Page 1

FEBRUARY – VOL 14 NO. 09

Vol 14 No. 09   FEBRUARY 2018

ART   ARCHITECTURE   INTERIOR

NRS. 100/-

facebook.com/spacesnepal

twitter.com/spacesnepal

Patan Dhoka Historic Gate gets a New Facelift

GHOPA CAMP CONVERSION FROM BRITISH GURKHA CAMP TO B.P. KOIRALA INSTITUTE OF HEALTH STUDIES

Lifting the

Ground

Royal Empire

BOUTIQUE HOTEL

OVERVIEW OF ASIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 3


4 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 5


Contents Volume 14 NO. 09 | FEBRUARY

S

P

A

C

E

S

N

E

P

A

L

.

C

O

M

26 CONSERVATION

32 ARCHITECTURE

Ghopa camp

Royal Empire Boutique Hotel

42 INTERIOR

52 ARCHITECTURE

54 ART

Lifting the Ground

Overview of Asian Architecture & Design

Patan Dhoka Historic Gate gets a New Facelift

64 INTERIOR

69 FROM THE SHELF

70 ARTSPACE

Formation of Color

Towards a New Museum

World for New Beginning

8 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


Volume 14 N 09 | FEBRUARY O.

Contributors

CEO

Ashesh Rajbansh Editor-in-Chief

Ar. Sarosh Pradhan Director- Products and Materials

Ar. Pravita Shrestha

Madan Chitrakar

Kai Weise

Asha Dangol

Bansri Pandey

Rajina Shrestha

Shweta Shakya

Shreesha Nankhwa

Contributing Art Editor

Madan Chitrakar Kasthamandap Art Studio Junior Editor

Shreya Amatya Sristi Pradhan Pratap Jung Khadka Advisor

Ar. Pawan Kumar Shrestha Subscription and Administrative Officer

Riki Shrestha

Contributing Editor

President - Society of Nepalese Architects Ar. Brinda Shrestha Photographers

Chhavi Vashist

Madan Chitrakar is a senior artist and an art- writer based in Kathmandu. As a leading art writer of the country, on many occasions he has taken Nepali Art beyond the borders - through his writings in many prestigious publications abroad notably in Japan, India and Bangladesh. Two well acclaimed books Tej Bahadur Chitrakar - Icon of a Transition’ 2004 and ‘Nepali Art: Issues Miscellany’ - 2012 remain to his credit, in addition to the numerous writings on Art and Culture in English and Nepali. Presently, he is associated with Tribhuvan University, Central Department of Fine Arts and Kathmandu University, Center for Art and Design as a member of the respective Subject Committee. Kai Weise is a Nepali national of Swiss origin who has been working as a planner and architect in the Himalayan Region. Kai Weise has been facilitating the establishment of management systems for World Heritage properties and was involved in earthquake response and rehabilitation for the culture sector in Nepal and Myanmar. He is president of ICOMOS Nepal and fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Durham University.

Pradip Ratna Tuladhar Intl. Correspondent

Bansri Pandey Intern

Soyana Nyachhyon Director- Operation & Public Relation

Anu Rajbansh

Asha Dangol is a contemporary Nepali visual artist. He is co-founder of the Kasthamandap Art Studio and E-Arts Nepal. He holds Master’s Degree in Fine Arts from Tribhuvan University, and has been creating and exhibiting his art since 1992. He has 10 solo art exhibitions to his credit. Dangol has participated in numerous group shows in Nepal and his work has been exhibited in different countries outside Nepal. The artist experiments with painting, mixed media, ceramics, installation, performance and video. Shweta Shakya is an aspiring architect with a passion for exploring traditions and cultures. Being a heritage enthusiast, she has been involved in projects concerning understanding and preservation of traditional architectural constructs within Kathmandu Valley. During her spare time, she pursues writing as a hobby.

SR. Business Development Officer

Debbie Rana Dangol Marketing Officer

Ruby Shrestha Legal Advisor

Bansri Pandey is an architect from India who is in love with stories. She has been writing about several issues on architecture since 2007. She came to Nepal in 2010. At the time, she established a training centre for teaching new technologies in the field of architecture/engineering in Nepal. After completing her masters in International Project Management from Germany in 2013, she worked in the field of construction technologies in Germany and in Qatar. After coming back to Nepal, her love for storytelling got her to write and perform a play in Nepali at a theatre in Kathmandu. Currently, she continues to write about architecture as well as work in the field of construction technologies in Nepal.

Yogendra Bhattarai Financial Advisor

Kiran Rajbhandary

Published by

IMPRESSIONS Publishing Pvt.Ltd. Kopundole, Lalitpur, GPO Box No. 7048, Kathmandu, Nepal. Phone: 5181125, 5180132 info@spacesnepal.com Design/Layout & Processed at DigiScan Pre-press

Printed at Wordscape The Printer, 9851037750 Distribution

Kasthamandap Distributors, Ph: 4247241

Advertising and Subscriptions

IMPRESSIONS Publishing Pvt.Ltd. Ph: 5181125, 5180132, market@spacesnepal.com

10 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

Chhavi Vashist is a Delhi-based, graduate in Bachelors of Architecture and Post Graduate of Landscape Architecture. She is experienced in content writing as an Interior Designer. She is a blogger, and working as a faculty of Interior Designing. She is practicing as an architect and her firm undertake projects of varied complexity in terms of Architectural Design and Execution, ranging from Concept making, Space planning, Detailed designing, Interior Designing, Fresh construction, Addition and Alterations in existing buildings, and Renovation work for every type of Residential, Commercial, Retail projects. Rajina Shrestha is currently working full time for Marketing and Operations at Threadpaints Store, a moderated online selling platform. She is a also co-founder at Women Leaders in Technology (WLiT) and Vice-President at Women LEAD. She is a freelance writer and asks too many questions.

Shreesha Nankhwa is an aspiring environmentalist with a penchant for writing. She is interested in sustainable living, alternative energy and creating a better future for the planet. Her works have been published in a number of magazines and publications in Nepal. She currently writes and edits blogs for IT companies while dreaming of trekking across the Himalayas.

Regd. No 30657/061-62 CDO No. 41 SPACES is published twelve times a year at the address above. All rights are reserved in respect of articles, illustrations, photographs, etc. published in SPACES. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without the written consent of the publisher. The opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher and the publisher cannot accept responsiblility for any errors or omissions. Those submitting manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other materials to SPACES for consideration should not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by SPACES in writing. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and other submitted material must be accompanied by a self addressed return envelope, postage prepaid. However, SPACES is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. All editorial inquiries and submissions to SPACES must be addressed to editor@spacesnepal.com or sent to the address mentioned above.


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 11


Editorial It is indeed fascinating to see how materials can change the character, style and aesthetics in architecture. The extensive use of exposed brick and wood in structures to add depth and art was well exploited in traditional Newar architecture during Malla era. The neoclassical European architecture dominated white buildings came into existence during Rana dynasty rulers. Today, with advancement in engineering research, global architecture relies on steel and glass to achieve the flow of form. The extensive use of exposed concrete in structures to add depth and smartness was playfully exploited by master architect Prabal Thapa. Being very minimalist but sensually catered for the necessities, the project has truly become a delightful satisfaction from the perspectives of owner and designer. Few remaining white buildings of Rana era managed to breadth life over the love and kindness of confident owners. Royal Empire Boutique Hotel provides opportunity for a commoner to realize the dream of living in a palace. Built and used by the mighty Rana rulers and merged with modern amenities, spending time there becomes truly a wonderful memory of larger than life experience. Not all life and structures share the same destiny, especially when acquired by bigger owners when their priority lies somewhere else. And often said the Nepalese are excellent to initialize but hopelessly poor on continuation, especially these days. The British Gurkha Recruitment camp in Dharan was constructed with a standard of quality and services unheard anywhere else in the country. Now that the camp was handed over to the Government of Nepal and became part of the BPKIHS, the existing buildings were being pulled down for new buildings that would hardly be even partially as strong. The concern is the complex would be incrementally destroyed if it was not planned out properly. Nonetheless, a good home transformation is a powerful show-and-tell that, hopefully, spurs you to elevate an existing home to extraordinary. It’s proof that a well-designed home makes life more enjoyable, more satisfying. The formation of features and emotions cannot be better done anything but color. The concepts of color psychology can also be applied in everyday life, maybe you’re planning on re-painting your walls or redecorating a house or room with a new color scheme. You might want to consider some of the suggestions we have about colors and how they might affect your emotions and mood. And it certainly changed faith when the historic Patan Dhoka was coming to life after many years in broad silence. The gate is again going to be transferred in the designated space of the monument - eminent Paubha painter Lok Chitrakar came into full play creating all the master drawings in paper along with final color scheme to the last details. We invite our readers, architects and designers to suggest us more of such projects in architecture that do not fight nature but are in sync with it.

Enjoy!

Ashesh Rajbansh / CEO

12 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


Office Furniture Office Furniture NEPAL’S NEPAL’S

MOSTMOST

PREFFERED PREFFERED

BRAND BRAND

W NOW N

NE ONLINE ON

SHOP SHOP NOW NO @

@

www.featherlitenepal.org/shop www.featherlitenepal.org

I N S TA L L DESIGN AT| I MANUFACTURE ON DE | INSTALLATION SIGN

vt. Ltd.

Parth International Pvt. Ltd.

|

MAN

Parth

Corporate Office: Ward No. 11, Central Business Park, 4thWard Floor, Thapathali, ss Park, 4th Corporate Floor , Thapathali, Office: No. 11 Kathmandu, Nepal. Contact: 977 1424 5342 | 977 1 410 1504 5342 | 977 1 410 Kathmandu, 1504 Nepal. C

Kamaladi Complex, Kamaladi, Kathmandu, Nepal. Complex, Contact: 9771600209 andu,Showroom: Showroom: Nepal. Contact: Kamaladi 9771600209 K E-mail: nikunj@parthinternational.org FEBRUARY ational.org E-mail: nik 2018 SPACES / 13


14 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


NEWS

BERGER PAINTS WITH ROTARY As a part of its corporate social responsibility, Nepal’s one of the leading paint manufacturer Berger Paints Nepal has joined hands with Rotary District 3292 to support its “Rotary Nepal Literacy Mission” Project. Past District Governo Rotarian, Mr. Tirtha Man Shakya, (Chair for Rotary Nepal Literacy Mission) & Mr. Saibal Ghosh (Country Manager of Berger Paints Nepal) signed MOU on 20th Magh 2074 at Birendra Sabha Griha, Biratnagar to take this initiative forward. Under this project, Berger Paints Nepal will be providing paint support at specially discounted rate to approximately 3000 schools to be built/ reconstructed by Rotary District 3292. The company is also supporting registered NGOs/ INGOs and social non-profit organizations to organize health camps in rural/ underdeveloped areas, promote

16 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

green belt/traffic awareness for environmental awareness and training and development for creating employment opportunities for socially backward community. The company is also working in the areas of education, health and hygiene, women empowerment and more.


FEDERATION OF NEPAL FURNITURE AND FURNISHING ENTREPRENEURS ASSOCIATION (FNFFEA) Federation of Nepal Furniture and Furnishing Entrepreneurs Association organized its 3rd Annual General Meeting as well as 2nd Conference on 22nd Poush, 2074. Mr. Bhupendra Giri, Mr. Surya Sharma Upadhya, Mr. Krishna Prasad Dahal, Mr. Suzil Shrestha, Mr. Kabindra Joshi and Mr. Om Dahal as President, 1st Vice President, 2nd Vice President, 3rd Vice President, General Secretary and Treasurer respectively were elected as new board members during the event. The event was inaugurated by President of Nepal Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Rajesh Kaji Shrestha. Former President of the association, Mr. Surendra Sarada mentioned about the efforts to make the government realize the works that the association has been doing and the problems which has been facing in the past few years during the event.

Furniture and furnishing, which was counted as one of the luxurious item in the past has become essential item these days. The rise in demand of such items have given job opportunities to many and have also contributed to uplift the economy of the country. At present, this area has generated revenue in millions and have provided job to more people. Even though, Nepal has all the manpower required to manufacture and distribute the furniture and furnishing needed to meet the demand of the nation, 50% of these items have to be imported to fulfill the need of its consumers. Former President of the association, Mr. Surendra Sarada believes that with advanced technology and talented workers, Nepal can manufacture distinct and fashionable furniture and furnishing products at less cost which will accord to uplift the economy of the nation.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 17


NEWS also with the latest medium available to express. Yet it is evident, it is no way detached with the rich heritage and the earlier traditional forms.

INTER-REFLECTION NEPAL-KOREA INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 2018

The city of Kathmandu welcomed the New Year 2018, with a rare Exhibition of Paintings. To the art lovers here, it was an unusual sight – a visual treat of a grand panorama of contemporary Paintings from Nepal and Korea - put together in a common platform. Entitled ‘Interreflection’, the Exhibition essentially sought to showcase the contemporary state of modern thoughts and forms of art in the two countries. But it also aimed to promote wider and closer friendship between the people of two Asian countries – and in particular, to widen and deepen closer artistic understanding between the artists of the two countries. Participated by 38 artists, 19 from each country, the exhibition literally proved to be an extra-ordinary event – a visual extravaganza. This became primarily so because the works of each country represented current status of each country - in a nutshell, within a limited space. More so, because each country presented a wide spectrum of diversity – in terms of age, subjects and the state of individual thoughts of participating artists. In Korean section, there’s a pleasant presence of works by respected senior artists Im- Goonoo, the

18 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

representative of International Art Exchange Exhibition along with the works of important artists like Kim-Woon Kyu, Lee Jae-Sang and Lee Kwan Woo. In the younger section too the diversity of forms were impressive – represented by the array works of Hwang Gowoon, Lee Hyun Jin, A Ryeong, Yung Jong Yong and many more. Apparently, it seemed present day Korean artists are seemed well exposed and well up-dated with the current global trends: well familiar

Similarly, Nepali section also has well remained representative of the time and has succeeded in presenting the current state of artistic achievements. Also, the spectrum of the participants remained equally broad and diverse. Prestigious presence of works by established Nepali painters like Shashi Shah, Madan Chitrakar, Govinda Dangol and Birendra Pratap Singh made the show well meaningful. Works by later generation specifically noted artists Jeevan Rajopadhya, Barun Pokharel, Mukesh Shrestha, Nem B, Tamang, Muna Bhadel, Mann Gurung, Prabin Shrestha and Umesh Shah added amazing diversity in thoughts and expressions- well representing the


current growth pattern. Proved equally interesting were the works by other participating younger artists as well. Amongst the Nepali art and the artists too, regardless of the external exposures and influences, it is found, Nepali Artists remained continually attached to its roots – evidenced by the works of senior and junior artists alike. Many impressive works are found either associated with either current social issues to human emotion to the responses to earlier tradition or the roots.

Organized between 20 – 24 January and held at Nepal Art Council Hall, the Show - entitled ‘Interreflection’ was formally inaugurated by Honorable Dr. Satya Mohan Joshi, eminent culture expert and scholar – as the chief guest of the occasion, on 20th January. Speaking on the occasion, Joshi expressed great delight and happiness at the continual growth of Nepali Art today and also emphasized the great need and importance of organizing similar events in future.

Besides, during the opening ceremony, amidst a seminar, each country made educative presentations to the audience. While artist Lee Won Ju from Korea presented interesting information on the current state of infrastructures and facilities available to artists in Korea (ROK), from Nepali side artist and art writer Madan Chitrakar presented a concise introduction on the ongoing evolution of Nepal Art today, in special reference with the works exhibited in the Hall.n

CO-CREATIVE CONNECTIONS 5 The Taragaon Museum and Center for arts and culture, directed by Roshan Mishra presented Co- Creative Connections 5, a public art- the object artist vs subject creativity and theory. The curator for the exhibition was Filipe Garcia and the co-curator was Komal Hamal. The exhibition was directed by Ashmina Ranjit in collaboration with Nexus Cultural Center. Creativity is characterized by the ability to perceive the world in new ways, to find hidden patterns, to make connections between seemingly unrelated phenomena, and to generate solutions which also involves two processes: thinking, then producing. The (in) dependent & (in) ternational project of curatorship that aimed to develop thought in action for the

present moment questioning Ethically and Aesthetically the implications in the relationship between; Culture and Society, Religion and Science, Art and Spirituality. So, that one can perceive beyond the small perceptions. The whole series is a small possible place that sublimate themselves in the way of the realization of the paradox that is the present co creation. We are living in the age of science and technology slowly losing the real connection among one another. Creative connection has a powerful effect on the lives of people as well as on long-term creativity and self-confidence. The program also featured Ana Marques, Anoj Subedi, Arpana Rai, BidhyamanTamang, Dipendra Shrestha, Durga Sunuwar, Jean Maharjan and many others.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 19


S

20 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


TH 4 th BUILDING SPECIFIERS 2018 4 INTERNATIONAL

BUILDING SPECIFIERS CONFERENCE 2018 Recovering from recent devastation and calamity, the construction industry of Nepal is exponentially booming and building specifications are the need of the hour. The upcoming conference to be held on the 13th of March 2018, at Hotel Yak & Yeti Kathmandu, will provide an open discussion platform to the architects, engineers, and the related industry professionals and educate them about the need and importance of specifications in a building and how to merge sustainable architecture and urban design in the lines of specifications.

SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE & URBAN D It is important to keep on top of the latest challenges and potential solutions to ensure the industry’s value chain can meet the demands of the future. The platform of conference gives an opportunity to academicians, researchers and industrial players from various fields to discuss the recent advances and research developments. Hence this conference is an invitation to architects, interior designers, engineers, policy makers and social partners to share knowledge from their fields of expertise according to the themes of the Conference.

Its contributionOF to the GDP and employment is very THEeconomy. FUTURE CONSTRUCTION, HOME-BUILDING & RENOV significant and plays an important role in the development Construction industry is one of the important sectors in any

of infrastructure that is essential for the development of all other sectors. In Nepal, construction sector is one of the main contributor of GDP and also one of the largest employers. Like other industries, the construction industry is continuously changing but its specialty is that it is a mix of traditional and modern aspects.

There are increasing challenges to reshaping our cities: they need to be smart and sustainable, but also livable, affordable, welcoming and resilient. This requires long-term integrated urban development strategies based on people’s needs. When setting objectives and implementing strategies, cities and towns have to exercise leadership and put in place the capabilities to deliver. Private sector engagement can provide the investments necessary for this transformation. New regulations and standards can provide direction, provided these are fair and forward-looking with regard to the long timeframes and cycles inherent to urban planning and construction. It is essential that local governments invest in public transport and affordable housing. The Building Specifiers conference is a series of conferences which highlights the role and importance of Building Specifications and all the subjects related to standards in a building, related to the material or its application. The 1st Edition of the Building Specifiers conference received an overwhelming response which informed the audience on the importance of building specification & standards. The 2nd edition of Building specifiers conference deliberated discussions on Building specifications with reference to high rise buildings and focusing on aluminum, glass, facades & coatings. The 3rd edition held in November 2017 focused on Interiors & Exteriors and covered a wide spectrum of subjects. Now, after back to back outstandingly successful conferences in India & Sri Lanka for the past seven years, Futurex Conferences’ (a division of The Futurex Group of Companies) Building Specifiers Conference plans to expand its foothold in the Democratic Republic of Nepal.

Ar. Christopher Charles Benninger, one of the most coveted architects will be the main keynote speaker of the program. His early architectural works were highly influenced by his association with modernist architects, under who he studied, and the modernist pioneers of India who were his mentors in the 1960’s and 70’s. Multiple award winning master architect Christopher’s interest in urbanism took him to Sri Lanka and up to the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan. Supreme Court of Bhutan, National Ceremonial Plaza, UN House and other civic institutions in Bhutan continue the strong traditions of craftsmanship in Bhutan, applying them to modern programmatic contexts. His book, ‘Letters To A Young Architect’, won the Best Architecture Book of the Year Award 2012 and was on the Top Ten Best Selling Non-fiction Books List for many months. Accompanying him and taking the stage will be renowned and leading architects from Nepal, Ar. Kishore Thapa, Ar. Arun Dev Pant, Ar. Prabal Thapa, Ar. Sarosh Pradhan, Eng. Jagdishwor Man Shrestha who have made a substantial contribution to construction industry and planning in the Nepal and beyond. Ar. Kalhan Mattoo and Ar. Swapnil Sawant from India will also be taking the stage with their thoughts and ideas. Building Specifiers Conference is being organized by Media Space Solutions Pvt. Ltd., and Futurex Trade Fairs and Events Pvt. Ltd with Spaces magazine as the Associate Partner.

6 February 2018 th

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 21


“BUILD NEPAL, INVEST IN DEVELOPMENT”

4TH NEPAL BUILDCON AND NEPAL WOOD EXPO 2018 “Build Nepal, Invest in Development” with this theme in mind, the 4th Nepal Buildcon International Expo 2018 and Nepal Wood International Expo 2018 was conducted in the premises of BhrkutiMandap, exhibition hall, Kathmandu from 9th to 11th February, 2018. The theme encouraged shared responsibilities, reiterates industry role and responsibility in National Development. The three day long expo focused on five key elements: facilitating growth, competitiveness, Promoting Infrastructure Investments, Developing Human Capital and Encouraging Social Development. The expo was jointly organized by Media Space Solution (MSS), Nepal and Futurex Trade fair and Events, India to provide platform for both national and international construction material, manufactures and domestic traders to promote their products and services. The expo was inaugurated by Deputy Prime Minister and Energy Minister Kamal Thapa the chief guest, in the presence of Indian Ambassador,

22 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

Mr. Manjeev Singh Puri, Er. Hare Ram Shrestha, president of Nepal Engineers’ Association (NEA). The members of Society Of Consulting Architectural And Engineering Firms (SCAEF), Society of Nepalese Architects (SONA), Federation of Nepal Furniture and Furnishing Entrepreneur Association (FNFFEA), Nepal Land and Housing Developers’ Association (NLHDA), Regional and Urban Planners’ Society of Nepal (RUPSON) and Federation of Heavy Equipment Entrepreneurs Association of Nepal (FHEAN) and Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) respectively were some of the well-known guests. Nepal Buildcon and Nepal Wood is the ideal blend of two largest and most successful exhibition and trade fair for our country. Nippon Paint and Mahindra were the official co-sponsors of the exhibition where more than 200 construction, wood as well as interior related stalls were exhibited.The exhibitors were from Nepal, India, Germany, Korea, Japan, Turkey, and Italy.

The highlight of the exhibition were heavy construction equipment, wood and woodwork machineries, pre-fab structures, UPVC windows machinery, UPVC profile, doors and windows, architectural hardware, bathroom fittings, pipes, laminates, veneers , plywood , tiles and sanitary ware, among others. The visitors could witness the innovative product launch, enlightening them about the latest technology available globally to meet their standards. The equipments and materials exhibited during the exhibition were the finest investment in building and developing Nepal. Some of the old companies as well as new companies both national and international had also participated in the exhibition. The exhibition also included launch of 10 different products from various brand such as Qutone, Bella Casa, Jowat, Poliplast and Kich for the first time in Nepal. SPACES, being the official Magazine partner since the year 2015 with Nepal Buildcon and Nepal Wood got an opportunity to review with some of the sponsors, visitors and the exhibitors to present their view point about the exhibition.


EXHIBITORS

KISHOR KARAN Sales manager, JK cement P.LTD.

SAPANA SAPKOTA Manager, Bella Casa International

RAJESH MANI TRIPATHI Sales Manager, Shree Marble Traders

AACHAL AGRAWAL Sales Manager, San Ventures P.LTD.

The exhibition is a platform for us and the visitors to know more about the product. These kinds of expos are necessary in the market for the betterment of the product itself. As the market is growing on with many competitions, we have launched a new product JK Primaxx which is a robust, multipurpose product which is a perfect blend of adhesion, coverage, strength and durability. We would also like to thank the management and the organizers to provide this type of platform which has been beneficial so far. We hope to gain more benefit and support in near future as well.

This the first time our company has participated in this kind of expo. This is an opportunity for us to create good relationship with the clients and the consumers as well. Our company is based on interior so we don’t have feel much competitive as our products are unique in nature and have ranges of varieties. This expo has met my expectation so far, in the next expo we expect the equal growth of interior market in the market.

The last time I participated in this expo, we had launched our new product which captured eyes of many visitors. We gathered positive responses from that expo and this is our second time participating in this expo. We are launching the Qutone ceramic branded tiles in Nepal for the first time. Qutone is the only brand in India who can produce huge slab. These tiles are flexible, that makes easier for the designing. We have gained positive feedbacks from the people and they are very curious about everything. Therefore, this expo is a better platform for the people to get answers of their curiosity.

We came back to the market after sometime, so for this expo we have launched our modular kitchen to the consumers for the first time which are in reasonable price, high quality and compatible. This expo is an agent, which has brought the companies and the people to together and share their queries and products. What I understand the number of exhibitors and visitors are increasing every year. It will grow in a larger scale in the coming years. Plus we would also love to get a bigger stall as the numbers of visitors were larger in number and the stall seemed a bit smaller.

Loya Pre Engineered Buildings Pvt Ltd www.loyapeb.com

Airplane hangars | Industrial sheds | Exhibition halls Warehouses | Showrooms

Fabricating Trust | Since 1989 400 + Projects

4 Countries

50 + Lakh sqft

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 23


VISITORS

CO SPONSOR

UJWAL SATYAL

TRILOKESH SJB RANA

SANJAYA PRADHAN

The overall experience of this expo was satisfactory. I was happy to see both national and international companies sharing the same platform with much enthusiasm. They were very focused about their products when the time came to solve people’s queries. The products related to décor, cleanliness, management was what caught my eyes at first. Being able to conduct this kind of trade fair is a huge achievement in the Nepalese market. From the next expo I would love to see some local products focused on the metal work and steel production. The collaboration between the local and the international companies could be seen in the expo, which is very good in terms of expanding our relationship with other countries as well.

I have been visiting a lot of different expo around the world so far. I was happy to see the locals as well as international companies sharing the platform to expose themselves among the visitors. It’s very effective for the businessman, interior designers, specifies and architects as they also need to know the variations in the market for better results. Of course there is a room for improvement but I am amazed by the organizing team who has managed the three days expo well.

The market is growing rapidly; there are many new machineries and materials we need to be notified about. With the concept of building Nepal the expo has introduced us to a whole new level of development material and products. It was very enlightening to gather information and knowledge about different products. We cannot compete with the international brands but what we can do is support and encourages the Nepalese brand amongst the local visitors.

24 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

Chandra Murthi Sales Manager, Mahindra (Dugar Brother & Sons (P.) LTD. We, the brand Mahindra has been providing services to the people since 1945. We are famous for our rugged and reliable automobiles. Nepal being a developing country we see a lot of opportunities. The expo is a platform for us and the different construction companies to know about the advancement and technology in the sector of infrastructure. It’s important for us to know what they are and how they work. Not only we get to know about the services we provide but also deal with the queries.


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 25


CONSERVATION

GHOPA CAMP CONVERSION FROM BRITISH GURKHA CAMP TO B.P. KOIRALA INSTITUTE OF HEALTH STUDIES TEXT & photo : Kai Weise

T

he British Gurkha Recruitment camp in Dharan was turned into the residential complex for B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Studies (BPKIHS), the new teaching hospital built with support from the Indian Government in the early 1990s. Sometime in 1994 when I was working in Biratnager a local architect Govinda Bahadur Shrestha asked me to join him to visit Dharan. He asked me to

26 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

help him design some residential buildings for hospital staff in the empty areas of Ghopa Camp. I must say I was rather excited, since I used to regularly visit the camp to play tennis. I had also heard of many who had lived at the camp when it was still under Gurkha management. I must apologise to G.B. Shrestha for as a young and rash architect, I went against his instructions of sticking to designing

residential quarters and campaigned to have a detailed plan prepared for the phase-wise conversion of the army camp to residential quarters. I still remember driving to Dharan in the Maruti van and standing in front of a large lawn discussing how many quarters would fit on the plot. Nearby they had started demolishing the soto-say temporary concrete structures built by the British Army. Though the buildings hardly had foundations, they had mild steel reinforcement tying the entire single story structure. The concrete was tough and the massive slabs, beams and columns gave the contractor a very hard time. The joke was of course that these buildings were being pulled down for new buildings that would hardly be even partially as strong. My immediate concern was that this wonderfully planned complex would be incrementally destroyed if it was not planned out properly. In 1953 the British Gurkha Recruitment Centre was established in Dharan. Several hundred Gurkhas were enlisted every year and sent to Hong Kong. After Hong Kong was handed over to the People’s Republic of China in 1997, the recruits were sent to the UK. The well planned 452 acre Ghopa camp was constructed with a standard of quality and services probably not found anywhere else in the country. The layout on a slightly sloping ground ensured good drainage. Several natural nallahs passed through the plot which became filled with water during the rainy season. These were later converted to the drainage system. Beautiful trees defined the ambience of the camp. There was a golf course and earlier even an airstrip.


CONSERVATION

The actual developed area was about 250 acres containing a training school with extensive sports facilities including two swimming pools, quarters for army personnel, staff quarters and a hospital. As mentioned most of the original structures were single storey temporary buildings aligned facing north south keeping in mind the sun and slope of the terrain. More recent additions and the more elaborate residences for the British Officers were constructed in a more permanent manner. The camp was closed down and handed over to the Government of Nepal in 1989 and became part of the B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS). With the support of Mr Majumdar the Chief Architect of the main hospital we got the director of the institute to agree to stall construction until the master plan was prepared. Three trainees who had come from Germany were made to survey the entire camp and identify every single tree that would need to be preserved. A recent graduate in planning from Delhi with a father who had political connections with the Congress Party later joined the team. The Master Plan proposed a layout for all the hospital requirements with least disruption to the character of the place. Even the golf course was to be kept. The complexity of planning the BPKIHS complex was due to the fact that the major task consisted of adapting an already existing complex, initially used as an army camp, to the new requirements of a medical institute. It was neither a project to be planned on a barren plot of land, nor was it a project where after a tabular

rasa demolition a total reconstruction was to be considered. Adaptation was to take place phase-wise over the following ten years or more keeping in mind numerous restrictive factors which required the planning to consider not only the spatial dimension but also the dimension of time. The camp built by the British was both well planned and had a district character which could not be ignored. It was necessary to take the given situation as the basis for planning the adaptation for the new requirements. A major challenge was how to increase density while retaining the character based on the expansive landscaping with numerous tress and green areas, the single story buildings and related infrastructure. The British camp was planned for a maximum of 3000 persons and that for only short peak periods. The requirement for the medical institute was at least

three times that capacity. This meant increasing density by allowing two to three story buildings and augmenting the services. The building cluster layout needed to be more compact. The restrictions were the existing trees. The well planned location of the large trees gave the complex its distinct character. All trees which had a certain size needed to be preserved. The topographical context of the site which sloped from north-east to south-west provided a natural hierarchy. The hierarchy was already established in the British camp and seemed predetermined for the planning of the requirements of the institute. The residents were allocated areas according to their hierarchical position generally mirrored by their income category. The slope of the land also determined the planning of the infrastructure of the camp, the water supply coming from the highest point

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 27


CONSERVATION

and the sewage disposal being located at the lowest point. Later expansion of the infrastructure was also subjected to the same determinants. The roads also needed to be laid out accordingly so that service lines laid along the sides of the roads would have a continuous slope in the correct direction. Some areas of the camp were not to be changed. These included the existing hospital, golf course, VIP zone with British bungalows, administrative area with director’s office, existing school and hostels as well as the temple area. Other areas were to be maintained but incorporated into the planning such as the recreational areas, green areas and renovated guest houses. Some part of the facility was already being renovated by the Indian team for use as labs, classrooms and hostels. A further area was still being used by the British roads project ERROM until 1996. Each of the areas that were going to be planned also needed to consider time factor. The phasing of the project depended on immediate needs in

28 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


CONSERVATION

1994, the needs when the hospital was completed in 1998 and the ten year plan for 2004. Hand in hand with the phase-wise construction plan, a demolition plan was also needed. This meant alternative accommodation needed to be planned for those who

were occupying the building that were going to be demolished. The immediate functions of the buildings restricted planning for demolition and reconstruction. It was also necessary to weigh the consequences on the overall development of the complex.

Once the parameters were analyzed and defined, there was little room left for creative design since most solutions were determined by contextual factors which guided planning in a definite direction. There were areas that were determined as fixed zones for ten

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 29


CONSERVATION

for residential development. As per the criterion laid down by BPKIHS, five categories of residential zones were defined. Zone A located in the eastern and central areas was for those with income above NRs 8000. Zone B was for nurses and senior residents who needed to be near the hospital. Zone C was for technicians and officers with income between NRs 5000 to 7000. Zone D was for clerks with income around NRs 3000. Zone E was for class IV staff (support staff) with income around NRs 2000.

years or more which was not going to be changed. There were temporarily fixed zones that needed integration into planning phase-wise when existing function were vacated. There were areas planned for institutional functions with zones for hospital extension, college extension and hostel zone. Then there was the area

30 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

The BKHIHS Master Plan 1994 to 2004 was an attempt to preserve a well planned complex which was going to be converted from an army recruitment camp to a teaching hospital complex. The concern was to plan the conversion in a systematic manner while ensuring the wonderful character of the area was maintained. I have not visited Ghopa Camp for many years. I sometimes wonder what has become of this planning and check from the distance on Google Earth.


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 31


ARCHITECTURE

32 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

Royal Empire

BOUTIQUE HOTEL Text: Shreesha Nankhwa  Photo: Pradip Tuladhar

WHO DOES NOT DREAM OF LIVING IN A PALACE? FOR A LONG TIME, WE THE MERE COMMONERS COULD ONLY DREAM OF IT. BUT THANKS TO THE CAPITALISM AND MODERN SOCIETY, IT HAS BECOME POSSIBLE. SETO DURBAR (WHITE PALACE) IS AN OLD RANA PALACE IN BALUWATAR THAT HAS RECENTLY BEEN CONVERTED INTO A BOUTIQUE HOTEL.

T

his 200 years old building,that now houses Royal Empire Boutique Hotel, is everything you imagined about a typical Rana Durbar looks like, at least from the outside. It has white plastered walls and an exterior that is reminiscent of 19th century English architecture. The Baroque European architecture style gives an old-world charm to the building despite the cars and bikes parked in the parking lot and the garden restaurant operating in the courtyard. But, once you enter into the building, you are reminded pretty soon that you are still living in the 21st century. Seto Durbar, has a long history befitting its age and it has certainly come a long way, since the days when

Rana Prime Minister Juddha Samsher Rana had it constructed. For most of its life, this building was residence for the Rana family that owned it. However, the building has since been functionally transformed into a college, then a travel agency and after the earthquake of 2015, it has finally been restored into a beautiful boutique hotel that combines the best of the old and the new world. The restoration was finally completed last year and finally, the restored, Royal Empire Boutique Hotel was inaugurated on 3rd of November 2017. The exterior of the palace is almost entirely intact in its original form. “All we did was repainted the exterior and restored the chipped and damaged portions of the wall.” says Rovit Shrestha, General Manager of Royal

Empire Boutique Hotel. However,a small section of the wall in the ground floor has been slightly modified in order to install a coffee bar. The palace ground provides a spacious parking on one side and includes a garden restaurant on the other side. As you step into the building and enter the reception area, you are immediately drawn by old portraits and photographs of Rana Prime Ministers and many other prominent figures. “Everyone in these pictures is related to this building in one way or another.” says Rovit, the General Manager. He points to a picture of Judhha Sumsher Rana who commissioned this building. He also points to the picture of Surya Bahadur Thapa who spent many childhood years playing in the grounds of this palace with his friends. This theme runs throughout walls of the entire building which showcases royal portraits of all the previous kings who ruled over Nepal starting from King Prithvi Narayan Shah. The lounge area is spacious with wall papers and furniture, not to mention a medium sized Romanesque bronze statue that recalls the original neoclassical design of the palace. But the recessed lights in the ceilings and the polished floors add a modern touch to the vintage design. The hotel has 15 rooms that are much bigger than the standard rooms you find in most of the hotels in Kathmandu. The rooms range from 500 sq. feet to 1200 sq. feet in size “The rooms are in the original size they used to be when this place was a Rana Palace. Unlike the other

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 33


ARCHITECTURE

THE ROOMS ARE IN THE ORIGINAL SIZE THEY USED TO BE WHEN THIS PLACE WAS A RANA PALACE. UNLIKE THE OTHER HOTELS, WE HAVE NOT PARTITIONED LARGER ROOMS TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF ROOM AS WE WANTED TO PRESERVE THE ORIGINAL LOOK OF THE DURBAR FROM THE INSIDE

34 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 35


ARCHITECTURE

hotels, we have not partitioned larger rooms to increase the number of room as we wanted to preserve the original look of the durbar from the inside� says the General Manager. “As for the design, we have focused on modern designs for the room. We are targeting mostly Arabian and Indian businessmen and our rooms are designed accordingly. We have incorporated some traditional elements that speak to the history of this palace, but we have also ensured that our rooms are completely modern when it comes to the amenities we provide, such as separate Wi-Fi routers for each room, TVs, mini bars

36 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

and room service form the restaurant.” says the General Manager. As we enter the first room, the Manager, points out the door of the room which has been made bigger for convenience and to accommodate to modern tastes. The room we enter is one of the largest rooms of the hotel that not only includes the usual bed, TV etc, but also a pool table and a mini bar. The interior of the room still preserves some of the original elements of the palace, but a heavy modern touch has been added with the modern furniture, lightings and décors. This theme runs throughout all the rooms we see in the hotel (minus the pool table). All the rooms we visit are a mix of traditional room design that has modern furnishing and décors added to it. The rooms are all spacious and quite luxurious, befitting the palace it was built on. One drawback some customers might face is the lack of bathtubs in the bathroom that was necessitated by having to build toilets into the original design that contained none. But to make up for it, the hotel offers spa facilities for the guests to enjoy all the times. The hoteliers did face some significant challenges while renovating this place. First of all, to ensure the structural integrity of the palace, they had the building retrofitted. Not all rooms in the palace had a bathroom in them so they had to figure out a way to add bathrooms to each room without disturbing the room’s size or design. To accommodate bathrooms, they rebuilt a curved corner of the whole palace into a square shape. For other

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 37


ARCHITECTURE

38 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

rooms, they had a bathroom built into the rooms themselves. Another challenge they faced was with plumbing as the walls were 21-inch-wide and adding plumbing inside the walls was not feasible, so they had to use external pipes. Given that the building was made from mud and not concrete, it needs regular maintenance as well. But despite these challenges, the renovation of the building is quite impressive. This palace has a lot of history attached to it. “If you talk to people from an older generation, they still recognize this place as Seto Durbar�says Rovit. And we must say the hotel has done an excellent job by preserving some of the history of the palace. Royal Empire Boutique Hotel is the perfect blend of the old and new, the history and the present.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 39


ADVERTORIAL

A LEADING INDIAN BRAND, WILL NOW SERVE REQUIREMENTS OF NEPAL Kich, a leading brand of architectural products, will now serve the requirements of Nepal. Kich is engaged in only premium segment of Architectural Products and delivers finest quality derived from high grade AISI 316 stainless steel. Its product line includes Architectural Hardware, Bathroom Accessories, Handrails & Baluster Systems, Floor Springs & Patch Fittings, Drawer Slides & Clip-on Hinges and Digital Safes. Most of these products are tested under stringent standards by leading international agencies such as Bodycote (UK), AlFuttaim Exova (Dubai) and Exova Warringtonfire (UK).

Kich is held in high regards for superior quality, modern designs and elegant finish of its products. It was established in the year 1992 and since then, it has always fulfilled global quality parameters and stunned every user with its outstanding product performance. Today, Kich is deep-rooted in India and also exports to 22 countries including Europe, Middle East and Africa.

40 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

To suit to its production objectives, Kich operates from a state-of-theart manufacturing facility spread across 2,00,000 sq. ft. area in Rajkot, Gujarat. Kich also has a multifacility Corporate House spread across 23,000 sq. ft. area. With its in-house Design Studio, Tool Room, R&D Division and Product Testing Facility, Kich is always equipped for advancement and innovation.Kich is also empowered with more than

55 product galleries, 2 application centers, 200 exclusive dealers and a team of more than 50 marketing executives across the country to serve to every kind of need. National Award for Best Quality Products clearly proves strength of Kich quality. Besides, Kich has also won prestigious accolades such as Asia’s Most Promising Brands, Star Brand India and Power Brand.


ADVERTORIAL

Due to powerful performance of Kich products, it has won the trust of more than 1400 corporates including Mercedes, General Motors, L&T, Coca-cola, Vodafone etc. Ranchi International Cricket Stadium (Jarkhand), JW Marriot (Kolkata), L & T House (Mumbai),General Motors (New Delhi),Acropolis Mall (Kolkata), Parliament House (New Delhi), etc. are some of its prestigious projects. “We are very excited to deliver our beautiful products to the beautiful country, Nepal. We are sure that quality of our products will exceed the expectation of citizens of Nepal.Our products will surely add significant value to their projects and they will trust Kich just like citizens of other countries we work in. We are hoping for the best in Nepal,� quotes Mr. Bharat Hapani, Managing Director of Kich Architectural Products Pvt. Ltd.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 41


INTERIOR

Lifting the

Ground

Text: Bansri Pandey  Photo: A. Rajbansh

TAKE A MOMENT AND PICTURE THIS: ‘THE BIRDS ARE CHIRPING. THE SUN IS PLEASANTLY CONVERSING WITH THE TREES. THE NARAYANHITI PALACE IS SILENTLY LISTENING TO THE BUSY NOISES OUTSIDE. RETREATING FROM THE DAY’S WORK, A COUPLE IS ENJOYING THEIR DELICIOUS GINGER TEA OUTDOORS IN THEIR GARDEN. PRETENDING NOT TO UNDERSTAND THEIR CONVERSATIONS, A SWEET LITTLE DOG SLEEPS BESIDE THEM IN THE GRASS. ACROSS THE HILL, SWAYAMBHUNATH STUPA ABSORBS THE SMOKE, DUST AND CHAOS RISING TOWARDS THE SKY.’

42 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

In a city of Kathmandu which is under the constant struggle to preserve few open pieces of land, picturing such green secluded open personal space may seem like a fantasy. But architect Prabal Thapa has ensured that it remains a reality for the family living in an apartment tucked inside Durbarmarg. On the way to the Hotel Yak and Yeti, a six storey building stands apart from other buildings in the neigh-bourhood due to the sliding metal grills that partly covers the building like curtains. Designed as shading for the large glazed windows, they can slide from inside depending if the users want the sun in or out - making


INTERIOR

“IT WAS THE TIME OF ENERGY CRISIS IN KATHMANDU, WHICH MEANT THAT LIFT WAS NOT OPERATIONAL MOST OF THE TIME. I DID NOT WANT PEOPLE CLIMBING ALL THE WAY UP TO FEEL OVERWHELMED AND EXHAUSTED. SO, WE EXTENDED THE STAIR’S LANDING AREA, OPENED UP ITS SIDE WALLS TO LET THE LIGHT AND AIR COME IN, AND CONVERTED THIS SPACE INTO A VERTICAL GARDEN. SACRIFICING THAT PART OF COMMERCIALLY RENTABLE SPACE WAS A RISK THAT I AND THE BUILDING OWNERS TOOK TOGETHER. BUT, AT THE END, THIS ENHANCED THE VALUE OF THE BUILDING. SO I THINK IT WAS ALL WORTH IT…” DESCRIBES ARCHITECT PRABAL THAPA.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 43


INTERIOR

44 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


INTERIOR

CGI sheet, L = 7'-6" (Hulas, red) 12" wide surface drain to shaft openings slope

slope

40 X 40 mm purlins 40 mm insulations between counter batten 40 X 40 mm 19 mm ply with bitumen paint

rounded telia tiles at edge project 1" from edge

RCC slab

3" X 4" Pine wood rafter (36" c/c)

5"

1'-1"

2'-4"

8"

Rounded telia tiles at edge project 1" from edge

Telia tiles finish Screed 2" thick insulation (styrofoam)

7'-4" 2'-4"

4'-2" Metal Flashing CGI plain sheet red Inner 19 mm ply with pine wood listi

2'-4"

CGI sheet Gutter (colour: Red)

6'-8"

4" X 4" hollow profile Dia 4", PVC Pipe

Outer sill, in cement punning or cotta stone Bedroom

Parquet Floor Screed RCC Slab

Parquet Floor Screed RCC Slab

Parquet Floor Screed RCC Slab

7'-9"

Living Room

Outer sill, imn cement punning or cotta stone

Study Room

2" high Skirting

Section At Roof Garden

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 45


INTERIOR

46 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


INTERIOR

the building dynamically change its elevation. Walk into the building, and more surprises await you. A beau-tiful artwork around the lift walls welcome you, made by artists of Lahar Srijana, a non-profit organisation supporting rural women. The staircase wrapped around the lift core, has a pleasant breeze and a stream of light, that intrigues you to take the stairs instead the lift. Commercial office spaces occupy the building up to four floors. Just when the stairs turn to go up, a door with statues folding their hands in namaste lets you in. The sun throwing the spotlight on the artwork in the stairs,

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 47


INTERIOR

while you climb up besides the series of flower pots, it makes you wonder what experience awaits next. It is an entry to the two duplex apartments of the building owners, occupying the top two floors. Along with being a symbol of long life, wood also signifies the values that pass through generations. The solid wood furniture, an elegant wooden staircase and the warmth of the wooden flooring under one’s feet gives a glimpse of the traditions that maybe still deeply rooted in the hearts and lives of the residents. Thanks to the large double glazed walls that the architect has used, the apartment is full of light and is sur-prisingly peaceful in a busy noisy commercial neighbourhood. But what lightens up your senses is outside the living room. Get closer, slide the glazed doors, take a step outside, green grass with an outdoor coffee table under a shade of a tree awaits you. Architect Prabal Thapa recalls that, “My main focus in the design was to create an experience that the residents do not feel that they are in an apartment on the fourth floor. The terrace and the room are on the same level. When they walk outside, they can feel the grass. I did not want them to lose the connection with the ground.”

48 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


INTERIOR

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 49


INTERIOR

50 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


INTERIOR

About six years ago, building a terrace garden was something very new. The technologies and materials were not as easily available as they are now. But with his keen eye for details, the architect managed to de-velop a beautiful garden on the terrace with natural grass, earth pits for trees and detailed drainage system that works without interfering with the structural integrity. Take the wooden stairs up to the bedrooms, large windows overlook this terrace garden and let some smell of the flowers enter through them. I wonder how it would be a decade from now, when one would stand under the shade of one of the trees in this terrace garden, looking outside towards the city’s expanding lim-its where green open spaces have been traded for the dust of concrete. Prabal Thapa and the building own-ers together have shown us that while we build more vertically now, we need not sacrifice our connection with the ground. We can still live among the green spaces and create enjoyable architectural experiences in our built environment. Architecture can indeed influence and guide the way we live now and the way we will live in future.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 51


ARCHITECTURE

OVERVIEW OF ASIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN DESIGN JOURNEYS, SHARED VALUES & ECONOMIES IT WAS A SPECIAL MOMENT FOR WADE ASIA 2017 TO HOST AND LISTEN TO SOME WONDERFUL WOMEN ARCHITECTS ACROSS SOUTH ASIA SUCH AS AR. DORJI YANGKI (BHUTAN), AR. SHAMIMA SHARMIM (BANGLADESH), AR. PATAMA ROONRAKWIT (THAILAND), AR. ANJU MALLA PRADHAN (NEPAL), AR. PATAMA ROONRAKWIT, AR. ANUPAMA KUNDOO (INDIA & SPAIN) ON A COMMON PLATFORM ABLY CHAIRED BY DR. ANURADHA CHATTERJEE (SYDNEY). DIVERSE YET CONNECTED, HOW IS THE ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN SCENARIO IN THESE COUNTRIES, ARE WE MORE SIMILAR THAN DIVERSE, DO WE HAVE COMMON ISSUES AND HOW DO WE INNOVATE IN OUR OWN SPACES AND CIRCUMSTANCES, THESE AND MORE WAS THE AGENDA OF THIS PANEL. WE PRESENT TO YOU SOME KEY EXTRACTS FROM THIS DISCUSSION. 52 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ARCHITECTURE

T

he federation of World Women Artists, Architects and Designers WADe Asia is 1st platform for recognizing & celebrating womenled development in Architecture, Art and Design in Asia. The recently concluded annual celebration of WADe Asia 2017 was attended by more than 700 architects, designers & artists over 2 days, the coming together of 6 countries, India, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Thailand and also received great response from the design fraternity. With a host of Panel Discussions, Keynotes, Master Class, Book launches, Students Workshop in association with IIA, WADe Asia had apt dose of entertainment as well. The panel moderated by Anuradha Chatterjee from Australia had international guests like Dorji Yangki, Bhutan; Anupama Kundoo, Spain; Anju Malla Pradhan, Nepal; Shamima Sharmim & Nadia Farah, Bangladesh, and Patama Roonrakwit, Thailand. Other talks were ‘Design Journey’ moderated by Sonal Sancheti, ‘Business of Architecture’ moderated by Ramprasad Akkisetti, ‘Slum & Shelters’ by Gita Balakrishnan and ‘Building with love’ by Payal Kapoor. Some of the panelists were Lalita Tharani, Rahul Sabrawal, Prasanna Desai, Swanzal Kak Kapoor, Pragati Jain and Supraja Rao. A special talk session called ‘Time is Changing’ had quick talks by change makers like Tanvi Jain, Tanya Khanna, Kavita Murugkar, Shweta Deshmukh, Maitri Buch and Pavitra Sri Prakash.

DR. ANURADHA CHATTERJEE

AR. PATAMA ROONRAKWIT

AR. ANJU MALLA PRADHAN

AR. ANUPAMA KUNDOO

AR. DORJI YANGKI

AR. SHAMIMA SHARMIM

An architect, academician, author, and urban researcher Neera Adarkar of Adarkar Associates was awarded the WADe India Special Contribution Award 2017 for Academics, Research and Social Cause. For years, she has integrated the concerns of the dispossessed and vulnerable in her work as an architect and as a writer. Pratima Joshi received the WADe India Special Contribution Award for Social Cause. She is passionately steering Shelter Associates that works to improve the quality of life of India’s urban poor, by delivering lowcost housing and sanitation solutions in urban slums. Their data driven model is interesting and appreciable.

Founder of Manasarm Architects Neelam Manjunath has been awarded WADe India Sustainability Champion 2017. Since decades, she is doing remarkable work in promoting one of the most versatile naturally available materials, Bamboo. A young architect, Tanvi Jain from CEPT, wrote, “It’s absolutely commendable to have seen the architects WADe brought together from such diverse backgrounds, and with such a rich body of work.” Ar. Nela de Zoysa from Sri Lanka felt quite the same. “The WADe Asia Conference gave me the opportunity to reconnect with many long lost Indian friends through my journey in life,” she said.

The 88 year old Didi Contractor received WADe Asia Life Time Achievement Award, she is known for designing sustainable architecture in the Himalayan region with local materials like clay, bamboo, slate, river stone etc.

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 53


ART

Patan Dhoka Historic Gate gets a New Facelift

NOT UNTIL THE LATE 18TH CENTURY, THE QUEEN CITIES OF KATHMANDU VALLEY EXISTED AS INDEPENDENT CITY-STATES. THE MALLA RULERS THEN OF EACH

Text: Madan Chitrakar

PRINCIPALITY NAMELY KATHMANDU, PATAN AND BHAKTAPUR, ALWAYS VIED WITH EACH OTHER FOR EXCELLENCE IN EVERY RESPECT, NOTABLY WHILE BUILDING MONUMENTS WITH ARTISTIC EMBELLISHMENTS. ONE OF THE MOST VISIBLE LANDMARKS THAT SHARED THEIR COMMON INTERESTS WAS BUILDING OF IMPRESSIVE CITY GATES THE MAIN ENTRANCES TO ENTER THEIR RESPECTIVE CITIES. BUT OVER THE YEARS TODAY, MANY OF THESE LANDMARKS HAVE HAD SEEN MANY PHYSICAL CHANGES – OR SOME HAVE VANISHED SINCE. AS FOR EXAMPLE, THE CITY OF KATHMANDU HAS NONE TO BOAST NOW – EXCEPT THE MODERN NEW ROAD GATE: CERTAINLY OF A RECENT MAKE - BUILT ONLY AFTER THE GREAT QUAKE OF 1934 AD. NO IDEA THAT WHETHER IT IS A REPLACEMENT TO AN EARLIER STRUCTURE OR TOTALLY A NEW ADDITION TO THE CITY. THE CITY OF BHAKTAPUR OR BHATGAON HOWEVER, IS MORE FORTUNATE - AS THERE STILL ARE TWO HISTORIC GATES INTACT - LOCATED IN TWO DIFFERENT LOCATIONS.

54 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


ART

PATAN DHOKA

However, no historic Dhoka or the Gate of Nepal has remained more popular than the Patan Gate or the famed Patan Dhoka. Today, the namesake destination itself has become a familiar term to any denizens of Kathmandu Valley. The reasons for its perennial popularity are not too far to seek. First, albeit today there are multiple entry points to the city, Patan Dhoka never lost importance as an entry point. For it offers the shortest and the most convenient walk to the city core. So irrespective of occasional changes or even during the adverse times, the structure - the Gate continued to stand as an important landmark of the city. Additionally, as the terminus of a popular transport system – connecting the town of Patan and the downtown Kathmandu, The Dhoka serves as an interesting starting point - to walk on foot. A walk begun from the Dhoka through the narrow lanes and by lanes is eventually led to ‘Layeku’ the historic Durbar square. And the trail in between is liberally dotted with many historically important artistic monuments - thus making the trail an ideal heritage walk.

New Road Gate, Kathmandu

Also, The Dhoka is made more important by a fact that in the recent times there have been many new arrival of nationally important institutions located in the easy physical proximity of the Dhoka.

HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT

Yes it is. But the details of its past is so sketchy no one is sure when was it first built. Or how did it appear then. Moreover, as the locals believe there used to be eight city gates, initially.

Entrance Gate of Bhaktapur Durbar square

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 55


ART

And as time passed by, it is believed it was reduced to four and then finally to one - the last one standing intact the present ‘Dhoka’. But the present structure is for sure, is also a rebuilt as the earlier fell to the great quake of 1934 AD. This is evidenced by the fact it contains many of the modern traits of Western influences – including the arched doors. The present structure has three arched gates – central large one flanked by two smaller ones. For sure, it is a new incarnation to an earlier structure - a Newar style gate. However, in the present structure, Newar contents are retained by the presence of idols from Hindu faith Lord Ganesha and Kartikeya placed in the either side of the central door. While in the centre niches located in the top are placed the two images from the Mahayan faith – Lokeswor – red and white in either side of the Gate. While looking for logic and reasons why the main Gate of the city is located

56 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

here, located in higher grounds and the panoramic view the place offers overlooking far beyond Bagmati River and the bird’s eye view of the town of Kathmandu explains many. Obviously it was primarily in consideration with the security threats or the concerns – presumably from the rival city state of Kathmandu then. In those days, as is evident the distance between the gate and core area is relatively a long and through a maze-walk of narrow streets. It is also because the Layeku – the palace complex and the residential core city were always located within a dense and a well protected area – more akin to a fort.

and opened at the early hours of the sun rise: or in case of emergency, during certain designated times. But it’s interesting to note that the jurisdictions of the city-states did not limit to the designated Gates – in fact, extended far beyond the open fields to a river - serving as the border. This is evidenced by a popular Newari proverb – saying ‘Dhwaaka machaabale buun wonimha’: or translated as the ‘the one in an untimely rush to farm or field– well before the city gate is opened.’ It is often used to describe a person ‘in an undue haste’. But the saying also explained that the private farmlands lay far beyond the city-gate.

And to enter the city as stated above it is believed, there used to be more than one gate then – may be, all of them were of similar distance from the core – the palace complex. All the gates were presumed to have been fitted with elaborate shutters – so that it is closed after the dark sets in

WHY THE NEW INITIATIVES

In the recent times however, frequent instances of lack of due respects to the historic monument – including using the gate as an open space for ugly sloganeering or as a free canvas to young graffiti lovers, led many city elites and culturally conscious younger


ART

people to express grave concerns and act accordingly. And now it has come as a matter of great gratification that the local youth – especially a local youth club is seen coming forward to act something effective - to not only correct the ugly trends but also to bring back the earlier glory and more. The present on-going project to rejuvenate the earlier glory of the Dhoka by embellishing it with traditional art forms is the final fruition of that collective wish and concern. As has been understood, the new initiative has been conceived way back in May 2017: and to give it a final collective nod several brainstorming sessions were held with all the stakeholders concerned on board. Finally, it is understood, decided on embellishing or painting the Door or the Dhoka in traditional Newar style. And to give all agreed to decide on painting images of ‘Asta-Matrikas’ – the great eight Mothers from Shakta cult – an esoteric sect of Hinduism on either side of the Door. And to realize it all was needed a leader - an accomplished artist in traditional art – also familiar with the philosophic

part of the art. This is when the valued expertise of eminent Paubha painter Lok Chitrakar came into full play – right from the concept stage to creating all the master drawings in paper along with final color scheme to the last details to be transferred in the designated space of the monument – the Gate. Honestly speaking, the entire scheme of the project is more complex and complicated than it may seem to a lay

observer. And since last May, Artist Lok has had been tirelessly engaged in behind the screen home works – preparing multiple actual-size sheets of master drawings of each deity, for months. And once the final drawings are ready and agreed, the hard task remained - to actually paint on the walls. It entailed the harder tasks - beginning with planning schedules to designing

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 57


ART

is the reason the expertise of an accomplished painter like Lok Chitrakar is desired and sought.

a proper scaffold to organize a guild of skilled artists – fully familiar and accomplished in the workings of Paubha painting, more so in a public space. As a result of continual hard works of six artists and long six months – assisted by four art-volunteers and after the final touches by Lok Chitrakar himself, finally the project is almost in the final stage. And come the month of May 2018, it is expected and most likely that all the plastic veils concealing ‘the artists –in work’ will be removed for good and public would finally, be able to view and enjoy the great Patan Dhoka – in full artistic grandeur, with exquisite Newar style traditional Paubha paintings, in public walls. A Thought on the Contents Conclusively however, a few words are needed to add or clarify on the choice of central theme. The choice of ‘Asta-Matrikas’ – as the central theme,

58 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

obviously has a lot do with the deeply entrenched spiritual beliefs of the Newars – the predominant populace of the Valley of Kathmandu. A well known belief has it here that since its early formative years, the city is protected by the great mothers from the Shakta cult – by residing in different corners of the city. There are popular shrines dedicated to each mothers: and are located in various corners of the earlier city limits. Obviously, to reflect this common beliefs and respects, the organizers may have chosen to depict the deities in the Dhoka. As according to the beliefs, the great mothers are popularly known as Brahmayani, Mahesvari, Kaumari, Vaisnavi, Varahi, Indrayani, Mahakali and Mahalaxmi. To render the deities in anthropomorphic form, it is believed that the details of each deity must be strictly followed as described in the respective iconography. Precisely

And what has been more interesting to note here is, to paint the images of Asta-Matrika in an entrance. This is certainly a new concept in the centuries old Newar tradition. Earlier tradition has it that images of ‘Panchayan’five divinities from one’s beliefs are painted on the main door or entrance – especially during a wedding or to welcome a new bride in the household. As per the earlier tradition, to a Hindu family, the chosen images are of the trinity of Hinduism - Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma flanked by the images of Ganesha and Kartikeya. For the Buddhist followers the depiction is of five celestial Buddhas. On the vertical walls of each side is painted motifs as mentioned in the ‘Kama-sutra’ – like auspicious full jar and parakeets holding pearl garland. In the present scheme of painting here, obviously the earlier details are replaced by more innovative contemporary elements. The central eight deities – four on either side of the Gate, are painted on the vertical panels of central door, smaller doors are topped by ‘Chhepus’ – on the top arches - the stylized head of a mythical dragon eschewing serpents held by human hands. And the rest of the space is utilized by rendering of the established Newar floral motifs. But all said the overall composition of the entire facelift – seemed well conceived and executed. Hearty congratulations are certainly due to the entire team – especially to artist Lok Chitrakar - the lead person of the entire project. He deserves a special mention and is worthy of heartfelt commendations from all the art-lovers.


D3 110.40 General woodworking Adhesive Laminate / Wood to wood joint Finger Joint (Food Grade Certified)

D4 (PUR) 687.40 Outdoor Furniture 100% Water Proof Adhesive Guarantee

Hot Melt 282.30 / 280.50 For Panel Processing Manual Machine Thru Feed Machine

(PUD) 152.25 Membrane Door Adhesive Membrane Kitchen Shutter Adhesive (Complete Water Based Adhesive)

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR FOR NEPAL

Bridge Tech International P. Ltd. Satdobato, Lalitpur, Nepal Tel: +977-1-5151171 / 5151822; Cell: +977-9851213044 info@bridgetechintl.com / sales@bridgetechintl.com

Tools from Italy

Furniture Handles Interior Decoration

Non-scratch Panels

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 59


SMART CHOICE

RIGHT MOVES SMART CHOICE FOR

Fiber-glass F

iberglass is a fiber reinforced plastic made by incorporating flexible strands of fibrous glass into a compatible plastics material. While a machine molded fiberglass is more the standard abroad, due to lack of a wider market, you find hand molded fiber glasses in Nepal. These are mixed with secondary ingredients for better mechanical strength. At Right Moves- Smart Choice, we take care of all the mumble jumble research to help you make a smart choice. If cost effectiveness, strength, and durability are your priorities in furniture, building accessories and material, fiberglass is a great choice to explore! This engineering material came into existence in 1942 for the first time and has been in Nepal for over 35 years. From a modest and limited option back then, it has grown both in number, quality, and design today to please the aesthetic snob in you. Although fiberglass components can still be painted, the available option for colors and textures virtually eliminates the need for after-production painting.

60 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

PROPERTIES With High Strength-to-weight ratio, the fiberglasses have a significant mechanical strength. While most of this depends on the raw material used (mats/sheets/threads), it also largely depends on the brand you are purchasing because of its domestic production. Trusted brands will give you a more uniform thickness thus making it stronger than its cheaper counterparts. Even at low thickness, fiber glass is a bad conductor of electricity and thus, safer. They are also a low conductor of heat making it useful in the building industry. They do not rot, get infested, or affected by moisture. The noncorrosive properties of fiberglass give it a much longer life expectancy than metal, wood, and non-reinforced plastics when used in highly corrosive application environments. When exposed to extreme temperatures, salty or humid air, sun (ultraviolet light), or acidic chemicals, they will last longer and perform better than most available alternatives. THE DOWNSIDES At places where they can come in contact to direct fire, they can however deform. So, using it for around cooking surfaces might not be the best idea. Also, if they are bent a lot, there is a chance they might bend or crack. COST Fiber glasses cost very similar to wood for 3-4 times more shelf life. A typical 7*3 door costs NRs. 14,000/-. This however will depend on the thickness, design, and type you order. You can also choose from printed and patterned sheets that will affect your cost. The better part is, they are cheap to install. CHOICES You can ask for a thickness and design of your choice. However, one thing to keep in mind before ordering a Fiberglass is to make sure you have all the dimensions correct. Unlike Wooden furniture, dimensions cannot be changed once molded. Your options will mostly be Opaque and Colored material but you can also choose to buy a printed and patterned surface. For places that need light to pass, translucent options are also available. If you are looking for a complete see-through product, this is not the best option for you.


SMART CHOICE

USAGE They are used in applications requiring high mechanical strength but with light weight requirements or can-dos. Combining fiber glass with plastics increases the materials physical strength, stiffness, impact resistance and dimensional stability, and it also increases its use over wider temperature ranges. The specific gravity of FRP is roughly one-fifth that of steel. Depending on the amount of glass reinforcement used and its particular geometry and arrangement in the resin mix, strengths can range from roughly half to several times those of structural steel. AT BATHROOM Fiber glass is a great for your bathroom/shower door. Along with the less brittle nature, they are also not affected by water use and can be found in translucent designs. Your sink and bathtubs are much better off made of fiberglass too if durability is a big factor. FURNITURE AND PANELS Chairs, tables, benches, cupboards, and doors can all be custom ordered to be made of FTP. A lot of schools use fiberglass benches and desks for its durability and low maintenance. For schools, it is especially a smart choice

if you want to avoid nail related injuries and damages from kids who treat school furniture like playground. Another popular use of them is through partitions for studio settingsespecially in large space offices to create department rooms or cubicles. For many outdoor furniture options, fiber glasses make a great material owing to its indifference to rain or cold on the material. ROOFING Fiber glasses have also found a wide market replacing Zinc sheets (jasta) owing to its various properties like low heat conducting, chemically inert nature, and non conductance of electricity. Boats, Road markers, White boards, and swimming pools are also widely made of composites like Fiberglass; along with parts of automobiles. WHAT ELSE IS MADE OF FIBERGLASS? The most interesting market fiber glasses have taken care of mannequins. All the dummies you see at Clothing stores are hand moulded of fiberglass. They might appear ceramic, but they are stronger than you might give it credit for.

LIFE AND MAINTENANCE Fiberglass products have a long shelf life and are incredibly easy to maintain. Being non corrosive also means there will be less damages and occasions for repair. They can be wiped clean with a wet cloth or colin. Or, you can just get baking soda and water to wipe it clean. Thinners or acetones are also perfectly safe to use. FUN FACT Many of the greatest advancements in composites were the result of wartime needs. Just as the Mongols developed the composite bow, World War II brought the FRP industry from the laboratory into actual production. DISPOSE The first thing to come to your mind after knowing its composition is plastic could be about its disposal. As the incombustible material, they cannot be burnt, recycled or disposed in an environment friendly way but if you know you are going to use it for years; it’s a good resource investment as they’re also repairable in case of damages.

Written with input help from Kapilvastu Fiber Glass Industries (http://kapilvastuglassfiber.com)

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 61


NEW IN THE MARKET

KICH: Steel for Life IKich, a renowned brand in Architectural Hardware, Bathroom Accessories, Handrails & Baluster Systems, Glass Door Fittings and Digital Safe and Dustbin are now available in Nepal. Parth International P. Ltd. has introduced the products from Kich in the Nepalese market. The brand is Asia’s most promising brand, established in the year 1992 in India. The products are made of corrosion resistant high grade stainless steel with utmost meticulousness. The products are enhanced with high grade brass bushing which can tolerate force and intensity and is also resistant to fire. It repels the Bacteria which makes it ideally suitable for the venues such as hospitals, educational institutions, hotels and even at home and office with the degree of hygiene. Due to its natural finish, the produce doesn’t require regular cleaning or maintenance making it most suitable for the users. Kich products assure peace of mind and the best reward for money spent by the customer. For further detail, log on to: www.parthinternational.org

3M Water Filtration System Most of us don’t think about the quality of water we drink. What goes in it, how it’s processed, and what it goes through before it reaches our home. Prevention is better than cure. At 3M, they think of solutions before problems happen and design our water filtration systems for every situation possible. 3M Home Water Filtration Systems come in three categories – Drinking Water Filtration, Whole House Water Filtration (Point-of-Entry), and Food Preparation Water Filtration. Sigma Technologies Pvt. Ltd. has brought a trusted expert in filtration with over 75 years of experience for water filtration, an international brand to solve our water filtration problems for residential and commercial applications for pure mineral water, zero water wastage, zero power consumption, zero maintenance and easy cartridge change. For further do contact: http://3mwaternepal.com/ Poliplast knobs, The Italian Factory Bridge Tech International Pvt. Ltd. has introduced an Italian brand “Poliplast”, best in design and implementation of knobs, handles and feet of quality. With happy intuition of the founder creation in 1970, who with passion and determination has revolutionized the way of conceiving décor accessories, introducing polymers as a construction raw material. When designing products, they express the best of the Italian design, with catchy shapes and volumes that gives the pleasure to use a product in an easy and natural way. If you are looking for unique and attractive designs for your door knob contact: info@bridgetechintl.com

Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester (FRP) Doors Looking for security, privacy or eco friendly? Fiberglass Reinforced Polyester (FRP) Doors exterior doors allow you to personalize your entryway. Combining their extensive selection of fiber glass with Gelcoat finish and Veneer finish allows you to create the perfect exterior door for every application. The Gelcoat finish gives a permanent single color finish, which is imparted using specially formulated resins and UV stabilized pigments. Whereas the Veneer finish is achieved using printed FRP tissue which replicates the majestic look of polished wood veneer. The doors look genuine and require no maintenance. It replicates not only the look but also gives the feel of a timber door with a unique wooden texture and gives you excellent value for money. Kapilvastu Glass Fiber Industries is the manufacturer and supplier for FRP doors and other FRP products to the market. For further detail, log on to: http://kapilvastuglassfiber.com/

62 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


SIGMA TECHNOLOGIES PVT LTD Prasuti Griha Marg, Thapathali, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: + 977 1 4262184, Fax: +977 1 4258634 Mobile: 977 1 9809 183636 Email: info@3mwaternepal.com

URL: fb.com/3m

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 63


INTERIOR

Formation of

Color

Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions... TEXT : Ar. CHHAVI VASHIST

COLOR IS ALL AROUND US. COLOR IS AN IMPORTANT ASPECT OF THE DESIGN OF INTERIOR SPACES. IT IS A SENSATION THAT ADDS EXCITEMENT AND EMOTION TO OUR LIVES. IN GENERAL COLOR IS CAUSED BY THE ABSORPTION OF CERTAIN WAVELENGTHS OF LIGHT BY A SUBSTANCE (AS A GEMSTONE) WHILE PERMITTING OTHER WAVELENGTHS TO PASS THROUGH THE SUBSTANCE UNALTERED. WITHOUT PIGMENTS OR DYE, FABRIC FIBERS, PAINT BASE AND PAPER ARE USUALLY MADE OF PARTICLES THAT SCATTER WHITE LIGHT (ALL COLORS) WELL IN ALL DIRECTIONS. WHEN A PIGMENT OR INK IS ADDED, WAVELENGTHS ARE ABSORBED OR “SUBTRACTED” FROM WHITE LIGHT, SO LIGHT OF ANOTHER COLOR REACHES THE EYE.

64 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

T

he inner surfaces of your eyes contain photoreceptorsspecialized cells that are sensitive to light and relay messages to your brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: cones (which are sensitive to color) and rods (which are more sensitive to intensity). You are able to “see” an object when light from the object enters your eyes and strikes these photoreceptors. Some objects are luminous and give off their own light; all other objects can only be seen if they reflect light into your eyes. However, humans can only see visible light, a narrow band of the electromagnetic spectrum (which also includes non-visible radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays, and gamma rays). In terms of wavelengths, visible light ranges from about 400 nm to 700 nm.


INTERIOR

Different wavelengths of light are perceived as different colors. For example, light with a wavelength of about 400 nm is seen as violet, and light with a wavelength of about 700 nm is seen as red. However, it is not typical to see light of a single wavelength. You are able to perceive all colors because there are three sets of cones in your eyes—one set that is most sensitive to red light, another that is most sensitive to green light, and a third that is most sensitive to blue light. Primary colors can be arranged in a circle, commonly referred to as a color wheel. Red, green and blue (RGB) form a triangle on the color wheel. In between the primary colors are the secondary colors, cyan, magenta and yellow (CMY), which form another triangle. 1. Light Color Primaries (Red, Green, Blue) 2. Pigment Color Primaries (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow)

Additive (Light) Color Primaries

Red, green, and blue are the primary colors of light—they can be combined in different proportions to make all other colors. For example, red light and green light added together are seen as yellow light. This additive color system is used by light sources, such as televisions and computer monitors, to create a wide range of colors. When different proportions of red, green, and blue light enter your eye, your brain is able to interpret the different combinations as different colors.

pigment (also known as subtractive primaries) are used when producing colors from reflected light; for example, when mixing paint or using a color printer. The primary colors of pigment are magenta, yellow, and cyan (commonly simplified as red, yellow, and blue). Pigments are chemicals that absorb selective wavelengths—they prevent certain wavelengths of light from being transmitted or reflected. Because paints contain pigments, when white

Subtractive (Pigment) Color Primaries

However, there is another set of primary colors with which you may be more familiar. The primary colors of

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 65


INTERIOR

light (which is composed of red, green, and blue light) shines on colored paint, only some of the wavelengths of light are reflected. For example, cyan paint absorbs red light but reflects blue and green light; yellow paint absorbs blue light but reflects red and green light. If cyan paint is mixed with yellow paint, you see green paint because both red and blue light are absorbed and only green light is reflected. Some color formation with fancy painting techniques, for inspiration, can be Wall Stripes, Stucco, Sheen, Vinyl matt, Vinyl silk, Flex, Eggshell and many others. Choosing paint colors for different spaces is what most people are afraid of. To make your spaces attractive, choose bold eye-catching hues preferring calmer colors. However, color is a powerful way to boost your spirit, so just go ahead and try some bolder colors. Most pop designs for a living room are based on this principle. Transform your conventional home using incredible faux painting techniques! You can create the impression of walnut walls or raw silk ceilings. Don’t set any limits to your fantasy! Swahili is a textured finishing with metallic pigments. It comes in silver or gold base. This water-based coat doesn’t have any smell and reminds of ancient decorative techniques. Multiple colors in the interior sometimes look more appealing. Introduce one or two darker exquisite shades on a wall or your favorite sofa to make your home look unusual and expensive.

66 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

Metallic coating always looks luxurious and expensive. You don’t have to gild every item of your interior, though. Several silver or bronze accents will be quite sufficient. Before you start experimenting with color combination for any space let’s stick to any one color example blue, and try to find out some classic solutions with that respective shade: • Blue and Cream. This combination is versatile in terms of style and is very classy. • Blue and Green. These colors from nature will inspire you, cheer you up and calm you down. • Brown color shades and brown color combinations with blue colors can handle a touch of one of brighter colors. White, beige, light green

and golden colors are perfect for complementing brown and blue wall painting ideas, modern wallpaper patterns and home furnishings. Red interior design color is harmoniously matching with blue. White, pink, orange, golden yellow, silver and black interior decor items and room painting colors can accentuate the blue and red color scheme. Bright orange can be combined with turquoise, medium blue and rich blue color shades. Light and soft orange tones, white, red, pink, yellow, ocher, green, black and gray are matching interior design colors for the blue and orange color combination. All green shades match with blue colors. Lime, yellow-green, light and rich yellow


INTERIOR

gold and warm brasses have returned to the mix. And now, a blushing rose gold is making decisions harder. Metallic rose gold wall paint is an all season fresh choice.

colors, brown color shades, black and white home decor and paint colors or wallpaper patterns look harmonious when used in moderation. Yellow color creates warm, inviting and beautifully matching interior design with blue color shades. White decoration ideas, creamy white tones, green color, black and all shades of brown colors can be attractively blended in modern wallpaper designs, home furnishings and interior paint colors. Purple color shades look great with blue colors. White, gray-blue, lilac,

pink, golden yellow colors, orange and light green wallpaper patterns, wall paint colors and room decor pieces add excellent accents to the purple and blue color scheme. Interiors with pink and blue home accessories, fabric upholstery, window curtains or interior paint colors can be enriched with one of matching interior design colors: red, white, beige, gray, coffee or lemon and yellow color tones.

When it comes to a seamless pairing, there is an obvious winner, pink. So, when you add a metallic pink to a room with a nonmetallic pink, the two pieces play off each other to create a brilliant layer of the same color. Here’s a great example of that point. A rose gold mirror creates a focal point in a simple white baby’s room with a pink chair. The contrasting textures in nearly the same color elevate the style and simple color scheme of the room. Even a grey shade can subtly bring life with the rose gold, which echoes the pink textiles on the bed or any furniture piece. Adding textures and patterns to your home interior can make it look absolutely chic! You can add an unusual wood figure or soft upholstery furniture for your home to look more aristocratic and definitely more expensive!

Color choices for metals in the home have boldly expanded beyond basic silver and chrome. Splashes of copper,

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 67


68 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


FROM THE SHELF

T

TOWARDS A NEW MUSEUM

owards a New Museum is a seminal exploration of the late-20th-centufy revolution in museum architecture: the transformation from museum as restrained container for art to museum as exuberant companion to art. Author Victoria Newhouse critiqued examples chosen from the more than 1,000 institutions for the display of art opened In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. culminating in Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim In Bilbao and Richard Meier’s Getty Center in Los Angeles. She continues her Investigation of new museums, assessing the radical, 21st-century changes that have propelled Herzog & de Meuron’s De Young Museum in San Francisco and SANAA’S 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan, to the forefront of this building type.

Newhouse divides her discussion according to the museums’ dominant characteristics: private collections, which carry forth the tradition of the Renaissance cabinet of curiosities; sacred space, or galleries with a reverential attitude toward the artworks they contain; monographic museums, whether developed by an institution or, In some cases, by an artist as an alternative space; museums that have expanded via wings or separate structures; the museum as entertainment, where a fine line separates culture and commerce; the virtual museum; and the museum as environmental art, in which container and contents interact. In recent years, private collections, monographic museums and expansions have remained current, dominated by the conservative, serene spaces exemplified by Renzo Plano’s buildings. At the present moment, however, the author shows that the museum as entertainment overshadows all other classifications. And there are now hybrids. The architecture of the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan (2004), by the young firm SANAA, is unlike any existing museum; the de Young Museum in San Francisco (2005), by veteran designers of this building type Herzog & de Meuron, combines several categories. The Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis, Missouri, designed by Tadao Ando, turned out to be the architectural jewel. The phenomenon referred to eight years ago as the museum’s unequalled proliferation has, if anything, accelerated. The Chinese government’s plan to build more than 1,000 new museums over the next 10 years is an impressive reminder of the importance accorded to the institution. Museums worldwide continue to multiply and expand at a rate unequaled at any other time in history.

This is not a Book Review; this is just an effort to conveying information to the readers on rare and valuable books on art and architecture. This column aims to give a helicopter view on such books and thus presents the excerpts and illustrations either from the preface, introduction, jacket or main contents of the book from the shelf. This book was kindly provided by Mandala Book Point, Kantipath, Kathmandu (Tel. 4227711).

FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 69


ARTSCAPE

WORLD FOR NEW BEGINNING Asha’s current figurative explorations engage us in a provocative dialogue of urbanization, consumerism, and ecological concerns. These contemporary issues are framed within a polarity and dichotomy of visual symbols: the traditional with the contemporary; the past with the present, and the mythic with the real. The imagery is seductive in its cultural appropriations, and the meanings become even more acute when the audience can read the cultural signifiers and its substitutions—the Tantric Buddhist deity Vajrabhairava recontextualized through urban decay or the artist’s persona subverts the spiritual with a sense of consumerism and loss. This illusion of play and reality provides a personal cultural commentary of globalization in a richly coded visual narrative in this series.

ASHA DANGOL Asha Dangol completed his Master’s in Fine Arts (MFA) from Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu and is co-founder of Kasthamandap Art Studio and E-Arts Nepal. He has been practicing and creating arts and paintings and has been exhibiting his artworks since 1992. He has had 11 solo exhibitions and one retrospective show in Nepal and has been exhibited in many countries. He has been awarded by ‘Arniko Youth Award - 2003’, ‘Best Prize - National Film Festival - 2005’, ‘First Prize - National Art Exhibition, Nepal Association of Fine Arts - 2006’, ‘Special Regional Award - National Art Exhibition, Nepal Academy of Fine Arts-2013’ and NAC Travel Grant 2015 & 2016 from Nepal Art Council.

70 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 71


Connects 74 Artex Pvt. Ltd. Tirpureshwor (Vibor Bank road) Ph: 977-1-4218274 E-mail: artex@mail.com.np Website: www.artex.com.np

16 Communication Corner Pvt. Ltd. (Ujyaalo 90 Network) Ujyaaloghar(Behind Central Zoo) Jawlakhel, Lalitpur Ph: 977-1-5000171

75 Marvel Technoplast Pvt. Ltd. Heritage Plaza-II, Kamladi, Kathmandu Ph: 977-1-4169122/123 E-mail: info@marvel.com.np Website: www.marvel.com.np

31 Apurva International Pvt. Ltd. Teku, Opposite Rastriya Banijya Bank Ph: 977-1-4264706 E-mail: apurvanepal2004@gmail.com Website: www.apurvanepal.com.np

4 Eco Parquet & Decorator Pvt. Ltd. Gairidhara Ph: 977-1-4445589/ 43639858 E-mail: ecoparquet73@gmail.com Website: www.ecoparquet.com.np

73 Nepa Top Organization Samakushi, Kathmandu Ph: 977-1-4354117, 4363548, 4387901 E-mail: info@nepa.com Website: www.nepatop.com.np

68 Asian Paints Nepal Balkumari, Lalitpur Ph: 977-1-5203045 E-mail: ccm@asianpaints.com.np Website: www.asianpaintsnepal.com.np

3 Fashion Furnishing Pvt. Ltd. Maitidevi, Ratopool, Kathmandu Ph: 977-01-4420661/ 4420647 E-mail: fnfurnishing@gmail.com

24 New Lotus Hardware Near Dhobikhola Bridge, Maitdevi Ph: 977-1-4437162, 4438370 E-mail: newlotus13@gmail.com

71 Foto Hollywood Civil Bank Building, Kamaladi Ph: 977-1-4169060 Website: www.fotohollywood.com.np

25 Panchakanya Plast Pvt. Ltd. Panchakanya Bhawan, Krishan Galli Ph: 977-1- 5526551 E-mail: info@panchakanya.com

5 Furniture Land Store Pvt. Ltd. Blue Star Complex, Tripureshwor Ph: 977-1-4224797

9/13 Parth International Pvt. Ltd. Ward No 11, Babbarmahal Ph: 977-1- 4245342 E-mail: info@parthinternational.org Website: http://www.parthinternational. org

17 ATC Pvt. Ltd. 336/21, Ganesh Man Singh Path-2, Teku Road Ph: 977-1-4262220 E-mail: info@atc.com.np 15 Bella Casa International Buddhanagar, Near UN Park Bridge Ph: 977-1-4784963, 9851120515 E-mail: info@bellakasa.com vivabellacasa@gmail.com Website: www.bellakasa.com

11 CMS Group Tara Bhawan, Teku Ph: 977-1-4100235, 4100236, 4240610 E-mail: info@cmsgrps.com Website: www.cmsgrps.com

76 Berger Jenson & Nicholson (Nepal) 59 Kapil Vastu Glass Udyog Pvt. Ltd. Berger House - 492, Tinkune, Kathmandu Sanepa Ph: 977-1-5551007 Ph: 977-1-4466038 E-mail: info@bergernepal.com 23 Loya Pre Engineered Buildings Pvt. Ltd. 59 Bridge Tech International Pvt. Ltd. Gut No. 13 & 14, Shendra Jahagir, Tutepani, Satobato, Chapaganu Road Aurangabad, Maharashtra 431 201, India Ph: 977-1-5151171, 5151822 Ph: +91 240 2622264/65 E-mail: info@bridgetechintl.com E-mail: sales@loyapeb.com sales@bridgetechintl.com

72 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018

59 Pest Control Nepal 7th Floor, Shree Krishna Sadan, New Baneshwor Ph: 977-1- 4786329/ 4492285/ 4784674 E-mail: sks3p@wlink.com.np Website: www.pestcontrolnepal.com 2 Pidilite Industrial Limited Putalisadak, Kathmandu Ph: 9851092221 E-mail: subratabhakta@yahoo.com Website: www.pidilite.com

14 R. I. P. L. International Pvt. Ltd. Teku Road Ph: 977-1-4270730 63 Sigma Technologies Pvt. Ltd. Prashuti Griha Mar, Thapathali Ph: 977-1-4262184 E-mail: info@3mwaternepal.com Website: www.3mwaternepal.com 15 Skylight Pvt. Ltd. Naxal (Opp to Police HQ), Kathmandu Ph: 977-1-4423851 E-mail: info@skylight.com.np Website: www.skylight.com.np 20 Worldlink Communication Pvt. Ltd. Jawalakhel, Lalitpur Ph: 977-1-5523050 E-mail: enterprise.support@worldlink. com.np Website: www.worldlink.com.np


FEBRUARY 2018 SPACES / 73


74 / SPACES FEBRUARY 2018


FEBRUARY – VOL 14 NO. 09

Vol 14 No. 09   FEBRUARY 2018

ART   ARCHITECTURE   INTERIOR

NRS. 100/-

facebook.com/spacesnepal

twitter.com/spacesnepal

Patan Dhoka Historic Gate gets a New Facelift

GHOPA CAMP CONVERSION FROM BRITISH GURKHA CAMP TO B.P. KOIRALA INSTITUTE OF HEALTH STUDIES

Lifting the

Ground

Royal Empire

BOUTIQUE HOTEL

OVERVIEW OF ASIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

SPACES Nepal FEB 2018  

Art-Architecture-Interior Design-Accessories based Magazine

SPACES Nepal FEB 2018  

Art-Architecture-Interior Design-Accessories based Magazine

Advertisement