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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Agent Manual INFORMATION AND ENROLLMENT Mailing Address: HISPANIOLA Academia Caribe de Lenguas Apartado Postal Z-111 Est. Zona Colonial Santo Domingo - República Dominicana School location: HISPANIOLA Academia Caribe de Lenguas c/ Nouel #103 casi esquina Duarte Zona Colonial Santo Domingo - República Dominicana

Tel: +809-689-8350 Fax: +809-688-9192 “Emergency Phone”: +809-856-5026 (24h, only for real emergencies, not to be used for informations unless on working hours)

e-mail web page

info@hispaniola.org www.hispaniola.org

Director: Mr. Luca Pellegrini


ŠThis material is property of Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Special thanks to Doc. Lynne Guitar (lynneguitar@yahoo.com) for her precious contribute and her special friendship


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Table of contents Location and Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 The Dominican Republic . . . . . . .12 Santo Domingo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 The Colonial Area . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Why study Spanish? . . . . . . . . . . .16 Why the Dominican Republic? . . .16 Why Santo Domingo de Guzman? .17 Why the Colonial City? . . . . . . . . .17 Why Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas? . . . . . . . . . . . .17 The School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Study material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Course levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Certificate of attendance . . . . . . .21 Other certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Minimum admission age . . . . . . .21 The first day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Language Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Standard Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Long-Term Standard Course . . . .23 The Intensive Course . . . . . . . . . .24 The Personal Course* . . . . . . . . . .24 The Specialized Course* . . . . . . . .24 Spanish for Emergency Corps* . .24 Spanish for Politicians/Diplomats*25 Spanish for Medical Purposes* . .26 Tourism and Culture . . . . . . . . . . .26 Business Assistance . . . . . . . . . . .27 Culture Course “Santo Domingo Hoy” . . . . . . . . . .28 Preparatión to DELE . . . . . . . . . . .28 Examination Hispaniola . . . . . . . .28 Cocina/Cooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Baile/Dancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Golf Lessons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Extra Curricular courses . . . . . . . .30 *Lunch with teacher . . . . . . . . . . .30 Accommodation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Day of arrival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32


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Arrival and departure . . . . . . . . . .32 Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Apartment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

How much does it cost? . . . . . . . .46 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Just in case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Important Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Leisure time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Activities of the school . . . . . . . . .35 Assistance provides by the school . . .36 Information and excursion . . . . . .36 Sports and facilities . . . . . . . . . . .36 Cultural and shopping facilities .36

Information and enrolment . . . . . . .47 To who . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Necessary data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Address of chosen accommodation .48 Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Cancellation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Practical Information . . . . . . . . . . . .37 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Language and communication . .38 Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Climate-related trave tips . . . . . . .39 Average temperatures . . . . . . . . . .40 What to bring from home . . . . . . .40 Documentation, Arrival and stay . .40 Currency and Changing . . . . . . . .41 Business Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Map of the time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Airports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Diplomatic Directory . . . . . . . . . . .42 Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Electrical current . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 Weight and measurements . . . . .44 National holidays and festivals . .44 Museums and galleries . . . . . . . . .45 Sport centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Appendix A - Syllabus . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Standard Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Medical Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Emergency Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Politic/Diplomacy Spanish . . . . . .60 Santo Domingo Hoy . . . . . . . . . . .61 Example of Tourism and Culture course . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Appendix B - Apartmend Policies . . .65 Appendix C - Families Policies . . . . .66 Appendix D - Brief Family Policies . .69 Appendix E - Application Form . . . . .70 Appendix F - Housing Information Form . . . . .71 Appendix G - General Conditions . . .72 Appendix H - General Information . . .73 Appendix I - List of recipes . . . . . . . .77 Appendix L - Extra Curricular Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Appendix M - FAQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Appendix N - All in one page . . . . . . .86


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Introduction

L

eanne Walker struts among the beautiful people of the Dominican Republic and discovers a colourful country that sways to the intoxicating beat of 'merengue.'

There is a distinct swagger in the way the locals promenade down El Conde, the main thoroughfare in Santo Domingo, capital city of the Dominican Republic. With the men, it is the way in which they hold their shoulders, chests thrust forward and heads held high, their dark Latin eyes always ready to give a pretty lady a wink. Dominican women are said to be the most beautiful in the world, and when they walk it is all in the hips. Like femmes fatales of the catwalk, they slink with feline grace. Here on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, which the Dominican Republic shares with Haiti, the cultural legacies of Spain, Africa and the Taíno Indians have blended together quite unlike anywhere else, creating in the Dominicans an exuberance for life.

La amaibilidad y cortesía, cualidad que caracteriza al criollo.

Haitian artists and jugglers all compete for my attention as I walk down El Conde--a street of performers where everyone has a role to play and always to the beat of merengue. It is immediately both overwhelming and contagious.

Street hawkers, taxi drivers, children blowing bubbles, shoeshine boys, 5


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Like a catalogue of New World firsts, it contains many of the oldest buildings in the Americas. With so many historically important buildings in the Colonial Zone, the very best way to explore is to simply wander the labyrinth of narrow cobbled streets with no fixed agenda. In one short walk I come across the New World's first church, the oldest street, nunnery, monastery, library and university. The weathered stonework, the fine iron gates and grills, heavy iron-studded doors and beautiful colonial balconies are testimony to the grand style in which Columbus and the early colonists lived.

La Catedral Primada de América

Where tables and parasols of the cafes and restaurants spill out on to the pavements, three-men merengue bands (called perico ripiao ) cruise amid the diners, delivering a sizzling Latin beat played on the accordion, tambora drum and the metal güira (a metal percussion instrument scraped by a forked stick).

From a stone seat in the battlement wall of Fortaleza Ozama--the oldest fort-I gaze over an impressive armoury of cannons aimed over the Ozama River and the anchorage where Columbus once weighed anchor. From here, Fernando Cortéz sailed to pillage Mexico and Balboa to discover the Pacific. This was the capital of the New World, the pivotal point of new beginnings.

Unconsciously I pace myself to the backdrop of rhythm, side-stepping the young lovers who spontaneously pause to dance among the pedestrians. While bombarding the senses with its pulsing urgency for enjoyment and self-gratification, Santo Domingo also manages to envelop the visitor with a strong sense of its past.

But Santo Domingo can never give a true overview of this wonderful country. To do that you have to get out into the countryside and see how the other half live. Each month the Hispaniola Spanish Language School goes on a tour to any one of the many fascinating corners of this gem of an isle.

This old Spanish colonial city founded by Bartolomé Columbus (brother of Christopher) in 1496, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1990. 6


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Thanks to a well-paved system of roads, this is the perfect Caribbean island (the second largest after Cuba) for touring. Despite my nightmares about the city traffic, my partner and I manage to negotiate our hired car out on to the highway. As the grey brick barrios of the city's outskirts fall behind, an island of diverse beauty and character unfolds before us.

beaches beckon with the lure of golden sands and torquoise water. Resort towns such as Puerto Plata and Samana dot the coast and provide a huge range of accommodation for all tastes. Like a booklet of picture perfect postcards, the Dominican Republic constantly serves up slices of colourful Caribbean life. We see it firsthand, from a street full of children whooping it up in the floodwaters of a sudden rain squall, to the boys at Boca Chica, who with a wink and a pout can send a passionate invitation over the heads of a crowded restaurant, even while your husband sits beside you. In Jimaní, on the Haitian border, we enter a tiny colmado (corner shop) for a cola and quickly find ourselves the centre of an impromptu party. "Beautiful lady, dance for us," cry the village crowd gathered for an afternoon of merengue and dominoes on the shop's veranda. Before I know it, I am in the arms of the shopkeeper desperately trying to keep pace with the hip-swaying step of bachata. The locals love it. Clapping and laughing they cheer me on and only by stomping on my dance partner's toes enough times, can I extract myself.

Isla caribeña paradisíaca donde brilla el sol en todas sus estaciones.

From the semi-arid cactus country of Barahona in the southwest we head north, up and over the misty Cordillera Central, the high mountain range that runs through Haiti and the Dominican Republic, dropping down to the northern coastline, sun-drenched and dripping with the greens of sugar plantations and coconut groves. Magnificent

The Dominican Republic occupies the largest part of one of the most beautiful and vibrant islands in the Caribbean. So who can blame these proud and beautiful people who strut their stuff in the streets of Santo Domingo, or the sweethearts who dance merengue on the 7


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the residence of not one, but two presidents. During the 1900s it was used as a secondary college and later a hospital before it was razed in a devastating fire and abandoned as a ruin. But the destiny of this fine colonial building was to be demolished like many of the old buildings. A Spaniard, Emilio Guerra, and his wife Maria bought the building in the early 1990s and set about restoring it to its former glory, importing many antiques and replicas of the colonial period from Spain to retain its historic integrity. Stepping through the grand twin doors from the noise of the street, one is immediately enveloped in an ambience of timelessnes and quiet. Through an impressive set of colonnades, the inner courtyard beckons with the promise of a cool retreat in a garden shaded by a grand old mango tree. Ferns and other exotic plants throw patterns of light and shade, whilst a fountain fills the air with the tinkle of cascading water.

La sonrisa es nuestra prerogativa

sidewalks. It is contagious, it is constantly surprising, exciting, colourful, and always welcoming, but above all, it is unforgettable. Monday morning back in Santo Domingo and in the heart of the Colonial Zone, I arrive on the doorstep of yet another one of the cities oldest buildings, Edificio de San Pedro.

I feel a thrill of satisfaction every time I enter the Edificio San Pedro. Each morning, Mondays to Fridays at 8.30, Spanish classes begin in the Hispaniola Spanish Language School here. There really could not be a bet-

Built in the early 1500s for a wealthy Spanish merchant, its passage through five centuries reads like an colourful account of Dominican history. During the Haitian invasion of the Spanish two-thirds of the island, this grand old building was a governor's residence. In the early years of independence it was

Mofongo, tipico plato dominicano

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by two hours of conversational class with Yaniras both challenging and stimulating, and always fun. I am not only learning a new language, but also learning first-hand about the Dominican culture through my interaction with my Dominican professors, who over the weeks have become my great friends. In the recess between classes, the balcony tables on the second floor overlooking the courtyard make an excellent spot to study or contemplate. Today Luca Pellegrini, the academy's director joins me to chat.

ter atmosphere to facilitate the learning of the Spanish language than within the ancient walls of this colonial gem. The morning gathering of students and teachers in the foyer is a chance to chat about the previous day's activities, the previous afternoon's student tour of the city's museums and other cultural sites, or the evening spent dining in one of the many restaurants serving comida tipica (typical Dominican food) followed by dancing merengue, salsa and bachata in a disco.

"You know, in a building as old as this it is only natural that there are ghosts," he tells me, immediately gaining my interest. "My office was once a prison, and I suppose that some of the ghosts of this building were prisoners who died there.

The current student group is truly international. There is Andre from Germany, Ana from Belgium, Danielle from Quebec, Jennifer from the U.S.A, Jenni from Sweden, Astrid from Switzerland, and myself from Australia. Classes cover all levels and usually only contain two or three students per teacher. I find the two hours of grammar class with my profesora Alexandra followed 9


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Prisons were notoriously cruel places in the days of the early Spanish occupation, and many prisoners were simply left to die in their cells." He paused to gaze out across the courtyard as if looking for something, and I shivered despite the warm tropical air.

ical personality of the building and chose to leave them at peace. The building's development over the last decade has remained in keeping with its evolution over the centuries. For the majority of the 1990s, it has operated as a business centre, but with recent renovations and a new direction, the change from business centre to touristic centre has taken place.

"Some evenings when I have been working late, I have felt the presence of someone close when there has been no one else in the building. Maria Guerra, the dueña (owner) of the building, awoke one night in her residence at the back of the building to see a ghost standing in the doorway of her bedroom." It is a familiar tale of many old buildings, one of objects going missing only to reappear in other rooms, of inexplicable noises, of an office worker smelling the choking smoke a of fire but upon investigation, finding nothing amiss.

Along with the Hispaniola Spanish Language School, there is an a la carte restaurant with function rooms, an artesanos' gallery/gift shop, and an intimate music bar. It could be said that, more than ever, despite the changes, the old building remains a living museum showcasing the Dominican culture through food, music, language, art and history. This article was written in 2001. Now, for some reason, the management of Edificio San Pedro is changed and all business relocated.

The building's owners called in a voodoo (ougan) priest to find out what could be done about the ghosts. First, a ceremony was performed to ascertain if there were indeed ghosts. The results were positive. A second ceremony took place to see if the spirits were malevolent or benevolent. The owners were told they were benevolent.

Hispaniola School moved in the late 2002 in another building few blocks away. In the old location is now working a popular Bar-Lounge open to the public every day but the atmosphere is still the same. Hispaniola School also is still the same.. no matter where it is located. (Note by the Director, Luca Pellegrini on 25 Sept 2004)

A third ceremony was called for to exorcise the building of its ghosts, but at this stage the owners decided the ghosts were indeed a part of the histor-

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Location and maps The Caribbean

In the heart of the Caribbean, bathed by the waters of the Atlantic on the north coast and by the impetuous Caribbean Sea to the south, rises the peaceful and beautiful country of the Dominican Republic. It is situated between 17° and 19° north of the equator and 68° and 70°, or four hours, west of Greenwich.

Hispaniola, Academia Caribe de Lenguas offers Spanish language courses from January to November in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic.

Map of Caribbean

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The Dominican Republic

occupies an area of 77,914 square km, which is shared by the Dominican Republic (48,442 square km) and Haiti.

The island of Quisqueya (according to the Tainos Indios) or Española (according to the Spanish conquerors) or, finally, Hispaniola (according to subsequent British and US diplomacy)

The Dominican Republic constitutes two thirds of the island while Frenchspeaking Haiti covers the western third. The capital of the Republic is Santo Domingo de Guzman, and so great is its influence that the entire country is often called Santo Domingo.

Santo Domingo

ment advisers, night life, cultural centers, museums, theatres and, of course, the magnificent Colonial area, which UNESCO has declared a “World Heritage Site”.

The capital is the busiest and most attractive city of the Republic, offering all the amenities that visitors and residents may need. Santo Domingo is home to the country’s best clubs and restaurants, best services and best prices, as well as the majority of the population. More than two million inhabitants, out of the country’s total of little more than four million, live in the capital. Santo Domingo offers athletic facilities, universities, government offices, banks and financial establishments, embassies, invest-

The Colonial Area There, in the Colonial City, in one of the city’s oldest streets, and in one of the oldest buildings is the Hispaniola Academia Carrie de Lingual. Hispaniola Lenguas

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Academia

Caribe

de


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS

Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas

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General Information Introduction

Lenguas has, in a short time, become the leading Spanish language school and organization in the Dominican Republic

Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas was founded in 1996 by a group of young Europeans after two years of research on the country, the society and the resources needed to establish the Academy.

Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas is dramatically increasing its number of enrolments, thanks to the positive experiences of past students.

Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas is located in the Colonial City of Santo Domingo, the cradle of the New World and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Hispaniola Academia Caribe de

Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas, though still relatively young, is well known to its collaborating agencies for its dedication to its top objective: 15


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- Several million people are studying Spanish in Europe, Asia, etc.

QUALITY Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas has earned its reputation by ensuring:

Why the Dominican Republic? The Dominican Republic occupies three quarters of the island of Hispaniola, leaving the remaining portion to the Republic of Haiti. The country’s scenic natural beauty, which features exotic wildlife and breathtaking landscapes capable of impressing even the most discriminating of travelers, combined with the incredible friendliness and hospitality of the locals, make the Dominican Republic the perfect destination for an unforgettable travel-study experience.

1. The highest commission on the market 2. A system of easy targets that allows you to INCREASE your commission even more 3. Facilitated payments 4. Flexibility in negotiating reservations 5. Personal and direct relations 6. High satisfaction of students, which helps to promote your agency 7. Highly customized courses, accommodations and prices

The Dominican Republic is a true gem for researchers, students and professors alike. It’s an incredibly beautiful Caribbean isle with the expected whitesand-and-turquoise-sea beaches lined with coconut palms, but the island also abounds with verdant mountains (including Pico Duarte, the highest peak in the Caribbean), vast fertile valleys, sere deserts and giant sand dunes, a salt lake larger than the U.S.’s Great Salt Lake, rushing rivers, tranquil fresh water lakes, cascading waterfalls, mangrove jungles, rain forests, lots and lots of caves, picturesque towns and villages.... and a modern, thriving capital founded more than 500 years ago.

Why study Spanish? According to the Instituto Cervantes and other sources: - Spanish is the second most important language for international communications - It is spoken in 21 countries - Two thirds of the Americas’ opening markets are Spanish-speaking, and in the remaining third more than 61 percent of the people consider Spanish their second language - Spanish is the official language of several international organizations - Spanish is the language of communication among more than 20 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and America

It was on this incredibly beautiful tropical island that Indians, Africans and Europeans, together, gave birth to a dynamic new American people and 16


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culture: a “criollo” people and culture. The process has been ongoing—the island’s geography, history, economy and culture are fascinating for their blend of old and new, developed and undeveloped. And the country is safe, with no major drug problems and virtually no crime or violence compared to other tourist destinations.

Why Santo Domingo de Guzman?

El colorido invade las casas de la zona colonial.

Why the Colonial City?

The Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas is located in the Republic’s capital, Santo Domingo de Guzman, which lays claim to be the oldest city in the New World. At the same time, Santo Domingo is a modern and exciting metropolis with something to offer just about everyone. Monuments, museums, theatres, art galleries, bars and nightclubs for every taste, casinos, cinemas, health clubs, sports facilities, local and international shopping emporiums and more combine to serve the country’s rapidly expanding tourist industry.

The Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas is located in a perfectly restored colonial building in the city’s fascinating and perfectly restored historic center, where you can literally step back in history to the “Siglo de Oro” and the age of Spanish colonization, while you breathe in the cultural and artistic atmosphere of this World Heritage Site for humanity.

Why Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas? Our courses, taught by young, enthusiastic professors trained in the latest teaching techniques, are based on modern methods and professional organization, which guarantee fast progress in the shortest possible time. The focus of all courses is the continuous, daily use of Spanish, both in class and during free time. Communication skills and speaking are emphasized.

Calle las Damas: la primera del Nuevo mundo.

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The School Methodology

Teachers

Our teaching methodology takes full account of modern didactics and is oriented towards the “Foreign Language Concept of the Council of Europe”. It also adheres to the recommendations of the Real Academia de la Lengua. Lessons follow the Direct Method, emphasizing the spoken language at school, where only Spanish is spoken from the first day, as well as during free time. We promote cultural encounters between students and Dominicans through organized nightly activities.

All our teachers are young university graduates who have been specially trained and regularly upgraded.

Study material Study material is included in the course price. Students receive the material at the beginning of the course and during classes, including practical activities and exercises that serve as a natural extension to the textbook. The school also has a library of language books covering 19


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grammar, readings and learning activities, as well as literature (Dominican, Hispanic and Spanish). There are also role-playing games that teachers as well as individual students may use to improve language skills.

but correct vocabulary. Good comprehension of the language if spoken slowly and clearly.

4. Intermedio B Better control of structures and practical, common vocabulary. Errors are frequent, but comprehension of the language is good and the speech is quick.

Course Levels On the first day of the language course, an assessment test and an interview will determine each student’s knowledge of Spanish. Students will then be assigned to one of eight levels:

5-6. Avanzado (I and II) Good choice of structures used with accuracy and naturally. Vocabulary and comprehension are good, but some errors are repeated.

1. Principiante

7-8. Perfeccionamiento (I and II)

No knowledge of Spanish except perhaps a few words or expressions. No comprehension of the spoken language.

Very good communication skills, accurately using grammar and syntactic structures. Speech can be directed over a wide range of topics using a proper vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. It is divided in 3 sub-levels (A, B and C) according to the skills of the students.

2. Elemental Very basic communication skills based on simple structures and a very narrow vocabulary. Strong communicative limitations in everyday situations.

At the end of any and each level a level test will take place. According to results any single student will be suggested to repeat the level or go to next one

3. Intermedio A Can participate in simple conversations on some topics using basic grammatical structures and a simple

1

2

3

Principiante Elemental Intermedio A

4

5

6

7

8

Intermedio B

Avanzado I

Avanzado II

Perfeccionamiento I

Perfeccionamiento II

One level = 2 weeks standard language course

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Certificate of attendance At the end of the course all students receive, on request, a Certificate of Attendance

Other certificates - Diploma basico de Dominio de la Lengua (on request at the end of the 3rd level) - Diploma de Dominio de la Lengua (on request at the end of the 6th level) - Diploma Idioma Español (on request at the end of the 8th level and after an examination)

Minimum admission age

The daily course is divided into four parts under the responsibility of two teachers: two sessions of grammar and two sessions of conversation. Each session lasts 50 minutes. The school will provide the study material, and students are suggested to bring a pencil, dictionary and paper.

The minimum age for participants is 18 years. We can, however, accept younger students if they are under the supervision of one or both parents.

The lessons of the Intensive course take place in the afternoon during the range of time between 14:00 and 18:00.

The first day

Personal courses are customized and the student may decide on the hour.

At the beginning of the first day (Monday) the new student will take the assessment test and be interviewed by a teacher. Students are requested to be at school at 8.30 a.m. After the test and interview, students will complete their enrolment with the school secretariat. For continuing students, this day will be normal.

Transfers On arrival, it is recommended that students take a taxi to their accommodation or to the school. Taxis are easily found in front of the main entrance of each airport. For those deciding to use public transportation, we will send some tips to make it easier. At the air-

Lessons begin on Tuesday at 8.30 a.m. and finish at 12.30 p.m., with a break from 10:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 21


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tion. In some cases, it will be necessary to spend a night in Higüey. Puerto Plata Airport: a taxi to the capital costs US$150. It is possible to go to Puerto Plata city (taxi US$30-35) and from there with a public bus (RD$100-150) to Santo Domingo. Another taxi (RD$100-150) will be needed to arrive to the final destination. In some cases it will be necessary to spend a night in Puerto Plata. Academia Hispaniola also offers a transfer service from the airports to the final destination. For prices, please consult our current price list.

port there is the bad habit of “assaulting” incoming tourists with offers of goods or services: we suggest ignoring these and going directly to an official taxi. We recommend agreeing on the fare before leaving. Las Americas Airport: a taxi to the city costs US$30-35 Punta Cana Airport: a taxi to the capital costs US$150. It is possible to go to the nearest city, Higüey (taxi US$3035) and from there with a public bus (RD$150-200) to Santo Domingo. Another taxi (RD$100-150) will be needed to arrive to the final destina-

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Language Courses Standard Course

Long-Term Standard Course

The Standard Course is held throughout the year at all six levels. Duration: two or more weeks. Classes consist of a maximum of 6-8 people, and run from Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Each level is taught by two teachers and is divided into two sessions of grammar and two sessions of conversation. Each session lasts 50 minutes.

Students wishing to study Spanish for longer periods are especially welcome at our schools and receive special care and attention from our staff, as well as benefiting from our long-term discounted prices. With this course, students profit from all the advantages of learning a language in the country where it is spoken. Through our experience in teaching the Spanish language, we know that the ideal minimum stay for a course is 10 weeks. Not only you will have more confidence in your language skills, but also instead

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A 23


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

of feeling like you are on holiday, you will be completely immersed in the Spanish culture and way of life. Many of our longterm students are preparing to enter university or rounding off their Spanish Long-Term Standard Course with a recognized examination.

The Personal Course* Personal Course is a fully customized one-on-one language course, designed according to the needs of the student. Students can decide where, when and how many hours within a wide range of choice. Courses may begin on any working day of the year, running for a minimum of one week, with one to eight lessons per day

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

The Intensive Course

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

In addition to the Standard Course, the Intensive Course includes one or two extra afternoon sections of group or private lessons. These extra sections provide an opportunity to increase knowledge and skills through practice in speaking and conversation. This course is available throughout the year. GroupIntensive (2 group classes), P5 (one personal class) and P10 (two personal classes). When a student scheduled for GroupIntensive can’t be introduced in any group s/he will be shifted to P5

The Specialized Course* The Specialized Course is designed for students who already have a good knowledge of the Spanish language and wish to improve or study some special aspect or topic. To enroll in this course, students need to have a good knowledge of Spanish. The course may begin on any working day of the year, running for a minimum of one week, with between one to eight lessons per day. Books and learning material are included in the price.

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Spanish for Emergency Corps* Special course designed for all professionals of emergency situations where Hispanics are involved. May be police, 24


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

This course is not, however, an action training program and there are no practical sections. The course focuses on the linguistic and cultural aspects of emergency management as it relates to Hispanics. The goal is to give students the basic elements that can help them to better understand and communicate with Hispanic people in emergency situations, thus to manage emergencies more efficiently. This course is one-to-one and held all year around in 2 levels. Each level lasts 10 lessons. Starting dates and schedule are custom and arranged between school and student with a minimum pre-enrolment of 2 weeks. Minimum 10 lessons max 20 lessons. For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A army, Red Cross, firemen, ambulance personnel, or members of any organizations who are trained to manage situations such as criminal events, natural disasters, and accidents—anyone who needs to communicate orders or commands during emergencies.

Spanish for Politicians/Diplomats* This course is designed for all professionals of politics and/or diplomacy

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A The course covers terminology of the most common weapons to general anatomy, military/police commands, bad words, most common crimes, and so on, and has segments on general Hispanic lifestyle and point of view. 25


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

who need or wish to make contact with the Spanish-speaking community. During the course, students get an overview of all Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America, which includes geographic, political, and economic aspects. Also included are elements of dialects, and a general introduction to Hispanic peoples and cultures. For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Spanish for Medical Purposes*

This course is not, however, an action training program and there are no practical sections. The course focuses on the linguistic and cultural aspects of politics and diplomacy as they relate to Hispanics. The goal is to give students the basic linguistic elements that can help them to communicate with and better understand the needs and point of view of Hispanic peoples.

Special course divided into 5 levels. Each level lasts 10 hours (each hour = 60 minutes) and is directed to all people involved with this special-need field, in particular to all health-care professionals who, for any reason, are working with (or who are interested in working with) Spanish patients and/or colleagues. The course is held all year around, starting any working day of the week, 1-5 hours per day, minimum 1 level (10 hours). This course is organized with one-to-one tuition and a personalized schedule. Any student may decide how many hours per day, how many days per week, how many weeks they want to study, with a minimum pre-enrolment of 2 weeks. The maximum is 50 hours (5 levels). To enroll in this course, student needs a minimum of intermediate-level Spanish and a good knowledge of healthcare in their mother language. The price is exactly the same as that of other personal

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A This course is one-to-one and held all year around in 2 levels. Each level lasts 10 lessons. Starting dates and schedule are custom and arranged between school and student with a minimum pre-enrolment of 2 weeks. Minimum 10 lessons max 20 lessons. For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

26


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

courses. Books and teaching materials are included in the price.

For an example of the courses please refer to appendix A

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Business Assistance The Dominican Republic, with its taxfree zones, is an emerging market and represents a good business opportunity. For those who need language assistance and translations we organize special services in which a teacher

Tourism and Culture This course is designed for students who want to take full advantage of their trip to the country. A general language teacher will travel with the student around the island, helping him or her to discover the tourist and cultural places of interest of the Republic. Students wishing to enroll in this course are required to plan their desired itinerary with the school secretariat. Courses may begin on any day of the year, running for a minimum of one week. Books and learning material are included in the price. We ask that this course be reserved one month in advance.

27


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Culture Course “Santo Domingo Hoy” For students who want to learn Spanish and at the same time become acquainted with the culture and history as well as the current social and political situation of their host country, we suggest choosing the “Santo Domingo Hoy” course. In addition to the 4 lessons of the Standard Course in the morning, there will an extra course in the afternoon where students will be introduced to art and culture, history and folklore, the media, and the current political and economic situation of Dominican Republic. The cultural part of this course consists of 10 supplementary lessons in two weeks.

Hay muchas cosas que descubrir en SD!

guides and supports the student through all situations: meetings with lawyers, banks, financial experts, visits to the tax-free zones, and all activities related to the student’s business in the country. This assistance allows students to understand better what they are doing, to save time, to be oriented in the jungle of possibilities and, of the course, to improve their Spanish. Several sessions of language learning and comprehension will be organized during the period, using part of the free time and following a previously planned and personalized schedule.

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Preparation to DELE The Preparation to DELE 1, 2 or 3 consists of 4 lessons Standard Course per day in the morning and 2 extra lessons of group language course in the afternoon. In the afternoon session, students have the opportunity to increase their knowledge with practice in speaking and conversing using specific material and past examinations. In case just one student is enrolled in the preparatory course, s/he will be shifted to intensive P-5 course

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

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Starting from beginner to prepare first level needs 6 weeks, second level 10 weeks, third level 14 weeks. For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Examination Hispaniola At the end of any course and upon request, free certificates of attendance are available. For those students who wish/need a knowledge/proficiency certificate with a teachers’ evaluation, we offer the exam “Hispaniola” in 3 levels: Basic (1) after completing the 3rd standard level, Intermediate (2) after completing 5th standard level, and Advanced (3) after completing the 8th advanced level. At the end a certificate with a note and a written evaluation by the teacher. Exams will be kept in school’s files. This examination will take place in the afternoon after the end of the class and will lasts 2 hours maximum. Normally results will be available the same day or the next working day together with the certificate. Minimum pre-enrolment of 2 weeks.

Merengue, bachatas, salsa.. todo lo comunicamos bailando y cantando..

We have a list of 12 complete menus to prepare delicious creole dinners. Any section includes 3 to 5 items. All the ingredients are included. Drinks are not included. Starting dates and schedule are custom and arranged between school and student with a minimum pre-enrollment of 2 weeks. Minimum 3 sections, max 12. Schedule is custom and arranged between school and student with a minimum preenrollment of 1 weeks. Appendix I El sancocho, nuestro plato mas sabroso

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Cocina/Cooking Join one or more of our doñas in the preparation of dinner for the family and then enjoy the meal together with them. More than a class, it is a party! 29


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

and schedule upon request with a minimum pre-enrolment of 1 week. For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Extra Curricular courses Some interesting short courses, taught in English or Spanish about different aspect of Dominican society/history/ culture/folklore. These courses are normally “on-field” and are managed by an external professional. For details please refer to appendix H. For prices please request for quotation to school secretariat. For description of the courses please refer to appendix L

Lunch with teacher* If you wish, the lessons can also be organized to include lunch with your teacher. Thus you are able to continue practicing the new language during the lunch-break. Quotation on request.

RD esta llena de floklor y tradiccion

For syllabus of the courses please refer to appendix A

Baile/Dancing

For syllabus of language courses please refer to appendix A

We have 1 basic level available about Merengue, Salsa, and Bachata. The basic course will be held at school. For Intermediate and Advanced levels, external professionals are available. This level lasts 8 hours. Starting dates 30


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Accommodation own should go directly to their accommodations, whose address will have been communicated several days before their departure. Students arriving between Monday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., or on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12 noons may drop by the school. In this case, however, they are kindly requested to advise previously by phone, fax or e-mail.

All accommodations, if not otherwise specified, start on the Sunday before the course commences and last until Saturday, 12 noon’s, after the end of the course.

Day of arrival On the day of arrival in the Dominican Republic (when coinciding with the Sunday prior to the beginning of the course), students who have requested a transfer will be accompanied directly to their final destination.

Availability Accommodations are always available for students booking through agencies.

Students choosing to arrive on their 31


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

On your arrive at the hotel, you should read the rules to ensure your stay will be pleasant. Every hotel has its own rules.

Location The location of accommodation can vary: We will try to lodge all students in the Colonial area, near the school when possible. We will communicate the distance between the school and the hotel in advance.

Location The location can be different: we will tray to lodge all the students in the Colonial Zone, near school when it will be possible. We will communicate as far from school the hotel is in advance.

Arrival and departure

Meals

You will be awaited on the day of your arrival. Please inform the school secretariat of your estimated time of arrival. At your arrival you will receive the keys, which you will keep during your stay and return on the day of your departure. You must vacate your room before 12 noons. You will be charged for any lost keys.

Breakfast is included in the price of the room. Half or full board can be arranged with the school secretariat or directly with the hotel on the day of arrival. In some case breakfast can be arranged out of the hotels.

Laundry All the hotels have laundry service. For the price list please ask at the front desk.

Categories 1 star: rooms with wash basin: bath/WC on the floor 3 stars: rooms with air-conditioning, TV, bath/WC

Apartment La oferta culinaria es moderna y completa

Students can choose a single or double room and share a communal kitchen and bathrooms with other students. The school will assign another student to the double room.

Hotels Students can choose a single room or, if they travel in pairs, a double room. Hotel policies 32


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Meals Not included. A kitchenette is available for simple recipes.

Cleaning and change of sheet Not included. A lady is available to fix it with.

Laundry Not included. A lady is available to fix it with.

Apartment policies See Appendix B Los servicios son modernos y completos.

Families

Incoming and leaving Students may choose to live either with an individual or a Dominican family during their stay. Although the families may be located throughout the city, accommodations of this sort are always comfortable and situated as close as possible to the language school. All families are chosen through a rigorous selection process

The person in charge will wait for you the day of your incoming for a limited time. Please inform the secretary of the estimate hour of your arrival. At your arrival you will receive the keys that you will keep for all the period and give back the day of your leaving. For the set of keys a US$100 deposit apply. Deposit has to be paid the day of the check-in to receive the set of keys and will be paid back the day of leaving when the set of keys will be returned to the administration. Please note that without the deposit the administration will retain the set of keys. In case you loose the keys you will be charged for a new lock. At your leaving you have to move out before 12.00. 33


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

and the school staff, which is always available to handle any problem that may arise, periodically checks housing conditions.

In case you loose the keys you will be charged for a new lock. At your leaving you have to move out before 12.00.

Meals Students can choose a single or double room. The school will book another student into the double room.

Not included in the standard pack. Different plans are available for an extra fee.

Incoming and leaving

Cleaning and change of sheet

The person in charge will wait for you the day of your incoming for a limited time. Please inform the secretary of the estimate hour of your arrival.

Included. Once in a week.

At your arrival you will receive the keys that you will keep for all the period and give back the day of your leaving.

HostFamily policies

Laundry Included. Once in a week.

See Appendix C

Note:

the message will be heard in a very short time.

The waiting time will be limited according to the estimate hour of student incoming. If student think to came at different hour any change and/or delay MUST communicate as soon as possible to the number +809-856-5026 and only to this number . If, for same reason, nobody answer, try in 10 minutes again or leave a message with all the new data:

The emergency number +809-856-5026 is a cell phone. If you are calling from Dominican Republic you need to dial “1” before the number, to enter the cellular network. If you are calling from abroad (outside Dominican Republic) you have to dial the international code (+) and then the number 809-856-5026 without the “1”

34


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Leisure time he school secretariat keeps students informed of all of the social and cultural events that the city has to offer, including some activities in which students can participate for free. Upon request, for example, courses in Latin American dance or Creole cooking can be arranged, while organized and impromptu class trips complete a travel-study experience, which will surly, be unforgettable. The famous allure of Caribbean nights, between salsa and

T

Activities of the school

merengue, Cuba Libres and piña coladas, friendship and adventure, are all waiting for you, and you’ll never be faced with the hated question: “What should we do tonight?” Among other delights, “Boca Chica”, one of the island’s most famous beaches, lies just 30 minutes away from the capital by public transportation. In addition, many other special requests for activities not included in our normal program can be organized through school secretariat.

(just an example..)

Week Day

Morning

Afternoon

Evening

Sunday

Arriving day - free

Arriving day - free

Flamenco dance show

Monday

Grammar Conversation

8.30 11:00 -

10.30 12:30

Free time

Don Pincho, Tacos del Sol, Trio Café…all in one night

Tuesday

Grammar Conversation

8.30 11:00 -

10.30 12:30

Free time

Cinema or something else

Wednesday

Grammar Conversation

8.30 11:00 -

10.30 12:30

Cultural excursion

Street sandwich and Gambling Casino

Thursday

Grammar Conversation

8.30 11:00 -

10.30 12:30

Beach

dinner/party organized by the school with special recipes

Grammar Conversation

8.30 11:00 -

10.30 12:30

Tour time: Discover the island leaving at 13.00

Evening out...

Friday Saturday

Tour activities

Tour activities

Tour activities

Sunday

Tour activities

Tour activities

Coming back to the city and dinner

This is just an example. The school is not committed to follow this schedule. Activities are arranged and do change on a daily base

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The Academy organizes a large variety of cultural and leisure activities on a regular basis:

organize all kinds of activities and excursions directly and/or through our travel agency.

- Different activities are proposed everynight. - Every wednesday a walking excursion - There is no extra charge for leisure activities: only entrance fees or transportation. - For weekends we inform students of one or two day excursions, such as Night Tour, Saona Island, Crocodile Lake, San Juan River in a boat and the mysterious Cri-Cri Lagoon, etc. - Information can be obtained at the Academy. - School, hereby, organizes weekends only when a minimum number of participants apply.

Cabarete esta en la top ten mundial para el windsurf y es el lugar #1 en el mundo para el kaysurf

Sports and facilities During their stay, your students may wish to practice their favorite sport or learn a new one. Our written guide for all sporting activities helps students organize their free time, and the office can also help with the organization of sporting activities.’

Assistance provided by the school Santo Domingo is full of leisure and entertainment spots, many of which are concentrated in the Colonial area. All students are provided with a monthly review of leisure time activities (with all the cultural events of the month and a large variety of tips about what to do during free time, including restaurants, discos, pubs, shops, sports centers, etc.) and, on request, a Tourist Guide of Santo Domingo and the Dominican Republic (with many tips on where to go).

Cultural and shopping facilities Our written guide includes all the cultural events of the month and a complete directory of shopping centers to help your students plan their free time. They can also ask specific questions to the school secretariat. Every month we will update all information on sports, cultural events, leisure and shopping: your students will have a memorable and eventful stay in the Dominican Republic, and not solely for the language course.

Information and excursions The school secretariat is available for providing information. We are able to 36


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Practical information History

Tainos, which in their own language means “the good ones”. Thinking they had reached India, the Spaniards called them “Indians”.

Hispaniola Island was discovered by Columbus the 5 December of 1492. It was the land he loved most and it was here he asked to be buried.

The epic events associated with Conquest and Colonization gave rise to America firsts. Santo Domingo host the first Cathedral of the New World, the first hospital, the first university.....The first mass was observed and the first Catholic priest was ordained here.

By Royal privilege of King Ferdinando in 1508 it was named Island of Santo Domingo. Its aboriginal name Quisqueya in the Taino language means “mother of all lands”. At the time of the discovery, our island was inhabited mostly by natives who called themselves

The depopulation carried out in 1605 and 1606 gave way to the settling of 37


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buccaneers and pirates in the western region of the island which in future centuries brought about the establishment of a French colony, and finally, led to the Independent Republic of Haiti.

is one of the most interesting places of vacation and/or to make business due to its well growing economy, society and culture.

The Dominican Republic was born on February 27, 1844. The proclamation of the Republic took place at the Conde Gate where, for the first time, its tricolor flag was raised. The founding Fathers are Juan Pablo Duarte, Francisco del Rosario Sanchez and Ramon Matias Mella.

Language and communications Spanish “Castellano” is the official language, but there are still commonly used words that are an inheritance from the language of the Tainos. It is important to note here that Dominican speech is the “soul’s expression” and the wisdom of the country folk is expressed with a rustic accent and with down-home flavour. Dominicans speak loudly and make hand gestures to overcome distances: shouting, sudden gestures, and running about in order to call attention to some protest may seem like the beginning of a violent confrontation; instead it is only a normal way of expressing feelings, and in half an hour everything goes on as if nothing had happened.

La historia de RD es “breve” pero intensa.

The Dominican Republic was annexed by Spain in 1861 and Restored as an Indipendent country in 1865. Authoritarism and anarchy were the hallmark of this second Republic. In 1930 Rafael Leonida Trujillo established a dictatorship, which lasted for 31 years. After the death of the dictator several governments was settled without the possibility to resolve the drastic economic and social situation of the Republic. Actually Dominican Republic is a period of big hope and it

Government Inhabited by over than 7.3 millions (AGR 2%) people, Dominican territory is divided politically into 29 provinces and a National District. It is a Democratic Republic and the president is elected every 4 years through direct votes as well as the Congress. 38


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Politic and elections are one of the most interesting arguments to Dominicans.

and upon a region’s location with respect to land formations that block the Trade Winds.

Religion

Overall temperatures in the Dominican Republic are somewhat cooler from December to February, and hottest in June through August. In general, however, the temperature differential is greater from night to day than it is from season to season! Temperatures change more rapidly in the tropics with altitude (10° for every 1000 meters of elevation) than they do from season to season.

There is freedom of worship in the Dominican Republic but 90% of the population is Apostolic and Roman Catholic.

Afternoon showers are common year round—be sure to bring along an umbrella—but the heaviest rainy season is normally between May and August (when the sun is hottest), with the least rainfall in November and December. Hurricane season officially runs from June 1 to the end of November, though August through mid-October are the months with the most potential of danger from these tropical storms, and six out of every ten hurricanes that have hit the Dominican Republic since 1871 have done so in September. The city of Santo Domingo where Hispaniola is located is pretty safe also in case of stronger hurricanes. Families, apartments and hotels are selected considering their resistance to the phenomena. Hurricanes in general do not break concrete walls. School secretariat monitor every hour the forecast, give all the information and in the case the forecast is really bad we all immediately evacuate to a safe place.

Viva el clima tropical!!

Weather Hispaniola is a tropical island. Average temperature throughout the year is 77° F (25° C); however, the island has the greatest mini-climate diversity in the Caribbean. In the high mountain regions, such as those around Constanza and Pico Duarte, temperatures have been registered as low as 0°! And rainfall levels vary not only from season to season, but also from one valley or peak to another. Some areas receive 70-100 inches of rainfall annually (1750-2500 mm), while others receive only 25-35. Much of the difference depends upon the flow of air from the moisture-laden Trade Winds 39


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Average temperatures: Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Jul

Aug Sep Oct

Nov Dec Year

Santo Domingo

19 29

19 29

20 29

21 30

22 30

23 31

23 31

23 31

23 31

22 31

21 30

20 29

21 30

Constanza

9 23

9 24

10 25

11 25

12 25

12 26

13 26

13 26

13 26

13 25

11 23

9 23

11 25

La Romana

19 29

20 29

20 30

21 30

22 31

23 32

23 32

23 32

23 32

23 31

22 30

20 29

22 31

Puerto Plata

19 27

18 27

19 28

20 30

21 30

22 30

23 31

23 31

22 30

22 30

21 28

19 29

21 29

Punta Cana

22 27

22 27

22 28

23 2

24 830

24 30

25 30

25 31

25 31

24 30

24 30

23 28

23 29

To convert to Fahrenheit multiply by 1.8 and add 32

What to bring from home

Climate-related travel tips:

First of all, bring a positive attitude and a desire to have a good time. Then, due to the climate, we would suggest a wardrobe of natural fibbers, cotton, linen, etc. (in order to feel more comfortable and transpire more easily during the day) and beach wear.

• Umbrellas have two well-deserved names here. They are called both paraguas and sombrillas. The first means «stop the (rain) water,» and the second «shade maker.» It’s a good idea to bring along a collapsible umbrella and keep it handy at all times for both purposes • The tropical sun is hot and fierce. Do not underestimate it. Bring along lots of waterproof sun protection lotion and use it. And drink lots and lots of water so that you do not become dehydrated.

In particular we suggest students bring their own towels and sheets. Nights can be cool from November to February, making a pullover appropriate. When visiting churches, men should uncover their heads, and shorts pants or beach dresses are considered offensive. 40


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Documentation, Arrival and stay

of the first and bypass the line that will be really a long affair. 2 Change a little bit of money at the airport enough for the week end 3 Do not trust in anybody at the airport but go directly to a taxi parked outside of the airport, the taxi costs 25-30USD from Las Americas airport. Ask for the price before.

Dominicans Immigration laws allows tourists to stay up to 60 days with a Tourist Card which costs 10USD and which may be purchased at Dominican Consulates accredited abroad or upon their arrival in one of the country’s international airport.

For extension of time in the country, you may call Some tips for incoming the General Direction of students: La mayoría de TC y TD son aceptadas en Migration, tel: 685-2535 casi todos los lugares. and pay a little fee. You can 1. After landing try to go out choose to wait your departure and pay of the airplane quickly and quickly go directly at the airport for the extra perito the desk with passport, 10USD od you stayed in Dominican Republic. cash, flight details (arrive and deparCitizens of several countries need only a ture), address in Santo Domingo. valid passport without the 10USD Tourist When he arrive at the desk first go at Card to be allowed to stay for up to 90 the right side of the room to buy the days: please refer to Dominican Tourist Card (10USD), compile it and Consulate in your own country. then go to the desk (immigration). Take care of the receipt. This to be one

Business Hours Banks Government Offices Commercial

8.30 to 15.00 7.30 to 14.30 8.00 to 19.00

Mon-Fri Mon-Fri Mon-Sat

Several commercial center and offices doesn’t make lunchtime. When they do they close between 13.00 and 14.30.

Map of the time mid Oct to Mid March mid March to Mid Oct

Sto. Dgo. Rome New York Los Angeles Sydney 0 +5 +6 -3 +12 0 +6 +6 -3 +12 41


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Airports Las Américas Herrera Gregorio Luperón Punta Cana Punta Aguila Cibao

Santo Domingo Santo Domingo Puerto Plata Higüey La Romana Santiago

809-549-0450 809-567-3900 809-586-0219 809-686-8790 809-556-5565 809-582-4894

School is not responsabile for any change on this information. Please verify with school secretariat Please dial "809" in front of these numbers

Diplomatic directory

Consulate and/or embassies in Dominican Republic ("809" in front of these numbers): Germany Benelux Canada China Korea Denmark Spain Finland France Great Britain Netherlands Italy Japan Russia Sweden Switzerland USA

565-8811 682-2977 685-1136 562-5565 532-4314 562-1661 535-1615 687-5553 689-2161 540-3132 565-5240 689-3684 567-3365 685-4555 685-2131 685-0126 221-2171 disappear and substituted by 10 and 25 pesos coins.

Currency and Changing The Dominican monetary unit is the peso/centavo. Its symbol is RD$ and is divided into coins of 1,5,10,25, 50 cents and 1 and 5 pesos and bills bearing denomination of 10,20,50,10,500, 1000 and 2000 pesos.

Changing money is possible in three ways: banks, agencies and through the school. Secretary will inform you about the best change rate. All the credit cards are honored all over the country.

In late 2006 10 and 20 pesos bills will

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Communications

options are available. Near school several internet-cafe’ are available.

Telephone There are several telephone companies in the Dominican Republic, but the most important are Verizon and Tricom with telephone centers throughout the island, including near the school. Tricom costs slightly less, but Verizon has better communications. It is possible to purchase a prepaid card nearly everywhere that allows you to phone from all public or private telephones. Other companies (Orange and Centennial) are actually dedicated to wireless communication only.

Transportation You can visit the entire island with ground transportation. You can travel by taxi or rent a car, or take public transportation. The school secretariat will provide details to students interested in travel, including prices, location, hours, etc.

Health According to the World Health Organization, “the median in terms of public longevity is the same of United States. In all circumstances it is possible to enjoy, choosing an adequate location, a comfortable climate in which one rarely encounters lung diseases, scarlet fever or other feared diseases of the northern countries, not to mention yellow fever”.

For wireless it is important to say that Verizon, Tricom and Centennial offer PCS system while Orange is a GSM (900Mhz) provider. Most of GSM tri-band cells may be activated with a pre-paid plan. Be sure your tri-band GSM cell phone is not blocked by your home provider if you want to use it in DR. In case it is blocked, you may ask your provider to unblock-it or pay a little fee to do it in Santo Domingo.

Many drug stores are open 24 hours and sell the most common medicines. But it is advised to bring all personal medications. The school can recommend a doctor in case of minor sickness, and there are modern clinics near the colonial area.

All PCS cells may cells may be activated with a pre-paid plan.

Fax and e-mail Verizon centers offer a fax service where you may send and receive faxes for a small fee, depending on the destination. It is possible to rent for 15 minutes or more an Internet terminal to send or receive e-mail. Students are allowed to use one of the studentsdedicated computers to check email/surfing for free. No printing

We suggest buying medical insurance before coming.

Electrical current American-type plugs for 110-120 volts, 60 cycles are used. 43


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

tostones (fried rings), pastelon (prepared in owen) are only few examples.

Weight and measurements According to Dominican law the metric system is used to calculate weights and measurements. However, it is important to note that certain units of the old Spanish system, as well as others, continue to be used in the Republic. For example, ounces and pounds are used in weighing solids, American gallons (128 ounces) are used to measure gasoline and motors oils, while cooking oil is retailed by pounds, fabrics are measured by the yard, drinks come in 0 .756 liter bottles, and land in rural areas is generally measured by the “Tarea”, equal to 624 square meters. In popular markets everybody seems to have his or her own units of measure.

Tipico plato dominicano.

Food The Dominican Republic has many comfortable and inviting restaurants serving a variety of food: Spanish, French, Italian, Creole, Mexican, Oriental, German, Arabic, etc. The school will provide students with information, A 10% service charge is added to the bill along with a 12% tax. You may leave an additional tip if the service is good. The most typical Dominican dish, known as ¨la bandera¨ (the flag), is compromised of white rice, red beams and stewed meat accompanied by salad and ¨fritos verdes¨, which are simply green plantains fried in a special way. Other dishes from regional cooking such as: fish in coconut milk in Samaná and goat meat in Azua or Montecristi and crabs in Puerto Plata. All over the island you can find the sancocho (meat and vegetable stew) and each region has a special way of preparing it. Very famous the sancocho prieto with its seven different meats.

National holidays and festivals According to Dominican law most national holidays (but not all of them!) are now moved to the nearest Monday. Therefore, it is impossible to provide an exact calendar. With some approximation, national holidays are as follows: Jan. 1, 6, 21, 26; Feb. 27; Easter Friday; May 1 30; Corpus Christi; Aug. 16; Sept. 24; Nov 6; Dec. 25, 31. It is also worthwhile to note local festivities. Some Dominican festivals that may be of interest to visitors are:

Plantains, green or mature, are always present in all the form: mangu (a puree), 44


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

February April June July October

Carnival Bolsa Turistica del Caribe Festival de Musica Latina (once every 2 years) Merengue Festival Amber Festival

Museums and galleries Cultural activity in Santo Domingo is vibrant, with art galleries everywhere. Some of the most important museums are: Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo Museo

de arte moderno del Hombre Dominicano Historia Natural Historia y Geografia Ciencias Naturales de Bellas Artes de Arte Pre-hispanica Numismatico y Filatelico de la era de Trujillo de las Atarazana de las Casas Reales Alcazar de Colon

Plaza de la cultura Plaza de la cultura Plaza de la cultura Plaza de la cultura Plaza de la cultura Gomez Avenue Av. San Martin Banco Central Plaza Criolla Zona Colonial Zona Colonial Zona Colonial

This sampling, together with the numerous theatres, galleries and monuments of Colonial area, shows why Santo Domingo is a flourishing center of art and culture.

Gymnastics, baseball, basketball, billiards, adventure sports (canoeing, rafting, etc.), racing, horse riding, golf, cockfighting, fishing, water sports, polo, tennis, soccer, and many others. More information is available at school secretariat. The national sports are baseball, basketball and boxing.

Sport centers A myriad of sports and recreational activities are available to watch or participate in:

Shopping centers In modern shopping centers it is pos45


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

sible to buy all the articles you may need, both international and domestic. In the popular markets it is possible to find Creole products and souvenirs with the emotion of a long, loud bargaining.

are. Here we present examples taken from inexpensive, popular locales and from medium priced establishments.

Insurance The insurance policy must be issued in the country where the student resides. The student, therefore, needs to arrange insurance through you or independently in his or her country of residence. Illness and accidents: during their stay at our school, students must be personally insured against illness and accidents.

More information can be obtained at the school secretariat.

How much does it cost? Here is a sample of prices. Prices can vary widely, depending on where you Prices are in US$. Coca Cola Beer Sandwich Complete dish Coffee Glass of rum T-shirt Urban Transport Taxi Rent a Car, per day Beach Hotel, per day Disco

(Min) (Average) 0.46 1.40 1.25 2.18 1.25 1.71 1.87 2.25 0.26 0.78 1.00 2.50 8.15 23.00 0.46 — 3.12 4.68 50.00 63.00 50.00 75.00 12.5

Just in case The emergency number is: Red Cross: Movimed (ambulance):

911 (809) 682-4545 (809) 532-0000

Theft coverage: we suggest your students purchase coverage for their stay in the Dominican Republic.

Important Notes - All visitors to the Dominican Republic should be aware that the country has serious problems providing lights and running water on a reliable basis. Unfortunately, shortages of electricity and water are a daily occurrence. The school will provide everyone with the information

they need to reduce such inconveniences to a minimum. - Although the beaches of Juan Dolio and Boca-Chica are located within 30-40 minutes of the school by bus, there are no interesting beaches located within the capital city of Santo Domingo.

46

- Because students requiring double rooms with two single beds are rarely housed in a hotel or with families, anyone interested in such accommodations must make special arrangements in advance with the school secretariat.


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Information and enrolment To who

Tel. + 809-689-8350 Fax. + 809-688-9192 Emergency Telephone: +809-856-5026

Mailing Address: HISPANIOLA Academia Caribe de Lenguas Apartado Postal Z-111 Est. Zona Colonial Santo Domingo República Dominicana

24h, only for real emergencies, not to be used for informations unless on working hours

E-Mail: info@hispaniola.org Home page: www.hispaniola.org Director: Mr. Luca Pellegrini

Necessary data

School location: HISPANIOLA Academia Caribe de Lenguas c/ Nouel #103 Casi esquina Duarte Zona Colonial Santo Domingo República Dominicana

In order to enroll students, we need the following data: - First name and family name /Date of birth (age)/ Gender/ Nationality - Type of course - Day of arrival, day of departure - Type of accommodation: Single or shared room Smoker/non smoker Allergies/diet - Flight details 47


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

- Transfer, if booked - Level of knowledge of the Spanish language - Special needs and wishes

Changes are only possible before the arrival of student.

Extensions

For apartment accommodations, we need your student to fill, sign and send to us the special form in appendix B

If your student extends his or her stay using the services of the school, we will communicate all the data and you will receive the relative commission.

For family accommodations, we need your student to fill, sign and send to us the special form in appendix D and all the information in appendix F.

Cancellations

Address of chosen accommodation

Payments

From private students: we retain the 20% deposit.Cancellations are only possibile bifore the arrival of students

Payments can be made to the bank account of Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas or directly to school secretariat.

We will send the address of the accommodation to agencies with the confirmation invoice. When this will not be possible, the student will be notified of the address no later than 15 days before the start of the course.

By Bank Can be a wire transfer or a check by mail at school account bank details are shown below

In any event, we reserve the right to change the accommodation at any time.

At school secretariat The first day of school, after test and interview, the student can pay in cash or travelers checks, in any currency, at the official exchange rate of the day. Credit cards are also accepted

Changes From Agencies: we accept changes at any time without extra charge. From private students: we charge US$30 for secretariat fees.

1st United Bank 1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd, West Palm Beach, Florida 33401, USA ABA number: 067014987, Swift code: HEMSUS3M, Account Number: 581814043 Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas, Nouel #103, Zona Colonial 10210 - Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

IMPORTANT Please ensure to write the reference student’s name. Payments should be effected before the student leaves the school and according to the pay-

ment deadline reported in any invoice/confirmation We would like to give you prompt responses: please remember to let us know as soon as possible

48

when the payment is done together with the following data: 1- The total amount 2- The date of the issue 3- If wire transfers or check via mail


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Appendix A - Syllabus Standard Course Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Léxico

Ortografía y Pronunciación

NIVEL Principiante (1/8) UNIDAD INTRODUCTORIA: EL ESPAÑOL EN LA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA UNIDAD I LECCIÓN I

Conjugar el alfabeto en español, saludar (informal, formalmente), identificarse, pedir nombre, decir nombre, clasificar pronombres personales.

El alfabeto (a, b, c, d...) Me llamo, te llamas, se llama, se llaman) Soy, eres, es, somos, son. Estoy, estás, esta ¿Cómo está? ¿Cómo se llama? Mucho gusto.

Nombres y apellidos usuales en español.

Nombre de las letras del alfabeto .

UNIDAD II LECCIÓN I

Preguntar por nacionalidad, origen. Preguntar por profesión, trabajo. Dar las gracias y responder.

El artículo determinado e indeterminado. El número: singular y plural. El género: femenino y masculino. El verbo tener, tener que + infinitivo.

Nombre de países hispanoamericanos y naciones mas importantes.

Valor fonético de la h.

Conjugar en presente los verbos regulares e irregulares mas usuales. La forma negativa utilizando verbos. Negocios mas usados en la ciudad.

El presente: ar, er, ir Verbos irregulares usuales: ir, hacer, ser, estar, tener, decir, poner. Forma negativa no + verbo. La interrogación ¿qué? ¿quién? ¿dónde? ¿cuándo?

Nombre de los negocios mas importantes y que se vende en ellos: panadería, farmacia, supermercado, papelería, floristería.

Valores de: ca, co, cu ce, ci.

LECCIÓN II

Expresar qué te gusta y que prefieres. Negar gustos, negar situaciones y oraciones. Reconocer la ciudad de Santo Domingo.

Los verbos pronominales: gustar, parecer, doler, molestar, interesar, importar. La forma negativa de los verbos pronominales. No + pronombre + verbo.

Los números del 1 al 20.

Sonido de la X Comparación entre G / J.

UNIDAD III LECCIÓN I

Conjugaciones y usos de los verbos ser y estar. Hablar en presente progesivo: estoy comiendo, estoy durmiendo.

Los verbos ser y estar su conjugación y usos. Comparación de los usos de los verbos ser y estar. El presente progresivo: verbo estar + gerundio.

Los números desde el 21 explicación de la formación de los demás números. Vocabulario para pedir direcciones.

Palabras escritas con: ce, ci, z.

LECCIÓN II

Identificar los casos en que debe usar el verbo estar y la forma verbal hay. Contar acciones futuras de manera simple. Hablar sobre las costumbres más importantes de sus paises y de la República Dominicana.

El uso de la forma verbal “hay”. Su similitud con el verbo “estar”. El futuro próximo: ir + a + verbo en infinitivo.

Los días de la semana, los meses y las estaciones del año, la hora. Fiestas Populares en sus paises y en la República Dominicana.

Escritura y pronunciación de palabras escritas con: W/ Y. Comparación de la LL/Y.

UNIDAD IV LECCIÓN I

Hablar de acciones personales utilizando los verbos reflexivos. Diferenciarlos de los verbos pronominales. Hablar en preterito perfecto.

Los verbos reflexivos. Diferencia entre estos con los verbos pronominales. El pretérito perfecto: conjugación y usos. Participios regulares: ado, ido. Participios irregulares: to, cho.

Nombre de las calles y lugares mas importantes de Santo Domingo.

Valor y escritura de: R / RR.

LECCIÓN II

Comparar situaciones utilizzando: mas que, menos que, el mejor, el peor. Aprender las partes de una casa y la busqueda de una casa o apartamento.

El pretérito perfecto con los verbos pronominales y los reflexivos. Los comparativos y Los superlativos. Verbos mas usuales para formar el superlativo: “estar”.Uso de las preposiciones: a, de, en, para.

Partes de una casa. Vocabulario necesariio para la busqueda de vivienda.

Escritura y pronunciación de la ñ.

La Clase: Saludos, Presentaciones, Utiles Escolares.

Establecimientos Comerciales. ¿Donde comprar?

Hablemos de gustos y preferencias.

La ciudad de Santo Domingo. Buscando vivienda. Orientandose dentro de la ciudad.

Las fiestas y las tradiciones de los países.

La ciudad de Santo Domingo. Buscando direcciones.

La casa. Busquemos una vivienda. La Mudanza.

UNIDAD DE EVALUACION DEL NIVEL PRINCIPIANTE

49


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Léxico

Ortografía y Pronunciació

NIVEL Elemental (2/8) UNIDAD V LECCIÓN I

Contar y narrar acciones en los tiempos verbales aprendidos. Expresar cantidades de distinta gradación. Hablar de alimentacion.

Análisis de la correlación de tiempos: presente, pretérito perfecto, futuro próximo. Cambio vocálico verbos presente: E – IE: cerrar, pensar. Empezar, querer perder

Alimentos, dietas, calorias, acciones cotidianas

Ortografia y pronunciación de las secuencias: gue, gui, güe, güi, que, qui

LECCIÓN II

Reconocer las diferencias entre los adjetivos y pronombre demostrativos y posesivos. Expresar gustos y preferencias sobre las comidas. Aprender los platos tipicos dominicanos.

Adjetivos posesivos sing. y pl.: mi, tu, su, nuestro. Pronombres posesivos sing. y pl. , masc. y fem.: mío, tuyo, suyo, nuestro. Adjetivos y pronombres demostrativos: este, ese, aquel. Comparación entre posesivos y demostrativos

La comida. Ordenar ó pedir en el restaurante. Verbos más usuales. Expresiones mas comunes: yo deseo, quiero pedir, cual es la especialidad de la casa, la cuenta por favor... Platos tipicos dominicanos

La entonación en frases interrogativa

LECCIÓN II

Reconocer las diferencias entre los adjetivos y pronombre demostrativos y posesivos. Expresar gustos y preferencias sobre las comidas. Aprender los platos tipicos dominicanos.

Adjetivos posesivos sing. y pl.: mi, tu, su, nuestro. Pronombres posesivos sing. y pl. , masc. y fem.: mío, tuyo, suyo, nuestro. Adjetivos y pronombres demostrativos: este, ese, aquel. Comparación entre posesivos y demostrativos

La comida. Ordenar ó pedir en el restaurante. Verbos más usuales. Expresiones mas comunes: yo deseo, quiero pedir, cual es la especialidad de la casa, la cuenta por favor... Platos tipicos inicanos

La entonación en frases interrogativa

UNIDAD VI LECCIÓN I

Expresar gustos y preferencias sobre tipos de ropa, materiales textiles. Negar ordenes y prohibir. Expresar necesidades.

Cambio vocálico verbos presente: O – UE: contar, costar, aprobar, volver, morir, doler. Complemento directo e indirecto. El imperativo regular e irregular.

Nombres de las piezas de ropa mas usadas. Tiendas por departamentos. Tus ropas favoritas. Los Colores

Ortografia y pronunciación Ch / LL

UNIDAD VII LECCIÓN I

Hablar sobre situaciones futuras de mayor distabcias. Hablar sobre sus actividades personales laborales. Hablar de tiempo metereológico.

Cambio consonántico verbos presente: C – ZC. Futuro regular e irregular. Introducción al pretérito indefinido forma regular.

El tiempo Metereológico. La familia. Las profesiones

Ortografia de las letras: V / B

UNIDAD VIII LECCIÓN I

Planificaciones de vacaciones. Relatar situaciones ocurridas en vacaciones pasadas. Aprender los nombres de tus paises favoritos.

Pretérito Indefinido. Conjugación y usos. Formas Irregulares mas frecuentes: cambios de e – i, o-u, i-y, c-cq, z-c, g-gu. y hacer, ser, ir, estar, decir, andar, tener. Usos mas comunes de las preposiciones.

Nombre de países, capitales, lugares interesantes. Vacaciones pasadas. Planes para el futuro.

La entonación en frases exclamativas

LECCIÓN II

Aprender a identificar situaciones expresadas en pretérito imperfecto e indefinido. Valores de acciones continuas o especificas. Expresar dolencias. Identificar las partes del cuerpo.

Pretérito Imperfecto. Conjugación y usos. Formas irregulares: ser, ver, ir. Uso simultáneo del pretérito indefinido e imperfecto

Las partes del cuerpo. Las dolencias. Los piropos.

La entonación en frases afirmativas

Hablemos de cantidades

En el restaurante ¿Cuál es tu comida favorita?

En el restaurante ¿Cuál es tu comida favorita?

La Ropa. Sus complementos

¿Qué trabajas? Las profesiones

Las vacaciones.

Tu cuerpo, las enfermedades

UNIDAD DE EVALUACION DEL NIVEL ELEMENTAL

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Léxico

Propuestas de textos y/o actividades

NIVEL Intermedio A (3/8) UNIDAD PRELIMINAR: LECCIÓN I RECAPITULACION UNIDADES VI, VII, VIII LIBRO 1

LÉXICO

UNIDAD I LECCIÓN I

Utilizar los tiempos verbales pasados para expresar ideas. Solicitar informaciones sobre un establecimiento, una dirección, una calle.

El pretérito indefinido. Morfología y usos El pretérito imperfecto. Morfología y usos

Vocabulario utilizado en la vida diaria ej. Para informarse sobre ubicaciones en la ciudad, pedir direcciones, buscar apartamento, etc

Artículo del periódico Listín Diario

LECCIÓN II

Utilizar los tiempos verbales pasados para expresar ideas. Estilo y costumbres de la vida dominicana.

Pretérito Perfecto. Morfología y usos Pretérito Pluscuamperfecto. Morfología y usos

Frases y palabras dominicanas mas populares.

Artículo del periódico Hoy

LECCIÓN III

Comparar todos los tiempos pasados e identificar la diferencia y similitudes entre ellos.

Sinopsis de tiempos pasados Doble sustitución de pronombre complemento

Lectura: Pronunciación y comprensión

Búsqueda en almanaque mundial de los países caribeños

UNIDAD II LECCIÓN I

Identificar y utilizar oraciones en condicional. Poner en practica las probabilidades. Hablar sobre trabajos y profesiones

El condicional simple. Morfología y usos. Condicionales irregulares Expresiones de probabilidad.

Los trabajos y las profesiones.

Los clasificados de los periódicos más importantes

LECCIÓN II

Ampliación de usos y aplicaciones de los verbos ser y estar. Expresar gustos y preferencias de actividades en el tiempo libre.

El verbo ser. Usos ampliados El verbo estar. Usos ampliados

Vocabulario utilizado para la realizacion de actividades al aire libre: deporte, playa, etc.

Artículos de guías de viajes que posean los estudiantes

LECCIÓN III

Ampliación de los conocimientos de adjetivos que cambian de significado según el verbo utilizado. Expresar gustos y preferencias sobre viajes.

Adjetivos que cambian de significado con Ser/Estar

Lectura: Pronunciación y comprensión

Sección de los miércoles del periódico Listín Diario

UNIDAD III LECCIÓN I

Ampliación de los usos de las preposiciones más importantes. Identificar los miembros de la familia. Analizar la posición de esta en la sociedad

Las preposiciones. Valores básicos (a, de, en, con) Usos de Por y Para

Lectura: Pronunciación y comprensión

Artículo de periódico sobre la familia dominicana

Pronombres posesivos y demostrativos Pronombres complementos directo e indirecto Presente Irregular - Imperativo regular e irregular – Futuro regular e irregular

Viviendo el día a día

La vida en la República Dominicana

Una visión al Caribe

El Trabajo y tu

Tiempo Libre

Viajando por el mundo

En familia. Su valor en la sociedad moderna

Sondeo sobre el nivel de conversación oral del estudiante: presentación personal, profesión, trabajo, objetivos de su curso de español, objetivos de su estadía en la República Dominicana

UNIDAD DE EVALUACION DEL NIVEL INTERMEDIO A

Examen Hispaniola Basico / Examen DELE Nivel Inicial Diploma Basico de Dominio de la lengua

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Léxico

Propuestas de textos y/o actividades

NIVEL Intermedio B (4/8) UNIDAD PRELIMINAR LECCIÓN I

Expresar acciones habituales y costumbres de alimentación. Describir hechos y características personales.

Repaso: Pretérito pluscuamperfecto Condicional Simple Las preposiciones (a, de, en, con, por, para)

Palabras utilizadas para expresar hábitos de alimentación

Artículos de periódicos extraídos de las secciones de salud.

UNIDAD IV LECCIÓN II

Expresar gustos y deseos sobre las comidas. Ordenar y expresar mandatos

Presente del Subjuntivo. Conjugación El imperativo, recapitulación Imperativo Negativo

Nombres de comidas típicas dominicanas

Proponer recetas de nuestro país y de los países de los estudiantes

LECCIÓN III

Cuéntame tu vida

Expresar situaciones y experiencias pasadas. Hablar de otras personas utilizando el estilo indirecto

Formas de impersonalidad El estilo indirecto (en presente) El estilo indirecto (en pasado) Pronombres relativos

Lectura: pronunciación y comprensión

Realizar encuesta sobre los aspectos más importantes de la vida de cada estudiante.

UNIDAD V LECCIÓN I

Hablar sobre dudas y deseos. Reconocer los valores del subjuntivo para hablar de hipótesis.

Imperfecto del subjuntivo. Conjugación Usos del subjuntivo en oraciones independientes: dudas

Vocabulario necesario para sobrevivir en una gran ciudad, ej. Pedir taxi, utilizar los medios de transporte, etc.

Artículo sobre México página No. 78 libro “Ven 3”

LECCIÓN II

Expresar gustos y preferencias sobre las artes y los espectáculos

Usos del subjuntivo en oraciones independientes: deseo Deseos posibles Deseos menos posibles o imposibles

Nombres de pintores, actores, películas latinoamericanas

Artículo Libro “Ven 3” pagina 116

LECCIÓN III

Describiéndonos...

Describir personas, paisajes y situaciones. Hablar sobre sentimientos personales.

Oraciones sustantivas con subjuntivo Oraciones sustantivas con indicativo

Pronombres y adjetivos posesivos. Ampliación del vocabulario de los adjetivos.

Actividad: “autobiografía” Leer biografía de un personaje famoso

LECCIÓN IV

Expresar opiniones sobre los niveles de contaminación en el mundo.

Oraciones sustantivas: Alternancia indicativo / subjuntivo Correlación de tiempos

Vocabulario relacionado con la contaminación ambiental: capa de ozono, hoyo negro, humo, etc.

Artículo Libro “Ven 3” pagina 122 “El Ruido”

LECCION V

Conocer la sabiduría popular relacionada a los refranes. Identificar la diferencia entre las oraciones impersonales con subjuntivo y con imperativo.

Oraciones impersonales con indicativo Oraciones impersonales con subjuntivo

Lectura: Pronunciación y compresión

Analizar un listado de refranes

Salud y dieta

La comida nacional e internacional

En la gran ciudad

Artes y espectáculos. El cine

Nuestro planeta. La contaminación.

Los refranes latinoamericanos

INTERMEDIO B

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Léxico

Propuestas de textos y/o actividades

NIVEL Avanzado I (5/8) UNIDAD VI LECCIÓN I

Comunicar las creencias existentes en sus países y sus creencias personales sobre diversos tópicos como la mala suerte, buena suerte, etc.

Presente e imperfecto del subjuntivo. Subjuntivo en oraciones independientes. Oraciones subordinadas sustantivas. Oraciones subordinadas impersonales.

El lenguaje popular

Análisis de un listado sobre los mitos y creencias del campo y de la ciudad

LECCIÓN II

Analizar las realidades de los medios de comunicación en los países hispanohablantes. Influencia extranjera en los medios.

Pretérito Perfecto y Pluscuamperfecto de subjuntivo. Oraciones temporales con indicativo. Oraciones temporales con subjuntivo.

Lenguaje utilizado en la televisión y en la prensa escrita

Artículo Libro “Ven 3” pagina 32

LECCIÓN III

Hablar sobre la situación actual de los países miembros de la Unión Europea.

Oraciones concesivas con indicativo. Oraciones concesivas con subjuntivo. Lectura: pronunciación y comprensión.

Vocabulario de los países europeos con incidencia en América

Articulo sobre el Euro extraído del internet

UNIDAD VII LECCIÓN I

El condicional compuesto. Oraciones condicionales con subjuntivo. La particula conticional si

Lectura de comprensión

Artículo sobre la historia dominicana

La realidad a través del tiempo.

Conocer aspectos importantes sobre la historia de la República Dominicana. Ampliación del uso de las partículas condicionales.

LECCIÓN II

Elaboración de los diversos tipos de currículum.

Oraciones finales con indicativo Oraciones causales con indicativo

Vocabulario utilizado en las entrevistas de trabajo y la elaboración de un currículum.

Elaboración de un currículum

LECCIÓN III

Situación social de la mujer. La guerra de los sexos.

Expresar su opinión y discutir sobre el rol actual de la mujer en nuestra sociedad. Su comparación con el rol masculino.

Oraciones adjetivas con indicativo Oraciones adjetivas con subjuntivo

Lectura de comprensión

Lectura de artículo sobre la mujer y/o la guerra de los sexos.

UNIDAD VIII

Leer y analizar artículos periodísticos.

Recapitulación oraciones subordinadas Usos del subjuntivo vs. Indicativo

Palabras técnicas utilizadas para la escritura.

Redacción de un artículo de periódico partiendo de un titular.

Nuestras creencias. Tus creencias.

Información y medios de comunicación.

La Unión Europea.

Mi currículum.

Análisis periodísticos.

AVANZADO I

Examen Hispaniola Intermedio / Examen DELE Nivel Intermedio

53


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Autores recomendados

Ortografía y Pronunciación

NIVEL AVANZADO II (6/8) UNIDAD I LECCIÓN I

Ver con un criterio objetivo la característica de consumo de nuestras sociedades.

El subjuntivo en oraciones independientes Oraciones que expresan ordenes o mandatos Oraciones que expresan deseos

Carlos Fuentes

Trabalenguas

LECCIÓN II

Comparar las costumbres locales con sus propias costumbres. Expresar ordenes y mandatos a empleados o personas bajo su mando.

El subjuntivo en oraciones independientes Oraciones que expresan ordenes o mandatos Oraciones que expresan deseo

Gabriel García Márquez

Trabalenguas

UNIDAD II LECCIÓN I

Expresar ideas y opiniones sobre la posición de la tecnología en la sociedad actual. Su influencia en nuestros estilos de vida. Analizar la realidad económica de los países considerados del tercer mundo. Expresar su opinión.

El subjuntivo y el indicativo en oraciones sustantivas El uso del subjuntivo El uso del indicativo

Mario Vargas Llosa

Acento ortográfico I

Ejercicios de aplicación de los usos del subjuntivo vs. indicativo

Lectura de comprensión

Acento ortográfico II

UNIDAD III LECCIÓN I

Expresar ideas y opiniones sobre el futuro que le depara a los países hispanoamericanos desde el punto de vista económico, social y cultural.

El subjuntivo y el indicativo en oraciones impersonales El subjuntivo y el indicativo en oraciones temporales Criterio para el uso del subjuntivo y del indicativo

Joaquín Balaguer

LECCIÓN II

Analizar las situaciones máas actuales a nivel político local e internacional.

Oraciones concesivas Oraciones modales Ejercicio de recapitulación Unidades I-III

Análisis de texto literario

Nuestra sociedad, una sociedad de consumo. La publicidad Usos y costumbres locales y del mundo

La tecnología, su rol en nuestros estilos de vida

LECCIÓN II

El tercer mundo

El futuro de los países hispanoamericanos

La Política Mundial

AVANZADO II

Diploma de Dominio de la Lengua

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Autores recomendados

Ortografía y Pronunciación

NIVEL Perfeccionamiento I(7/8) UNIDAD IV LECCIÓN I

Estructurar puntos de vistas sobre la programación local. Críticas al sistema.

Partículas complejas con varios valores Criterio para el uso del indicativo o el subjuntivo

Horacio Quirogas

LECCIÓN II

Expresar características propias. Elaboración de una autobiografía.

Perífrasis verbales: Incoativas, terminativas, acumulativas, etc

Manuel de Jesús Galván

LECCIÓN III

Leer y analizar las noticias mas importantes de los periódicos locales que mas inciden en nuestra sociedad.

Aplicación de las perífrasis en la escritura

Lectura, análisis de noticias de la prensa local

UNIDAD V LECCIÓN I

Que es un cliché y cuales son los mas utilizados en la República Dominicana y en sus países. Reafirmar los conocimientos sobre los modos del indicativo.

Tiempos del modo indicativo I

José Martí

LECCIÓN II

Analizar desde un punto de vista personal las situaciones mas sonadas a nivel mundial de los países latinoamericanos

Ejercicios de recapitulación de todos los tiempos del indicativo. Lectura, análisis y completar textos donde se haga énfasis en los tiempos del indicativo

Ricardo Perez Alfonseca

UNIDAD VI LECCIÓN I

Expresar condicionalidad de situaciones necesarias o imposibles de cambiar en la sociedad dominicana

Tiempos del modo indicativo II

Rubén Dario

LECCIÓN II

Conocer una realidad indudable como lo son los dominicanos en New York: su vida, su importancia en la sociedad, sus aportes.

Ejercicios de recapitulación

Fabio Fiallo

Los medios de comunicación en la sociedad. La televisión Mi autobiografía

Nuestras noticias. Análisis periodísticos

Tópicos y clichés más populares del mundo hispanoamericano.

La situación económica en América Latina. Caso Ecuador y Argentina.

La realidad dominicana. Un vistazo a nuestra prensa local Los dominicanos en New York

PERFECIONAMIENTO I

Examen DELE Nivel Avanzado

55

Diferencias entre: porque, por qué, ¿por qué?

Valores de la letra Z


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Unidad Temática

Se aprenderá A...

Gramática

Autores recomendados

Ortografía y Pronunciación

NIVEL Perfeccionamiento II (8/8) UNIDAD VI LECCIÓN I

Expresar gustos, inquietudes y opiniones sobre autores latinoamericanos. Conocer nuevos escritores.

El Modo Imperativo: Morfoligia y uso. Análisis de noticias locales. Modos de redacción.

Federico Garcia Godoy

LECCIÓN II

Expresar opiniones sobre los diversos estilos de vida según las características de los contienetes.

Análisis de un cuento de Juan Bosch. Libro Cuentos escritos en el exilio

Juan Bosch

LECCIÓN III

Intervenir en un diálogo. (preguntar/responder). Expresar relaciones temporales o definitivas de hechos.

Ser y Estar: ampliación de usos Adjetivos que cambian de significado con ser y estar

Lectura Unidad VII

UNIDAD VII LECCIÓN I

Usar algunas expresiones tomadas de los demás idiomas diferentes al español, pero que han influenciado en éste.

Las preposiciones: Uso de por y para Regimen preposicional fijo

Salomé Ureña

LECCIÓN II

Informar de manera impersonal. Informar mediante el uso de la voz pasiva.

Análisis de un cuento de Juan Bosch. Libro Cuentos escritos en el exilio

Juan Bosch

LECCIÓN III

Comunicarse mediante carta formal e informal

Lectura Unidad VIII

Gabriel Garcia Márquez

La literatura hispanoamericana

Estilos de vida, Comparación de la vida en el viejo y el nuevo continente La educación. Su papel en la sociedad.

La transculturización. Influencia extranjera en el idioma español.

La redacción periodística. Análisis de Estilos.

La redacción de cartas. Análisis de estilos.

PERFECIONAMIENTO II Examen Hispaniola Avanzado / Diploma Idioma Español

56

Locuciones Usuales

Ortografía


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Medical Spanish NIVEL 1

NIVEL 2

COMUNICACIÓN CON EL PACIENTE

ANATOMÍA Lección 1 Introducción al cuerpo humano Términos de orientación, órganos, sistemas, cavidades del cuerpo, topografía de los órganos intraabdominales (división del abdomen)

Lección 1 Nombre de ropa Instrumentos médicos usuales Verbos pronominales Frases usuales de los pacientes Lección 2 Relación médico-paciente Historia clínica

Lección 2 Sistema esquelético Clasificación de los huesos, articulaciones, cabeza, etc. Dibujo de un esqueleto y huesos

Lección 3 Enfermedades más comunes Cómo los pacientes explican sus síntomas Nombres de signos más comunes

Lección 3 Sistema muscular Cabeza, cuello, tronco

Lección 4 Tipos de consultas: privadas, semiprivadas y públicas Remuneración del médico: salario, honorario. Dicotomía

Lección 4 Sistema muscular Extremidades Lección 5 Clasificación de los músculos de acuerdo a su número de vientres e inserciones

Lección 5 Nombres de exámenes clínicos Términos quirúrgicos

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

NIVEL 3

Lección 4 Glándulas del cuerpo humano

SISTEMA CIRCULATORIO Y NEUROANATOMÍA

Lección 5 Cavidad bucal: anatomía, fisiología e histología Organos que componen la cavidad bucal

Lección 1 Sistema Circulatorio (venas, arterias y capilares) Esquema

NIVEL 5

Lección 2 Sistema nervioso periférico

FISIOLOGÍA Lección 3 Lección 1

Sistema nervioso central

Sangre, tipo sanguineos, Corazón Respiración Pulso Signo vitales (valores normales)

Lección 4 Genitales Masculinos y Femeninos Dibujo

Lección 5

Lección 2

Resumen y Evaluación

Patología Enfermedades del sistema digestivo Enfermedades del sistema respiratorio Enfermedades del sistema urinario Signos y síntomas

NIVEL 4

HISTOLOGÍA

Lección 3

Lección 1 Células. Partes y dibujo Tipo de tejidos Gráfica

Bioquímica: monosacáridos, nucleotidos, disacáridos, vitaminas, enzimas Clasificación de aminoácidos proteicos

Lección 2

Lección 4

Tipo de Células Hiperplasia y hipertrofia Clasificación de los músculos Gráfica

Farmacología Antibióticos, sedantes, anesteticos, antistaminicos, antivertiginosos, antieméticos

Lección 3

Lección 5

Organos

Términos de embriología 58


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Emergency Spanish 1er. CICLO Lección 1 Lección 1

El Arresto

Las Heridas.Tipos y sub-tipos de Heridas Vocabulario: Las partes del cuerpo, verbos, Enfermedades más comues. Lista de síntomas más frecuentes

Lección 2 Tipos de actos delictivos (Violación, secuestro, etc.) Como trabajar en pareja frente a situación peligrosa

Lección 2

Lección 3

Tipos de Armas Vocabulario: Tipos de Transportes Vocabulario: Verbos de Movimiento

Localización geográfica Situaciones de orden publico (toque de queda, redada, etc.)

Lección 3

Lección 4

Tipos de Accidentes Las Emergencias. Primeros auxilios

Como reportar a la base una situación tales como: heridas, muertos, etc. Tipos de golpes.

Lección 4 Reanimación Cardiopulmonar (RCP) ¿Qué es la RCP? ¿Quiénes deben saber RCP? ¿Existe algún riesgo legal al aplicar la RCP? Procedimiento del RCP Antes de la emergencia

Lección 5 Palabrotas Taller (practica oral y escrita).

Lección 5 El Plan de Emergencia Familiar (PEF)

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Politics/ Diplomacy Spanish 1er. CICLO

Países: Colombia-Puerto Rico Paraguay-Uruguay

Lección 1

Países: República Dominicana -Cuba-Chile

1) Reseña histórica 2) Organización política gubernamental 3) Datos geográficos 4) Geografía Económica

1) Reseña histórica 2) Organización política gubernamental 3) Datos geográficos 4) Geografía Económica

2do. CICLO Lección 1

Lección 2

Vista Global en Términos económicos

Países: Nicaragua-Costa Rica Perú-Bolivia-México

Lección 2

1) Reseña histórica 2) Organización política gubernamental 3) Datos geográficos 4) Geografía Económica

Vista Global en Términos Bancarios

Lección 3 Organizaciones Mundiales Tratados Modernos Etapas de la Integración Económica Las Determinantes del crecimiento del Proceso de Integración en América Latina.

Lección 3

Países: Guatemala-El Salvador-Argentina-Honduras 1) Reseña histórica 2) Organización política gubernamental 3) Datos geográficos 4) Geografía Económica

Lección 4

Lección 4

La República Dominicana ante la Integración La Economía Dominicana y el Proceso de Globalización

Países: Panamá -VenezuelaEcuador

Lección 5 Perfil psicosocial Dialéctica Latinoamericana Tipos de Verbos Oratoria

1) Reseña histórica 2) Organización política gubernamental 3) Datos geográficos 4) Geografía Económica

Lección 5 60


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Santo Domingo Hoy ASPECTO # 1 NUESTRA HISTORIA - Los Primeros pobladores - La Sociedad Taína - El Descubrimiento del Nuevo Mundo - La Colonización - La Ocupación Haitiana de 1822 - La Independencia Nacional - Nuestros Símbolos Patrios

ASPECTO # 5 TURISMO Y ATRACCIONES - Ley de Migración. ¿Cómo obtener una residencia? - Ley de turismo y exportación - Situación actual del turismo - Principales lugares de interés turistico - Los principales Aeropuertos del pais - Las principales líneas aéreas que llegan a la República Dominicana

ASPECTO # 2 NUESTRA GEOGRAFÍA - El Clima - La Ubicación - Nuestras Provincias - El Relieve - Nuestros Parques Nacionales - La Hidrografía

ASPECTO # 6 LA ECONOMÍA

ASPECTO # 3 LA POLÍTICA. PASADO Y PRESENTE

- Importación y exportación - Principales productos para la exportación - Zonas Francas Industriales - Nuestra Moneda. Procesos de devaluación - La Deuda externa - Posibilidades de invertir en el país

- Nuestros primeros gobiernos luego de la fundación de la República - La Era de Trujillo - História de los gobiernos desde 1966 hasta la actualidad - Pricipales partidos politicos (breve história, fundadores) - El gobierno

ATRACCIONES DE LA CAPITAL Y DE LAS CIUDADES PRINCIPALES

ASPECTO # 4 NUESTRA SOCIEDAD

- Casinos - Discotecas - Restaurantes - Monumentos - Museos - Hoteles - Estaciones de autobuses - Renta de vehículos

- El carnaval - La música - Nuestras Creencias - Los Refranes - Nuestras Costumbres (racismo, piropos) - El Transporte - Gastronomía

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Example of Tourism and Culture course PROGRAMA DE LECCIONES ESPECIALES LA VEGA - SANTIAGO - PUERTO PLATA - RIO SAN JUAN DAY

HOUR ACTIVITY

OBSERVATIONS

TRANSPORT TO USE

SUNDAY

HOTEL Jaragua 18:00 Meeting Hotel Jaragua, greetings, briefing

MONDAY

07:30

Meeting Hotel R. Jaragua Breakfast

08:00

Exit to the Vega Lessons (1 hour)

09:30

Arrival to the Vega Visit: Sacred Hill, Cathedral, Old Vega, Manufactures of Masks

12:00

Exit to Santiago

12:30

Arrival to the Hotel Gran Admiral

13:30

Lunch in a local restaurant

PRIVATE MINIBUS

14:30

Visit to Fabrica Tobacco León Jimenes

PRIVATE MINIBUS

16:30 17:00 19:00 20:15 20:30

Back to the hotel Lessons (2 hours) Rest Briefing following day Dinner in a local restaurant

PRIVATE MINIBUS

PRIVATE MINIBUS

END FIRST DAY

TUESDAY

07:30

Breakfast in the hotel

08:00

Lessons (1 hour)

09:00

Bus-Transfer

TAXI

10:00

Exit to Puerto Plata Lessons (1 hour)

Caribe Tours

11:15

Arrival to Puerto Plata

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

DAY

HOUR ACTIVITY 11:45 12:15 13:00 14:00 16:30 17:00 19:00 20:15 20:30

OBSERVATIONS TRANSPORT TO USE

Check-in Hotel Dorado Club Lunch in the Hotel Arrival to the Cable car Cable car Back to hotel Lessons (2 hours) Rest Briefing following day Dinner in hotel

TAXI TAXI TAXI TAXI

END SECOND DAY WEDNESDAY

07:30 08:00

Breakfast in the hotel Exit toward La Isabela Lessons (2 hours) 12:30 Lunch in a local restaurant 14:30 Museum of the Amber 16:30 return approximate to the 17:00 hotel 19:00 Lessons (2 hours) 20:15 RestBriefing following day 20:30 Dinner in hotel END THIRD DAY

THURSDAY 06:00

Exit toward bus transfer

PRIVATE CAR

PRIVATE CAR PRIVATE CAR

No time for Breakfast in hotel

07:00

Bus transfer toRio San Juan Lessons (1 hour) 08:30 Arrival to Rio San Juan 08:45 Check in Hotel Bahia Blanca 09:15 Lessons (2 hours) 11:15 Rest 12:00 Lunch in a local restaurant 12:30 Exit to the Lagoon Gri-Gri (bring swimsuits) visit Lagoon and Beach 16:30 Return approximate to the hotel 17:00 Lessons (2 hours) 19:00 Rest 20:15 Briefing following day 20:30 Dinner in a local restaurant END FOURTH DAY

TAXI Caribe Tours

TAXI

WALKING (5 minutes) WALKING (5 minutes) BOAT WALKING (5 minutes)

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

DAY FRIDAY

HOUR ACTIVITY 06:30 07:45

11:45 12:30 13:30 14:30 17:00 19:00 20:15 20:30

OBSERVATIONS TRANSPORT TO USE

Breakfast Bus transfer to Santo Domingo Lessons (4 hours) these lessons will be during the itinerary in bus Arrival to Santo Domingo, Hotel R. Jaragua Lunch in a local restaurant Visit to the Colonial Area (including Edificio San Pedro) Back to the hotel Lessons (2 hours) Rest --Dinner a local restaurant

Caribe Tours

TAXI

WALKING TAXI

END FIFTH DAY

SATURDAY 07:30 08:30

10:45 11:00

Breakfast Visits Mercado Modelo: Time for souvenirs purchase This time may be used to recover lost hours or to rest Back to the hotel Farewell

END PROGRAMME

64

TAXI

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Appendix B - Apartment Policies Student’s duties and regulations for apartment accommodation 1 2

3

4 5

6 7

8

9

10 11

12 13

14

These rules are obligatory for everybody who stays inside the building. The apartments are licensed only for the students of the school. Non-students can not be housed in these apartments. Students only have right to the use of a single place/bed as well as the shared use of common space. It is strictly forbidden to admit persons without authorization by the school It is strictly forbidden to use a vacant bed or room in the apartment Only guests are allowed to enter the building if they are admitted by the school and after payment of the regular rent. It is strictly forbidden to invite any “justmade-friends” to enter the apartment Anybody who enters the building without being registered by the school will be charged with the daily rent plus any damages. Sometimes they will be reported to the police. As a courtesy to the neighbors please don’t make too much noise after 12.00 p.m. This means stereo, radio, TV and conversations only in room volume. Any noise, danger, insane activity and/or anything that is contrary to moral, good sense and Dominican Law is forbidden. Leave the common rooms clean and presentable and wash dishes after use Please empty the garbage between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. every day. Place closed plastic bags on the sideboard near the apartment. Don’t wake other flat mates after midnight when returning home It is strictly forbidden to organize parties without the prior approval of all flat mates, neighbors and school. The use or traffic of any kind of illegal drugs is strictly forbidden.

15 In case of loss of the keys, the administration will change locks, charging the client for the correspondent fee. 16 Report any damages or technical problems immediately to the school secretariat 17 Leave the apartment clean on departure 18 The occupants in common are responsible for harm and damage. The school is not responsible for articles of value leaved in the apartment. 19 The school is not responsible for anything clients leave inside the rooms. 20 The school reserves the right for itself to inspect the building to verify the respect of the rules. 21 The school reserves for itself the right to modify or change the policies, fix the prices, admit or kick out clients and/or client’s guests. 22 Guests who don't abide by these rules will be kicked off, forfeit any and all rent or deposit monies and reported to the police

This agreement is valid from

until

Not considering each and all the 22 rules above mentioned may cause expelling the student without reimbursement of the fees collected. I, declare I have read and accepted all and each one of the 22 apartment stay policies.

Date: Signature:

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Appendix C – Families Policies Student’s duties and regulations for family accommodation dents to advise the family about late arrivals in order to avoid worries or misunderstandings.

The current agreement plans a series of scenarios where rights and duties between the students and their host families are established. These regulations have been set in order to define criteria that will help maintain the coexistence between the involved parties during the students’ stay in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

II. PLANS There are 4 plans. PLAN B0 No meals. Room cleaning and laundry on a weekly basis. PLAN BB Daily breakfast. Room cleaning and laundry on a weekly basis. PLAN HB 2 daily meals. Room cleaning and laundry on a weekly basis. PLAN FB 3 daily meals. Room cleaning and laundry on a weekly basis.

I. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS Hispaniola has a norm of providing individual rooms to the students unless otherwise a room is requested to be shared between two students. The room must have a good bed (or two separated beds, when the room is shared), closet, bureau, fan, a desk or study table with its lamp and a chair. The room must have a lock with key. No family items should be left inside the room; the closets must be empty. The student must sleep alone (or with a same-sex partner, in the case of shared room) and the privacy of the objects kept in the room must be respected, never allowing their use by any member of the family. The bathroom must have hot water. The family must provide: toilet paper, soap, towels, sheets, pillows, quilt (for cool months). It is not necessary to put shampoo or any other articles for personal use.

PLAN B0 This is the most economical plan and only includes the use of the bedroom and once a web laundry service, as well as cleaning of the bedroom with change of sheets and towels one day per week. We suggest to set with the student one day in the week so he/she leave their door open and the room organized so the cleaning can be eased for the housekeeper. The student will be allowed to keep some kinds of food and beverages in the refrigerator and will be able to have a limited use of the kitchen to fix himself / herself simple meals. It is understood that limited use implies a maximum of 20 minutes 3 times per day. The student must leave the kitchen organized and clean within the 20 minutes limit.

The family must provide the student with a set of keys of the house, the bedroom, and the closet, to keep the family’s environment away of disturbance when he / she come in or out of the house. It is basic the family informs the student about the house’s schedule in order to keep the proper respect for it and avoid misunderstandings. It is a duty for the stu-

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

among the family’s laundry. Since the beginning, the family must indicate clearly where and when clothes should be placed for laundry, placing a basket at the student’s room for such purposes. It is understood that the laundry also includes change of sheets and towels once a week. It is not an obligation for the responsible person at the house to wash delicate garments that must be hand washed or sent to the dry cleaner: it is the duty of the student to do the washing by himself / herself or pay the bill if dry cleaning is required.

It is the same as plan B0 plus a daily breakfast including weekends and holidays. Breakfast must be enough for the student’s nutrition needs and it must have at least coffee, milk, juice, bread, drinking water and fruits. If the family is going out on a Sunday, and the student decides to remain at home, arrangements should be made in order to have food for him / her. It is recommended to include the student in the family activities.

The student must allow the room cleaning at least one time per week and keep a certain order that eases such activity.

PLAN HB It is the same as plan BB plus one daily meal including weekends and holidays. The student will have two meals at the family’s house, meaning breakfast and dinner. If the family is going out on a Sunday, and the student decides to remain at home, arrangements should be made in order to have food for him / her. It is recommended to include the student in the family activities.

IV. FAMILY RELATIONS In no event the student is allowed to receive visitors that will stay in the house, and it is absolutely prohibited that other students (excluding the one assigned by the school’s secretary for room sharing) or family’s relatives stay with the student. Family must consent to the visits of classmates. This might entail providing the family with the phone number and address of new friends so they can be verified prior to the visit.

If the student is not vegetarian, dinner must have meta of: beef, chicken, pork, fish, rice, beans, vegetables or salad. Son students are vegetarians, then meat can be substituted for a vegetable based recipes or pasta.

PLAN FB

It is always forbidden to receive visit of justmade friends.

It is the same as plan HB plus another daily meal including weekends and holidays. This plan has three meals, breakfast, lunch and dinner. If the responsible person at the house will not be at home at lunchtime, can leave some food ready for the student.

The student understands that he / she should not be out of the house later than 12:00 at night, without advising the family first. The student has the right to be out of the house for a longer time, after advising his / her Hostess. The student must pay for any object that he / she breaks at the family house where he /she are staying, even if it is an accident such as buying the door lock if the key for the closet, his/her room or the house’s entrance gets lost. In the event the door of the bedroom, or closet needs to be broken after locking in the key, the student must pay for its repair and buy a new lock.

III. SERVICES The student will have laundry service once a week. The family is not responsible if a piece of clothing is damaged; however, the family is responsible of making sure that the number of students’ clothes given for laundry are returned completely and are not mixed or lost

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ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

The student has the right to use the telephone to receive phone calls that cannot exceed a limited time of 3 minutes for local calls and 5 minutes for international calls. The student will have the right to use the telephone to make phone calls that cannot exceed a limited time of 3 minutes for local phone calls. In the event of long distance phone calls, in or out of the Dominican Republic, he/she should always do it collect, via operator or with a calling card. The student must do all calls to cellular phones using a calling card. No telephone expense of the student will be charged to the family.

VI. SAFETY In order to increase the safety of the student, the parties must: • always leave word with the family about where the student will be (preferably with a phone number included), if he/she is going to the beach for the weekend, etc. • inform if the student has not returned from a trip as agreed. • pay his/her own expenses and transportation bills, as well as medicines if necessary, and show the receipts to the Program in order to have the medical insurance cover the costs.

Strong physical contact, even from children, must be avoided. Some “games” end up as physical aggressions that are not allowed by the program.

Please use discretion when giving your phone number to new acquaintances. Ask the family about the phone policies and tell your friends not to call after 21:30.

V. INFORMATION FOR THE STUDENT

VII. SETTLEMENT DAYS

The family is responsible to inform the student about the proper drills in case of a fire or earthquake emergency; the plans to overcome a hurricane; how to use the stove and the kitchen appliances, precautions with gas tanks and gas stoves; if electric water heaters connected to the shower are used, an example of a proper warning for the student is to recommend not touching it if wet.

May be possible that students and family, for some reason do not match. Also possible that something is not exactly working as it was expected. For this reason students have 4 days time to ask for changes. After this time no changes are allowed.

VII. REFUNDS There are no refunds for any reasons at any time in any case.

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Appendix D – Brief Family Policies (to be copied and given to the student) night away from the home is only acceptable if the family has been previously informed.

1. Meals The D.R. has a rich tradition of food. Expect Dominican food. Families are open to requests. Please try to remain culturally sensitive while making them.

10. Visitors Family must consent to the visits of friends and classmates. This might entail providing the family with the phone number and address of new friends so they can be verified prior to the visit.

2. Use of Living Room This room is used to receive visitors and generally not to take naps. Please refrain from lying or sleeping on the sofa.

11. Use of Toilet

3. Use of Kitchen

The sewer system in Santo Domingo is not strong enough to process toilet paper. Therefore small garbage cans are found next to every toilet for toilet paper.

All families are aware that you might want to use the kitchen for simple staff. You can use it for a maximum of 25 minutes. While doing so, keep it clean.

12. Cleaning

4. Clothing

Once in a week the room will be cleaned. Maintain room ordered and cleaned during the week is a must-do for any single student to avoid the possibility of rats, mice or any other pests.

“Modest” is a good word to describe the clothing which should be worn in the house. No students should go shirtless and all should observe the “shoe policy” in the home.

13. Laundry

5. Entrances

Once in a week. Family will communicate place and hours to place clothes.

Dominicans are often very concerned with home security. Please make sure that doors and gates are closed and locked according to the family’s wishes.

14. Settlement Days 4 days (including arrival day) time to ask for changes. After this time no changes are allowed for any reasons.

6. Energy and Water Both are precious commodities in Dominican Republic. Please turn off everything when not in use.

15. Refunds There won’t any refund for any reasons at any time in any case.

7. Telephone Students are allowed to use the phone. When they do, local calls should be no longer than 3 minutes. Long distance only made collect with a phone card or in a telephone center. Please use discretion when giving your phone number to new acquaintances. Ask the family about the phone policies and tell your friends not to call after 21:30.

This agreement is valid from

until

Not considering each and all of the 15 rules above mentioned may cause expelling the student without reimbursement of the fees collected.

8. Alcohol Use of alcohol is prohibited in the homes unless offered by a family member. As well it is considered distasteful to return home intoxicated.

I, declare I have read and accepted all and each one of the15 home stay policies.

9. Out of Home

Date:

Please keep your family informed of your schedule. This includes classes and planned/extracurricular activities. Spending the

Signature:

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Appendix E – Application Form Mr/Ms Place and date of birth Nationality Home address Phone E-mail

First name Passport n.

Fax

Length of time you have studied Spanish?: Knowledge: None Elementary Medium I wish to enroll in the following courses: Language course Standard from Intensive from Personal from Special from Tourism and Culture from Business from

Good

Fluent

to to to to to to

Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks

I wish to reserve the following accommodation Hotel ***, breakfast from to Hotel *, breakfast from to Apartment from to Family from to Family, 1 meal from to Family, 2 meals from to Family, 3 meals from to Other: from to Single room Double room

Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks Total weeks

My flight details are the following: Transfer from airport: Yes

No

Special wishes or needs: I declare that I have read and accepted the general conditions. Date:

Signature:


ACADEMIA DE LENGUAS • SANTO DOMINGO • REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

Appendix F - Housing Information Form Please compile this form accurately in order to assist us in identifying proper placement. - This information will not be divulged. - This data form is for information purposes only. This data form does not obligate us to fulfill all requests. - Thank you.

Name: Date of birth: Sex: Male

Prefer to be called (other name): Female

1- Do you prefer a family: with children? with pets?

without children? without pets?

no preference no preference

2- What is your religion? Do you consider yourself very religious? 3- Are you a smoker?

Yes

No

Yes

No

If yes, what do you smoke and how much? 4- Are you vegetarian?

Yes

No

5- Do you have special dietary restrictions or requests? Which?

6- Do you have any allergies? Please explain.

7- Do you have any specific requests and problems you would like considered in the selection of the family? Please explain.

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Appendix G - General Conditions 1) 2) 3) 4)

Minimum age of admission: 18 years. The course must be started on the fixed dates. No refund for delayed start or early departure. Payment: 4.1) The enrolment should possibly be finalized 30 days before the beginning of the course and must be sent together with a deposit of 20% of the entire amount. 4.2) On receipt of the confirmation, the remaining amount has to be paid within 30 days before the beginning of the course or, for later enrolments, immediately. 4.3) Payment must be made to the Academy account at:

1st United Bank 1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd West Palm Beach, Florida 33401, USA ABA number: 067014987 Swift code: HEMSUS3M Account number: 581814043 Beneficiary: Hispaniola Academia Caribe de Lenguas 4.4) Please enclose a copy of your receipt of payment. 4.5) If you send your payment via “City Bank” an additional US$50 will be charged. 5) Cancellations: 5.1) The course can be cancelled only by means of a registered letter or a telegram or a fax to the secretariat of the school. 5.2) If the cancellation is made at least 30 days before the beginning of the course, the Academy will refund the whole amount retaining only the deposit. 5.3) If the cancellation is received up to 15 days before the beginning of the course, 50% of the whole amount will be retained. 5.4) Up to this term the Academy accepts the replacement of the enrolled student by another person. In this event, a handling fee of US$30 is charged. 5.5) Cancellations at a later date are not entitled to any refund. 6) Students are not insured against illness, accidents, theft or loss of personal goods. We therefore recommend taking out a personal insurance policy. 7) The Academy reserves the right to change programs and prices. 8) Refunds: no refunds for any reason.

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Appendix H – General Informations Notes & numbers to make your stay in the Dominican Republic more pleasant

TAXIS: Although there are lots of taxis cruising by or calling out their services from their appointed stands, it’s safer to use a taxi driver you know is reliable (we will introduce you to some) and/or to use the radio-controlled cabs from the larger companies that check out their drivers. Here are two of the most frequently called:

IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS: Luca Pellegrini 809 856-5026 cellular Emergency phone for school situations: 809 856-5026 cellular Emergency phone other situations 911

APOLO CAB ANACAONA

809-537-0000 809-530-4800

DRINKING WATER: Drink lots of water to avoid dehydration in the tropical heat, but drink only bottled water or the 1-peso plastic bags. Don’t worry about ice. All ice used or sold commercially is made from purified water.

Note that calls to cellular phones are always a local-long-distance call here, requiring the “1.” It’s a good idea to buy and carry a VERIZON phone card that you can use at all private and public phones. You can even use them to call the U.S., but such long-distance calls are far cheaper at the Verizon or Tricom offices.

RESTAURANTS, FRUIT & FOOD STANDS: The budget-wise will find it is best to switch to the Dominican custom of eating their main meal at noon, when a delicious Dominican meal (beans and rice, salad, choice of meat) costs from RD$35-100 at any of the many local “comedores.” There is a full range of restaurants in the city, however, where you can find any cuisine you desire, from the familiar American fast foods to exotic international dishes. Note that Dominicans are especially fond of pizza, fried chicken, and ice cream, all of which are abundant

SAFETY TIPS: The Dominican Republic is one of the safest countries in the world for tourists, but it’s never smart to walk alone, especially at night—if female, it’s best to be accompanied by a trusted male at night, be in a group, or phone a taxi. Don’t carry large amounts of money, don’t ever flash money around, don’t exchange dollars for pesos on the street, and don’t wear gold necklaces…. Normal street-smart stuff. Watch your step when out walking! Pedestrians do NOT have the right of way. Look both ways and wait until traffic is clear to cross streets. And look DOWN as well ahead while walking to avoid twisted ankles or worse in the many areas where the sidewalks are broken or water-valve covers are missing.

Generally speaking, street food here in the capital is safe for most people to eat (those with super-sensitive stomachs know who they are and should avoid street vendors) , though it’s best to look for the most popular vendors and eat at key times of day, so that the food is fresh.

SUN PROTECTION: Walk and stand in

When riding in public cars (“públicos” or “conchos”) get your 5-peso fee out before you enter the car and guard your purse on your lap.

the shade whenever you can, and wear sun protection lotion for those times when you can’t find shade (minimum #15). Super sun-

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sensitive people will want to wear long sleeves and a brimmed hat, or maybe even carry a “parasol.” Sunglasses are almost a necessity for everyone. As mentioned above, drink lots of bottled water to avoid dehydration.

BEST BUYS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC • hand rolled cigars • ceramics of all kinds, including the unique “faceless” dolls and replicas of Taíno artifacts • carved and painted wooden sculptures and household objects • drums, maracas and güiras (the latter are rhythmic scraper instruments) • beautifully carved gourds • baskets • vanilla & chocolate • stick cinnamon, nutmeg and other whole spices • rum • Presidente beer • coffee • amber (the Dominican Republic is the world’s amber capital) • larimar (a creamy turquoise stone unique to the island) • leather goods • CD’s and cassettes of merengues and bachatas • colorful paintings • imaginative t-shirts, beach wraps, and towels

MONEY: Dominican currency is the peso. Rates of exchange vary, but generally waiver around 16 pesos to 1 American dollar. You can exchange dollars for pesos at any bank (most are open Mon-Fri until 6PM and Sat until noon), or at a Casa de Cambio, which are especially prevalent in tourist districts. Do not, however, change money on the street, no matter how high a rate of exchange is offered. The risk of being short-changed is not worth the extra percentage points. Handy quantities to remember: RD$ 5 = approx. US13¢ RD$10 = approx. US26¢ RD$38 = approx. US$1.00 RD$190 = approx. US$5.00 RD$100 = approx. US$2.63 RD$380= approx. US$10.00 RD$500 = approx. US$13.15 Shopping in and about the Zona Colonial— Prices in clothing stores, grocery stores and the like are well marked and fixed (grocery stores are the best places to buy such Dominican products as coffee, vanilla, chocolate, and rum). In most shops that specialize in souvenirs, however, you can bargain for lower prices than the sticker prices. Expect perhaps a 10-20% reduction—lower prices if you pay in cash (en efectivo), not so big a discount if with a credit card. At the Mercado Modelo, the two-level covered marketplace on Avenida Mella near Calle Santomé that caters to tourists, you’ll find a vast array of arts and crafts. Best advice is not to buy anything that does not have a pricetag and to bargain down to approximately half of the listed price, which is closer to the “real” price. The market and its environs are lively and colourful, a dynamic crossroads where the countryside and the city meet. A note of caution, however: it’s better to buy expensive, high-quality jewellery at established stores, not in the market stalls, to insure that you get what you pay for.

GARBAGE & SANITATION—One of the biggest complaints that tourists have about the Dominican Republic is the garbage. True, there is a lot of litter strewn about, especially in the Capital. This is partly due to lax anti-litter laws (in the Trujillo Era, the country was squeaky clean under penalty of death!), partly due to a shortage of garbage cans (garbage cans cost money, which is a scarce resource here), and to too many people living together too closely in too small a space. It’s also due, in part, to lack of interest. Who cares about litter when you and your family are trying to scrounge up enough money for food and rent? Do like Dominicans do. Step over or around the garbage and ignore it as best you can. But please remember your manners and carry your own litter with you until you find a garbage can—hopefully you’ll set a good example. (Note that garbage IS picked up on a regular basis here in the Capital. It just accumulates quickly.) 74


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*A special note about toilet paper & sanitation—The Dominican sewage cleaning system cannot handle much paper. In the bathrooms of private homes, in hotel bathrooms, restaurant bathrooms, bar and nightclub bathrooms, airport bathrooms... In every bathroom here, there are waste receptacles beside the toilet. These are for used toilet paper. Please fold your used toilet paper in on itself and place it in the wastebasket, not in the toilets.

frequently, how he’d like to spend time with her. In point of fact, a Dominican man would think it horribly rude and uncultured not to say something complimentary to a beautiful woman as she passes by. So please do not interpret either the remarks or the men who make them by the standards of your home country. The piropos are compliments by appreciative men. Smile, say “gracias,” and walk on.

MACHISMO & PIROPOS: Much has

TIME: A common complaint is that Dominicans are never on time. That’s true, but not because they are “lazy” or because they are “careless” or “unthinking.” The Protestant equation of “time is money” does not exist here. In the Dominican Republic, people are more important than things. If a Dominican has an appointment at 3 p.m. and is en route to keep that appointment, he or she would think it very rude not to stop and chat with friends and family along the way— far ruder than keeping you waiting. After all, they assume that you will be chatting with someone at the appointed location. And that’s the best way to pass the time, socializing. Also keep in mind that most Dominicans use public transportation, so have only limited control over how fast or how slowly they cover the route. And if they are driving their own vehicle or taking a taxi, there are all those "tapones" (traffic jams) to deal with, which are a fact of life no matter the hour in the Capital’s busy, congested streets. So relax, they’ll join you ahorita—flexible in meaning, the word initially meant “right away,” but in the modern Dominican Republic it means “whenever.”

been written about Latin American machismo, the ancient tradition that is so opposite to the ideals of modern Women’s Liberation. If you are female, please do not be offended when a Dominican man opens doors for you, offers his hand or his arm, assists you across a street, or any of a number of other "caballeroso" (gentlemanly) things he may insist on doing, including commenting on your beauty, your charm, etc., in a way that may seem to you to be excessive or even rude (see “Piropos” in the section that follows). It is a long-standing Dominican tradition to be excessively, attentively a gentleman around women of all ages. Despite what is often seen by foreigners as too much machismo “posing,” Dominican men are far more free to express their loving feelings and emotions with their children, friends, and family members, whether male or female, than most Americans or Europeans. It’s not even unusual to see two Dominican men dancing together— merengue, of course, or other fast-paced music, not a romantic bolero. Piropos (wolf calls)—Many American and European women become upset because of all the piropos thrown their way by Dominican men. They interpret the remarks and suggestions as “wolf calls,” but in point of fact the word is more properly translated as “compliments.” Americans and Europeans are “exotics” here, thus are almost all seen as handsome or beautiful. And Dominican men genuinely appreciate even large women and older women of all nationalities, seeing them for the attributes they have…. And when a Dominican man sees a beautiful woman, he can’t help but comment upon her beauty and,

NO

PROBLEMA: Sometimes the Dominicans’ tendency to say that there is “no problem” is a big problem for foreigners! It’s a clash of cultures. Dominicans don’t want to upset you by saying that they don’t know, are uncertain, or that things are not proceeding in a positive way. So, for example, if you ask directions to a particular place, and they don’t know where it is, they’ll point you in a convenient direction, assuming that you’ll ask again up the road and someone there will know and will give you the correct information. Try not to get frustrated, nor to think badly of them. 75


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No one is intentionally lying to you or misleading you. And who knows? You might just see something interesting along the unintentional route—you might have a serendipitous adventure. Remember that time is more flexible here, is to be enjoyed, not guarded as a scarce resource.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST While you’re here in the Dominican Republic, keep an open mind. Be ready to enjoy yourself among a people who have a world-renowned reputation for being sincerely warm-hearted, open and friendly. But do remember that this is a “developing world.” The majority of the people here are not middle class, like they are in the U.S., Canada and Europe. There is a small, elite upper class, a very small middle class, and a vastly huge class of very poor people. You will definitely see some things here and have some experiences here that are very different from “back home.” That doesn’t mean the Dominican people or their ways are wrong—just different. Don’t spend your precious little time here lamenting how things could be so much better “if only they did it like back in _________.” After all, learning something new, having new experiences and meeting new people is what you came here for, isn’t it? Refunds: no refunds for any reason.

GREETINGS & SHOWING AFFECTION—Dominicans seldom just shake hands. That’s considered to be somewhat too formal, cold, rude. They kiss each other hello and goodbye on the cheek. The trick is to turn your head slightly to the left and kiss his or her right cheek, while they’re kissing your right cheek. The kiss will no doubt be followed and/or preceded by a hug. It is not considered to be unmanly for a man to greet another close male friend or family member in this way, either, although the American thump on the back or hearty handshake is becoming more common. Women friends walk hand in hand or arm in arm down the street without fear of being labeled gay—it’s how friends show their affection. Likewise, mothers and fathers still cuddle their children, hug them, kiss them, and walk hand in hand with them in public, without the children being in the least bit embarrassed. It’s wonderful!

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Appendix I - List of recipes Secciones: SEPTIMA

PRIMERA A) B) C) D) E)

A) Sancocho de Habichuelas B) Arroz Blanco C) Aguacate

Carne frita (Cerdo, Pollo, Res) Arroz Blanco Habichuelas Guisada Tostones (Plátano verde frito) Ensalada verde

OCTAVA A) Bistec al Criolla B) Arroz con Maíz C) Plátano Maduro Frito D) Ensalada de Zanahoria y Repollo

SEGUNDA A) Sancocho Típico B) Arroz Blanco C) Ensalada de Aguacate

NOVENA A) Carne de Res Guisada con Papas B) Moro de Habichuelas Negras C) Arepita de Maíz D) Ensalada de Tayota, Zanahoria y Papas Hervidas

TERCERA A) Locrio de Pollo o Cerdo B) Habichuelas Blancas C) Arepita de Yuca D) Ensalada de Vegetales Hervidos

DECIMA

CUARTA

A) Chivo Guisado B) Yuca al Moho C) Mangú de Plátano Verde D) Casabe Tostado (Moro, Arroz Blanco, Etc.)

A) Carne guisada (Res, Pollo, Gallina, Cerdo) B) Moro de Guandules Verdes con Coco C) Plátanos al Caldero D) Ensalada Rusa al estilo dominicano

ONCEAVA

QUINTA

A) Chicharrones de Pollo al estilo Dominicano B) Puré de Papas C) Ensalada de Lechuga, Pepino y Tomates (Arroz y Habichuelas, Tostones, Etc.)

A) Carne de Cerdo Guisada con Tayota B) Moro de Habichuelas Negras C) Berenjenas Fritas Empanizadas D) Ensalada de Papas

SEXTA A) Tasajo (Ropa Vieja) Frito, Guisado o Frito con Huevo B) Arroz Blanco C) Guandules Guisados D) Batata Frita E) Ensalada de Tomate con Berro

DOCEAVA A) Pescado con Coco B) Arroz Blanco C) Frito Maduro con Queso D) Ensalada de Repollo y Tomates

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Appendix L – Extra Curricular Courses tic replicas of the Taíno artifacts are made and sold. Optional Taíno Tours, in addition to the trip to the ceramics workshop of the Guillén Brothers described above, include trips to - La Caleta, an ancient Taíno burial grounds just outside the Capital (wear your swimsuits, for this site is adjacent to a magnificent Caribbean beach). - Cueva de Pommiers or Cueva de las Maravillas. These two incredible caves were Taíno ritual centers. Both are filled with fascinating Taíno drawings, stalactites and stalagmites, and both are approximately a 1-hour drive away from the Capital.

A- “The Colonial Zone”, an approximately 2-

- Río Chacuey, where we'll wade up the river to discover for ourselves some of the island's most famous petroglyphs (Taíno art carved into rocks) and swim in the freshwater “charcos” where the Indians once swam before participating in their communal dances. This trip includes a visit to a casabe factory, where Dominicans still make the traditional “bread” that the Taínos made from yucca.

hour walking class to visit all of the most important historical sites in the colonial city with explanations of the Capital's Indian, African and Spanish foundations. Optional extras available include guided tours of the Museo de las Casas Reales, Casa de Colón (Alcázar), Fortaleza Ozama and/or a shopping trip to the Mercado Modelo. Night tours are also available, when the Colonial Zone turns on its antique lights to become an even more romantic place than it is during the day.

B- “The Taínos of Hispaniola” is a 1 to 2hour class on the island's indigenous history and culture, followed by a 1-hour tour of the Taíno artifacts in the Museum of Dominican Man or the private museum, Fundación García-Arévalo. A second class dedicated to Taíno art is available (half day) to the mountain-top ceramics workshop of the Guillén Brothers in Yamasá (once a thriving Taíno site), where authen-

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C- “Putting the 'color' in Colorful” is a 1 to

E- “Dominican Foodways” is a 1-hour class

1.5-hour class on the history of African slavery and Afro-Dominican culture, followed by a 1-hour tour of the Museo del Carnaval run by Indefolk and dedicated to the memory of the renowned AfroDominican scholar Fradique Lizardo. Optional Show Folklórico Dominicano featuring Afro-Dominican dance and music traditions is available.

that explains the indigenous, African and Spanish roots of Dominican foodways and the impact of “the discovery of America” on modern world nutrition. Optional finale of an expansive buffet to taste-test what you've been learning about. Another wonderful option is a bus tour to the western Cibao, the mountainous regions west of Santiago where most of the country's casabe is produced in ingenious ways that continue the Taíno traditions (casabe is the round cakes of “bread” the Taínos made from yucca). F- “The Columbian Exchange” is a 1 to 1.5hour class that provides an overview of the exchanges of foods, animals, diseases and peoples that have taken place between the Old World and the New World since 1492 and how these exchanges have affected the modern world. Optional buffet of unusual tropical fruits and other Dominican foodstuffs, or a tour of the port area, where so many of the exchanges took place, which includes a visit to the Museo de las Atarazanas (the “shipwreck” museum). G- “Tops in Tourism” is a 1-hour introduction to and history of the Dominican Republic's number one industry. Includes current tourism statistics, problems and future potential. Then we'll tour one or more of the Capital's most prominent tourist hotels and casinos. Optional day

D- “The History of Merengue”. Merengue is more than a sensual, fun dance and national symbol of the Dominican Republic; it is an integral part of the country's modern history and politics. The 1hour class finishes with merengue lessons and dancing with Dominican partners.

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1.5-hour class on how the problems between the two republics that share the island of Hispaniola began, and how and why the enmity continues today. Optional excursions to the border towns of Dajabón (and to the Haitian market there) or Jimaní are available, as are visits to Haitian art galleries in the Capital.

passes, 24-hour or weekend stays (which include tours of the facilities) are available of a wide variety of Caribbean resorts, most of which provide unlimited food and beverage service, water sports, pools and beach facilities. A multiple-day tour to compare the island's various top-ranked resorts is also available.

H- “Sugar is not always Sweet” is a 1-hour

M- “Carnaval and Fiestas Patronales”.

class that covers the history of America's sugar industry-and accompanying slavery system--which began here on the island of Hispaniola between 1505 and 1515. Optional tours available include the remains of several of the island's 16th-century sugarcane ingenios and/or a visit to a batey, where the cane workers live and work today, where (depending upon the season) we'll see how sugar is grown, harvested and processed.

February is Carnival month in the Dominican Republic, a double celebration of pre-Lent and Independence (February 27). Join us for a 1-hour class on the genesis and evolution of Dominican Carnaval. Depending on the time and date, class will be followed by participation in one or more of the country's most popular celebrations: La Vega, Puerto Plata and Santo Domingo. Can't come in February? Easter Week (Semana Santa) is almost as fun and colorful, as is Corpus Christi. And there are regional fiestas patronales throughout the year, feast days dedicated to the various patron saints, each with its own unique and colorful music, dances, clothes, foods and beverages-one of the most celebrated is the feast day of St. John the Baptist on June 24.... Or we can see a Show Folklórico Dominicano featuring carnivalesque music & dance. And the end of July is the big Merengue Festival. There's always something to celebrate in the Dominican Republic!

I- “Tropical Fruits” is a 1hour class about tropical agriculture. A variety of illustrative tours are available, ranging from a visit to the Capital's award-winning Botanical Gardens, to market tours or excursions to the island's small fincas, and large agricultural complexes and multinational experimental farms.

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Appendix M – FAQ FAQ.Would you like to know more about: A) Tuition B) Cultural and Leisure Program C) Arrival / Housing / Transfer D) Other Useful Tips

developed by our school. These books are used in conjunction with authentic teaching materials such as newspaper and magazine articles, audiovisual materials and activities inside the classroom.

A) ALL ABOUT TUITION Which is the next starting date? You may start your Spanish language course every 2 weeks on Mondays, even if you are a complete beginner! Please consult our course starting dates to perfect match your level with the group level. You may also start any other day but in this case after test interview you will be introduced in one of the existing group, the nearest to your level. Not recommended for beginners.

Is the teaching material included in the course price? All text books and other supplies are provided by the school, but you are expected to bring your own dictionary. Which teaching method do you use? Hispaniola teaches according to the Direct/Communicative Method: from the first day on, at all levels, only Spanish will be spoken. The spoken language is the most important part of the tuition. Continually promoting the use of verbal communication permits you to learn Spanish 'naturally', to unite theory and practice with no great problems and to increase your knowledge quickly and with confidence. You are encouraged to practice your spoken Spanish in real-life situations, with your teacher, and with other participants, in pairs and groups. In advanced courses the written language will also be promoted.

What should I expect to do on the first day at school? We will wait for you at 8.30 am in the main reception area of the school. All students will take a written and oral placement test which enables us to find the appropriate level. Which is a typical course schedule? STANDARD Spanish LANGUAGE COURSE: 08:30 - 10:30, 30-minute break, 11:00 – 12.30 INTENSIVE Spanish LANGUAGE COURSE: 08:30 - 10:30, 30-minute break, 11:00 – 12.30 And 13:30-15:30 INTENSIVE P5 or P10 Spanish LANGUAGE COURSE: • group lessons: 08:30 - 10:30, 30-minute break, 11:00 – 12.30 • individual lessons (one or two lessons): 14:00 - 15:00 or 14:00 – 16:00 For homework and exercises you should calculate about one additional hour per day.

Which is your teacher’s qualification? All our mother-tongue instructors are highly qualified. Most of them have studied Spanish language and literature. All our teachers have been specially trained in teaching Spanish to foreigners. Which course certificates do students receive? Hispaniola CERTIFICATES: • At the end of each course and upon request, students with regular attendance receive the certificate of attendance indicating the level of proficiency attained. • At the end of 3rd ability level, students who passed a test receive the "Diploma Basico de Dominio de la lengua

Which books do you use in the lessons? Our basic text and exercise books have been

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studied and my level of proficiency at the end of the course? Yes, upon request at no cost

• At the end of 6th ability level, students who passed a test receive the “Diploma de Dominio de la Lengua”. Which is the average age of students attending the school? I'm interested in attending a course for older students aged 30 and above. Do you have suitable courses for this age?

What is the average number of students in the standard group session? Groups are composed for a max of 8 students and an average of 1 to 4.

Sixty percent of our students are aged between 17 and 30 seeking to improve their Spanish language skills and awareness of Spanish Sixty percent of our students are already working; about ten percent are business managers and executives of different Five percent are retired and wish to improve their Spanish and familiarize themselves with Spanish-Latin culture.

What is the average number of students in the intensive group session? Up to the moment, the intensive lessons are always one-to-one. It happens that most of our student that wish to have extra lessons normally chose P5 or P10 extension. In case you chose GroupIntensive extension (max 8 persons in a group) and we do not have any other student to share the group with you will be shifted to P5 extension at no extra cost

After twelve weeks, how much Spanish will I be able to speak, assuming I am a complete beginner upon arrival, I work very hard and I am good at languages? Hispaniola offers 8 different course levels from beginner to advanced. Each course level usually consists of 20 lessons/week over a period of 2 weeks. If you are good at languages and you work hard, it is possible to complete 6 levels in 12 weeks. At the end of the Intermediate level (5th) you already possess considerable knowledge of Spanish. Your feeling for the language has become confident and your range of expressions has developed greatly and is more differentiated.

What will happen if I enroll in the Plus 10 Supplement and as a result I progress quicker than the group I am assigned to? Actually the Intensive extension shouldn't be considered a way to progress faster in quantity but in quality. Students that apply for intensive normally, in the extra lessons, do not study new items. B) ALL ABOUT CULTURAL AND LEISURE PROGRAMS The cities and the surroundings offer a nearly unlimited variety of leisure activities, which our students might undertake by themselves. We offer leisure activities as well and organize on a • Dinners, which enable teachers and students to get to know each other better; • Guided visits in History of Art; • Film evenings at school; • Day and half-day excursions; Every month our schools distribute a calendar (La Guia al Dia) of cultural activities. In this way participants will always be well informed concerning exhibitions, concerts, films and other events. And the secretary’s office can also help with the organization of sporting/leisure activities. Can you give me an example of a weekly activity calendar? • Half-day excursion to touristic/cultural places around Santo Domingo, every Wednesday in the afternoon (at cost price).

I may want to stay 8 to 12 weeks, but I don't want to commit to that up front. If I pay for 4 weeks, can I then decide at the end of the last week that I would like to pay for another two weeks or another four weeks and just extend my stay in the school and the hotel? You can enroll for a period and then decide to extend your stay as long as you want. Just note that the longer the period you enroll for, the less you pay, because after the 5th week there is a special price. If you extend week by week, you end up paying the normal price, which is more expensive than enrolling for a 5-week period or longer. Another thing is that your room may not be available at the end of your first period, requiring a move. Will I receive a certificate/diploma from the school documenting the number of hours

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• Dinners with the school in a local restaurant: students and teachers have a good chance to get to know each other; every Monday and Wednesday evening (at cost price). • Pasta Dinner: school prepare 2 recipes of pasta, students pay their own drinks.

modation details and emergency phone always available: 1. If your plane is in late (more than 2 hours) and you didn’t communicate it to school secretariat, your pick-up is lost. Please take a taxi to your accommodation. Please refer to next question. 2. If your plane is on time or you communicate it to the school please double check among the visitor’s zone: the person in charge should be there carrying a paper with your name and flight details. In case you still don’t find it please go to the calling center (Verizon) inside the airport and call the emergency cell phone: 1 809 856 5026 (if you call form a cell phone do not dial the “1”). 3. If you arrive late at night or communication center is closed or any other trouble make it impossible to communicate with the emergency phone , just take a taxi to your accommodation... but only after double and triple check. We pay back pick-up fee ONLY if the person in charge doesn’t show up.

After class is over, are group excursions considered mandatory or can we do whatever we want with our free time? Of course you can do what you want with your free time. We only suggest activities How do I know about social/cultural/entertainment activities? We provide any student with a copy of the monthly “Guia al Dia” a complete guide of any sort of events in the month. Secretariat is available for any additional information. How dangerous is Santo Domingo at night? Santo Domingo is far less dangerous than New York or Milan or Berlin. You only have to know there are few parts where it may be unsafe to go at night. Then just use a few general commonsense rules (do not walk alone in the dark, don’t wear a lot of gold jewelry, use taxis...) like all over the world, and you won't have any problems

C) ARRIVAL / HOUSING / TRANSFER

Where should I go upon my arrival and how to get there? Please go to your accommodation. You should have received your accommodation details couple of weeks before your arrival. We suggest you print it out and show it to taxi driver to fix the price. Here some suggestions: 1. After landing, try to go out of the airplane quickly and go to the tourist card desk with your passport, $10US cash, flight details (arrival and departure), and destination address in Santo Domingo. Before arriving at the immigration desk, first go to the right side of the room and buy the Tourist Card ($10US), and then go to the immigration desk. Keep the receipt. The line will get really long very quickly. 2. Change a little bit of money at the airport, enough for the weekend. 3. Do not trust anybody at the airport to give you a ride, go directly to a taxi parked outside. The taxi costs $25-30US from the Las Americas airport. Settle on a price before you get in.

WHAT HAPPEN IF I ARRIVE AND MY PICK-UP IS NO THERE? First of all, please remember to have your accom-

What happen if me and hosting family where I am lodged in, don’t match? You have 3 days settlement. If for some serious

I might hire a personal guide for an evening or two to show me which bars and clubs (and which parts of the city) are safe and which aren't. How much should this cost? You do not need to hire a guide because the secretariat of the school will give you all the orientation materials you need—besides, there are not too many areas of the city that are unsafe. We, and the people at your accommodation, will help answer any questions or problems you may have during the period you stay at the school. Also, Dominicans are very friendly. Most visitors easily find Dominican friends who will show you around their city for free

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reason you feel uncomfortable pleas communicate as soon as possible to the school secretariat (no later than the first Wednesday of the first week of your stay). If your complaint is reasonable you will be changed at no cost. Later than Wednesday 12:00, no changes are allowed.

you will have your own keys and you will be absolutely free to go up and down at your convenience. Are cleaning and/or laundry services available in apartment accommodation? It is not included. You can have it for a little extra fee.

The ***hotel with single rooms has a private bathroom and air-conditioning, correct? Do they have a telephone? Yes, the 3-star hotel has all of these facilities included in the price. Breakfast is included too.

D) OTHER USEFUL TIPS Are taxi cabs readily available and is there a problem with cab drivers kidnapping, robbing and/or beating tourists? Taxis are very readily available and, while some problems have arisen in the past, most Dominican taxi drivers are professionals. We suggest you use radio-taxis, which are a little cheaper than others and which are identified by a number.

Is the ***hotel properly exterminated? Have students had problems with bugs in the hotel rooms? The 3 star-hotel has a good cleaning service and good extermination practices, too. This is the tropics, however; if it happens that you see some bugs in your room, just call the reception desk and management will resolve the problem immediately

Are the residents of Santo Domingo friendly and inclusive, or wary of people they do not know, as in New York City (where I live)? Dominican people enjoy their life very much and they really love to meet new people. You only need to be smiling, open minded and friendly to be immediately accepted by Dominicans.

Do the hotels give guests any problem with bringing additional guests to the room? Does the hotel have security in case of a problem? The hotel has 24-hour security. To bring additional guests to your room, you have to pay an extra fee and deposit the guest’s identification at the reception desk. The guest is not able to leave the hotel without your permission

What is the average age of the students who attend? Do you get more ladies or gentlemen? Our school is like a little family. We have an average of 8-10 students, usually about 50/50 males and females. Their average age is between 25 and 35, but students over 40 are very common.

Do the apartments and/or hosting families give guests any problem with bringing additional guests to the room? Yes. It is strictly forbidden to receive any “justmade” friends in apartment or families house any time w/out any exception. It is in our policies. If you wish to spend some time with some friend “cabañas” are much more secure and always available for a little fee. More information at school secretariat. Restriction

How big is the Hispaniola School (total # of students)? How old is it? How many teachers are there? Is it in a house or an office building? Our school is a little family. We have an average of 8-10 students at any given time. Last year we had a total of 147 students for an average stay of 4-6 weeks. The school was founded in 1995. We have up to 12 teachers available, but only 4-5 are actually working at most times. Our classrooms are in a half-colonial half-beginning-of-century mansion that has been converted into a modern classroom building.

Does hosting-family accommodation have some special rules/restrictions? Any families have their own policies and a general housing policy also exists. But please feel free to discuss any trouble you may have with your hosting-lady and you will be surprised how elastic they may be. If your concern is about going out,

Do you offer discounts to students studying more than 4 weeks? Yes if you apply for course+accommodation. If

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you apply for course w/out accommodation we offer discount over 10 weeks course

ning of the course, the first Monday. We do not accept enrollment with payment at later date.

Do you offer discounts to students who prepay for the course? No we don't. To prepay the course is required. We normally ask the 100% of the course at least 30 days before the course commencement but, in same case we can also accept a 20% deposit immediately and the remaining 80% at the begin-

What should I do if I feel uncomfortable and/or have some complaint? Please direct to your teacher or the school secretariat asking for the complaint form. Once you filled, after a max of 2 working days, school will answer to your complaint.

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Appendix N – ALL IN ONE PAGE Any change and/or delay MUST be communicate as soon as possible to the number (+809) 856-5026 and only to this number. If nobody answer elave a message with new data. We suggest you to advise your clients to bring with them a photocopy of their passport and a printed copy of their address in Dominican Republic. If the student doesn’want to be picked up it is recommended that they take a taxi to their accommodation. Taxis are easily found in front of the main entrance of any airport. If student arrives at Puerto Plata or Punta Cana airports in some cases it will be necessari to spend a night there. School secretariat is available for any informations.

School location: HISPANIOLA Academia Caribe de Lenguas c/ Nouel #103, casi esquina Duarte Zona Colonial - 10210 Santo Domingo RepúblicaDominicana Tel. +809-689-8350 + 809-856-5026 (dial “1”from inside the country) only emergencyFax. +809-688-9192 e-mail info@hispaniola.org web page www.hispaniola.org

Accommodation Accommodation starts on the Sunday before the course commences and last until Saturday, 12 noon’s, after the end of the course. Students will receive address of accommodation few day before their arrival. At arrival student will receive the keys, which tehy will keep during their stay and return on the day of departure. Students must vacate the room before 12 noons. Students will be charged for any lost keys. In family accommodation weekly laundry and weekly cleaning are always included, meals are not but can be arranged with the school.

The school Students are requested to be at school at 8.30 a.m. After the test and interview, students will complete their enrolment with the school secretariat. For continuing students, this day will be normal. Standard lessons are 8.30 a.to 12.30 p.m., monday to friday. Any level lasts 2 weeks. Certificate of attendance is available upon request

In apartment accommodation a US$100 deposit apply Be aware that if your student books apartment accommodation, she/he will most likely have to eat out the first evening as all supermarkets are closed on Sundays. Your students as well as the fellow-lodgers are expected to keep the apartment clean

Leisure time School organizes activities almost on a daily base. Every day students will be informed about the activity. A person is in charge to keep students informed about anu kind of activity. School secretariat is always available to suggest, infrom and help students.

Pick-up and arrival day The waiting time (either at the airport for pick-up or at accommodation) will be limited according to the estimate hour of student incoming.

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