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Incumbents need to step in and help them reach scale Like in any field, most innovations in mobility have emerged from small, flexible and disruptive players. Most are still local and have not yet scaled up country-wide or internationally, for lack of financial and technical resources. The incumbent mobility providers (i.e. energy providers, equipment manufacturers, and network operators) that today provide the vast majority of mobility services also control the assets and master the processes which would allow such innovations to reach scale: but they have so far been slow in harnessing them. However, traditional competitive borders are shifting as these mobility incumbents are becoming increasingly threatened by more agile new entrants (e.g. IT firms such as Google developing driver-less cars). Tapping into the wealth of innovation happening on the ground, and scaling up efficient, clean and inclusive mobility solutions would certainly help incumbent players stay ahead of the curve.

(1) This article is based on a 2014 research assignment on inclusive mobility by Hystra for TOTAL (2) Source: International Transport, Forum Transport Outlook (2012). (3) Source: World Bank & DFID, Poverty and Transport (2000) (4) Recently, most of these efforts to improve the efficiency or rickshaws have had to consolidate, shut down or be bought up, mainly because of the price war currently being waged between providers of app-based taxi fares such as Uber or Ola

S U S TA I NA B L E T R A N S P O RT | R O B I N B O N S E Y

vehicle in the Philippines. GET has developed a business model that will allow to transition from Jeepneys to clean and comfortable electric COMET vehicles, while offering enhanced opportunities for Jeepney drivers and owners, and keeping prices stable for end-users. GET has launched its first route in Manila and is hoping to replace some 20,000 of the 60,000 Manila Jeepneys by 2020. Lastly, new enterprises enable consumers to avoid the need for mobility altogether, by bringing products and services closer to them. This is best done by leveraging existing infrastructure: for instance, the small retail corner shops (“mom and pop shops�) that are ubiquitous in many developing cities. Several organisations have successfully equipped such shops with tablets providing low-cost telecommunications, financial transactions, and other services to their consumers. In the poor districts of Mexico City, companies like Barared and Virtual Market have enabled entire neighbourhoods to place long-distance calls, withdraw cash, or pay their utility bills around their block, without having to travel to the city centre and queue for hours in front of crowded phone booths, ATMs or utility offices.

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Towardsustainablecities solutions&co  

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