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In 2009, the Modern Language Association of America asked me for an article on graphic novels of the Hispanic world as part of a volume of the MLA, Approaches to Teaching Series. Editor Steve Tabachnick, English Professor at the University of Memphis, was fully aware of the evolution and interest in comics and graphic novels as part of the learning process of a culture. He also knew that Hispanic comics, in all of their editorial forms, such as comic strips, comic books and graphic novels, were a rich and complex reality that involved many countries and needed to be included in the project. When focusing on Spain, the most prominent contemporary authors with graphic novels published in English in the U.S. at that moment were Miguelanxo Prado and Max. Both authors are considered pioneers of the Spanish graphic novel. Miguelanxo Prado’s Streak of Chalk was published in Spain in 1993 and won both the 1994 Alph Art Angouleme Award in France and the Best Work Award for the Barcelona Saló del Cómic. The English translation, from 1994, received nominations for the American Eisner and Harvey Awards in 1995. Prado then had his pieces Tangents and Daily Delirium translated into English. In the case of Max, his graphic novel The Extended Dream of Mr. D, which was initially published as a serial, won the 1999 Ignatz Award for Best Serial at the SPX Festival. His other translated pieces are Bardin the Superrealist (Spanish National Award) and Vapor.

Fantagraphics, the most prominent American alternative publishing house, is now bringing to the general public the anthology Spanish Fever: Stories by the New Spanish Cartoonists. Coordinated by Santiago García, an author known in the U.S. for his recently translated book On the Graphic Novel, this anthology showcases the latest generation of Spanish cartoonists. Within Spanish Fever, you can also find historical figures that transformed the Spanish comics landscape of the last quarter of the twentieth century, such as Antonio Altarriba, Kim, Miguel Ángel Martín, Pere Joan, Miguel Gallardo, Javier Olivares, Micharmut, Javier Olivares, Ramón Boldú or Max. Santiago García also combines excellent examples from rising stars such as Paco Roca, Juan Berrio, Alfonso Zapico or Juanjo Sáez, with new voices like David Rubín, Sergi Puyol, Álvaro Ortiz or José Domingo. A total of 30 fantastic voices that show great talent are included. There are just three Spanish female cartoonists in this anthology: Mireia Pérez, Clara-Tanit Arque and Ana Galvañ. All three are fantastic and promising comic artists in what has been a male-centered tradition in the twentieth century, as also happens in the American and European landscapes. Scholars in the U.S., such as Gema Pérez Sánchez of the University of Miami, have researched the Spanish

Clara Tanit-Arqué

o José Doming


SPAIN arts & culture's Fall / Winter 2016 Program