butte Falls Charter School 26 5 6 North Eugene HS ('91) 0 6 7 8 North Valley HS ('06) 21 9 Willamette HS ('07) 0 8 10 Siuslaw HS 5 9 10 11 Ashland HS ('11) 78 12 Redmond HS ('10) 10 11 -- # Marist Catholic HS 23 12 13 14 Mountain View HS ('12) 13 1 Bandon HS ('13) 37 14 15 -- # Coquille HS 10 PENNSYLVANIA '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Greater Latrobe HS ('06) 17 6 Bellwood-Antis HS ('10) 49 2 5 Rockwood HS ('07) 0 3 4 7 Trinity HS ('09) 21 5 9 McKeesport Area HS ('11) 25 2 Greensburg Salem HS ('13) 13 6 7 10 The Kiski School ('12) 6 PITTSBURGH (PA) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 North Allegheny Sr HS ('10) 234 2 2 + Cathedral Prep School ('96) 18 4 Pittsburgh Central Catholic HS ('93) 61 3 4 7 West Allegheny HS 124 5 5 Quigley Catholic HS ('00) 47 6 Knoch Senior HS 38 6 7 8 Bethel Park HS ('06) 59 9 Mercyhurst Prep School 18 8 9 13 Upper St Clair HS ('07) 96 10 10 Mercer Area HS ('05) 28 11 Lakeview Christian Academy 14 11 12 12 Cardinal Wuerl North Catholic HS ('02) 15 15 Pine-Richland HS ('08) 45 13 14 14 Sewickley Academy 17 17 Fox Chapel Area HS ('09) 44 15 16 16 Moon Area HS ('76) 21 17 18 Peters Twp HS ('01) 35 18 19 Deer Lakes HS 17 19 20 McDowell HS ('11) 54 20 21 St Joseph HS 4 21 22 Mt Lebanon Sr HS ('12) 27 22 1 Shady Side Academy ('13) 37 VALLEY FORGE (PA) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Pennsbury HS ('04) 58 2 3 E L Meyers HS 43 3 4 Perkiomen Valley HS 19 4 5 Unionville HS 42 5 9 La Salle College HS ('06) 62 6 8 Danville Area HS ('07) 49 7 10 William Tennent HS 64 8 6 Notre Dame HS 8 9 7 Scranton HS ('99) 11 10 -- # Lower Moreland HS 36 11 13 Abington Heights HS 44 12 11 State College HS 22 13 12 St Joseph's Preparatory School ('05) 23 14 15 CR North HS 72 15 14 Holy Ghost Prep ('09) 56 16 16 Truman HS ('10) 68 17 -- # Delone Catholic HS ('03) 25

+ Leading Chapter Award

376 376 339 305 258 245 208 185 172 127 83 60 55 28 Total 375 362 345 303 285 269 250 198 186 142 68 56 39 37 32 Total 158 154 107 74 66 13 13 Total 858 655 582 546 541 475 440 367 341 328 284 278 268 248 247 242 231 206 201 87 56 37 Total 488 457 393 383 375 362 346 327 325 304 289 285 280 274 266 263 227

# New or Restored Chapter

VALLEY FORGE (PA) (continued) 18 17 Upper Dublin HS 17 20 Southern Lehigh HS ('11) 39 19 20 18 West Shore Christian Academy 16 21 21 Shikellamy HS ('12) 29 -- # The Hill School 26 22 1 Gwynedd Mercy Academy ('13) 20 23 SOUTH CAROLINA '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 Southside HS ('11) 132 2 3 + Bob Jones Academy ('08) 67 3 2 Irmo HS ('90) 10 5 Christ Church Episcopal School 0 4 5 6 Allendale-Fairfax HS ('99) 19 6 7 Barnwell HS 26 11 Riverside HS ('12) 115 7 10 Mauldin HS ('10) 18 8 9 12 Williston-Elko HS 18 10 13 Waccamaw HS 24 11 1 Hillcrest HS ('13) 51 NORTHERN SOUTH DAKOTA '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 + Lennox HS 43 2 Watertown HS ('09) 115 2 3 3 Huron HS ('02) 51 5 Aberdeen Central HS ('11) 142 4 5 6 Brookings HS ('10) 97 6 4 Groton HS ('97) 9 8 Mitchell HS ('12) 88 7 7 Madison HS ('08) 26 8 9 1 Milbank HS ('13) 52 RUSHMORE (SD) '14 '13 Charter New 1 10 + Roosevelt HS ('04) 100 2 Yankton HS ('01) 49 2 3 4 O'Gorman HS ('10) 154 -- # Beresford HS ('92) 24 4 5 5 Harrisburg HS 53 6 Stevens HS ('07) 47 6 7 8 Washington HS ('11) 89 7 Vermillion HS ('06) 19 8 9 9 Brandon Valley HS ('09) 48 1 Sioux Falls Lincoln HS ('13) 151 10 11 11 Tea Area HS 3 TENNESSEE '14 '13 Charter New 2 + Dickson County HS ('01) 34 1 2 4 St Cecilia Academy 22 3 5 Collierville HS ('03) 50 3 Battle Ground Academy ('99) 13 4 5 6 Montgomery Bell Academy ('02) 45 7 Jefferson County HS 33 6 7 8 The McCallie School 18 -- # University School Of Nashville 14 8 9 9 Portland HS 45 10 10 Rossview HS 13 13 Ravenwood HS ('11) 83 11 12 12 Seymour HS 20 13 11 Sullivan East HS 2 17 Brentwood Academy ('08) 46 14 15 15 Merrol Hyde Magnet School 10 16 14 Cookeville HS ('05) 0 17 16 Independence HS 6 18 19 White House HS 45 19 18 Henry County HS ('09) 29 20 21 Brentwood HS ('00) 66 21 1 Morristown West HS ('13) 128 22 22 Northeast HS ('10) 17 23 -- # Madison Academic Magnet High 26 CENTRAL TEXAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 -- + Judson HS 53 2 2 Smithson Valley HS 22 3 3 Douglas MacArthur HS ('04) 44 4 4 James Madison HS - San Antonio ('99) 54 5 -- # Jack C Hays HS ('00) 44 6 5 Blanco HS 1 7 8 Winston Churchill HS ('11) 110 8 6 Earl Warren HS 36 9 10 Ronald Reagan HS ('10) 93 10 7 Sandra Day O'Connor HS ('07) 23 11 9 Claudia Taylor Johnson HS 45 12 13 Tom C Clark HS ('08) 47

102 92 80 67 67 20 Total 472 466 410 315 310 279 252 163 152 108 51 Total 599 555 475 436 384 374 159 99 52 Total 796 663 600 433 383 347 294 288 180 151 92 Total 567 549 545 542 501 461 421 399 359 305 264 223 220 187 182 173 170 166 153 148 128 78 65 Total 657 506 469 455 400 391 367 329 305 292 287 213

* Lost or Suspended Charter

CENTRAL TEXAS (continued) 13 11 Devine HS 14 14 Geneva School Of Boerne 54 14 15 12 William H Taft HS ('01) 5 16 17 La Vernia HS ('12) 87 17 16 Robert E Lee HS- San Antonio ('09) 39 15 John Paul Stevens HS 7 18 19 18 Lehman HS 15 20 -- # Louis D. Brandeis HS 14 21 1 Saint Mary's Hall HS ('13) 48 EAST TEXAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + William P Clements HS ('06) 157 2 2 Katy HS ('80) 19 3 4 Crosby HS 15 5 The Woodlands HS ('99) 41 4 7 Kingwood HS ('97) 74 5 6 6 Klein Oak HS 29 7 8 St Thomas HS 60 8 9 Jersey Village HS ('01) 31 10 Klein HS ('07) 49 9 10 11 Northland Christian School 69 11 13 The Woodlands College Park HS 24 12 15 Dulles HS ('05) 60 14 Conroe HS ('87) 1 13 14 16 Cypress Springs HS 18 15 17 Spring HS ('04) 26 18 J Frank Dobie HS ('08) 24 16 17 19 Magnolia HS 32 21 James E Taylor HS ('10) 78 18 19 23 Cypress Creek HS ('11) 91 22 Montgomery HS 54 20 21 20 Channelview HS 0 22 -- # Galena Park HS 38 26 Cypress Falls HS ('12) 61 23 24 1 Oak Ridge HS ('13) 82 27 Magnolia West HS 4 25 26 28 # The Kinkaid School ('09) 20 GULF COAST (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Harlingen HS South ('06) 77 2 3 Ball HS 34 3 4 Pharr-San Juan-Alamo HS ('93) 31 5 El Campo HS 27 4 5 6 Richard B King HS ('04) 32 -- # Harlingen HS 38 6 7 8 Calhoun HS 12 8 10 Wharton HS 13 12 Columbia HS 30 9 10 11 Three Rivers HS 12 13 Corpus Christi Carroll HS ('05) 28 11 12 14 Boling HS 19 13 1 Gregory Portland HS ('13) 64 16 Victoria East HS ('11) 8 14 15 15 Angleton HS ('10) 0 HEART OF TEXAS New '14 '13 Charter 2 + San Marcos HS ('92) 45 1 2 3 Lyndon Baines Johnson HS - Austin ('95) 34 3 4 James Bowie HS 61 4 6 Westwood HS ('01) 44 5 5 Round Rock HS ('99) 16 6 7 Harker Heights HS 29 7 8 Wimberley HS 28 8 9 John Connally HS 27 9 11 Dripping Springs HS 26 10 12 Stephen F Austin HS - Austin ('07) 42 11 10 W B Travis HS 11 12 15 Hendrickson HS 125 13 13 Stony Point HS 7 14 16 Pflugerville HS ('04) 54 15 18 Lake Travis HS ('10) 55 16 17 Salado HS 15 17 20 The Parish Episcopal School 26 18 19 St Michael's Academy 12 19 21 McNeil HS ('09) 20 20 23 Westlake HS ('11) 36 21 22 Cedar Ridge HS 19 22 1 L C Anderson HS ('13) 68 23 -- # Concordia HS 20 LBJ (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Richardson HS ('07) 82 2 3 Berkner HS 10

206 192 191 167 145 137 80 77 48 Total 1,017 885 820 782 780 740 704 673 604 588 526 526 500 439 395 304 302 287 287 262 237 191 131 82 72 68 Total 529 388 372 331 324 319 280 248 190 174 163 105 64 61 54 Total 565 553 551 419 400 386 376 326 309 304 304 302 244 226 210 187 150 147 141 134 133 68 48 Total 415 323

Rostrum | FALL 2014 119


2013-14 Charter Chapter Report

LBJ (TX) (continued) 3 4 James Bowie HS - Arlington 8 4 5 Canton HS 28 8 Lovejoy HS 63 5 6 6 Decatur HS 6 7 7 McKinney HS 16 8 10 McKinney Boyd HS 16 11 Lake Highlands HS 9 9 10 12 Whitesboro HS 21 13 McKinney North HS 23 11 12 14 Summit Int'l Preparatory 25 15 Melissa HS 33 13 14 16 Saginaw HS 41 15 19 Wylie Sr HS ('12) 55 18 Aubrey HS ('10) 16 16 17 20 Pottsboro HS 5 18 -- # Liberty Christian School 24 19 -- # Sachse HS 13 1 Graham HS ('13) 11 20 LONE STAR (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 -- + Allen/Lowery HS 22 2 2 Plano West Sr HS 57 3 Carroll HS - Southlake ('06) 62 3 7 Plano Sr HS ('10) 137 4 5 5 JBS Law Magnet HS 60 6 4 Arlington HS ('02) 24 7 15 Grapevine HS ('11) 126 11 Community HS 47 8 12 South Grand Prairie HS ('06) 46 9 10 13 Greenhill School ('09) 73 11 10 Byron Nelson HS 42 9 Mansfield HS 10 12 13 14 North Crowley HS 28 -- # Woodrow Wilson HS 18 14 15 16 Granbury HS ('07) 19 16 17 Skyline HS & Career Development ('06) 10 19 Garland HS ('99) 58 17 18 20 Trinidad Garza Early College 60 18 Dallas Highland Park HS ('08) 20 19 20 # John Paul II HS 45 19 Trinity Valley School 41 21 22 1 Northwest HS ('13) 21 NORTH TEXAS LONGHORNS '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 Hillcrest HS ('73) 0 2 4 + Plano East Senior High School ('01) 53 3 Naaman Forest HS 11 3 6 Edward S Marcus HS ('99) 29 4 5 5 Lewisville HS ('95) 10 9 Centennial HS 86 6 8 Newman Smith HS ('00) 8 7 8 12 Coppell HS ('09) 78 -- # Mesquite HS 37 9 10 11 Hockaday School ('08) 43 10 Grand Prairie HS ('04) 16 11 12 14 Creekview HS ('07) 34 13 15 John H Guyer HS 40 14 17 Colleyville Heritage HS ('10) 65 15 13 Sunset HS 0 16 16 St Mark's School Of Texas ('03) 13 17 18 Shepton HS ('06) 21 18 19 Flower Mound HS ('11) 41 19 -- # Coram Deo Academy 12 20 1 Jasper HS ('13) 94 21 20 W T White HS 0 22 22 Vines HS ('12) 24 SOUTH TEXAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 1 + Bellaire HS ('09) 203 2 5 Clear Brook HS 80 3 4 IH Kempner HS 67 3 Clear Lake HS ('02) 30 4 5 6 Mayde Creek HS 31 6 7 Aldine Sr HS 9 7 8 St Agnes Academy 60 8 10 Clear Creek HS ('87) 59 9 12 Lamar HS - Houston ('06) 83 10 11 Stephen F Austin HS - Sugar Land 27 11 14 Westfield HS ('05) 39 12 13 Monsignor Kelly Catholic HS 14 13 15 Westside HS 42 14 16 Foster HS 42 15 17 Cinco Ranch HS 42 16 -- # Westbury Senior HS 41

120

Rostrum | FALL 2014

320 258 220 200 188 169 151 133 126 124 120 118 115 86 61 61 59 11 Total 501 477 466 398 384 367 319 278 276 274 273 264 229 151 149 138 124 122 120 93 76 21 Total 534 495 463 461 451 421 395 357 341 340 331 286 285 273 268 248 201 170 116 94 85 54 Total 1,002 828 824 806 764 734 715 670 645 603 524 522 510 473 457 409

SOUTH TEXAS (continued) 18 Lamar Consolidated HS ('08) 29 17 18 19 Elkins HS ('07) 34 19 -- # Dickinson HS 15 20 20 Needville HS 15 21 Harmony School Of Advancement 5 21 24 Michael E DeBakey HS For Health Prof 53 22 22 LV Hightower HS ('11) 15 23 24 25 Friendswood HS ('10) 57 25 23 Clear Springs HS 14 28 Strake Jesuit College Preparatory ('12) 106 26 26 George Ranch HS 39 27 28 27 Ridge Point HS 27 29 2 Bay City HS ('13) 21 SPACE CITY (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Spring Woods HS ('96) 87 2 2 Barbers Hill HS 44 4 Kerr HS 72 3 4 5 Seven Lakes HS 115 5 6 Cypress Woods HS 64 7 Stratford HS ('00) 36 6 7 9 Cypress Ridge HS 0 8 13 Houston Acad For Intl Studies 136 10 Cy-Fair HS ('03) 69 9 10 11 Memorial HS - Houston ('08) 99 11 12 Hastings HS ('07) 35 12 14 William B Travis HS 7 15 Langham Creek HS ('06) 31 13 16 Eastwood Academy 17 14 15 17 Cypress Lakes HS 35 16 19 Andy Dekaney HS 11 18 Cypress-Ranch HS 5 17 18 21 Pasadena HS ('09) 13 1 Alief Elsik HS ('13) 39 19 20 24 Alief Taylor HS ('12) 8 25 Eisenhower HS ('11) 16 21 TALL COTTON (TX) New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Robert E Lee HS - Midland ('04) 37 2 3 Hereford HS ('01) 37 4 Borger HS 19 3 4 5 Big Spring HS ('05) 39 7 Amarillo HS ('03) 35 5 6 6 Odessa HS ('00) 18 7 8 Lubbock HS ('07) 19 9 Snyder HS 17 8 9 10 Randall HS 7 11 Midland Christian School 18 10 11 13 Tascosa HS ('08) 38 12 14 Seminole HS ('11) 57 12 Midland HS ('06) 1 13 14 15 Cooper HS ('10) 15 1 Central HS - San Angelo ('13) 98 15 16 -- # Sudan HS 24 17 16 Holy Cross Catholic Academy 17 19 Frenship HS ('12) 20 18 UIL (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 4 + Lindale HS ('09) 78 2 2 Whitehouse HS 8 3 3 Crandall HS 26 4 6 Good Shepherd School 35 5 5 Gilmer HS 9 6 8 Van HS ('08) 41 7 7 Midlothian HS 30 8 10 Royse City HS ('07) 24 9 9 Brownsboro HS 16 10 12 Ferris HS 16 11 13 Hallsville HS ('10) 36 12 17 All Saints Episcopal School ('12) 64 13 16 Caddo Mills HS 29 14 18 North Lamar HS ('11) 36 15 15 Chapel Hill HS 0 16 -- # Chireno HS 10 17 19 Leon HS 15 18 1 Athens HS ('13) 32 WEST TEXAS '14 '13 Charter New 1 1 + Eastwood HS ('96) 7 2 4 Americas HS ('06) 55 3 -- # Montwood HS ('97) 21 4 2 Austin HS - El Paso 0 5 5 Ysleta HS ('07) 21

363 304 278 249 200 174 150 141 135 131 96 79 21 Total 627 610 607 596 525 494 407 401 396 386 303 263 224 184 140 99 99 58 39 29 21 Total 515 420 386 385 329 315 310 292 248 183 178 170 156 107 98 80 69 46 Total 358 338 324 291 283 253 247 216 213 168 158 128 107 100 83 78 55 32 Total 315 309 291 270 237

WEST TEXAS (continued) 6 6 Chapin HS 29 7 7 Burges HS ('04) 38 8 8 Franklin HS ('08) 38 9 El Paso Coronado HS ('12) 34 9 10 -- # Mountain View HS 32 11 11 Hanks HS ('09) 5 12 12 Bel Air HS ('11) 14 13 3 El Paso HS ('13) 16 YELLOW ROSE (TX) '14 '13 Charter New 1 8 + A & M Consolidated HS ('01) 23 2 2 Midway HS ('96) 12 3 3 Smithville HS 6 4 Mexia HS 0 4 5 6 Princeton HS ('11) 52 6 7 Vanguard College Prep School ('08) 34 7 8 Godley HS 48 8 9 Round Rock Christian Academy 34 9 13 Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns 66 10 12 Center HS 17 -- # Hamshire-Fannett HS 27 11 12 1 Holy Trinity Catholic HS ('13) 61 13 -- # Mildred HS 13 14 15 West Hardin HS 24 GREAT SALT LAKE (UT) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 Lone Peak HS ('07) 106 2 + Skyline HS ('08) 84 2 3 4 Salt Lake City West HS ('05) 29 4 5 Cottonwood HS ('03) 29 5 -- # Kearns HS ('97) 22 6 6 Taylorsville HS ('01) 37 7 8 Highland HS ('04) 38 8 7 Tooele HS 27 9 9 Rowland Hall-St Mark ('10) 75 10 11 East HS ('09) 38 11 10 Intermountain Christian School 11 12 12 Olympus HS ('11) 64 13 14 South Summit HS 16 14 13 The Oakley School 1 15 1 Cyprus HS ('13) 24 SUNDANCE (UT) '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 Bingham HS ('10) 145 2 2 + Lehi HS ('06) 28 3 5 Juab HS 84 4 4 Carbon HS ('00) 30 5 7 Karl G. Maeser Preparatory Academy 61 6 6 Juan Diego Catholic HS 17 7 8 Timpview HS 33 8 -- # West Jordan HS ('95) 29 9 9 Beaver HS ('08) 57 10 12 Salem Hills HS 100 11 10 Stansbury HS 38 12 11 Waterford School 30 13 -- # Jordan HS ('04) 20 14 14 Murray HS ('10) 59 15 13 American Leadership Academy 16 16 15 Alta HS ('11) 25 17 1 Hillcrest HS ('13) 149 18 18 Herriman HS 74 19 17 Hunter HS ('12) 50 20 16 Riverton HS ('09) 13 21 -- # Summit Academy HS 38 UTAH-WASATCH New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + Layton HS ('97) 28 2 3 Northridge HS ('03) 62 3 4 Wasatch HS 44 5 Mountain Crest HS 90 4 5 6 Roy HS ('92) 62 6 7 Weber HS ('04) 76 7 8 Viewmont HS ('93) 60 8 9 Syracuse HS 32 9 10 Clearfield HS ('08) 74 10 11 Bountiful HS ('06) 58 11 12 Logan HS ('09) 52 12 13 Sky View HS ('12) 128 13 14 Davis HS ('11) 40 14 15 Morgan HS 74 15 1 Woods Cross HS ('13) 63

227 218 214 82 57 46 42 16

Total 438 338 281 250 214 190 175 141 131 87 63 61 47 51

Total 674 674 560 550 500 340 334 329 279 237 211 208 70 62 24

Total 588 514 483 460 437 406 342 332 326 287 281 257 253 187 159 152 149 139 128 100 62

Total 672 588 539 531 502 500 445 408 407 377 308 281 172 147 63


www.speechanddebate.org

LEGEND:

VIRGINIA '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Edison HS ('02) 11 3 Chantilly HS 16 2 3 8 Montgomery Blair HS 53 4 10 Dominion HS 36 5 9 Yorktown HS ('79) 31 7 West Springfield HS ('04) 5 6 7 5 W T Woodson HS ('98) 0 20 South Lakes HS 66 8 9 11 Our Lady Of Good Counsel HS ('75) 0 13 Wilson Memorial HS 22 10 11 18 Randolph-Henry HS 34 12 14 James Madison HS ('99) 19 15 Sherando HS ('05) 15 13 14 17 Turner Ashby HS 24 15 25 Briar Woods HS 47 16 19 Freedom HS 27 22 E C Glass HS 20 17 18 24 Fresta Valley Christian School 23 19 16 Robinson Secondary School ('87) 0 20 21 Potomac Falls HS 8 26 John Handley HS 35 21 22 30 Midlothian HS 29 35 Broad Run HS ('12) 84 23 28 Hargrave Military Academy 4 24 25 32 Madison County HS ('11) 43 26 33 Blacksburg HS ('09) 43 27 34 Fluvanna County HS 57 37 Thomas Jefferson HS Science & Tech ('10) 27 28 36 Liberty HS 5 29 30 -- # John Champe HS 32 1 Lake Braddock Secondary HS ('13) 39 31 32 -- # Holy Cross Regional School 10 INLAND EMPIRE (WA) New '14 '13 Charter 1 2 + University HS ('05) 57 2 3 Wenatchee HS ('94) 43 3 4 Mead HS ('06) 34 4 7 Gonzaga Prep HS ('08) 53 5 Coeur D'Alene Charter Academy 23 5 6 Walla Walla HS 0 6 7 8 Coeur D'Alene HS ('11) 67 14 Lake City HS ('12) 73 8 10 Chiawana HS 22 9 10 1 Central Valley HS ('13) 98 11 Mt Spokane HS ('09) 11 11 12 13 Moses Lake HS ('10) 0 15 Republic School District 0 13 PUGET SOUND (WA) New '14 '13 Charter 1 3 + Snohomish HS ('07) 53 2 Interlake HS - Bellevue ('82) 37 2 3 4 Mountain View HS 52 4 5 Sammamish HS ('74) 0 7 North Kitsap HS 16 5 6 8 Bishop Blanchet HS 17 9 BC Academy 48 7 8 12 Union HS 51 9 11 D D Eisenhower HS ('89) 10 10 13 Ballard HS 0 11 14 Kentlake HS 12

+ Leading Chapter Award

Total 377 364 351 320 317 308 308 278 276 272 256 255 250 249 243 239 231 228 228 220 216 180 168 164 163 154 142 82 71 64 39 30 Total 572 385 359 313 311 272 249 145 137 98 93 73 28 Total 515 512 465 394 290 279 272 255 232 204 204

# New or Restored Chapter

PUGET SOUND (WA) (continued) 12 15 The Bear Creek School 46 13 17 Ridgefield HS ('10) 44 18 Raisbeck Aviation HS 45 14 15 19 Seattle Academy Of Arts & Science ('11) 50 16 21 Newport HS ('12) 75 17 22 Cedar Park Christian Schools 38 20 Glacier Peak HS 7 18 19 23 Mount Si HS 18 20 1 Kamiak HS ('13) 65 21 -- # Providence Classical Christian School 28 -- # W F West HS 63 22 23 24 Ingraham HS 1 WESTERN WASHINGTON '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Peninsula HS ('86) 31 2 3 Gig Harbor HS ('10) 90 3 5 Puyallup HS ('08) 69 4 Whitestone HS 16 4 5 6 Tahoma Senior HS 46 6 7 South Anchorage HS 41 8 Emerald Ridge HS 0 7 8 10 Kingston HS 47 9 9 Auburn Riverside HS ('04) 2 11 Auburn Senior HS ('03) 5 10 11 12 Renton HS 0 12 14 Federal Way HS ('09) 34 13 15 Capital HS ('07) 25 17 West Anchorage HS ('11) 43 14 18 Eastside Catholic HS ('12) 47 15 16 1 Thomas Jefferson HS ('13) 41 WEST VIRGINIA '14 '13 Charter New -- # The Linsly School 10 1 2 1 Wheeling Park HS ('09) 50 3 Parkersburg South HS ('11) 63 3 2 Parkersburg HS ('10) 20 4 NORTHERN WISCONSIN '14 '13 Charter New 1 3 + Appleton West HS ('03) 70 4 Waupaca HS ('00) 62 2 3 5 Neenah HS 49 6 Appleton North HS 47 4 5 7 St Croix Falls HS ('93) 17 6 8 Sheboygan South HS ('08) 53 -- # Tomahawk HS 13 7 8 12 Appleton East HS ('12) 105 10 Sheboygan North HS ('09) 10 9 10 11 New London HS ('06) 15 11 13 Hortonville HS ('10) 30 14 Fond Du Lac HS 17 12 13 1 Little Chute HS ('13) 6 SOUTHERN WISCONSIN '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + James Madison Memorial HS ('07) 80 2 3 Marquette Univ HS ('05) 56 5 Brookfield East HS ('09) 70 3 4 4 Middleton HS 49 5 -- # Milwaukee HS Of The Arts 31 6 7 Rufus King HS ('06) 50

194 168 162 161 160 123 100 97 65 64 63 54 Total 482 452 412 369 326 318 261 252 240 206 189 165 139 66 61 41 Total 388 280 101 79 Total 586 561 499 494 407 364 222 187 159 144 108 76 6 Total 549 499 495 491 435 393

* Lost or Suspended Charter

SOUTHERN WISCONSIN (continued) 7 6 Nicolet HS ('98) 25 17 Whitefish Bay HS ('12) 166 8 9 8 Vincent HS 25 10 9 West Bend East HS ('04) 28 11 10 Black Hawk HS ('03) 18 12 11 Mukwonago HS 37 13 12 Bradley Tech HS 26 14 13 Cedarburg HS ('10) 26 15 15 Ronald Reagan College Prep HS 37 16 16 Muskego HS ('08) 21 14 Messmer HS 15 17 18 18 Luther Preparatory School 51 19 19 Milton HS 16 20 20 Franklin HS 18 21 21 West Bend West HS ('11) 23 22 1 Madison West High School ('13) 62 HOLE IN THE WALL (WY) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Cheyenne East HS ('07) 77 2 3 Sturgis Brown HS ('99) 32 3 5 Scottsbluff HS ('00) 35 4 6 North Platte HS ('06) 67 4 Buffalo HS ('98) 4 5 6 7 Campbell County HS ('05) 35 7 11 Cheyenne Central HS ('10) 127 8 -- # Central HS ('00) 23 9 10 Lead-Deadwood HS ('04) 55 10 9 Burwell Jr-Sr HS 36 11 12 Cheyenne South HS 74 13 Lexington HS 34 12 13 -- # Wright HS 17 14 14 Sheridan HS ('03) 37 15 15 Cozad HS 15 16 16 Newcastle HS ('08) 16 -- # Niobrara County HS 15 17 18 16 Douglas HS 10 19 17 Spearfish HS ('12) 32 1 Gothenburg HS ('13) 81 20 21 18 Wheatland HS ('09) 31 22 19 Glenrock HS ('11) 9 WIND RIVER (WY) '14 '13 Charter New 1 2 + Saratoga HS 33 2 5 Green River HS ('09) 140 3 3 Kelly Walsh HS ('99) 24 4 Hot Springs Co HS ('92) 14 4 5 6 Star Valley HS ('01) 46 6 7 Natrona County HS ('08) 57 7 9 Worland HS ('06) 50 8 8 Lovell HS 10 10 Cody HS ('05) 24 9 10 11 Powell HS ('07) 24 11 12 Greybull HS ('04) 13 12 14 Jackson Hole HS ('11) 52 13 15 Riverton HS ('10) 29 14 -- # Rawlins HS ('03) 28 15 13 Douglas HS 20 16 16 Rock Springs HS ('12) 45 17 1 Evanston HS ('13) 46

379 296 288 287 238 227 214 208 189 173 168 161 109 92 84 62

Total 694 623 486 484 467 428 396 390 355 348 334 281 270 258 211 162 146 144 113 81 76 40

Total 667 621 597 561 418 409 381 346 322 293 260 183 139 134 88 80 46

Powering the voice of our future.

CONNECT. SUPPORT. INSPIRE. Rostrum | FALL 2014 121


2013-14 NEW DEGREES SUMMARY (This summary indicates the average number of new members and degrees added by the charters in a district, not chapter strength.)

DISTRICT

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55

122

Florida Manatee East Kansas Three Trails (KS) Nebraska East Los Angeles (CA) Kansas Flint-Hills Show Me (MO) California Coast (CA) Northwest Indiana New York City Northern South Dakota Northern Illinois Idaho Mountain River Rushmore (SD) Central Minnesota Illini (IL) Rocky Mountain-South (CO) Eastern Ohio San Fran Bay (CA) Utah-Wasatch Montana Southern Minnesota New Jersey Sunflower (KS) Ozark (MO) Northern Ohio Southern California Golden Desert (NV) West Iowa New England (MA & NH) West Kansas Greater Illinois Sundance (UT) Heart Of America (MO) Carolina West (NC) Colorado Pittsburgh (PA) Lone Star (TX) North Coast (OH) Sierra (CA) Florida Panther South Texas Space City (TX) Western Ohio East Texas Eastern Missouri South Carolina New York State New Mexico Florida Oceanfront Arizona Southern Wisconsin Northeast Indiana Carver-Truman (MO) Idaho Gem of the Mountain

Rostrum | FALL 2014

NEW CHARTERs

3 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 3 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 4 0 2 0 4 1 1 0 1 0 3 2 2 1 0 3 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 3 0 2 3 3 3 1 0 2 1

AVG NEw DEGREES NEW DEGREE LEADER

102.00 97.67 91.91 90.75 84.27 77.27 74.00 70.64 70.55 70.52 69.22 68.24 67.75 67.00 66.88 65.76 65.07 64.78 64.64 62.87 62.65 60.91 60.38 58.86 58.77 58.69 57.54 57.44 54.62 54.07 54.06 53.17 52.19 49.89 48.75 48.35 47.86 46.64 46.32 45.71 45.45 44.79 44.71 44.61 44.50 43.68 43.64 43.44 43.42 43.24 42.77 42.27 42.18 42.00 41.63

Nova High School Olathe Northwest High School Blue Valley North High School Millard North High School Gabrielino High School Washburn Rural High School Blue Springs High School Leland High School Munster High School The Bronx High School of Science Aberdeen Central High School Glenbrook North High School Highland High School O'Gorman High School Eastview High School Downers Grove South High School Denver East High School Perry High School Dougherty Valley High School Sky View High School Flathead High School Eagan High School Ridge High School Valley Center High School Central High School - Springfield Canfield High School Carlsbad High School Palo Verde High School West Des Moines Valley High School Newton South High School Salina High Central Belleville West High School Hillcrest High School Liberty Sr. High School Ardrey Kell High School Cherry Creek High School North Allegheny Sr. High School Plano Sr. High School Gilmour Academy Clovis North High School Lake Highland Preparatory Bellaire High School Houston Acad for Intl Studies Mason High School William P. Clements High School Clayton HS / Parkway West HS (TIE) Southside High School Scarsdale High School Los Alamos High School Boca Raton Community High School Brophy College Prep Whitefish Bay High School Chesterton High School Neosho High School Mountain Home High School

NEW DEGREES ADDED

363 191 281 247 349 159 168 363 226 394 142 184 256 154 176 142 210 168 216 128 141 230 172 199 229 170 176 172 133 146 142 83 149 170 117 275 234 137 129 142 125 203 136 94 157 76 132 145 88 116 125 166 187 126 84


www.speechanddebate.org

2013-14 NEW DEGREES SUMMARY (This summary indicates the average number of new members and degrees added by the charters in a district, not chapter strength.)

DISTRICT

56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 69 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 31 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 97 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110

Central Texas Great Salt Lake (UT) West Los Angeles (CA) Tarheel East (NC) South Florida Hole in the Wall (WY) Colorado Grande Wind River (WY) Northern Wisconsin South Kansas Big Valley (CA) Georgia Northern Mountain Georgia Southern Peach Arkansas Inland Empire (WA) Valley Forge (PA) Hoosier Heartland (IN) West Virginia Heart Of Texas East Oklahoma Deep South (AL) North Dakota Roughrider North Oregon Kentucky Puget Sound (WA) Western Washington Nebraska South Tennessee Northern Lights (MN) North Texas Longhorns Magnolia (MS) West Oklahoma Florida Sunshine Capitol Valley (CA) Sagebrush (NV) Rocky Mountain-North (CO) Yellow Rose (TX) Chesapeake (MD) Tall Cotton (TX) Gulf Coast (TX) UIL (TX) Hoosier Crossroads (IN) Michigan Virginia Louisiana Pacific Islands Hawaii Maine LBJ (TX) Western Slope (CO) West Texas South Oregon East Iowa Pennsylvania Iroquois (NY)

NEW CHARTERs

3 1 3 3 0 3 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 3 1 1 0 2 3 1 2 1 2 0 0 2 4 2 2 2 1 1 1 0 3 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 2 0 2 2 1 0 3

AVG NEw DEGREES NEW DEGREE LEADER

40.71 40.07 39.96 39.68 39.45 39.18 39.00 38.53 38.00 37.92 37.89 37.80 37.62 37.00 37.00 36.91 36.50 35.75 35.65 35.64 34.56 34.48 34.27 34.16 33.74 33.56 33.47 33.26 32.72 32.50 32.45 30.92 30.50 30.31 30.00 29.85 29.79 28.77 28.67 28.33 28.06 27.80 27.80 27.03 26.55 26.25 26.15 25.69 25.25 24.14 23.85 22.40 21.71 18.71 17.25

NEW DEGREES ADDED

Winston Churchill High School Lone Peak High School Palos Verdes Peninsula HS / Chaminade College Prep (TIE) Cary Academy Braddock High School Cheyenne Central High School Pueblo West High School Green River High School Appleton East High School Fort Scott High School James Enochs High School Alpharetta High School Grovetown High School Bentonville High School Central Valley High School CR North High School Fishers High School Parkersburg South High School Hendrickson High School Bixby High School The Montgomery Academy Fargo Shanley HS / West Fargo HS (TIE) Westview High School Rowan County Sr. High School Newport High School Gig Harbor High School Lincoln Southwest High School Morristown West High School Moorhead High School Jasper High School St. Andrew's Episcopal School Norman North High School Pine View School Mira Loma High School Reno High School Fairview High School Home Educator's Outsourcing Solns Walter Johnson High School Central High School - San Angelo Harlingen High School South Lindale High School Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School Portage Northern High School Broad Run High School Comeaux High School Marianas High School Kamehameha Schools Cape Elizabeth High School Richardson High School Central Of Grand Junction High School Americas High School Ashland High School West High School - Iowa City Bellwood-Antis High School McQuaid Jesuit High School

110 106 85 118 111 127 89 140 105 63 67 109 110 88 98 72 111 63 125 116 136 78 141 89 75 90 73 128 119 94 75 90 102 106 70 73 66 85 98 77 78 62 75 84 83 50 58 77 82 43 55 78 48 49 45

Rostrum | FALL 2014 123


IN MEMORIAM

Carmendale Fernandes: Shattered Glass by James M. Copeland

The speech and debate community lost a tremendous coach, leader, and friend on October 15, 2014. Here, Mr. Copeland celebrates the life and accomplishments of Ms. Carmendale Fernandes.

T

he day she conceded the Democratic Party nomination to Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton ruefully stated, “We weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time…” For decades, a glass ceiling has kept talented women from reaching the pinnacle of their professions— but not in the speech profession, and not in the National Speech & Debate Association! In 1978, Carmendale Fernandes became the fourth Board President and shattered that glass ceiling, just as she had shattered so many other glass ceilings in organizations where she served. Recently, after celebrating her 90th birthday, this remarkable women quietly passed away. Carm (the late Billy Tate always called her “our Carm”) blazed a

124

Rostrum | FALL 2014

trail of accomplishment during her lifetime that serves as a template to all women and men who wish to serve in professional academic organizations. Within the National Speech & Debate Association, Ms. Fernandes served as District Chair, Executive Board Member, Vice President,

President, and National Tournament Host. In her native California, she was elected State League President and later as administrator's representative on the CHSSA council. For years, Carmendale coordinated the logistics for council meetings and the state tournament. Regionally, Carmendale was the first high school teacher to be elected Vice President and President of the Western Speech Association. Nationally, she served on the Speech Communication Association Council (and was often urged to run for SCA President); the Planning Commission of the Bi-Centennial Youth Debates (sponsored by the National Association for the Humanities); Coordinator of Youth Activities for the American Forensic Association; and Commissioner for the National


www.speechanddebate.org

Association of Student Activity Advisers under NASSP. Carm's educational credentials were top rank: Northwestern, Stanford, University of the Pacific, San Francisco State, and San Jose State. She taught at institutes at Northwestern, Georgetown, The University of Kansas, and several California colleges. Carmendale originally planned to become a music teacher and band conductor. She switched to speech education where she thought there were more opportunities for women. Ms. Fernandes was hired as a teacher of English and coach of speech and debate at Fremont High School in Sunnyvale, CA. She rose to become Chairperson of the English department and a school administrator. One of the nation's most successful coaches, Carm's students placed highly at state and national contests, including a national champion in Girls’ Extemp (1967), a national Policy Debate semifinalist (1966) and quarterfinalist (1955). Additional final round contestants included two second place finalists in Girls’ Extemp (1965-1966), a second place finalist in Boys’ Extemp (1967), and a third place finalist in Original Oratory (1965). Five other speakers reached final rounds. Fremont High School won the DSR-TKA Trophy (now the Pi Kappa Delta/Bruno E. Jacob Trophy) in 1977.

Carmendale Fernandes is perhaps one of the most honored women in forensics. She earned her fifth diamond (the fourth presented) in 1986—a remarkable feat considering how difficult it was to earn points during her career. (Students could not compete in more than 40 rounds per year; debate points were W=4, L=2; and a student could only earn 250 points in each category: debate, speech, service). She was awarded the Association's service key and plaque. In 1978, founder Bruno E. Jacob named Carmendale as one of the founding 12 members of the National Speech & Debate Association Hall of Fame. She was the only woman selected. Carm is also a founding member of the California Speech Hall of Fame. Ms. Fernandes was perhaps the most social person since Lady Bird Johnson. She and her close friend Natalie Weber had tickets to the San Francisco Opera. Carm was invited to many cultural and social events where she arrived beautifully dressed and perfectly coiffed. She was an elegant lady in every respect. She also expected those accompanying her to be perfect. One year, I was accompanying Carm to an event in Denver, and she felt I needed new shoes. We went to a shoe store and discovered the store carried no shoes for me that she found appropriate; but they did

have some shoes she liked. I ended up buying her new shoes! Carmendale anecdotes are often humorous. Her friend Natalie called them “Carmendillies.” One true story occurred at a Board meeting in Baltimore where Carm attended a reception with many prominent and wealthy people. One elderly and bejeweled lady asked “our Carm” what business she was in. When Carmendale proudly announced she was President of the National Forensic League, the lady gave Carm a pained look, took her hand, and said, “Oh my dear, how do you stand all those bodies!” Now, after 90 years of recordsetting accomplishments, Carm is gone. Her competence and charm remain. It was once the custom in England that after one raised a toast to the Queen, one broke that glass, presumably so that glass would never be used to toast a lesser person. At the Hall of Fame banquet at the Dallas 2015 Nationals this summer, I shall raise a toast, with her favorite champagne, to Carmendale Fernandes, my Hall of Fame sister and colleague for 50 years…and then in her honor, I shall shatter that glass!

James Copeland is Director Emeritus for the National Speech & Debate Association.

Rostrum | FALL 2014 125


Careers Basis Independent Silicon Valley (San Jose, CA) Seeks Speech and Debate Coach

Communication Academy Seeks Part-Time Speech and Debate Instructors

Basis Independent Silicon Valley, a private 5th-12th school located in San Jose, CA is seeking a speech and debate coach for the 2014-15 academic year. Our middle school and high school students are very enthusiastic about speech and debate, and we anticipate a great club year! We are looking for someone with prior experience in the National Speech & Debate Association and a background in a variety of speeches to maintain the speech side of our program. The ideal candidate will also have experience in debate (preferably Public Forum or Parli) and will be able to help with coaching and critiquing debate rounds. Practices will be Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4 to 6 p.m. The position will also require that the candidate be available to attend weekend tournaments with the students. If interested, please send your resume and a cover letter highlighting your experience in speech and debate to brooklynn.titus@basisindependent.com.

Communication Academy is an enrichment program based in Cupertino, CA that seeks to improve students' communication skills from a young age. We are seeking instructors to teach our speech and debate classes for grades K-9 across the Bay Area. Applicants should have experience in competitive speech or debate and must have the ability to work after school or on weekends. Prior teaching or coaching experience is highly desirable. For more information, please visit our website at www.communicationacademy.com. Applicants should send a cover letter and resume to steve@ communicationacademy.com.

Chicago Debate Commission Seeks Director of Programs The Chicago Debate Commission (CDC) seeks an energetic, dedicated full-time Director of Programs to take a senior leadership role in managing the CDC’s rigorous and engaging academic debate programs for public school students in Chicago. The CDC’s mission is to advance the educational results, life success, and community contributions of urban youth through academic debate. Working in 78-80 schools and impacting over 1,400 students each year, the CDC facilitates, promotes, and manages the Chicago Debate League (the country’s largest urban debate league) in partnership with Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The CDC also plays a role in introducing curricular debate into CPS, impacting thousands more students. The successful candidate for this position will have the opportunity to manage programs for one of the nation’s leading urban debate leagues and transform the lives of thousands of Chicago students through debate. To apply, candidates must submit a cover letter, resume, and short writing sample. Please include salary history. If possible, collect all application materials in a single PDF and submit via email to ediecanter@chicagodebateleague.org. Alternatively, you may submit your application by mail to Edie Canter, Chicago Debate Commission, 200 S. Michigan, Suite 1040, Chicago, IL 60604. For more details, visit www.speechanddebate.org/ careers.

Flagstaff High School (AZ) Seeks Speech and Debate Coach Flagstaff High School in Flagstaff, AZ is looking for a speech and debate coach for the 2014-15 school year. All coaching positions require a current Arizona Department of Education teacher or substitute teacher certificate OR coach's certificate. Experience coaching the activity a plus. Candidate must work effectively with students, parents, and staff. Check with Flagstaff High School at (928) 773-8100 for more specific information regarding schedule, duties, etc. Flagstaff is a member of the NFHS/National Federation of State High School Associations (www.nfhs.org). All applicants must submit a complete online application at www.fusd1.org/hr.

Lakewood High School in Colorado Seeks Experienced Debate Teacher and Coach Lakewood High School in Colorado is seeking an experienced debate teacher and coach for a competitive and nationally recognized debate team. The team has been an Association chapter since 1958, attended Nationals annually from 1969, finished second in the nation in Public Forum Debate in 2010, and second in the world at the IPPF in 2012. Because of excellent support by the administrative teams and the community, you would be only the fifth teacher/coach since 1958. This position includes teaching Freshman English and the debate team/classes, which are currently comprised of 60 members. An assistant coach position is also funded by the district. A strong background in rhetoric and public address and philosophy is preferred, but not required. Email inquiries to Principal Lisa Ritchey at lritchey@jeffco.k12.co.us. Learn more at www.speechanddebate.org/careers.

Contact us at editor@speechanddebate.org if you're interested in advertising in Rostrum. We look forward to working with you! 126

Rostrum | FALL 2014


www.speechanddebate.org

Magnet Debate Academy Seeks Head Debate Coach for South Korea Branch Magnet Debate Academy is seeking a head debate coach for its South Korea branch. Magnet Debate Academy is located near Seoul and has been one of the top debate academies in South Korea. Magnet Academy offers debate coaching and professional level competition preparation for students in elementary, middle, and high school. For more information, please visit our web page at www.magnetacademy.com. Applicants should send a cover letter and resume to magnetacademy@gmail.com.

Sheboygan North High School (WI) Seeks Debate Coach and Assistant Coach Sheboygan North High School, approximately one hour north of Milwaukee on Lake Michigan, seeks coach and assistant coach for its long-standing debate program. More information is available at www.sheboygan.k12.wi.us/jobs/ncocurr.html.

Silicon Valley Urban Debate League is Seeking a Leader The new Silicon Valley Urban Debate League is seeking a leader with experience in urban education and policy debate to serve as its founding Program Director. The Program Director will be the primary leader for a program with seven schools ready to launch in Fall 2015, helping build and implement a shared vision among the teachers, staff, volunteers, and youth who together make SVUDL's impact possible. This is a high-level position, and SVUDL stands ready to attract high-quality candidates with a competitive salary and the support of a committed team of volunteers, board members, and staff. For the full job description, visit www.speechanddebate.org/careers.

This ad space could be yours!

Have a speech or debate coaching position to fill? As a service to member schools, the Association offers complimentary employment listings on our website and also in Rostrum. For $100, you may reserve a custom, third-page print ad with larger font, optional logo, and more. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll even help you design your ad! Contact us at editor@speechanddebate.org or call (920) 748-6206 to reserve your employment ad today.

www.speechanddebate.org/careers

More Employment Opportunities Available Online:

www.speechanddebate.org/careers

Rostrum | FALL 2014 127


FORENSICS Our 2014 Tournaments 12.06.14 Junior Hilltopper

offering competition in 11 jr. events!

12.12-13.14 Hilltopper Classic

our largest tournament of the year!

HILLTOPPER CLASSIC The 2013 Hilltopper Classic was a great experience which brought schools from all over the country. The 2014 Hilltopper Classic will be even better.

Hilltopper Classic events - Broadcast, Cong., Dec., DI, Duo, Ext., HI, Improv. Duo, Imp., OO, Poetry, POI, Prose, Pub. Forum, & Storytelling. || Junior Hilltopper events - Broadcast, Dec., Duo Act., Ext., Interp. of Lit., Improv. Duo, Poetry, Prose, Pub. Speaking, Solo Acting, & Storytelling. SemiďŹ nals for events with large entries. The Hilltopper Classic remains an NIETOC qualiďŹ er. Only a few tournaments across the country allow students to qualify for the NIETOC. We host both individual events and debate, over a two-day schedule!

WKU TEAM AUDITIONS Want to be a member of WKU Forensics? Auditions held Fri. morning, 2/12. Contact Ganer Newman at ganer.newman@wku.edu for a reservation.

Last year, team member auditions were a great success. Several students were selected to become WKU competitors, and some received scholarships.

I n t e r e s t e d i n H e a r i n g M o r e A b o u t W K U Fo r e n s i c s ? E m a i l g a n e r. n e w m a n @ w k u. e d u o r v i s i t w w w. w k u f o r e n s i c s. co m P h o n e ~ 2 7 0 . 7 4 5 . 6 3 4 0 Fo l l o w u s o n Tw i t t e r : @ w k u f o r e n s i c s


National Speech & Debate Association

ONLINE INSTITUTE

Sign up for the Winter Edition of the Online Institute! Students and coaches can participate in one of three online training sessions December 29 – 31.

Debate (Public Forum -OR- Lincoln-Douglas) December 29 – 31 • 1:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. CT Choose from either our PF or our LD session designed to prepare you for the January PF or January/February LD topic. Our instructors will offer advanced argumentation strategies, extensive case writing process work, blocking exercises, skill drills, and more. Additional one-on-one training sessions with the instructors will be available.

Regular Price

Resource Package Subscriber

SLC Member

$125

$100

$90

Extemporaneous Speaking (United States and International) December 29 – 31 • 1:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. CT This session will focus on topic overviews of timely current events and advanced question selection strategies. Students will create files to share among the participants, practice speeches and delivery exercises, and have an opportunity for one-on-one work with the instructors.

Regular Price

Resource Package Subscriber

SLC Member

$125

$100

$90

Middle School Argumentation December 29 – 31 • 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. CT This online learning session is specifically for middle school students. Instructors will explore the structure of argumentation, identify refutation strategies, and help middle school students develop arguments for their debate or extemp events.

Regular Price

Resource Package Subscriber

$60

$50

Lead Instructors

Guest Instructors

Tom Evnen Deano Pape Glenn Prince Steven Schappaugh Jason Warren Megan West

Aric Floyd Matt Linn Dan Meyers Isabella Paretti

Robert Sheard Max Solomon James Stage

Learn more and register:

www.speechanddebate.org/institute


2014 Fall Rostrum