Issuu on Google+

An in-depth look at the businesses and organizations shaping our region

BrandL/A

New faces at the Lewiston-Auburn Economic Growth Council, Paul Lacombe, Loan Portfolio Manager and Calvin Rinck, Marketing Director (left to right) look to build on past success and welcome a new era of growth and development to the twin cities.

2011 edition

Profile Business


SUN MEDIA GROUP presents Profile 2011, our annual snapshot of the businesses and organizations that provide innovation and important services to our communities. Between its glossy covers, you will find pages of business profiles that provide a look at a company’s or organization’s products and services, key contact information, sales levels, ownership, employment growth, and historical background.

Advertiser index Education

Androscoggin Home Care & Hospice............................................ 31

Kaplan University........................... 12

Assisted Home Care........................ 33

USM’s Lewiston-Auburn College...15

Center Street Dental....................... 30

Entertainment

Central Maine Medical Center...... 26

Fireside Inn & Suites....................... 14 Portland Sea Dogs............................. 8

Profile 2011 features businesses and organizations that help shape your world — past, present and future. Take the time to browse through these profiles and explore what these companies have to offer. We hope that you enjoy reading this unique section. STEPHEN M. COSTELLO Vice President / Advertising and Marketing 689-2920 Advertising Director Jody Jalbert 689-2913 ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Larry Baril 689-2960 Mike Blanchet 778-6772 Nancy Carpenter 364-8728 Brian Croteau 689-2909 Jeff Haggerty 689-2942 Ben Lachance 689-2956 Dan McManus 689-2906 Norm Moreau 689-2904 Eileen Morse 743-9228 Kevin Qualls 689-2928 Bruce Rioux 689-2915 Kelly Wade 689-2958 Special Sections Editor Denise Scammon 689-2997 Marketing Coordinator Sheri Verville 689-2903

Rolandeau’s....................................... 9 Theater At Monmouth...................... 4

Finance Androscoggin Chamber of Commerce......................................... 5

Gagne & Son Concrete.................... 24 Hammond Lumber......................... 19 Mount Blue Oil................................ 10 Redlon Johnson............................... 22

Cosmetic Enhancement................ 36

Non-profits

Davis Chiropractic........................... 31

American Heart Association......... 35

Greene Village Pharmacy................33

Safe Voices....................................... 24

Health Club & Spa........................... 37

Sexual Assault Crisis Center.......... 39

Marshwood Center......................... 38 Montello Heights............................ 39

Tri-County Mental Health Services ............................................. 4

Pine Tree Orthopedic Lab.............. 29

Triple Crown 5K Series................... 28

Schooner Estates............................. 29

Retail

Androscoggin Valley Council of Government.................. 10

Shapiro Audiology & Hearing Aid Center............................................... 37

Franklin Savings Bank .................. 14

St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center............................................... 40

Employment Times / MyJobWave.com............................. 16

Taylor Brook Dental..........................32

Lee Auto Malls................................. 13

The Meadows.................................. 32

Oxford Networks............................. 23

The Medicine Shoppe......................38

ServPro of Lewiston-Auburn......... 18

Gregory Strong................................ 15 Lewiston-Auburn Economic Growth Council................................ 3 Northeast Bank............................... 11 Oxford Federal Credit Union........... 8

Health Androscoggin Cardiology / Maine Research Associates........... 34

Home

Earrings & Company....................... .9

Sun Media Group............................ 20 Tambrands Inc./P&G..................... 12

American Concrete......................... 22

Wadsworth Woodlands.................... 6

Electrical Systems of Maine........... 11

Whited Motorhome & RV................. 7

Press

Commercial Print Services

MARKETING DESIGN / COVER Jesse Richter 689-2917 Design Manager Darla Farmer 689-2954 AD DESIGN TEAM Leo Baillargeon Jennifer Gendron Carleton Shirley Hood Sandy Marquis Linda Perry Michelle Pushard Terri-Lee Seeley Jim Vangeli Cover photo credit: Jason Wheeler

2

Sun Journal, 104 Park Street, P.O. Box 4400, Lewiston, Maine 04243 Lewiston 784-5411 • Farmington 778-6772 • Rumford 364-8728 • Norway 743-9228

Sun Journal

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Lewiston-Auburn

Economic Growth Council

It’s way more than a slogan. By Rich Livingston Feature Writer

It

rea lly is happening here, in t he language of the regional marketing prog r a m promot i ng L e w i stonAubu r n cha mpioned by t he Lew istonAuburn Economic Growth Council, in ways which are the env y of nearly every other hyphenated community and metropolitan a rea i n t he state. A nd ma ny of t hose communities are in constant competition with each other, and with countless other similar communities all over the country, to at t ract jobs, busi ness, i nvest ment, entrepreneurs; to expand the tax base and improve the quality of life for their citizens, employers and employees.

Secret weapon For the past 30 years, L-A has had a secret weapon that helped this community recover from the conversion from the mill-based economy of the 19th century to the more diversified economic base of the 21st; that enabled L-A to be “the engine of job creation” through the first decade of the new century, for a time creating more jobs than in the rest of the state combined; that has provided a basis for inter-city collaboration that is unmatched anywhere in Maine. Much of that progress was achieved by projects underta ken or assisted by t he Gr ow t h C ou nc i l, i nc lud i ng ne w a nd rehabi l itated bu i ld i ngs, bu si ness a nd indust ria l pa rks in bot h Lew iston a nd Auburn, gap financing, and confidential consu ltat ion rega rd i ng site select ion, expansion and infrastructure.

Visionary leaders LAEGC was created by visionary business and civic leaders from both cities, in 1981, and had, as a predecessor, the LewistonAuburn Railroad Company – founded in 1872 as an essential part of the critical infrastr ucture t hat helped L-A become among the countr y’s leading producers of textiles and footwear for more than a century, and still under the management of L A EGC – a nd t he Aubu r n-Lew iston Airpark, developed 100 years later, a model of c ol la bor at ion, i n nov at i ve re venue sharing, and a foundation of the logistics and transportation hub that is driving the new economy.

Public-private partnership The Growth Council is a distinctive model of a public-private partnership that is a unique catalyst enabling municipalities to stimulate private sector activity in ways which are otherwise beyond the scope of government. A recent opinion column in

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

the Sun Journal by economic development specialist, Phil Blampied, entitled, “Local Government & Economic Development: Why local programs fail,” suggested that when “government steps into the private economy [it] inevitably makes mistakes.” LAEGC is a solution to that problem, and one which other Maine communities have been trying to emulate for years. The distinctive mission, configuration and model of collaboration helps minimize any potential barriers between business a nd t he publ ic sector, a nd prov ides a degree of privacy that facilitates business establishment a nd g row t h in ways not available directly to municipalities. Bu s i ne s s e s a s s i s t e d b y L A E G C h a v e contributed more than $216 million to the tax base of Lewiston and Auburn in just the past decade, helping minimize the tax burden for existing businesses and homeowners. An average of 15,000 people have worked in Growth Council-assisted jobs in the past 10 years, and the Council has provided over $34 million in lending funds to Auburn businesses plus an additional $33 million to Lewiston-based enterprises.

Local investments Beyond just direct lending, the Grow th Council has, since its inception in 1981, leveraged nearly $45 million in new local i nv e s t ment s t h r ou g h c ompr ehen s i v e f i na nc i ng prog r a m s. T he spe c ia l i z e d staff creatively explores traditional and nontraditional resources to meet financing need s for equ ipment pu rcha ses, rea l estate acquisitions, other fixed assets, and working capital. The Growth Council has a proven record of utilizing lending and packaging skills to facilitate bank financing for businesses t h at w er e i n it i a l l y u n a ble to ac c e s s conventional credit. The Council is also the staffing authority for both the Lewiston Development Cor porat ion a nd Aubu r n Business Development Corp., providing both financial acumen and management along with administrative services.

Business development T he Grow t h Cou nci l helps busi nesses take full advantage of the area Pine Tree Zone ta x benef its, and was t he driv ing force behind creation of the international Foreign-Trade Zone. To take advantage of the FTZ designation and continue tackling the perennial issue of limited development space, ABDC and LAEGC worked on a plan to create a new Auburn Industrial Park. The 140-plus-acre industrial park abuts the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport, and drew the interest of Bisson Transportation,

SUN JOURNAL

which created a 100,000-square-foot heated and secure warehouse, with a complete array of inventory logistics services. Savage Safe Handling also created a massive warehouse and distribution facility called the Port of Auburn, LLC. A mong t he mo s t v i si ble of L A EG C’s continuing projects is the annual Businessto-Business trade show, Maine’s largest oneday business show, which has, since 1995, annually attracted about 2,500 attendees and nearly 200 exhibitors. This year’s show is slated for the Androscoggin Bank Colisee on Thursday, June 9. T he Grow t h C ou nc i l w a s a mong t he fou nd i ng pa r t ners, a long w it h t he A nd roscog g i n Cou nt y Cha mber of Commerce and the cities of Lewiston and Auburn, in the establishment of the “It’s Happening Here” marketing effort, which ha s ach ieved recog n it ion t h roug hout Maine, and beyond, for the twin cities and the resurgence of economic v italit y the campaign celebrates.

Two vibrant cities In t imes of prosperit y a nd in t imes of austerity, economic development experts from a ll corners of Maine ack nowledge that LAEGC has provided the L-A area with unique capacit y to be competitive and to optimize whatever opportunities the economic climate offers.

Perhaps, most importantly, the Growth Council has, in its 30 years, helped shorten the distance across the Androscoggin, creating a cooperative, integrated business community on the base of two vibrant cities.

Launch L-A Among the most innovative new projects undertaken by LAEGC in the past year was the introduction of the “Launch L-A” project to encourage former area residents to come home and establish businesses (and jobs) in this community. Together with the Chamber, t he Grow t h Council leveraged $100,000 worth of business services and incentives which were awarded as a grand prize to the entrepreneur judged to have the most attractive business plan.

Business Service Center In addition to ongoing projects including FTZ marketing, staffing the L-A Railroad Company, and prov iding support for its sister corporations with spec building and industrial park projects, the organization also maintains the Business Service Center in Lewiston’s Southern Gateway on Lisbon St reet. The one-stop shop for business services includes the offices of LAEGC, the Androscoggin County Chamber, Coastal Enterprises, L-A Magazine, Merrill Lynch, and others.

Jose Leiva / Sun Journal Photo

Left to right, seated: President Lucien Gosselin, Staff Accountant Stephanie Lewis; standing: Economic Development Specialist George Dycio, Loan Portfolio Manager Paul Lacombe.

Lewiston-Auburn Economic Growth Council 415 Lisbon Street, P.O. Box 1188 Lewiston, ME 04243-1188 Phone: 784-0161 www.economicgrowth.org

PR FILE 2011

3


The Theater At Monmouth: Professional pride in works By David Sargent Feature Writer The 42nd year of The Theater At Monmouth marks a planned transition in leadership coupled with a continuation of the acclaimed Shakespearean Theater of Maine’s high artistic and historic standards. Activity is already in full swing as TAM prepares to take a children’s production of “The Reluctant Dragon,� based on the Kenneth Grahame story, on the road this spring to schools throughout the state. In June, Theater At Monmout h’s roster will swell from a few staff members to a company of more than 50 as actors, directors, ma nagers, desig ners, a nd tech n icia ns converge upon the small town of Monmouth from points across Maine and from all over the United States. Dav id Gre en h a m, pr o duc i ng a r t i st ic director, announced several months ago that he will make the coming season at Monmouth his last. After 14 years and more than 100 shows at Monmouth, he said he expects to continue working as an adjunct professor of drama at the University of Maine at Augusta while pursuing other projects he

has wanted to tackle. His successor may take a limited role in the theater company as early as this summer. This summer’s program of shows performed in rotating repertory will include a wide range of productions from Shakespeare to NĂśel Coward. The 2011 season includes Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothingâ€? and “King Lear.â€? Other summer productions w ill include NĂśel Coward’s “Blithe Spiritâ€? and the 1937 Broadway comedy “Room Serviceâ€? by Allen Boretz and John Murray. Special events, and a few surprises, can be expected throughout the season as well. The fall offering will be “On The Twentieth Century,â€? the Tony-award winning musical comedy by Comden and Green. The Theater At Monmouth’s performances ta ke place in the beautiful, sma ll-sca le opera hall at historic Cumston Hall. Much of that venue’s unique ornamentation has been beautifully restored, and the project is nearing completion. Joshua D’Errico, TAM marketing associate, said audiences have an unusual opportunity this year to whet their appetites for the season’s presentations. For your enjoyment, mov ie versions of each show on TA M’s

schedule are being screened at the public library in Cumston Hall. The series of free movie nights with snacks began March 25 w ith “Much Ado About Nothing.� The screenings offer a chance for audiences to compare how the shows were done for movie-goers and how TAM will stage them this summer. For instance, TAM’s stage production of “Much Ado About Nothing� will be set in the post-World War II period, D’Errico said. The Theater At Monmouth has gained a noteworthy reputation through the years and D’Errico said TAM is offering some great deals for group audiences. He said camps, churches, business and community groups will find great discount opportunities when they bring their events to Cumston Hall and enjoy TAM productions.

Ronald C. Simons Photo

Annie Rubino, J.H Smith III and Gene D’Alessandro in “Misalliance� produced by Theater At Monmouth last summer.

TAM’s enduring relationships w ith area businesses will continue to grow, providing t heatergoers w it h g reat new packages to experience such as dinner and show combi nat ions w it h T he Sedg ley Place restaurant in Greene.

casts and crew of 50 to 60 people gather for meals and rehearsals will undergo an extensive renovation. D’Errico said they will make other arrangements while the historic building is moved back from the road and made accessible for all, ensuring that the old Grange will be a treasured building for the Theater and the town of Monmouth for many years to come.

In addition to all the work that goes into the shows, TAM is faced with another challenge this year. The nearby Grange building, where

More information about TAM and the 2011 performances can be found online at www. theateratmonmouth.org.

For tickets, show dates and more, go to www.theateratmonmouth.org or call (207) 933-9999

   ďż˝   

             ďż˝    ďż˝      Â?Â?  Â?Â?  Â? ďż˝    ­    €  ‚Â?­   ­ ­     ­ ƒ  „    Â… † „  ‚ ­   ­Â?  ­ ­€ ‚Â?     €  ‡Â?Â? ‚   ˆÂ? ďż˝   ƒÂ?     ˆ Â?Â?   ‚Â? ‚Â?  ‚Â…

���                                              �  �                    �          �      �   �  

4

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Androscoggin County Chamber of Commerce It’s about all of us. T he Reg iona l Image Development Committee continues to let t he rest of Maine know that the L/A area has changed dramatically and is a cool place to live, work, and learn. It directly supports LAEGC’s “It’s Happening Here” campaign to broaden efforts to market the positive attributes a nd activ ities of A ndroscogg in Count y and promotes Androscoggin County as a tourist destination, a surprisingly successful initiative celebrated in a new “road show” t he Cha mber ma kes ava i lable to civ ic groups which enumerates the astonishing successes of recent outreach ef forts. A renewed emphasis t his yea r w ill be to ensure that local residents also develop an enriched understanding of everything our communities have to offer.

2011 Chamber board of directors

The Androscoggin County Chamber of Commerce is the regional voice of our communities, contributing directly to our quality of life, representing its members and our towns in Augusta, attracting visitors to the area, helping local businesses grow and prosper and new businesses to take root and create jobs. And in the process, it has become the largest regional chamber in the state with nearly 1,400 members. By Rich Livingston Feature Writer / Submitted photos

“W hen we ex tol t he st reng t hs of ou r communities, we’re not simply engaging in ‘boosterism,’” long-time Chamber CEO Chip Morrison explained at a recent installment of the Chamber’s monthly breakfast series; although, he said, “My job is to ‘sell’ the Twin Cities. I am paid to tell people and businesses how great the Lewiston-Auburn area is — to promote our communities and to brag about our renaissance. So really, when the president of a chamber of commerce tells you that his community is thriving and has all the ingredients for success — in a word, when I tell you that ‘It’s Happening Here’ — shouldn’t you be at least somewhat skeptical? The answer is yes, absolutely.” But the characteristics that Morrison talks about with so much enthusiasm are those of resu rgence, of qua l it y of place a nd community. The grow th and vibrancy of the community is ref lected in the growth a nd v ibr a nc y of t he C ha mber, w hose membership has increased two and a half fold in the past 10 years or so. And the membership ref lects the diversity t hat is t he underpinning of t he region’s renewed vigor, including about 120 nonprofit organizations, more than a dozen mu n icipa lit ies a nd quasi-publ ic sector inst itut ions, a nd over 1,250 t radit iona l bu si nesses t hat col lec t ively represent some 45,000 employees (which would make the membership the second biggest cit y in Maine).

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

T he Cha mber ha s had a d i rect role i n much of the growth and dynamism of the community by creating an environment in which individual enterprise can thrive, by advocating on behalf of its members with local, state and federal legislators, agencies and regulators. It supports its members with a wide range of networking opportunities, access to education, information, and expertise that w ill help them in the successful pursuit of their own missions. The work of the Chamber is undertaken by four standing committees of its ow n plu s a not her f i ve c om m it te e s w h ich fulfill the mission of the Chamber’s semiautonomou s prog r a m, Y PL A A ( You ng Professionals of the Lewiston-Auburn Area, pronounced Why-Play). The Business Advocacy Committee works most d i rect ly w it h elected of f icia ls at every level of government to help “foster business grow th and regional economic development.” A mong t he committee’s targeted efforts for this current year is a strengthened commitment to promote “local action on collaboration and cooperation between the cities of Lewiston and Auburn.” T he Member Ser v ices Com m it tee suppor t s a w ide v a r iet y of memberb enef it s, f r om i n s u r a nc e opt ion s to member-to-member discounts, to lots of networking, informational and educational opportunities. Among its concentrations this year is the provision of particular services and mentoring to new or f ledgling small business members. T h is com m it tee is a lso com m it ted to ex pa nd i ng col laborat ion bet ween t he Chamber and the YPLAA committees — L/A

SUN JOURNAL

Betterment, Communications, Personal and Professional Development, Networking and Community Involvement, and the YPLA A Steering Committee.

The Chamber’s mission is not just to ensure that people know about what’s happening here, it is most importantly to ensure that it continues happening here; work that, according to Morrison, “is made possible by the thousands of hours of time and effort graciously provided by our membership.”

There is strength in numbers, indeed, and our region is indeed made stronger by the strength of the Chamber’s membership.

T h e n e w L /A A r e a B u s i n e s s S h o wcase telev ision ser ies, hosted by t he u biqu itou s Mor r i s on (w ho, it i s r u mored, may at tend a s ma ny a s 500 m e e t i n g s e a c h y e a r, n o t i n c l u d i n g Chamber meetings), is also a program of this committee. T he E d uc a t ion-B u s i ne s s P a r t ne r s h ip Committee has been advocat ing relentlessly foryears to improve dialog between educators a nd employers, to ra ise tens of thousands of dollars for a diverse array of scholarship programs, and to encourage local residents to pursue post-secondar y education. The Chamber helps implement Junior Achievement programming in local schools, supports career and job fairs, and the Androscoggin Leadership Development Institute which helps expand the pool of future leaders for public, private and nonprofit enterprise in our communities. New this year, the committee w ill help develop programming for Entrepreneurs’ Week, and will be working with the Finance Authority of Maine to help bring financial literacy programs to local schools. As t he Cha mber’s “road show” asserts, “Recent stories in the Wall Street Journal, New England Cable News, Newsweek, and the Boston Globe have focused NOT on a mill town that is crumbling, or about civil unrest, or even about employers closing their doors. Rather, they have all covered our renaissance. The Globe summed it up best: ‘A newer, hipper L/A.’ Who knew?”

PR FILE 2011

Visit, call or write the Chamber at:

The Business Service Center at KeyBank Plaza

415 Lisbon Street, PO Box 59 Lewiston, Maine 04243

207-783-2249 www.androscoggincounty.com

5


Timber Harvesting and Forestry Consulting Services agricultural business and receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in Economics.

By Deborah Conway Feature Writer In 1790, Revolutionary War General Peleg Wadsworth purchased a large tract of land from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in what is now called Hiram, Maine. Of the original 7,800 acres, Jack Wadsworth, fou nder of Wad s w or t h Wood l a nd s, still ow ns 22. Ow ning and managing Maine forestland is deeply rooted in the Wadsworth family’s heritage. I n 1971, Jack Wad s w or t h e a r ne d a Bachelor of Science in Forest Management from the University of Maine Forestr y S c ho ol . I n 19 9 4, a f t er w or k i ng for t wo decades as a forester for a paper company, Jack and his wife Beth began offering professional forestry services to independent landowners. From the seeds of his expertise and his “long term vision [with respect to] forest management,” Wadsworth Woodlands, Inc. sprouted. Si nce 1994, Wad s wor t h Wood la nd s, Inc. has grown into one of the largest timber asset management companies in Southern Maine and provides services to large and small landowners in Maine and New Hampshire. To date, Wadsworth Woodlands’ team of Licensed Professional Foresters has developed management pla ns for more t ha n 75,000 acres of privately owned land. In addition to Jack and Beth, whose administrative tasks keep things running smoothly, the Wadsworth Woodlands team includes two additional Licensed Professional Foresters. Brian Reader graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 2001, with an Associate of Applied Sciences degree in Forestry Technology. Jesse Duplin graduated from the University of Maine at Orono in 2007, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Forest Operations. Jack and Beth’s son, Nathan Wadsworth, completes this well-rounded and experienced team. Nate graduated from Montana State University after studying

By managing one’s timber assets, the landowner is able to keep their forest property healthy and productive. Harvesting, or selective cutting, is t he process of removing only specific trees and is the means by which one keeps timber assets. As a result of a harvest, poor quality trees are removed and sold as pulpwood or biomass. Good quality trees are removed and delivered to sawmills and lumberyards. Both result in the generation of income for the landowner and the creation of a forest environment in which their timber investment will continue to grow.

TIMBER HARVESTING • Harvest plan development • Boundary line location • Timber marking & trail layout • Logger contracting and logging supervision • Permitting & notification with local and state agencies • Providing insurance certification to landowners A lt houg h protect i ng a nd developi ng one’s financial investment in a property can be a significant motivating factor in the decision to work with a professional forester, the benefits of the harvest extend to ot her a spect s of t he la ndow ner’s enjoyment of their property. The process begins with the landowner’s interest in managing a woodlot on his or her property. During a free initial consultation, the foresters at Wadsworth Woodlands and la ndow ners ident i f y a nd out l i ne t he landowner’s objectives. With objectives established, the Wadsworth Woodlands team sets about the task of meeting the landow ner’s goals while

Jack Wadsworth, Jesse Duplin, Brian Reader, and Nathan Wadsworth comply i ng w it h “Best Ma nagement Practices.” Careful consideration is also given to rules and regulations established by the towns, counties and states of Maine and New Hampshire, as well as by the federal government. Boundary lines are identified and marked with f lags for future use by logging contractors. Using the latest technologies including globa l positioning systems and aeria l photog raphy, Wadswor t h Wood la nds is able to create an accurate forest map that identifies boundaries as well as the locations and acreage of fields, swamps, streams, bodies of water, old roads and stone walls. They are also able to create a map regarding the locations and acreage of stands of softwood and hardwood trees. During t his process, t he t rees recommended for removal are identified and marked. This allows the landowner to see exactly what trees will be removed and allows the professionals at Wadsworth Woodlands to determine the value of the standing timber to be harvested. Wadsworth Woodlands has also been committed to harvesting timber in an environmentally friendly manner and using these maps, the foresters are able to lay out the skid roads in the most efficient manner so that the harvesting will have the least impact possible. Wadsworth Woodlands hires and supervises the logging crews who perform the task of cutting and delivering the trees to the mills. According to Nate, “Foresters

add value to the harvesting transaction. We pool our wood from all seven logging crews that we subcontract and negotiate a much higher price at a sawmill than a single logging contractor could negotiate.” In fact, Wadsworth Woodlands is “Hancock Lumber’s number one supplier of pine.” Education is also important at Wadsworth Woodlands. Wadsworth Woodlands is well versed with respect to the current rules and regulations, as well as Best Management Practices, and by working as a team is able to coordinate all aspects of each project for the landowner. T h roug h ca ref u l at tent ion to a l l details, expertise with respect to good forest ma nagement practices a nd a n understanding of rules and regulations, Wa d s w o r t h Wo o d l a n d s ’ L i c e n s e d Professiona l Foresters ca n help t he landowner “improve the aesthetic and biological integrity of the forest. Wildlife habitat, recreational opportunities, access, and forest health can all be improved with the thoughtful application of forest science.” In addition, properly managed w o o d l ot i n v e s t m e n t s w i l l r e m a i n healthy and productive, and will create a satisfactory return for generations. To learn more about how Wadsworth Woodlands can help you meet your goals if you own 10 or more acres of woodland, contact them at 207-625-2468 or visit them at their website or office in Cornish, Maine.

LOGGING • FORESTRY

WOODLANDS

I N C

Every service that your woodlot needs, from economical Tree Growth Plans to GPS Woodlot Mapping.

Professional, Licensed Foresters Serving Maine & New Hampshire

207-625-2468

35 Rock Crop Way, Hiram, ME • www.wadsworthwoodlands.com

6

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Whited Motorhome & RV: 10th anniversary celebration By David A. Sargent Feature Writer / Photographer It is t he 10t h a n n iversa r y of W h ited Motorhome and RV Center at 2160 Hotel Road in Auburn and Gary Mynahan, manager, has been seeing lots of interest in the newest units as warmer weather approaches. He said signs of an improving economy are evident. There is a trend to downsizing and he believes the lightweight, towable units will be most popular this year. “We began to see a lot of customer interest in January and February,” Mynahan said. “Our lot is always cleared of snow and it made it easy to come here and check out all the vehicles, inside and out.” A motor home or a towable RV is a sensible way to get a second home, Mynahan said. “It’s not necessary to have your own heavy-duty pick-up truck or SUV for towing,” he said. “We can tow it to a campground and set it up on a lot, ready to move in.” Bill Strauss, sales professional at Whited’s spacious location near the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport, likes to tell people who are considering purchasing an RV, “Wherever you are, you’re always at home.” He and sales professional Scott Lewis have a dozen years combined in RV sales at Whited in Auburn, and they agree that finding just the right fit in an RV for each customer is a rewarding goal for all. “They are the nuts and bolts of this place,” said Mynahan, “I count on their expertise. We are a team and we get together all the time to brainstorm about things that can make this operation better.” Mynahan, Lewis and Strauss are particularly pleased when they see RV buyers come back to Whited to upgrade their RV or trade for something a bit different once they have discovered what is right for them. Lewis said, “In the past, it seemed that nobody under the age of 60 was looking at motor homes,” he said. “Now, couples in their 30s and 40s are buying moderate-size motor homes.” He agreed that lightweight, towable models are gaining favor all the time. Lewis and Strauss have plenty of stories to tell. They recall a husband and wife whose first-time purchase was a Winnebago unit. They said they planned to place their unit at a campground where they would stay put for the season. But first, they decided to try a trip on the road. They wound up in New Mexico and Arizona, and they found that it had been so easy and enjoyable that they were in no hurry to come back to Maine. Lewis emphasizes the importance of making the W hited RV experience an easy-going and productive relationship for customers.

“We make long-lasting friendships with a lot of people,” Lewis said. “They stop in just to say ‘Hi’ and to tell us what they did on their vacations and trips. They tell me about parts of the country they have visited, but probably I will never get to visit.” Some people want to be on the move, Lewis said. They will use their recreational vehicles to follow the NASCAR circuit or visit tourist destinations throughout the nation. It is also a popular way to travel for visits with friends or relatives. Ot hers li ke to stay put, a nd t hey enjoy getting to know their camping neighbors. Bot h L ew is a nd St rauss a re wel l acquainted with the needs and benefits of campgrounds. They can deliver vehicles right to the campground site and place it on the lot. They also point out that campers like to help their neighbors, so new RV owners are never at a loss for help with equipment or camping tips. Strauss ran a campground in Wester n Ma ine not ma ny yea rs ago, so he sa id he u ndersta nds t he RV owner’s perspective. My na ha n empha si zed t hat product knowledge is ver y important. Mynahan, Strauss and Lewis stay up-to-date on all the latest makes and models. They know the W hited product lines and they know the competitors’ products, so they are wellequipped to help their customers make the right choices.

Dozens of recreational vehicles are on display at the large Whited RV lot at 2160 Hotel Road near the Auburn-Lewiston Municipal Airport.

Scott Lewis, sales professional, checks out the swivel driver seat in a Winnebago Vista motorhome.

“It ’s a n e duc at iona l proc ess a nd t he important thing to know is how well the units are made,” Mynahan said. The Whited team makes a particular effort to make just the right match between the buyer and unit depending on their wants and needs. Mynahan said the Auburn facility has a big service shop at the adjacent truck center building. Four bays are dedicated to servicing RVs, there is a full-service parts department and the shop is open until midnight. New vehicles a re a rriv ing a ll t he time, Mynahan said. That means the line-up of used RVs on the lot is also changing often. He said lots of people make frequent visits to check out the latest arrivals at Whited. T he W h ited RV product l i nes i nclude Forest River and its all-new Surveyor line, Winnebago, Keystone RV Company, Cruiser RV and others. Many details of each unit can be found online at their website at www. whitedrv.com. It is possible to see photos of each unit, specifications on all its features, and even a floor plan.

Gary Mynahan, manager, shows information about the many types of recreational vehicles on display during their 10th anniversary year. Photo, right: Scott Lewis, left, and Bill Strauss, right, Whited sales professionals, demonstrate an outdoor kitchen with gas grill, sink and refrigerator, one of the popular features available on many new towable units. Photo, below: Expandable sleeping space is a feature of the new hybrid models of towable recreation vehicles. Lewis and Strauss show the canvas and screen space that comes on hard-side, hard-top RVs.

Mynahan, Lewis and Strauss can be reached at Whited’s large Auburn location by calling 800-235-3613 or 207-786-3673. They look forward to sharing their 10th anniversary celebration with new and past customers.

www.whitedrv.com Whited Motorhome & RV • 2160 Hotel Road, Auburn, ME • 800-235-3613 Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

7


Sea Dogs Promotional Schedule

2011 Portland Sea Dogs Schedule Sea Dogs Ticket Office 207-879-9500 www.seadogs.com APRIL

MAY

SUN MON TUE WED THU

Fireworks April 22 3

4

5

6

FRI 1

SAT 2

5

7

8

9

10

11

AL

RI

RI

RI

BO

BO

7:00 14

7:00 15

7:00 16

7:00 17

6:00 18

ER

ER

ER

AK

AK

20

21

22

23

24

25

NH

NH

27

8

9

10

11

12

NB

NH

NH

NH

NB

NB

6:00 15

1:00 16

1:00 15

17

18

19

20

21

12

NB

NB

NB

RE

RE

RE

TR

TR

BO

23

22

6:00 24

6:00 12:00 25 26

28

1:00 19

TR

NH

NH

NH

NH

TR

TR

AK

TR

TR

TR

6:00 31

6:00

6:00

7:00

1:00

29

6:00 30

26

7:00 28

7:00 29

6:00 30

TR

TR

NB

NB

NB

NB

NH

1:00

1:00

7:00

7:00 12:00 7:00

13

TR

NB

1:00 17

6:00 18

6:00 19

6:00 20

NB

BI

BI

BI

NB

NB

NB

27

6:00 28

6:00 29

1:00 30

BI

BI

RE

RE

21

22

6:00 12:00

16

23

JULY

27

Fireworks May 6

Fireworks July 3

13

NH

FRI 1

SAT 2

SUN MON TUE WED THU 31 1 2 3 4

FRI 5

SAT 6

NH

NH

AL

BO

BO

BO

RI

RI

8

9

10

11

12

13

AK

15

SUN MON TUE WED THU Field of Dreams 1

September 4

3

4

5

6

7

7:00 8

6:00 9

1:00 7

NH

BI

BI

BI

BI

NH

NH

RI

AK

AK

ER

ER

NH

NH

7:00 12:00 7:00 17 18 19

6:00 20

1:00

1:00

14

7:00 16

RE

RE

6:00 10

11

NH

NH

17

18

NB

BI

1:00 24

7:00 25

NH

BI

12 13 14 ALL STAR NB 7:00 BREAK 19 20 21

BI

BI

7:00 12:00 26 27

BI

BI

NH

15

16

NB

NB

ER

7:00 22

6:00 23

1:00 21

22

23

NH

NH

BI

HB

HB

7:00 29

6:00 12:00 30 31

HB

HB

28

29

30

1:00 28

AL

AL

AL

RE

7:00

7:00

6:00

RE

BI

BI

24

25

7:00 26

TBA 27

HB

RE

RE

RE

HB

Fireworks August 23

Home

Away

at Fenway Park

WERZ 1240 AM Lewiston WTME 780 AM Richmond WKTQ 1450 AM South Paris

4

AK AL BI BO ER HB NB NH RE RI TR

SUN JOURNAL

HB

April 9

1:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Reading Phillies Schedule Magnet Giveaway COURTESY OF PAUL G. WHITE INTERIOR SOLUTIONS

April 12 6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Trenton Thunder (New York Yankees) Sea Dogs Poster Schedule Giveaway PRESENTED BY NORTHEAST MOBILE HEALTH SERVICES

New England Patriots player Rob Gronkowski appears at Hadlock Field April 22 6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Britain Rock Cats (Minnesota Twins) FIREWORKS show after the game PRESENTED BY OXFORD NETWORKS & WCYY

April 27

6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Binghamton Mets Jon Lester Bobblehead to the first 1,000 fans MADE POSSIBLE BY U.S. CELLULAR

May 6

6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Britain Rock Cats (Minnesota Twins) FIREWORKS show after the game MADE POSSIBLE BY U.S. CELLULAR & WJBQ

May 8

SEPTEMBER

Listen to games on:

8

6

AUGUST

SUN MON TUE WED THU

AL

NB

9

12

BI

NB

AL

NB 1:00 14

RE

TR

6:00

NB

SAT 4

NB

8

11

BI

June 23

FRI 3

TR

RE

TR

6:00

TR

SUN MON TUE WED THU Fireworks 1 2

7

10

26

TR

SAT 7

RE RE

25

TR

FRI 6 6:00 13

6:00 14

24

SUN MON TUE WED THU 1 2 3 4 5

RE

as of April 1, 2011 (Game times and promotions are subject to change)

JUNE

FRI 2

SAT 3

NH

NH

7:00

6:00

5

Akron Aeros (Indians) Altoona Curve (Pirates) Binghamton Mets (Mets) Bowie Baysox (Orioles) Erie SeaWolves (Tigers) Harrisburg Senators (Nationals) New Britain Rock Cats (Twins) New Hampshire Fisher Cats (Blue Jays)

Reading Phillies (Phillies) Richmond Flying Squirrels (Giants) Trenton Thunder (Yankees)

May 17

1:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Britain Pink Jerseys worn by the Sea Dogs players during the game 6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Reading Phillies “All the Hair You Can Spare” PRESENTED BY AKARI & 99.9 THE WOLF

May 24

6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Hampshire (Toronto Blue Jays) “Mike Piazza Dog Tricks” Night

May 25

6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Hampshire (Toronto Blue Jays) WEBKINZ GIVEAWAY GAME

MADE POSSIBLE BY U.S. CELLULAR

PRESENTED BY NORTHEAST DELTA DENTAL

May 26

Portland Sea Dogs Leading Women Awards 6:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. New Hampshire (Toronto Blue Jays) Kevin Youkilis Bobblehead to the first 1,000 fans COURTESY OF IRVING OIL

May 29

1:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Trenton Thunder (New York Yankees) L.L. Bean Day at Hadlock Field May 30 10:00 am Play Catch on the Field from 10:00 am-11:15 am COURTESY OF MERCY HOSPITAL

May 30

PR FILE 2011

1:00 pm Sea Dogs vs. Trenton (New York Yankees)

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Earrings and Company: Handcrafted treasures await you By Elizabeth Webster Feature Writer / Photographer

Carrie McBride has two good reasons for asking Freeport shoppers to “lend me your ears.” The most obvious reason is that she’s the owner of Earrings and Company which features affordable handcrafted jewelry by more than 75 American and Canadian artisans. The other is that she wants current and new customers to hear that each of her jewelry artisans have been carefully selected for their individual style, quality craftsmanship and commitment to their craft. Customers visiting her store at 2 Mechanic Street in Freeport, situated a block from L.L. Bean, will clearly see the exceptional range of jewelry available, neatly displayed along her freshly painted walls. “To meet the needs of our diverse customer base, we select a wide variety of interesting and unique jewelry in a variety of price ranges. Styles from vintage to contemporary, classic to hip, serious to whimsical, are created in media including sterling silver, 14k gold, copper, brass, semi-precious stones, porcelain and glass,” McBride explained.

Carrie McBride, owner of Earrings and Company, left, and a display of merchandise including unique jewelry from vintage to contemporary, classic to hip. In addition to offering the area’s largest variety of jewelry, McBride also carries a full selection of Chamilia beads, the number one competitor of Pandora in the personalized jewelry category. “We k new cha rm beads were a popu la r t rend a nd our customers wa nted t hem. We chose t he Cha m i l ia bra nd for t wo reasons. First, Chamilia is family-owned and operated in America, and second, the bead designs are intricate, fresh and fun,” she said. Earrings and Company holds seasonal “bead parties” where customers can work with

McBride’s talented and creative sales staff to design their own unique jewelry. “We put customer service as our top priority,” McBr ide st ate d . “ We def i n itel y work with each customer to help them select just the right jewelry for their needs. If we don’t have what they are looking for, we will try to find it. Special orders are a large part of our business. In some cases, an artisan will make custom pieces.” And spring is definitely in the air at Earrings and Company w ith bright, new exciting mercha nd ise a r r iv i ng da i ly. New t h is season is a bridal/prom section filled with

necklaces, earrings and hair accessories for brides, bridesmaids, mothers of the bride and prom night. McBride’s goal for 2011 is to introduce more brilliant and original handcrafted jewelry from artisans throughout North America, “offering even more fantastic creations to a store that’s already brimming w ith spectacular designs,” she promised. “Drop in and see our treasures. You won’t be disappointed. We also encourage our customers, bot h old a nd new, to shop online at www.earringsandcompany.com,” McBride said.

2 Mechanic St., Freeport, ME • 866-209-2570 • www.earringsandcompany.com

Rolandeau’ s RESTAURANT

OUR SPECIALTY

16oz. Roast Prime Rib of Beef Au Jus $1595 Served with Tossed Green Salad, Choice of Potato, Bread & Butter

Still the “BEST DEAL” in LA

In 1971, 40 years ago, Roland Nadeau noticed a need for a fine dining establishment in the Auburn-Lewiston area. He wanted to bring to his patrons a quiet, dignified dining-out experience. With this goal in mind he opened Rolandeau’s Restaurant at 775 Washington Street in Auburn and made a commitment to provide a restaurant where you can enjoy a quiet luncheon, an elegant evening dinner, entertain business associates, have a private party, have your wedding rehearsal and/or wedding and leave feeling that you matter to the people who just served you. Rolandeau’s specializes in both French and American cuisine. The Specialty of

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

the house is the Roast Rib of Beef served au jus, “the best anywhere around,” Roland states proudly. Rolandeau’s also specializes in roast duck. If you are craving seafood, try the Fresh Lobster and other seafood dishes. The veal dinner at Rolandeau’s is a favorite with many patrons. With a capacity for 225 diners, Rolandeau’s is a fine choice for that special birthday or anniversary party. There are private dining rooms which make these occasions secluded and memorable. The establishment welcomes you to plan your wedding rehearsal dinner there, and also has means to accommodate your wedding if you wish. Rolandeau’s takes busi-

SUN JOURNAL

ness meetings right in stride as well. Just let them know your needs and they will provide an enjoyable eating experience for you. Rolandeau’s is open for lunch Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Their luncheon specials are priced from $6.95 to $9.95. Rolandeau’s dinner hours are from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The restaurant is closed on Sundays and Mondays. Reservations are not required but will be cheerfully accepted. Call 784-2110.

Rolandeau’s Restaurant

Roland Nadeau

Bringing you Fine Dining and Great Food for over 40 years!

775 Washington Street, Auburn

784-2110

www.rolandeausrestaurant.com

PR FILE 2011

9


Building Partnerships Western Maine Communities Working Together

Highlights 2010

Meeting the Needs of Western Maine

Regional Services

The joint purchase of 34,364 tons of road salt netted an estimated $168,430 in savings for the 51 participating towns and counties. Household Hazardous Waste collection activities removed 10,470 gallons of HHW from the solid waste stream. Operated the Environmental Depot in Lewiston from May to November and held nine one day collection events throughout the AVCOG region. Assisted, on average, six municipalities per day with planning, land use, environmental, and code enforcement issues. Regional Universal Waste Program to collect fluorescent bulbs, batteries, TVs, and computers saved municipalities around 10% of the cost of recycling these products.

• •

Fulfilled 1,301 requests for regional tourism information

• •

Regional Promotion

• •

Maine’s Lakes & Mountains Tourism Council members represented the region at the following consumer trade shows: The Big E, Boston Globe Travel Show, New York Times Travel Show and the Montreal Hunting, Fishing, Camping Show. Maine’s Lakes and Mountains website received 11,588 unique visits.

Regional Business Development

www.avcog.org

Regional Economic Development Business Lending and Counseling

• •

Financial Management Services Transportation Planning

State and Federal Relations

Environmental Management “To strengthen local self government while combining total resources for meeting regional challenges beyond individual’s capacities…” AVCOG Bylaws 125 Manley Road, Auburn, ME 04210 • 207-783-9186 • www.avcog.org

10

$1,000,000 in AVCOG lending leveraged nearly $2.8 Million in private investment and created/retained 110 jobs. Small Business Development Center counselors provided services to over 317 clients; created 75 jobs; retained 59 jobs; started 27 businesses; helped submit 45 loan applications for a total of $7,514,923, of which 37 have been approved for a total of $5,033,620. Manufacturing Extension Partnership staff reached out to and/or assisted 45 area businesses. Maine Procurement Technical Assistance Center staff assisted over 120 clients with completing government registrations, providing bid match services, GSA assistance, competitive knowledge and procurement history, and one-on-one counseling assistance.

SUN JOURNAL

• • •

The Northern Border Regional Commission designated AVCOG to provide a delivery role for this multi-state federal commission aimed at improving the regional economy. The Maine Quality of Place Initiative proposes to have AVCOG develop a Regional Quality of Place Strategy with recommended projects. Appointed by the Governor, staff serves on the State Quality of Place Council. AVCOG staff is designated as the regional Business Development Specialist for the Maine Office of Business Development’s programs and services. AVCOG staff serves on the statewide Rail Plan Committee.

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Electrical Systems of Maine: Using electricity wiser By Dan Marois Feature Writer / Photographer If there is a need for electrical ser v ices in your upcoming project, you will find just about ever y t h i ng you m ig ht need at Electrical Systems of Maine on Minot Avenue in Auburn. You might as well call this

company, “Everything Electrical Services,� because the company provides electrical services for residential, commercial and industrial installations. “We provide everything from engineering a nd design to insta llation,� sa id Dav id Tassina r i, ow ner of Elect r ica l Systems of Ma i ne. “ We a l so prov ide ongoi ng ma intena nce a nd ser v ice for electrica l installations. I guess you might say we do everything electrical from start to finish as well as ongoing service to the customer.� Electrical Systems of Maine was established in 1985. Since then, the company has built its reputation one job at a time on projects ranging from hospitals and manufacturing facilities to commercial buildings and highend residential homes. Take a look at the company website and you will find that no job is too small or too large in the scope of what ESM can do. Current projects include electrical renovations at Bates College’s Hedge and Roger Williams halls and the installation of new operating rooms and facility renovations at St. Mary’s Hospital in Lewiston. E S M of f e r s a f f or d a b l e p a c k a g e s f or residential back up power needs. (Remember t he impact of power outages in t he Ice

Storm of 1998?) The ESM website boasts many residential generator options that are installed directly into home wiring systems for ease of use and convenience. For as little as $1,995, ESM can provide a home generator system that w ill prov ide peace of mind when wind and ice storms run rampant in Maine winters. ESM also has a unique ser vice that can diagnose electrical problems called thermal imaging. By using this technology, electrical professionals can locate faulty components, poor connections, contamination, corrosion and load imbalances that can potentially lead to a safety hazard. “Monitoring electrical connections with thermal imaging can accurately evaluate potential problems and allow you to take preemptive action to manage those problems without failure,� said Matthew Tassinari, project manager. ESM’s service department also performs work ranging from replacing faulty devices such as sw itches, receptacles, lig ht ing ba l lasts a nd la mps to t roubleshoot ing machinery and other electrical concerns. Need an energy overhaul? One of the best ways to reduce your electricity consumption is by installing energ y-efficient lighting

such as LED or high-efficiency f luorescent technolog y. ESM is an Efficiency Maine Qualified Partner and can help guide you through the product selection, installation, and incentive paperwork process. If you need elect r ica l ser v ice for your next project, help is only a phone call away at 783-7126. The ESM website also has an online work order form where customers can schedule electrical service. “Customer service is the cornerstone of what we do and our service department is ready to dispatch an electrical service tech to your site, same day in most cases,� said Craig Norcross, operations manager. “We take great pride in getting the job done on time and within budget and our employees are trained to give our customers the best quality installation possible.�

Electrical Systems of Maine • 1200 Minot Ave., Auburn, ME • 783-7126 • www.electricalsystemsofmaine.com

   ďż˝    ďż˝               

 €    



    

 ‚   

  

   

     

             ďż˝          Â?Â?   Â?  Â? Â?            ­               ���

  

ďż˝                     ďż˝   ďż˝                    ďż˝       ďż˝     Â?    Â?  ďż˝Â?     ďż˝ Â?    Â? Â? ­  €  Â? ‚  ƒ„  …€ †      ‡   Â?  ˆÂ?‰      Â?     Â?   Š ‰  Â?‹       Â?       Â?

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

11


Tambrands takes out the trash By Duke Harrington Feature Writer It’s the largest private employer in Auburn, with a 500,000-square-foot manufacturing facility to boot, so naturally you’d assume Tambrands is a pretty big contributor to local landfills. But you’d be wrong. Earlier this year, the Hotel Road plant, which produces nine million Tampax brand tampons per day, supplying the entire North American ma rket for pa rent compa ny Procter & Gamble, capped off a three-year project to become completely “landfill free.” Although the manufacturing facility creates 2,300 tons of waste a nnua l ly, not one ounce of it ends up in a landfill. Today, everything that once might have gone in the dumpster, to be buried and forgotten, is recycled, reused, or re-purposed. In ma ny ways, Ta mbra nds is a head of the curve. It beat 36 sister-plants on this continent to the waste-free punch, joining just eight in the global P&G family to achieve the first phase in a new, green initiative for a company which touches the lives of families around the world three billion times per day, with trusted brands like, Pampers diapers, Tide detergents, Bounty paper towels, Crest toothpaste and Duracell batteries. Last September, Cincinnati-based P&G went one step further, announcing a long-

term vision to power all of the 140 facilities it ow n s w orld w ide w it h 10 0 -p erc ent renewable energy, while using 100-percent renewable or recycled materials in all of its products and packaging. “These [goals] give value to waste, whereas waste that ends up in landfills has no value,” sa id P& G Globa l Supply Of f icer Keit h Harrison. “As it relates to manufacturing waste, we want to ensure that over 99.5 percent of what enters our plants goes out the door as finished product or has some other beneficial end-of-life use by 2020.” That’s not necessarily a money-ma k ing prospect for P&G. In fact, Ta mbra nds Fina ncia l Ma nager Dav id Ba r tage sa id the company committed to the green project even though it expected to lose money. The zero-landfill initiative did end up paying for itself, thanks to recycling revenue, which of fset i ncrea sed t ra nspor tat ion cost s. Still, long before anyone knew that might happen, all 450 Auburn employees jumped on board with the idea, spurred on by a greater motivation. P & G’s c om m it ment to c om mu n it y i s evident from the top down. Since buying Tambrands in 1997, it has invested more than $350 million in operations here, adding nine production lines for its Tampax Pearl line (which now accounts for 30 percent of the tampon market) and creating jobs that,

in terms of wages, benefits and working conditions are among the very best in Maine. As part of the green initiative, Tambrands launched a popular auction series in which employees bid on tools, office furniture a nd ot her equ ipment t hat once wou ld have been tossed out. Proceeds from those auctions, which last year netted more than $10,000, are donated to the United Way. “It’s win-win-win. The employees love it,” said Tambrands’ External Relations Manager Rick Malinowski. The company achieved the balance of its zero-waste efforts via partnerships with area businesses, all facilitated by Sonoco Sustainability Solutions, of South Carolina. Used computers a re donated to Rut h’s Reusable Resources, in Port land, while nu merou s produc t sa mples a re g iven to nearby Good Shepherd Food Bank. About 60 percent of the company’s remaining waste, including cardboard, plastics, metal and paper, is sent to recycling plants run by Corcoran Environmental in Kennebunk and Mechanic Falls. The rest is sent to the Mid-Maine Waste Action Corp. plant in Auburn, where it is incinerated a nd converted to electricity. Tambrands’ green project has meant new jobs for at least one local business Sonoco helped it to partner with. The Corcoran bailing unit in Mechanic Falls, which opened in July, 2010, now has nine employees. “We could not have justified opening it up at all had it not been for the Tambrands account,” said company co-owner, Nadja Corcoran.

Tampax division of worldwide, householdproducts maker Procter & Gamble, includes among its leaders (left to right): Site Engineer Gary Bair, Plant Manager Felica Coney, Facilities Leader Mark Dobransky, Purchasing Agent Ken Bellefleur, Environmental Leader Don Dallaire and Site Finance Leader David Bartage.

“The interests of employees, the company and the local community are inseparable,” said P&G’s Tambrands plant manager, Felica Coney. P&G has often called its Auburn plant a “key” to the corporation’s success. Working toward a sustainable environment, the company said, is no less important than its basic goal of bringing value to the lives of consumers. “Even t houg h we a re zero-la ndf i l l, we don’t look at it like we’re done,” said P&G Tambrands Purchasing Agent Ken Bellefleur, who is credited with pulling a large part of the load on the green project, and who continues to seek end-users for a whole host of manufacturing by-products that now go to the incinerator. “In everything we do, we are always looking for better solutions.”

Tambrands, Inc. / P&G • 2879 Hotel Road, Auburn, ME • 753-4000 • www.pg.com

12

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


�   ­

€€

‚   ƒ   

 „           

…       †„  … „            

  

             ‡

ˆ‰�

�ƒŠ

 

� 

‹     �  

 

   �  

‹      �

 

      � 

                               �     �

  � � � � � � � �       

    �

 Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

�   

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

13


Maine’s hospitality family: Fireside Inn & Suites, Auburn By Rich Livingston Feature Writer / Photographer From Ogunquit to Bar Harbor; from the Holiday Inn by the Bay to the Senator Inn & Spa in Augusta; Auburn’s own Fireside Inn and Suites hotel, a familiar sight at turnpike exit 75, is part of a family of more than two dozen fine hospitality venues in Maine, New Hampshire and Michigan. With a bustling conference center and catering operation, 100 rooms, each w it h ref r igerator a nd microwave, many with in-room fireplaces and some suites with in-room Jacuzzis, “Our plan,” explained General Manager Jessica Mooney, “is to bring back the kind of atmosphere local folks remember from when this was John Martin’s Manor.” Under the supervision of Food and Beverage Manager Richard Fields, who had previously spent eight years at the events and guest house prog ra m at Pinela nd Fa r ms, t he Danny Boy’s Irish Pub and Restaurant is increasingly appealing to L-A people. “We host 30 to 40 business-related functions each year,” Fields explained, “and all sorts of social functions, including weddings and other catered events.” The Inn continues to host its annual bridal show, and offers complete wedding packages, as well. There are three function rooms,

Staff Jessica Mooney, Richard Fields, Amanda Fyfe

with the largest accommodating between 150 to 200 guests. There is a family-friendly restaurant beyond the traditional pub. “We remain a major destination for tour buses and for visiting sports teams,” Fields said, “but we’re really happy to see local people returning for dinner and an evening of entertainment, and becoming ‘regulars’ here, too.” The Inn hosts more t ha n a dozen w i ne ta st i ngs a nd ha s a ser ies of comedy nig hts a nd murder myster y evenings. The pub, restaurant and catering depa rtment of fer a surprising ra nge of delectable menu options, perfect for any occasion or evening out. Many of the contemporary and comfortably appoi nted rooms i nclude work i ng gas

Danny Boy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant

Fireside Inn & Suites is located at exit 75

fireplaces, as do larger suites. The Fireside, like many of the Lafayette properties, is a petfriendly hotel. The family’s website, http:// lafayettehotels.biz, proclaims that, whenever asked about pets, the general response is that, “Dogs are welcome in this hotel. We’ve never had a dog that smoked in bed and set fire to the blankets. We’ve never had a dog who stole the towels, played the TV too loud or had a fight with his traveling companion. We’ve never had a dog who got drunk and broke up the furniture. So, if your dog can vouch for you, you’re welcome, too!”

in which t hey’re located, a nd Mooney said the Auburn Fireside Inn is making a special effort to re-introduce itself to its hometown people.

“We a re a lw ay s pa r t ic u la rly crowded during snowstorms,” Mooney quipped. “We are a snug, comfortable alternative to being on the road!” The Lafayette family of hotels are all dedicated to the communities

The hotel group, headquartered in Bangor, employs over 1,000 people, and has deep charitable commitments to the University of Maine, the Maine Institute for Human Genetics and Health, and the Lafayette Family Cancer Center, in Brewer. Comfort, convenience, conv iv iality and great food and fun, along with a commitment to their guests and their community, the Fireside Inn and Suites of Auburn, despite its very familiar and visible location, is one of the town’s great under-discovered dining and lodging alternatives.

Fireside Inn & Suites • Washington Ave., Exit 75, Auburn, ME • 777-1777 • www.firesideinnauburn.com

14

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Degree completion program at USM’s LAC Many people begin college with the best intentions, but, sometimes, life gets in the way. Whether it is due to personal circumstances, a move, or a career change, they find themselves with credits from various institutions of higher education, but still do not have a bachelor’s degree. T he Un i v er sit y of S out her n Ma i ne’s Lew iston-Aubu r n Col lege Deg ree Completion program is designed to address this problem. The new degree completion

program introduced this past year at USM L AC is designed to help individuals, who have a variety of academic backgrounds, employ ment ex per ience a nd ca reer aspirations, complete their degrees. St u d e nt s c a n a p p l y a nd i nt e g r a t e a combination of courses at USM, transfer credits, and credits for prior learning into a de g re e i n A r t s & Hu ma n it ie s or Leadership Studies. The degree completion program at USM LAC allows greater f lexibility and greater access for people who may only need a few more credits to obtain a bachelors degree. Prospective students in the degree completion track work closely with advisors from USM LAC to put together a portfolio of life experiences, assess credit transfers, and help select courses. Students need to take 30 credits at USM through courses and a portfolio. Classes are available in either faceto-face or online formats as well as blended face-to-face and online classes. “For years I wanted to go back to school to finish the degree I had started, but finding a program that fit my needs was a problem,” said USM L AC graduate, Mark Coursey. “Home and work left me with little time for school and many programs, especially those offered online, were too expensive.

The Leadership and Organizational Studies program at USM L AC solved all of these problems. Class schedules were f lexible, the faculty understood the challenges of balancing school with life, and I found the course work to be relevant and engaging.” T he Un i v er s it y of S out her n Ma i ne’s Lewiston-Auburn College offers bachelor and graduate degree programs that include an array of courses, internships, research and community service projects, and study abroad opportunities. As one of three campuses of the University of Sout hern Ma ine, USM L AC prov ides the intimacy of a small college, yet offers access to the resources of the state’s regional metropolitan university. Its internationallyrecognized faculty offer classes face-toface, entirely online or in blended format (meeting in person some times and online at other times). USM LAC plays an especially distinctive role in addressing the higher education needs of Androscoggin County through its broadbased interd isciplina r y underg raduate majors: Arts & Humanities, Leadership & Organizational Studies, Natural & Applied Sciences, and Social & Behavioral Sciences. The Lew iston-Auburn campus has a lso been responsive to the need for graduate

educat ion prog ra ms in Cent ra l Ma ine. T he Masters i n Occupat iona l T herapy and Leadership Studies programs have established nat iona l a nd internat iona l reputat ions for excel lence, a nd ma ke sig n i f ica nt cont r ibut ions to t he loca l com mu n it y. Cer t i f icate prog ra m s a re available in the Leadership Studies program and the Occupational Therapy program. For more information about the degree completion program at USM’s LewistonAuburn College, please visit usm.maine.edu/ lac or call 753-6500.

USM’s Lewiston-Auburn College • 51 Westminster St., Lewiston, ME • 753-6500 • usm.maine.edu/lac

RETIRED OR RETIRING SOON? Concerned About Your Retirement Account? Call Gregory Strong Toll Free at

1-877-692-3979

Free One Hour Appointments Available ■ 401(k) Rollover/IRA Questions or Concerns ■ Learn how you can now protect your retirement accounts from the IRS, and perhaps save 20% or ■ Sound Investment Strategies to Help Build Your more in taxes. Retirement Fund ■ Learn how to protect your life savings from Long ■ Strategies for a Comfortable Retirement Term Care Health Costs – without paying for annual ■ Ways to Deal with Volatile Markets and Low Interest Rates premium insurance. ■ Create a lifetime Income stream ■ Strategies for a Comfortable Retirement ■ Making Sure Your Estate is Distributed The Way You Want

GREGORY STRONG

FREE Appointments Offered in

LEWISTON • NAPLES • YARMOUTH

Call 1-877-692-3979 Today

Helping Mainers since 1975

40 Forest Falls Drive, Yarmouth, Maine

1-207-846-0734

Securities offered through Center Street Securities, Inc (CSS), a registered Broker-Dealer and member of FINRA and SIPC

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

15


                                                           

        �          

‹

 

 €ˆ‚‚‚     „  …      �                  †      

   

 „        †    Š 

 

                    ­€‚      ƒ  „  …            †   ‡    

 

16



    ­  SUN JOURNAL

  �  ‚  

PR FILE 2011



ƒ„…   †

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Profile Business

Home | Profile The local companies profiled in this section have an impressive history of experience and knowledge. Whether planning your dream home or living in it, they are prepared to service and support area homeowners, from the ground up.


Bed Bugs.... Appearance

• Eggs are pearl white and only 1mm long • Nymphs are almost translucent and also about 1mm long • Adults are about ¼ inch long and reddish-brown

Activity

• Mostly nocturnal, but are capable of feeding at any time • Attracted by warmth and carbon dioxide • Live in mattresses, linens, upholstery, behind wooden trim, cracks and crevices, luggage and wallpaper • Professional hitchhikers on anyone and anything

Food

• They feed almost exclusively on human blood • They can survive for more than 1 year without a blood meal • Bites do not hurt, but can leave red marks • Bed Bugs are not known to carry disease

Life Cycle • • • • •

Six life stages (5 immature and adult stage) Female can lay 1-5 eggs per day Eggs hatch in 7-10 days Egg hatch to maturity is 1½-2 months Bed bugs shed their skins throughout the multiple stages, leaving a clear, empty exoskeleton

What's the Dog Difference?

Dependable: Dogs have shown to be more than 96% accurate in detecting and pinpointing the location of bed bugs.

How it Works!

Thermal Solutions of Maine uses Thermal Remediation®: a safe, effective, chemical-free and environmentally friendly process using dry heat to kill the entire life cycle of bed bugs. We use Trusted: Dogs are trained to work for food and love specialized equipment in our process including: – not profits. • Electric bed bug heaters that heat infected Cost Effective: Bug detection dogs generate much spaces between 120°-135° F, quicker and more accurate results, meaning less the temperature necessary expensive remediation costs. to heat and kill bed bugs and their eggs. Peace of Mind: Reasonable certainty of the • Wireless sensors that presence of bed bugs. monitor temperatures in Tyson, a black Labrador Retriever, real time to ensure lethal temperatures are was rescued from the Florida reached without damaging the space and it's Humane Society and trained contents. at the Florida K-9 Academy by • High temperature fans that move heated air Bill Whitstine. Bill is a Certified throughout the space to reach infestation zones. Master Trainer, specializing in the training and certification of •Residential •Dormitories bed bug, bomb, drug, money, weapons, termite, mold and accelerant detection dogs. Bill has been •Commercial •Hotels/Motels featured on over nine shows, including segments on •Schools •Condos the Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, HGTV and Extreme Makeover. •Nursing Homes •Fitness Centers

(207) 795-1100 Office www.mainebedbugs.com

FIRE AND WATER DAMAGE n Commercial and Residential

n Trained, Uniformed Professionals

Restoration:

Cleaning:

• Fire, Smoke and Soot

• Air Ducts and HVAC

• Water Removal and Dehumidification

• Biohazard, Crime Scene and Vandalism

• Mold Mitigation and Remediation

• Carpet, Upholstery and Oriental Rugs

• Catastrophic Storm Response

• Catastrophic Storm Response

• Move Outs and Contents Restoration

• Ceilings, Walls and Hard Floors

• Electronics and Equipment

• Odor Identification

• Document Drying

• Deodorization

• Contents Claim Inventory Service

• Services vary by location

n Restoration Vendor for Insurance Companies Nationwide

207-783-2500

Over 1,300 Franchises Nationwide. Servpro® Franchise System Serving Since 1967.

Of Lewiston-Auburn

24 Hour Emergency Service 18

SUN JOURNAL

Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration™ Independently Owned and Operated

Like it never even happened.®

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


HAMMOND LUMBER COMPANY IN HIGH GEAR Bold moves pay off for Auburn and other stores

As signs of economic recovery appear on the horizon, Hammond Lumber now has nine retail locations one Maine family business is already on the road to the throughout the state: Auburn, Bangor, Belgrade, future. By taking new initiatives and making the most Brunswick, Fairfield, Farmington, Greenville, Portland of every opportunity, Hammond Lumber Company and Skowhegan. has been able to add to its long list of customer benefits Auburn going strong by expanding its Maine presence and making valuable The manager of Hammond’s Auburn store, Marc upgrades. Ducharme, says local sales were “We feel very fortunate,” also up significantly last year, says third-generation and he expects the trend to vice president Michael continue through 2011. Hammond. “Some of the “We’re doing very well,” moves we made before Ducharme says, “despite the and during the downtime fact that very few permits have worked out very well.” for new construction have Among those moves was the been issued lately. What’s building of a brand new store in happening is that people are Portland in 2008 and last year’s feeling better about spending purchase of Downeast Building money on fixing up what they Supply in Brunswick and already have, though they’re Pineland Lumber in Lewiston. not quite ready to jump Hammond says the Portland headfirst into the expense of store, though constructed e m a new building.” ar ch Du c ar Store Manager, M right across the street from Among the factors he points to Home Depot and just up the street from Lowe’s, has in his store’s success is the merger with Pineland performed strongly during a challenging time and now last November. Hammond Lumber purchased the has a firmly established customer base of contractors Lewiston company’s assets, including equipment and do-it-yourselfers. and inventory, and also offered positions to its staff, Discussions that led to the acquisitions of Downeast including Pineland’s former co-owners, Neal Ouellette and Pineland were each initiated by the previous owners and Ruth Gallagher. Neal now works with the Auburn “We believe both acquisitions have benefited everyone store, and Ruth in Belgrade. Five other former Pineland involved,” says Michael Hammond. “Opening up in employees now work for Hammond as well. Brunswick allowed us to serve our customers along “We’ve expanded our customer base for sure,” says the coast directly from that area and also give pre- Ducharme, “but we’ve also added tremendously to existing Downeast customers expanded service and the experience of our already very experienced staff. product availability. The Pineland acquisition served It’s great to have Neal working on outside sales. He has a to increase our Lewiston/Auburn customer base and ton of knowledge and knows so many people in the area.” also gave Pineland employees an opportunity to join Joining Ouellette on Hammond-Auburn’s team of road the Hammond team.” reps is as Rene Gaudette, who had worked for Pineland for more than 30 years. They combine talents and experience with three longtime Hammond reps: Jeff Newton, Kevin Hackett and Tim Mancini. “It’s a great bunch,” says Ducharme. “Jeff and Kevin have been here from the start, and Tim has been here for many years, too. Add Neal and Rene to that mix, and you’ve got a very strong team.” TwootherformerPinelanders also now work at the Auburn store. Phil Laurendau, who t, Rene Gaudette,

worked for his father at Lewiston Lumber before going to Pineland after Lewiston closed, works on inside sales. Steve Carver works as an outside receiver.

Understanding MUBEC

Besides adding new facilities and upgrading existing ones, Hammond has focused on intensive training in understanding the intricacies of the new Maine Uniform Building and energy Code (MUBEC). The code is intended to standardize building codes throughout the state and make new buildings and existing buildings more energy efficient and ultimately more cost effective. Among many other requirements, the code calls for R-21 insulation in walls and R-49 in attics, depending on the specific situation. “We’re committed to understanding the code and making customers more aware of products that can help meet it,” says Ducharme. “We want to be able to show them how they can build the most value into their projects.”

Inside/Counter Sales The Auburn store is located on the Poland Road and can be reached by phone toll free at 1-800-439-2826 or 784-4009. Directions for driving to the store are available by phone and e-mail, and by visiting www. hammondlumber.com. Customers may also call 1-866-HAMMOND toll free, and they will be connected with the store nearest where they are calling from.

Hacket L-R Neal Ouellette, Kevini, Jeff Newton Tim Mancin

TOLL FREE

1-866-HAMMOND www.hammondlumber.com

AUBURN - BANGOR - BELGRADE - BRUNSWICK - FAIRFIELD FARMINGTON - GREENVILLE - PORTLAND - SHOWHEGAN Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

19


Sun Media Group Profile By David A. Sargent Freelance Writer LEWISTON -- There’s nothing more rewarding for a community than seeing the building blocks of an extraordinary history become the solid foundation of modern social and technological benefits. That’s the essence of Sun Media Group, the parent organization for the Sun Journal. In addition to ownership of the newspaper that had its beginnings nearly 150 years ago, Sun Media Group now includes numerous weekly publications, and it is at the forefront of technology with online and mobile delivery of news, advertising and area-wide employment information. Four generations of the same family have guided this organization. The Costello family role began when L.B. Costello became associated with the Lewiston Daily Sun soon after he graduated from Bates College in 1898. In a few years he was business manager and treasurer and eventually publisher. His son, Russell H. Costello, led the newspapers for more than 30 years before his son, James Costello, assumed the leadership position in 1983. Today’s Costello family members working at Sun Media Group are James Costello, Sr. president and publisher; James Costello, Jr., vice president - operations; Stephen Costello, vice president - advertising and marketing; David Costello, vice president - technology; and Maureen Wedge, vice president - human resources. The way people receive their news and information has changed over the years and so has Sun Media Group. The Sun Journal’s e-edition brings each issue to computer screens, and for a very inexpensive subscription price, it can be viewed exactly as its print version appears with all the stories, photos and advertisements. Numerous stories also have video that can be seen online. The company has acquired several well-known weekly newspapers and their websites as well. They include Bethel Citizen, The Forecaster Group , Rumford Falls Times, Advertiser-Democrat, Franklin Journal, Livermore Falls Advertiser, Rangeley Highlander, and Penobscot Times. Sun Media Group has become the umbrella business for Sun Press, which is the commercial printing branch, The Employment Times and MyJobWave.com, where both job seekers and employers go to find reliable employment resources, and Celsius Technology Group, offering the most efficient solution for creating, managing and publishing content to any medium - print, web and more. Celsius provides a number of industry specific solutions for newspapers, magazines, schools, non-profits, and local governments. Sun Media Group is committed to keeping YOU connected in print, online, through mobile communication and developing future technology.

20

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Sun Journal, Lewiston, Maine, Saturday, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

21


3 Middle Street Lewiston

784-5721 http://showroom.redlon-johnson.com

MPO-IQ

87%

AFUE

Oil-Fired, High Efficiency, 3-Pass Water Boiler • Features Burnham IQ Control System™ • True Plug & Play Controls Utilizing Burham IQ Option Cards; - Outdoor Reset (with Domestic Hot Water Priority) - Auxiliary High Limit - Low Water Cut-off - Optional LCD Touch Screen Display

Call for an appointment to visit our Showroom Where licensed tradesmen showcase quality & style! (Redlon & Johnson is a wholesale company and does not sell retail.)

• Improved Boiler Operation • 87% AFUE • 3-pass Cast Iron Sectional Design • Built-in Protection for Low Return Water Temperatures • Natural Draft Oil Burner

- Five Sizes Available, 0.60-1.65 GPH

• Direct Vent Option Kit

- Three Sizes Available, 1.05-1.65 GPH

• Easy Installation and Servicing • Multiple Burner Options • A Consumers Digest "Best Buy"

An appointment with one of our showroom consultants gets you EASY ACCESS to a “World of Choices,” Ideas and Advantages.

SHOWROOM HOURS: MON- FRI 8:00AM-4:30PM

Made In The U.S.A.

www.burnham.com

APPOINTMENTS RECOMMENDED

Shawnee Steps a division of

American Concrete Industries of Auburn and Bangor Maine, USA.

American Concrete Industries was formed in 1957 under the name of Maine Shawnee Step Company, Inc. by the Snowe brothers, Carleton, Richard & John. In 1967 the company expanded from Auburn to Veazie, Maine and the corporate name was changed to its present name, American Concrete Industries. Since 1957 American has been producing high quality pre-cast concrete products. The company first started producing concrete steps and later moved into manufacturing burial vaults, septic tanks and commercial products. American Concrete now employs over one hundred people and delivers pre-cast concrete products throughout Maine and northern New England.

American Concrete Industries

1022 Minot Ave, Auburn, Maine 784-1388 • 1-800-638-9000 • www.shawneesteps.com 22

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


 �  

                �  

                   �  

         �          ­ 

€    ‚         

  �

  ƒ „   ƒ … †   ƒ ‡ ƒ  †  ‡   �  ­   „ˆ‰

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

23


AND

economical O U R G UA R A N T E E

and economical with locally quarried stone, a variety of Maine-made hardscape products, and the finest masonry, precast, and construction supplies. Belgrade

Auburn

Westbrook

Quality & integrity etched in stone

Saco

& SON

GAGN

Don’t put off your outdoor improvement project this season. We can help you make it beautiful

Kittery

Naples

Topsham

Call 1.800.339.3313 or visit gagneandson.com.

Everyone has the right to live free from violence. 1 in 4 women will experience domestic violence at some point in their lives. Men can also be victims of domestic violence. If you need information,

The mission of Safe Voices is to support and empower those affected by domestic violence and engage the community in creating social change in Androscoggin, Franklin and Oxford Counties. Services: � � � � � � � � � �

24 Hour Free and Confidential Helpline Emergency Shelter Transitional Services Individual and Court Advocacy Advocacy with Child Protective Services Support Groups Community Education Youth Education/Advocacy Batterers Intervention Program Volunteer Programming

Office Locations: Lewiston: 795-674

24

assistance, or support, please contact us.

24 hour free and confidential helpline 1-800-559-2927 For more information, to get involved, receive our newsletter or learn about upcoming events please visit

www.safevoices.org Or email us at

info@safevoices.org.

Farmington: 778-6107

SUN JOURNAL

Rumford: 369-0750

PR FILE 2011

Norway:743-5806 Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Profile Business

Health | Profile From left: seated, long-time CMMC Emergency Department volunteer Hartley Fogg, and Irene Hughes, R.N.; standing, Theresa Carr, R.N., volunteer John Veader, patient access specialist Sandy Beaulieu, Jeff Chase, R.N., and Lawrence Oliver, M.D., director of emergency medical services. CMMC recently opened its new Emergency Department facility, relocating both the walk-in and the ambulance entrances to the Main Street side of campus. See inside for more details.


26

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

27


28

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Schooner Estates: Comfort in community, confidence in care Retirement Community

By Jackie Rybeck Feature Writer

here... under one roof to make life easier and more enjoyable.”

It’s always a warm welcome at Schooner Estates.

Schooner Estates of fers a wide range of living options to meet each resident’s needs and priorities:

It’s an easy place to feel settled; the lifestyle is first-class and the surroundings are picture perfect. According to Marketing Director Frank Proulx, particulars matter, and at Schooner Estates, nothing is overlooked.

• O ne- a nd t wo-bed room i ndependent living apartments, which are thoughtfully designed with features like well-equipped kitchens and generous storage.

“We have all the comforts of home without t he responsibilities,” Proul x explained. “Dozens of amenities include such things as 24-hour emergency response, security, except iona l d i n i ng, housekeepi ng, door-to-door transportation, home health and personal care ser v ices and indoor/ outdoor maintenance.”

• A s s i s t e d-l i v i n g s t u d i o a p a r t m e n t s , which have caring staff to tailor wellness programs and personal care services to individual needs.

Schooner, with its wide variety of common areas, provides a perfect opportunity to make new friends or get reacquainted with old ones.

“If necessa r y, Schooner Home Hea lt h is a lso ava i lable in a l l liv ing opt ions,” explained Proulx. “Even in the independent apartments.”

“There’s a village green, a café, four dining rooms, t hree libraries, t wo pa rlors, si x intimate lounges, a fitness room, a billiard room, a movie theatre, a ballroom, a beauty parlor and a non-sectarian chapel. It’s all

At Schooner, they know the importance of the dining experience. Award-winning food is prepared and served in stylish dining rooms with fresh linens, sparkling silverware and china.

• R e sident ia l c a re l iv i ng , w h ich have spacious, well-appointed rooms available with 24-hour personal care.

There is no shortage of activities to enjoy at Schooner Estates. “Residents have a myriad of year-round options,” said Proulx. “There are exercise classes, indoor and outdoor concerts, crafts club, book club, bingo, sharing groups, religious services, card playing, dine-around club, theme days, day trips discovering Maine, shopping trips or an outing to the symphony, to name a few activitities.” Schooner Estates is located on 10 beautifullylandscaped acres on Stetson Road in Auburn and the area features extensive restaurant and shopping options, places of worship and excellent medical care at Central Maine Medical Center and St. Mar y’s Regional Medical Center. For more information, check their website at: www.SchoonerEstates.com or call Proulx at 784-2900. He would be delighted to arrange a personal tour. “Because we know seeing is believing, a visit to Schooner Estates is the best way to appreciate the beauty and ambiance our community and its setting has to offer,” he said. “Schooner Estates is a place where retirement is a new beginning.”

Schooner Estates is an easy place to feel settled; the lifestyle is firstclass and the surroundings are picture perfect.

Schooner Estates • 200 Stetson Rd., Auburn, ME • 784-2900 • www.SchoonerEstates.com

Spring Open House

NEW TO PTOL: ZAMBERLAN HIKERS

BROOKS SPORTS

175 Park Street, Livermore Falls, ME 04254 Open 8-5 Mon-Fri & 8-2 Sat • Evening Appts. Available

Call us at (207) 897-5558

KEEN Utility & Safety

WALDLAUFER Comfort

SPRING ARRIVALS:

Come in and see for yourself!

We have the largest selection of comfort footwear in the State of Maine! From safety footwear to running shoes, we’ve got something for your foot type! If you’ve never been in before, you don’t know what you’re missing! Stop in today!

Aetrex Sandalistas & Bodyworks

You can have happy feet again!

Ryn Rockers

Take YOUR first step to foot comfort!

5 Certified Pedorthists on staff trained to help you today!

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

APRIL 29th & 30th!

 HUGE inventory!  HUGE sales & discounts!  UNBEATABLE FOOT COMFORT!  Closeout tent: 50%75% off regular price  FREE Foot Type Analysis  FREE door prizes!  FREE Hot Dogs & Soda!  Live Radio with B98.5 Central Maine’s Country on Saturday the 30th!

Don’t miss out on the fun!

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

29


Our relationship starts with a good conversation about your oral health. Dentistry shouldn’t just be something a dentist does, but also something that the patient understands.

Welcome to our family...

Visit our new website!

www.centerstreetdental.net

Center Street Dental (207) 784-2211

26 Cross St. Auburn, ME 04210

Meet our dentists, hygienists and staff! Tour our office and learn about the wide variety of general and cosmetic dental services we offer:

• Checkups & Cleanings • Implants & Dentures • Porcelain Veneers Rosemarie G. Sheline DDS

We

30

kids!

Emergencies seen the same day

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

• Root Canals • Extractions • General Restorative James P. Dunn DMD

• Accepting most insurances

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Relief for HEADACHES, BACK & NECK PAIN!

Lower Your Handicap!

Life is too short to let pain slow you down. It can affect your sleep, your marriage and your job. Nothing’s worse than feeling great mentally, but physically feeling held back from life because your back or neck hurts and the pain just won’t go away! My name is Dr. Jason Davis of Davis Chiropractic in Lewiston. For nearly 10 years, I’ve seen hundreds of people with neck and back pain and headaches leave the office pain free. Because patients tell me too often…“I only wished I found you sooner”, I’m offering a 2 week promotion for people suffering with these problems.

SUMMER IS HERE! SAY “YES” TO LIFE AGAIN

“Will This Really Work For Me?” Here’s what some of the top medical researchers had to say about chiropractic… Manipulation [chiropractic adjustments], with or without exercise, improved symptoms more than medical care did after both 3 and 12 months.” – British Medical Journal “Chiropractor’s manipulation of the spine was more helpful than any of the following: traction, massage, biofeedback, acupuncture, injection of steroids into the spine and back corsets, and ultrasound.” -- Stanley Bigos, MD, Professor of Orthopedic Surgery

With my “Back and Neck Pain Evaluation” we’ll be able to find the problem The Most Important and then correct it. Think of how you’ll feel in just a few weeks. Solution To Your Pain You’ll be able to live life like normal, play with the kids, enjoy time For 14 days only, $30 will get you all the services I with friends, and not worry that pain will hit you at just the wrong time normally charge new patients $140 for! That includes - especially during the summer! my new patient evaluation including a complete consultation, examination and adjustment. If you read nothing else READ THIS! Call us today at 782-3330 and we can get started as The following conditions can be caused by soon as possible. Our office is Davis Chiropractic and you can find us at 16 Highland Spring Rd in a problem in your neck… Lewiston next to Hannaford. This special offer • Carpal tunnel syndrome expires Thursday, May 12th. • Numbness and tingling in arms and hands Sincerely, Dr. Jason Davis, D.C

• Weakness in arms and hands • Neck pain, soreness or stiffness • Headaches and migraines • Tension or pain in the shoulders and arms

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

P.S. How many years can your body handle taking one pill after another? Call today. I may be able to help you live a normal, pain-free life again. 782-3330

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Do any of these conditions affect your golf game? Are your drives getting shorter and shorter and your putts less smooth? It may have more to do with your back than your swing. A study at the University of Calgary showed… “Pain-free golfers demonstrated over twice as much trunk flexion velocity on the downswing.” Simply put, the more flexible your spine, the faster you can swing.

• Back pain • Sciatica • Muscle spasms • Pinched nerves • Leg weakness

Call 782-3330 to schedule a free consultation to learn how we can help your golf game. Dr. Jason Davis Davis Chiropractic 16 Highland Spring Road Lewiston, Maine 207-782-3330 www.healthdavis.com Insurance accepted, Affordable cash rates

31


You will feel like you belong to a family at The Meadows By Dan Marois Feature Writer / Photographer

from staff who know their needs, problems and favorite things.

O

“The Meadows provides retired residents with safety, security, and, no doubt, some of the best home cooking available,” said Rebecca (Becky) Laliberte, who has food service experience and the ability to whip up fresh, home-style cooking. “And, while residents enjoy the privacy of their ow n rooms, they can also gather in the library/ pool room, the outside patio, or the spacious dining room for activities or socializing.”

nce the site of a motel, and then a nursing home, The Meadows Living Center for Seniors on Route 202 in Greene has to be one of the best housing options for the elderly in central Maine. With ever ything housed on a single level and handicapped accessible, The Meadows is uniquely constructed to offer an intimate, personal setting that makes each resident a name and not just a number. W it h on ly 24 rooms at T he Meadow s, residents feel like they are living with one big family where they get personalized attention. Unlike larger senior housing centers where there are many residents, folks who live at The Meadows enjoy the comfort and caring

A visit to the center might find residents playing a card game, finishing a jigsaw puzzle, reading a book, or sipping coffee with friends. And while smoking is not allowed in the private rooms or common areas, The Meadows is one of the few facilities that allow smoking on the patio year-round.

Room rates at The Meadows are affordable for many seniors with rates starting at $800 a month that includes the room, three daily home cooked mea ls, housekeeping a nd linen services, and many transportation and personalized services. Laliberte lives on site at The Meadows and assistance for residents is available 24 hours a day. “You don’t have to worr y about who you know, what you did for a living, or what your background is when you consider living here,” said Laliberte. “At The Meadows, you are instantly family.” Laliberte is available to answer any questions about The Meadows by calling 946-3007, e-mailing RLalib3967@aol.com, or by going to their website at www.mainemeadows.com.

The Meadows • Route 202, Greene, ME • 946-3007 • www.mainemeadows.com

TAYLOR BROOK DENTAL ASSOCIATES

are now participating providers with Northeast Delta Dental State of Maine

and

CIGNA Dental Radius Network

Quality dental insurance programs provided by your quality dental provider. And we are...

ROLLING BACK OUR FEES FOR SERVICES TO 2008 PRICING. We sincerely hope this will benefit all our current and future patients whose trust in us is always appreciated and never forgotten.

27 Millett Dr., Auburn • 784-1577 www.TaylorBrookDental.com

32

SUN JOURNAL

TAYLOR BROOK DENTAL

PR FILE 2011

Associates, P.A.

“Not a Medicare/MaineCare provider.”

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Assisted Home Care is “Our Family Assisting Your Family” By Deborah Conway Feature Writer / Photographer In keeping with its stated mission, Assisted Home Care provides “exceptional personal care” to individuals and families. According to Nancy Merrill, administrator of Assisted Home Care, the scope of home care has expanded and “is not just for the elderly.” With its “highly qualified and experienced staff, super vised by a registered nurse,” Assisted Home Ca re is able to prov ide services to a wide population, and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Heather Trainer, a registered nurse and the director of nursing at Assisted Home Care adds that home care “is also for parents with disabled children, [and] teens and young adults with special needs,” as well as the elderly and others. They provide inhome respite care, hospice care, and both temporary and long-term care. They also provide wound care, post-surgical care and assistance to new mothers and their babies. Assisted Home Care’s goal is to meet the needs of the entire family. Assisted Home Care’s registered nurses are able to administer medications and intravenous f luids, and monitor feeding tubes. They spea k w it h doctors on t he fa mily’s beha lf, assist w it h cha nges in treatment regimens and follow through with

repairs such as snow removal, yard work and the construction of ramps to make the environment safe and the home accessible to a family member with physical limitations.

Carol Fontnette sits with Joan Merrill. doctor’s orders. Assisted Home Care’s health care providers ensure that the family’s voices are heard and that they remain involved in the process of planning for their loved one. Assisted Home Ca re works a round t he fa m i ly ’s schedu le to prov ide t he best home care services available in the state of Maine and its practitioners have traveled throughout Maine, at all hours of the day, to meet the needs of its patients and families. Assisted Home Care also provides “staff relief” for facilities and other agencies whose staffing needs increase unexpectedly or are temporarily under filled. This year, Assisted Home Care has added home maintenance to its list of available services. Through a trusted and capable subcontractor, Assisted Home Care will perform maintenance tasks and light home

Accord ing to Tra iner, one of t he most valuable services provided by Assisted Home Care is “respite care.” Respite care reinforces and supports the belief that the family members “need to take care of themselves in order to take care of their loved one.” Respite care gives the family the time and space that they need to run errands or enjoy some personal time away from the tiring and stressful routine of providing round-theclock care. Mer r i l l a nd Tra i ner bot h respect a nd acknowledge the difficulty that many family members have when it comes to relinquishing the task of caring for a loved one, even for short periods of time. They understand the feeling of guilt that a family caregiver may experience when they leave their loved one in the care of others, and they strive to provide family members with the physical, emotional and spiritual support that they need in order to stay healthy, alert and effective while providing care. W hat sets them apart from other home health services is the “continuity of care” that Assisted Home Care is able to provide. When placing a caregiver in a home, Merrill ta kes g reat ca re in matching t he

personalities of the caregiver, the patient and the family, to ensure a successful and positive experience for all. Assisted Home Care is presently seeking to expand its family of health care providers and interested health care professionals are encouraged to contact them. For information as to how the family of health care providers at A ssisted Home Ca re ca n help you r fa m i ly a nd loved one a f ter a n i nju r y, illness, childbirth or surger y, as well as with elder care, please call 207-783-7375 or 207-212-6736.

Client testimonials: Dear Nancy, I wanted to take the time to write and thank you and the nurse who went to Cynthia’s house to care for her. Your team effort is very much appreciated! I was Cynthia’s hospice nurse, this was a very difficult case and because of your help and wonderful care, Cynthia was able to go peacefully and her family had good support. Thank you so much again. — Jo Pilgrim, R.N., CHANS Dear Nancy and staff, Jerry’s wish was to die at home and we couldn’t have accomplished that without the wonderful and caring people who came from your agency. Please give my best to all of those who became a part of our lives for these weeks. They will always be fondly remembered. — Family of hospice patient

Assisted Home Care • 550 College Street, Lewiston, ME • 783-7375 • www.assistedhomecare.org

Greene Village Pharmacy: Personalized, quick service By Dan Marois Feature Writer / Photographer There’s a new pharmacy not far from the village center of Greene that’s sure to have the area buzzing. Jon and Jackie Schomaker have recently opened the Greene Village Pharmacy on Patten Road, next door to the Monmouth Federal Credit Union. Open for less t ha n t wo mont h s, t h i s i nd e p e nd e nt l y o w n e d a nd op e r a t e d pharmacy is a welcomed addition to the growing town of Greene. “I’ve lived here for 17 years and I’ve seen the town grow during that time,” said Jackie, who is a registered pharmacist. Originally from Perry, Maine, Schomaker is a graduate of the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy. “The town has a grocery store as well as a hardware store and a restaurant. Now, it will have its own pharmacy.”

Schoma ker’s husband, Jon, is co-ow ner and a part-time pharmacy tech. She and Jon are the proud parents of a 16-yearold daug hter, a nd t wo son s, a ge s 10 a nd 7. Joi n i ng t he Schoma kers at t he Greene Village Pharmacy is Kayla Adams as a full-time pharmacy technician. Hav ing worked in many different chain store pharmacies, Jackie believes that an independent pharmacy can offer a more personalized shopping experience. “Chain stores stock everything and customers have to sort through so much stuff simply to get to the pharmacy,” said Schomaker. “We can offer more personalized and quicker service a nd we a re t he only pha rmacy located between Winthrop and Lewiston, which is nice considering the cost of gas.” And if the convenient location doesn’t gain your attention, the free delivery service will. That’s right.

Jackie and Jon Schomaker, owners of Greene Village Pharmacy; Kayla Adams, pharmacy technician.

debit cards. The pharmacy is also ready to match the same prescription discount programs offered by some of the bigger chain store pharmacies. “Our goal is to keep our prices low and affordable,” Schomaker said.

The Green Village Pharmacy offers free deliver y in about a 15-mile radius from the store. “If you give us an order by 5 p.m., we prov ide f re e del iver y by 7 p.m .,” said Schomaker.

Though the pharmacy has just opened, Schoma ker is a lready pla nning for t he future. “A year from now, I’d like to see us in a larger space and offering more home health products,” said Schomaker, who is content at the moment with getting the pharmacy known in the community.

Schomaker notes that the pharmacy accepts credit cards, personal checks and flex benefit

“We also want to add to the community spirit of being located here in Greene,” added

Schomaker. “I want to set up a section of the store to sell handmade items brought in from local non-profit organizations.” One Greene resident was overheard in the pharmacy park ing lot say ing, “I do my bank ing here (pointing to t he adjacent credit union) and now I’ll be able to get my medications next door. I feel this is a great addition to our area.” The Greene Village Pharmacy is located at 19 Patten Road in Greene, immediately off the highway on Route 202. Business hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. They can be reached at 946-2425.

Greene Village Pharmacy • 19 Patten Rd., Greene, ME • 946-2425 • Jackie & Jon Schomaker, owners Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

33


Maine Research Associates:

The Medicines of Tomorrow for The Patients of Today By Rich Livingston Feature Writer

G

roundbreaking and important work is bei ng done i n L ew i ston a nd Auburn, Maine, by its own residents and local professionals. Most medications used in the treatment of heart disease, that have been developed over the past three decades, have passed through the Twin Cities on the way to becoming approved for use in the treatment of the general population. This is a statistic that will continue for at least the next decade according to Dr. Robert Weiss, MD, FACC, FACP, FAHA, the Director of Maine Research Associates located at Two Great Falls Plaza in Auburn, Maine. Maine Research Associates is the largest independent cardiovascular research site in New England, and has been connecting people with treatments of the future for over 25 years. To date, the research center has completed more than 500 clinical pharmaceutical trials. Today, more than 30 studies involving over 250 participants are in progress, and the team at Maine Research Associates continues to work with patients and primar y care physicians to enroll patients in new studies that advance treatment and provide hope. Some of the current studies will continue for years into the future. Many are designed to prevent a heart attack before it ever happens. The practice has achieved an international reputation for reliable, pioneering research, along with a superior level of patient care. With the ability to deliver accurate data to the pharmaceutical industry, the work being done locally has global impact for the advancement of health and wellness. It’s no longer a best kept secret that Maine Research Associates is a hidden gem in its home community. Local area residents have the opportunity to participate in the research, often while being paid, and a lways while receiv ing comprehensive healthcare oversight at no cost to the patient. While Maine Research Associates is affiliated with Androscoggin Cardiology Associates, participants need not be patients of the cardiology practice to be candidates for the research. The Research Center is served by a separate, full-time staff of 11 professionals including nurses and healthcare assistants. “It’s important to us to have a group of nice patients participating in our studies,” explained Robert Weiss, MD, who is the director of research as well as medica l director of the group. “Patients develop a close camaraderie with the staff. It’s a much more personal relationship than at big-city clinics; it’s a collaborative process. Patients may have an opportunity to benefit from leading-edge medications that aren’t even

Research Center staff, front, left to right: Dr. David Abisalih, Diane Cass, Rhonda Crowley, Tina Binette, Gloria Therrien, Dr. Dervilla McCann, Dr. Robert Weiss; back: James Trytek, Diane Orino, Sarah Dumais, Marissa Tardif, Monique Crawford. on the market yet, and all patients contribute directly to the effort to bring science to the art of helping patients improve their health.” Participation in a clinical trial presents minimal risk to the patient. Weiss explained, “We test new medications that might be improvements beyond what people currently have available to them, and we also test new treatment methods. The health history and current medications of people who join the studies serve as a baseline, and the research might help improve their conditions.” Weiss is board certif ied in Interna l Medicine and Cardiology. He has participated as a Principal Investigator in more than 500 trials in nearly 30 years. In addition, Weiss is the Associate Editor of Evidence-Based Medicine and acts as a reviewer of several prominent medical publications. The center is currently conducting studies i nvolv i ng new cholesterol lower i ng medicines, new blood pressure medicines, new hea r t i mag i ng agents, new blood thinners, and, new treatments for atrial f ibrillation. Prev ious studies have a lso included dr ugs for weight loss, for t he treatment of various aspects of diabetes, hy per ten sion, a nd per ipher a l a r ter y/ vascular disease, arthritis and pain control. Study sponsors have included such familiar na mes as Bayer, Ta keda, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Nov a r t is, P f i z er, I nc., Sa nof i-Avent is, Schering-Plough Research Institute, among many others. Virtually any drug to be used in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases in t he next

decade is already under study by Maine Research Associates, which is allied with a network of similar centers geographically d ispersed a rou nd t he cou nt r y but collected under the banner of Alliance for Multispecialty Research. “Our research isn’t limited to drug studies,” Weiss sa id. “We a lso work on st ud ies desig ned by t he Nat iona l Inst itutes of Hea lt h to help eva luate new treatment protocols and pathways. Some studies look at reducing the overall cost of health care while maintaining effective treatment. One example is a study looking at how to diagnose patients with chest pain. We are studying CAT scan protocol and Stress Test protocol to determine if the additional cost of a CAT scan is producing better or more accurate results versus the less costly stress test. We will help define new ‘pathways of care,’ that provide the basis for new standards of treatment.” One new med icat ion u nder st udy is a cholesterol-lowering vaccine that could potentially supplement or replace more familiar pills. Another example of a study subject are medicines that treat diabetes and also cause weight loss.

“We

welcome new participants into our studies,” Weiss sa id. “W it h so many projects under way at once, investigating so many health conditions and oppor tunit ies, we a re a lways tr y ing to identify new candidates who might be interested in participating, who might benefit from participating.”

Research usually involves periodic blood and lab tests and other routine healthcare monitoring under t he super v ision of a dedicated staff. “Our study participants are provided free healthcare screening and monitoring while they’re in the study,” Dr. Weiss explained, “and often it is more comprehensive than what they may be getting on their own.” In addition, those participating in clinical trials are helping advance the practice of medicine, helping provide new treatments for people with life-threatening conditions or diseases, and potentially availing themselves of some of those same medications and treatment protocols. And they are often paid a stipend for their time as well. “We are proud of the work we have done over the years. We are proud of our community, and the role it has played on the world stage in the field of developing leading edge medical treatment,” said Weiss. “We have a great, compassionate staff who love working with patients, and, of course, we are especially proud of all the people from the Androscoggin County area who have contributed so much to the advancement of medical knowledge and a better quality of life for millions, worldwide, over the years.” Anyone who might like to join in a study, please contact Jessica Gamache at 782-9835, to see if you qualify to participate. Referring physicia ns ca n a lso contact t he of f ice. Weiss added, “This is exciting work, and we are happy to be able to do it right here in this community.”

2 Great Falls Plaza, Auburn, ME • 782-9835

www.maineresearchassociates.com 34

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


About the American Heart Association

Founded in 1924, we’re the nation’s oldest and largest voluntary health organization dedicated to building healthier lives, free of heart disease and stroke. To help prevent, treat and defeat these diseases — America’s No. 1 and No. 3 killers — we fund cutting-edge research, conduct lifesaving public and professional educational programs, and advocate to protect public health. To learn more, call the AHA’s Maine office toll-free at (800) 937-0944 or visit www.heart.org.

2011 Central Maine

Heart Walk

Sunday, September 18 What is “Life’s Simple Seven”? For the first time, the American Heart Association has defined “ideal cardiovascular health,” and identified seven health factors and lifestyle behaviors to measure and track called “Life’s Simple Seven.” Improvements in these seven areas can greatly impact quality of life and life span.

1. Stop smoking 2. Get active 3. Lose weight 4. Eat better 5. Manage blood pressure 6. Control cholesterol 7. Reduce blood sugar

Breakfast Celebration:

Hilton Garden Inn Auburn Riverwatch Walk Route: LA Trails Riverwalk (choice of 1 or 3-mile route) Satellite walks also held in Rumford, Bridgton and Brunswick FMI - (800) 937-0944 or visit www.centralmaineheartwalk.org.

My Life Check is an accurate assessment of how you are doing in the seven areas. Your “heart score” will help you understand what simple steps you may need to take to improve your heart health and quality of life. From there you will be directed to specific action plans that will teach you how to change your behaviors and move you closer to your individual health goals. Research shows those who can reach cardiovascular wellness goals by age 50 can expect to live another 40 years free from heart disease and stroke. Find out where you stand by taking the My Life Check assessment at www.heart.org/MyLifeCheck.

Heart-Healthy Recipe Grilled Chicken with Strawberry and Pineapple Salsa Recipe Grilled pineapple and fresh mint and strawberries combine with tangy lemon and a bit of hot pepper flakes to make an interesting salsa for grilled chicken. Serves: 4; 3 ounces chicken and 1/2 cup salsa per serving Ingredients 1 teaspoon canola or corn oil Salsa 2 slices fresh pineapple, each 1/2 inch thick, patted dry 1 cup whole strawberries (about 5 ounces), diced 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion 3 to 4 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves 1 to 2 teaspoons sugar 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 1 medium lemon Chicken 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 4 ounces each), all visible fat discarded 2 teaspoons salt-free steak seasoning blend 1/4 teaspoon salt Cooking Instructions Preheat the grill on medium high. Brush a grill pan or grill rack with the oil. Heat the grill pan or rack on the grill for about 2 minutes, or until hot. Grill the pineapple for 2 minutes on each side. Transfer to a cutting board and let cool slightly, about 2 minutes, before chopping. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, stir together the remaining salsa ingredients except the lemon. Grate 1 teaspoon lemon zest, reserving the lemon. Stir the zest and chopped pineapple into the strawberry mixture. Set aside. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken with the seasoning blend and salt. Grill for 5 minutes on each side, or until no longer pink in the center. Transfer to plates. Squeeze the reserved lemon over the chicken. Serve with the salsa on the side. This recipe is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Face the Fats campaign. Recipe copyright © 2009 by the American Heart Association. Look for other delicious recipes in American Heart Association cookbooks, available from booksellers everywhere, and at deliciousdecisions.org

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

35


       

                                     

                       �    �        ­            € €   �  

  €              

             €      ‚                   �        �           

 €      €      € ƒ        €   „            … �                €     €   €    €  €          †‡ � �        € ˆ‰     ˆ‰ ˆ �         ­   €   €   Š €  ‹    ­    �       ‚�ƒ „… † ‡            €    €    €€€     Œ    �  ‡ � ˆ  ‰  € Ž‚‘  ’‰ “ ‘ ”‘  •‘ � 

     Š �     ­              �­ ˆ‚      �  �     •€   �  •  ˆ   •€

 ‹ŒŽ‘Ž’“‘Œ“ŽŽ    

ˆ‰‰Š ‹‰ Œ    �       �   �  �   

Ž ‰ ‘�’

           �

‚‚„  ‚  ƒ„ ‚ ƒ„…  …  “…  ”­…

„„‚…„­ …‡…  …‡‡…        � 

  �

�    �     €€ €     € ‹  €    €      €    € ‚    €      €    �€              €         �            €€  €  –€ Ž  —  ”   €    €     € �  „       „             Š        ˜ˆ        €   ™ € � Ž ­ ƒ   ”  ˆ‚

 ‹ŒŽ‘ŽŽ•‘“–—’    

              �              �  

 �

 � 

    

   �   

 �   

†      €       €  ­                         €    �  ˜                €         � †          €                               †ˆ‰                         €   € ˆ€     €    

     €       ­   

 ‚   � †      €      € 

   ­       ˜ €

‘

36

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

 ��      ­ €   ‚  ƒ ­„ „…  … …   „ƒ ƒ †   „…

 „ „…„­       

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Shapiro Audiology & Hearing Aid Center By Jackie Rybeck Feature Writer

The staff at Shapiro Audiology & Hearing Aid Center is knowledgeable, compassionate and professional.

Hearing shapes what you do; it makes a significant improvement in many areas of your life, including your relationships, independence and participation in many social activities. Untreated hearing loss not only affects the hearer, but loved ones as well, with the feeling of rejection to an unanswered question or frustration with having to constantly repeat what they say.

• Do you strain to hear a conversation? • Does it seem as though people mumble? • Do loved ones complain about your hearing? If you are answering yes to these questions, you may be missing out on the little things in life; the whispers of “I love you,” partaking in conversations, or the feeling of being part of the family. Hearing aids can change your life; it is possible to discover the beauty of sound

Left to right: Carolyn Gaiero, doctor of audiology; and N. Michael Shapiro, owner/ operator. again. At the Shapiro Audiology & Hearing Aid Center, they know the importance of hearing for both you and your loved ones. The staff is knowledgeable, compassionate and professional. N. Michael Shapiro, BC-HIS, has successfully owned and operated the hearing aid center for over 40 years. He is board certif ied in Hea ring Instr ument Sciences a nd is a Licensed Hea ring A id Specia list. His passion for improving the hearing of central and southern Maine affordably and with unparalleled, professional service, is well known by the thousands of patients he has worked with over the years.

Carolyn Gaiero, Au.D., received her master’s degree in Audiolog y from Northwestern University and later obtained her doctorate in Audiolog y from the Arizona School of Health Sciences. Gaiero is certified by the American Board of Audiology and is a past president of both the Maine Academy of Audiolog y and New Hampshire Academy of Audiology. At Shapiro’s, they understand that no two experiences are alike; everyone’s hearing loss and lifestyle requirements are unique. Exceptional devices by Siemens, Oticon, Phonak and Sonic Innovations are just a few of the top name brands at Shapiro’s, giving patients a wide range of choices in lifechanging audio enhancement.

We’re here to help so that you can pay less to hear better Not only does Shapiro offer the very best hearing aid systems, they offer exceptional service and the lowest prices in northern New England, offering each patient a hearing solution that works with each individual lifestyle and budget. A l l p r i c i n g i n c l u d e s a f a c e -t o -f a c e consultation, testing and custom-fitting sessions by a certified, hearing-instrument specialist. Rechecks are also provided for free throughout the warranty period of the hearing aid. At Shapiro’s Audiology & Hearing Aid Center, they truly want your hearing enhanced while paying less. They live by the motto: The highest compliment our patients can give is the referral of family and friends.

10% off

our already low, rock-bottom prices with this coupon.

410 Main St., Lewiston, 783-9443 • 1006 Forest Ave., Portland, 774-9872 • www.hearbetterpayless.com

The Health Club & Spa: Better health and fitness for everyone By Jackie Rybeck Feature Writer / Photographer

Looking and feeling great are not the only benefits to joining the Health Club & Spa.

Are you looking for a place to work out and feel comfortable?

“It feels good to hear how a member has not only lost inches, but also eliminated medications because their blood pressure, cholesterol or sugar numbers have gone down. It’s healthier to be off meds, so why not exercise to do it?” added Fontaine. “It’s possible to even pay for your membership with the money you saved.”

Look no further than the Health Club & Spa in Lewiston. According to the owner, Lisa Fontaine, the full-service fitness center has over 11,000 square feet of sectioned areas that include: water and floor aerobics, cardio, free weights, cable/lever machines, pool, sauna, hot tub, tanning, stretching area and a punching bag.

The Health Club & Spa is member friendly and a great source of exercising the soul as well.

The Health Club & Spa offers different membership packages to accommodate everyone.

“We have it all and more for every level of fitness,” explained Fontaine. “Whether it’s to reduce pain, gain energy, lose weight, gain muscle, tone or just get out of the house.” The facility has a non-intimidating atmosphere with a membership that ranges from ages 12 to 87 and fitness levels that range from “newbies” to those training for competition.

“For example, our senior program offers a variety of different ways to help strengthen a nd increase ra nge of motion, but t he socialization is a great benefit as well,” said Fontaine. “They look forward to coming in and leave laughing and smiling. My members are awesome. No matter the age or level, they offer support and encouragement to each other.”

“You pay one fee and get it all: the pool area, workout area, classes and unlimited ta n n i ng. If you ca n’t a f ford a cer ta i n package, we offer payment plans.”

“Members join for a wide variety of reasons,” she said. “Losing weight, reducing pain, gaining f lexibility, toning, rehabilitation from either surgery or an injury and even just coming in and swim.”

The Hea lt h Club & Spa of fers dif ferent routines to satisfy everyone. “You can enjoy the pool area only, the workout area, classes or do it all,” explained Fontaine. “We offer a wide range of classes at no extra cost.”

Fonta i ne sa id, “We of fer a f ree i n it ia l workout and a four-week follow up; however, we have trainers on site if you feel you need more help.” The Health Club & Spa is located at 1977 Lisbon Road and is open 365 days a year/no matter the weather: Monday through Friday, 4:15 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 6 a.m. to 3 p.m.

For more information, or to see their wide range of classes, check out

www.hcslewiston.com

The Health Club & Spa of Lewiston, Maine • 1977 Lisbon Road • Lewiston, ME 04240 • (207) 782-9188 Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

37


The Medicine Shoppe: Award-winning customer service By Rich Livingston Feature Writer / Photographer

Photos, left to right: Lana Hoang, owner and pharmacist; Angela McRae RPh; Lou Gagne, RPh, compounding specialist; Erika Dubois, pharmacist student; Joan Caron, board certified prosthetist.

You won’t find Fourth of July or Halloween supplies, a can of soup or a box of ShamWows. W hat you w ill find is a group of c on su m mate profe s siona l s de d ic ate d entirely to health and healing, to the wellbeing of their friends and patients. With the opening this spring of an additional ne w f a c i l it y, opp o s it e t he L e w i s t on Hannaford and just out Sabattus Street from their familiar store, The Medicine Shoppe w ill more than double its size, add lots of new equipment, products and services, and continue its long tradition of “caring beyond prescriptions.� The Medicine Shoppe’s full array of durable medical supplies and equipment is moving to 683 Sabattus Street, while the original location will be remodeled and expanded with a larger selection of over-the-counter me d ic at ion s a dde d t o it s de d ic at e d prescription and award-winning customer services. As always, The Medicine Shoppe will specialize in building long-term relationships with patients, providers and hospitals. The Medicine Shoppe continues to offer free delivery to homes, offices, nursing homes and

doctors’ offices in L-A. “We are affiliated with the St. Mary’s Center for Joint Replacement, the CMMC Physical Rehab department, and just about every nursing and rehab facility in the area,� explained Richard Gregoire, public relations.

Kitty won’t swallow pills? Maybe a specially compounded chicken-f lavor might help. Patients receiving pediatric services in Boston are often issued prescriptions that must be custom-filled in Maine to satisfy insurance parameters, as well.

The Medicine Shoppe is a training pharmacy, with students from Husson College, University of New England and the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy able to experience a wider range of pharmacy operations and challenges than at any other Maine facility. Lou Gagne, one of three Registered Pharmacists on staff, specializes in compounding prescriptions from scratch, creating alternative formats such as transdermal, liquids, flavored liquids, powders, even gluten-free variations of customized medications. Referrals often come from other area pharmacies, and the Medicine Shoppe also compounds medications for pets, working with area veterinarian offices.

Having the compounding capacity on-site helps enrich the student experience, but Medicine Shoppe owner and pharmacist, Lana Hoang, explained, “We enjoy [being a teaching facility] as much as the students do. They bring new ideas to us, and we can learn from each other.� Hoang has owned the local Medicine Shoppe for four years, having apprenticed with its previous owner, Maurice Paradis, and having had a long career in what she described as “corporate pharmacies,� before that. “I really wanted to be in a place where I could have close, direct contact with my patients, and The Medicine Shoppe has been a dream come true.�

In addition to an expanded array of medical equipment, the new location will also house The Pink Ribbon Care Center, staffed by board-certified prosthetic fitter Joan Caron. The new Center will display a wider range of mastectomy products a nd clot hing, including swimwear. Caron, who has been part of the Medicine Shoppe family for 41 yea rs, w ill continue seeing patients from Bennett Breast Center at CMMC. She will also start visiting Stephens Memorial Hospital in Norway monthly, to be more convenient for t he many patients from western Maine who have relationships with the Medicine Shoppe. Easier access for patients – in the new store, new Pink Ribbon Center, the expanded old store, now in Norway, and, as always, in hea lthcare facilities throughout L-A, The Medicine Shoppe remains committed to your health.

373 Sabattus Street • Lewiston, ME • (207) 783-3539 • www.medicineshoppe.com/0550

Accident? Illness? Surgery? Our Transitional Care Units Offer Enhanced Clinical Capabilities and Comfortable Amenities:  Rehabilitation Services tailored to individual patient needs (available 7 Days/Week)  State-of-the-art medical and therapy equipment  Enhanced rehabilitation gyms  Medical staff with expertise in post-acute care   ďż˝    

  

in patient assessment and evaluation

             ďż˝ 

                                    Â   ďż˝ Â? 

33 Roger Street | Lewiston, ME 04240 Phone: 207 784-0108 | www.genesishcc.com

OON! O COMING SOON! Transitional nal 38

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Worry-Free Assisted Living Retirement Community Services available include: • Transportation • Meal Plans • Housekeeping • Laundry • Activities • Medication Administration • Personal Care • Month to Month Rent • 24 Hour Nursing Services For More Information Call

207-786-7149

MONTELLO

HEIGHTS Retirement Community

550 College Street, Lewiston www.montelloheights.org

Providing support, advocacy, and education in Androscoggin County for people affected by sexual assault, childhood sexual abuse, stalking and sexual harassment.

P.O. Box 6, Auburn, ME 04212 tel. (207) 784-5272 To learn more about us and how you can volunteer, donate or get help, visit us at www.sexualassaultcrisiscenter.org or on facebook at www. facebook.com/saccmaine.

24 hour response line | 1-800-871-7741 | 1-888-458-5599 TTY Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011

SUN JOURNAL

PR FILE 2011

39


IF IT’S AN EMERGENCY, WHY WAIT? When you need help it should happen fast. That’s why we proudly post our current average door-to-physician wait time on our web site: www.stmarysmaine.com. > Simple process that gets you into an exam room FAST. > Private exam rooms large enough to accommodate family and loved ones. > Separate waiting and treatment area for individuals with alcohol, drug and behavioral needs. > Accredited Chest Pain Center with staff and physicians trained in cardiac care. > The latest in diagnostic technology. > Clinical staff specially trained in emergency care. > Covered drive-up entrance. > Easy parking in front of Emergency Center.

WE’RE READY. WHY WAIT?

EMERGENCY CENTER

91 CAMPUS AVENUE, LEWISTON, ME

OUR FACILITIES AND SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE.

40

SUN JOURNAL

777-8120

www.stmarysmaine.com

PR FILE 2011

Lewiston, Maine, April 23, 2011


Profile 2011