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THE DIRTY THREE

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HOLLY THROSBY

SAM AM SIMMONS

BORIS WOODEN SHJIPS THE GIN CLUB CHEAP FAKES

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GIVEAWAYS Recorded live at a sold-out show at the Bristol Hippodrome in July, Mark Watson’s debut DVD features the best material from his highprofile and awardwinning career. Exclusive extras include a video diary from his latest tour, behind-the scenes footage and a special feature. Thanks to Roadshow Entertainment we have five copies of Mark Watson Live to give away! After eight years of absence, Steve Coogan has brought back to life one of his most renowned and outrageous characters – Alan Partridge. Unable to resurrect his TV career, our unique presenter Alan is now hosting a radio show called

Alan Partridge’s Mid Morning Matters. Thanks to Roadshow Entertainment we have five copies of the DVD up for grabs! Steve Coogan takes to the stage in his first stand-up tour in a decade. The star of I’m Alan Partridge and Saxondale, and the creator of Paul and Pauline Calf returns in a show featuring the characters that have made him a BAFTA and British Comedy Award winning comedy legend. Thanks to Roadshow Entertainment we have five copies to give away of the DVD Steve Coogan as Alan Partridge and Other Less Successful Characters Live! Kristian Fletcher presents his biggest retro party yet... Four DJs on rotation playing the best pop, rock and dance music of the 1980s. The theme is 1980s Senior Prom and there will be prizes for the best dressed. It’s happening at the St Paul’s Tavern Friday 23 March. We have got three double passes up for grabs! Entrants must be 18+.

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Foreword Line – news, opinions, tours, Backlash, Frontlash 8 The Pogues are all about the classics 12 Electrelane are back in action and Australians are among the first to see the rejuvenated group 13 Japan’s mighty Boris talk about their conflicting musical styles 14 Holly Throsby might not be back in Brisbane for a while after this upcoming tour 15 Warren Ellis of Dirty Three talks coffee, iPhones and gives his thoughts on collaboration 15 Wooden Shjips reminisce on making West, their previous Aussie tour and their earlier live days 17 A new albums sounds like the perfect chance to get The Gin Club back together 18 We chat with the legendary Brian Setzer about the reasons for forming his epic new band 18 Cheap Fakes embrace both the old and the new 18 It’s all about energy for Dangerous! 18 Find out how Melody Black’s formation was like a perfect storm 19 Transvaal Diamond Syndicate want to give everyone a taste of what they have to offer 19 On The Record has the latest, greatest and the not so greatest new musical releases 20 Chris Yates spotlights the best (and worst) tracks for the week in Singled Out 20

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Check out what’s happening This Week In Arts Donald Sutherland and Gary Ross tell us what attracted them to The Hunger Games The Looking Glass knows that art and the internet don’t have to be mutually exclusive What’s in a name? Cultural Cringe addresses this age old question Sam Simmons is unapologetic about his occasionally confrontational style Director Mike Witt tells us how the West End Film Festival will strengthen the local filmmaking scene

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TIME OFF • 7


FOREWORD LINE

NEWS FROM THE FRONT

IN BRIEF Michael Hossack, the drummer for the Doobie Brothers for a number of years, passed away in his Wyoming home last week after a long battle with cancer.

HELLO BELLE

It has been ages since we got to see Bic Runga in Brisbane. She’s had a stupidly busy few years though; she had her first child and decided to embrace a new method of songwriting, namely collaboration. This led her to Dan Hume of Evermore fame, with whom she wrote Hello Hello, the first single from her forthcoming album Belle, which is being released in Australia this month after a very successful release in her native New Zealand late last year. She is backing that up with a national tour, her first in forever, so don’t miss her when she hits the Powerhouse Theatre, Brisbane Powerhouse Saturday 5 May and Bangalow’s A&I Hall Sunday 6 May; tickets are available through the venue (Powerhouse) and OzTix (Bangalow) right now. Proudly presented by Street Press Australia.

GOLDEN YEARS

For the past two decades Minneapolis hip hop group Atmosphere, pictured, have been one of the most consistent underground independent hip hop acts going around and one of the most inspirational groups to up and coming artists in the genre. They proved a couple of years back that they still have what it takes with the 2008 album When Life Gives You Lemons, You Paint That Shit Gold, in fact that record suggested that they might even be better than ever right now. They are back in Australia with full live band in tow later this year and a very special guest is getting in on the action as well. Dilated Peoples are another of independent hip hop’s really great success stories and Evidence is one of the strongest voices in rap that the general public has most likely never heard of. The Grammy winning rapper and producer tags onto the Atmosphere tour and they both hit The Hi-Fi Saturday 5 May. Tickets are available from Moshtix and the venue’s website right now for $60 + bf.

ON A MISSION

If we’re being honest, the genre name post-dubstep sounds a bit funny. But after hearing Mount Kimbie, you realise it is no laughing matter; in fact, these guys are incredibly good. Bursting out of the London scene following the release of their debut album Crooks & Lovers in 2010, this duo have brought their take on post-rock, UK garage and general indie fare to the masses and picked up a hell of a lot of fans in the process. They were here about a year ago for a few club shows but are set to pack out even bigger rooms upon their much anticipated return; this time around they hit The Hi-Fi as a part of that venue’s Shoreline series on Wednesday 2 May. Tickets will set you back $38.50 + bf and you can grab them through Moshtix and the venue’s website right about now. Proudly presented by Street Press Australia.

The Westboro Baptist Church have protested a Radiohead concert in Kansas City, Missouri. The extreme group call the band “freak monkeys with mediocre tunes”. The musical based on The Flaming Lips’ 2002 album Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots will be premiering in Los Angeles later this year. It has been in production since 2007.

MAY BE AWESOME

8 • TIME OFF

A representative from the British India camp has said the band’s new single I Can Make You Love Me should be out by now, but the band have had to hold off on its release as there are a number of parties interested in signing publishing and record deals with the band.

MOUNTAIN OF SOUND

Oh Mercy have inked a deal with Rough Trade records, who will release their Great Barrier Grief album in Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxemburg this Friday.

Sydney’s The Mission In Motion have already completely owned the shit out of 2012; they smashed it up at the Soundwave festivals across the country, have been all over the radio with their killer new single Control and have announced that they will have a new record out – their second – some time around August. You don’t have to wait that long if you want to hear the new songs though, the band are heading out on the All Work No Pay tour and they plan on road testing as much new material as they possibly can. They are going to be joined on that tour by Melbourne rockers Jonesez, who released a great debut album in Betty’s Soup last year and are a very fitting support for these shows. Up here you can see them at the Miami Shark Bar on Friday 18 May and X&Y Bar on Saturday 19. Tickets are available through OzTix right now for $15.30.

Were you one of the many techno fans around town holding your breath for news that Derrick May would be making his way to Brisbane while in Australia for his previously announced Melbourne dates next month? If so, we urge you to exhale deeply, as the Auditree team have ensure that he will indeed be up here for a set that is going to shake the foundations of BarSoma as well as rattle the very bones that enable you to dance so nicely. The Detroit legend has been one of the leading figures in techno for a quarter of a century now and he has lost none of his talent in that time, continuing to deliver both great records and live sets for his faithful followers. He plays the Auditree second birthday celebrations at BarSoma on Saturday 21 April; grab yourself a ticket from Moshtix for $15 + bf.

DZ Deathrays were kicked off their first SxSW showcase performance last week after complaints that they were playing too loudly.

DARK AND BEAUTIFUL Zola Jesus is like some great big musical contradiction. A paradox. While her voice is undoubtedly powerful and completely arresting, it also has a tender quality that elicits a whole new gamut of emotion. Flittering between cinematic synth pop and darkly anthemic balladry, the young singer, whose real name is Nika Rosa Danilova, has made a name for herself with epic performances with her band, three stunning records including last year’s awesome Conatus and some awesome collaborations with the likes of The xx, Fever Ray and M83 and now she’s on her way to Australia. As a rare Brisbane sideshow from Sydney’s massive Vivid LIVE festival, Zola Jesus will play Alhambra Lounge Friday 1 June. Tickets are available through OzTix and outlets from $28.60.

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Craig Finn, frontman of The Hold Steady and freshly minted solo artist, has released his own beer call Clear Heart, to coincide with the release of his debut solo record Clear Heart Full Eyes.

BASS DRUM INVASION

Mississippi two-piece Bass Drum Of Death are hot property right now; last year they signed to Fat Possum records – a sure mark of quality if we’ve ever seen one – dropped their debut record GB City to some serious acclaim and toured the United States with the likes of Wavves, Best Coast, Smith Westerns, Unknown Mortal Orchestra and a heap more. The aforementioned record is a no frills affair, recorded by guitarist and vocalist John Barrett with just a USB microphone, but the songs are so damn good that it wouldn’t matter how they were captured. The band are hitting Australia for the very first time next month and will drop by Oh Hello on Thursday 5 April with support from Morning Harvey. Grab a ticket from OzTix when they go on sale, which oughta be real soon!


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TIME OFF • 9


FOREWORD LINE SHEEP FOG

They first visited us as a part of BIGSOUND Live last year, and now Canadian roots rockers The Sheepdogs are making their way back down under as the guests of one of the true legends of the game. John Fogerty handpicked The Sheepdogs to be his support on his upcoming Australian tour – where he will play a whole bunch of Creedence songs, which will totally rule – and the band have taken the opportunity by the horns and are keen to make their not so long, but still very much awaited return. Get in early to see them support Fog at the Brisbane Entertainment Centre on Thursday 5 April. Tickets are still available through Ticketek from $99 – $149.

READY, SET

Melbourne’s The Go Set have been going hard for years now and aren’t slowing down if their forthcoming tour is any indication. In support of their fifth, and self-titled, LP, the band are gunning it all around the country, delivering their incendiary live shows with the fired up passion only they can evoke. When it comes to reference points, the band are always compared to the likes of The Pogues, The Clash and Midnight Oil, but when you see them for yourself you’ll realize they are truly on their own trip. You can do just that when they play the Railway Hotel, Byron Bay Wednesday 11 April, The Beergarden, Surfers Paradise Thursday 12, Kings Beach Tavern Friday 13 and wrap things up with a big one in Brisbane at Nundah’s Prince of Wales Saturday 14.

THE SHOW GOES ON

The Dutch do hard dance very well, everyone knows that, and since the release of their 2007 debut album Today Is Tomorrow, Showtek have been regarded as one of that country’s most exciting prospects in the genre. The accolades don’t stop for the two brothers Sjoerd and Wouter Janssen, they have been featured on BBC Radio 1’s Essential Mix, ranked in the DJ Mag Top 100 poll and even worked with Tiesto, the undisputed master of trance, on some banging tracks. Now they bring their considerable skills in the realm of dance music to Australian shores and they are no doubt going to make the crowds go bananas with their powerful live performances. In Brisbane they are hitting The Hi-Fi on Saturday 26 May, you can grab tickets through Moshtix and the venue’s website real soon, so keep your eyes peeled.

ALL IN THE FAMILY

There’s been a lot of The Butterfly Effect talk in recent weeks, and for good reason, but we’d like to remind you about A Family Of Strangers for a moment, if we may. The band – initially a pop-rock side-project for TBE’s Glen Esmond – has, over the past 18 months, evolved into quite a dark and wonderful beast. The band have been playing their fair share of shows around town and with the release of their brand new EP Old Faiths In New Light they are bound to build more and more momentum as time goes on. The band are launching the new release with a show at Fortitude Valley’s iconic Elephant And Wheelbarrow on Sunday 25 March with Cute Machines and Martin Party getting in on the action as well.

SISTERS DOIN’ IT FOR THEMSELVES

Could it be that disco music is coming back into vogue? Nile Rodgers’ Chic were in the country (though not Brisbane) a couple of weeks ago, Candi Staton is just about to be here for Bluesfest and now we hear that the mighty Sister Sledge are coming to town with their enormous bag of hits in tow! The best way to describe this legendary disco act is just by namedropping song titles; We Are Family, He’s The Greatest Dancer, Lost In Music, My Guy, Lost In Music and Got To Love Somebody just a few of the almost 40 hit singles they released in the almost 20 years they were issuing chart songs, but there are also a huge number of other tracks that will get your arse shaking from the second this group hit the stage. They play The Hi-Fi on Saturday 9 June, tickets are on sale right now from Moshtix and the venue’s website, starting at the special price of $79 + bf but they’ll go up soon so get in quick! 10 • TIME OFF

NEWS FROM THE FRONT

IN BRIEF Courtney Love has said that The Muppets “raped” her husband Kurt Cobain’s memory with their barbershop quartet rendition of his Smells Like Teen Spirit. Canberra band Tonk have received an undisclosed payout from the producers of US sitcom How I Met Your Mother after they used one of their songs without permission. Drummer Hamish Rosser has quit The Vines after ten years to join Wolfmother, citing differences with frontman Craig Nichols. His first show with the new band was last Saturday.

BLOWING UP HITTING HOME RUNS

If you were one of the very, very many people who missed out on tickets to see Ball Park Music at their hometown show as a part of their big 180° national tour at The Hi-Fi on Saturday 24 March then you are an idiot and you need to learn to go and buy tickets earlier. Thankfully the band aren’t as mean as us and they realise that plenty of you couldn’t get your tickets in time for fairly good reasons, so they’ve decided they’d put on another show so that no one misses out on the fun. The second show will also be at The Hi-Fi, this one happening on Friday 11 May; tickets are on sale now from Moshtix so hurry up. In support at both shows will be Cub Scouts while Nantes play the March date and are swapped with locals YesYou on the May one.

DJ/social networking website Turntable. fm signed licensing agreements with all four major labels in the US last week, after existing with questionable legality for months.

LOTS OF SONGS Do you remember the QUT 100 Songs Project from last year? You know, where 72 Brisbane bands and solo artists went into a recording studio over the space of six days to record a total of 100 songs to show everyone just how good the songwriting talent up here is? Well there are two exciting developments; firstly, 12 of the better songs from the project have been slapped onto a CD compilation by the name of Twelve and it will be released at the end of the month. Secondly, the initiative is taking place again in 2012 and organisers are looking for bands! If you’re interested in recording a song or two for absolutely no cost, apply at implabs.net/100-songs where you can find more information. There’s a big launch happening for Twelve at the Brisbane Powerhouse on Saturday 31 March, Cold And Need and Brianna Carpenter will be playing and entry is free!

Karen O, Low and Akron/Family are among the acts who will be making guest appearances on the new album from punk/ noise legends Swans. The fifth full length record from Swedish garage rock superstars The Hives will be called Lex Hives and released on Friday 8 June. It is their first album in five years. The latest Hilltop Hoods record Drinking From The Sun was certified Gold on its day of release and debuted in the number one position on the ARIA album charts, while their I Love It single (featuring Sia) has gone double platinum.

The career of New York City MC Kurtis Blow has been a long and enduring one, not to mention one full of insanely epic successes. He was the first rapper to have a gold record with 1980’s The Breaks, one of the true classic party hip hop songs of all time, and has had a whole heap of other incredible tracks over the past three decades which has seen him name checked as a major influence on everyone from 2Pac to They Might Be Giants. The 52-yearold MC is still going strong and is heading over to Australia for some best-of style shows next month, one of which Brisbane is very lucky to experience. Make sure you’re ready to dance and ready for some serious crowd participation when Blow makes his way to the Mustang Bar on Thursday 19 April with support from DJ Katch, Butterz + Slynk and Elements Collective. Grab your tickets from OzTix or the Rumpus Room right now for just $14 + bf!

DARKEST DAYS

SELL OUT! Oh man. We told you 360 was killing it right now when we announced his two upcoming Brisbane shows a couple of weeks back and if you needed any more proof then cop this. He’s sold those two shows right the fuck out already – no tickets left whatsoever – so if you wanted to go then that’s just too bad. It’s not all bad news though, Uncle Six has decided to put on one more show for the older kiddies so if you’re over 18 you can catch him (with Gossling), Hermitude and Bam Bam smashing up The Hi-Fi from 8pm on Monday 11 June; grab your tickets from Moshtix or the venue’s website right now (seriously, get them now or you’ll miss out) for $30 + bf.

BACKLASH

DAME EDNA EVERAGE

SPRING REIN

Yes, you already know about the pure fucking metal of DevilDriver invading Australian shores once again this May and we know you’re already fired up about it, but did you know that Darkest Hour are going to be accompanying them? Okay, you might have, it’s been a badly kept secret. But that doesn’t make it any less exciting, because this is a band who, over the past 15 years, have remained utterly ferocious and full of life at all times. Their live shows are absolutely menacing and, given they’ll be here on the back of their awesome seventh album The Human Romance, we reckon these could be some of their finest dates yet. It’s happening at The Tivoli on Friday 4 May and tickets are available through Ticketek right now for $63.40.

FRONTLASH BULLS HIT!

New venue on the block Spring Hill Hotel is shutting down for a couple of weeks for some compliance issues – when it’s back up and running make sure you get down there and support the place, we can ill afford to lose another cool rock hangout…

Well done to the Queensland Bulls for taking out the Shield once again in a cliffhanger at the Gabba. Few pundits would have picked them to prevail at the start of the cricket season but they got the job done, top stuff!

LOU B OR NOT LOU B

FINAL BOW

Lou Barlow hit Twitter claiming that he might have to cancel his impending solo tour because of slow ticket sales. We know he was just here with Sebadoh but that’s no excuse to be lazy, if you’re a fan get out there now and buy a ticket while you still can…

While it’s sad that Barry Humphries is finally drawing the curtain on his renowned alter-ego Dame Edna, it’s cool that he’s done one final run of shows to say farewell (unless she does a Dame Nellie on us). Nearly six decades of wonder and bafflement, what a career…

BOOK CLUBBED It’s incredibly sad that the Encyclopedia Britannica is going out of print after 244 years as a pinnacle of information, although it was obviously on the cards in the current technological climate. That blasted internet stakes another victim…

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HAPPY MEN? Are ‘80s Oz rock legends The Sunnyboys reuniting for a show in Sydney soon? While there’s been no official word on the matter, rumours are rife that the amazing band are treading the boards again. Watch this space…


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ROLLING BACK THE YEARS SOUTHERN CROSS-REFERENCE From their very first album The Pogues made a habit of having an Australian connection in the music, with each of their first three albums having one song with a distinct Aussie bent. According to “Spider” Stacy; “We’re imbued with Australian culture! It’s from watching Neighbours probably. It’s an ancestral fear on the Englishman’s part of Dennis Lillee.” It’s these first three albums from which the bulk of their current live set is taken, and the songs in question are: Song: The Battle Of Brisbane From: Red Roses For Me (1984) A jaunty instrumental number, the song references the running street battle which took place in November 1942 between US troops stationed in Brisbane for the WWII Pacific campaign and Aussie servicemen and civilians who were envious of their superior amenities and treatment (“They’re overpaid, they’re oversexed and they’re over here” was the catchcry of the day). By the time the violence was quelled one Australian was dead and hundreds from both sides injured. Song: And The Band Played Waltzing Matlida From: Rum, Sodomy & The Lash (1985) A cover of Eric Bogle’s famous account of a young Australian soldier who was wounded at the treacherous Gallipoli campaign during WW1. Worth a listen for Shane MacGowan’s pronunciation of Suvla Bay alone. Song: South Australia From: If I Should Fall From Grace With God (1988) A traditional sea shanty given the inimitable Pogues treatment (also known as Bound For South Australia). Passed down over the years in the great folk tradition, the song has been covered by many great artists and is more about the tyranny of distance and the voyagers themselves than the destination per se. going to Ireland, because it’s kind of in a way like Britain, but in another way absolutely nothing like it at all.” For now there are no plans afoot for new Pogues music, they’re completely content having fun with their current catalogue and taking this music to fans old and new around the globe.

IT’S BEEN MORE THAN TWO DECADES SINCE THE POGUES’ ONLY VISIT TO AUSTRALIAN SHORES, AND FOUNDING MEMBER PETER “SPIDER” STACY EXPLAINS TO STEVE BELL HOW THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME.

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egendary London outfit The Pogues are a band at once defined by the decade in which they rose to prominence – their classic body of Celticflavoured punk was crafted in the ‘80s, and a product of that decade’s political and societal upheaval – but also one out of sync with that same era, for their unique music and persona was completely and utterly different to everything surrounding them at the time. The band were informed by the spirit of punk that had energised the London scene so brightly in the late-‘70s before burning out or mutating into other musical forms, but they married this manic energy to the ramshackle bonhomie of traditional Irish folk songs to make something completely distinctive and timeless, a music certainly rooted in geography but not mired to a particular epoch. It’s fitting that the band’s creative core – shambolic frontman and songwriter Shane MacGowan (already an identity in the London punk community before the band got off the ground) and tin whistle player Peter “Spider” Stacy – famously first met in the toilets at a Ramones gig in London, little knowing the long-term ramifications that this chance encounter would have on the rest of their lives. “And The Saints!” Stacy exclaims of that fateful evening. “The Saints were the first band on that night – an Australian connection! I love that band. It was The Saints and Talking Heads and the Ramones. It was great – Talking Heads in between The Saints and the Ramones! I felt sorry for them before I saw them, but once they started I knew they didn’t have anything to worry about – they were fucking great. And The Saints were fucking great, then the Ramones were stunning.” It was a couple of years after witnessing that amazing proto-punk line-up before The Pogues played their first show – they played one infamous gig as The New Republicans, before changing their name to Pogue Mahone (Gaelic for “kiss my ass”) which eventually morphed into simply The Pogues – and in that intervening time their wedding of rock and folk came to stunning fruition. “I honestly don’t know how conscious it was,” Stacey recalls of the embryonic Pogues sound. “Essentially what happened was that Shane and I were around at a friend’s 12 • TIME OFF

house, and he picked up a guitar and started playing [Irish folk tune] Poor Paddy On The Railway, just playing it really fast – he was essentially doing an ‘acoustic punk’ version of it, for want of a better expression. Whether or not that was something he’d had running through his head anyway or just something he did there and then on the spur of the moment I really don’t know, but we looked at each other and a sort of light bulb went off. It still took some time for that to coalesce and form and eventually form into The Pogues, that was 18 months before the first Pogues gig. “If you took the amount of time that was spent actually getting [the aesthetic] together it probably didn’t take that long at all. Shane and Jem [Finer – banjo] were knocking a few ideas around after the show we did as The New Republicans – the germ of the idea had remained, it never really went away. It was always going to turn up somewhere, because it worked so brilliantly – it was like a marriage made in heaven.” When things took off for The Pogues it was with the force of a hurricane. Supports with The Clash lead to headline tours and their 1984 debut Red Roses For Me, and before long the band had made headway both in the UK and overseas. There was a definite political bent to their music – many songs concerned the trials and tribulations befalling the working class – but there was also a radical, hedonistic edge to both their many songs about drinking and their actual lifestyles that made everything they did so distinct. This reckless element that made the band so beloved as rogues to so many eventually proved their downfall, when just after the release of their fifth album Hell’s Ditch in 1990 MacGowan succumbed to alcoholism and drug addiction and was forced out of the band. The Pogues continued for a few more years – first with punk icon Joe Strummer out front, then with Stacy handling vocal duties – before finally calling it quits altogether in 1996. “There was a lot of very intense touring, which is probably one of the reasons why we burned out the way that we did, or more accurately the way that Shane did, although he was far from the only one,” Stacy reflects. “But he personally just found it too much – the amount of touring that we were doing was insane, and really not conducive to any longevity, or so it seemed at the time.

I mean when Shane left the band went on for another few years, but when Shane left the real proper heart of The Pogues went with him. We sort of carried on, and it was The Pogues, but his songs are such a defining part of what the band is about that it’s very difficult to take one away from the other. Well it’s stupid even thinking about it, you couldn’t have The Pogues if you took Shane’s songs away, that goes without saying.” Eventually, in 2001 The Pogues – including MacGowan – reformed for a Christmas show, and since then have been playing sporadically, now branching out again into the overseas realms (their impending Australian trip will be their second, following their inaugural visit in 1989). Their music is still reaching new audiences – resonating as fully with new fans as it always has with the stalwarts – precisely due to its inherent timeless nature. “I think that’s got a lot to do with it, the whole idiom wasn’t really tied to any particular decade, or if it was it was the 1780s or something like that rather than the 1980s,” Stacy laughs. “Plus also the quality of the songs – with Shane’s songwriting plus a lot of the songs that we covered like The Band Played Waltzing Matilda and Dirty Old Town and those kind of songs – they are themselves kind of timeless songs, and played in that particular way they’re not specific to any era. There were a lot of bands from the ‘80s who clearly sounded like they were from the ‘80s, but we were something apart. And I think underpinning it all – the really crucial thing – is the strength of Shane’s songwriting. With all of those other things you could present a good body of work, but when you’ve got that added ingredient you’re on to a winner. And I can say that without blowing my own trumpet – he’s the one.” While The Pogues are often mistakenly taken for an Irish band because of MacGowan’s prominence and songwriting bent, most of them are Londoners – was it easy at the outset to embrace the music’s Celtic flavour? “Yeah, there’s something really appealing about the whole thing,” Stacy muses. “Plus you’ve got to bear in mind that growing up in London – especially near where I grew up in London – there are some very Irish areas, so it wasn’t something that I was unfamiliar with at all. But in a funny kind of way nothing prepares you for actually

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“Yeah, it actually relieves us of so many pressures – not having to worry about the legacy, not having to worry about living up to what we’ve done in the past,” Stacy considers. “It just wouldn’t work, a new Pogues album. You have to look at the songwriters and say that Shane as the main songwriter is not the same person that he was 27 years ago. He’s not going to be writing the same sort of songs, so you’d get something that might be a Pogues album in name and it mind sound kind of like The Pogues but it wouldn’t really be The Pogues. Unless you had that sort of continuity of creativity – like someone like Nick Cave as obvious example, or someone like Tom Waits , people who turn out consistently high quality, well-realised work, and they’re always looking to improve on what they’ve done before – with that continuity it’s a different story, but when you’ve had a break of 21 years since Hell’s Ditch came out, it’s just too long a time. “Plus, it doesn’t seem that we need new music to reach new audiences – a lot of the fans coming to the shows these days are very young, there’s no way that they were even thought of when we were around before. I guess we’ve always been popular in colleges and universities and stuff like that, given the strong sort of alcohol content in our songs – I think that possibly explains that in part. Going back to the late-‘90s before the first reunion tour I had the impression that we’d kind of been forgotten about almost, but you realise that just because you don’t see your name in the papers that often it doesn’t mean that people aren’t listening to you and digesting and absorbing what you’re doing. So you’re getting bands coming out that have shown [that we’ve been an] influence, and there’s obviously been this line of people that have been listening to us, it’s just moved down the line.” And finally, will Stacy be bringing any of the beer trays with him that he was so fond of whacking on his head as percussion back in the day? “Oh yeah, but it will probably be pizza trays!” he guffaws. “I don’t know what the story is in Australia, but it seems that in the rest of the world the beer tray is a thing of the past, or it’s become a valuable antique. If I’d realised that they would become this resource I might have treated them with some respect! No, I wouldn’t have actually...” WHO: The Pogues WHEN & WHERE: Sunday 8 April, Bluesfest @ Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm


POWER BACK ON AFTER A FOUR-YEAR BREAK FROM THE BAND, THE MEMBERS OF UK INDIE TYRO ELECTRELANE ARE BACK IN ACTION, AND – AS GUITARIST MIA CLARKE TELLS STEVE BELL – THEY’RE TOTALLY STOKED TO BE BACK IN THE FRAY.

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steemed indie outfit Electrelane were a driving force in the UK rock scene at the forefront of this millennium, earning a reputation as a taut and savage live act and releasing an eclectic string of intelligent and at times apocalyptic albums – the songs often instrumental – before the impact of their gruelling schedule on their collective wellbeing forced them to take a break from the band at the tail-end of 2007. They posted a message on their website explaining the need for the hiatus – the main gist of which was that they needed time off to pursue other interests – and then all but disappeared from the music landscape. It was, however, an open-ended letter which foresaw the possibility of future work and – true to their word – in February, 2011 they posted on the same website a message trumpeting that they were tentatively back, play a few shows over the English summer just to see how it would go. Well, news of the reunion sent the online community into a frenzy, the shows garnered rave reviews and the four members of the band had good enough a time playing the gigs that it’s prompted them to keep the ball rolling, and now Australian fans are the next beneficiaries of this second phase of the Electrelane career.

of new music from Electrelane is very much in the picture. “We’re definitely going to play it by ear,” Clarke tells. “We just want to get together in Australia and have a chat about what we plan to do in the future – I guess it’s just a matter of trying to find out how we can do it when we’re all spread all over the world. So far Australia is the only confirmed plan that we have, but I think that we learned from our hiatus that we don’t really want to close any doors ever – I think we’re open to doing anything as long as we can make it happen.” WHO: Electrelane WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 24 March, The Zoo

“I think that the main reason why it’s been more fun than ever doing the band now was because it was really important and good for us to have a break from each other after so many years of being stuck in a van together,” laughs guitarist Mia Clarke. “It’s been really nice to reconnect with everybody. Also I think we’re feeling more fulfilled in our lives – three of us went back to school and we’re all working, and I think it’s just been good for us to remove ourselves from that world for a bit because we now really, really appreciate it and feel really lucky. “I think that after a couple of years, we just started to really miss playing together – we missed the energy of being onstage together. Even though with the hiatus it was time for it to happen when it did, I think we were surprised by how quickly it was before we started missing the band.” The four members of Electrelane – Clarke, keyboardist/ vocalist Verity Susman, drummer Emma Gaze and bassist Ros Murray – all stayed involved in music in some capacity, which meant that when it came time to get back into band mode their renowned chemistry was still well-and-truly intact. “Yeah, the first time we ran through the set we were going to play it was definitely a bit ropey, but we quickly snapped into it,” Clarke recalls. “Muscle memory plays a huge part in terms of me playing guitar – I was a bit worried about forgetting things because we hadn’t played for four years, but that muscle memory definitely kicked in and it felt very natural for us all to be together. It was fun, it felt pretty strong quite quickly.” Electrelane seemed to love thinking outside the box and tinkering with song structures and the tone of albums, and Clarke posits that this was just due to the band’s inquisitive nature. “[That] just naturally came about,” she explains. “We made [2001 debut] Rock It To The Moon, and then we thought, ‘Why don’t we make something that’s a bit more traditional sounding with singing?’, and that was [2004’s] The Power Out. Then after we did that I think we wanted to get a bit darker and more instrumental so that’s what happened with Axes (2005), and then we went back again and did another record with a lot of vocals, which was the last one [2007’s No Shouts, No Calls]. So I think it’s just a natural consequence of writing a record and playing it – touring it for a long time – and then wanting to do something different. I think it’s really important for us to feel like we’re pushing ourselves musically and doing different things.” Some decisions such as turning their back on the poppier elements of The Power Out in favour of the live power of Axes seemed almost like commercial suicide – has it been difficult for Electrelane to tread that fine balance between art and commerce? “Yeah it has been, because like you say if we’d made another record like The Power Out then we might be a bigger band than we are now, but I don’t think that that was ever really an option to us – I think we’ve always wanted to authentically do what we feel like at the time,” Clarke muses. “I think there’s quite often a tension between your artistic intention and need for artistic gain, and you have to walk the line very carefully and not make any silly decisions.” In early reunion interviews Clarke bemoaned the lazy typecasting which had seen Electrelane lumped in with other all-female rock bands currently doing the rounds, a situation which still clearly riles her. “There must be a lazy pigeonhole of ‘women in bands’” she ponders. “We had that in the early-2000s, we were always being compared to Sleater-Kinney, who we really like but we don’t sound anything like them at all. And now it’s Vivian Girls and Dum Dum Girls – bands where there’s no musical similarity whatsoever. I just don’t see it. I can see it more with bands like Warpaint – who have been thrown into the mix a few times – but I think it’s just laziness really. It’s frustrating.” Obviously gender should be irrelevant when discussing music but it always ends up a discussion point, particularly when you have a hard-rocking band such as Electrelane with four intelligent, female multi-instrumentalists – was gender an issue in the band’s first phase? “Yeah, definitely,” Clarke muses. “I think more in the beginning: we had a lot of the classic comments like, ‘You play well for a girl’ – there’s always some idiot saying something. But I don’t know whether that’s become less of an issue as the band progressed or whether we just tune it out, but I personally haven’t encountered direct sexism being part of Electrelane in recent years. But that might just be because I avoid any people that would say things like that.” While the band’s plans for the future are still very much up in the air, things are progressing well enough that the prospect

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INVINCIBLE OVER 16 YEARS, BORIS HAVE RELEASED 17 ALBUMS ACROSS NEARLY AS MANY GENRES. AHEAD OF THEIR RETURN TO AUSTRALIA, MATT O’NEILL INVESTIGATES THE JAPANESE BAND’S UNASSAILABLE LEGACY WITH DRUMMER ATSUO.

O WE HAVE ALWAYS TRIED TO HAVE TWO OPPOSITE ELEMENTS COUNTERBALANCING EACH OTHER AT THE SAME TIME IN OUR MUSIC.”

ne often doesn’t fully appreciate how totally industry and economics have permeated popular music until uncovering a band unaffected by their influence. For better or worse, Boris are such a band. The Japanese trio have successfully established a history of warm, human, volatile unpredictability that doesn’t so much defy industry expectations as ignore them altogether. Boris’ work over the past two decades has been defined almost exclusively through a series of philosophies. Born of Japan’s fertile late-‘80s hardcore scene, Boris have, throughout their ever-evolving music and performances, always maintained a fierce dedication to punk’s fundamental ideals of community, DIY and artistic freedom. “Our hardcore manner is always with us,” drummer Atsuo says of the band’s values. “But it is not limited to the hardcore community in Japan. That should not be expressed particularly musically – everyone should show it as their attitude. Boris won’t ever try to record specific sound or aesthetic on purpose. We didn’t expect anything at first because playing together was just for fun. When I look back on that, it seems like a very long time ago.” The 16 years since the release of Boris’ debut album, 1996’s Absolutego, have seen them continually saddled with ambiguous genre tags like post-metal, nu-gaze and avant-rock. The band has flirted with everything from hardcore punk, doom and drone-metal through to pop, ambient music and psychedelic rock over the years. “Various titles or sub-genre tags will only ever show an outline of our music. It won’t ever be more than that. I will admit it might be helpful to communicate with someone else, though,” Atsuo says diplomatically. “Obviously, what we communicate is through music, not via language. We would like to do whatever we feel fresh and psyched at the moment. Boris won’t be faithful to fans if we neglect that.”

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Having opened for Nine Inch Nails, Boris can count Trent Reznor as a fan. They’ve also received the stamp of approval from legendary filmmaker Jim Jarmusch (who featured the band’s work in the score to 2009’s The Limits Of Control). Over the course of their career, they’ve collaborated with Ian Astbury of The Cult, Stephen O’Malley of Sunn 0)) and legendary Japanese sonic experimentalists Merzbow and Keiji Haino. “We have always tried to have two opposite elements counterbalancing each other at the same time in our music,” Atsuo muses. “Like ‘beautiful’ and ‘ugly’, ‘momentary’ and ‘eternal’, or something like that. I think this is the real thing that we say with our music – otherwise it would just be chaos, though I suppose that is entirely possible too. I don’t know. We always work so hard at what we’re doing in the moment that it often feels hard to remember what we’ve actually done.”

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JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE’S NOTHING’S GONNA CHANGE THE WAY YOU FEEL ABOUT ME NOW THIS MEMPHIS-SOUL STYLE ALBUM WAS RECORDED COMPLETELY LIVE WITH NO OVERDUBS OVER A FOUR-DAY PERIOD IN AN OLD CONVERTED CHURCH RECORDING STUDIO IN ASHEVILLE, NC.

OUT MARCH 23 ON BLOODSHOT RECORDS THROUGH INERTIA

The crucial twist in the narrative is that this approach hasn’t impeded Boris’ success in the slightest. The band’s profile has been gradually expanding ever since their inception. The arrival of breakthrough album Pink in 2005 saw them burst through to non-Japanese audiences in style and they’ve been building upon their success ever since.

Yet, their work remains driven by the same basic principles as always – a refusal to be pigeonholed, an intense appreciation of the visceral intimacy of performance and an abiding respect and admiration for their audiences across the globe. Fittingly, their entire mantra seems to oscillate around the very sense of contradiction Atsuo pinpoints as the defining aspect of their catalogue – their practice and career an ongoing negotiation between absolute freedom and commitment.

YUKON BLONDE’S TIGER TALK

COMPARED TO CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG, THE CANADIAN OUTFIT RECORDED THEIR SECOND ALBUM WITH PRODUCER COLIN STEWART (BLACK MOUNTAIN, LADYHAWKE).

OUT MARCH 23 ON DINE ALONE THROUGH SHOCK

Boris’ longing for artistic freedom is both legendary and obvious. It is, by the band’s own admission, one of the key motivators behind their notoriously prolific work ethic. At the time of interview, Boris were recording – despite 2011 having already seen the release of three albums of new material (New Album, Heavy Rocks and Attention Please). “We’re looking forward to our tour of Australia. It is going to be our second proper tour over there. This time we will also be going to where we haven’t been yet so we feel excited,” Atsuo announces, relieved to be breaking away from the studio temporarily. “We are writing and recording new music these days and we scarcely see anyone else, so it should be great to meet up with many fans and listeners once again.” Their commitment to their audiences, however, is similarly powerful. Everything Boris does seems to revolve around sustaining their unique brand of artistic freedom or connecting with as many people as possible – from conducting interviews with the press (“I think press work and interviews are very important and I value it since it would be a door to our show and music,” Atsuo says.) to simply maintaining an unstoppable tour schedule over two decades into their career.

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“Yes, Boris loves studio work and, at the same time, we love to have a time for the immediate connection with our fans at shows too,” Atsuo confirms. “It has absolutely become harder for us over the years to keep up the touring. In general, Japan is an easy place to live so, once we go out to tour, it is often quite hard – but we have had great experiences during tours too. I think health management for touring leads to good effects and results to keep going what we do.” Neither impulse is particularly unique within popular music – but it’s rare for a band to be defined solely by such a contradictory philosophy. Make no mistake, there is very little else to the world of Boris. There is no grand architecture to their sprawling discography and no strategy to their collaborations. In a world where each and every artist seems to understand the concept of branding, Boris don’t even seem to grasp the concept of planning twenty years into a career. “The more we do, the more we can’t see it,” Atsuo says of Boris’ future. “Surprisingly, there are further more possibilities – one after another. We’re still just trying to do new things, anytime, all the time.” WHO: Boris WHEN & WHERE: Friday 23 March, The Hi-Fi

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HOOKED ON STRINGS WHEN WARREN ELLIS OF DIRTY THREE WENT TO DAVID LYNCH’S SILENCIO NIGHTCLUB IN PARIS, WITH ITS NO CAMERA POLICY, HE TELLS BRYGET CHRISFIELD, “FOR THE FIRST TIME IN MY LIFE I FELT LIKE FILMING. AND DAVID LYNCH WAS STANDING NEXT TO ME.”

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s this the correct address? A recognisable figure sporting a long-sleeved purple paisley shirt opens a nearby door and leaps out onto the pavement. He wanders towards a metallic purple Ford Falcon, makes a victorious hand gesture (probably celebrating the fact that the windscreen remains parking fine free). Yep, this is definitely the right place. Warren Ellis is particular about his coffee: “Small cup, long black, room at the top with a splash of cold milk. Like a macchiato but not with hot milk.” Only a few of his shirt buttons serve their function and many chains, including a chunky crucifix, compete for attention on his chest. Ellis also wears a killer pair of black cowboy boots and fondles his longer-than-Catweazle grey beard quite regularly throughout this interview. Dirty Three’s violinist first moved to Melbourne from Ballarat “in ’83” and recalls, “I do remember hearing People With Chairs Up Their Noses on a cassette that a guy, he’d been down to Melbourne and recorded it and he was playing that and, you know, cleared the common room at school with it. [That occasion] ended up being the first time I ever heard Jim White [Dirty Three drummer] play – ‘cause he was in that band – and then ten years later, yeah, I end up playing in a band with him.” One of the first bands Ellis remembers going to see regularly upon moving to Melbourne is The Birthday Party and he also wound up playing in the bands some of those band members went on to form [Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, Grinderman]. When it’s suggested such circular occurrences are perhaps characteristic of his musical career, Ellis ponders, “I guess so, yeah. I haven’t thought about it, but I guess if you work in any field, like, imagine if you were an actor, you know, you bump into similar people along the way and there’s points drawn up and if that happens with music – it just happens with life.”

like smoking now that everybody’s forced out to the streets to smoke and there’s this kind of, you know, this taking away of people’s rights, I guess. It was interesting when there’s bouncers walking around and telling everybody to stop filming and stuff like that. And for the first time in my life I felt like filming. And David Lynch was standing next to me.” WHO: Dirty Three WHAT: Toward The Low Sun (Anchor & Hope/Remote Control) WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 22 March, The Tivoli

The ink hasn’t long set on the announcement that Grinderman have called it a day. “Dirty Three is, you know, it’s not like it takes a back seat, but it’s like everything,” Ellis shares. “Everything has its moment and I’ve being doing soundtracks and Bad Seeds and Grinderman and just odd things here and there and [Dirty Three have] been out playing. And it doesn’t feel like we’d gone away, but the older you get too it’s – when you’re young, that’s all you do. It’s, like, you’re out, you tour and that’s it and you’re in this group and everyone’s there. I mean, I’ve got kids, I’ve got family and I’m blessed with a very rich musical life and do lots of different things... I’m really happy that we’ve managed to finally finish a [Dirty Three] record. It’s been a while [between records]. If I wasn’t working then Jim was out working and, you know, Jim’s really busy or Mick [Turner, guitar] would be busy. Mick had a load of kids in the last few years and life just sort of takes over.” One would imagine Ellis often gets asked by bands to compose orchestral/string arrangements, “Well I don’t feel like I can walk in very well to projects that are established. And I don’t feel what I do is particularly, um, malleable? I think quite often people might like the idea of me going in to work on their [songs], but in reality it sorta doesn’t really work,” Ellis muses. “I mean, I do play on other people’s things – occasionally I do stuff – because I know it’s really good to kinda branch out and do that. Jim does that a lot; Jim plays the drums for lots of different people and all that. I think I always got a bit superstitious and I felt like I only had a small amount to give and I wanted that to be to a few things as opposed to just throwing it all away.” The toughest of souls are often reduced to tears at Dirty Three’s live shows. Ellis admits “the odd sniffle here and there” is not uncommon to hear. “I think the great thing about playing music is that you get to experience and feel the people’s responses to what you’re doing,” he continues. “It’s one of the few creative mediums, I can’t think of another one that has... you do a painting, you go to the opening, but you don’t really see how it affects people beyond that. Or you do a film, you go to the screening and you see the people [who are] into it and then that’s it! You’re not sitting at every screening. But a live show: everyone is different and there’s a thing with the audience there and you get that interaction that’s very particular to the performing arena and it’s really wonderful.” Nowadays these memories live on and can be shared with others, as can be witnessed by the amount of iPhones held skyward to record the action at any given gig. “A concert can take you to a place that you just never thought you’d go and it’s usually something that happens in the moment, when you’re there. And you can’t be in the moment when you’re trying to film it with a bloody iPhone,” Ellis offers. “I don’t even know why people bother doing it, to be honest. It’s terrible and it all sounds the same; it’s all just distorted and stuff. It’s just this age we live in when everybody has access to information and everybody wants more information than they need. “It’s a different thing now but, I mean, I used to like going to concerts so that I could kind of just be immersed in it and I didn’t wanna be reminded of where I was. And I think once you pull out a camera, then you’re reminded of where you are. And, for me, going to concerts and films was always about escaping reality, not about reminding you of reality. “I actually went to Silencio, David Lynch’s club, recently in Paris – he’s done a club there and they have a no camera policy. It is fantastic, but there’s something kind of annoying about it too. It’s like that no smoking rule. Like, I don’t smoke but I feel

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TIME OFF • 15


COVERING ALL BASES TO SAY SHE’S BEEN BUSY OF LATE WOULD BE TO GREATLY UNDERSTATE THE CREATIVE ENERGY OF HOLLY THROSBY. WHAT IT BOILS DOWN TO, SHE TELLS TYLER MCLOUGHLAN, IS THAT HER CURRENT NATIONAL TOUR WILL BE THE LAST TIME YOU’LL SEE HER FOR A WHILE.

WE HAD TO BE CAREFUL THAT A CRAZY ELEPHANT NOISE WOULDN’T FALL OUT A TRAPDOOR OR SOMETHING...”

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or someone who has released three very different records in a relatively short period of time, Sydney’s Holly Throsby is clear and collected as she runs through her list of creative achievements of the past 18 months, beginning with ARIA-nominated children’s album See! Her fourth solo album Team followed to critical acclaim, and then of course Seeker Lover Keeper became a 2011 highlight as Australia’s newest supergroup. Throsby looks back at the period in which she was also a part of the national They Will Have Their Way Finn brothers’ tribute concerts and begins at perhaps her most surprising accomplishment to date. “It started out as a kind of a joke because I have a goddaughter who’s five now and, you know, she’s very important to me, and she has a little brother who’s three,” Throsby explains of her inspiration to make a children’s album. “I spend a lot of time with them and I find them really entertaining and fascinating because I haven’t spent a huge amount of time around kids in my life, and I guess it started as an idea to write some songs for them because if I was like borrowing the car and driving them around and listening to the kids’ music they had in the car, I always found it really patronising and it drove me crazy… I thought it was probably the dorkiest idea in the entire world. But then I started talking to Tony Dupe about it – he’s produced a lot of albums for me before – and he’s got such an interesting mind, and he’s just very illustrative with music and with sounds and loves illustrating words with different sound effects and stuff, and I just knew that he would be the perfect person if he could harness that part of his imagination to make the record with.” Some people employ elaborate strategies to stay on-track when dealing with a full workload of varied tasks, though Throsby seems to have switched her creative hats with little effort, even though the writing for all three projects overlapped. “We did the children’s album first and then when we did Team, we had to be careful that a crazy elephant noise wouldn’t fall out a trapdoor or something,” she giggles, “but you always kind of know where you are I think with that kind of stuff. I think it was good for me because I’d done four albums of my own, and I guess I’d always been doing this one thing, exploring this one side of myself musically which is writing my own songs. …Making the kids album which is just like a pop album that had lots of crazy sound effects and weird lyrics, and Seeker Lover Keeper as well, I got to really explore writing pop songs which I found really enjoyable. And since then I’ve been starting to do co-writing with various people and I’ve been enjoying exploring different sides of writing songs. Because I think the songs that I will always put on my album, I write really personal stuff and it’s really important to me that it is a certain way, but I have a lot of other stuff in me too so it was kind of fun to get it out in different areas.” Following on from four weeks touring Europe alongside Spunk labelmates Tiny Ruins and Jordan Ireland, Throsby is pleased to be finally touring her project proper nationally before she retreats for some well deserved down time. “I haven’t actually done my own tour in Australia for like a year which is why I’m doing this one, because I feel like I really need to take a long break from doing shows because it’s been a lot of travelling and a lot of playing,” she says in a spritely tone with no indication of weariness. “I really love it but I kind of want to be able to sit down and write new songs and stuff like that. It was a really busy time recording the kids’ album and then Team, then the Seeker Lover Keeper album and releasing them all in quick succession. It’s so interesting because the three records were so different and appealed to completely different people. I just did these kids’ shows for Sydney Festival, which I didn’t think I’d do when I released the album – I said to ABC I don’t want to be a children’s entertainer, I don’t want to do any live shows and I just want to release the album. Then a year later I was, like, ‘So I’m gonna do these massive kids’ shows’, and I totally changed my mind! But it was really fun and I kind of thought I would either just find it completely humiliating and hate it and wanna die, or it would be super fun, and it turned out that luckily it was super fun so I’m going to do a few more of those throughout the year for some festivals. “I am doing a handful of kids’ shows throughout the year, but in terms of doing a tour for my normal music, I think this will be the only tour for this year and probably the only tour until I make a new album, which is just gonna take me a long time, I can feel it. I think it’s time for me to take a break. I really did wanna do one more tour here before I did that because I love playing with [bandmates] Bree [van Reyk] and Jens [Birchall] and we have such a nice time so this is like the farewell before I go away and make some new stuff.” Though she now has a considerably broadened fanbase following such a prolific period of new endeavours, Throsby is ever aware of those that have followed her intimate folk persona since the release of her debut record On Night in 2004, and she has designed the setlist for her current tour just accordingly. “I’ve been trying to teach myself how to play [Seeker Lover Keeper single] Even Though I’m A Woman on the piano which is much harder than I thought it would be… and I guess I’ll obviously play stuff from Team, but we’ve also been taking some requests by email,” she says of the fan consultation process. “I think that just comes from being a music fan, like going to see shows and sometimes just like [saying] ‘Oh I’ll die if they would only play that song’, and a lot of people forget about their songs. I always forget about songs I’ve written if I haven’t played them for ages and then someone says, ‘Oh I like this song’ and I have to sit down and learn it again. Everybody likes something different so it’s nice to think that the underdog song might be appreciated by someone out there.” WHO: Holly Throsby WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 29 March, Black Bear Lodge

16 • TIME OFF

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PLEASURE BOATING WOODEN SHJIPS WANT AUDIENCE RESPONSE TO THEIR PRIMAL GROOVES. ANTHONY CAREW CHATS WITH BEATMAKER OMAR AHSANUDDIN.

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ooden Shjips had a great time in Australia on their debut tour here, back in 2010. Thanks for asking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a great time, man,â&#x20AC;? says Omar Ahsanuddin, the drummer for the San Franciscan psych-rock crew. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got to play [at Golden Plains] at Meredith. That was wonderful, magical, great, and fun. We loved Melbourne, we had an afternoon off to meander round, found some really cool places. We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to come back; this time we get to go to Perth, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our first trip out there. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forward to it.â&#x20AC;? The band will be returning to Australia on the back of their third LP, West. After first flickering to life as Erik â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ripleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home-recording project (with designs on issuing purposefully-obscure physical artefacts and existing outside the promotional mill of the online era) Wooden Shjips had, even in the six years since, never really gone beyond that: each of their first two records â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2007â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wooden Shjips and 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dos â&#x20AC;&#x201C; recorded live to a tape-machine in the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rehearsal room. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always recorded ourselves, playing in our own practice space,â&#x20AC;? Ahsanuddin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[But] we knew as soon as we had finished making [Dos] that the next time we wanted to go into a studio. We knew that thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d create something very different just by its nature; because West was the first time weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ever been into a studio.â&#x20AC;? That studio belonged to Philip Manley, former Trans Am frontman turned producer of Barn Owl, Mi Ami, Psychic Reality, The Alps et al, and a friend of the Wooden Shjips dudes from around-the-town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having him there totally changed our own roles in recording,â&#x20AC;? offers Ahsanuddin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because, this time, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to think of the nuts-and-bolts. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to think about â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;did I press record before I played that song?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how can we work these microphones?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; or all that stuff â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all that other stuff â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that comes with trying to engineer yourselves. And, best of all, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to worry about running out of tape halfway through a take and then having to go and buy some more, which has definitely happened to us before...

us, trying to puzzle it out ourselves. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to have someone there who can, when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re listening back to a take, just say to you â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a better one in youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the tempo slowed down in the middle of the songâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;that take was awesomeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Everything about making this record just felt so different.â&#x20AC;? Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title happily tackles the mythologism of the American West; from its frontierdom to the eternal lure of California, forever pulling Easterners across the country. Wooden Shjips know all about it, each of their members â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Johnson, Ahsanuddin, organ player Nash Whalen, and bassist/trumpeter Dusty Jermier â&#x20AC;&#x201C; grew up on the Eastern seabord of the US. Ahsanuddin hails from tiny Morganton, North Carolina, and relocated to San Francisco 15 years ago. He and Johnson played in a noise band together, so, when Wooden Shjips were being turned from a recording project with conceptual live line-up into a functional rockband, Ripley rang up his old pal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When the band started, we had a pretty good idea of what we wanted to do,â&#x20AC;? Ahsanuddin recounts, of those beginnings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to make primitive rock music that has a good groove, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple, that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go over the top on things, but just locks into this primal essence. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way we approached it at the beginning, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s held true: I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still the way we approach it now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a band, we try to look for repetition, look for simple ways of doing things. For me, as the drummer, that means not a lot of drum fills at all. I play a really stripped-down drumkit. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want a lot of different things I can hit, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for me to just lock in on the rhythm and the repetition, and let the guitars and keyboards sort of jump off from that, and hopefully just hit this groove where we can get people dancing.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It provided the opportunity to have some genuine constructive feedback in the middle of recording; and to have someone there as a sounding board. Which weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had before. Previously itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just been the four of

Wooden Shjipsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; repetitious, fuzzy, tranced-out psychrock comes steeped in Ash Ra Tempel, Spacemen 3, The Doors, and anyone else who ever chased organdraped space-rock towards the transcendental. In 2007, playing their second-ever show, they scored a support to an obvious spiritual antecedent: the legendary founder of The 13th Floor Elevators (and

recent Australian tourist) Roky Erickson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d just started playing again,â&#x20AC;? Ahsanuddin recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It felt so weird and also just crazy fast: our first show had been at a pizza parlour, and then for our next one weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing at the Great American Music Hall with Roky Erickson. It was strange and wonderful.â&#x20AC;? In their early years, there were many more strangeand-wonderful shows for Wooden Shjips: playing house-parties and art-galleries, or, memorably, in a half-pipe (â&#x20AC;&#x153;there were drunk people sitting up the top of the ramp, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d occasionally fall and tumble down into the bottom of the ramp where we wereâ&#x20AC;?). But after the release of Dos â&#x20AC;&#x201C; effectively the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breakout set â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they were touring more and more, playing at rock clubs at home (â&#x20AC;&#x153;it really sucks playing in bars in the US, because you have to be 21 to get in; we really wish we could play more all-ages shows) and European festivals. Whilst their record-collector-friendly rep cultivates many a chin-scratcher audience, Wooden Shjips found

that, touring in Europe, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d find far more â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;liveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; crowds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In San Francisco where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re from, you play a show to a roomful of people with their arms crossed, maybe someone nods their head,â&#x20AC;? Ahsanuddin says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Which is why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so awesome to go on tour and go places where people are really psyched to have a good time and get into the music; where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be way more demonstrative in the way they respond to the music. You go play in Athens and no oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just standing there, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hanging from the rafters, yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;know? When you play in one of the more out-of-the-way places in Europe, people are just excited that a band from San Francisco has come to play.â&#x20AC;? WHO: Wooden Shjips WHEN & WHERE: Sunday 25 March, The Zoo

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STAIRWELLS OUT NOW TIME OFF â&#x20AC;˘ 17


IT’S JUST GOTTA ROCK

TEENAGE KICKS SIX MONTHS AGO ADELAIDE’S DANGEROUS! RELEASED THEIR DEBUT ALBUM THROUGH THE INTERNATIONALLYRENOWNED EPITAPH RECORDS. FUN LOVING VOCALIST TOMMY ICON SPEAKS WITH LOCHLAN WATT.

HOW DO YOU FIT ALL YOUR FAVOURITE SONGS INTO ONE BIG SHOW? FOR BRIAN SETZER THE ANSWER IS TO TAKE A ROCKABILLY RIOT TO THE WORLD, AS HE TELLS MICHAEL SMITH.

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quick scan of just the albums he’s released and you realise just how busy Brian Setzer has been since he first pulled together his rockabilly revival meets punk trio The Stray Cats, back in 1979. With them there are eight studio, one live and a best of; with the Brian Setzer Orchestra, there are another eight, with seven others that are either best ofs or live albums, then as Setzer solo, there are six studio and another two live albums. And there are assorted other bits and bobs, including his contribution to the soundtrack of the feature film, La Bamba, in which he appropriately played Eddie Cochran, one of his all-time musical heroes. “That’s really the reason why I wanted to do this,” Setzer explains from his home in Minneapolis, about the evolution of Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot. “I’ve got a big catalogue – that’s right, a lot of songs I could play, reaching back – and I thought I’d really like to play them all and not be limited to just Stray Cats songs or just solo songs. Just play the whole thing – I even do some Big Band songs, without the horns of course – and some old Sun Session songs. So this seemed to solve the problem there.” And it all began when this kid from Massapequa, in New York State, first came across the quintessential “rockabilly” guitar, the archtop semi-acoustic Gretsch. “Yes, it really did. At first I just wanted one because it looked like Eddie Cochran’s. Now, I didn’t know what it would sound like and I bought it in my local paper – it was a hundred bucks – and the body was on one side of the guy’s workbench and all the electronics were in a shoebox. He’d taken it apart ‘cause he was gonna re-finish it, so I just took it and I put it all back together and I didn’t realise just how good it was ‘til I made some records with it and it always sounded great. People think of it as a rockabilly guitar but, I mean, Jack White uses a Gretsch and Pete Townsend uses a Gretsch, so I think it’s whatever the musician’s hands do with

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the thing. Don’t forget those guitars were basically made for playing country and western in the ‘50s.” Regardless, the guitar has become the hallmark of Setzer’s sound and it’s still in evidence, along with a whole bunch of other guitars, on his most recent album, Setzer Goes InstruMENTAL!, which is surprisingly the guitarist’s first foray into instrumental guitar music. As it happens, it was a surprise to Setzer too. “It’s funny, ‘cause I was lookin’ at some eight or nine songs that I’d written and almost finishing this first thing I started messin’ around with Blue Moon In Kentucky and I went, ‘God this sounds good,’ playin’ it, melody chords and there’s some finger-pickin’ and a little jazz thrown in and it just excited me,” he laughs. “And when somethin’ excites me like that, I have to jump and do somethin’ else in that vein. So then I went to Be-Bop-A-Lula and thought, ‘No-one’s done this instrumental – it sounds so good.’ Then I just kept goin’. I wrote some songs, found a couple more and then I guess it dawned on me I had never made an instrumental record, you know? I’ve won Grammys in the category for a song [1998 for Sleepwalk and 1990 for Caravan, both with the Orchestra] but never done a whole album, but I thought, ‘Let’s keep goin’, it sounds good’.” WHO: Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot! WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 28 March, The Tivoli; Saturday 7 April, Bluesfest, Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm

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n some ways, Cheap Fakes seem like a band well and truly of the now – they utilise social media as well as any other modern group, and are proudly sporting a flashy new website, the result of some talented nerd’s six-month effort. So it’s not like they don’t appreciate the future. But equally, if not more, they appreciate the past, having brought their retro-tinged mélange of rock, ska, funk and pop to enthusiastic audiences for years now. This month, they’re hitting stages again in support of their second LP Hand Me Downs and, as frontman Hayden Andrews explains, it’s pretty much a whole new show. “With the first album, when I first started recording I didn’t have a band to play it so it’s pretty much all of my songs and just a whole lot of my friends that I got in to play and be my backing band and stuff,” he says. “Towards the end of the album, I got a few of the guys that I’d met, that are in the band now, to play some horns and stuff on it. But this new album is more of a team effort – it’s our whole band so I guess it’s more cohesive and the songs flow better into each other and stuff. It’s just more of a whole kind of package.” For album number two, Andrews obviously had to relinquish a chunk of creative control during the composition phase, but the affable singer seems totally comfortable to share the load. “It’s still sort of like, one person will bring the main idea for the song and then everyone fleshes it out,” he says. “But I don’t mind – these guys, we’re all really good friends and we work really well together. We know each other’s strengths and weaknesses, so it’s really easy to write music with these guys.” 18 • TIME OFF

“It’s been a long time, definitely,” says Icon of the slow rise from formation to debut album. “We’ve always had heaps of fun doing what we do, touring and playing in bands. It has flown by. We started Dangerous!, and just like always we have fun with it, record music, release CDs, put stuff up on the net, tour, put on our own tours, manage our own bands, and all that kind of stuff. We put out an EP, and as usual we took it around to record labels, and like usual a couple of record labels would get back to us and say they love us and they want to sign us and stuff. This time it went a little bit further, and Epitaph said they loved the music that we’ve made, and they loved our band, and were as excited about it as we were. The next thing you know, we’re on tour, and Brett Gurewitz from Bad Religion who owns Epitaph, called our telephone and said he wants to sign us and fly us overseas to record our first album.” Icon reveals that the band experimented with unusual means of recording – at least for the international level they were operating at – aiming for an unhinged sound rather than worrying about perfection. “We tried a bunch of different things in different takes,” he explains of his vocal tracking, “and I ended up recording the vocals like I would live, which was with a microphone in a room, jumping off the walls. I had speakers playing the tracks back at me, so it was like

This is an unsurprising development – if you’ve ever seen a live Cheap Fakes show, you’d know there’s no shortage of unity circling among the members. That cohesion not only permeates their gigs and their writing process; it’s even indirectly manifested itself in their latest’s title, the eponymous hand-medowns more than just a throwaway reference. “We all wear vintage retro suits when we play, and for the styles for the videos and stuff for this album, it’s all vintage, so I wanted to play on hand-medowns, like, hand-me-down clothes, because we’re all wearing hand-me-down suits!” Andrews laughs. Now, on the eve of their tour, having called upon some long-time friends to provide even more horn-based and percussive flavour, Andrews and his bandmates are prepared for the joys and perils of being on the road.

DESPITE BEING INTERRUPTED WHILE CARBO-LOADING ON A MASHED POTATO SANDWICH, MULTI-INSTRUMENTALIST SCOTTY REGAN FROM BRISBANE’S THE GIN CLUB IS HAPPY TO SPRUIK THE GROUP’S NEWEST RECORD TO CHRIS YATES, AN EPIC LIVE ALBUM SPANNING THEIR WHOLE CATALOGUE, AND GETS US EXCITED ABOUT SEEING THEM DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN IN REAL LIFE.

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he live album must surely be a daunting task to tackle. No matter what goes down at a show, usually the haze of booze and blast of energy are enough to distract the audience from any minor faults or quibbles. But when you’re committing it to tape (or hard drive) the misfirings are documented forever. Regan says that the way The Gin Club’s live album came together was without any of these fears or concerns whatsoever.

“I guess I’m most looking forward to just letting everyone see and hear the album, really. The band’s put their heart and soul into the album, and to actually get it out there and show people the fruits of our labour, it’s really rewarding. It’s good.

“These days most sound engineers have some kind of recording set-up and they’ll just ask if you want it recorded and we always say, ‘Yeah, sure,’ and then not really think about it until we get the CD or something. We’ve done it for years, just kind of kept recordings and never really thought about it too much. The album itself is a compilation of lots of different recordings from different places that we’ve picked out. We never set out to release something like this, but I think because of that it turned out really well. Magoo the producer did quite well to make the different fidelity of recordings sound cohesive.”

“We do have some really exciting things up our sleeve that we’re sort of working on at the moment, so yeah. I can’t really say, but yeah. It’s good news.”

It certainly does work, a casual listener could be fooled into thinking it was all just one show. Regan says there are some particular highlights for him on the record.

“We’re really excited about it,” he says of the tour. “It’s just sort of, y’know, we’ve played heaps and heaps of gigs all year, but when it comes up to the tour, you just get really excited. Playing different places is always really exciting, even though the reality of tour is that there’s lots of waiting around at airports and stuff.

WHO: Cheap Fakes WHAT: Hand Me Downs (Independent) WHEN AND WHERE: Friday 23 March, SoundLounge, Gold Coast; Saturday 24, Solbar, Maroochydore; Sunday 25, Bond Uni, Gold Coast; Saturday 31, The Zoo

a band was playing in the room with me live, which is totally unconventional to do when you’re recording a professional album – you’re supposed to use nice expensive mics and have an isolated room, but we cranked it up, man. We just went for it like that, and didn’t care too much about it in regards to the sound and everything being perfect. We just went for the performance side of things, and I think we caught that. I think the album sounds pretty live, and pretty real, and pretty raw, and a bit untamed in a sense.” Despite having left their teenage years behind some time ago, Icon explains the greater reasoning behind their debut album’s title. “I think the album is like an ode to our youth. We wanted to recreate the albums that we grew up on. That’s how we found our producer Ulrich Wild. We looked on the back of these CDs from these cool bands that we loved when we were growing up, and we were trying to find our producer on the back of these CDs, and Ulrich Wild’s name kept popping up. So we went with him, and we tried to recreate what we grew up with, and create an album that made us feel like we did when we were growing up. The album’s very youthful and adolescent. The sound is just very raucous, a lot of energy and stuff. That’s the vibe of the entire album and the theme as well.” WHO: Dangerous! WHAT: Teenage Rampage (Epitaph/Warner) WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 21 March, Afends Warehouse Party, Byron Bay; Friday 23, Monster madness @ Surfers Paradise SLSC; Saturday 24, King’s Beach Tavern, Caloundra; Thursday 29, Snitch @ X&Y Bar; Saturday 31, Spotted Cow, Toowoomba

COLD GIN TIME AGAIN

TIMES ARE CHANGING BRISBANE-BASED PURVEYORS OF UPBEAT GOODTIMERY CHEAP FAKES ARE CELEBRATING THE RELEASE OF THEIR SOPHOMORE FULL-LENGTH HAND ME DOWNS IN STYLE – IN THE MOST LITERAL SENSE. THE EXUBERANT QUINTET ARE UNDERTAKING A TOUR DECKED OUT IN THE FINEST IN SECONDHAND THREADS, AS FRONTMAN HAYDEN ANDREWS TELLS MITCH KNOX.

he emphatically party band that is Dangerous! has come a long way from their more humble hometown beginnings. Formed in 2007 from the remains of their previous, more hardcore-rooted outfit Wendy Icon, they threw aside the conventions of said scene and decided to have as much fun as they could. In due course the four-piece travelled to Los Angeles to record their debut album Teenage Rampage – releases last September – with none other than Ulrich Wild, the man responsible for the sonic qualities on albums by bands like Pantera and Deftones.

“I especially like the recordings of Company Kept and Drugflowers that were taken from The Troubadour’s last night before it closed,” he says, recalling the sadly lost Brisbane institution. “It’s a bit ramshackle and a bit loose and it kind of captured – for want of a better word – the vibe of the night. There’s some sort of nostalgia in the singing as well. We pretty much began at The Troubadour, and it pretty much nurtured our first year.”

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Fortunately the end of The Troubadour did not also signal an end to The Ginners, and they’re getting the extensive lineup (minus Sweden-based Ola Karlsson) together for their current Australian tour. Regan says they are also happy to be co-headlining the tour with Brisbane’s Texas Tea. “Conor [Macdonald, also from The Gin Club] and I both played on the first Texas Tea record, so we have had a long relationship with them. Plus I’m really looking forward to seeing the other bands we’re playing with in Brisbane, Okemah and Silent Feature Era. I’ve just been listening to the stuff on their websites and it’s pretty cool. Silent Feature Era have this sound they call ‘bush noir’ and it’s swinging, boozy, mariachi horns mixed in with synthesisers and guitars and stuff like that which is really interesting.” With The Gin Club featuring so many different singers and songwriters, it’s not surprising that Regan is working on his own material in between stints with the group. “I’m always working on my own solo thing,” he admits coyly. “Whether or not I get a band together of my own this year I’m not sure, but it’s certainly going to be something I’m focusing on. I’m really keen to join as many bands as possible as well with people I know around Brisbane. I’m recording stuff just at home. A lot of the time I’m incorporating some sample-based things and, um, electronic things... Nah, I don’t wanna say that!” He laughs when it’s suggested that he’s recording the booty-bass electro hip hop record of his dreams in his bedroom. WHO: The Gin Club WHAT: The Gin Club Live (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: Friday 23 March, The Beetle Bar


DARK AND STORMY

DUEL HIGHWAYS

SYDNEY ROCKERS MELODY BLACK HAVE LEFT THE PAST IN THE PAST, AND FORGED INTO THE FUTURE WITH THE VALUE OF PERSONAL ENJOYMENT PLACED OVER THAT OF SELF-DESTRUCTION. VOCALIST JONATHAN DEVOY SPEAKS WITH LOCHLAN WATT.

STRAIGHT SHOOTER CHRISTIAN TRYHORN, LEADER OF MAGNIFICENT BRISBANE BLUES BASTARDS TRANSVAAL DIAMOND SYNDICATE, CHATS WITH BENNY DOYLE ABOUT THEIR MAMMOTH AUTUMN TOUR AND THE LONG ROAD AHEAD.

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“I

t’s a funny thing,” comments the lurching frontman of the fact that he’s now been in three bands with bassist Leeno Dee – from industrial metal majorlabel stars Jerk, to follow-on group Ink, and now the largely stripped-back, totally rocking, yet still somewhat dark sounds of Melody Black who have just released their debut album Love Your Demons. “Leeno’s had these songs under his belt for a really long time. He’s been working on some of them even while we were doing Jerk. These were the kinds of songs that really didn’t suit Jerk. We had the songwriting taken care of. The same with Ink, it just wasn’t right. When Ink wound down, and he had been jamming with Tubby [Wadsworth – drums] a bit, he’d given Phil [Bowley – guitar] a call and Phil didn’t want to do it, but I think it was the end of a five-minute conversation when he had Phil on board. It was a perfect storm kind of situation – I was singing in another band at the time. Someone mentioned me, he’d been thinking about it, and he just called me and I needed all of five minutes to decide myself.” In terms of any expectations based on their past, Devoy says that “it’s a reference now in the way that people can go, ‘Oh those guys, cool’, but they’re no longer expecting that kind of music from us, because that was ten years ago, and even that in itself is a scary thing.” Those years of experience had their impact felt – by the end of the first Melody Black jam their debut gig was lined up, and by the end of said gig recording time was booked. Reportedly spending only three days in the studio, and having done the majority of the tracking live including some of the vocals, Devoy describes it as having gone “from go to whoa in about two weeks”. He further adds that “I’ve never been in a band that has been so easy to just come in and play and enjoy it, and know that it’s going to be quality.” To have come to the apparently lighter, punk-rock oriented Melody Black from the depressive, gory days of Jerk,

represents a significant progression. Did they simply grow out of their old sounds and subject matter? “I wouldn’t say that,” Devoy considers. “I think we’re all at the point in our lives now, where if you added it all up, we’ve all been on stage for 100 years, and that’s no exaggeration. At the end of the day this is supposed to be fun. You’re supposed to enjoy it. It’s not supposed to be a struggle to get through... music should always be cathartic, absolutely, and there’s places to put all of that bullshit. But it’s more about us playing what we enjoy, getting together and playing with people we respect, and just generally enjoying music instead of... I mean goddamnit, I nearly used to not survive half the gigs I used to do. Now it’s like I can get up, sing, do another show the next night, and not need three days to recover because I tore myself apart.” Although the band is yet to take on any full-scale touring, Devoy insists that “it’s by no means a hobby, don’t get me wrong. It’s a frivolous way of looking at it. The enjoyment we get out of it is because we’re extremely passionate and dedicated people. This isn’t a part time thing. We’re not fucking Short Stack. This is an actual thing that we want to do and achieve big things with. Overseas will come.” WHO: Melody Black WHAT: Love Your Demons (Riot!)

urrently rolling around the countryside convoy style with Taswegian two-piece Guthrie, these kindred spirits are taking on any township from the northern reaches of the Sunshine State right down to Tasmania. The romanticism of the open road, music and your friends still holds true with Tryhorn when he calls in en route to Noosa. “You have those moments every few days where you’re sitting on a beach or sitting at the pub in the arvo having a quiet beer and you’re just going, ‘This is living’. You can’t really complain; we only have to work a few hours a day, and that’s fun anyway. It’s hard getting it all organised but it’s all cool now.” This current Transvaal Diamond Syndicate incarnation, featuring Tryhorn, Tinian’s Boy’s Adam Stonehouse on drums and towering bass fiddler Niyi A, are riding the back of the final single to be release from their stomping Sins Of The Blessed record. Pistols At Dawn is a raw rockabilly hit that recalls the jailhouse odes of Johnny Cash and a blood-spilled western front. It’s a song that ties in all too well with the visceral nature of the band, a fact Tryhorn acknowledges. “With Sins Of The Blessed we had a real visual element with all of our design and we had a bit of a western theme which has continued to stick to our style; getting some burlesque chicks on board and all those cowboy, devil type ideals.,” Tryhorn expands. “One of my friends was just using the saying ‘pistols at dawn’ when we’d disagree about something so I took that onboard and we were watching a few old westerns and shit at the time and I just came up with the song. It’s just a tale about a cowboy gunfight that escalates and it’s a fun thing to tie in with our visual elements.” Jobless and homeless all in the name of rock’n’roll, Tryhorn admits that this tour is daunting yet exciting, an inspired combination that will work to spur on Transvaal Diamond Syndicate over this expansive autumn tour.

WHERE: Friday 23 March, Miami Shark Bar, Gold Coast; Saturday 24, Jubilee Hotel

With a little under 50 gigs to go, Tryhorn reflects on the tour thus far with nothing but satisfaction. “They’ve been really good mate,” he states. “Pretty much every gig has been really solid and everyone has been coming up to us [after the show] saying this is the best night they’ve had in ages. We’re doing really well; the Townsville gig at the Herbert Hotel was a good one, we had a real bluesy crowd there. We played the Rocky Roller Derby in Rockhampton, which had a few hundred people there, and both nights in Airlie Beach were really good. “All the people in Central and North Queensland were saying that they simply don’t get bands visiting and it’s true, no bands really tour past the Sunny Coast. So I’ve been making an effort in the last year to get to those areas a lot,” he finishes. They’re just as keen as fans anywhere and it seems like a real untapped market to build a following. I really just wanted to do something large where I could basically stop work for a while, hit the road and do it hard. It’s not like we’ve been sitting around but I just want to give it every opportunity I can to have a crack and touring hardcore is one way of bringing music to the masses.” WHO: Transvaal Diamond Syndicate WHAT: Pistols At Dawn (Starving Kids/MGM) WHEN & WHERE: Friday 23 March Rics Bar; Saturday 24, Coolum Beach Hotel, Coolum; Sunday 25, Wallaby Hotel, Gold Coast; Wednesday 28, The Joynt; Friday 30, 4Senses Charity Event @ The Bridge Club; Saturday 31, Woody’s Surf Shack, Byron Bay; Sunday 1 April, Byron Brewery (Buddha Bar), Byron Bay

THU 29 MAR 2012

THE NECKS NEW YORK TIMES

Not entirely avant-garde, nor minimalist, nor ambient, nor jazz, a performance by this great Australian cult band is a mesmerising musical journey into the unknown.

B R I S B A N E P OW E R H O U S E .O R G

Photo by Holimage

“ONE OF THE GREATEST BANDS IN THE WORLD.”

P R E S E N T E D BY B R I S B A N E P OW E R H O U S E BY A R R A N G E M E N T W I T H TO P S H E L F P R O D U C T I O N S

ALL TICKETS $

35 themusic.com.au

TIME OFF • 19


SINGLED OUT WITH CHRIS YATES

ON THE RECORD

SWIMWEAR Kissing Machine Independent

While The Fearless Vampire Killers polish up their sound a lot more than most of the other garage bands floating around at the moment, they still know their way around a solid tune. I Won’t Stay Too Long marries a nice snare stomp with some tweaking guitars that pepper the vocal line with a bit of grit to distract you from the sharpness of the production. The track builds to a hearty romp for an outro and is over before you know it. The chorus benefits from a bit of extra grunt as well, but overall the sound is so shimmery that it does undermine the group’s toughness a little. With a bit less time in the studio and some more dirt in the mix, TFVK could do themselves a great service next time around.

Columbia/Sony

Matador/Remote Control

Microphone & Loudspeaker/MGM

A collective squeal can almost be heard across the globe as a five year wait ends and James Mercer gathers his cohorts and returns to The Shins. Those cohorts are different this time around and his last five years hanging with Danger Mouse is on show here on Port Of Morrow – their fourth longplayer – but the results are still uniquely and beautifully the sounds of The Shins.

Ceremony got deserved props for 2010’s Rohnert Park, but left many original fans confused. They were initially a thrashy powerviolence group playing fast, ferocious hardcore and while Rohnert Park retained their grimness, musically they’d shifted down a gear. The songs started going for longer than a minute a piece and the dynamic shifts weren’t quite so pointed. Zoo sees them step slightly further in that direction. It sounds a little slicker than Rohnert Park, the love for stadium filling guitars that’s clearly always been there shines through more, though perhaps most polarising is that, more than ever, they’re playing the kind of rock’n’roll you’re likely to hear on the radio; their thrash roots almost completely extinguished. Comparisons to Fucked Up are unavoidable; same label, same shift in musical direction, same fantastic results.

Charge Group made slight tremors with the release of their debut album Escape Mankind, yet has LIVE returned with such a varied palette of sound and scope on their follow-up eponymous LP that it’s hard to reconcile what has come before them. Charge Group is an album of innate beauty, soaring sonics and elegant experimentation, and should hopefully be marked as one of the true contenders of best Australian release when 2012 passes by.

Zoo

Port Of Morrow finds Mercer becoming more and more confident, not only in his vocal delivery but also in production. It’s shinier than ever before, enough to perhaps to charm the mainstream without polarising diehards. It’s a two-faced affair, one moment echoing a back to basics, classic Shins-vibe like 2003’s Chutes Too Narrow, the next it’s dense, multi-layered neo-pysche and pop. The Rifle’s Spiral and first single Simple Song are up first and arguably the poppiest affairs on here, perhaps even the whole Shins discography. The former features subtle electro stabs and a bouncy drum line while the latter rings of a younger sibling of the Wincing The Night Away (2007) highlight Turn On Me but with more majesty – undoubtedly one of the Mercer’s finest moments. September is a love song and vintage Shins at that, For A Fool is a guilty admission of self-defeat while 40 Mark Strasse is simply beautiful in its longing execution and sets up for the home run of the closing title track, an utterly sprawling masterpiece of Pet Sounds-sized proportions. All of this makes Port Of Morrow another flawless outing for Mercer; it’s head and shoulders, entire torsos and navels above all contemporary indie-rock currently doing the rounds. Stunning.

The intro to Hysteria is almost a call to arms, an invitation to go nuts, and when it kicks in, it rattles your insides. Citizen sounds like an outtake from Wire’s Pink Flag and Quarantine swings so hard it reminds you of Green Day’s Longview mixed with ‘70s power pop, but in Ceremony’s inimitable style. While Zoo is definitely a dark album, Ceremony are able to balance the bleakness with light; vocalist Ross Farrar is constantly lethargic but injects a tunefulness (see Repeating The Circle for best example) that is inviting despite the oft-foreboding thick chug and spidery riffs of the band’s twin guitars.

★★★★½

★★★★

Ben Preece

The heart and soul of the album is most notably VD shown in opener The Gold Is Gone, which serves as

D

D

VD

Charge Group

Zoo is a big album for Ceremony if only because it proves the band can deliver on what they’d promised previously. They’ll lose some fans, but they’ll gain far more; though what really matters is that the songs are great, the mood is unmistakably bleak and Ceremony seem completely on top of their game.

a microcosm of what the rest of the album proves to hold. Starting out as a fragile, lilting lullaby, the six-minute song ends in a cacophonous explosion of exultant triumph, the exorcism of demons into the sunlight of hope. Matt Blackman’s vocals echo and quiver at the front of an incredibly intricate musical machine, the combination of the foursome’s efforts a wonder to behold. Broken Sunlight provides a plinking pop sensibility that eschews whimsy and twee elocutions; Volcano meanders through shimmering strings to cascade down in a euphoric chorus. Run and Search Party sees the vocals put aside, with the former offering an apocryphal fever trip akin to Battles without the bombast, whilst the latter holds a more traditional, eloquent bent. The album coalesces towards its emotive finale in the esoteric Hearth Of Your Home and the plaintive Janet’s Song.

VD

Independent

CHARGE GROUP

VD

I Won’t Stay Too Long

CEREMONY

Port Of Morrow

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THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS

LIVE

THE SHINS

D

Having never really dug on Dappled Cities’ sophisticated, over-produced indie sounds, I was surprised to learn that this particular release is the side project of singer Tim Derricourt. Given more space to breathe in this electro setting, his distinctly Australian vocal style works really well. The tunes themselves are restrained and quite subtle – Knocks doesn’t have too much going on with the melody and it gives him time to just feel his way over the top. Highs And Lows is a bit cheesy with its unnecessary keyboard stabs detracting from the simple beat, and maybe it revels a little too heavily in its ‘80s nostalgia, but it still manages to work. Nitpicking really – the production on the whole EP is tasteful despite obvious references and on the last track Easy High he really nails it.

Charge Group may hold their heads up high – their latest is audacious, emotional and awe-inspiring stuff. ★★★★½ Brendan Telford

Dan Condon

SEAN PAUL She Doesn’t Mind Atlantic/Warner Sean Paul’s Like Glue was a track I thought I would get sick of after the initial thrill of digging on something all my friends thought was shit wore off. Somehow it still manages to find its way onto basically every party playlist I ever throw together. One of my buddies came around and digs it too, but the rest still harbour some resentment. She Doesn’t Mind is nowhere near as good as Like Glue, but it’s still pretty ruling. It’s a bit more ‘for the ladies’ and doesn’t bang quite as hard, but whatever – his style is still intact and there’s still a great sense of melody and the hooks grab in just the right places.

SWEDISH HOUSE MAFIA Greyhound EMI I got excited when I clicked on this YouTube link because it started out with the Knight Rider song, and I hoped it was gonna just be a remix of that or something, but then realised that it was just that beer ad which YouTube now decides is totally fine to put on the front of fucking videos. Bullshit. In a further effort to try and get us drunk, Swedish House Mafia’s single is somehow a collaboration with Absolut Vodka. How this happened in the studio is hard to fathom, seeing as how vodka is an inanimate object. If it just means they got shitfaced first, then good on them for still being able to operate equipment and make a moderately interesting Daft Punk for kindergarteners light house beat with a little bit of synthesiser thrown on top.

DEEP SEA ARCADE

GEMMA RAY

GRINDERMAN

Ivy League

Bronzerat/Shock

Mute/EMI

Rome wasn’t built in a day and, similarly for hardcore Deep Sea Arcade fans, it feels like all the Christmases have arrived simultaneously as they finally get their grubby mitts on their long-awaited debut, Outlands. Cutting their teeth with excellently-executed, flawless and melodically-rich singles like Don’t Be Sorry and Lonely In Your Arms, the Sydney quintet once indulged a classic vintage sound not far from the likes of The Zombies, The Byrds or The Beatles at the peak of the psychedelic pop powers. Now, however, they’ve found their own path and one hell of a unique strut.

Island Fire isn’t so much the title of this record as the situation which these songs were birthed from. Gemma Ray became stranded in Australia during April 2010 thanks to a spewing Icelandic volcano. With lava on her mind, she put the time to good use, nutting out the template for the album in Sydney before returning last year to finish the record.

Remixes have taken on a realm of their own in the last decade, with no genre left unscarred. Often the result is the lathering of terrible mismatched sounds to a tune to make it “unique” (aka shithouse). But there are many wunderkind producers and artists out there that are not only adventurous but are also in sync with the artists they are working with, thus the remix becomes more of a collaboration. Nick Cave’s scabrous offshoot Grinderman isn’t an act synonymous with such aspirations, but Grinderman 2 RMX helps cast aside any ill-feeling in what is generally in ingenious take on what is already an incredible album.

Outlands

The opening slam of the title track and the following Seen No Right sum up proceedings just nicely, slipping between the melancholic, coolly-delivered and something a little more upbeat and poppier. Girls is up next, sneering like caged animal – still in captivity but bursting with a sexy as sin swagger and a vocal line that’s both infectious and sinister. New single Steam is as composed in its steady execution and sublimely casual delivery from vocalist Nic McKenzie. Together is an airy beauty while old live favourite The Devil Won’t Take You is present in rather glorious form. And just when you’ve thought you’ve heard it all, Airbulance closes out the affair with a beautiful flourish. For long-time followers, Outlands is both everything you could want from a Deep Sea Arcade album plus much more than you’d expect. It’s a dark, cinematic venture that culminates all the band’s influences into one neat package and spits them out into something that swaggers like the Stones, possesses balls the size of Jim Morrison’s while simultaneously sparkling with first rate musicianship, top-shelf songwriting and a cannon of ideas bursting at the seams. ★★★★

20 • TIME OFF

Island Fire

Ben Preece

The resulting 12 tracks have those feelings of natural drama entrenched within them; cinematic brass and string section; tribal percussion and echoing guitar lines. Fire is another constant theme running through the album, from song titles and lyrical connotations to the capturing album artwork. And strangely enough, the closer Ray burns to the flame, the better the songs sound for it. Fire House is a beautiful contradiction of sonics and themes. It feels distant yet immediately grabs your attention. It has a bubbling positive hook, one of the most joyous found on the record, however, it still feels dark, surrounded by simple piano progressions and all kinds of haunting production wrapping around Ray’s voice. Flood And A Fire meanwhile is a moody torch bearing ode that recalls PJ Harvey in her darker Desert Session hours. The two bonus Sparks covers tacked on the end don’t really bring much to the table. In fact, How Do I Get To Carnegie Hall could be the most annoying song you will ever hear. But it does highlight further that Gemma Ray is very much a maverick in the pop world and a real breath of fresh air. Inventive, exciting and sultry smooth throughout, Island Fire takes you to the rim and back. ★★★½

themusic.com.au

Benny Doyle

Grinderman 2 RMX

There are a number of tracks and artists here that are rife for the picking. Nick Zinner (Yeah Yeah Yeahs)’s production on Bellringer Blues turns the debaucherous tune into a far more surreal rabbithole journey of filth. Stoner rock god Josh Homme in some ways takes the easy route with his take on the already full-throttled devilry of Mickey Mouse and The Goodbye Man (here called Mickey Bloody Mouse), adding his penchant for rampant riffs and smoky segues. New York noise merchants A Place To Bury Strangers dial Worm Tamer up considerably, yet manage to somehow exaggerate an already bulging swagger. However, if you are going to remix something, look to the masters. Splicing geniuses UNKLE have taken a different route to Worm Tamer and created a parallel world monster where blood drips off the walls from a Bollywood saloon, as if King Khan may walk in at any second and let Cave et al do tequila shots from his cavernous navel. It’s incredibly reckless, highoctane and audacious – much like Grinderman itself. ★★★★ Brendan Telford


KATE MARTIN

LUCERO

THE MARS VOLTA

THE PEEP TEMPEL

Shock

ATO/Shock

Warner

Wing Sing

It’s difficult to know how to frame Hand Me My Bow And Arrow. It seems caught between worlds. It could be described as either an indie-pop record of middling accomplishment or an over-produced folk record with hints of greatness. The sophomore album of Queensland’s singer-songwriter Kate Martin, it’s a record with two key components – but those components often don’t seem to complement each other as much as confuse.

Memphis country-rockers Lucero started their career railing against musical paradigms dominating their hometown – playing country fare at punk gigs – but recently they’ve embraced their city’s rich musical history. Their sixth album 1372 Overton Park (2009) incorporated Memphis horns and dipped into the verdant soul history of Stax and beyond, and they’ve continued steadfastly down that path with follow-up Women & Work.

When Melbourne duo The Peep Tempel added a bass player to their line-up, it seemed superfluous. They already had a massive sound, with an octave pedal on the guitar doubling up the low frequencies anyway – it didn’t seem necessary. After hearing these recordings and witnessing their live show as a three-piece it’s safe to say it was a fucking brilliant decision.

It’s largely a conflict between Kate Martin as a songwriter and bandleader. As a songwriter, Martin is clever – her lyrics lively and imaginative, her melodies dreamy without being forgettable and she shows an engaging fondness for the unexpected. As a bandleader, she presides over a delicate, vaguely experimental wall-of-sound of rock instrumentation augmented by bursts of unconventional sounds. Both approaches yield compelling results (Candle Burnin’, Wax Drippin’ could smash triple j’s Hottest 100, The Earth Resonates develops an intriguing set of soundcapes and samples) but they generally don’t play nice together. Martin’s songwriting is intricate and detail-driven but her sound is vague and expansive – such contrast muddies Hand Me My Bow And Arrow to the point of ambiguity. It’s hard to appreciate the songwriting when it’s so buried and the soundscapes aren’t intricate enough to reward on their own terms.

Frontman and songwriter Ben Nichols’ expressive voice is a huge part of the Lucero bluster, a life-ravaged rasp that reeks of whiskey and smokes and gives great power to his tales of the women and work alluded to in the album’s title. This collection of songs is more upbeat across the board than past efforts, with none of the ‘crying in your drink’ soul-crushers that litter earlier albums, although It May Be Too Late and Sometimes are more downbeat than their counterparts, and I Can’t Stand To Leave You deals with familiar tropes of heartbreak and yearning. Elsewhere reflective lament When I Was Young is a thoughtful glance at former glories, and both the jaunty title track and upbeat Like Lightning are destined to become live faves.

With each successive album the masses seem to grow a little less endeared toward The Mars Volta, and while the release of Noctourniquet will be overshadowed by At The Drive-In’s reunion, there’s still much to celebrate. By this point Volta mastermind Omar Rodriquez-Lopez has long thrown out traditional notions of constancy in favour of a creative approach synonymous with change. The album art has taken a drastic turn from the surreal toward a more minimal preference, drummer Thomas Pridgen has been replaced with wunderkind Deantoni Parks, and as a first, Ikey Owens and John Frusciante are absent from the process.

Hand Me My Bow And Arrow

Women & Work

Noctourniquet

Hand Me My Bow And Arrow is by no means a bad album. There isn’t a bad song on the record and, at its worst, it’s quite intriguing. Martin still has a great deal to offer. She just needs to figure out how to present it.

The only real problem with Women & Work is that (apart from the possible exception of the choir that dominates Go Easy) there’s not much ground covered here that Lucero haven’t traversed before, but that’s a minor gripe when the songwriting and musicianship are as strong as what’s on offer here. In a world where inferior bands like The Gaslight Anthem are revered, let’s hope Lucero leap to that next level soon because they clearly deserve it.

★★★

★★★★

Matt O’Neill

Steve Bell

It also sees a formal progression that distances the band further from the formula of the first two albums. While Aegis and Molochwalker conjure joints of old, they’ve mostly departed from the tight, complex prog-explosions which defined their sound. Electronic elements play a greater role, but where Copernicus showed an intervention of said elements, these compositions assimilate them through a fully realised synthesis. As The Malkin Jewel tumbles over itself, Cedric Bixler-Zavala sharply interjects with a chorus amongst his finest to date. The same can be said for Vedamalady, a bittersweet jewel where every element comes together in seamless brilliance. The Mars Volta have pushed on through new realms of maturity and progression to deliver one of the finest albums of the year thus far. And all this while the main creative force is producing solo albums, directing films and playing live shows; a commendable effort! ★★★★

themusic.com.au

Jake Sun

The Peep Tempel

On their debut album they’ve lived up to the promises presented by both their live performance and earlier seven-inch singles. The album kicks off with the sinister Lance, built on a two-chord pulse punctuated with flourishes of squealing guitars that are integral to the band’s sound. The drumming is intense and explosive – erupting when it feels the need which thankfully is quite often. The tempo is increased for Collusion, and you start to get the idea of the non-stop party happening here. Even when the pace is dropped for People Don’t Get You, Do What You Want and Mission Floyd, there’s no reduction in intensity. It’s hard to go past earlier single Thank You Machiavelli as the pinnacle moment of the record – a more blistering command to lose your shit is basically impossible to imagine. While it doesn’t have the subtlety of some of the other numbers, its ridiculously violent in your face party mayhem is beyond infectious. While occasionally some of their influences seep through to the surface, The Peep Tempel really don’t sound like anything other than everything a rock’n’roll band should be. ★★★★½

Chris Yates

TIME OFF • 21


F R O N T R O W @ T I M E O F F. C O M . A U

THIS WEEK IN

ARTS

WEDNESDAY 21 Brisbane Comedy Festival – shows this week include The Best of Malaysian Comedy with Harith Iskander, Tommy Dassalo, Asher Treleaven, Des Bishop, Tom Gleeson, DeAnne Smith, Lindsay Webb, Andrew O’Neill, Sam Simmons, Wil Anderson, and Tom Green. All shows at Brisbane Powerhouse. Various session times. See briscomfest.com for details. Brisbane Comedy Festival runs to 25 March.

THURSDAY 22 GOMA & GOPA – local artist Anthony Jigalin has pieced together a great collection of local artists for a group show. Works on display by artists including Jigalin, Guido van Helten, Sam Butel, LUCKS, Barek, and ZKLR. Closing day. Bleeding Heart Gallery. Dickens’ Women – following sellout performances in 2007, BAFTA Award winning actress Miriam Margolyes returns to Australia for an encore national tour of her one-woman tourde-force. Bringing to life 23 of Charles Dickens’ most affecting and colourful female (and male!) characters, Margolyes presents her powerful, comprehensive, and at times hilarious exposé of Dickens, his writing, and the real-life women who found themselves immortalised in his books. Opening night, 7:30pm. Playhouse, QPAC until Saturday 24.

FRIDAY 23 Romeo & Juliet – Graeme Murphy is famous for bringing new life to classic ballets, and now he’s tackled the greatest love story ever told: Romeo & Juliet. The Australian Ballet with Queensland Symphony Orchestra. Opening night, 6:30pm. Lyric Theatre, QPAC until Wednesday 28.

SATURDAY 24 As You Like It – Shakespeare’s most joyous comedy, a feast of wit and wisdom, love and lust, cross-dressing and crosspurposes; this is a life-affirming, wonderfully optimistic trip into the forest of love performed by a crack cast for your special beguilement. Directed by David Berthold for La Boite. Final night. Roundhouse Theatre. Ross Noble: Nonsensory Overload – Noble is back fresh from his travels, not to mention his own TV show, doing what he

does best; spinning forth hilarious nonsense for your amusement. Now is your chance to see one of the best live comics working internationally today. Final night. Concert Hall, QPAC.

SUNDAY 25 West End Film Festival – multiple screening sessions of the festival’s best films as well as an awards ceremony with cash prizes being presented to the winning filmmakers over three award categories. Rumpus Cinema, West End, 5:30pm. See westendfilmfestival.com.au for details.

ONGOING The Boys Next Door – four mentally handicapped men live in a communal residence under the supervision of Jack, an earnest, but increasingly “burned out” young social worker. Mingled with scenes from the daily lives of Norman, Lucien, Arnold and Barry, where “little things” sometimes become momentous (and often very funny), are moments of great poignancy when we are reminded that the handicapped, like the rest of us, want only to love and laugh, and find some meaning a purpose in the brief time that they, like their more fortunate brothers, are alloted on this earth. Brisbane Arts Theatre until 7 April. The Laramie Project – in October 1998, a 21-year-old student at the University of Wyoming was kidnapped, severely beaten and left to die, tied to a fence in the middle of the prairie outside Laramie, Wyoming. His name was Matthew Shepard, and he was the victim of this assault because he was gay. The Laramie Project’s authors conducted more than 200 interviews with the people of the town and the breadth of their reactions to the crime is fascinating. It explores the depths to which humanity can sink and the heights of compassion of which we are capable. Nash Theatre, New Farm until 31 March. Midnight Sun – a film programme bringing together a wide selection of film and video by contemporary Nordic filmmakers and artists, highlighting some of the most engaging and unconventional work to have emerged during the last decade. Screenings include Lars von Trier films, the original Millenium trilogy, and a look at Scandanavian horror films. Australian Cinémathèque until 18 April. See qag.qld.gov.au/ cinematheque for details. AY RSD THU S T R STA

GAME THEORY

TOM HAWKING GETS ALL AGOG AT SITTING IN THE SAME ROOM AS DONALD SUTHERLAND – AND DIRECTOR GARY ROSS – TO TALK ABOUT THE POLITICAL ALLEGORIES BEHIND UPCOMING DYSTOPIAN BLOCKBUSTER THE HUNGER GAMES. “I thought it was a beautiful script,” said Donald Sutherland to Total Film recently. “[I thought] it had the possibility to be the most influential film made in this country for many years.” Sutherland was talking about the upcoming film adaptation of wildly successful young adult novel The Hunger Games, a dystopian thriller that places its young heroine Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) into a sort of Survivor-meets-TheRunning-Man deathmatch with 23 other underprivileged adolescent combatants for the entertainment of a populace who watches the entire thing on TV. Sutherland plays the sinister patriarch President Snow, the man whose role it is to keep the 1 percent entertained and the 99 percent oppressed. It’s a part that Sutherland apparently chased off his own bat, and now he’s sitting opposite Front Row in a swanky LA hotel – the sort of place where there’s an iPad in every room, just because – fielding questions from a battalion of journalists from around the world. Front Row elbows its way between a veteran long-winded Italian and a studious film nerd from France to ask: why? What was it about The Hunger Games that impressed Sutherland so? I mean, shit, we’re talking about Hollywood

royalty here, an actor whose career spans half a century, a man who’s got his star on the Walk of Fame, who worked with Fellini and Bertolucci, who played the lead roles in films like Don’t Look Now and Klute. “I was not aware of the novels [at first],” he explains. “But I was so impressed with Gary Ross’s script. Gosh. It was really terrific. I thought it could maybe be a catalyst for young people in this society, and to be a part of that – to be a part of something that was part of their movement – thrilled me.” There’s something puckish about Sutherland, an apparently undiminished enthusiasm for his craft and for life in general, a boyish gleam in his eye as he holds court, relating stories about Fellini and his son Kiefer and an acquaintance who got arrested at the airport after telling immigration officials that he was in the USA “to shoot a pilot”. But he speaks with a certain gravitas, too, as if he’s used to being listened to. And he takes his time to think carefully about his answer when Front Row asks him what exactly he thought the film might catalyse. “Well,” he says, “apparently a lot of young people like these books. Maybe they will come to realise out

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of liking them that [the story] is an allegory – that certain aspects of the society that we live in are as unjust as perhaps the Occupy Wall Street people think. I didn’t care if I was walking on [in the film]. I would have walked on.” In the event, director Gary Ross wrote extra scenes to provide greater insight into Snow’s character – a wise move, considering that the President could so easily have been a fairly onedimensional villain. (A suggestion, it has to be said, that doesn’t amuse Sutherland: “I don’t think,” he says sternly, “that any of my characters could ever be one-dimensional”.) For his part, Ross was similarly struck by the novel’s powerful vein of allegory when he first read them – it’s a rare YA novel that evokes the spirit of Guy Debord, after all. “I read The Hunger Games in one sitting,” Ross says. “I was completely riveted by it. I thought it talked about the way that entertainment can be used as a political instrument, and the way entertainment devolves into spectacle, and the way that spectacle can be used as a means of political control. And I think it’s the way that [the government] gets the people to participate in the games is particularly brilliant. They’re not just oppressing them, they’re getting them to participate [in their own oppression]. I thought that the story had a lot on its mind that’s relevant to where we are today.” It’s Sutherland who delivers perhaps the film’s key line, when he observes that the Hunger Games exist to give the populace hope, with hope being a far more effective method of repression than fear.

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The spark grows into a flame in the form of protagonist Everdeen, played with consummate skill by Jennifer Lawrence. Both Ross and Sutherland are full of praise for the film’s young star. Ross says, “There’s a beautiful human element [to the film], and that’s what Jen was able to add. Hers is a rare talent. I auditioned a lot of people, but when she came in, it was, like, ‘Forget about it.’ Hers was the best audition I’ve ever seen.” Her performance also gives an anchor to what’s a fairly horrific concept: kids slaughtering other kids for the entertainment of the general public. One of The Hunger Games’ more notable achievements is managing to convey the abhorrence of its premise while keeping a suitable rating. “The trick to that,” Ross says, “is that you stay in [Lawrence’s] point of view. When you pop wide, you’re committed to a bloodbath. But when you stay in her point of view, you see a glimpse of blood, hear a twig break, [convey] the need to escape. I don’t have to be gratuitous or indulgent. But the key to the movie is the subjectivity.” WHAT: The Hunger Games WHERE & WHEN: Screening in cinemas from Thursday 22 March

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This, as it turns out, was one of the two extra scenes that Ross wrote: “We had a long conversation about the nature of the kind of political structure [in the books],” Sutherland recalls. “[Gary] wrote those two other scenes, with Snow explaining why of the 24, one survives. Why hope is essential. Why people will continue if you give them hope. But hope is a spark, and it will grow into a flame if you don’t control it.”

THU 6.30PM/TUES 4.00PM

PRESUMED GUILTY

THU 9.15PM/SUN 4.15PM/ WED 4.00PM

ALL OUR DESIRES (M) FRI 1.30PM, 8.45PM

JO’S BOY (M) FRI 4.00PM

THE WELL-DIGGER’S DAUGHTER (PG) FRI 6.30PM

DECLARATION OF WAR (M)

HOUSE OF TOLERANCE

SUN 4.00PM

SAT 3.45PM/SUN 8.45PM

SUN 6.00PM

(18+)

CAFÉ DE FLORE (MA15+) SAT 6.15PM

PARIS-MANHATTAN (PG) SAT 7.00PM/MON 6.30PM/ TUES 1.30PM

ELLES (R18+) SAT 9.00PM

THE SKYLAB (M) SUN 1.30PM

THE GIANTS (M) GOODBYE, FIRST LOVE (M) SUN 6.15PM

NOTHING TO DECLARE (M)

SUN 8.00PM

TALES OF THE NIGHT (G)

A LIFE FOR BALLET

MON 4.00PM

SUN 2.15PM

(MA15+)

THU 6.45PM/WED 9.00PM

FRI 9.00PM/SAT 8.45PM/MON 1.30, 9.00PM

(MA15+)

MY PIECE OF THE PIE

THU 9.00PM

SAT 1.30PM

AGAINST THE WIND (M)

MON 7.45PM/TUES 8.30PM

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THE ART OF LOVE (M)

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THU 6.30PM SAT 1.45PM

ELLES (R18+) THU 8.30PM SUN 4.00PM MON 1.30PM

THE SKYLAB (M) THU 9.15PM

PRESUMED GUILTY (MA15+)

FRI 1.30PM MON 6.30PM

THE ART OF LOVE (M) FRI 4.00, 6.30PM WED 8.30PM

AGAINST THE WIND (M) FRI 6.45PM SAT 4.30PM TUE 1.30PM

SAT 3.45PM

BELOVED (MA15+) SAT 6.00PM MON 9.00PM

DELICACY (M) SAT 6.30PM TUE 9.00PM

ALL OUR DESIRES (M) NOTHING TO DECLARE (M) SAT 9.00PM FRI 8.30PM MON 4.00PM

SUN 4.15PM

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THE GIANTS (M)

SILENCE OF LOVE (MA15+) THE WAR OF THE BUTTONS (PG)

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SUN 2.15PM WED 6.30PM


F R O N T R O W @ T I M E O F F. C O M . A U

C U LT U R A L

CRINGE

WITH MANDY MCALISTER A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, just as Leonardo DiCaprio by any other name would be as handsome. But would he still be the man we know, aka a Hollywood superstar? DiCaprio was famously asked by an agent early on to change his name to Lenny Williams because his birth name sounded too ethnic. He stuck to his guns because, as DiCaprio put it, he “already looked like a full blooded Aryan boy” and this reflects his family roots. It’s not unusual for performers to change their names but keeping his now iconic name was a good move on Leo’s part, besides the name Lenny Williams is already taken...by an African American soul singer. Recently singer Lana Del Rey pulled a swifty on fans of Latina songstresses until it became widely known that she was born Elizabeth Grant, fresh outta boarding school, yo. It didn’t hurt her career to switch to her much less posh sounding stage name, but you have to wonder if it’s not a bit wrong, if not outright sneaky, to appropriate ethnicity for the sake of record sales? Del Rey stated in a 2011 interview with Vogue, “I wanted a name I could shape the music towards... I was going to Miami quite a lot at the time, speaking a lot of Spanish with my friends from Cuba – Lana Del Rey reminded us of the glamour of the seaside. It sounded gorgeous coming off the tip of the tongue.” If she wanted a name reminiscent of the sea maybe Lana de le Mer would have been a better choice,

however, she’s deliberately taken a Spanish name for her own, stepping into the murky waters of cultural appropriation. It happens to come with a massive fan-base who don’t seem to mind being hoodwinked, so should anyone care? Of course she’s not the first person to trade in a boring white girl name for something with a bit more chutzpah. Portia de Rossi was born with the ultimate of names for the girl next door but traded Amanda Lee Rogers for her Italian sounding moniker at age 15. You can hardly blame her for that; in 1988, for a girl raised in Geelong what could be more glamourous than being Italian? Possibly only her current legal name, Portia Lee James DeGeneres. For my part I have to admit to practicing a socially acceptable way of appropriating ethnicity, having trading in the German surname “Kohler” for one from those put upon Celts, the Scots, in adopting Husband’s suffix “McAlister”. Swastikas for shamrocks is a pretty good swap. Better than being Celtic by marriage is having, like the most memorable comic book characters, an alliterative name. Though, if I were a comic book character I’d probably be the dorky ginger fetching Vicki Vale’s coffee. So what is in a name? Maybe Del Rey is right in choosing one to grow into when your birth name doesn’t fit. Shite, that last sentence might have me referring to said husband as Optimus.

SAY IT AGAIN, SAM COMEDIAN SAM SIMMONS CHATS TO SAM HOBSON ABOUT HIS NEW SHOW ABOUT THE WEATHER, AND THE UNDERPINNINGS OF HIS STYLE. Curt as hell, Sam Simmons can be challenging to talk to. He doesn’t like bullshit, and will tell you so, usually with a blunt insult that’s excused with a sharp burst of laughter. He’s passionate and defensive about what he does, and so any attempt to cross-question his motives often leads to fire. But Simmons is a fantastic – and bold – comic, and really his ‘rudeness’ is, in the context of understanding him through his material, just a highly-functioning, perhaps a little conversationallycareless individual, living unrepentantly what he preaches. His latest show is called About The Weather, and it’s about the subtext that underlies small talk. “I have no time for the inanities of [talk] like that,” he chirps. “I’m too rude, too abrupt. It’s just another one of my weird fuckin’ metacomedies, [and] I’d say it’s quite easily my best.” Trying to make an arc of the personality he presents, it’s put to him that there’s a hint of misanthropy to his work. He snaps back, furiously to the negative. “Why can’t you make comedy more confrontational, have some fun, and really fucking light a fire? It’s really the last great medium live where you can really say whatever the fuck you want. [Everything else], you’ve got to be political. If you’re doing it in music, who gives a shit –

it’s hidden behind a chord. If you’re doing it in theatre, it’s a wank, ’cause it’s theatre. [And] what can you get on television these days, really? Live comedy’s pretty exciting; you can smash theatre and music into it, and make people laugh and think. It’s pretty cool.” The structure his comedy takes lends largely to his success. It’s short, but never fleeting. Simmons reconstructs the experience of Living Sam through tiny, hilarious observational snippets. He… He sighs heavily, exasperated. “I think what you’d be alluding to here is saying it’s random.” It’s insisted that to label it ‘random’ would be supremely reductive. “Hugely [reductive], man,” he interjects. “I think Australian audiences might look at me as random, but it’s pretty weird that over in the UK, they [get it]. “But there’s no real technique to it. Why do I have to admit something personal in a funny story, and then [have] a punchline at the end of it? [And] I’m not a scientist, man. I don’t sit there going ‘ooh, if I just add a little bit of nuance to what I’m doing, I’m going to win an award.’ It’s more just trying to get the story out, and inevitably, because I wear my heart on my sleeve, it comes through.” He seems plagued by the reduction of his work to mere ‘randomness’.

WEST END STORIES

THE LOOKING

MIKE WITT, THE DIRECTOR OF THE WEST END FILM FESTIVAL, TALKS PASSIONATELY WITH SAM HOBSON ABOUT HIS PROJECT’S AIMS, AND THE PROBLEMS WITHIN THE LOCAL INDUSTRY. Entering its third year, the West End Film Festival, which screens throughout the day on Sunday 25 March at the Rumpus Cinema here in Brisbane, is a national short-film festival. It’s a production that’s deeply proud of itself, too. And so it should be. Bringing back cinema culture to a region of the city that’s not otherwise known for its dalliances with that sector of the local arts scene, the festival’s not only one of its kind, but it’s also, as its director Mike Witt explains it, most importantly an answer; a response, waving its hand frantically and welcomingly above the crowd, to what he sees as a section of Queensland arts that’s given inadequate representation and support from the government. “As a filmmaker, I saw hundreds of really good short films [that] weren’t being seen,” Witt explains passionately. “They weren’t getting into film festivals, and the majority of Australian film festivals are international competitions, and [so] the West End Film festival, its biggest point of difference is that it’s a national competition, so we can showcase [exclusively] Australian filmmakers. “Really,” he continues, “it was [foremost] an exercise to try and strengthen the film community in Brisbane; to try and give the filmmakers and the community

an avenue [through which to access] their work.” But is the Brisbane film scene really lacking? We have multiple multiplexes, a series of fantastic Palace cinemas, a remotely located Dendy, a fledgling Tribal… Not to mention the Australian Cinémathèque at GoMA. “Not in content, or outlets,” he rushes, “but in opportunity, yes. There’s really few platforms – festivals – to [showcase] local things here. “It’s very competitive in Australia,” he continues, tracing the root of the problem. “Places like France, for example, every single cinema ticket that is sold in France, funds the films in France. It’s a wonderful system. Australia just can’t compete with that. The majority of our films – particularly in Queensland – are only partly [government] funded, so the filmmakers are actually reaching into their pockets, and paying for the things themselves. It’s really, really sad for short films.” He intimates that, amongst creatives, there’s a growing slump; a depression about how ‘put-off’ they are about starting new films, new cinematic ventures, directly because of this lack of support. “It’s difficult for filmmakers to not only come up with creative scope which requires

“Hugely. Not overseas, but here definitely,” he says, bitterly. “There’s a lot of fear with television networks with me, and that’s cool, because it means that, in my own little dumb head, I’m being dangerous, which I think’s pretty great. “And, my God, if they consider ‘danger’ [to be] someone being silly – people get so offended by ‘silly’. They equate people being silly with

“A festival can represent a community, or a group of people, and connect that community to filmmakers, that’s what it can do. And it’s a great benefit to the community, and to the film industry that it can do that. As we grow, there will be those [funding] opportunities. It’s just a matter of time. This is still just our third year, and we’ve still got a lot to prove, so…baby steps.” WHAT: West End Film Festival WHEN & WHERE: Sunday 25 March, Rumpus Cinema

WHAT: Sam Simmons: About The Weather WHEN & WHERE: Tonight to Sunday, Visy Theatre, Brisbane Powerhouse

GLASS

WITH HELEN STRINGER

decent funding,” he explains, meaning that they already have to condense and reshape their vision to fit the funds on offer, “but also just to do that regularly. It’s just not coherent to nurturing a healthy creative industry.” So his festival band-aids this, as best it can, by offering money as prizes; a pool at the moment of $3,000. In the future, Witt says, they’d love to be able to grow this considerably; to become a viable funding stream for burgeoning local filmmakers.

effeminate, [and] with being not smart, or not being able to write a clever joke. There’s a lot of baggage coming with doing what I do…and fuck it’s boring.”

Who knew a room full of giant heads could be so dull? The Archibald Prize is back, but it’s impossible to think of anything exciting to say about that increasingly irrelevant snoozefest. Although there is some hilariously cranky commentary over at the Australian from art conservative Christopher Allen. Allen’s criticisms of the entries include killer summations like, “What we are seeing, dreadful as most of it is, must be the tip of an iceberg of awfulness that goes down a very long way” and “Among such an embarrassment of choice, it’s hard to decide which is the worst picture in the show.” It’s unintentionally hysterical brilliance from an art dinosaur who likes his portraits to be of the classic variety, none of this multimedia-enhanced business, thank you very much. Safe to say then that Allen would not be pleased with the suggestion that portraiture was totally 17th Century and this year the kids are all going mad for these new-fangled things called computers and the magical wizardry of the internets. These days art is mostly free and usually available in a humorous YouTube clip; critics should be truncating words like bona fide citizens of 2012 and rating art according to the LMFAO spectrum. Apparently the gap between internet and credible art has been closing for a while but, according to learned internet bloggers, American artist Christian Marclay is the man finally successful in building a sturdy bridge. His The Clock

is comparable to a really long YouTube video – like those montages of scenes from movies that have been cut together to make it appear as though Bruce Willis and Samuel L Jackson are singing a Justin Beiber song only with a lot more swearing. Instead of being amusing Marclay’s montage consists of scenes from movies that show a specific time, spliced together to make a great big 24-hour-long work. A heads up: it’s not called The Clock for nothing. The installation is in real-time, so when you’re looking at your watch at 1:02pm thinking “what the hell is going on?” some actor is up on the screen in front of you checking their watch and finding that it’s 1:02pm for them as well. Putting this piece together must have been one of the most frustrating, irritating, and yes I’ll say it, time-consuming endeavours ever undertaken in the history of video installation and for that fact alone Marclay has surely earned his title as the Godfather of the YouTube Art Revolution. So now the flood gates are open, who will be next to make the crossover? Next up has to be Kony 2012, the most viral video of all time. I heartily support Kony – the video, not the murderous militant – it has all the hallmarks of a great work: it’s popular with the masses but not the critics; it has at least one minority group fuming (sorry Uganda); and putting the cherry on the art glory cake, the man behind it is just the right amount of unhinged giving Kony 2012 the winning trifecta for the new (art) world order. TIME OFF • 23


FAST · FURIOUS · ALL GIRL · FULL CONTACT

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BLANK REALM Member/role:

It’s just me, Daniel Spencer, fielding these ones, as I was elected group spokesperson. In the band we’ve got Luke Walsh on guitar and viral marketing, we got Sarah Spencer on infection control, Luke Spencer is the one who knows how to use the internet well, and I just procure the cigars. Our unofficial fifth member is our producer and mentor Slice.

How long have you been together? Our entire lives!

How did you all meet? Well, three of us met just sort of hanging around our parents’ house being kids, getting into trouble, annoying the cat. We found Luke W wandering in the bushland behind our house. He was 11 years old. He couldn’t remember a single thing about who he was or where he came from. All he had on him was a Nintendo power glove and 30 cents. He lived with us for six months before we found his parents and returned him. They were way stoked to see him again. By that time he had turned 12. Ever since then he’s been, ya know, part of the family.

You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? Probably Jive Bunny. On the drive from Sacramento to Portland we played Swing The Mood 89 times. I joke you not.

Would you rather be a busted broke-but-revered Hank Williams figure or some kind of Metallica monster?

What reality TV show would you enter as a band and why?

I see what this question is getting at, and I like it. I think some of us will end up very rich indeed, and some of us quite poor. Financial matters are a bit sensitive for us lately as we recently found out that our producer, and sometime manager, Slice was siphoning around 85% of our profits to keep his massage parlours afloat. We were pretty angry, but we still keep him round for that golden sound.

Really funny you should ask that, we just did one! I can’t remember what it’s called, but the premise of the episode was that we had to break into Matt Kennedy from Kitchen’s Floor’s house and steal all his jewels and wine, while a camera crew followed us around. We totally failed, and I can say that in addition to being a top shelf songwriter, Mr Kennedy is a devious and cruel builder of traps. It should be airing pretty soon, watch for the scene with the crazy possums. Holy hell!

Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? Lately we’ve been listening to this band Slice was in from the early-‘70s called Hurricane and M’Ladies. They were the kings of the Brisbane gypsy funk/reggae scene. We’ve seen the pics and the leftover cologne bottles, it was a big deal.

What part do you think Brisbane plays in the music you make? Brisbane makes everyone act really silly. We get silly and make music, Brisbane style!

Is your band responsible for more make-outs or break-ups? Why? I think it just makes people really horny, so probably make-outs, as a very brief prelude to full on sex.

If your band had to play a team sport instead of being musicians which sport would it be and why would you be triumphant? I think it would be golf. Although none of us know the rules, we do dress mostly in golfing attire when we are offstage, so we would at least look the part. I know golf isn’t a team sport, but we’d change all that.

What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? We’ve got two hot ones nearly ready to drop, one is self-titled and the other is called Patriot Games. Slice spread the jam thick on these ones, so get at ‘em. Blank Realm play the 4ZZZ Happy-Fest benefit at Woodland on Saturday 31 March. Photo by TERRY SOO.


TOUR GUIDE

FEATURE GIG VELOCIRAPTOR

FRIDAY 23 MARCH, ALHAMBRA LOUNGE There ain’t no party like a Raptor party, that’s one thing Brisbane audiences have well and truly realised over the past couple of years that Velociraptor have been destroying stages in our fair city. The band, who tend to feature anywhere between 8 and 12 bodies on stage at a time, depending the respective schedules of its clan members, play a loud, brash and energetic brand of garage rock, but one that is built on solid songs packed with disgracefully catchy hooks. The band are currently raising a bit of cash so they can afford to tour (there are a lot of them of them) so this Friday night you can help them in their quest to spread their prehistoric gospel to the people of our fair country simply by getting along and having one hell of a great time. They’re joined by Tiny Migrants, Go Violets and Hierophants at Alhambra Lounge from 8pm.

TIME OFF PRESENTS DIRTY THREE: The Tivoli Mar 22 VELOCIRAPTOR: Alhambra Mar 23 THE BEARDS: The Zoo Mar 30 4ZZZ HAPPY-FEST: Woodland Mar 31 BLUESFEST 2012: Tyagarah Tee Tree Farm Apr 5-9 SNEAKY SOUND SYSTEM: Family Apr 5 DEAD TO ME & COBRA SKULLS: Basement 243 Apr 8 ADAM ANT: The Tivoli Apr 8 BLUEJUICE: The Hi-Fi Apr 14 JAY AND SILENT BOB: The Tivoli Apr 19 HOODOO GURUS, THE SONICS, 5.6.7.8’S: The Tivoli Apr 20 LAST DINOSAURS: The Zoo Apr 24, Spotted Cow Apr 26, Elsewhere Apr 27, Sol Bar Apr 28 GOSSLING: Black Bear Lodge Apr 26 BIG SCARY: The Zoo Apr 28 MOUNT KIMBIE: The Hi-Fi May 2 FU MANCHU, BLACK COBRA: The Hi-Fi May 4 BIC RUNGA: Brisbane Powerhouse May 5, A&I Hall May 6 GROOVIN’ THE MOO: Townsville May 6 ANDREW W.K.: The Zoo May 9 PUBLIC ENEMY: The Hi-Fi May 10 DEAD LETTER CIRCUS: The Northern May 31, Spotted Cow Jun 1, The Hi-Fi Jun 2 YOUNG GUNS: The Hi-Fi Jun 1 BOY & BEAR: Coolangatta Hotel Jun 6, Beach Hotel Jun 7, The Tivoli Jun 8, Lake Kawana Community Centre Jun 9, Empire Theatre Jun 10

INTERNATIONAL BORIS: The Hi-Fi Mar 23 ELBOW: The Tivoli Mar 24 & 25 ELECTRELANE: The Zoo Mar 24 PROSUMER: Barsoma Mar 25 WOODEN SHJIPS: The Zoo Mar 25 KINA GRANNIS: The Arts Ctr Gold Coast Mar 27, Brisbane Powerhouse Mar 28 BRIAN SETZER’S ROCKABILLY RIOT!: The Tivoli Mar 28 YELAWOLF: The Hi-Fi Mar 29 NICK LOWE: The Tivoli Apr 4 DEAD MEADOW: The Zoo Apr 4 SUBLIME WITH ROME: Coolangatta Hotel Apr 4, The Hi-Fi Apr 5 BASS DRUM OF DEATH: Oh Hello May 5 G3 : Brisbane Convention Ctr Apr 5 JAMES VINCENT MCMORROW: Black Bear Lodge Apr 5 JOHN FOGERTY: BEC Apr 5 26 • TIME OFF

NEW FOUND GLORY, TAKING BACK SUNDAY: The Tivoli Apr 5 VEIL OF MAYA: Snitch Apr 5, Beenleigh PCYC Apr 6 TONY BENNETT: Brisbane Convention Ctr Apr 7, Jupiters Apr 16 ADAM ANT: The Tivoli Apr 8 DEAD TO ME, COBRA SKULLS: Basement 243 Apr 8 YANN TIERSEN: Brisbane Powerhouse Apr 10 COSMIC GATE: Family Apr 13 PETER HOOK: The Tivoli Apr 13 THE FEELERS: The Tempo Hotel Apr 13, Coolangatta Hotel Apr 14, Great Northern Apr 15 LOU BARLOW: Old QLD Museum Apr 14 AUGUST BURNS RED, BLESSTHEFALL: The Hi-Fi Apr 18 ONE DIRECTION: Brisbane Convention Ctr Apr 18 JAY & SILENT BOB: The Tivoli Apr 19 KURTIS BLOW: Mustang Bar Apr 19 IN ELEMENT: Jubilee Hotel Apr 20, Miami Tavern Apr 21 THE SONICS, THE 5.6.7.8’S: The Tivoli Apr 20 DERRICK MAY: Barsoma Apr 21 MARK LANEGAN BAND: The Tivoli Apr 21 THE EXPLOITED: The Hi-Fi Apr 26 HENRY ROLLINS: Brisbane Powerhouse May 2, 3 & 4 MOUNT KIMBIE: The Hi-Fi May 2 THE MOUNTAIN GOATS: Great Northern May 3, The Zoo May 4 DEVILDRIVER, DARKEST HOUR: The Tivoli May 4 FU MANCHU: The Hi-Fi May 4 ATMOSPHERE, EVIDENCE: The Hi Fi May 5 BIC RUNGA: Brisbane Powerhouse May 5, A&I Hall May 6 ORBITAL: The Tivoli May 6 CITY AND COLOUR: The Tivoli May 8 & 9 KAISER CHIEFS: The Hi-Fi May 8 WAVVES: The Zoo May 8 ANDREW WK: The Zoo May 9 DIGITALISM: Family May 9 THE MACCABEES: The Hi-Fi May 9 MUTEMATH: The Zoo May 10 PUBLIC ENEMY: The Hi-Fi May 10 FRANK TURNER & THE SLEEPING SOULS: The Zoo May 13 BITTER END: Basement 243 May 17, Between the Walls May 18, YAC Byron Bay May 19 MORGAN PAGE: Family May 18 TIM ‘RIPPER’ OWENS: The Hi-Fi May 19 MICKEY AVALON: Coolangatta Hotel May 19 MURDER BY DEATH: Surfers Paradise Beergarden May 24, Spotted Cow May 25, Jubilee Hotel May 26 THE BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE, THE RAVEONETTES: The Hi-Fi May 24 BELL BIV DEVOE, GINUWINE: The Tivoli May 26 FLORENCE & THE MACHINE: Riverstage May 26 SHOWTEK: The Hi-Fi May 26 ANTI-FLAG: The Zoo May 30, Coolangatta Hotel May 31 YOUNG GUNS: The Hi-Fi Jun 1 ZOLA JESUS: Alhambra Jun 1 MARK KOZELEK: Black Bear Lodge Jun 7 SIMPLE PLAN, WE THE KINGS: Southport RSL Jun 8, Eatons Hill Jun 9, Caloundra RSL Jun 10

BON IVER @ THE TIVOLI PIC BY STEPHEN BOOTH

BON IVER, SALLY SELTMANN THE TIVOLI: 17.03.12

Scoring the opening slot for a tour as anticipated as the current run of shows by Justin Vernon and his ragtag bunch of American indie troubadours must be a doubleedged sword – obviously you get to play your music to swathes of new people each night, but even for someone as comfortably established as Sally Seltmann it must be nerve-wracking playing to such a large crowd of people so clearly waiting for you to finish. Not to say that the demur singer-songwriter doesn’t do a good job of winning over some new fans – after all her polite, heartfelt songs are surely not miles removed from the musical terrain traversed by tonight’s headliner – but the anticipation for someone else must be stifling on that big stage. Seltmann traverses her entire career, with New Buffalo tunes (Emotional Champ, You’ve Gone My Friend) nestling nicely alongside more recent solo fare (Heart That’s Pounding, Dark Blue Angel) and a couple of new tunes, but unsurprisingly her biggest reaction comes when she unveils the fresh Even Though I’m A Woman from the recent Seeker Lover Keeper collaboration. The stage is decked out in strange hessian webbing, giving off a spooky forest vibe which ushers memories of the ‘cabin in the woods’ mythology that kickstarted the career of Bon Iver so intriguingly, but from the opening bars of set opener Perth tonight it’s strikingly clear that this band has moved far beyond the realms of a one-man operation, both literally and figuratively. The ten or so people on stage build the song into a massive semi-orchestral breakdown, noir-ish to the extreme, and it’s obvious that we have a new entity on our hands, especially as they embark on a playful Afro-tinged segue into Minnesota, WI. The crowd are enraptured – people are hugging as if it’s the second coming – but it’s somewhat difficult to see where all of this passion and emotion is coming from. Despite the size of the ensemble, Vernon – the frontman and songwriter who started the band, and who used to be the band – still justifiably commands the lion’s share of the focus, exuding a quiet confidence and laidback charisma, and he seems grounded despite his massive recent acclaim. Holocene is built to a subtle crescendo before Blood Bank ups the rock quotient, the band seeming happy to be given some rein, although they seem focused and in the zone throughout the set despite the constant requirement for them to exercise restraint amidst the bombast. Creature Fear is a perfect example, staring out as a quiet, bespoke folk number before morphing into a vivid cinematic soundscape and eventually ending as a massive wigout, the band unleashed and Vernon clearly giving it his all. Despite this contrast, however, the entire performance just feels a bit safe, flat at times: the music’s all shiny and shimmery but it’s difficult to discern if there’s any real substance beneath the trickery. Vernon does himself no favours lyrically – his vocals are so routinely affected that it’s difficult to decipher lyrics at all if you don’t already know the songs backwards – so it’s left to the music to tell the tale, although if that’s in the eye of the beholder then Bon Iver are clearly winning because the full house is besotted as the set finishes with a slew of faves such as re:Stacks, Skinny Love and Calgary. They return triumphant for an encore – even on the third night of their Brisbane stand The Tivoli is enraptured –

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but even as the spectral The Wolves (Act I and II) ends cacophonously before sliding into the melodic, almost traditional For Emma and the crowd goes wild, it’s hard to work out if the new emperor is clad in finery or whether beneath the effects he’s wearing anything at all. TOM LEDGER

NO ANCHOR, WHITEHORSE, QUIET STEPS, TINY SPIDERS WOODLAND: 17.03.12

There’s nary a green shirt nor a leprechaun in sight, yet this St Patrick’s Day evening is still an incredibly eclectic, drunken and loud affair. Kicking out the jams is Tiny Spiders, the duo slathering the Woodland crowd with their sludge pop. Insert whatever genre you want and these guys will channel it with some pop nous and a bucketload of noise. Cam Smith is a whirling dervish behind the skins, a live-action (yet coherent) Animal, whilst Innez Tulloch holds court with her scuzzy guitar and light vocals. They may be the odd band out on tonight’s bill, but they are also the most fun by a country mile. Quiet Steps continue their measured march towards global domination with another electric set. The trio continue to meld their punk roots with other musical mores, bordering the screamo aesthetic but infusing it with intelligence and working-class grunt, something that The Nation Blue have pretty much patented. That said, it is Leon Perkin’s vocal dexterity that continues to impress, and although when at times the band teeters on indie malaise, it is their visceral underbelly that drags them to the fore once more. A great show. If those two bands rattled the headspace, Melbourne’s Whitehorse obliterate the last brain cell that the crowd have collectively clung to before now. A brutal mixture of drone and doom metal, the five-piece throw up the bleakest, blackest set many have seen for quite a while. That is an imminently good thing. They are able to maintain a diligent, militaristic monotony, pinned down to the floor by Pete Hyde’s guttural growls and pitch-perfect screams. On the occasions (around about two) that the band take flight with something resembling speed, it is breathtaking. Not many are prepared for such a sledgehammer approach – but that’s Whitehorse for you. The patron saints of this evening are undoubtedly noiseniks No Anchor, who are also launching their Rope/Pussyfootin’ 7”, and with the bar raised incredibly high, the three-piece have some work in front of them to come out on top. Anyone that has been following their progression of shows over the past two years, particularly the seven days’ residency at The Waiting Room, will know that they have a wealth of musical dexterity up their grimy sleeves, and tonight they throw it all against the wall in wanton fury. The approach to shorter songs allows the band to distill their aggression into capsule size, easily swallowed for maximum effect. Donnie Miller and Ian Rogers bear their bass attacks like they are brandishing blunt instruments, whilst Alex Gillies remains their fierce fulcrum. New tracks meld with old seamlessly, even with a Big Black cover thrown in the mix. Intense brilliance from one of Brisbane’s best. BRENDAN TELFORD


REAL ESTATE, FEATHERS, TIGHT SLIP THE ZOO: 13.03.12

Is it the abundance of current touring acts? Is it the overwhelming plethora of festivals doing the rounds? Or did you just spend too much cash on your new iPad 3? Whatever it is, there is a criminally poor turn-out for tonight’s show featuring Brooklyn’s Real Estate. No one knows it more than Brisbane’s Tight Slip as they play what’s a lacklustre post-punk set to literally ten people. All girl, surf-psychedelic outfit Feathers fair slightly better with a set of steady-paced songs that feel like the beach at midnight, with a campfire. Wonky vocals and the odd spag-western guitar twang only add to an appeal that’ll creep up on you from behind. Now with about 250 people in the room, the politely presented Real Estate subtly begin what will eventuate in an equally subtle, entirely brilliant set of their trademark sound of suburbia guitars, orderly drums and sublime harmonies. Kicking off with Fake Blues from their 2009 self-titled debut, the dynamic barely shifts across the next hour and a bit as they lift majority of their set from mostrecent longplayer Days but also include cuts from their other album and play a b-side or two. Easy is an early highlight as is the anthemic It’s Real, placed so early in their set that some diehard punters even miss the song due to a much earlier than advertised start. Out Of Tune slows it down a notch and is arguably the finest inclusion. The band say little beyond “Thanks for coming out”, instead opting to let their dreamy and laid-back jangle do the talking. After a quick, chilled hour finishing with a flawless combo of Younger Than Yesterday, Atlantic City and All The Same, the band returns for just one encore song – Suburban Dogs; short, sweet and incredibly satisfying. BEN PREECE

back catalogue, and instead what eventuates is a dedication to the music they helped establish throughout the ‘70s, and since. Spread across The Zoo stage, the musicians are fused with an array of both traditional and electronic instruments between them, working the multiple devices with all hands on deck. While it’s the sounds most familiar to NEU! fans that might ring most prominently through the audience’s collective ear, the set features a healthy presence of the musicians’ combined collaborations. Even a hint of a Can melody or two is heard to echo through the venue walls – a twist that leaves a smattering of tuned in spectators cheering with glee. The climax of the showing meets both eyes and ears as the musicians push a rhythmic cycle of audio-visual patterns across a plane of rock and trance blueprints – an endurance test for both band and audience alike, that upon close, completes a performance so succinct in its theory and execution, that it surely appeases every one of the bodies and minds in attendance. CARLIN BEATTIE

FIRST AID KIT, LITTLE SCOUT, BIG STRONG BRUTE THE ZOO: 16.03.12

Big Strong Brute, the musical moniker of Brisbane’s Paul Donoughue, opens the evening in appropriate style with an all-singing backing band beautifully filling out the melancholy of his very new debut album Avalanche Of Truth. It’s heart wrenching stuff, and when he tackles Springsteen’s Hungry Heart as just a simple, lonesome bloke with an acoustic guitar, perhaps the audience is glimpsing the shape of things to come for the 24-year-old. After being quiet on the live front for a while, the gradual keys and percussion build of Little Scout’s

In The End allows Melissa Tickle’s sweet yet defined vocal to greet a growing crowd with the charm and confidence of an old friend. The five-piece chalk up a set of polished dynamism, interspersing pop moments including the tropicana rhythms of Know Your Exit with some memorable newbies of the dark folk persuasion. This Old Routine introduces Sweden’s First Aid Kit, sister’s Klara and Johnanna Söderberg accompanied by drummer Mattias Bergqvist tonight, in an unfussy manner designed to highlight the girls’ best feature – their harmonies. There’s no stage distractions, no band of smarty-pants instrumentalists to fill out a sound and no entourage save their father who mans the sound desk. Though the younger Klara directs the trio with lead vocals and confident acoustic strums, Johanna is particularly mesmerising to watch as one hand fills melody on keys whilst the other plays the bassline, often in an authentic plodding country manner, all the while singing harmony. Following a rousing rendition of Emmylou, a tribute to some of country music’s finest vocal partnerships, the sisters hush the crowd and reiterate the sentiment by doing something quite unusual; unplugging and moving to the front of the stage, an unamplified version of Ghost Town shares simply the special and very intimate bond that comes with singing together. Though they do it so well, it’s not all sweet, countrified tales of heartbreak for the two porcelain-skinned beauties who leave the title track of their current album Lion’s Roar until last, throwing their flowing locks all over the stage and turning it into a drawn out, gypsy-like finale. A surprise encore offering of their not-often performed cover of Patti Smith’s 1979 classic Dancing Barefoot leaves barely a dry eye as Klara repeats “Oh god I fell for you” to a room likely projecting the same emotion back. It’s perfect, and touching, and one hell of a way to finish a performance that requires no frills to be utterly magnificent. TYLER McLOUGHLAN

MICHAEL ROTHER, BAPTISM OF UZI, ANONYMEYE THE ZOO: 15.03.12

Outside The Zoo this evening it’s raining steadily; inside, it’s raining men. The night’s all-male line-up provides for an intriguing remark on the music-makers of some of the past and present’s most progressive, introspective and intricate sounds – both alternative and influential in equal measure. The perfect Thursday night refuge for purveyors, aficionados and newcomers to electronic and ‘experimental’ composition, the modest crowd showing presents just that. With both familiar and new faces, the intimate affair allows for close-to-stage and seated viewing for the duration of the performances. Opening the show, local talent Andrew Tuttle presents the latest manifestation of his musical pursuits as Anonymeye. The ongoing evolution of this Brisbane musician comes to a culmination tonight through the synthesis of both laptop and acoustic devices. Federation, Pacific Highway and If At First You Don’t Secede… each prime the crowd with the buzz and hum of textural and atmospheric dexterity. Melbourne outfit Baptism Of Uzi are next to throw paint on the canvas adding a decidedly thicker rock’n’roll layer to the proceedings. While dance turns coil from the base of the band’s Kraut-centric meanderings, the spice in this group’s soup is a balanced sprinkling of amplifier overdrive and sincerity to their musical inspirations. The star of the night, Michael Rother, hits the stage, and for the extent of the performance is joined onstage by fellow Krautrock legends Dieter Moebius and Hans Lampe. The dots that draw this trio together form for a supergroup performance, featuring a selection of the men that brought the world Kraftwerk, NEU!, Harmonia, Tangerine Dream and Kluster, among other prominent names in the development of contemporary music. Delivering a mind opening set, the intriguing decision is made to pull any focus from sounds that might emerge as a strict rendition of the groups’

TOUR GUIDE SISTER SLEDGE: The Hi-Fi Jun 9 EIFFEL 65, N-TRANCE: The Hi-Fi Sep 21 RADIOHEAD: BEC Nov 9

NATIONAL

BALL PARK MUSIC: Coolangatta Hotel Mar 22, Great Northern Mar 23, The Hi-Fi Mar 24 & May 11 DIRTY THREE: The Tivoli Mar 22 DANGEROUS!: Kings Beach Mar 24, X&Y Mar 29, Spotted Cow Mar 31 XAVIER RUDD: The Hi-Fi Mar 25 THE NECKS: Byron Bay Community Ctr Mar 28, Brisbane Powerhouse Mar 29 CANYONS: Cobra Kai Mar 29, Elsewhere Mar 30 CLOSURE IN MOSCOW: Great Northern Mar 29, X & Y Bar Mar 30, Kings Beach Tavern Mar 31 HOLLY THROSBY: Black Bear Lodge Mar 29 THE GETAWAY PLAN: Kings Beach Tavern Mar 29, Fitzy’s Mar 30, Runaway Bay Tavern Mar 31 YACHT CLUB DJS: Spotted Cow Mar 29, Alhambra Lounge Mar 30, Great Northern Mar 31, Coolangatta Hotel Apr 1 THE BEARDS: The Zoo Mar 30, Solbar Mar 31 DEEZ NUTS: The Tempo Hotel Apr 5 SNEAKY SOUND SYSTEM: Family Apr 5 BAG RAIDERS: Bowler Bar Apr 8, La La Land Apr 9 DZ DEATHRAYS: Elsewhere Apr 12, The Zoo Apr 13, Great Northern Apr 14 SNAKADAKTAL: The Zoo Apr 12, Beach Hotel Byron Bay Apr 13, The Loft Apr 14 JOELISTICS, DIAFRIX: Alhambra Lounge Apr 13 BLUEJU!CE: The Hi-Fi Apr 14 HOODOO GURUS: The Tivoli Apr 20 POND: Alhambra Apr 20, Great Northern Apr 21 STONEFIELD: The Zoo Apr 20, Kings Beach Tavern Apr 21, Coolangatta Hotel Apr 22 LAST DINOSAURS: The Zoo Apr 24, Spotted Cow Apr 26, Elsewhere Apr 27, Sol Bar Apr 28 HUSKY: The Zoo Apr 26, SoundLounge Apr 27, Woombye Hotel Apr 28 THE HERD, THUNDAMENTALS: The Zoo Apr 27, Great Northern Apr 28 BIG SCARY: The Zoo Apr 28 AN HORSE: The Zoo Apr 29 THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT: Great Northern May 2, Arena May 3, Coolangatta Hotel May 4, Kings Beach Tavern May 5 MICK THOMAS: Sol Bar May 3, The Beetle Bar May 4 CALLING ALL CARS: The Zoo May 5 SAN CISCO: Elsewhere May 10, The Zoo May 11 KIMBRA: The Tivoli May 15 JOSH PYKE: The Tivoli May 18 THE MISSION IN MOTION: Shark Bar May 18, X&Y Bar May 19 LANIE LANE: Woombye Pub May 30, The Hi-Fi May 31 DEAD LETTER CIRCUS: Great Northern May 31, Spotted Cow Jun 1, The Hi-Fi Jun 2, Kings Beach Tavern Jun 10 MATT CORBY, ALPINE: The Tivoli Jun 1 FUNKOARS: Great Northern Jun 1, The Zoo Jun 2 THE JEZABELS: Brisbane Convention Ctr Jun 7 360: The Hi-Fi Jun 10 & 11

FESTIVALS

FIRST AID KIT @ THE ZOO PIC BY JOHN STUBBS

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BLUESFEST: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm Apr 5 – 9 SUPAFEST: RNA Showgrounds Apr 14 GROOVIN THE MOO: Murray Sports Complex May 6

TIME OFF • 27


ROOTS DOWN

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

OG FLAVAS

Blues ‘n’ roots with DAN CONDON rootsdown@timeoff.com.au

Metal, hardcore and punk with LOCHLAN WATT

With CYCLONE

DAVID BROMBERG Musical mastermind David Bromberg is making his first visit to Australia since his long absence from the music industry at large. I had a chat with the legendary musician about his career before he made his way out here. This guy has played with everyone from Bob Dylan to Link Wray to the Eagles (you can’t win ‘em all) as well as established a deep well of incredible material of his own. He hasn’t been here in over 20 years. “1903 I think it was,” he quips from his Willmington, Delaware home when asked when his last visit was. “A wonderful year.” Much of the footage circulating of Bromberg’s live shows featuring him in full flight with his Big Band, but logistics get in the way of bringing them to Australia. “The Big Band is 11-pieces so that’s pretty hard to move around, but the quartet is a pretty versatile group and I’m proud of it – we play some nice music. I like having three horns, it gives you a great feeling of power, but there’s a little intimacy you can get with the quartet that’s a little different. The strange thing is, I don’t plan the shows. I’ve never planned a set in my life. Just before we hit the stage we decide on what the first tune will be and then the tunes kind of string themselves together.” There’s no doubt Bromberg has friends in high places. His latest record, Use Me, features songs performed by Bromberg, but written and produced by the likes of Los Lobos, Vince Gill, Dr John, Levon Helm and John Hiatt to name a few. While he hopes each gig he’s done has helped shape his style, he’s just not sure. “I hope I’ve taken something from every gig I’ve done but that’s a lot of gigs,” he admits. “When I was a studio musician in New York I was on over 150 LPs, that’s a lot of recording and a lot of different artists; but I think I learned a lot during those days. The thing is, if you’re smart – and I try to be smart – you don’t stop learning.” Though for 22 years his learning took on a different form. He opened a violin shop and turned his back on the world of touring and recording. “The first thing you have to understand about me is that I’m a complete idiot,” he retorts. “I was touring at an unreal rate; I was on the road for two years without being home for as long as two weeks. If you do stuff like that you’re gonna get burnt out, but I never believed I could get burnt out. I didn’t want to be one of those guys who drags his sorry arse out on stage and does a bitter imitation of something he used to love, I didn’t wanna be that guy, there’s plenty of them.” In his time away hip hop fans got to know David Bromberg, as his song Sharon lended its main riff to Beastie Boys’ classic 1989 track Johnny Ryall. “I felt very good about it,” Bromberg says of the New York rappers appropriating his song. “At this point it wasn’t necessary to pay the people who wrote the material that you sampled. But they said, notwithstanding their right to sample, they wanted to pay me. We worked out a deal and when I sent them the signed contract they asked for an autographed photo which made me feel very, very good. It was a wonderful thing, that they wanted it was a great compliment.” Was he happy with how they used his riff? “Why not?” he exclaims. “What’s not to be happy about? Any time anyone shows appreciation for your work, you’re an ingrate if you can’t appreciate it. You can’t determine how someone is going to relate to it, everyone relates to it in their own way and that’s as it should be.” David Bromberg Band play Bluesfest Thursday 5 April, Friday 6 and Saturday 7. 28 • TIME OFF

French experimental metal group Hypno5e will return to Australia in May. Having toured last year with Adelaide’s Truth Corroded, this time they’ll have their second album behind them. Acid Mist Tomorrow was released in Australia through Truth Inc. in February. They’ll play the Surfer’s Paradise Beergarden on May 17 and Monstrothic at The Jubilee Hotel on May 18. Dead Letter Circus is embarking on another huge national tour, and they’re taking US prog-metal/rockers Fair To Midland and Melbourne progressive group Twelve Foot Ninja with them. There’s quite a few coastal and regional dates in Queensland, with the trio arriving in the city on June 2 to play The Hi-Fi. Local post-punk/indie three-piece Quiet Steps have released a new eight track album called Secular. It can be streamed in full or downloaded for as a little as $1 over on their Bandcamp page. The initial line-up for this year’s Dead of Winter Festival has been announced. Focused on themes of “music and horror-culture”, it will take over the Jubilee Hotel on July 14. More acts are expected to be announced, but things are already looking pretty full so far with The Rumjacks, Mz Ann Thropik, Charlie Greaser, Captain Reckless and The Lost Souls, I Nation, Heaven The Axe, The Ramshackle Army, Darklight Corporation, Horrorwood Mannequins, Perpetual End, Bronson, No Idea, and Graveyard Rockstars, as well as locals like the Dreamkillers, Midnight Creepers, Dead Letter Opener, D-Nine, Acacia, Shellfin, Malakyte and many more. With the departure of their last original member, Adelaide metal band Double Dragon have announced they will soon change their name to Sons Of Asena. Sons Of Asena is also the name of the new Double Dragon album due for release in April. So basically, the band will play a handful more to-be-announced shows over the next few months to launch the effort, before their first shows as Sons Of Asena in June. The band plans to record a new EP soon after, with vocalist Liggy Higgins saying he can see the band “becoming more Tool-like, with flourishes of extreme death metal”.

Recently reunited Newcastle hardcore band Dropsaw have released a new three-track EP online for free. Entitled For The Punters, the download comes with a lyric sheet, and was recorded by Jake Willoughby of I Exist, with the mixing and mastering handled by Danile Castleman (Sworn Enemy, Impending Doom). There’s a Mediafire link floating around that can be accessed from the band’s Facebook page. Perth prog-metal group Voyager will tour the US and Canada in May in support of Italian symphonic metallers Rhapsody of Fire. Self-described as “early-‘90s Ebullition/Gravity influenced post-hardcore”, Adelaide group Nebraska have made their debut 7” available. It can be purchased from nebraskafromadelaide.bigcartel.com. Featuring members who have been involved in such bands as Marathon, Shock Value and Downpour, new Brisbane group Nazi Dentist have just released their demo and it is set to tear your face off. Fans of heavy, thrashing hardcore should check out their six track demo over at nazidentist.bandcamp.com. Mortal Sin have announced that Dave Tinelet of Nekrofeist is their new vocalist. Last month original vocalist Mat Maurer announced his departure from the Sydney-based thrash legends. The new line-up played their first show at Venom in Sydney on March 17.

GIGS OF THE WEEK:

Thursday: Jamie Hay, Jen Buxton, Milestones, Run Squirrel, Columbia Buffet – Snitch. Armada In The Dusk, The Endless Pandemic, I Am Eternal, Averice, Trust and Fall – Basement 243. Friday: Boris (JPN), Laura, Nikko – The Hi-Fi. Jame Hay, Jen Buxton, Run Squirrel, Lookout Mountain – Between The Walls. Saturday: Hirs, Last Chaos, The Fevered, Heroin SS, Nazi Dentist – The Waiting Room. Darkc3ll, Melody Black, Daywalker, Gimpus – Jubilee Hotel. Sunday: Hirs, Tangle, IDYLLS, Body Sentence, Shortlife – Red Hill House.

THE BREAKDOWN Pop culture therapy with ADAM CURLEY It was an easy line to the front barrier when Angie Hart and Simon Austin walked onto the outdoor stage at Brisbane’s Big Gay Out last week. Hart was smiling in a shimmering gold dress; Austin was dressed more casually in a polo shirt and shorts but appeared in a similarly excitable mood. Their smiles continued as they were joined by Peter Luscombe and Bill McDonald, the same rhythm section that helped Hart and Austin bring Frente! back to life for a successful 2005 tour. But there was shyness, or perhaps an awareness of the group’s somewhat awkward placement at the festival, behind the smiles, too. Though the crowd was generally polite, giving the band its attention and clapping after songs, few in attendance openly recognised many songs in the set. The band knew that most were waiting for the one song to which they could sing along. “It’s coming,” Hart said, still smiling, at one point. It’s a familiar scenario, a crowd awaiting a hit single. It’s more familiar when the band on stage is playing exclusively from old sets, as Frente! were at the festival, making the likelihood of hearing known songs that weren’t hits slim for those who haven’t sought them out. Though the stereotype is made reluctantly, the truth is that it’s even more familiar again when the crowd is drawn from an ‘LGBTI community’. That isn’t to say LGBTI people aren’t interested in music, just that those who attend events based around bringing together LGBTI people aren’t usually there due to a shared love of music, let alone any particular kind of music. (That said, by all reports Ru Paul’s dance-pop set got a big welcome later on in the night, so there’s no accounting for taste – or perhaps there is.) At Big Gay Out, a call for Accidentally Kelly Street was made from somewhere in the crowd even after Hart informed us there were three songs left in the set. It was difficult to suppress the surprise that even those with a casual relationship to

Australian music couldn’t guess that the final three songs would be sing-along hits from the days of (or some days of) Doc Martins and pixie haircuts. Hart, too, told us we might have known the next song before the band played Ordinary Angels, which went to #3 on the Australian chart in 1992, followed by their New Order cover Bizarre Love Triangle and then Accidentally Kelly Street, which got its sing-along but had nowhere near the impact expected of a charted single played live. As the crowd went back to chatting and drinking, then, a question lingered: Why does pop music made by bands so often slip through the cracks in Australia? Our biggest rock bands old and young can headline mainstream festivals and majorlabel-backed pop singers remain the only kind given the media exposure to become household names. But when it comes to our pop bands, we often shrugged them off as too light for ‘serious’ music fans and not commercial enough for the everyman. Of course, Frente! came up in a time when ‘alt’ was in, hence the chart figures. They also called it a day long before they deserved the accolades awarded to the likes of, say, Nick Cave or The Jezabels (joke). But even pop-writing peers who stuck it out and also had hits are rarely awarded outside loyal circles: The Clouds, Ratcat and Custard to name three. Frente! can be directly charged with influencing a new and unashamedly Australian pop songwriter – from Sally Seltmann and The Grates to newcomers Elizabeth Rose and Emmy Bryce – yet are hardly ever talked about as anything more than a group with a couple of incidental chart hits. A pop act. Hopefully their booking by the organisers of the Big Gay Out is a sign that, in this case at least if not for all our great pop bands, the old saying is true: First come the gays, then come the girls, then comes the industry.

themusic.com.au

Sam Sparro (aka Samuel Falson) is back – and with a soulful second album. Yes, soulful! Return To Paradise is out in May. The singer has just wrapped a mini-tour, taking in Mardi Gras, to reintroduce himself to Australian audiences – as if we’d forgotten him. Still, Falson hasn’t released solo music since 2008’s eponymous debut, entailing the mega-hit Black And Gold. He’s also switched labels, signing to EMI Australia “for the world”. Falson was born in Sydney but at ten moved with his family to Los Angeles, his Dad a muso and Christian minister. He sang in church. By chance, Chaka Khan heard him, praising his abilities. That’s now part of the ‘Sam Sparro’ mythology. Leaving school, he came back to Sydney, then headed to London, immersing himself in the club scene (and coming out). Eventually, Falson, already making music in his teens, returned to LA where he met production cohort Jesse Rogg. Falson penned Black... while working in a coffee shop. It first aired independently in 2007 with tastemaker DJs Pete Tong and Annie Mac both spinning it. Such was the buzz that the electro-soulster scored a deal with Island. The re-issued Black... shot to No. 2 in the UK and No. 4 here. An album followed, entering the UK Top 5. Oddly, Falson would be bigger in Britain than Oz, much like Melbourne neo-soulster Daniel Merriweather. Nevertheless, he was nominated for several ARIAs. (Black... was also put up for a Grammy as ‘Best Dance Recording’.) Significantly, Falson was associated with the UK’s ‘wonky’ (read: eccentric) pop phenom, together with Mika and the electro La Roux. In fact, a few urban, r’n’b or hip hop acts have been classed as wonky: VV Brown, Example, and US illwaver KiD CuDi. But, even in a Mixmag cover story, Falson indicated that his debut was rushed, the label anxious to capitalise on the momentum of Black... He teamed with Paul Epworth in addition to Rogg. Mixmag referred to Black... as that year’s Crazy. Adele covered it – and Falson supported her. The feisty Londoner told Mixmag, “When I first met Sam, I was expecting Cee-Lo Green, not a skinny gay white boy.” Yet an unhappy Falson subsequently parted Island, their loss EMI’s gain. Regardless, he never slipped totally off the radar. Falson guested on tracks like Basement Jaxx’s Feelings Gone off Scars. He joined Mark Ronson’s supergroup Chauffeur with hipster MC Theophilus London. And he’s currently remixing the likes of Kimbra. Industry types flocked to Falson’s Melbourne showcase as he previewed Return... and performed old favourites. His band is the tightest OG has seen in ages, the backing vocalists (a guy and a girl) executing slick choreography (and the guy played sax!). Falson’s dashing brother James is on guitar. For Return..., Falson has tapped into vintage soul, funk and disco – specifically from 1978 to 1984. His new music, which is more liveoriented, and intentionally not over-polished, offers a welcome respite from the trancey/electro/urban hybrid currently clogging up the airwaves. Rogg is on board – and Greg Kurstin (Lily Allen) is credited for The Shallow End. The funky Let The Love In, Falson said on stage, was inspired by Khan. There’s an ‘80s electro-boogie charge to I Wish I Never Met You. Falson, who endured a breakup when prepping Return..., also sang a ballad, Shades Of Grey. Paradise People is celebratory – and very early George Michael. Incidentally, the Return... title references the fabled New York club Paradise Garage. What’s more, the lead single Happiness features a rare remix from Chicago’s Larry Heard, aka Mr Fingers, the Godfather of Deep House. If at one stage R&B became, like hip hop, depressingly homogenous, then everything has changed with post-Lady Gaga artistes such as Nicki Minaj revelling in a new camp that is glam yet street. Even Cee-Lo’s soul is vampy: Al Greenmeets-ABC. Falson’s 2012 look is kinda The Great Gatsby goes to Studio 54, but he’s been raving about urban diva Beyoncé Knowles – and he has the sound to match. Falson’s comeback couldn’t be more timely.


HAVE YOU HEARD

LUNAR SEASONS How did you get together? Adam Anthony (vocals): “Frank (guitar) and I were in a band together previously, so he was my first choice when looking for a guitarist. We found Scott (drums) through a street press ad. I found Brendan (bass) staggering around in my front yard with a dazed look on his face early one Sunday morning. He set up camp in my yard for a few weeks, so we figured we might as well get him to play bass.” Sum up your musical sound in four words. Abrasive, cinematic, dynamic, psychedelic.” You’re being sent into space and there’s only room to bring one album – which would it be? “Leonard Cohen’s Songs Of Love And Hate.” Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career? “Every time we get to play a show is a great moment for me. Even better than that are the moments when I see people headbanging and/or dancing along to our songs. Nothing beats that!” Why should people come and see your band? “We love playing live, so a good time is guaranteed. Our guitarist Frank has the best fuckin’ beard ever! It needs to be seen in the flesh to be truly appreciated and The Basement is a kickarse venue, and Brisbane venues need all the support they can get at the moment.” Lunar Seasons play Basement 243 on Saturday 24 March.

SUPERSONIC

The showcase series for local music blog Sonic Masala just doesn’t stop with the team behind the website putting together yet another wildly eclectic show on at their favourite stomping ground of The Waiting Room this Friday 23 March. However, this time it’s a little different, as they drag their first ever interstate act into the mix! Melbourne’s noisy miscreants Franco Cozzo will tear your eardrums and sell you carpets, while fresh new local acts like Crass Creatures, Fred Savage Beasts and Motherfucking Morgan Freeman will also bring the party. With names like these, and the same old BYO policy, things are destined to get messy...

WHAT THE PEOPLE WANT Sydney’s Lomera released their debut EP earlier this year and it seems like some of you folk got a copy of it and enjoyed it very much as they have announced they are embarking on a Brisbane tour due to the support they’ve received from music lovers up here thus far. The band play what call only be deemed as sludge metal; their songs are loud, doomy and packed full of big riffs, but they still retain that kind of punk rock energy that keeps things exciting. They are playing the Jubilee Hotel on Friday 30 March as a part of the week Monstrothic metal night and will be joined by Fear The Setting Sun, Crevis and Sons Of The Soil for what will be a stoner’s delight.

RISE AND FALL Local purveyor of shock pop, Stephen Carmichael, is building more and more steam with every new project he puts his mind to and you can bet the release of his new single Falling For You will be no different. This guy has been featured on the front page of Britney Spears’ website, so taken was she with his rendition of Til The World Ends, and he spent a fair whack of time up the pointy end of the triple j Unearthed charts with his previous single Girl. This new tune, a song about losing your identity, could well be Carmichael’s finest work yet and will have fans even hungrier for the release of his debut album Pop Culture, which is due for release later this year. He’s launching the single with a big show at The Zoo on Wednesday 28

March, where he’ll be supported by Rawr Vanity and Phil Hancock; grab your tickets from OzTix now for $8 + bf or wait it out and get one on the door for $10.

FUCK WEDNESDAYS Generally speaking, there’s not much to get excited about on a Wednesday. You’re smack-bang in the middle of the week, the weekend still seems so far away and you’ve used up all of your stories about the exploits you got up to on the weekend just passed. One way to combat this is to get out there and see some rock bands and you can do just that as Ah Fuck That!, Leadlight Rose, Columbus and Darklab all get together and smash those midweek blues away with some fiery punk rock that’ll make the hairs on the back of your neck stand to attention. They are doing this at Basement 243 next Wednesday 28 March, entry isn’t even going to cost you a cent and with doors at 7pm you don’t have to have a ridiculously late night, either.

WHAT WE NEED

For the sixth year, the team at Bonefinger Records are hosting their very special tribute to the greatest band who ever existed with their annual All You Need Is Beatles tribute night. Basically what happens is a heap of our city’s finest pop-rock groups get together and smash out their favourite Beatles songs; everyone has a good time and all the money that is raised goes to Medicins Sans Frontieres, so everyone is a winner! The acts tackling the Fab Four this year include Drawn From Bees, pictured, Bang Bang Boss Kelly, Grand Atlantic, Buick Six, Howling Rabbits, Welcome To Television and Dom Miller, it happens at The Zoo on Friday 23 March and entry will set you back $15.30 if you grab a ticket from OzTix right now or $20 if you want to grab one at the door.

themusic.com.au

PARTY ON

A brand new single from Brisbane’s hardest partying five-piece The Belligerents is finally here and their local fans are understandably very excited to hear about it. The group have spent recent months becoming a little more worldly but are more than ready to get back into dedicating time to the group with a new five-track EP set for release in the not-too-distant future. This single, the first taste of that release, is being launched with a big old party at the Black Bear Lodge on Thursday 22 March. They have Gung Ho and Wolfwolf joining in on the action, so you can bet the Lodge’s dance floor will be getting a good workout. Tickets are $10 + bf from OzTix and that includes a free copy of the single including a remix by Wolfwolf!

TIME OFF • 29


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BRISBANE BOUND Is this your first foray to Brisbane? Yes, yes it is

AMANDA IN THE DUSK

BOBBY ALU

LOCAL PUNK/NU METAL OUTFIT AMANDA IN THE DUSK ARE EXCITED ABOUT HOW THEIR DEVOTED FANS ARE REACTING TO THEIR NEW VIDEO, GUITARIST JEREMY COOMBES EXPLAINS TO TONY MCMAHON.

THE BLESSING OF BEING ABLE TO WRITE SONGS WHILE EXPERIENCING THE WORLD ISN’T LOST ON CHARLES ‘BOBBY ALU’ WALL. HE HANGS OUT WITH BENNY DOYLE.

What can we expect from your show? Raw sex appeal.

FRANCO COZZO Name Of Act: Franco Cozzo Member/role: Maurice – disco guitar shred/ vocals Home ground: Melbourne Bitter

According to Coombs, the video, for the song All The Sins You’ve Sold, off the band’s self-titled album, only represents the rest of the record partially. “It is musically and vocally. Lyrically, the album is quite varied. We cover a lot of subjects outside of relationships.” The video has already had 4,000 hits on YouTube in only the first week of its release. Coombes has a very simple theory about this. “Because it’s an awesome video! It was a surprise to our fans, we didn’t announce it or promote it at all. Our fans have been amazing with sharing and promoting the video as well. Shout out to our fans for that.” When it comes to what sets Amanda In The Dusk apart from the other emerging artists in their genre, Coombs says it’s all about structure. “We are punk/nu-metal influenced artists playing heavier music. Liquid Courage really shows that. We write all of our songs on computer programs then learn to play them once they are constructed. It gives our songs a better, clearer structure.” In what is perhaps an indication of what punters can expect from the band’s upcoming show at Basement 243, Coombs recalls the events of one of his all time favourite shows. “Our album release show at Snitch. The smoke machine set off the fire alarms. The fire brigade showed up and the crowd was climbing over them while they watched us play. So good.” As far as the future is concerned, it seems that Amanda In The Dusk wants all the same things all bands do. “[We’d like to be] touring nationally supporting an international act. Going wherever the booze, chicks and money are.”

“I feel pretty lucky to get to travel so much,” he begins. “Getting to these locations puts me in such a good mood. Sometimes I just stop and look around in awe of the surroundings. Essentially, I’m just a guy that hits and strums things. Being full of gratitude presents the perfect mood and setting for writing. Just last week we stopped en route to a gig at an incredible beach in Yallingup, WA and spent half the day swimming in perfect clear blue water – so lucky.” Having spent the last year sourcing his inspiration from beautiful and disparate locations such as Samoa, Bali, America and Canada, multiinstrumentalist Wall returned to Brisbane’s West End to record the blissed out new single Love You More. With a hip wiggling groove and Wall’s friendly floating vocals, it’s an exciting first taste of the anticipated follow-up to his sun-drenched self-titled release of 2010.

WHO: Bobby Alu WHAT: Love You More (MGM) WHEN & WHERE: Friday 23 March, SoundLounge, Gold Coast; Saturday 24, Solbar, Maroochydore; Saturday 31, The Zoo

WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 22 March, Basement 243

NOT FRIENDLY

30 • TIME OFF

Local industrial metal group Our Last Enemy have got to be one of the city’s most punishing live acts at present, they know this and that is why they are once again getting out on the road and showing off their incredible brutality on the forthcoming Wolves of Perigord tour in support of their brand new EP of the same name. The release follows on from their hugely successful debut album Fallen Empires and promises to be more brutal than anything they’ve ever released before – and that is really saying something – their special blend of industrial rock, metalcore and good old-fashioned heavy metal as powerful as you could imagine. The band have support the likes of Static X, Fozzy and Dope over the years, and they have always held their own, so when they hit the Surfers Paradise Beergarden on Thursday 29 March (with Shifting The Paradigm, Acacia, Kaerulean and 4deadin5seconds) and The Hi-Fi Friday 30 March (with Shifting The Paradigm, Alpine Fault and Acacia), you better be ready to bang your head.

Franco Cozzo play Ric’s Bar on Wednesday 21 March (with Still Rain Fell) and The Waiting Room on Friday 23 March (with Crass Creatures, Fred Savage Beasts and Motherfucking Morgan Freeman).

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QUORUM CONSENSUS

STEPHEN CARMICHAEL

A DECADE IN THE MAKING, QUORUM CONSENSUS ARE DROPPING THEIR FIERY BOMB OF A DEBUT EP. SAM ‘NON OFFICIAL COVER’ JONES TAKES SOME TIME OUT WITH BENNY DOYLE.

SELF-CONFESSED ‘80S GEEK STEPHEN CARMICHAEL GOES ON THE RECORD WITH TONY MCMAHON ABOUT HIS INNER CHILD, BRITNEY SPEARS AND HIS TERRIFIC NEW SINGLE, FALLING FOR YOU.

Not a group to be tied down to a select style, Brisbane’s industrial hip hop maestros Quorum Consensus (QC) are as much impacting rhythms as they are verbal flex. Currently operating as a six-piece, this musical menagerie is filled with a colourful array of the city’s most provoking musicians and MCs. N.O.C Jones talks about the lyrical inspirations and spurs that have unearthed on their new release. “I’d have to say we quite often play the part of the scourge, writing from the perspective of a sarcastic antihero administering severe criticism upon those deemed to be an irritant,” he informs. “Fire is a theme we often end up coming back to. The track Pyrolysis is the first instalment in a series of tracks we’re writing about a tormented exotic dancer. Then we have the songs Sometime and Cliche in which we poke fun at a music industry oversaturated with trite lyricists slapping together linear sets of pop culture references and calling it art.”

WHAT: For All The Sins You’ve Sold (Independent)

Melbourne’s The Toot Toot Toots seem to be one of the hotter and coming acts out of that city of so-so-rich musical talent and they’re heading up here in a mere couple of weeks’ time to show off tracks from their new debut record Outlaws, which is said to be a “spaghetti western rock opera”. Sounds pretty good to us, as does the fact it was produced by Melbourne garage-rock acolyte Loki Lockwood of Spooky Records, who manages to produce records with just the right amount of grit and just the right amount of clarity to make them quite powerful indeed. The record is out (through Lockwood’s Spooky Records) on Monday 2 April and they’ll be in town launching it at The Joynt Friday 27 April, the Queen St Mall early on Saturday 28 and X& Y Bar a little later on that night.

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“I find the new songs that are surfacing have relation to lifestyle; making changes, developing new habits, working hard or hardly working,” he offers. “Holding the power to take charge of your own life has really been hitting home to me the past few years. It’s definitely coming out in the writing. Being a drummer means these songs need to have some serious pocket. You could say it’s a curse because I usually take a while to make sure the groove and tempo is right. There’s some new soul, afrobeat and island songs that have given the crowd some extra dance material. I can’t wait to showcase them locally!”

WHO: Amanda In The Dusk

ROLLIN’ ROUND THE BEND

Describe your performance style succinctly. Electric, sensual, Twitter, awesome.

Has anything exciting been happening in your world of late? We recorded a 7” in Adelaide which will be out later in the year (spring). Also super psyched to be playing with our Brissie pals Still Rain Fell who used to be To The North and Motherfucking Morgan Freeman which used to be Librarians and before that Matter Doesn‘t Matter… for all you Bris kids playing at home.

Jones puts the long wait for this EP down to quality control on the band’s behalf. “Approaching Scourge Of The Third Rock From The UV, we had 18 tracks written and recorded,” he explains. “Out of these, we chose the seven we felt best represented where our heads are at and the direction we’re headed in. The remaining 11 we released about a month ago as the Done & Dusted Collection. Never having been an advocate for airing one’s dirty laundry out in public, we now feel QC has evolved to where we want to be [both] sonically and artistically.”

themusic.com.au

“My new single follows on from my last release, Love Defeat. I’m telling a story about two lovers. I sort of feel that all of my songs are linked together whether I like it or not. I write based upon personal experiences, but then I abstract them and use characters to tell the story. In my upcoming album, Pop Culture, each song is used to tell a little more of the story or to give some insight into how the character feels or what they’re going through.” Carmichael recently appeared on the front page of Britney Spears’ website for his cover of Til the World Ends, so does this mean they’re besties now? “Ha yes, Britney and I go way back! No, in all seriousness when she featured me on her website I was shocked to say the least. It meant a great deal to have someone as big as her take interest in an artist, like myself, who is just starting out.” On a more serious note, Carmichael espouses the notion in his music of creating his own reality in order to survive. Not surprisingly, he says this has personal resonances. “All the songs I write and sing come from a deep and sometimes dark place; I guess everyone has been through some kind of shit in their life. When I write music I become almost ignorant of the world around me – ignorant in a childlike manner. When I write music, I feel like I can create and become anyone I want to be. I guess when people listen to my music I want them to be taken away with me; maybe to think about or to reflect upon past experiences or memories; I want them to get creative and to let their imagination take control.”

WHO: Quorum Consensus WHAT: Scourge Of The Third Rock From The UV EP (Beanstalk Records)

WHO: Stephen Carmichael

WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 24 March, Beetle Bar

WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 28 March, The Zoo

WHAT: Falling For You (Independent)


WEDNESDAY 21ST MARCH

SETTING THE TONE

FALLING LIKE AN AVALANCHE

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve more than likely heard the name Big Strong Brute kicked around the local scene a little more than usual of late, we certainly hope you have, because he has just released his brand new album â&#x20AC;&#x201C; his second â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Avalanche Of Truth and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most certainly worthy of some attention. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, Big Strong Brute is the brainchild of local musician Paul Donoughue and has been an ongoing concern for the musician for the past five years or so. In that time heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s travelled the world playing his songs and released some great material, though nothing quite as solid as this record. He is of course setting out across our wide country to launch the album and locally he will do so with a show at the Brisbane Powerhouse on Sunday 1 April with a little help from the always awesome Texas Tea. Entry is free and the show begins at 3pm.

STU LARSEN

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt a warmth during the writing and recording and hoped listeners would feel it too,â&#x20AC;? Larsen affirms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have chosen to not have a home over the last few years, chosen to spend my time moving around, meeting people, staying with friends, experiencing new things and places, long distance relationship ups and downs etcetera, and I guess these songs have come out of all that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found comfort in the uncomfortable and learnt to have a pretty relaxed approach to all that comes my way, and this flows out when I write songs.â&#x20AC;? In between considerable time spent with UK peers Passenger, Larsen journeyed to the Asian island of Japan. It was here that he connected with his partner in song for this run of shows, harmonica master Natsuki Kurai. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a connection that Larsen canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak of highly enough. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Natsuki adds so much to every song. He is simply amazing,â&#x20AC;? he gushes unconditionally. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tell people he is the best harmonica player I have ever seen, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe me until they see it for themselves. Japanese people perfect their craft â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Natsuki has perfected the art of playing harmonica. But more than this, he has soul, which I think is a little more rare in Japanese musicians and perhaps even music in general.â&#x20AC;?

SAMURAI DISCO CHASING CLOSURE

THURSDAY 22ND MARCH

ARMADA IN THE DUSK THE ENDLESS PANDEMIC I AM ETERNAL (WA) AVERICE TRUST AND FALL DANGEROUS

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FRIDAY 23RD MARCH

THE DVAMPERS ROUSER REGULAR GONZALES

THE ESPLANADE

SATURDAY 24TH MARCH

ON THE BACK OF THEIR DEBUT RELEASE, THE LIGHTSHOW, LOCAL OUTFIT THE ESPLANADE ARE MAKING QUITE A NAME FOR THEMSELVES IN THE LIVE SCENE. TONY MCMAHON TALKS DRUM AND BASS WITH GUITARIST MARK FRANCEY.

PARTY AND BULLSHIT PARTY & BULLSHIT THE ESPLANADE LUNAR SEASONS DOLLAROSA RETURNS

243 BRUNSWICK STREET FORTITUDE VALLEY

www.facebook.com/thebasement243

WITH A STIRRING EP TO SHARE AND A FRIEND BY HIS SIDE, STU LARSENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TOUR IS SHAPING UP TO BE AMAZING. HE CHECKS IN FROM JAPAN WITH BENNY DOYLE.

On his latest EP Ryeford, troubadour Stu Larsen offers unbridled tenderness through melody, his songs providing a familiarity that is as disarming as it is homely. Recorded in south Toowoomba, the worldly songwriter reflects on that time as an amazing point in his life.

STIGMARTYR WHISKEY & SPEED

As if seeing Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absolutely incredible indie/doom/ noise/dream pop ensemble Boris wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reason enough to head along to The Hi-Fi this Friday night, the support cast is pretty damn impressive as well. Melbourneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Laura have proven over the many years theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been together that they are one of the finest bands in the country when it comes to tastefully being able to set and alter moods within their music. The post-rock ensemble released their fourth album Twelve Hundred Times late last year and this will be another great chance to see them blast out plenty of tunes from it. Opening things up on the night is Nikko, who spent their summer drinking the bars of Melbourne dry as they had a shot at relocating down there, but the majority of the band decided to make their way back home and this show ought to be a wonderful way to welcome them back. Tickets are still available through Moshtix or the venueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website for $42 + bf.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The drums and bass is the backbone of all rock music,â&#x20AC;? says Francey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the most tangible aspect of the tunes. Whether it be a live show where you can physically feel the bass and drums pounding in your chest or on the EP where they form the rock solid platform that the melodic guitars and vocals are built on, without the classic rock rhythm section everything else falls apart. I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about being able to actually feel each stroke of the drums and note on the bass that gives a kind of intoxicating effect that leaves people craving more.â&#x20AC;?

Prince of Wales Hotel Friday 23rd march

TEST PATTERN

The Esplanade have also been working on a new video. Francey says the band wanted it to reflect them as humans, not just musos.

BLIND LEMON

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UNCLE BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MUSIC CLUB Come â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n play live music

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Sunday 25th march

JAM WITH CRAM

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Friday 30th march

PUNKFEST PRESENTS: Done For, Shackles (Byron), Tired Minds (nsw), Open sea, Postal (nsw), Dirty Charlie, Without Myth Saturday 31st march

Donelle Brooks

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We approached the second video much differently to how we did the first. In our latest video, we aimed to capture the personalities in the band and give everyone an insight into the people not just the band. The video is a combination of footage taken pre- and postshows, at practices and our live shows. It really shows off how much fun we have with our music and how much we love what we do.â&#x20AC;?

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Will we see a follow up to The Lightshow anytime soon? Francey says it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be too far away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re planning to get back in the studio toward the latter half of this year. As for the sound, it will certainly show the improvements weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all made as individual musicians and as a band. In saying that, we definitely intend on keep the core formula: a rock solid rhythm section, melodic guitars along with the soaring vocal melodies that feature on The Lightshow.â&#x20AC;?

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Shanon Watkins & Scattered Vision, Conjure Elysian, Slow Riot

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Sunday April 1st march

PUNKFEST presents: SKARFACE (France), DJ Buqi from, Bohemian Rudeboys (Prague), The Black Market, The Vampers, The Fred Band, Surfari Krishnas only $12 entry

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WHO: The Esplanade WHO: Stu Larsen

WHAT: The Lightshow (Independent)

WHAT: Ryeford EP (Independent)

WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 24 March, Basement 243; Tuesday 24 April, The Hive (all ages)

WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 28 March, Black Bear Lodge

1154 Sandgate Rd, Nundah, Queensland, 4012

PPH: (07) 3266 8077 www.princeofwaleshotel.com.au

themusic.com.au

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TIME OFF â&#x20AC;˘ 31


WED 21 10cc The Tivoli Barefoot Alley, Sneaky Mojo, Constant Change The Zoo Bon Fromage The Joynt Franco Cozzo, Still Rain Fell, DJ Redbeard Ric’s Bar Locky Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Mark Sheils Royal George Pete Smith, Mark Z Regatta Hotel, Toowong

THU 22 Ball Park Music, Nantes, Cub Scouts Coolangatta Hotel Damien Robertson, B-Syde, The Doses, Blind Dog Donnie The Music Kafe Dave’s Pawn Shop, Purple Toes, DJ Valdis Ric’s Bar Dirty Three The Tivoli Epic Low-Fi Night The Cavern Nobby Beach Jabba Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Jamie Hay, Jen Buxton, Milestone, Run Squirrel, Columbia Buffet X & Y Bar Strangers, Lords Of Wong, London Bureau, Bottlecock, Jordie Flange The Beetle Bar Super Best Friends, Moss On The Rocks, Tape/Off The Loft Chevron Island The Belligerents Black Bear Lodge The Boys, Finders Keepers, Willows, Young Giriffo The Zoo The Dirty Three, Lost Animal The Tivoli Vita, DJ Climate Fitzy’s Loganholme Zoe K & The Shadow Katz The Joynt

FRI 23 About Time Locknload West End AC/DC Tribute Show, The Chauffers, Black Whiskey Jubilee Hotel Alternate Drop AnDergrove Tavern Amos Coolangatta Hotel Andee-J The Brewery Ball Park Music, Nantes, Cub Scouts Great Northern Hotel Byron Bay

32 • TIME OFF

Benjam Victory Hotel Bobby Alu, Cheap Fakes Soundlounge Currumbin Boris The Hi-Fi Boris, Laura, Sleepmakeswaves, These Hands Could Separate The Sky The Hi-Fi B-Rad, Jabba Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Brett Allen, Apollo Flex, Eakut, BluFfsta, Mister P, Dj Masta K, DJ K-Otic Shooters Brett Hitchcock Australian National Hotel Christian Argenti Story Bridge Hotel Darkc3ll, Melody Black Miami Tavern Shark Bar Fat Albert Broadbeach Tavern Generation Jones Edinburgh Castle Hotel Greenthief Surfers Paradise SLSC Havana Brown, Triplickit Wharf Tavern Jakarta Criers, The Bad Roots, Calling For A Hero, Chris Miller The Loft Chevron Island K2 Duo Springfield Tavern Mike BarBer Centenary Tavern Mr Perkins Hinterland Hotel Mr.Troy Chinderah Tavern Nathan Pursey Dog And Parrot Tavern Out Of Abingdon Diana Plaza Hotel Paul Bell, Mark Z Regatta Hotel, Toowong Quando Caloundra Bowls Club Rockaoke Springwood Hotel Saint Arther Duo Stones Corner Hotel Seductive Soul Brothers Ipswich Stevenson St Coolum Beach Hotel Super Best Friends X & Y Bar Test Pattern Prince Of Wales Hotel The Gin Club, Silent Feature Era, Texas Tea, Okemah The Beetle Bar The Joshua Hatcher Quintet Brisbane Jazz Club The Residents, Crystal Radios Brisbane Powerhouse Turbine Platform The View From Madeleine’s Couch, The Sambalicious Dancers Queen Street Mall

Totally 80s Party, Kristian Fletcher St Pauls Tavern Transvaal Diamond Syndicate, Guthrie, DJ Valdis, DJ Strex Ric’s Bar

SAT 24 Amanda Gilmour, Steve Cook, The Lamplights New Farm Bowls Club Anna Saleh Brisbane Jazz Club Artists Unknown Fitzy’s Waterford Ball Park Music, Nantes, Cub Scouts The Hi-Fi Blind Lemon Prince Of Wales Hotel Bobby Alu, Cheap Fakes Sol Bar, Maroochydore Boss, DJ Katch, Erther The Boundary Hotel Dan Hannaford Coolangatta Sands Hotel Dangerous! Kings Beach Tavern Darkc3ll, Melody Black Jubilee Hotel Desmond Cheese, The Manks The Joynt DJ DC Fitzy’s Loganholme DJ Enrique, Live Latin Band The Loft Chevron Island Elbow, Bombay Bicycle Club The Tivoli Electrelane, Feathers, The Legend The Zoo Fushia, Cold & Need, Surfin Bird X & Y Bar Ger Fennelly, Berst, Jabba Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Greenthief The Squealing Pig Guthrie, Alert The Pharoah, Transvaal Diamond Syndicate Coolum Beach Hotel Havana Brown Oxford 152 Havana Brown Victory Hotel Layla Harrington Centenary Tavern MC Bossy, Paul Bell, Marky Mark Z, Scotty R, DJ Tom Walker Regatta Hotel, Toowong Mirror World Hamilton Hotel Mojo Webb Locknload West End Newman Duo, Collin’s Class, Legless The Music Kafe Paul Mckenna Caloundra Bowls Club

Quorum Consensus, Meglomaniac Crew, Co-Accused, Blest Feat Siege A, Mateusz, Face Invada The Beetle Bar Recharge Beats Cbx Saturday Sessions The Cavern Nobby Beach Super Best Friends Spotted Cow The Busymen, Some Jerks, DJ Valdis, DJ Cutts Ric’s Bar The Decoys Wharf Tavern The Dirt Band, Punxie & The Poison Pens, The Poison Pens, Le Murd The Tank Hotel The Dreamkillers, Magnertron, Upside Downside, Eat City, Desolution, .308, Portrait Of Pride And Roses For The Demand Greenslopes Bowls Club

SUN 25 Cuca Shop Ric’s Bar Elbow, Bombay Bicycle Club The Tivoli Fat Albert Miami Tavern Flyin’ Solo With Dreamboat The Joynt Ger Fennelly, Wasabi, Jabba Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Jam Session With Cram Prince Of Wales Hotel Prosumer Barsoma Triplickit Blue Pacific Hotel We Live Forever, Arms Of The Ocean, The Dirty Liars, Pretty Ugly, Connor Cleary, The Stone Fox, Mjootmn Springwood Tavern Wooden Shjips The Zoo Xavier Rudd The Hi-Fi Zoe K & The Shadow Katz Cloudland

MON 26 B-Rad Irish Murphy’s Brisbane Evanescence, Blaqk Audio Brisbane Convention And Exhibition Centre Kissing The Blue Lady The Music Kafe The Beez Kneez, Alert The Pharaohs Ric’s Bar

SINGLES ONLY

TEXAS TEA Band Name: Texas Tea Member/role: Kate - Guitar/vox/hair’n’makeup/ general chit chat Name Of Single: I Don’t Write No Sad Songs Stand-alone release or precursor to something more substantial? We have a new album coming out later this year. This is the first single from it. How does the single differ from previous work? Ben is having a sing. That’s a bit different. I do some screaming, which is also a bit different. It has double bass and drums courtesy of Myka Wallace and Joe Muller (Laneous). A ballsy little swamp country affair. What do you have planned for the launch? We’ll be playing with the full band, and using our legs to stand on, it will be amazing. Where to from here? We’ll have another single coming out around June, then album in September, another tour around then, Christmas with the family, and hopefully the world won’t end so we can go back to Europe next year... Texas Tea launch I Don’t Write No Sad Songs (Independent) at Beetle Bar on Friday 23 March and Spotted Cow, Toowoomba on Friday 30 March (plus the play Live Spark at Brisbane Powerhouse on Sunday 1 April.

ON THE TIME OFF STEREO Bloodstream DZ DEATHRAYS Magnetic North KELLIE LLOYD Simone Felice SIMONE FELICE Foundations THE MEDICS Barton Hollow THE CIVIL WARS Gold Watch HOODOO GURUS Port Of Morrow THE SHINS Zoo CEREMONY No Plans COLD CHISEL Folila AMADOU & MARIAM

TUE 27 Jumping Fences, More Fiddles Than Frocks New Farm Bowls Club Kina Grannis, Ollie Brown The Arts Centre Gold Coast

themusic.com.au

Kinda Sexy, Meg & The Allnighters The Music Kafe Lita and the Bird Ric’s Bar Tappa’s Trivia Coolangatta Sands Hotel Tyson Faulkner Fiddlers Green Woody Lives Here Irish Murphy’s Brisbane

Q MUSIC IS A NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANISATION SUPPORTING QUEENSLAND MUSIC, MUSICIANS AND INDUSTRY WORKERS. THIS COLUMN WILL PRESENT YOU WITH INFORMATION ON GRANT AND EXPORT OPPORTUNITIES, CONFERENCES AND THE GENERAL LOW-DOWN ON THE STATE’S MUSIC INDUSTRY.

BIGSOUND ARTIST SHOWCASE APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

Apply now for the rare chance to showcase in front of some of the international music industry’s most influential figures at BIGSOUND Live 2012 (12-13 September). This year 100 acts perform across ten venues, with a focus on country music. Apply exclusively at www.bigsound.org.au until May 4.

ARTS QUEENSLAND’S 2012 SONG SUMMIT SCHOLARSHIPS

Arts Queensland’s 2012 Song Summit Scholarships enable ten Queensland songwriters to receive $1000 towards attending Sydney’s APRA Song Summit (May 26-28). Applicants must submit two copies of the form and support material to Arts Queensland by 29 March. Check qmusic.com.au or contact Arts Queensland on 07 3224 4896.

A-VENUE WORKSHOPS!

Aged between 15 and 30? Live regionally and want some music industry education? Check out the A-Venue workshop program designed to develop regional careers. Most are free and feature industry professionals. Check avenueqld.com.au.

PLAY A GIG AND WIN PRIZES

Bands from SEQ high schools battle it out at The Rockschool Challenge Battle of the Bands for a chance to perform at a great venue and win over $5000 in prizes! The Southbank Institute of Technology Rockschool Challenge seeks contestants to perform a 20-minute set (covers or originals). Apply at rockschoolchallenge.com until March 23.

‘ART SONG’ COMPETITION

Katie Noonan and Karin Schaupp launch the ‘Art Song’ Composition Competition. This is your chance to have two of Australia’s most loved artists record, perform and release your music, plus win $2000 and concert tickets! Winner announced 21 May. Apply by 20 April at songsofthesouthernskies.com.


BEHIND THE LINES SOUND MODERN

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

BEHIND THE LINES WITH MICHAEL SMITH BTL@STREETPRESS.COM.AU

BIGSOUND ARTIST APPLICATIONS OPEN

The event doesn’t happen until the second week of September, Wednesday 12 through Friday 14, but applications are open for the part of the annual BIGSOUND Music Industry Conference that showcases the makers of the music that’ll be showcased. Check into the BIGSOUND website for details and application forms and the best of luck – applications close Friday 4 May.

FINDING YOUR VOICE THE VAI WAY

Coming to Brisbane Convention Centre Thursday 5 April, G3 includes Toto’s Steve Lukather, the man who came up with the idea, Joe Satriani, and his one-time student, Steve Vai. I asked Vai about he evolved his technique, starting at just 12-years-old – Satriani was all of 16 – from his first guitar teacher.

“Well, it’s kind of like a mental trip that you put yourself in,” Vai explains. “You just tell yourself, ‘Okay, I’m interested in doing something that I’ve never done, something I’ve never heard anybody else do. I know I have it within me because everybody has it within them…’ It’s just knowing that you can do it and it just starts happening. But you have to make an effort, you know? What happens is if you sit and you focus long enough and you start playing, either you’re gonna get tired of playing because you’re playing the same thing over and over or you’re gonna be forced to carve some new ground. It takes some time and courage but it’s really fun because the reward is that you have a different voice, you’ve added something to your vocabulary that’s unique.”

SOUND BYTES

Baltimore dream pop duo Beach House recorded their fourth album, Bloom, at Sonic Ranch Studios in Tornillo, Texas, co-produced with Chris Coady (Yeah Yeah Yeahs, TV on the Radio, !!!, Grizzly Bear) and mixed at Electric Lady in New York.

MELBOURNE-BORN LONDONBASED, IT WAS TO LOS ANGELES THAT THE TEMPER TRAP TURNED TO RECORD THEIR SECOND AND SELF-TITLED ALBUM. GUITARIST LORENZO SILLITTO TALKS MICHAEL SMITH THROUGH SOME OF THE PROCESS OF MAKING IT.

B

ased these days in London, The Temper Trap haven’t exactly rushed into cutting a follow-up to their incredibly successful debut album, 2009’s Conditions, which was produced by Scott Horscroft (The Sleepy Jackson, Silverchair). But that’s all to the good as far as they’re concerned, lead guitarist Lorenzo Sillitto, on the line during rehearsals for their forthcoming American tour assures Time Off. As it happens, much of last year was taken up by working up the material for that second album, self-titled this time, which they recorded at The Sound Factory in Hollywood over two months from the end of November last year with American producer Tony Hoffer (Beck, Phoenix, M83, The Kooks), who also owns the studio. “We were talking to a few other people,” Sillitto admits, regarding the choice of Hoffer, who leases Studio B in the facility as producer, “but we spoke to Tony and just a lot of the things that he said kind of really resonated with us so we decided to go with him. And then when we first met him it was like, why didn’t we choose you sooner. We had a great working relationship with him, he knows a lot of music, very knowledgeable in that respect, and he’s actually got an amazing knowledge of synthesisers and he can pull sounds very quickly, so we couldn’t have asked for anyone better.” The Sound Factory’s Studio B is “old school”, with a analogue Custom API 40-channel console as well as a Neve 5302 Melbourn mixing console, through which the band ran their drums, the studio itself featuring a big L-shaped performance area and two isolation rooms.

“They do have a tape machine and stuff like that, so everything was recorded digitally into ProTools [HD/3 Accell], all the outboard was completely analogue and really old, so we got a nice kind of warm feeling to the record.” The fact that Hoffer has extensive expertise with regards to synthesisers suggests that sonically The Temper Trap were moving away from the sound they established on Conditions, and Sillitto confirms this. “We bought a Moog and we bought a Nord and we had a few other little things floating about and I guess when we went into the writing process we had those there. So rather than trying to write things as we had done before, we’d move onto these new instruments and Joseph [Greer, now permanent fifth member] obviously is a very good piano player as well, so that kind of features heavily in the songs. We like to write kind of big, anthemic songs, and there are a few other songs which are more of the electronic vein, conceptualised in the computer by Toby [Dundas, drums] and then fleshed out more in the rehearsal space, and that was something that we really wanted to explore as well. We’d done a few things like that on the last record but not quite as heavily as on this one.

saying trying to make things sound different to the way you may have heard before. So I always use Telecasters – they’re kind of like the go-to guitar first off – playing through my Marshall Bluebreaker, but in the studio we used really old ‘60s Silvertone 1450 amps and there was this Ovation electric [The Breadwinner], the only one they ever made, in the ‘80s, that I used on a couple of songs. It’s unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. I had a [Fender] Jazzmaster in there and this guitar that’s like a Reverend, which has P90s [pickups] in it that has a particular tone to it that Johnny [Aherne, guitar] was using a bit. “The studio had a lot – you know, 335s, Les Paul Juniors, things like that. It just depended on what the song was needing, so it was a mixture of things. We had like four amps set up and it was a blend basically – we had an AC30, this Matchless Roland JC 120 and then my Marshall – and most of the guitar sounds are a blend, and the JC 120 was pretty much blended in with everything – a solid state amp blended in with a valve amp and just work from there. But it’s pretty hard to distinguish what’s what I guess. On the cleaner stuff I think it’s pretty much the JC 120.”

“As for me, I’d bought some new pedals and things like that. It was kind of weird because towards the first half of the record I was trying to take away the effects and try and be more intuitive with my guitar playing. It was working for some things and then it wasn’t for others, and I just happened buy just like a multi-effect pedal [a Line 6 M9] so I could come up with things at home. So I got into the studio one day and decided I’d completely go the opposite way and try and make the guitar sound nothing like a guitar, and that seemed to work really well for a lot of things. So there are a lot of things on the record that is probably me playing but you probably don’t really, that could be a synth or some type of synth lead line but it’s coming through the guitar. So it was good, kind of like a regression and then a progression from there, just trying to change things up a little bit.

The album was also mixed by Hoffer at The Sound Factory and mastered by Dave Cooley (M83, Die Die Die, Dangermouse), at Elysian Mastering, again in LA. The Temper Trap will be released on Liberation Friday 18 May.

“Tony, in the studio, one of his catch phrases was that we want everything to sound modern, which was just

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TIME OFF • 33


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CD / DVD

15year old bass player looking to join metal or punk band. influences include metallica, slayer, megadeth, anthrax, pantera, ozzy osbourne/ black sabbath and many more. email space1996@hotmail.com

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& GIBSON ACOUSTICS

GIBSON ELECTRICS

J-45 STANDARD VS RRP $4699

W

NE

$2999 $299

RRP $899

$16999 $1

RRP $2399

RRP $299 RR

$6999 $699

RRP $999

HUMMINGBIRD CLASSIC MODERN CLASSI

FLYING V 11968 FADED WC W

THUNDERBIRD BASS IV VINTAGE SUNBURST

$629

RRP $799

CUT CUUT LP JUNIOR OR SINGLE AW OR VSS

EXPLORER MELODY MAKER SB

$32999 $329

EP BASSES AND SGS

EXPLORER 1958 EB

SG STANDARD NB

SONGWRITER DELUX DELUXE STUDIO EC AN S RRP $4699 699

EPIPHONE ELECTRICS ELECTRIC

BASS VIOLA VS

$1999

RRP $699

LP STANDARD HS

$3499 $349

FEATURED

GIBSON SON L LES PAUL KING

BUC

HUM NEW

EL

MOD

$699 DOT STUDIO WC RRP $629 $449

RRP $209

Solid Mahogany body

LES PAUL STUDIO AW W

VINTAGE SG G-400 FADED WORN BROWN

GREAT EPIPHONE DEALS

AJ-100 NA or VS

NIGHTHAWK STUDIO

$1199

$299 RRP $599 $419

RRP $429

EPIPHONE AJ SERIES

NEW!

    DARK BACK GOLD TOP RRP $1599

$1199

RRP RP $1699

$499

SG G-310 VW

RRP $999

RRP $4999

$ $549

DR-220S NA

$159

RRP $369

AJ-220S NA or VS

NEW

P

KU W/ PIC

$259

LES PAUL UKULELE*

Coil-tapped burstbuckers RRP $2399 NEW

$16999

RRP $369

Available in Goldtop, Silverburst and Pelham Blue

LP TRADITIONAL 1960 ZEBRA GOLD TOP

OP ID T SOLPICKUP &

$259

RRP $199

$1399

MANDOLIN MM-50E PROFESSIONALL

AJ-220SCE NA

RRP $2199

$2399 LP STUDIO WC RRP $1899 $1399 RRP $3499

$349 AJ-100CE NA RRP $299 $219 RRP $499

$1399

RRP $1 $1,199 199

*COMES IN VINTAGE SUNBURST AND HERITAGE CHERRY

$800 OFF RRP! EPIPHONE CASES EPIPH

AJ / DREAD CASE LES PAUL CASE

EPIPHONE PRODUCT

RRP

GIGBAG ELECTRIC ................. NEW A/B PEDAL BK ....................... E-GT820-EB TUNER ............... EIC201 INST. CABLE ..............

NOW

$29 $79 $26 $15

$19 $49 $15 $9

GIBSON PUMP POLISH

ID SOL DS ALLE WOO N O T

EPIPHONE MASTERBILT DR-500 MCE

GIBSON LOGO FITTED CAP RRP $40 R

SG G-400 CASE

RRP $1199

$30 30

$849

EP DR-90T PLAYER PACK NA EPIPHONE COFFEEHOUSE MUG

335 CASE

RRP $10

RRP $169

$99

$6

RRP $10

$8849 $849

NEW

$5

EEPIPHONE DISTORTION PEDAL RRP $79

$49

GIBSON LOGO T-SHIRT GI RRP $40

$30

GIBSON LOGO BEANIE G RRP $30

RRP $329

$23 23

$229

EPIPHONE PR-4E PLAYERPACK RRP $429

$299

TO

PS ELL E

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PARTICIPATING DEALERS Ares Music Max Mackay Yamaha Music Music City Music Express

3/424 Gympie Rd, Strathpine Cnr Victoria & Chain St, Mackay 55 Sheridan St, Cairns 2048 Logan Road, Upper Mount Grava

07 3889 7499 07 4951 3437 07 4051 6826 07 3849 7088

Shake It Up Music Gallin's Musicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro Shop Gallin's Musicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro Shop Gallin's Musicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pro Shop

Shop 4, 188 Currie Street, Nambour 59 Barry Parade, Fortude Valley 2557 Gold Coast Highway, Mermaid Beach Shop 3, 1 Young St, Southport

07 5441 5454 07 3831 5232 07 5586 0696 07 5561 1106

THE RRP IS THE RECOMMENDED RETAIL PRICE SET BY THE AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTOR OF THE PRODUCT AND MAY NOT HAVE NECESSARILY BEEN SOLD AT THIS PRICE POINT IN THE PAST OR SOLD IN THE FUTURE. ALL PRICES WERE CURRENT AT THE TIME OF PRINTING MARCH 2012. WE CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR PRICE RISES OR REDUCTIONS AFTER THIS DATE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT ANY MISPRINTS. STOCK SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. SOME STOCKS ARE LIMITED.


BIGGEST

SALE EVER

All stock must go! While stocks last! Hurry! Most items are one only! Southport

PRODUCT NAME

RRP

SALE

80W SUPER STROBE LIGHT AER COMPACT 60 ACOUSTIC AMP SATIN OAK ART USB PHONOPLUS PREAMP W/USB BEHRINGER 12” DRIVER BOSS AC3 ACOUSTIC SIMULATOR BOSS BF3 FLANGER BOSS BR1600CD DIGITAL RECORDING STUDIO BOSS GT10B BASS FX PROCESSOR

149 1899 220 175 175 1699 699

59 1299 49 39 69 89 999 399

BOSS LMB3 BASS LIMITER/ENHANCER BOSS XT2 XTORTION EPIPHONE EXPLORER GT EPIPHONE FLAMEKAT EB W/BIGSBYY

119 289 399 1449

49 69 199 699

EPIPHONE HUMMINGBIRD LTD NATURAL EPIPHONE JEFF WATERS ANNIHILATION V LTD RD EPIPHONE LES PAUL CUSTOM JOHN CONNOLLY EPIPHONE LES PAUL CUSTOM LTD P-90 EB EPIPHONE LES PAUL JOE PERRY BONEYARD RD D

549 1199 1349 1199 1749

299 699 499 499 599

EPIPHONE LES PAUL JUNIOR '57 REISSUE P100 VS EPIPHONE LES PAUL LP-100 RED EPIPHONE LES PAUL NIGHTFALL GUITAR EB EPIPHONE MARCUS HENDERSON APPARITION

549 479 999 1599

299 199 399 499

EPIPHONE VALVE JUNIOR HOT ROD HEAD ESTEVE GRO7CE CLASSICAL GUITAR FOSTEX MC10ST PENCIL MIC PAIR GIBSON LES PAUL CLASSIC CUSTOM AE GIBSON LES PAUL STUDIO RAW POWER SWHITE GIBSON ROBOT LP DARKFIRE GIBSON SG GODDESS ROSEBURST KRAMER PARIAH GUITAR CANDY RED KRAMER VANGUARD S-440S RED METALLIC LANEY AH200 AUDIO HUB 165W COMBO LANEY CXSUB-A ACTIVE SUB MXR DIME DISTORTION PEDAL ROLAND KC60 KEYBOARD AMP S/H TAPCO 6925 PASSIVE SPEAKERS EPIPHONE CASES VOX AC30VR 30W 2X12” VALVE REACTOR AMP VOX CT05CO SNAKE CHARMER COMPRESSOR VOX V412BN 4x12” CAB YAMAHA A12M PA SPEAKER SYSTEM YAMAHA PSRS550B KEYBOARD

EPIPHONE LES PAUL JUNIOR ASSORTED COLOURS RRP : $299

449 1999 349 6499 1699 5999 2499 699 529 999 949 399 699 419 1099 399 1399

179 1299 199 2499 999 2500 999 299 199 399 399 149 299 300 each 399 99 399 249 699

SALE : $179

RRP : $329 EPIPHONE CUTAWA CUTAWAY WITH ACOUSTIC WI PICKUP & ACCESSORIES

GIBSON STRINGS

$8 A SET!

SALE : $229

Mermaid Beach

Fortitude Valley

PRODUCT NAME

RRP

SALE

PRODUCT NAME

6 CHANNEL DMX ROTATING LED MOON FLOWER AER COMPACT 60 ACOUSTIC AMP AKAI 25 NOTE PORTABLE KEY CTRLR ARIA AC/EL BASS BLUE BURST ART AVDIRECT MULTI-INPUT AUDIO/VIDEO

369 1799 149 599 109

149 1299 99 249 49

BABY FALCON LIGHT BALDWIN PIANO B-42 HIGH POLISH EBONY BEHRINGER BEQ700 GRAPHIC EQUALIZER BOSS DN2 DYNA DRIVE C. GIORDANO ELECTRIC DOUBLE BASS CAD D189 MICROPHONE EDIROL PCRM30 MIDI CONTROLLER EDIROL UA25EX USB AUDIO INTERFACE EDIROL UM550 MIDI INTERFACE EPIPHONE EMPEROR II HS EPIPHONE LES PAUL CUSTOM LTD P-90 EB

349 8499 45 129 1399 279 399 329 499 1399 1199

179 4999 19 69 899 79 199 229 199 599 499

AIRLINE SYNTH GUITAR WIRELESS SYSTEM ARIA AC50 SPANISH CLASSICAL GUITAR ART DUAL PHANTOM POWER SUPPLY ART PRO SPLIT 2-WAY MIC SPLITTER BASIX STD POWER DRUM KIT MET WINE RED BEHRINGER AT108 15W ACOUSTIC AMP BOSS AC3 ACOUSTIC SIMULATOR NG STUDIO BOSS BR1200CD DIGITAL RECORDING

EPIPHONE LES PAUL NIGHTFALL GUITAR UITAR EB LTD EPIPHONE LES PAUL STUDIO LTD MIDNIGHT IDNIGHT V EPIPHONE LES PAUL ULTRA II FADED CHERRY SBURST FISHMAN AURA ACOUSTIC FX PROCESSOR FISHMAN AURA IMAGING PEDAL DREADNOUGHT FISHMAN PRO EQ PLATINUM GIBSON EXPLORER '76 W/SHORT VIB TA GIBSON LES PAUL CLASSIC CUSTOM AE GIBSON ROBOT EXPLORER MET RED GIBSON ROBOT SG SPECIAL EBONY GIBSON SG 1967 REISSUE W/P90 HC HAZE MACHINE JBL 2226 TRANSDUCER 8OHM KRAMER IMPERIAL S-404S METAL BLUE KRAMER PARIAH GREY FLAMES KRAMER VANGUARD RED METALL KURZWEIL PC3 61 KEY CONTROLLER SYNTH LANEY RB9PK 300W BASS HEAD & CAB LEXICON IONIX U82S USB AUDIO INTERFACE LIGHT EMOTION COSMIC LASER LIGHT EMOTION KINTA FX LIGHT MACKIE 8 CHANNEL 1600W POWERED MIXER MARTIN D15S ACOUSTIC GUITAR

999 699 1199 899 389 269 2999 6499 3499 2999 3229 495 555 549 699 899 3499 749 1275 199 1499 2495

399 399 499 299 199 199 1199 2199 1250 1250 999 199 299 199 299 399 1999 599 499 299 129 999 999

MATRIX LIGHT NUMARK CDX1 CD TURNTABLE PAISTE 18” 2002 CRASH CYMBAL PAISTE PST5 ROCK CYMBAL SET 14/16/20 SHURE SM11 MICROPHONE SONTRONICS STC 5 MICROPHONE SPUTNIKP LIGHT WASH STARBALL LED TRACE ELLIOT 1518C 1X15” 300W BASS CAB VOX BIGBADWAH JOE SATRIANI DUAL WAH YAMAHA C112V 12” PASSIVE SPEAKER YAMAHA DGX230 PORTABLE GRAND KEYBOARD

219 2295 469 499 139 399 599 285 1499 299 599 699

99 999 199 399 129 149 199 159 749 199 399 449

R YAMAHA N12 FIREWIRE MIXER

2399

999

849 499

599 299

YAMAHA NPV80 76 KEY PORTABLE BLE KEYBOARD YAMAHA R112 PA SPEAKER

299 499 49 49 249 69 69 999

BOSS DN2 DYNA DRIVE BOSS FZ5 FUZZ PEDAL BOSS LMB3 BASS LIMITER/ENHANCER BOSS MD2 COMPACT PEDAL BOSS TU88 TUNER & MICRO MONITOR BUGERA 6260-2X12 VALVE GUITAR COMBO CROWN XLS202D POWER AMP EDIROL MA1EX USB STEREO SPEAKER EDIROL MA7A MICRO MONITORS EPIPHONE BASS EMBASSY STD V TB EPIPHONE LES PAUL TRIBUTE 09 TB *DISC EPIPHONE MASTERBILT DR-500P NS *DISC

129 149 119 119 79 999 799 129 169 499 1099 1099

69 99 69 69 49 599 299 29 69 279 399 499

EV SXA100+ 12” POWERED SPEAKER FOSTEX PM0.4 POWERED MONITORS (PAIR) GIBRALTAR 4600 HI HAT STAND GIBSON ADVANCED JUMBO CUSTOM OM VS GIBSON LES PAUL CHAD KROEGER R

1249 399 89.95 8499 4199

649 199 59 3999 2499

GIBSON LES PAUL MELODY MAKER RAW EB GIBSON ROBOT SG SPECIAL EBONY *LTD GIBSON ROY SMECK AOUSTIC *LTD GIBSON WOODY GUTHRIE SOUTHERN JUMBO GRETSCH MAPLE FUSION TOBACCO FADE JBL CONTROL 2P POWERED MONITORS (PAIR) JTS GC80 INSTRUMENT WIRELESS KORG KOAX3A ACOUSTIC GTR EFFECTS KRAMER ASSAULT 211 PEARL WHITE KRAMER NITEV FR SS KRAMER VANGUARD BK LEGACY ST1 ELECTRIC GTR PACK MAPEX MERIDIAN STUDIOEASE BIRCH DRUMKIT MARTIN DX1K ACOUSTIC GUITAR MARTINEZ LAP STEEL ELEC GUITAR & BAG ORANGE 50W AD CUSTOM SHOP VALVE HEAD ORANGE AD 30W 2X12 TWIN CH COMBO

999 2999 4999 4999 2459 389 469 179 799 729 899 129.99 1499 1195 299 3999 2799

579 1250 2299 2299 1199 199 199 99 399 379 449 79 799 799 169 1999 1499

PAISTE TWENTY 18” THIN CRASH CYMBAL ROLAND MICROCUBE RX GUITAR AMP SHURE VP64AL SHOTGUN MIC SLINGERLAND TS SESSION RED GLITTER DRUMKIT SONTRONICS ORPHEUS DUAL DIAPHRAGM MIC SOUNDCRAFT GIGRAC 600 POWERED MIXER TRACE TA-100 ACOUSTIC AMP TRACE ELLIOT AH-600-12 BASS HEAD UFIP CLASS 20' RIDE CYMBAL VOX BIGBADWAH JOE SATRIANI DUAL WAH WUHAN 12” SPLASH CYMBAL YAMAHA C112V 12” PASSIVE SPEAKER YAMAHA P3500S POWER AMP YAMAHA PSRS500 KEYBOARD

669 399 139 11549 799 679 2399 2799 535 299 125 599 999 1199

349 199 29 3299 499 449 1199 1399 199 199 9 399 599 599

GOLD COAST MERMAID BEACH

SHOP 3/1 YOUNG STREET SOUTHPORT

2557 GOLD COAST HWY MERMAID BEACH

HOURS: MON-FRI 9:00am - 6:00pm SAT 9:00am - 3:00pm

SALE

699 1299 129 109 499 124.99 175

GOLD COAST SOUTHPORT

(07) 5561 1106

RRP

BRISBANE FORTITUDE VALLEY

(07) 5526 0636

(07) 3831 5898

HOURS: MON-FRI 9:00am - 5:30pm SAT 9:00am - 2:00pm

HOURS: MON-FRI 9:30am - 6:00pm SAT 9:00am - 3:00pm

59 BARRY PARADE FORTITUDE VALLEY

Time Off Issue #1569  

Time Off is Australia’s longest-running street press publication, and has positioned itself as an iconic Queensland brand. For past 18 years...

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