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2010 2011

Season

S pa r ta n b u r g Philharmonic Orchestra

i o a n n i d e s

music director


2010-2011 season

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Patron Information Prior to the performance, please note the location of all exits in case of an emergency. If the power to the building should be interrupted for any reason, our generator will begin within ten (10) seconds for lighting. In Concert All performances begin at 7:00 pm unless otherwise advertised. Latecomers will be seated at the first appropriate pause in the program. Additionally, those patrons who must leave prior to the end of the performance are asked to leave between selections, not during the music if at all possible.

facebook & twitter Become a fan of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Please, go to facebook.com/spartanburgphilharmonic & twitter.com/spartanburgphil email If you would like to receive an invitation to the SPO’s 2011-2012 concert season or to receive our e-newsletters with special offers, please provide us your email address or visit our information table during intermission.

Name __________________________________________________________ Email __________________________________________________________

2010-2011 season

Restrooms Restrooms are located on the first floor in the main lobby.

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Sight & Sound In order to ensure a quality performance for everyone, please turn off all cell phones, beepers, etc. Also, no flash photography or video recording is permitted.

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Ticket Returns We are unable to issue refunds for unused tickets. The Music Foundation of Spartanburg will gladly give you a tax receipt for the face value of tickets returned to our office at least 24 hours prior to the performance.


Program Index Patron Information................................................................................................. 5 2010-2011 Concert Series . .................................................................................... 9 Board of Directors . .............................................................................................. 11 Corporate Sponsors .............................................................................................. 12 Contributors ..................................................................................................................... 13 Letter from Sarah Ioannides, Music Director . ...................................................... 15 Sarah Ioannides Bio . ............................................................................................ 16

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Orchestra Instrument Arrangement . .................................................................... 20

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Arts Partnership Leadership Donors ..................................................................... 24

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Orchestra Members & Sponsors . ......................................................................... 18

About the Music Foundation................................................................................ 25

Performance Broadcast Schedule........................................................................... 22 Chats on the Classics . .......................................................................................... 23

Educational Outreach........................................................................................... 25 Concertmistress Sarah Johnson Bio....................................................................... 27 Concert Notes Begin ............................................................................................ 29 Music Sandwiched In ........................................................................................... 37 Big Red Ticket Program........................................................................................ 71 Twichell Seating ................................................................................................... 72 Ticket Order Form . ............................................................................................. 73 Music & Memories Program ................................................................................ 75 Annual Gift Levels................................................................................................ 77 Meet the Maestra.................................................................................................. 79 Annual Fund ........................................................................................................ 81 Endowments .................................................................................................. 83, 84 Advertiser Index ................................................................................................... 85


Dueling Local Chefs February 10, 2011 For more information, call The Music Foundation of Spartanburg 864.948.9020

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featuring

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to benefit The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra and The Converse College Lawson Academy for the Arts Music Scholarship Program

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Hottest Ticket in Town


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2010-2011 Board of Directors President – Beau Shuler President Elect – Dexter Cleveland Treasurer – Reel Robertson Secretary – Karin Cornelson DIRECTORS

EX-OFFICIO DIRECTORS Dr. Betsy Fleming Dr. Patricia Foy Converse College Converse College THE MUSIC FOUNDATION OF SPARTANBURG STAFF Sarah Ioannides – Music Director Cindy Kaiser – Executive Director Lucas Patterson – Marketing Director Sharon Atherton – Operations Director Michele Tate – Music Librarian

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LIFETIME DIRECTORS Dr. Joella Utley Dr. J. Sidney Fulmer Dr. Victor N. Iskersky

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George Holbrook Jim Hudgens Kenneth Law Mimi McKinney E. T. McLean Carole Lindsey Miller Mark D. Monson Sally Overcarsh Susan Price Betsy Richardson Reel Robertson Beau Shuler Lalage Warrington Don Wildman

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Clarke Blackman Jamie Boyd James Bradof Betty Bramlett Dexter Cleveland Karin Cornelson Mary Alice Davidson Rick Dent Betsy Fleming Will Fort Patricia Foy Sarah Galloway Susan Hawkins Jean Hayes


The Music Foundation 2010-2011 Contributors Current as of August 25, 2010 Conductor Circle The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg • Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Rev. & Mrs. David Fort • The Barnet Foundation • Budweiser • Kurt & Nelly Zimmerli Linda & Gary McHam • The Utley Foundation • Higginbotham & Nease Orthodontics Grand Benefactors Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Hudson • Beau & Ginger Shuler • Jim & Patsy Hudgens • J M Smith Foundation

Sustainer Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Bartram • Margit Wagner • Mrs. Larry McGehee • Max Jent Mr. & Mrs. Roland Stebbins • Col. & Mrs. John R. Jeter, Jr • Dr. & Mrs. Peter Sereque Gaines H. Mason, Jr. • Roland & Amy Zimmer • Mr. & Mrs. Marshall Walsh Dr. & Mrs. William W. Burns • Nancy Zoole Kenney • Jay & Julie Harding • Theta Dennis Michael & Katherine Wiggins • Allen & Sharon Doyle • Ann H. Karegeannes • Susan Hodge David & Sharon Atherton • Dr. John R. Burchfield • Mrs. Beth Terrell Supporter Margaret Korpi • Mrs. J. Edwin Foster • Jane W. Clark • Dr. & Mrs. Harry Kinard Dr. & Mrs. Stephen L. Garrell • Thomas & Mary Miller • Cornelia Linder

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Patron David & Jane Tate • Mitch & Sarah Allen • Mr. & Mrs. John A. MacPhail

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Donor Mr. & Mrs. James W. Ivey • Mr. & Mrs. Frederick B. Dent, Jr.

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Benefactors W.R. & E.H. Floyd Foundation • Dr. & Mrs. David Holt • Advance America Kathie & Peter Weisman • Mr. & Mrs. John R. Murphy • John & Pat Tatham Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence E. Flynn, Jr. • E. T. McLean – In memory of John Turnbull W. Reed & Suzanne W. Brown • Don & Alanna Wildman • Sarah & Billy Gunn J M Smith Foundation • Mrs. John F. Dulken • Mary Alice Davidson • Rich & Susan Hawkins Betsy & Ricky Richardson • Jack & Libby Steinberg • Jamie & Bear Boyd • Liz & Will Fort Susan H. Baker • Frederick B. Dent • Joe & Edith Molfenter • Sara & Paul Lehner Dr. & Mrs. Louis F. Knoepp, Jr. • Dr. Lois Ann Hesser & Mr. John Rungo • Sally & Jerry Cogan Mark & Cheryl Monson • Susan Price • J. Michael Kohler, Jr. • Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr. James & Carol Bradof – In honor of Joella Utley, MD. In memory of Joe Utley, MD Boyce & Carole Miller • Mr. & Mrs. Scott Hartman • Mrs. James A. Chapman, Jr. Dr. Betty Bramlett – In memory of Charner W. Bramlett, MD • Hearing Center of Spartanburg Martin & Karin Cornelson • Elizabeth Chapman • Rick & Lib Orr – In honor of our children


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Proud Supporter of the Music Foundation of Spartanburg And The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra

SPARTANBURG COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 500 West Main Street Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-582-3467 1-800-582-3467


From our Music Director, Sarah Ioannides, to you ... The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra is back, and in full bloom! This season promises to be one of the most exciting yet. Each performance will celebrate ties with our community – Ballet Spartanburg, Converse College, Spartanburg Choirs, and young musicians of the area – as well as the young rising stars of the classical music world.

Next, we reach out to Spartanburg’s finest young string players from all regions in an invitation to join the Philharmonic on stage with an exciting rendition of Beethoven Symphony No.5.

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Hailed “expressive, brilliant and elegant,” Tim Fain joins SPO in Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto within a gripping American program of Bernstein and Barber. A strong start to the season, for sure!

| Patrice Jackson – who has soloed with the Philadelphia Orchestra – joins us in Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations for the first concert of 2011. During that same performance we continue our longstanding collaboration with Converse College by featuring a work from one of their very own: David Berry, Professor of Composition. In March we bring back academy award-winning composer Dario Marianelli for a rescheduled performance of The Atonement Suite, and the U.S. premier of The Pride & Prejudice Suite. We’ll also feature French works by Debussy & Ravel – inspiring music from the past that has heavily influenced the evening’s composers and musicians. With only five very special occasions to celebrate, we hope that you’ll be there for each one. Thank you for all of your support in making this season possible, and for keeping Spartanburg Alive with Music from the SPO!

Sarah Ioannides

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Our Christmas spectacular is a great way to kick off your holiday festivities! Traditional favorites will have a special American flavor with jazzy features, contributions from the Pure-N-Heart Children’s Choir, a carol sing-along led by the Spartanburg First Presbyterian Church Chancel Choir, and other special guest artists.


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Sarah Ioannides, Music Director Hailed by the New York Times as a conductor with “unquestionable strength and authority,” Sarah Ioannides’ dynamic presence on the podium has won praise from audiences and critics alike for bringing fresh ideas, original programs and exciting performances to the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra since becoming its sixth Music Director in 2005. During her tenure with the SPO, Ioannides has presented world premieres and enriched the orchestra’s repertoire with numerous first time performances. Her dedication to develop and sustain an enthusiastic audience for classical music has attracted new generations of music lovers bearing a positive impact on the city’s cultural life. Guest conducting engagements span five continents and include the Orchestra Nationale de Lyon, Flemish Radio Orchestra at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Bachakademie in Stuttgart, Nordic Chamber Orchestra, Swedish Wind Ensemble, Orquesta Sinfonica Municipal de Caracas, Daejeon Philharmonic Orchestra in Korea, Wurttembergisches Kammerorchester Heilbronn, Cyprus State Orchestra, Chattanooga Symphony, Annapolis Symphony and the Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra. She has also appeared in special engagements with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the New World Symphony and the London Symphony Orchestra. Upcoming debuts for the 2010–2011 season include the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the Louisville Orchestra, and Västerås Sinfonietta, Sweden. A native of Australia, Ioannides was raised in England. She entered Oxford University on an instrumental scholarship earning a Bachelor of Arts and Masters of Music degree. Ioannides was awarded an Advanced Certificate in Conducting from the Guildhall School of Music in London, a Diploma in Conducting from the Curtis Institute of Music where she studied as a Fulbright scholar, and a Masters in Orchestral Conducting from the Juilliard School of Music. Ioannides was appointed as Assistant Conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra from 2002 through 2004 under Music Director Paavo Jarvi, and served as the Music Director of the Cincinnati Symphony Youth Orchestra. Prior to that appointment Ioannides was Assistant Conductor to Academy Award winning composer Tan Dun touring Japan, China, Hong Kong, Russia, France, Germany, Sweden, the USA and the UK. As such, she conducted the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, the BBC Concert Orchestra, the Flemish Radio Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta and the Oregon Bach Festival.


In the field of opera, Ioannides led the European premiere of Stephen Paulus’ The Woodlanders, garnering acclaim from the Times, The Guardian, and The Telegraph in the UK. Additional production highlights include the works of Mozart, Britten and Offenbach, as well as numerous collaborations with opera companies and festivals worldwide. Opera-Opera depicted Ioannides lyrical conducting technique as one “with the most persuasive of gentle textures, she coaxed from the performers an extraordinary array of sounds. She was grace personified.” 2008 marked the release of Ioannides’ debut recording with The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and violinist Lara St. John. The recording features the Suite from the Red Violin by John Corigliano and two world premiers.

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Sarah Ioannides and her husband Scott Hartman are parents to daughter Audrey and twins Elsa and Karl.

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In 2009 Ioannides was featured in the Los Angeles Times as one of six female conductors breaking the glass podium. Recognized by the New York Times as part of “a new wave of female conductors,” Ioannides is the recipient of numerous prizes and scholarships. Highlights include: the JoAnn Falletta award for the most promising female conductor, the Bruno Walter Assistant Conductor Chair, The Kenneth Tyghe Memorial Prize from the Leeds Conducting Competition, the Presser Award from the Curtis Institute and the Janet Watson Prize from Oxford University.


Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra

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Current as of August 25, 2010 VIOLIN I Sarah Johnson, Concertmistress Sponsor: Beau & Ginger Shuler Joanna Lebo, Assistant Concertmistress Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Hudson Qian Zou Sponsor: W.R. & E.H. Floyd Foundation Ann Buttimer Alicia Eshleman Betsy Fee Christine Hallet Sharon Kerr-Lawrence Annette Genovesi Jessica Martin Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. David Holt Arlyn Baer VIOLIN II Haejin Kim, Principal John Malloy Sponsor: Advance America Robin Els Sponsor: John & Pat Tatham Suzanne Nelson Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. John R. Murphy Mary Ada Poole Sponsor: Kathie & Peter Weisman Mariya Potapov Sarah Vogt Rachelle Whitcomb Michael Fedor Emily Blankenship William Thomas

Michele Tate Sponsor: Mr & Mrs. Lawrence E. Flynn, Jr. Paul Stroebel Tessa Harcourt VIOLA Lisa Clough, Principal Sponsor: Wallace Eppes Johnson Principal Viola Chair Established by the Endowment Founders Rachel Sanders Sponsor: W. Reed and Suzanne W. Brown Linda Sickles Sponsor: Don & Alanna Wildman Sara Rossi Sponsor: E. T. McLean – In memory of John Turnbull Vasily Gorkovoy Sponsor: Sarah & Billy Gunn Diana Maley Sponsor: J M Smith Foundation Katy Martin Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Michael Orseck, and a Friend Sarah Steeves, Apprentice CELLO Ken Law, Principal Sponsor: Mrs. John R. Dulken Brenda Leonard, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Mary Alice Davidson

Kathy Foster Sponsor: Rich & Susan Hawkins James Lestock Sponsor: Betsy & Ricky Richardson Christine Lee Sponsor: Jack & Libby Steinberg Mary Sinski Eric Scheider Emma Johnson, Apprentice BASS Ian Bracchitta, Principal Tim Easter, Assistant Principal Sponsor: Jamie & Bear Boyd Matt Waid Martin Houghtaling Jan Mixter FLUTE Rhea Jacobus, Principal Sponsor: Liz & Will Fort Caroline Ulrich Sponsor: Susan H. Baker Judi Lampert OBOE Virginia Zeblinsky-Metzger, Principal Sponsor: Frederick B. Dent Erin Martin Sponsor: Joe & Edith Molfenter MaryAllyeB Purtle Sponsor: Rick & Lib Orr – In honor of our children Kelly Vaneman


CLARINET Karen Hill, Principal Sponsor: Sara & Paul Lehner Harry Hill, Jr. Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Louis F. Knoepp, Jr. Donna Black Joe Eller Robert Chest

Amy Cherry, Assistant Principal Sponsor: James & Carol Bradof – In honor of Joella Utley, MD. In memory of Joe Utley, MD Ken Frick Sponsor: J. Michael Kohler, Jr. Bruce Cox

KEYBOARD Kuo-Pei Cheng-Lin, Principal Sponsor: Mrs. James A. Chapman, Jr.

BASSOON Frank Watson, Principal Dean Lake Sponsor: Dr. Lois Ann Hesser & Mr. John Rungo Mary Catherine Pitts

TROMBONES Mark Britt, Principal Sponsor: Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr. Wes Lebo Sponsor: Boyce & Carole Miller Matthew Anderson Sponsor: Martin & Karin Cornelson Steve Wilson

ACOUSTIC SHIELDS Sponsor: Hearing Center of Spartanburg

TUBA John Holloway, Principal Sponsor: Mr. & Mrs. Scott Hartman

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Terry Campbell

PERCUSSION Jacob Thieben, Principal Sponsor: Dr. Betty Bramlett – In memory of Charner W. Bramlett, MD Del Burton Matthew McDaniel Adena McDaniel HARP Christina Van Arsdale, Principal

STAGE MANAGER Wayne Campbell

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TRUMPETS Dan Kirsop, Principal Sponsor: The Dr. Joe Roy Utley Principal Trumpet Chair established by Dr. & Mrs. Steven A. Leyland

TIMPANI Patrick Lowery, Principal Sponsor: J M Smith Foundation

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL & OPERATIONS Sharon Atherton Sponsor: Jim & Patsy Hudgens

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HORNS Anneka Zuehlke, Principal Sponsor: Sally & Jerry Cogan Paula Riddle Sponsor: Mark & Cheryl Monson Christina Cornell Bailey Slice Sponsor: Susan Price Jeanette Schlimgen Selena Adams

LIBRARIAN Michele Tate

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ALTO SAXOPHONE Frank Southecorvo, Principal

ORGAN Marcia Andrews, Principal


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Chats on the Classics Join us this season for “Chats on the Classics.” This year’s chats will give you insight on the composers and pieces being performed. We will be joined by guest speakers from around the world so be sure not to miss a minute of these chats! Refreshments are available for purchase at each event. All chats take place in Twichell Auditorium. We can’t wait see you there! September 18, 2010 January 22, 2011 March 26, 2011

“Opening Night” Chat / 6:15 pm “Romantic Classics” Chat / 6:15 pm “Film Score” Chat / 6:15 pm

Pre-Concert Entertainment / 6:15 pm Pre-Concert Entertainment / 6:15 pm

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October 14, 2010 December 4, 2010

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As much as we love chatting, sometimes we’d rather just sit back and give our brains a rest; and so the idea for pre-concert entertainment was born. Join us for duos, trios, or other small ensembles sure to please with a variety of musical talents. All pre-concert entertainment takes place in Twichell Auditorium.


Leadership Donors The Spartanburg Cultural Community salutes the Leadership Donors to the Arts Partnership Annual Campaign. The following is a list of all donors to The Arts Partnership from July1, 2009 through July 30, 2010 of $1,000 or more. Founder’s Circle

AT&T • Bank of America - Spartanburg • BMW Manufacturing Company, LLC • Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Crowley Mr. Frederick B. Dent, Sr. • Duke Energy Carolinas • Reverend and Mrs. David A. Fort • Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy I. Gibbs Inman-Riverdale Foundation • Integral Solutions • J M Smith Foundation • Mr. and Mrs. George Dean Johnson, Jr. Milliken Foundation • Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Montgomery • Romill Foundation • SC Bank and Trust South Carolina Arts Commission • Spartanburg County • Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System • State of South Carolina Wachovia / Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation

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President’s Circle

Alfred Moore Foundation • Mr. and Mrs. William Barnet III • Mrs. Elizabeth S. Chapman • Coca-Cola Bottling Company Dixon Hughes PLLC • Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Hannah, Sr. • McAbee, Talbert, Halliday & Company Metromont Corporation • Mr. and Mrs. E. Norman Peterson, Jr. • Sew Eurodrive, Inc. • Spartanburg Herald-Journal Mr. and Mrs. William G. Willard III • Young Office/Room Choices by Young

Pacesetter

Advance America • Ann C T Brown Foundation • Atkins Machinery LLC • BB&T Bank • Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Bradshaw Mr. and Mrs. MacFarlane L. Cates, Jr. • Contec, Inc. • Extended Stay Hotels • Gosnell Menard Robinson Infante Mr. and Mrs. James D. Hunt • Knights Apparel, Inc. • Kohler Company • Mr. J. Michael Kohler, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William Lowndes III • Michelin North America, Inc. - Spartanburg • Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Perrin Piedmont Natural Gas Company Inc. • Mr. and Mrs. John F. Renfro, Jr. • Southern States Packaging Co. • SunTrust Bank The Palmetto Bank • Mr. and Mrs. Russell R. Weber • Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Woodward

Leader

Dr. and Mrs. G. Ashley Allen • Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Allen • Mr. and Mrs. Callis J. Anderson, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Marion L. Arnett, Jr. • Mr. W. D. Bain, Jr. • Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Barnet • BASF Corporation - Spartanburg Beverage-Air Co • Blue Cross and Blue Shield of South Carolina • Dr. and Mrs. Gary Bozeman • Dr. and Mrs. James Bradof Mr. and Mrs. George Brandt III • Mr. and Mrs. William H. Burton III • Dr. and Mrs. Henry Frederick Butehorn III Dr. and Mrs. Louis Buttino • Mr. and Mrs. Christopher L. Cannon • Mr. and Mrs. Harold McMillan Cannon • Mrs. Donna Cart Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Foster Chapman • Mrs. Harrison Chapman • Mr. and Mrs. Norman H. Chapman Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Chapman III • Mr. James A. Cheek • City of Spartanburg • Mr. and Mrs. Jerry A. Cogan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William M. Coker • Mr. and Mrs. Justin Converse • Mr. and Mrs. Martin S. Cornelson • Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Cote’ Mr. and Mrs. Daniel E. Cromer • Mrs. Nancy Rainey Crowley • Mrs. Ysabel Dulken • Mr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Dunleavy Mr. Allen W. Edgerton • Mr. and Mrs. T. Alexander Evins • Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Falatok • Dr. and Mrs. John S. Featherston First Citizens - Spartanburg • Mr. and Mrs. A. Gordon Floyd • Mr. and Mrs. W. Russel Floyd • Mr. and Mrs. Caleb C. Fort Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Freedman • Mr. and Mrs. H. Laurence Fritz, Jr. • Dr. and Mrs. J. Sidney Fulmer, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. James S. Fulmer, Jr. • Mr. and Mrs. John W. Gandy • Ms. Joan Gibson • Mr. and Mrs. John T. Gramling III Mrs. Lucy Harper Grier • Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Grier • Mr. and Mrs. Roger Habisreutinger • Mr. Steven A. Hairfield Mr. James L. Hamrick • Mr. and Mrs. Troy M. Hanna • Ms. Kerin L. Hannah • Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Harley Dr. and Mrs. John A. Harrill, Jr. • Mrs. Eaddy Williams Hayes • Mrs. Anne T. Irwin • Mr. and Mrs. James W. Ivey Dr. William A. James, M.D. • Mr. and Mrs. Stewart H. Johnson, Sr. • Dr. and Mrs. Julian C. Josey, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Keim, Jr. • Dr. Ann J. Kelly, M.D. • Mrs. Robert S. Lyon • Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mabry Marriott at Renaissance Park • Mr. Zerno E. Martin, Jr. • Mr. and Mrs. William Mayrose • Dr. and Mrs. Thomas R. McDaniel Mrs. Sonia A. McDuffie • Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. McMeekin • Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Menard • Mr. and Mrs. D. Byrd Miller III Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mize • Mr. and Mrs. John Montgomery • Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Montgomery IV Mr. and Mrs. William James Montgomery • Mr. Fred B. Oates • Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Oates, Jr. • Mrs. William Old Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Phillips • Polydeck Screen Corp. • Mr. and Mrs. John S. Poole • PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Mr. and Mrs. Norman F. Pulliam, Sr. • Col. & Mrs. L. Stephen Quatannens • Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Richardson V Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Riehle, Jr. • Dr. and Mrs. Regis H. Robe • Mr. and Mrs. C. Leslie Roberson Mr. and Mrs. Randy Romberger • Dr. and Mrs. Anthony A. Sanchez • Mr. and Mrs. G. Garrett Scott • Security Finance Corp. Dr. and Mrs. Peter A. Sereque • Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Shoaf • Southern Arts Foundation • Spartanburg County Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Roland A. Stebbins • Mr. and Mrs. Hank J. Steinberg • Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Steinberg Mr. and Mrs. George E. Stone • Mr. and Mrs. David E. Tate • Target Corporate Offices • Tindall Corporation The Merit Group/Lancaster • Mr. and Mrs. George C. Todd, Jr. • Mr. and Mrs. W. Burnham Uhler II • Dr. Joella F. Utley Mr. and Mrs. Gregory H. Wade • Mr. and Mrs. John T. Wardlaw • Mr. and Mrs. Peter Weisman • Mr. and Mrs. John B. White, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas D. White, Jr. • White’s Pine Street Exxon • Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Willard Mr. and Mrs. Emerson Fort Wolfe, Jr. • Mrs. Susan Chapman Young • Zimmer Machinery Corporation Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Zimmerli • Mr. Mark J. Zimmerli


The Music Foundation of Spartanburg Charted in 1949, The Music Foundation of Spartanburg, Inc. serves as the presenting organization for the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. The Music Foundation presents over 100 events annually reaching over 95,000 people in the Spartanburg community and surrounding counties.

Music Foundation Vision Statement

The Music Foundation of Spartanburg aspires to be the community’s primary resource for meaningful live performances of classical and entertaining music. The Music Foundation of Spartanburg enriches life in the Upstate region by: Presenting concerts by the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra; Providing entertaining musical initiatives; and Sponsoring educational outreach efforts.

Educational Outreach

In School Performances / Muse Machine Muse Machine is series of twenty performances featuring ensembles from the Philharmonic and artists from other genres for students grades K~12 in Spartanburg County public and private schools. The Music Foundation also presents a series of formal and informal educational activities with the Musical Director & members of the Philharmonic- inside the classroom & in various locations throughout the community. Scholarships The Music Foundation of Spartanburg is proud to support the Lawson Academy for the Arts by providing thirteen scholarship opportunities annually for aspiring music students in Spartanburg. Youth Concerts Each year, The Music Foundation of Spartanburg presents the

annual youth concerts featuring the Philharmonic for 4,000 graduating elementary school students in the county. This year’s concert will be held January 21, 2011, at Twichell Auditorium.

The Big Red Ticket The Music Foundation of Spartanburg provides each school aged child in Spartanburg County a free ticket to the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra! Watch your child’s back pack for more information.

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ent at the Spartanburg County Public Libraries Headquarters, Barrett Community Room 12:15-1:00 pm on selected Wednesdays. (Boxed lunches are available for purchase.) For more information, call The Music Foundation: (864) 948-9020. See page 37 for music listings.

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Music Sandwiched In A free lunchtime concert series showcasing regional tal-

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Mission Statement


info@drnease.com

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Meet Our Concertmistress Sarah Johnson, violinist Concertmistress Sarah Johnson is currently Associate Professor of Violin at the Petrie School of Music of Converse College & on the Artist Faculty of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, where she also directs the Summer Chamber Music Institute for Strings.

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Ms. Johnson graduated from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where she studied with Ivan Galamian, Jaime Laredo & members of the Guarneri Quartet.

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Prior to coming to Spartanburg she was founder/director of a successful nine-year chamber music series in Charleston, S.C., & was on the distinguished roster of Affiliate Artists for five years. She is a former member of the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Orpheus Ensemble & served as founding concertmaster of the South Carolina Chamber Orchestra. She made her European debut at the Spoleto Festival in Italy, & in 1994 premiered the Violin Concerto by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Robert Ward, which she later recorded for the Albany Label. Her discography includes two other compact disks on the Albany Label.

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She has toured nationally & internationally as soloist & recitalist & is now a member of the Converse Trio, along with principal cellist Kenneth Law & Steinway pianist Douglas Weeks.


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Your spotlight on local news‌ with, for and about Spartanburg, South Carolina


spartanburg philharmonic orchestra Sarah Ioannides, Music Director opening night September 18, 2010 7:00 PM Twichell Auditorium

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Concert Sponsored by

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Intermission Bernstein On the Waterfront: Symphonic Suite Bernstein Selections from West Side Story (arr. Mason)

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Barber Music for a Scene from Shelley, op. 7 Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor, op. 64 Allegro molto appassionato Andante Allegretto non troppo - Allegro molto vivace Tim Fain, Violin


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Tim Fain

A native of Santa Monica, California, Tim Fain is a graduate of the Curtis Institute, where he studied with Victor Danchenko, and The Juilliard School, where he studied with and Robert Mann.

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His debut CD on Image Recordings combines old and new solo works and has another disc due out on Naxos next season. He was hailed for his appearance as guest soloist with the New York City Ballet, and has toured nationally and abroad with the Mark Morris Dance Group and Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Passionate about jazz, he has worked with jazz pianist Ethan Iverson, and has recently appeared with composer-saxophonist Patrick Zimmerli at the Jazz Standard and with composer-violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain at The Cutting Room.

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His recitals have taken him to the Kennedy Center, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, Boston’s Gardner Museum, Mexico’s Festival de Musica de Camera, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, California’s Carmel Mozart Society, and New York’s 92nd Street Y. He has toured with Musicians from Marlboro, performed as a member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and appeared at the Spoleto, Ravinia, Moab, and Santa Fe Festivals.

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Avery Fisher Career Grant-winning violinist Tim Fain was selected as one of Symphony magazine’s Up-and-Coming Young Musicians, was a Strad magazine “Pick of Up and Coming Musicians,“ and was heard as the “voice” of Richard Gere’s violin in Fox Searchlight’s feature film Bee Season. Recipient of the coveted Young Concert Artists International Award, he made his Baltimore Symphony debut, with Marin Alsop conducting, appeared as soloist with the Philip Glass Ensemble at Carnegie Hall, debuted with the Brooklyn Philharmonic, made his Ravinia Festival recital debut, and gave other recitals for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society and in Utah, Maryland, Syracuse and more. He has appeared as soloist with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, Mexico City Philharmonic, New York Chamber Symphony at Alice Tully Hall, Curtis Symphony Orchestra at Philadelphia’s Kimmel Center and many others internationally in works ranging from Beethoven and Tchaikovsky to Danielpour and Corigliano.


2010-2011

G.R.I.T.S.

Second City

Capitol Steps

Yesterday & Today

346 Cedar Springs Road Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-585-5233

Golden Dragons

Glenn Miller Band

C. Edward Davidson, D.V.M.

Dayton Contemporary

Tickets‌ 542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org

Girls Raised In The South Sept. 24 & 25

Chinese Acrobats Feb. 4

Dance Company Feb. 19

Improv Comedy April 8

Beatles Tribute Band April 21

April 29

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Political Satire Set to Music Oct. 21

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Spartanburg Animal ClinIc

This project is funded by the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

W. David Eddins, D.V.M Stefaine Gagliardi, D.V.M.


Music for a Scene from Shelley, op. 7 Samuel Barber (1910-1981) American composer, Samuel Barber II, was born to create music. His mother was a pianist, Aunt Louise Homer a leading contralto at the Metropolitan Opera, and Uncle Sidney Homer a composer of American art songs. Barber wrote a note to his mother at age nine:

Shelley is a tone poem in an A-B form with a coda — a tone painting through orchestral color. Beginning with muted strings, horns and trumpets the music then shifts to jubilant, triple-forte strings. Intensity and speed and brilliant high brass music brings this work to a “fortissimo climax.” Then a concluding coda resumes the spirit of the opening, as it ends with softly muted brasses. Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

After winning the Prix de Rome in 1935 Barber traveled to Italy where, in 1935, he composed the Music for a Scene from Shelley. Barber explained, “In the summer of 1933 I was reading Prometheus Unbound. The lines in Act II Scene V, where Shelley indicates music ... suggested the composition. It is really incidental music for this scene, and has nothing at all to do with the figure of Prometheus ...”

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He began composing at age seven; entered the Curtis Institute at age 14 as a member of the institute’s first class in 1924. Here he was noted as a triple prodigy in composition, voice and piano. In those early years he wrote numerous classical works which were performed and conducted by leading artists of the day.

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Dear Mother: I have written to tell you my worrying secret. Now don’t cry when you read it because it is neither your nor my fault. To begin with I was not meant to be an athelete. I was meant to be a composer, and will be I’m sure. I’ll ask you one more thing. Don’t ask me to try to forget this unpleasant thing and go play football. Please. Sometimes I’ve been worrying about this so much that it makes me mad.


Violin Concerto in E minor, op. 64 Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

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Few of the great musicians of the past have led the happy successful life of Felix Mendelssohn who was born in Germany to wealthy, educated parents. His musical genius was realized at an early age and he was well educated, not only in music, but in the arts and philosophy. He was a child prodigy, playing the piano in public at age nine and composing prolifically by age eleven. Well-mannered and elegant in his style, Mendelssohn was very popular during his lifetime. In fact it is often stated that the only thing he lacked was the stress, turmoil, or tragedy to give him an urgency in communicating his deepest feelings through his music. As conductor of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Mendelssohn appointed his good friend, violin virtuoso Ferdinand David, as concertmaster in 1836. Mendelssohn was himself an excellent violinist. In 1838 he wrote to David, “I should like to write a concerto for you next winter. One in E minor keeps running in my head and the beginning will not leave me in peace.” The E minor Violin Concerto was written over a six year period. The premier performance occurred at the Leipzig Gewandhaus on March 13, 1845 with Ferdinand David as the soloist and with Niels W. Gade conducting. Mendelssohn missed the first performance because of illness. The concerto was an instant hit. The three movements are played without interruption. Mendelssohn makes the orchestra a full partner with the soloist. The incomparable nineteenth century violinist, Joseph Joachim, who was Mendelssohn’s own pupil, probably played the concerto more than anyone. He said at a party given on his seventy-fifth birthday in 1906, “The Germans have four violin concertos. The greatest, the one that makes fewest concessions, is Beethoven’s. The one by Brahms comes close to Beethoven’s in its seriousness. Max Bruch wrote the richest and most enchanting of the four. But the dearest of them all, the heart’s jewel, is Mendelssohn’s.” Program Notes by Joella Utley


On the Waterfront: Symphonic Suite Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990) American-born Leonard Bernstein was one of the 20th century’s most celebrated musicians, renowned as a conductor, composer and pianist. His was a presence on Broadway, in Hollywood, at Carnegie Hall, and with the New York Philharmonic as well as on radio and early television. Bernstein was the first classical music conductor to make numerous television appearances between 1954 and 1989.

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The son of first-generation Jewish immigrants from Russia, he began the study of piano at age ten and wanted to become a concert pianist. His parents, however, hoped that Lenny would seek a more practical profession. He was sent to the Boston Latin School and then to Harvard where he obtained a degree in law. But after graduation he became a student at the Curtis Institute of Music and began to study orchestration. Summers at Tanglewood brought him into contact with conductor Serge Koussevitzky. His unique style and musical abilities were noted by Arthur Rodizinzki, who appointed him assistant conductor of the New York Philharmonic, a group he would come to lead for many seasons.

| Bernstein was not prepared for the way his music was handled in the film. He was not used to having his music cut, changed into a different order and having the volume turned down when the theme reached its emotional heights. Thus he never agreed to do another film project. The composer later brought the music together as a six-movement suite which portrays the atmosphere, the emotion, the tenderness and the pathos of that savage episode. As Bernstein described the suite: “The main materials of the suite undergo numerous metamorphoses, following as much as possible the chronological flow of the film itself.” A misty dawn over the New York skyline and dockyards is interrupted by the Presto barbaro when the mob gets vicious; the tender and haunting Andante largamente that represents Eva Marie Saint (“one of the most beautiful that Bernstein penned...”) yield to the tragic dirge-like finale.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

In 1954 Bernstein was asked to write the film score for Elia Kazon’s film, On the Waterfront. The story of Waterfront was based on a true-life account of union corruption on the docks of New York City. A series of 24 articles in the New York Sun, written by reporter Malcolm Johnson, brought this situation to light. Johnson received a Pulitzer Prize for his work. On the Waterfront, featuring Marlon Brando and Eva Marie Saint, was nominated for 11 Academy Awards and won eight. However Leonard Bernstein, who received a nomination, was not one of the recipients.


West Side Story: Selections (arr. Mason) Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990)

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It took almost a decade for Bernstein to mold his thoughts for the musical, West Side Story. The idea came from choreographer Jerome Robbins in 1949. He proposed to set Romeo and Juliet in the slums of New York at the time of EasterPassover celebrations. The original title was “East Side Story” and the conflict was to be between Jews and Catholics. The idea was set aside for several years. Bernstein felt a surge of interest in the “Romeo-Juliet” idea as he worked on the music for On the Waterfront in 1954. In that year Bernstein chose Stephen Sondheim to write the lyrics for the musical. Sondheim was trained as a musician. Bernstein did not want to give up all the writing of the lyrics. They both shared an intense interest in words, word games, word puzzles and anagrams. The work languished for a year or so. In December 1956, after the opening of Candide and acceptance of the position as Joint Principal Conductor of the New York Philharmonic, Bernstein took a few days in Nassau. There he realized that he had to work very earnestly on West Side Story to meet the deadlines. Through the spring and summer of 1957 Bernstein, Sondheim, Robbins and Arthur Laurents tugged away at the project. Sondheim wrote that his task was “to bring the language down to the level of real simplicity. The whole piece trembles on the brink of selfconscious pretentiousness anyway ... and Lenny’s idea of poetry was much more purple than mine.” The original cast included Carol Lawrence and Chita Rivera. The premiere on September 26, 1967 was not a total triumph. “The show is, in general, not well sung,” wrote Walter Kerr of the Herald Tribune, “It is rushingly acted... and it is... almost never emotionally affecting.” But he also added, “The radioactive fallout from West Side Story must still be descending on Broadway this morning.... the most savage, restless, electrifying dance patterns we’ve been exposed to in a dozen seasons.” Others described “... Romeo and Juliet with songs, dances and New York street gangs battling for turf ... the pulse-pounding Bernstein music.” “A venturesome forward step ... a bold new kind of musical theatre - a juke-box Manhattan opera,” says John Chapman of the Daily News. “...An exciting new form ... there is ballet and jive ... It is the most exciting thing that has come to town ...” according to John McCain of the Journal American. “It moves with the speed of a switchblade knife thrust,” proclaimed John Coleman of the Daily Mirror.

Program Notes by Joella Utley


| 2010-2011 season

www.infodepot.org

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Music Sandwiched In at Middle Tyger Library: 9/15/10 | 12/15/10 3/16/11 | 6/13/11 All performances begin at 12:00pm.

Join us for a free lunchtime concert series at the Headquarters Branch of the Spartanburg County Public Libraries. Performances take place in the Barrett Room from 12:15pm to 1:00pm. Bring your own lunch or purchase your lunch at the door. 8/11/10 Joyce Fankhauser – Harp 8/25/10 Spartanburg Little Theater – Hello Dolly 9/15/10 Sarah Ioannides – Notes on a Concert 9/29/10 Heartsease & Thyme – Period Music (Happy Birthday SCPL) 10/13/10 Sarah Ioannides & Katie Mahan Notes on a Concert 10/27/10 Foothills Oompah Band – Octoberfest Music 11/3/10 Mark Guest – Jazz 11/17/10 Arbor Wind – Hill clarinet, Hill clarinet, Watson bassoon 12/1/10 Miller – Rowe Consort Traditional Holiday Favorites 12/15/10 SPO Brass – Holiday Favorites 1/5/11 Spartanburg Little Theater – Patsy Cline 1/19/11 Sarah Ioannides & Patrice Jackson Notes on a Concert 2/9/11 Dale Burke & Sassabrass 5 – Brass Quintet 2/23/11 Silver and Wood – Leonard cello, Jacobus flute 3/9/11 Laurel and the Lads – Irish Favorites 3/23/11 Sarah Ioannides & Dario Marianelli Notes on a Concert 4/6/11 Deeper in Duet – Jazz 4/20/11 Done for the Evening – Jazz Trio 5/4/11 Strings of Choice – Swinging Strings 5/18/11 Jon Shain – Blues 6/8/11 The Brass Trifecta – Brass Trio 6/22/11 Lawson Academy of the Arts – Students


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spartanburg philharmonic orchestra Sarah Ioannides, Music Director side by side with the spo October 14, 2010 7:00 PM Twichell Auditorium

rev. and mrs. david fort the barnet foundation

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Concert Sponsored by

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Intermission Beethoven Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67* Allegro con brio Andante con moto Scherzo. Allegro Allegro

* 20 highly talented Spartanburg County high school students auditioned for the opportunity to perform tonight with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Please see program insert for the young musicians’ names and the schools they represent.

2010-2011 season

Mozart Overture to “Don Giovanni� Clara Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, op. 7 Allegro maestoso Romance: Andante non troppo con grazia Allegro non troppo Katie Mahan, Piano


Katie Mahan

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Praised for her unique personality and extraordinary musical sensitivity, American pianist Katie Mahan is quickly establishing herself as an artist of rare appeal. Her passionate performances have attracted audiences throughout the United States, Germany, France, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Canada, Austria, Russia and Japan. A native of Colorado, Katie began her piano studies at the age of four with her mother, Bobette Mahan, and gave her first solo recital at the age of six. She has appeared as recitalist, soloist with orchestra, or chamber musician across the world. Katie made her orchestral debut in the summer of 1999 with the Breckenridge Symphony performing Gershwin’s Concerto in F, and was soon invited for performances of Ravel’s Concerto in G major and Brahms’ Concerto in D minor. She has subsequently appeared with many orchestras in the United States and Canada. Concerto highlights have included Clara Schumann’s Concertino in F minor with Maestra Marin Alsop and the Colorado Symphony in which Katie was lauded by Maestra Alsop as “a young protégée in the style of Clara Schumann” and a world premier performance of Canadian composer Michael Conway Baker’s Concerto Festiva with the Vancouver Metropolitan Orchestra. Further concerto appearances have included performances of Chopin’s Concerto in F minor, Rachmaninov’s Third Concerto, Mozart’s Concerto K414, and Mendelssohn’s Concerto for two pianos in E major. Katie was recently awarded the prestigious 2008 Classical Superstar Award by the Berliner Salon, a Berlin-based foundation dedicated to discovering and furthering the careers of young and gifted individuals in the arts and sciences both in Germany and abroad, and is a prize winner in many national and international competitions. Katie received her Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance Degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder where she was a student of Robert Spillman, graduating with highest honors. Katie was a protégé of the late Howard Waltz, himself a pupil of the legendary French pianist, Robert Casadesus, and has participated in masterclasses by such musicians as Stanislav Ioudenitch, Lang Lang, Lori Simms, and Nancy Roldan. Katie is a Steinway Artist and has been featured on radio in Colorado and on TV in Canada, France, Czech Republic and Slovakia. Recent CD recordings include a recital program of Brahms, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev, “Fantasy” containing works of Schumann and Schubert, and a program of Debussy.


Overture to “Don Giovanni” Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

The overture begins solemnly with strains that accompany the later appearance of the stone guest in the last scene of the opera. These thirty measures in a minor key suddenly break into a sunny major key and continue briskly leading directly, without a break, into the opening scene. Don Giovanni has been in the repertoire of established opera-houses for almost two hundred years, its only rival being Mozart’s Figaro. It’s safe to say that these two operas are being sung at least every month of the year somewhere in the world.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

The orchestra took their places shortly before seven and the hushed crowd waited for the conductor. Twenty or so minutes passed before a side door opened, not to admit Mozart, but a young boy bringing the freshly copied manuscripts, ink still wet, distributing them to the players who saw the music for the first time. The house was moved with enthusiasm as the overture subsided, but applause waited as the overture proceeded abruptly into the first act. Wolfgang is said to have winked at the Konzertmeister and whisper from the side of his mouth, “A good many notes fell under the desks, to be sure, but it went off damn well, just the same.”

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The evening of the premier saw a great gathering of people including ladies in their jewels and flowers, their white hair piled high, and their escorts in velvet and jewelled swords. Also filling the galleries were the good towns people, and even the evilsmelling hoards of poor but true Bohemians who came to hear their own new opera.

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The opera Don Giovanni has been described by great composers such as Rossini, Gounod, and Wagner as the greatest opera ever composed. This two act opera was first performed in Prague, October 29, 1787. The day before the premier was a day of celebration in anticipation of the opening with much partying and music playing. However a portion of the opera had yet to be written! The overture was in Mozart’s head but was not yet on paper and had not yet been rehearsed by the musicians. Mozart partied as much as anyone that day but at the insistence of his friends he finally went to his room to begin transcribing the overture. A little sleepy from “punch” he had Constanze, his wife, sat beside him talking to him to keep him awake. Mozart had the ability to write music quickly and as Constanze chattered on he wrote until three o’clock in the morning. At this point he could go no further, falling asleep until five o’clock. He then scribbled furiously finishing by seven and sent the manuscript to the copyist.


Piano Concerto in A minor, op. 7 Clara Schumann (1819-1896)

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Born in Leipzig, Clara Wieck Schumann was raised primarily by her father, Friedrich Wieck. Her parents divorced when Clara was four years old and Friedrich was given custody. He became her one and only piano teacher. Clara was a musical prodigy who began playing public concerts by age nine. At eleven she toured Paris playing solo recitals. She rightfully earned a reputation throughout Europe as a musical child genius and a pianist of unbelievable virtuosity and musicianship. At age 14 Clara began composing her one and only piano concerto, op. 7. Robert Schumann orchestrated the work for her. At that time Robert—Clara’s future husband—was also a piano pupil of Friedrich Weick. (The story of the romance of Robert and Clara and the opposition by Friedrich to their marriage is another story in itself!) Clara first performed her concerto on November 9, 1835 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. The Piano Concerto is an incredible composition for a 14 year old. The opening movement, Allegro maestoso, demands considerable virtuosity from the pianist, something Clara could readily do. Following the dramatic orchestral opening the piano enters quite early. Lyrical themes play above a supportive orchestra. Intensity rises and then falls before the ending of this movement. In the slow, second movement, a beautiful and lyrical Romanze reminiscent of a nocturne, the piano solo is joined by a cello in a duet. As this comes to an end a soft tympani roll ushers in the final Allegro non troppo. The final movement begins with a short trumpet announcement preceding the piano entry. A triple-time dance style, a polonaise, is played by the piano over the ever supportive orchestra. The virtuosic ending brought thrilled audiences to their feet. The three movements are performed essentially without breaks. Program Notes by Joella Utley


Symphony No. 5 in C minor, op. 67 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Although Beethoven is said to have chosen his Third Symphony, the “Eroica,” as his favorite, (the Ninth was not yet in existence) the Fifth Symphony in C minor is unquestionably his most popular. The music may have started fermenting in his mind as early as 1800. However he was composing several other major works during that time and the Fifth came to completion in 1808. It was first performed on December 22, 1808 at Vienna’s Theater an der Wien with the composer conducting.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

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2010-2011 season

In 1801, at age 30, Beethoven revealed for the first time the fact of his increasing deafness. He stated in a letter that he would “... seize Fate by the throat; it shall not bend or crush me completely.” Thus by the time audiences heard his intense and dramatic Fifth Symphony in 1808 the composer seemed to have accomplished that very thing. His music has the power to uplift and ennoble the human spirit—this gift, given to us by a man struggling against his own great adversities.

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This four-movement work goes from the opening Sonata, to a lyrical Andante, followed by a fast Scherzo and it ends with a fiery Finale. The third and fourth movements are played with pause.

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Perhaps the famous four-note passage —“short-short-short-long”— which opens the symphony is the most quoted theme in musical history. Beethoven himself said of these opening notes, “Thus Fate knocks at the door,” and at a later time in history (World War II) it was known as the V-for-Victory motif. Beethoven used this Fate motif as an opening, with the pattern appearing no less than forty-five times. The theme is heard first in the horns and later it is passed between the strings and woodwinds. It clearly helps to unify the entire Symphony.


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spartanburg philharmonic orchestra Sarah Ioannides, Music Director an american christmas December 4, 2010 7:00 PM Twichell Auditorium Concert Sponsored by

Hosted by Sharon Decker and Pam Stone from the radio show “The Satisfied Life” (107.9 fm)

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of Spartanburg

linda and gary mcham

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Tchaikovsky Dances from The Nutcracker featuring dancers from Ballet Spartanburg Traditional Carol of the Bells (arr. Carmen Dragon) Traditional I Saw Three Ships (arr. Mack Wilberg) Bloch American Rhapsody featuring First Presbyterian Chancel Choir

Intermission Gershwin Cuban Overture Traditional Away In A Manger Logan Christmas Time’s A Comin’ Fayssoux McLean Alphaeus Anderson You Make Me Happy Afanasieff Jesus, What A Wonderful Child Pure-N-Heart Children’s Choir Leroy Anderson Sleigh Ride Leroy Anderson Christmas Festival Sing-Along featuring First Presbyterian Choir, Audience

2010-2011 season

Prokofiev Troika from Lieutenant Kijé Suite


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Sharon Decker “I hope I can guide a few more women down the path of recognizing it’s a tapestry we weave, not a perfect piece of cloth.” Born and raised in small towns near Charlotte, N.C., Sharon Decker’s history offers inspiration for women everywhere. She is a highly successful business executive who has effectively balanced her professional life with responsibilities of the home, service to the community and devotion to her faith. As the daughter of a minister, she learned early the value of spirituality as the grounding for other facets of life. She successfully applied that lesson as an adult business executive and in her latest venture, The Tapestry Group, where she seeks to share it with others. In addition to her work with Tapestry, Sharon is a mother of four and a commissioned lay pastor, graduating from the Presbytery of Western N.C. School for the Laity. She is also a board member for several non-profit organizations and Fortune 500 companies including Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated Inc., Family Dollar Stores Inc., SCANA, Herschend Family Entertainment Group and the Institute at Biltmore.

Pam Stone Springing from the womb of an English mother and sired by a German father, Pam Stone, inheriting the freakish height of European ancestry, and being raised in the rural south, had no option in life except to become a stand-up comic. “Plus,” she laments, “I have no marketable skills.” In 1985, after beginning a career at The Punchline Comedy Club in Atlanta, Pam, “blissfully ignorant,” drove across country to make her move to Los Angeles, CA. Things began to happen quickly: in one year, she was writing for a game show and performing studio audience warm-up for sitcoms, and three years later found herself cast in the role of basketball coach “Judy Watkins” in the hit ABC series “Coach,” starring Craig T Nelson and Jerry Van Dyke. It was too many earthquakes, fires, and riots that lead Pam and Paul to make the bold move back to the Southeast in 2000 to a farm Pam had purchased in 1993. “It was everything I’d dreamed of as a kid,” she explains.”Rural, modest, and sprawling. You can walk around the place naked — which explains why UPS refuses to deliver here, anymore.”


Fayssoux McLean

Brandon’s interest in music can be traced back to the very beginning: “From the time I was born some of my first memories are of having a house full of folks playing music. My Dad played drums, so a drumset stayed set up in the living room of my house. People would be coming in and out and stoping by to play a few songs. I remember trying to play guitar at about 4 or 5 years old. I got my first electric guitar when I was 9 and from there I guess the story goes ...”

2010-2011 season

Brandon Turner, an acoustic/electric guitarist in demand for studio work as well as performance, is in several bands and has worked with Fayssoux for 10 years. Most recently he played on the floor of the State House with his bandmate Freddie Vanderford who was there to receive the 2010 SC Folk Heritage Award. Brandon has been called a “guitar wizard,” and Fayssoux refers to him as “the heavy artillery.” An intuitive musician who can interpret songs as well as embellish them with scorching guitar leads, he is always in extreme demand.

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Brandon Turner

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You’ve heard Fayssoux McLean, even if you haven’t heard of her. Fayssoux’s beguiling voice was an integral element in some of the finest country music recordings of our time. Fayssoux sang harmonies all over Emmylou Harris’ legendary early recordings, “Luxury Liner,” “Quarter Moon in a Ten Cent Town,” “Elite Hotel,” and “Pieces of the Sky,” and she sang duets with Emmylou on “Spanish is a Loving Tongue” and Green Rolling Hills.” Given that Emmylou Harris is herself the single greatest and most consequential harmony vocalist in country music history, Fayssoux’s role as Emmylou’s harmony singer of choice should tell you nearly all you need to know. Fayssoux finally lets the world hear her stunning lead voice on her debut recording, “Early.” She called old friends Emmylou Harris and the Whites to sing harmony with her, as well as Ricky Skaggs to play mandolin. She asked Spartanburg native David Ball to play Walter Hyatt’s bass, and sing harmony as well. She brought heavy duty Spartanburg guitarist Brandon Turner with her who plays on nearly every track and holds his own with the most seasoned Nashville veterans.


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Stellar Nominated Pure-n-Heart Kids Choir The Lord has given Choir Director Alphaeus Anderson a charge to gather the youth of this hour and provoke praise and worship through their pure hearts. Matthew 5:8 says, “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” Pure‐N‐Heart consists of over 200 children from SC, NC, and GA, ages 5‐13. This dynamic choir started in the Upstate of South Carolina and surrounding areas and has now extended to the other parts of South Carolina, Charlotte, NC and parts of GA. Pure‐N‐Heart consists of children rapping, singing, dancing, declaring scriptures, and just simply expressing the God-given talents incubating on the inside of them. The ultimate goal of Pure‐N‐Heart is to promote discipline, unity, positive attitudes and relationships, and to usher in God’s presence through their songs. PNH has also recorded its sophomore Live CD and DVD entitled “We are different.”

1st Presbyterian Chancel Choir The First Presbyterian Chancel Choir is the flagship musical ensemble for a program that includes three adult choirs, handbells, a youth and adult band, four children’s choirs and a First Steps program for infants and toddlers. The Chancel Choir staffs the 11:00 AM worship services at the church and presents special programs, including major choral/orchestral works, from time to time. Past performances have included such works as Mozart’s Requiem, Mendelssohn’s Elijah and Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna. On December 12 they will perform music from the Christmas portion of Handel’s Messiah at both the 8:45 and 11:00 AM worship services.


Ballet Spartanburg

Ballet Spartanburg 2010-2011 Season

2010-2011 season

Alice in Wonderland The Nutcracker DanSynergy III Peter and the Wolf

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October 16-17, 2010 December 10-12, 2010 March 19, 2011 March 19, 2011

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Since 1966 Ballet Spartanburg has been enriching lives through the art of dance by presenting national and international dance companies. Today Ballet Spartanburg is recognized as a regional dance company with an exceptional commitment to education and outreach activities in the Upstate. Ballet Spartanburg has performed at the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in Charleston, at the Koger Center in Columbia, at the Peace Center in Greenville, Lander University, Tryon and Forest City, North Carolina, and with Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra.


American Rhapsody, Final Movement Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)

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Ernest Bloch was born in Geneva and studied violin and composition in several important cultural centers in Europe before coming to America in 1916. Europe at that time was in the midst of WWI and Bloch was so pleased to be in this country that he described it as “like being in another planet.” While here Bloch held several teaching positions including Musical Director of the newly formed Cleveland Institute of Music and Director of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music where the composer, Roger Sessions, was among his outstanding students. In 1924 Bloch received his American citizenship and wrote a symphony to honor the country. His desire was to fill the composition with popular songs, “Indian songs, southern songs, The Old Folks at Home, Hail Columbia” ... ” The work is in three parts covering the history of this country from 1620 to 1926— the date of the music’s creation. The first section entitled “1620” includes depictions of The Soil, The Indians, England, The Mayflower, and Landing of the Pilgrims. The middle section, “1861-1865”, comprises Hours of Joy - Hours of Sorrow. And the final section, entitled “1926” has two sections, The Present and The Future. This final movement, which includes elements of blues and ragtime and concludes with an Anthem which breaks into Pop Goes the Weasel or Yankee Doodle. The Anthem is written for four-part mixed choir and audience participation. Bloch wrote on the title page, “This Symphony has been written in love for this country — in reverence to its past —in faith to its Future. It is dedicated to the memory of Abraham Lincoln and Walt Whitman whose vision has upheld its inspiration.” The American Symphony won the Musical America Prize in 1926 and was performed by five major orchestras in the US in December 1928. Program Notes by Joella Utley


Cuban Overture George Gershwin (1898-1937) In May of 1932 Geroge Gershwin’s father, Morris Gershwin, died and because of his sadness George cancelled a planned trip to Europe. Instead he took a brief vacation to Havana, Cuba. When word spread of the famous visitor in their country a rhumba band appeared under his window to serenade him with Cuban music. Gershwin was fascinated by the rhythms and native percussion instruments and decided to compose with these elements in his own music. He completed this new work in just three weeks, calling it Rumba.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

As Gershwin writes his in own program notes for this composition, “I have endeavored to combine the Cuban rhythms with my own thematic material. The result is a symphonic ouverture which embodies the essence of the Cuban dance.” Through this overture audiences can gain an impression of the big bustling world of Pre-Castro Cuba.

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Gershwin worried that the first performance was not heard to its best advantage, fearing the open-air stadium lost some of the percussive effects and tone colors. However the work was greeted favorably by critics.

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It was introduced in New York, August 16 1932, at an all-Gershwin concert at Lewisohn Stadium where Albert Coates conducted the Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra. Gershwin brought some of the native instruments to New York and placed them in a row in front of the conductors stand: the Cuban stick, the bongo, the gourd and the maracas. The concert was a huge success. As Gershwin wrote: “It was, I really believe, the most exciting night I have ever had ... 17,845 people paid to get in and just about 5,000 were at the closed gates trying to fight their way in, unsuccessfully.”


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6/2/10 1:20 PM


spartanburg philharmonic orchestra Sarah Ioannides, Music Director romantic classics night January 22, 2011 7:00 PM Twichell Auditorium

KURT AND NELLI ZIMMERLI

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Concert Sponsored by

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Intermission Schumann Symphony No. 2 in C major, op. 61 Sostenuto assai - Allegro, ma non troppo Scherzo: Allegro vivace Adagio espressivo Allegro molto vivace

2010-2011 season

Berry The Search for Stephanie Thayn, Overture Tchaikovsky Rococo Variations, op. 33 Thema: Moderato semplice Var. I: Tempo della Thema Var. II: Tempo della Thema Var. III: Andante sostenuto Var. IV: Andante grazioso Var. V: Allegro moderato Var. VI: Andante Var. VII e Coda: Allegro vivo Patrice Jackson, Cello


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Patrice Jackson The gifted young cellist Patrice Jackson is carving a name for herself as a talented and charismatic young soloist. The Detroit News has described her as a “big-toned, boldly projected soloist” and the Hartford Courant stated that Ms. Jackson “wowed the audience with effortless facility, playful phrasing and a sense of spontaneity that one hears usually only from the highest caliber of musicians.”

Ms. Jackson has taken master classes with world-renowned Brazilian cellist Aldo Parisot, and has studied chamber music with Claude Frank and the Tokyo String Quartet at the Yale School of Music, as well as with the Juilliard String Quartet at the Juilliard School. Ms. Jackson, who performs on an Alberto Blanchi cello generously donated by Franklin and Tresa McCallie of Kirkwood, Missouri and Doris Taylor Cope of Chattanooga, Tennessee, has been a student of Janos Starker, Aldo Parisot, Joel Krosnick, and Bonnie Hampton. She is a graduate of the Juilliard School in New York and the Yale School of Music in New Haven.

2010-2011 season

Ms. Jackson has won numerous competitions and awards throughout her career, including the Alton Symphony Orhcestra / Merie Stillwell Solo Competition, University City Symphony Orchestra Young Artist Competition, Laclede String Quartet Solo Competition, and Laclede String Quartet Chamber Music Competition. She has spent several summers studying chamber and solo repertoire at the prestigious Quartet Program, the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, and at the Banff Center for the Arts.

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In 2002 Ms. Jackson was awarded first place in the Senior Laureate Division of the nationally renowned Sphinx Competition, and was the recipient of the 2002 Yale University Aldo Parisot Prize awarded to a “gifted cellist who shows promise for a concert career.” Since then she has performed with the Atlanta, Detroit, Dallas, New Jersey, Milwaukee, Omaha, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Grand Rapids, Nashville, Hartford, Chautauqua, Colorado and Mississippi Symphonies, as well as with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Ms. Jackson also made her international orchestral and recital debuts in South Africa in 2002. Highlights of the 2008-2009 season included performances with the Chicago Sinfonietta and the Lima Symphony.

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A native of St. Louis, Ms. Jackson began piano lessons with her mother at the age of three and cello lessons with her father at the age of eight. At thirteen she made her debut with the Belleville Philharmonic Orchestra, performing the Elgar Cello Concerto.


The Search for Stephanie Thayn, Overture David Berry

2010-2011 season

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Converse professor, Dr. David Berry, started his musical life at a young age playing French horn in junior high school. His career as a musician took him into the world of rock, computerized music, musical aesthetics and the field of fine art music. As well as a composer he is a conductor, recording engineer, and a BMI-affiliated publisher. He has spent 14 years touring professionally and recording with the band, Anthem. Dr. Berry received his Bachelor of Music in horn performance from the University of Maryland, a Master of Music in composition from Converse College, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in composition from the University of South Carolina. He is currently a Professor of Music History, Theory and Composition at Converse College. At age nine, young David “fell in love” with Stephanie Thayn, a girl aged ten. Chances are she didn’t even know of his feelings for her. But when a chance came to return to his old home city, Cheverly, MD, in 1989 David decided to see if he could find Stephanie or learn of her whereabouts. His old house and that of Stephanie’s looked about the same. The city blocks hadn’t changed much. A knock on Stephanie’s door and a conversation with the present owner led to further searching. Some of these thoughts, subsequent events, and daydreams led to Act Three of Berry’s trilogy: 3 American Yarns (three one-act theater pieces) with music by David Berry and lyrics by Gary Poole. Tonight’s program brings the premiere of Berry’s Overture to Stephanie Thayn. It pays homage to opera overtures by Rossini and Berlioz. Composed in a Modern Romantic style, “it is unabashedly tuneful and tonal.” Like Rossini, it has a slow introduction and a fast sonata form without a development section. Four primary themes are heard: The first, an introduction by pizzicato strings and a fast string melody, are derived from an old original rock song melody. This is followed by theme two, a new theme in the horn. The third theme in the strings is taken from the middle section of an aria within the opera. The closing theme, introduced by solo brasses, is derived from another old original rock song. This final theme brings the work to a dramatic conclusion with a “Rossini Crescendo”—an instrumental build up of sound as more and more instruments are added to the mix.


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proud supporter of the Music Foundation


Rococo Variations, op. 33 Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840-1893)

2010-2011 season

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Tchaikovsky is most noted for his works of melodic richness and orchestrations as heard in his classical ballet music, symphonies, suites and serenades. The Rococo Variations was his only full concerto for cello and orchestra. Written between December 1876 and March 1877 with the help of German cellist and fellow professor at the Moscow Conservatory, Wilhelm Fitzenhagen, this work is composed of a theme and seven variations. (Tchaikovsky’s original version contained eight variations.) The underlying theme contains Tchaikovsky’s gracious melodic style. Then the challenge of altering the theme in each variation is met with great craftsmanship. Tchaikovsky admired Mozart greatly. His intention is this music was to echo the style of the late Baroque/early Classical period, and its association with highly decorative elements. Tchaikovsky asked Fitzenhagen to go through the Variations and make suggestions. The cellist apparently was very energetic in doing that very thing. He enhanced the cello role greatly, rearranged the order of the variations, and even deleted the composer’s eighth variation. In some sections he did this to “cello-ize” the music and bring a “stormy applause” from audiences. Following the introductory theme, which is repeated six times in the opening, we hear a lively, graceful variation I. This is followed by a conversation between orchestra and soloist in Var. II. A change of key and tempo in Var. III bring us to a return to the original key in Var. IV. The fifth variation ends with a first and second cadenza. Number six is melancholy and then after a brief pause, the soloist flies into the most difficult, Var. VII. It is said that in one of his occasional fits of insecurity about his work Tchaikovsky allowed the changes to stand. When asked by one of Fitzenhagen’s students if he would restore his original idea to the piece Tchaikovsky replied, “Oh the hell with it! Let it stay the way it is.” The original manuscript has since been subjected to X-ray experiments, revealing that Tchaikovsky’s hand-written text was inked over. Since then the original version was finally published and has since been recorded. However, even today the Fitzenhagen version is what audiences hear.

Program Notes by Joella Utley


Symphony No. 2 in C major, op. 61 Robert Schumann (1810-1856) In 1845 Robert Schumann wrote to his friend and colleague, Felix Mendelssohn: “For several days, there has been much trumpeting and drumming within me. I don’t know what will come of it.” Indeed—what came of it was his Symphony in C Major, published as his Second Symphony in 1846.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

We hear echoes of Bach in the introduction where a slow brass chorale serves as a prelude. Then the first movement becomes dramatic and turbulent. The vivacious Scherzo is followed by a passionate, melancholy Adagio while the Finale brings back themes from the preceding movements. It contains a vigorous hymn of triumph. Schumann wrote, “In the Finale I first began to feel like myself again; and indeed, I was much better after I had completed the work.”

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Despite the composer’s worries that audiences would notice some elements of what he called the “black period,” during which he wrote this symphony, there is very little sense of melancholy in the music. Critics soon began to make comparisons of Schumann’s Second to Mozart’s Jupiter and Beethoven’s Fifth.

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This work had a difficult birth. Schumann was not well, either physically or mentally. Today it’s felt he had bipolar disease consisting of spells of depression, during which he wrote little, alternating with happy, productive times. In a letter to D. G. Otten, founder of the Hamburg Musical Association, the composer said, “I wrote the C major Symphony in December l845 while I was still half sick, and it seems to me that one can hear this in the music. ...” However, with much encouragement from Felix Mendelssohn the composition was completed and Mendelssohn led the premiere with the Liepzig Gewandhaus Orchestra on November 5, 1846. A few revisions were added by Schumann and the second performance was give two weeks later.


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Please call 864.278.1446 for the latest technology in hearing instruments. Hearing Center of Spartanburg Ear, Nose & Throat 1330 Boiling Springs Road · Suite 1400 · Spartanburg, SC 29303 www.spartanburgent.com


spartanburg philharmonic orchestra Sarah Ioannides, Music Director award winning film score night March 26, 2011 7:00 PM Twichell Auditorium

the utley foundation

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Concert Sponsored by

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Intermission Marianelli Pride & Prejudice Suite Dario Marianelli, Piano Ravel Le tombeau de Couperin PrĂŠlude Forlane Menuet Rigaudon

2010-2011 season

Marianelli Atonement Suite Music from the Academy Award winning original score Dario Marianelli, Piano Ken Law, Cello Debussy Clair de Lune (arr. Stokovski)


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Spartanburg, SC Asheville, NC • Charlotte, NC Greenville, SC • Knoxville, TN CareyMoving.com

2010-2011 Season 2010-2011 Season Hello Dolly! Dolly! Hello September 10 --19 19 Hello Dolly! September 10 September 10 - 19

Perfect Wedding Wedding Perfect November 14 Perfect Wedding November 55 -- 14 November 5 - 14

Always...Patsy Cline Cline Always...Patsy Always...Patsy January 14 14 -- 23 23Cline January January 14 - 23

Roald Dahl’s Dahl’s Willy Willy Wonka Wonka Roald March 44Willy 13 Wonka Roald Dahl’s March -- 13 March 4 - 13

Arsenic & & Old Old Lace Lace Arsenic May& 15 Lace Arsenic May 66 --Old 15 May 6 - 15

For ticket ticket information information For For ticket information Call 864.542.2787 Call 864.542.2787 Call 864.542.2787


Dario Marianelli Dario Marianelli was born in Pisa, and studied piano and composition in Florence and London.

Dario has won the Oscar, Golden Globe and Ivor Novello in the Best Original Score category for the award winning film Atonement, for which he was also BAFTA nominated. He was also nominated for a Classical Brit, in the Soundtrack of the Year category for Atonement. In 2006 he was nominated for an Oscar in the Best Original Score category for his music for the BAFTA award winning feature film Pride & Prejudice. This score has won him the coveted ‘Classical Brit’ award in the Soundtrack/Musical Theatre Composer of the Year category and has also earned him an Ivor Novello Award nomination.

2010-2011 season

He has written orchestral pieces for the BBC Symphony Orchestra and for the BrittenPears Orchestra, vocal music for the BBC Singers, and incidental music for the Royal Shakespeare Company. He was also commissioned in 2008 to write a piece of music for the new Vertu phone range entitled ‘signature’ which he recorded with the London Symphony Orchestra.

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Dario has worked with a number of different directors on a range of films. These films include Shooting Dogs, V for Vendetta, The Brothers Grimm, and The Brave One. He has also worked very closely with the director Joe Wright scoring all of his feature films to date the most recent being The Soloist staring Jamie Fox and Robert Downey Junior.

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After a year as a postgraduate composer at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, where he was also the chairman of the Contemporary Music Society, he received a scholarship from the Gulbenkian Foundation for a course held by Judith Weir & Lloyd Newson at Bretton University College, on the subject of Composition & Choreography. Other scholarships allowed him to go to Germany for a series of workshops on European Film Music, and to spend three years at the National Film & Television School, from which he graduated in 1997.


Atonement Suite Dario Marianelli (1963-)

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Sometimes a story seems to dictate its own music. That would be the sentiment of Dario Marianelli when speaking of his film music for the movie Atonement. This film, an adaptation of the novel of Ian McEwan, is based on a screenplay by Christopher Hampton. As the composer stated, “I knew that Atonement needed two distinct musical themes: the restlessness of Briony, who just can’t stop until she’s wrecked everyone’s lives, and the intense love story between Cecilia and Robbie.” ... “The fictitious and the real — war, love, aspiration and destruction — all meet and affect the other in this beautiful tragedy, almost as musical themes would in a classical symphony. The story itself was so musical that it allowed the score a chance to appear only where necessary, and join its voice to the others in telling of this sad tale.” Italian-born, London-based composer and pianist Marianelli has received numerous awards for his orchestral and film music. His music featured in Atonement won Best Original Score at the 80th Academy Awards on January 22, 2008 as well as a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture Drama, Best Original Score. Other awardwinning music by Marianelli is heard in the films The Soloist and Pride & Prejudice. Throughout the music of Atonement Marianelli shows great creativity by use of the percussive sound of a 1930s typewriter on which Briony hammers away. Beautiful love themes produced through the rich and romantic music of strings and piano, give the mood of the wartime period and of the ill-fated lovers. Individual pieces from the film score used in the suite include: “Briony”: The opening typewriter percussion is followed by rushing strings and the lonely piano theme, which represent the teenage girl who accuses her sister’s lover of a crime he didn’t commit. ”Robbie’s Note”: romantic sounds come from the clarinet playing over flowing strings and piano. “Half Killed”: a slow somber tone of strings is supported by drums and brasses. “Elegy for Dunkirk”: atmospheric, with the lush low tones of the cello and strings. A background hymn, “Dear Lord and Master of Mankind,” sung by a male chorus swells and diminishes, before the music returns to the haunting, slow theme. “Cottage on the Beach”: slow, romantic music, played by the keyboard and strings. And finally, “Atonement” concludes the suite in a sad, pensive mood. Program Notes by Joella Utley


Clair de Lune Claude Debussy (1862-1918) Claude Debussy was a rule breaker. As a student in the Paris Conservatory—which he entered at age eleven—he exasperated his teachers by breaking all of the rules of musical harmony: unresolved ninths and seventh chords, parallel fifths and counterpoint in parallel motion. None the less, he won the Prix de Rome while at the Conservatory. If the established rules of music didn’t influence Debussy, the work of Symbolist poets, impressionistic painters and some avant garde musicians of his day did. His strong interest in literature and the visual arts helped shape his musical style.

Program Notes by Joella Utley

2010-2011 season

Along with Ravel, Debussy became one of the most significant generative forces in twentieth-century impressionistic music. His music was influential to such major composers as Stravinsky, Messiaen, Bartok, Boulez, Steve Reich and Philip Glass. He also influenced many prominent jazz artist including George Gershwin, Bill Evans, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington and others. As well, he had a profound impact on contemporary film music composers such as John Williams.

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In 1890 Debussy composed a suite of four pieces for piano, Suite bergamasque, which contains the movement Clair de Lune, (Moonlight). He revised the score just before its publication in 1905. Guido M. Gatti said of this piece; “What an airy flowering of arpeggios ... leap up again like a fountain jet which scatters its waters on the air then relapses into calm again ... undulations on which the theme spreads out, ample, sonorous, expressive.”

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Although he did not like the term “impressionistic” applied to his music, it’s quite understandable that works given the titles of “Clouds,” “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun,” and “Footsteps in the Snow,” would lead a listener to gain an impression of these subjects. His music evokes images, moods, color, shadows and sensations.


Gallagher

proudly supports the Music Foundation of Spartanburg.

2010-11 Season

Alice in WonderlAnd Sat. Oct. 16, Sun. Oct 17 David Reid Theater Chapman Cultural Center The nuTcrAcker Fri. Dec. 10, Sat. Dec. 11, Sun. Dec. 12 Twichell Auditorium Converse College

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dAyTon conTemporAry dAnce compAny Sat. Feb.19 David Reid Theater Chapman Cultural Center peTer And The Wolf Sat. March 19 David Reid Theater Chapman Cultural Center

2010-2011 season

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dAnSynergy iii Sat. March 19 David Reid Theater Chapman Cultural Center

www.ajgrms.com

Exciting & Enchanting Dance


Pride & Prejudice Suite Dario Marianelli (1963-) Jane Austen’s second novel, Pride and Prejudice, published in 1813, presents the story’s main character, Elizabeth Bennet, as she deals with issues of manners, upbringing, moral rightness, education and marriage in her aristocratic society of early 19th century England. Over the two centuries since its publication the story continues to fascinate readers and is on top lists of ‘most loved books.’ This historic English melodrama has been adapted to film, television, and stage performances.

2010-2011 season

Program Notes by Joella Utley

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Marianelli received several awards for his film music for Pride and Prejudice, including nomination for an Oscar in the category of Best Original Score in 2006. This breakthrough work cast the composer into international renown.

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Dario Marianelli’s film music for Pride and Prejudice is elegant and passionate. Listen for the beautiful main theme as well as the secondary theme, which is first introduced the piece “Georgiana.” This entire work brings to mind scenes of rolling English hills and hedgerows. There is drama, tragedy, longing, and a return to happier times as the last piece sums up.


Le tombeau de Couperin Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) While Claude Debussy may have turned his back on many composers of the past, Maurice Ravel embraced musical styles of earlier periods, albeit in an impressionistic/neoclassical manner.

2010-2011 season

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In 1914 Ravel began work on a programmatic piano suite describing how it may have felt to visit the tomb of Francois Couperin (1668-1733), the famed French composer, harpsichordist and organist. Tombeau is actually a musical term popular in the 17th century meaning “a piece written as a memorial.” Ravel initially intended this as a way to pay homage to Baroque French keyboard music. With the outbreak of World War I the composer felt great patriotism and wanted to enlist in the military. He had previously been exempted from service when he was 20 because of his general physical weakness. Now, in 1915, at age 39 he managed to enlist in an artillery unit as a truck and ambulance driver where he served on the front line under extremely dangerous conditions. During the war years he lost several personal friends on the battle field. Upon returning to his home he took up the unfinished suite, Le tombeau de Couperin, and completed the six movements, inscribing each dance arrangement to the memory of one of his lost friends. Tombeau has been described as one of Ravel’s most personal creations, as well as the nearest he came to producing a “nationalist” or patriotic statement in his music. The four orchestrated movements are: Prelude. “To the memory of Lieutenant Jacques Charlot” (who transcribed Ravel’s four-hand piece Ma Mere l’Oye for solo piano). Forlane. “To the memory of Lieutenant Gabriel Deluc” (a Basque painter from Saint-Jean-de-Luz). Menuet. “To the memory of Jean Dreyfus” (at whose home Ravel recuperated after he was demobilized). Rigaudon. “To the memory of Pierre and Pascal Gaudin” (brothers killed by the same shell).

Program Notes by Joella Utley


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AYS RSD U H T F BEF ET K S I BR

FRI DA RIB YS S

Restaurant Hours Tuesday - Thursday 11:00 am to 7:00 pm Friday 11:00 am to 8:00 pm Saturday 11:00 am to 3:00 pm 2612 Highway 56 ● Pauline, SC 29374 ● (864) 585-7222 www.bullhawgsbbq.com ● info@bullhawgsbbq.com Harold Jennings, Owner

2010-2011 season

2008 & 2009 Winner of Spartanburg’s “Hottest Ticket in Town” Best Chef! 2001 South Carolina State Champion/Poultry


Practicing the art of caring.

Through the Community Healing Arts Program, we combine the soothing powers of creative arts with modern medicine to comfort patients and their families. Throughout the year, local musicians and artists share their time and talent to bring harmony into the lives of our patients and visitors. The 5,000 employees and volunteers who make up Spartanburg Regional are your friends, family members and neighbors—all dedicated to the practice of the healing arts. THE COMMUNITY

2010-2011 season

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At Spartanburg Regional, we know that healing takes more than state-of-the-art equipment and the latest treatments. It takes the compassion, caring and commitment of all our employees and volunteers. It also takes innovative programs such as Spartanburg Regional Foundation’s Community Healing Arts Program (C.H.A.P.), which brings the healing arts into our hospital system and to community outreach sites throughout Spartanburg County.

For more information about the Healing Arts Program, please call 864-384-0165 or visit regionalfoundation.com.

spartanburgregional.com

HEALING ARTS PROGRAM

PRMK80J


or Watc hef th i B g Red Ticket

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OPENING NIGHT, September 18, 2010 7 PM SIDE BY SIDE with THE SPO, October 14, 2010 7 PM AN AMERICAN CHRISTMAS, December 4, 2010 7 PM ROMANTIC CLASSICS NIGHT, January 22, 2011 7 PM AWARD WINNING FILM SCORE NIGHT, March 26, 2011 7 PM The Big Red Tickets will be distributed to all public schools, private schools & to homeschoolers.

Thanks to the generosity of Higginbotham & Nease Orthodontics and The Music Foundation of Spartanburg, the two schools that redeem the most Big Red Tickets will receive a $500 donation each to their music program.

2010-2011 season

With the mission “...to entertain, educate & enrich lives through music,” The Music Foundation of Spartanburg is reaching out to all the schools and home schoolers in Spartanburg County offering “The Big Red Ticket.” “The Big Red Ticket” entitles every student a chance to experience a free live performance of great orchestral music, perhaps for the first time in their lives. Every concert will be a “The Big Red Ticket” concert. We are expecting a tremendous response from this outreach program, and we are grateful to Higginbotham & Nease Orthodontics for being the Big Red Ticket sponsors.


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2010-2011 Concert Season Ticket Order Form Section B

Under 18 (free)

Total

$25x ________

$25x ________

________

$ ________

December 4, 2010, 7:00 pm “An American Christmas”

$25x ________

$25x ________

________

$ ________

January 22, 2011, 7:00 pm “Romantic Classics Night” featuring Patrice Jackson, Cello

$25x ________

$25x ________

________

$ ________

March 26, 2011, 7:00 pm “Award Winning Film Scores” featuring Dario Marianelli, Piano

$25x ________

$25x ________

________

$ ________

“Music and Memories” __________________________________________________________________ (write your musical selection above)

$ ________

Season Donation

$ ________

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Order Total

$ ________

2010-2011 season

order information Name ________________________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _____________________________ Email _____________________________________________ Method of Payment

______ Check

______ Bill Me

______ Visa

______ MasterCard

Credit Card # ______________________________________ VIN# _______ Exp. Date _____________ Signature _____________________________________________________________________________

The Music Foundation of Spartanburg P.O. Box 1274 Spartanburg, SC 29304 Phone: 864-948-9020 Fax: 864-948-5353 Email: music@spartanarts.org www.spartanburgphilharmonic.org

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Section A

Individual Tickets October 14, 2010, 7:00 pm “Side by Side with the SPO” featuring Katie Mahan, Piano


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www.SpartanburgPhilharmonic.org


& Do you have a piece of music or composer that means something special to you? We are offering sponsorships of music this year! If you want to sponsor a piece, simple write in your selection in on the ticket order form (page 73) or you can contact us directly at (864) 948-9020.

Music Selection

SponsorED BY

200.00

An American Christmas Gershwin - Cuban Overture Bloch - An Epic Rhapsody “America� American Christmas Favorites

$ $ $

100.00 500.00 500.00

Romantic Classics Night Tchaikovsky - Rococo Variations Schumann - Symphony No. 2

$ $

300.00 300.00

Award Winning Film Score Night Marianelli - Pride & Prejudice Marianelli - Atonement Suite Debussy - Clair de Lune Ravel - Tombeau de Couperin

Anonymous Donor David & Sharon Atherton

$ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 E.T. McLean Susan Hodge

2010-2011 season

$

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Side By Side Mozart - Don Giovanni Overture Clara Shumann - Piano Concerto Beethoven - Symphony No. 5

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Opening Night Barber - Music from a Scene from Shelly $ 350.00 Mendelssohn - Violin Concerto in E minor Candace Perry, Callee Boulware, Emily Marr Bernstein - On the Waterfront $ 1,000.00 Bernstein - Selections from West Side Story Jim & Cindy Kaiser


2010 Fall Music Events

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Chamber Music Series

Ayako Yonetani and Fabio Parrini

Sandor Teszler Memorial Concert

Monday, Oct. 11, 2010, 7 p.m. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Friday, Dec. 3, 2010, 7 p.m. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building William Preucil, William Ransom, Charae Krueger and Eun-Sun Lee

Program includes Brahms Sonata #1 in F; Arvo Part’s “Fratres” and others

Program includes Brahms Piano Quartet in G Major and Others

The Troubadour Series Montana Skies, Classical Guitar and Electric Cello Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010, 7 p.m. Chapman Cultural Center

Buckland Duo, Classical Guitar and Piano Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010, 6:30 p.m. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Amy Burritt, Singer and Songwriter

Matt Theado presents Kerouac meets Sandburg

Friday, Oct. 29, 2010, 4 p.m. Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

Friday, Oct. 8, 2010, 4 p.m. Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

Patrick Lui, Guitar Friday, Nov. 19, 2010, 4 p.m. Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

Wofford Choral Music Family Weekend Concert

Christmas Concert

Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010, 5 p.m. Steps of Main Building Patriotic Music by the Men’s Glee Club, Women’s Choir, Wofford Singers, and Goldtones.

Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010, 7 p.m. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building Bach Magnificat by the Wofford Singers

Concert Band Christmas Concert Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010, 7 p.m. Leonard Auditorium, Main Building

Quintessential…Wofford education Additional musical events may be found by checking the Wofford Web site at www.wofford.edu/arts


We Need Your Support With your generous tax deductible gift, you are helping The Music Foundation present over 100 education, outreach & main-stage performances in the Spartanburg community this year.

Annual Gift Levels Supporter $50+ Concert program recognition

$300+ Special recognition plus all benefits listed above

Donor

$500+ Special recognition plus all benefits listed above

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Patron

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Sustainer $100+ Discount on season ticket packages, an extra 10% on Masterworks season ticket packages, Invitations to parties, Invitations to 2 special donor events a year

SPO Principal Chair Sponsor $1800+ Four Masterworks season tickets, Two tickets to the Opening Night Gala, plus all benefits listed above (Value $450) Grand Benefactor $2,500+ Four Masterworks season tickets, Four tickets to one concert, Two tickets to the Opening Night Gala, plus all benefits listed above (Value over $700)

For more information about becoming a Concert Sponsor, contact The Music Foundation of Spartanburg Office.

2010-2011 season

SPO Chair Sponsor/ Benefactor $1,200+ Two Masterworks season tickets, Two tickets to the Opening Night Gala, ability to choose chair, invitations to backstage events & parties, opportunity to meet orchestra members & Maestra, recognition on website (Value $250)


2010-2011 season

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Price House, Switzer

Walnut Grove Plantation, Roebuck Regional History Museum Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg

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Experiment With Us! If it’s science, we do it at the Spartanburg Science Center‌ everything from stargazing to snake holding, rock hunting to robotics. Stop by learn to more about our tours, camps, parties and customized on- and off-site programs. At the Chapman Cultural Center, Thurs.-Sat., 10 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Seay House, Spartanburg

SpartanburgScienceCenter.org | 583.2777

www.spartanburghistory.org 864-596-3501


Support the Annual Fund As standard for the performing arts industry, ticket sales account for only 30 percent of The Music Foundation of Spartanburg’s annual income. Therefore, your contribution to the Music Foundation is vital for the continuance of quality educational programming, outreach performances & main-stage concerts in Spartanburg & outlying communities including: The Music Foundation & SPO Concert Series Spartanburg County Youth Concerts Music Sandwiched In

Thirteen scholarships to young musicians through the Alia Lawson Pre-College Department of Music & Dance

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Over 30 annual Spartanburg County in-school performances

| ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name: ___________________________________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________ City: _____________________________________ State: _______ Zip: ______________ Phone (Day): _______________________Email: _________________________________ Tax-Deductible Contribution $ ________________________________________________ In Honor or Memory of: _____________________________________________________ Payment: ____________ Check ____________ MasterCard ____________ Visa Credit Card #: _____________________________Exp. Date: ___________ Vin #:_______ Signature: _ _______________________________________________________________

2010-2011 season

To make your tax-deductible gift, simply return it with the following request form to: The Music Foundation of Spartanburg P.O. Box 1274/Spartanburg, SC 29304


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A healthy community is more than just healthy people.

It’s performing well at whatever we do.

Artists and musicians teach us to appreciate the beauty of life in many expressions — and to use our talents to enhance the lives of others. By embracing the arts, BlueCross helps promote the good things that life — and the communities we live in — have to offer.

SouthCarolinaBlues.com

Building healthy communities. It’s the business we’re in.


The Jerrie Lucktenberg Concertmaster Chair Endowment Dr. Jerrie Lucktenberg, Concertmaster of The Greater Spartanburg Philharmonic, artist, pedagogue & author retired from her position during The Music Foundation’s 2002-2003 season. To help ensure the presentation of Spartanburg’s professional orchestra in our community, Dr. Lucktenberg made a generous gift of $50,000 towards the endowment of the concertmaster chair. With your help, The Music Foundation’s goal is to match this gift to fully endow the chair as the Jerrie Lucktenberg Concertmaster Chair.

The Henry Janiec Society

Yes, I (we) would like to contribute to The Jerrie Lucktenberg Concertmaster Chair Endowment. Enclosed is my (our) gift. Yes, I (we) would like to contribute to The Henry Janiec Society. Enclosed is my (our) gift. Name____________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________ State_______ Zip __________________ Phone ___________________ E-Mail Address___________________________________ Payment: ______ Check (payable to the Music Foundation) _____ Visa _____ MasterCard Card #: ____________________________________ Exp. Date ________ Vin #_________ Signature:_________________________________________________________________ Return this form with gift to The Music Foundation of Spartanburg P.O. Box 1274, Spartanburg SC 29304

2010-2011 season

Members of The Henry Janiec Society have established permanently endowed chairs in The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra with a gift of $25,000 or more. These chairs & funds help guarantee the future of the Philharmonic.

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The Henry Janiec Society was established in 2001 to honor the distinguished Dr. Henry Janiec. A conductor, educator & pianist, Dr. Janiec conducted the Spartanburg Symphony Orchestra from 1952 to 1995 & served as Dean of the Converse College School of Music from 1967 to 1994. He also served as Director of the Brevard Music Center from 1964 to 1996.

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Dr. Lucktenberg gave her musical talents to our community for 29 years & served over 23 years as the concertmaster for the Spartanburg Symphony Orchestra, the predecessor to the Greater Spartanburg Philharmonic. With the generous contribution of Dr. Lucktenberg & her commitment to our musical community, we hope you will be inspired to join her lead. We ask you to consider making your contribution to the permanent endowment of the concertmaster chair in Dr. Lucktenberg’s name.


The Joe Roy Utley Legacy Society THE JOE ROY UTLEY LEGACY SOCIETY Recently, a number of our benefactors asked how they could support the future financial well being of our organization. We have created the Joe Roy Utley Legacy Society to provide a fund through which friends can make bequests. Your participation in the Society will provide support of live performance music into the future, beyond our lifetimes.

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A bequest may be made in a number of different ways. The easiest method is an instruction in your will to leave a specific dollar amount to The Music Foundation of Spartanburg. If you have an existing will, it is a simple matter to add a codicil giving the direction to make a gift from your estate to the Society. In addition to a bequest through your will, gifts may also be made by giving appreciated securities or other assets, by way of charitable trusts, through gifts of life insurance, or by gifts of retirement account assets. If you would like more information, please call The Music Foundation of Spartanburg office at 948-9020. Should you have a specific question regarding which alternative would best fit your personal situation, feel free to call our board member, Beau Shuler, who is a Certified Financial Planner. He may be reached by calling Wealth Management Associates, at 591-1099. My wife and I feel very fortunate to have been able to enjoy the professional performances of our Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Our participation in the Legacy Program will enable the Spartanburg Philharmonic WILL Orchestra to continue contributing to the strengths of the Spartanburg community long after our demise. We hope many of you will consider joining us in this endeavor, which we feel will enrich the lives of others.

Jack and Libby Steinberg

Joe Utley, who played the trumpet expertly in the Spartanburg Philharmonic while simultaneously heading the cardiovascular surgery department at Spartanburg Regional, excitedly pulled me aside one day: “Jim,” he said, “I think we’re going to be able to make the orchestra a professional one!” He was then president of the Music Foundation and, in 1994, it came to pass under his tenure and direction.

Music Foundation

Joe was a gifted cardiovascular surgeon, a fine musician, and a man with a vision. I am certain that he would be mightily pleased to know that the Music Foundation Legacy Society is being named in his honor.

Jim and Carol Bradof

THE JOE ROY UTLEY LEGACY SOCIETY FOUNDING MEMBERS Jim and Carol Bradof Jack and Libby Steinburg Kurt and Nelly Zimmerli


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Advertisement index Art & Frame Gallery........................................................................................................................................ 10 Artists Guild of Spartanburg ........................................................................................................................... 69 AT&T.............................................................................................................................................................. 52 Ballet Spartanburg . ......................................................................................................................................... 66 Bernhardt House of Violins . ........................................................................................................................... 64 Blue Cross Blue Shield..................................................................................................................................... 82 Bob Burnett’s Appliance and Television Center................................................................................................ 34 Brad Forth Photography . ................................................................................................................................ 80 Brown Packing................................................................................................................................................. 10 Budweiser of Spartanburg ............................................................................................................................... 44 Bull Hawgs Barbecue....................................................................................................................................... 69 Carey Moving & Storage . ............................................................................................................................... 62 Carolina Foothills Artisan Center .................................................................................................................... 43 Carolina Garden World . ................................................................................................................................. 50 Case Brothers................................................................................................................................................... 38 Chapman Cultural Center .............................................................................................................................. 32 Chautauqua .................................................................................................................................................... 87 City of Spartanburg . ....................................................................................................................................... 82 Coca-Cola of Spartanburg . ............................................................................................................................. 14 Converse College ............................................................................................................................................ 88 Country Club of Spartanburg.......................................................................................................................... 22 Cribb’s Kitchen & Catering . ........................................................................................................................... 66 Dr. Lois Ann Hesser, Voice & Piano Coach . ................................................................................................... 59 Duer/Carolina Coil ......................................................................................................................................... 54 Eastside General Dentistry............................................................................................................................... 67 Ford & Harrison Law Firm.............................................................................................................................. 27 Gallagher Risk Management............................................................................................................................ 66 George Johnson Insurance . ............................................................................................................................... 2 Hearing Center of Spartanburg........................................................................................................................ 60 Higginbotham & Nease Orthodontics............................................................................................................. 26 Inn On Main................................................................................................................................................... 51 Kennedy Street Florist ..................................................................................................................................... 57 Montessori Academy ......................................................................................................................................... 3 Morgan Stanley, Smith/Cobb Group . ............................................................................................................... 8 Music Sandwiched In....................................................................................................................................... 37 Nu-Way Lounge & Restaurant......................................................................................................................... 74 Panera Bread.................................................................................................................................................... 62 RJ Rockers....................................................................................................................................................... 32 RoseCrest......................................................................................................................................................... 86 Salon Surreal.................................................................................................................................................... 49 Southeastern Printing ...................................................................................................................................... 57 Spartan Photo Center . .................................................................................................................................... 69 Spartanburg Animal Clinic . ............................................................................................................................ 32 Spartanburg Art Museum . .............................................................................................................................. 82 Spartanburg County Historical Association ..................................................................................................... 80 Spartanburg Journal......................................................................................................................................... 28 Spartanburg Little Theater . ............................................................................................................................. 62 Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System......................................................................................................... 70 Spartanburg Science Center ............................................................................................................................ 80 Stone Lighting ................................................................................................................................................ 42 The Advent Shoppe ......................................................................................................................................... 17 Theodore Morris Home Accents . .................................................................................................................... 10 Upstate Parent . ............................................................................................................................................... 78 Wade’s.............................................................................................................................................................. 30 White Oak Estates ............................................................................................................................................ 4 Wofford College . ............................................................................................................................................ 76


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2010-2011 season

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Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra 2010-2011 Program Book