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TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Developing Systems 1.1 History of manufacturing 1.2 Iconic biography 1.3 Projective Futures 2. Robotic Landscapes 2.1 Robot futures 3. Studio 3.1 Park 3.2 New Towns 3.3 Geometry and Matter in cities 3.4 Assignment 1 : Suzhou Industrial Park


1. ROBOTIC LANDSCAPES

Instructor: Benjamin Bratton


1.1 ROBOR FUTURES

The three core strands of robotics are perception, action and cognition. Perception collects and interpret through sensors, action is capacity to effect change in the world and cognition is the ability to reason toward making decisions.

Although these conditions are based on human qualities, robots have proven that they not only can achieve those but perform better, they can reach places at speeds humans can’t, process multiple information at a time or achieve perception with accurate


precision and on several directions. One of robots main features must be flexibility of use, one device-robotic creature should be able to perform several functions. While they can be multitasking simultaneously, they can also be programmed to change their use as many times needed. Since this late driven attention towards the DIY philosophy and the more accessible building hardware-software has become, future scenarios include building many of our daily objects even at home. As for now, prototyping with 3d printers has made us all into candidate designers and makers, which also goes along with trends of appreciating design and showing by willingness to pay for it. Automated processes by robots perhaps would be one of the fields that will evolve faster, manufacturing have experienced this for a while now, but now this technology seems more handy to the common citizens, automated transit/ cars, customer service, etc. Which leads to another conflict treated by the author,

how humans will react to robots? Would a regulation with laws must be needed? By automation comes substitution of human labor, which is still hard to predict if it would come out as unemployment or society being more capable and specialized in technology use. Since first option comes as the most likely, robotic creatures might be rejected and as some cases have proven, they could even be victimized and tortured. Robots also will play a big role within the capitalist tendencies towards recording and directioning consumption behaviors. While we already contribute by our constant use of intercommunicated systems, sensors in robots would become more precise on their intention of getting to know the actual and possible customer, how they react, how long they stare, how they navigate spaces, how many times they visit and details such as sense of style, occupation, economic position, all these information collected by your rutinary visit to the grocery store. Even

Even though initiatives towards protecting our privacy are already showing, how much do we really appreciate privacy these days? Technological use has given society one of their most beloved treasures, status. Being anonymous is not one of our intentions these days, and every time we are making bigger efforts to get noticed. Fortunately, conclusion of the author ends up as not a hopeless future, robots used for its superhuman capacities towards benefiting communities, aiding the ill or the damaged, providing care and better tools for making decisions. Are politicians and the powerful becoming less ambitious and would see these possible positive conditions? Perhaps not, but we are constantly thinking of ways to gain power, technology is now the tool, I think is perfect timing to get some of this power.


2. DEVELOPING SYSTEMS


2.1 HISTORY OF TIJUANA’S MANUFACTURING

Border Industrialization Program in 1965

Alleviate the rising unemployment burden along the border.

1970’s.

Massive Oil based debt.

Demise of the “Bracero Program” by the U.S. government in 1964.

1980’s.

The “Bracero Program” had allowed Mexican agricultural workers (mostly migrating northbound from the interior of Mexico) to work legally in the U.S. on a seasonal basis.

Devaluation of Mexican Peso attracts US companies for lower labor costs.

1980’s BOOMING OF MAQUILADORAS 1994. NAFTA

U.S./Mexico Bilateral Tax Treaty (to avoid double taxation)


2.1 HISTORY OF MANUFACTURING

Television Capital of the World. Located 2.5 hour from the Long Beach Shipping Port, Tijuana had full advantage had full advantage to become the biggest manufacturer of electronics in North America

4 of 10 color TV ‘ s sold in the US manufactured in Mexico (1991) 7 of 10 color TV ‘ s sold in the US manufactured in Mexico (1998) PANASONIC 100% of TV ‘ s sold in the US from the same factory in Tijuana. 35 Million TV’s (2003)


2.1 HISTORY OF MANUFACTURING

1990. GROWTH IN MAQUILADORA = DEFICIT ON SERVICES ( WATER AND SEWAGE ) INFORMAL HUMAN SETTLEMENTS (HOUSING) -------------------------------------------- INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT

2010’s 70 million sq ft covered by industrial use. 50 Industrial Parks 58 million sq ft inside Industrial Parks

630 Industrial Buildings

(Vacancy of 10.7 % in 2012)


2.2 PROJECTIVE FUTURES


2.2 PROJECTIVE FUTURES


2.3 ICONIC AUTOBIOGRAPHY


3. STUDIO

Instructor: Rene Peralta


3. 1 ‘Park’ extract from book Enduring Innocence by Keller

LOGISTICS CITY

Park

Orman patois for campuses or headquarters

Logistics city k Par k Par rict

t

Dis

Distripark

Automated enclaves that sort and redistribute


FREE

TRADE ZONES

Cluster around

+ Warehouse

+ Intelligent office space

+ IT Campuses

+ Calling Centers

+ Exporting Processing Center

+ Conference / exhibition centers


Flexible / relaxed control 5-20 million people An airport A port Container Handling Capacity

Special instruments in: Finding favorable logistics Circumventing labor restrictions Filling quotas

CROSS NATIONAL GROWTH TRIANGLES

Economic Stimulants for developing countries

Management

(Cheap) Labor

Raw Material

SUPPLY CHAINS

Cotton Savannah

Spun into fabric Pearl River Delta

Factory India

Processing Zone Bangladesh


Efficient Movement of Goods U RBAN ADDICTION:OBSESSIONAL STACKING BEHAVIORS

ASC Automated Stacking Crane

AGV Automated Guided Vehicle

OMNIDIRECTIONAL

MOVEMENT

system now leads to Automated Passenger Transportation

More ways of navigating and reading buildings and urban spaces


3. 2 NEW TOWNS by Manuel Delanda

Development

Motifs

NEW TOWN + Demographic Growth + Rising Middle Class + Exponential Rise in the standards of living.

1940- 1950

+ Lower-middle income + Post war : house shortage

1960- 1970

+ Financed by government + Shaped by social reforms + Bringing classes together : PROGRESS

China Facts

Will plan 400 new cities

India

Needs 200 cities to absorb demographic growth

Today

+ Financed by large multinational enterprises + Elitist, superficial and commercial + Shelters from urbanization, big city problems


PLANTIT VALLEY

PORTUGAL

Leaders on environment and sustainability.

Project of National Interest (PIN)

More flexible faster land rezoning Reduced Corporate Taxes Effective government support

Founders: Steve Lewis and Mlacom Hutchinston ( Both backgrounds in IT ) Partners: Cisco, Hitachi, Philips, Critical Software, Alliander // Benefit : MONOPOLY OF SERVICES WITHIN THE CITY.

SYSTEMS, SERVICES, SENSORS AND SMART GRIDS

Features + Master Plan covers 1,670 hectares + Planned population: 225,000 + Pre-fab Hexagonal Structure ( Little Aesthetic Importance ) + Hub of creative industries

Operating Platform for Managing

ORGANIZATION

Million sensors throughout the prototype city collecting and sending data.

Service Providers share information and streamline city management. Waste, water, electricity, traffic.


LAVASA

INDIA + No clear planning regulations + Urban growth by private developers + Building on agricultural land = FOOD CRISIS Founders: Aniruddha Deshpande and Sharad Pawar (Minister of Agriculture - National Congress Party President) Market demand for middle class families // Sheltered community hides the slums // Mediterranean architectural style

FIVE TOWN CENTERS

1. DASVE + Mixed Housing + Recreation + Working

BUILT

2. MUGAON - Employment -

3.

+ IT Park + Biotechnology + Light industries + Film / Animation studios

+ Villas + Golfcourse

- Luxury model -

4 & 5. Based on 1 and 2 models


+ NEW SONG-DO CITY

1996 . Rem Koolhas - Master Plan / Housing for 200,000 residents 1998 . South Korean currency failed, Daewoo declares bankrupcy.

1999. Steel Company POSCO + Stanley Gale

Completely privately financed Most expensive private real estate development

Koth Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) to reinterpret OMA’s plan.

PROJECTION // Mass Produce 20 Copies of Song-do across Asia

Features + Strict zoning rules = Monofuctional + Broad avenues segregate city blocks + 22k Housing Units + 400,000 commuters per day + Diverse mix of transport system + Generic Architecture

BUSINESS

Denser business district

Smartcard. Key to everything in the city. + Subway + Parking Meter + Public bike + Seeing a movie + Your house. - Anonymous and easy to block if lost -


3. 3 GEOMETRY AND MATTER IN SPACE by Manuel Delanda

Metric: GEOMETRY

AREA

LENGTH

VOLUME

PROPERTIES

Non Metric

MEDIUM TOWN

CONNECTIVITY

Length = walking distance Hierarchy of roads

LARGE REGIONAL CAPITAL

ENGLISH INDUSTRIAL CITIES Journey to work by foot = living near factories.

SMALL TOWN


Number of people

Extensive (divisible)

MATTER

PROPERTIES

1 2 3

4 5 6

Intensive (not divisible) DIFFERENT SCENARIOS Number of people/area

DENSITY

Less people on extended settlements

More social interactions

High density on small surfaces

SPEED SPEED

Landlocked towns

Inward looking regional culture

+ SPEED

Port cities

Closer contact, heterogeneous population


HIGH DE NSIT Y

Physical density

Complex interactions

Network density

to local norms

TRAVEL FAST

Me

ENFORCEMENT

Friends Informal interactions

News of transgression

You

mechanism for local norms

Friends

METRIC

A place (x,y,z)

SOCIAL ENCOUNTERS 1 2 EXTENSIVE

Between number of people

2 COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

INTENSIVE PROPERTIES

Friends

ORK TW

Friends

NE

1

METRIC Copresence TOPOLOGICAL Connectivity

Machine Topologies compensate distance


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