The Music (Melbourne) Issue #45

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2 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 3


themusic 2ND JUL 2014

“THIS FRENZIED, SUBVERSIVE, ANTI-THEATRE EXPLOSION OF ENERGY HITS YOU HARD.”

#045

INSIDE FEATURED

London Grammar Straight Arrows Jungle Glengarry Glen Ross Bell X1 Twin Jeff Lang Jason Dohring Allday Keir Choreographic Award Jack On Fire Lily Allen

REVIEWS Album: Sia Live: Lloyd Cole Arts: Photographs Of A ...and more

THE GUIDE Cover: The Good Person Of Szechuan Eat/drink: Chilli sauces Frontlash/Backlash Indie News/Q&As Opinion Gig Guide

review

USURPER OF MODERN MEDICINE @ THE CATFISH. PIC: DARCY RAHN

“HAVING ARRIVED IN MELBOURNE FROM SYDNEY WITH ONLY CARRY ON GEAR DUE TO AIRPORT/AIRLINE INEPTITUDE MEANS THEY ARE PLAYING AN “ULTRA STRIPPED-BACK, SUPER-LOOSE SET”.” GLENN WALLER REVIEWS USURPER OF MODERN MEDICINE (P28)

WE WERE ON GROUND AT ONE OF THE WORLD’S BIGGEST FESTIVALS, GLASTONBURY THIS PAST WEEKEND – HERE’S WHAT WENT DOWN.

READ OUR REVIEW ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

CATCH UP ON WHAT YOUR FAVOURITE LOCAL INDIE ARTISTS HAVE BEEN UP TO. MORE ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

feature

WHAT ALBUMS NAILED IT IN THE FIRST HALF OF 2014? WE’LL TELL YOU. READ OUR LIST ONLY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

TWIN. PIC: HOLLY ENGELHARDT

“IT’S ONE OF THOSE PLAYS YOU JUST WANT TO DROP PEOPLE INTO AND SEE WHAT THEY COME OUT WITH AT THE END.”

PAIGE RATTRAY, DIRECTOR OF NEON FESTIVAL OF INDEPENDENT THEATRE’S TWIN (P22) ALLDAY

track-by-track 4 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

JAMES DANIEL REVIEWS THANK YOU, THANK YOU LOVE (P29)

“I REALLY ATE TOO MANY PANADEINE TABLETS FOR A WHILE AND THIS SONG IS KIND OF A WEIRD HEARTBROKEN LOVE STORY TO OPIOIDS.”

ALLDAY TAKES US THROUGH HIS NEW ALBUM STARTUP CULT (P24)


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 5


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Bryget Chrisfield

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Stephanie Liew

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch vic.giguide@themusic.com.au

SENIOR CONTRIBUTOR Jeff Jenkins

CONTRIBUTORS Steve Bell, Emma Breheny, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Oliver Coleman, Rebecca Cook, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Tim Finney, Bob Baker Fish, Cameron Grace, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Samson McDougall, Tony McMahon, Fred Negro, Matt O’Neill, Josh Ramselaar, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Stephanie Tell, Simone Ubaldi, Glenn Waller, Matthew Ziccone

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 2 JULY - 8 JULY 2014

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Get ready for ENCORE, a creative partnership between two of Melbourne’s most beloved performing arts venues. This week sees La Mama’s standout production of Mein Kampf performed at fortyfivedownstairs in an effort to bring the highly acclaimed show to a larger venue and wider audience. Get your dose of 20th century history from 2 – 13 Jul.

St Kilda hasn’t always been the rock’n’roll heart of Melbourne – oh wait, yes it has! Throughout the not-soquiet seaside suburb are some of Melbourne’s most iconic live venues, and the streets are littered with rock history. Join punk legend Fred Negro and rock chick Fiona Lee Maynard on a walking tour of The George, The Prince, The Espy and everywhere in between, and learn music history as you never knew it. 2pm on 5 Jul.

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Have you heard Cookin’ On Three Burners’ new album Blind Bet yet? It’s a corker. They’re launching it at Corner Hotel on 4 Jul with special guests Daniel Merriweather (pictured), Kylie Auldist, Mantra, Jason Heerah and 1/6. Oh, what a night! MELBOURNE

watch


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 7


national news news@themusic.com.au

ANGUS & JULIA STONE

IT’S IN THE BLOODLINE

SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS

AIN’T NOTHING SLOW ME DOWN

After Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings had announced the release of new album Give The People What They Want last year, the livewire frontwoman was diagnosed with cancer. In typical fashion though, Jones didn’t stop fighting, and now she’s healthy and ready to lead her charges in the ultimate soul explosion. The group will visit us in spring, playing 5 Sep, The Tivoli, Brisbane; 8 & 9 Sep, Astor Theatre, Perth; 13 Sep, Sydney Town Hall; 17 Sep, Meeniyan Town Hall; and 19 Sep, Melbourne Town Hall, with Bombay Royale also appearing at select dates.

FLOATING FREE

The success of last year’s Given The Chance has driven Danny Harley, aka The Kite String Tangle, to finally put out a debut EP, with launch dates happening all around the country. Get some warm electronica at Amplifier, Perth, 22 Aug; Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 5 Sep; Corner Hotel, Melbourne, 6 Sep; Zierholz, Canberra, 11 Sep; Manning Bar, Sydney, 12 Sep; Cambridge Hotel, Newcastle, 13 Sep; and Spiegeltent, Brisbane Festival, 17 Sep.

START A RIOT

Dead Kennedys have unfinished business with Australia, and they’re set to spread their vitriol and shake political apathy from our souls with a series of punk rock master-classes. The Bedtime For Democracy tour happens 1 Oct, 170 Russell, Melbourne; 3 Oct, The Hi-Fi, Brisbane; 4 Oct, Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast; 5 Oct, The Hi-Fi, Sydney; 8 Oct, Mona Vale Hotel; 9 Oct, Entrance Leagues Club; 10 Oct, The Small Ballroom, Newcastle; and 11 Oct, Capitol, Perth.

ONE DAY

SIGNING OFF IN STYLE

Visiting us for a 29th and final time, veteran rocker Suzi Quatro will plug in 28 Jan, Regal Theatre, Perth; 6 Feb, Arts Centre, Melbourne; 10 Feb, Frankston Arts Centre; 12 Feb, Canberra Theatre; 13 Feb, Enmore Theatre, Sydney; 17 Feb, WIN Entertainment Centre, Wollongong; 18 Feb, Newcastle Entertainment Centre; 20 Feb, Twin Towns, Tweed Heads; 22 Feb, Empire Theatre, Toowoomba; 24 Feb, Brisbane Convention Centre; and 25 Feb, Events Centre, Caloundra.

FRYING IT UP

Their bangers are as delicious as the name suggests, and Peking Duk are in one hell of a mood to celebrate after scoring double Platinum sales for their Nicole Millar featuring jam High. After they do the Splendour In The Grass thing, they bring the party to Oxford Art Factory, 6 & 9 Aug; The Met, Brisbane, 12 Aug; Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 13 Aug; Corner Hotel, Melbourne 14 & 15, 17 & 18 Aug; Meche, Canberra, 16 Aug; and Villa Nightclub, Perth, 23 & 24 Aug.

“I FEEL THE SAME ABOUT MOST ADAM SANDLER VEHICLES.”

@DAVIDFOLKENFLIK RESPONDS TO NORTH KOREA CALLING THE NEW FRANCO/ROGEN COMEDY AN “ACT OF WAR”. 8 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

After spending the last few years following their own rabbit trails, Angus & Julia Stone are settling into their brother-sister guise again. Hear tracks off their Rick Rubin-produced self-titled third record 13 Sep, Llewellyn Hall, Canberra; 14 Sep, Sydney Opera House; 17 Sep, Civic Theatre, Newcastle; 18 Sep, The Tivoli, Brisbane; 21 Sep, The Arts Centre Gold Coast; 23 Sep, Perth Concert Hall; and 26 Sep, Palais Theatre, Melbourne. Support from Brisbane’s Vancouver Sleep Clinic.

TITANS UNITE ON THE MIC Mega Aussie hip hop supergroup One Day, featuring members of Horrorshow, Spit Syndicate, Jackie Onassis and Joyride, are making sure the sounds of Sydney’s inner west are being heard nationally with the release of new record Mainline. Watch history go down 5 Sep, 170 Russell, Melbourne; 13 Sep, Capitol, Perth; 19 Sep, Enmore Theatre, Sydney; 20 Sep, The Hi-Fi, Brisbane; and 26 Sep, ANU Bar, Canberra.

KEEP EVERYTHING

WRITING ON THE WALL

Billed as an “apocalyptic love letter to humanity” where cutting edge electronica and contemporary dance collide, Chunky Move’s Keep Everything traces movements from human evolution to robots and back again. Put together by Presets members Kim Moyes and Julian Hamilton, and choreographer Anthony Hamilton, the works tours 23 – 26 Jul, PICA, Perth; 31 Jul – 2 Aug, Brisbane Powerhouse; 13 – 16 Aug, Performance Space, Sydney; and 20 – 24 Aug, Arts House, Melbourne.


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local news vic.news@themusic.com.au APES

THE MOTION OF LIGHT IN WATER

THROUGH THE MOTIONS A queer sci-fi love story, The Motion Of Light In Water celebrates the complicated, exhilarating journey of the human heart, as our imaginations soar through space and time. Created by Elbow Room, through sound, light and space the piece explores what it means to be human and to love. See it at Theatre Works from 17 – 27 Jul.

WHAT AN APE!

Having recently been announced as part of the BIGSOUND line-up, and taking support slots for Band Of Skulls and Stonefield, Melbourne’s Apes are heading on a single launch run of their own, hitting up Grace Darling Hotel, 9 Aug. They’ll be launching new track Pull The Trigger, another catchy garage-rock tune to add to their repertoire.

PUCKER UP

Teen heartthrobs and surf pop party band Hockey Dad have released their debut EP, Dreamin’. They’ve also put together a video for their latest single, I Need A Woman. Oh yeah, and they’re playing a string of east coast dates, including 16 Aug, The Public Bar.

COPE THIS

Atlanta rockers Manchester Orchestra are returning to Australia with a run of east coast dates in support of their fourth album, Cope. Recorded in a home studio, which was the band’s old sharehouse that they refurbished, Cope is about “getting by... and being OK with being OK”, according to frontman Andy Hull. Manchester Orchestra play Corner Hotel, 13 Nov.

DAZED AND CONFUSED

Making its Victorian theatre debut is Glory Dazed, a darkly humorous and confronting exploration of soldiers returning from Afghanistan. Written by Cat Jones, the production took home the prize of Critics’ Choice at the Adelaide Fringe Festival in 2013 and the Holden Street Theatre Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2012. Glory Dazed will be running from 23 Jul – 23 Aug at Red Stitch Actors Theatre.

OPENING UP

On the support train for Obits on 1 Aug, Barwon Club, Geelong will be The Peep Tempel and Kids Of Zoo; and on 2 Aug, Reverence Hotel, it’s The Stevens, Freak Wave and Deep Heat. Darlia has been announced as the support for Skaters’ Splendour sideshow on 26 Jul, Corner Hotel. Fractures will support Wild Beasts on 29 Jul at The Prince. Dustin Tebbutt will join London Grammar to open their sold out Splendour sideshow at Festival Hall, 22 Jul; however, limited tickets will be released exclusively to Secret Sounds and Dew Process mail out subscribers 9am 4 Jul.

Brissy-based stalwarts Like Thieves are following up their massive May adventure with Dead Letter Circus with the announcement of their forthcoming Autumn’s Twilight tour throughout August, in support of their eagerly awaited second EP (out 21 Jul) after which the tour’s named. See them on 22 Aug, Barwon Club, Geelong and 23 Aug, Evelyn Hotel.

STICKING TOGETHER

Anna Schwartz Gallery hosts Collages, the latest exhibition from London’s John Stezaker from 30 Jul to 6 Sep. Stezaker is known for his head-shots and cinema memorabilia, as well as being awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. His surreal collages involve intermingling images of male and female faces with landscape postcards and other faces, speaking to our current world’s identity crisis and to the sense of fragmented selves.

SHEPPARDED AWAY

Chart-topping wonders Sheppard have announced a handful of headline shows to help celebrate the release of their forthcoming debut album Bombs Away, due out 11 Jul. They’ll be supported by Sydney’s New Empire on all dates, including on 1 Aug at The Hi-Fi.

“I SPREE-WATCHED THE TRANSFORMERS SERIES FOR AN ARTICLE AND NOW I AM NO LONGER CAPABLE OF RATIONAL THOUGHT. NOT WORTH IT! DO NOT TRY.” WARNING HEEDED, @JRHENNESSY. 10 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

OUT THIEVING

DEWEY DELL’S MARZO

HOUSE OF DELIGHTS

Arts House have announced their line-up for Season 2. Chunky Move’s Keep Everything is contemporary dance meets pulsing electronica in a love letter to humanity. Robin Fox and Liquid Architecture’s RGB Laser Show is a visceral immersion into synaesthetic sound and light. Dewey Dell’s dance work Marzo is an eccentric exploration of war and pace, love and hate. From One Step At A Time Like This comes Since I Suppose, a walk through Melbourne incorporating technology and Shakespeare. Ridiculusmus’ The Eradication Of Schizophrenia In Western Lapland is a fantastical look into psychosis. And Going Nowhere is a sustainable arts festival happening from 21–23 Nov in Melbourne and Cambridge, UK simultaneously.


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THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 11


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au

DOUBLE TROUBLE

Catch Royal Chant at The Tote on 18 Jul as the garage-rockers celebrate the launch of their latest double EP, Small Town Bruises/A Day At The Wauchope Races. That’s proof Mark Spence and James Carthew, with expat Ryan Stuart, have properly used the funds from their Kickstarter campaign to record to tape a fuzz-pop record, due for release 7 Jul.

THE JURADO’S OUT

Seattle singer-songwriter Damien Jurado will play his first Australian headline shows this September, to coincide with his just announced appearance at Brisbane Festival. The conceptual music-maker, who came to prominence in the ‘90s as part of the famed Sub Pop record label with his lo-fi folk, Americana sound, will perform at Northcote Social Club, 19 Sep. Joining will be Adelaide artist Summer Flake and Great Earthquake.

YOUNG HENRY

Catch Joe Henry when the songwriter and Grammy-winning producer plays 12 Sep, Melbourne Recital Centre and 13 Sep, Meeniyan Town Hall. Having recorded at his own Pasadena Studio The Garfield House, Henry brings with him his 13th album, Invisible Hour, due out 8 Aug, a record brimming with his gravelly vocals and clear Southern soul arrangements.

NOT DEAD YET

With Tim Hulsman’s third record out on 18 Jul, Dead Man’s Garden, it’s time to head on tour down the east coast. Hulman’s personal story of leaving the Jehovah’s Witness church and striking out on his own, without the support of his family, is infused in his folky alt-country songs. On 17 Aug, Wesley Anne; 24 Aug, The Drunken Poet; and 28 Aug, Retreat Hotel.

MIRIAM LIEBERMAN TRIO

FLYYING COLOURS

FLYYING HIGHER

Following on from a ripper year last year, when they released their debut EP through Universal Distribution, got attention from radio and street press, and fired up the blogosphere, Flyying Colours are now set to release their new single Not Today and take it out on the road on a launch tour. See ‘em at Golden Vine Hotel, Bendigo, 24 Jul; Shebeen Bandroom, 25 Jul; and Beav’s Bar, Geelong, 27 Jul.

SWEENEY SAYS SEE YA

After a decade, ACMI Director and CEO Tony Sweeney will retire from his role in December when his contract ends. During his time with ACMI, Sweeney has overseen record organisational growth, performance and visitation, success and achievement. Highlights of his tenure include creating the permanent free exhibition, Screen Worlds: The Story of Film, Television and Digital Culture; a significantly expanded range of pioneering exhibitions, creative workshops, live events and online engagement programs; and new outreach programs. Sweeney said it was a good time for him to move on and explore new interests and personal family connections.

“99 PROBS AND I’M 99 OF THEM.”

NO ONE ENCAPSULATES ‘SAD INTERNET’ AS MUCH AS @SOSADTODAY DOES.

TYDI DRESSING

MIRIAM’S MOON

Birds Of The Moon, the new album from Sydney singer-songwriter Miriam Lieberman blends African influences seamlessly with blues-infused melodies and soaring vocal harmonies. Released on 2 Aug, the album’s songs reflect Lieberman’s musical journey from Mali to central India and south America. She presents them live – with help from Kate Adams and Lara Goodridge on cello, violin and BVs – at The Flying Saucer Club, 21 Sep. 12 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

See much-loved Oz DJ, producer and songwriter tyDi as he returns to the Aus east coast this July and August. Having received love from his new home in the US, where his latest single Stay ft Dia Frampton is currently climbing up the dance charts, his homecoming is set to impress and get the dancefloor pounding. See him 25 Jul, Alumbra and 25 Jul, Ciroq Nightclub.

TRAILING BEHIND

See Harmony when they head back on tour to celebrate new single Vapour Trails, reaching Copacabana, 20 Jul and Poison City Weekender at Reverence Hotel, 24 Aug. Having enjoyed praise from the critics for their second album Carpetbombing and their album launch tour, Harmony will surely be a sight to be scene, breaking moulds and winning new fans.

MUSTOED COURAGE

Glenn Musto and Lars Wallin are heading across Australia to promote the release of Musto’s new self-produced single Don’t Give Up Now. All proceeds from the single’s sale will go towards Love Me Love You, an organisation that helps young people suffering from mental illness and substance abuse issues. They play 16 Jul, The Espy; 18 Jul, Babushka Bar, Ballarat; and 23 Jul, Spotted Mallard.

JINJA KNIGHT

Local fans will be able to witness Jinja Safari co-frontman Pepa Knight performing live and solo for the first time this August, as he celebrates the single launch of new quirk-pop track Clams. The track comes off his forthcoming debut, Hypnotized. Catch the bearded muso on 7 Aug, Northcote Social Club.


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197A BRUNSIWCK ST FITZROY 3065 (03) 9417 5955 THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 13


music

CAPTURING THEIR YOUNG YEARS Chatting with Coldplay made Dan Rothman and his London Grammar bandmates realise that chemistry is more important than individual capability. He tells Benny Doyle about “forgetting the aspiration” to live in the now. Cover and feature pics by Kane Hibberd.

E

ven with his beloved English national squad suffering at the World Cup, Dan Rothman still has plenty of reasons to smile. Closer to 20 than 30, the guitarist has seen his band London Grammar develop from the University of Nottingham halls to become a globally-lauded live drawcard, while their debut full-length album, If You Wait, has just secured Platinum sales in both their native UK and Australia.

knew the words and were singing along and were excited to see us, you really sensed that. It was just wonderful, and it’s one of my best memories of the band, I think for all of us.” For a group like London Grammar – whose intricacies and space need to be heard as much as the hero elements – a respectful audiences goes a long way in helping make the show a success, especially at festivals. But that can be coupled with a welcomed rowdiness too – it’s all dependent on how deeply the crowd is connected with the music. “If they’re loud during the songs, that’s necessarily not a good thing for us because we have such quiet music sometimes,” Rothman

That inaugural Australian visit wasn’t completely full of victories though – the trio’s first Sydney headline show at Metro Theatre was a “bit of a nightmare” after their laptop packed it in. However, the overall experience played a big part in London Grammar’s artistic growth, allowing them to gain awareness with regards to what crowds want from the band. “When we first started playing [the songs live] we immediately wanted to make them different and a bit more experimental and weird, and it was wrong, it was wrong from the beginning,” Rothman stresses. “We had a really terrible initial gig where we played this secret show and it was a fucking disaster – it really was, I’m not shitting you. It was really bad and our managers were very worried about it, but me and Dot [have since] put a lot of work into getting the music right.” As well as being a capable Harry Styles lookalike, Dominic ‘Dot’ Major is responsible for keys, synths and rhythms – the technical beauty in the band’s sound. “He’s a computer nerd and a real whiz like that,” says Rothman. “I’m very lucky to be in a band with that guy.” But without a doubt the most arresting element of London Grammar is the vocal of frontwoman Hannah Reid. Soaring and longing, youthful yet brimming with confidence, her voice removes time and place from your mind. Rothman still remains grateful that their paths crossed while studying in Nottingham.

“IF ANY ONE PERSON THINKS THEY’RE BEYOND THE BAND THEN THE BAND WOULD CEASE TO EXIST.”

Listening to the record, the British success is something of a given. If You Wait has plenty of touchstones from various pockets of English brilliance past: the classical purity, the restrained electronica, the emotive textures and tones that are uplifting and heartbreaking – it recalls everyone from Massive Attack to Florence & The Machine. But it’s surprising that the album has struck such a chord in our humid home – it’s not exactly backyard barbecue music after all. Rothman agrees, saying that on their first visit (over New Year’s period for Falls Festival) the band felt like they were arriving into the unknown, making the response given to them all the more memorable. “When we went to Australia [the first time], it almost felt like we’d broken earlier there because triple j was playing the record and Strong was on the radio and I think it was going into the top five at that point,” remembers Rothman. “And it really culminated, and there was all this excitement about us coming, so when we got there we didn’t know what it was actually going to be like, and until we stepped onto the stage at Falls and Lorne we really didn’t have any idea. “Then when there was like 10,000 people there – okay, it’s not the biggest festival in the world, but I assure you it is quite something to see that; if you’ve never had that many people [watching you] before it’s quite something to see in an outside venue. It was very overwhelming. And beyond that it was just the amount of people that 14 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

admits. “But you can get passionate fans that can listen intently and then are rowdy as well, and that’s the ultimate combination, that’s what we always hope for.

“I heard her sing and was obviously incredibly surprised by it – that was probably my initial reaction. And [I was] just genuinely excited about finding someone who was great at music. It was quite innocent at that time, I don’t think we were ever like, ‘Oh, we’re going to make a band.’ Me and her played acoustic gigs for a year before we even met Dot; that was what it was like.”

“In Australia you have that to some extent, and we’ve always experienced that in France as well. English audiences, as much as I love them, are different in that sense; they expect a lot more and I don’t think they’re as appreciative of bands coming over because they’re more used to the bands being here. That might be a complete generalisation, but particularly in London it’s always difficult. If you go outside of London the shows become much more enjoyable, but London is undoubtedly always stressful.”

It seems rather incongruous that Rothman wouldn’t have at least daydreamed about the possibility of future success after connecting with Reid. He assures us, however, that there was never an initial goal outside of making tracks together – a by-product of seeing peers pass him by as a teenager. “I was in bands before I ever came to university, and I had this dream of being in a band, and I was in indie bands, and I’d seen other bands get signed, and I lived in the same area as Bombay Bicycle Club, they’d been signed and I’d seen their [quick] progression, so I went to university and was just like, ‘Fuck, I don’t know, it’s so much more difficult than I thought.’ But forgetting the aspiration made it a lot more easy and a lot more enjoyable, and ultimately it led us to making better music and progressing quicker. Most importantly, I was excited about writing songs with Hannah, and excited about what she can do.” Working with Reid as a centrepiece, London Grammar have written some of their finest tunes; Hey Now, for example, was an extended jam that was melded into


an almost operatic pop song. But other notable tracks like Wasting My Young Years were brought to the band by Reid almost fully realised. “In some ways [those tracks] are the most impressive,” remarks Rothman. He goes on to add that as a songwriter, the blonde-haired Reid is “one of the most gifted people I’ve ever seen”. “I genuinely believe that she’s just different,” Rothman smiles. “Like obviously I write music, I’m a songwriter, but I don’t think it’s the same, she’s got that talent that’s just a little bit... you can’t quite put your finger on what it is. And she doesn’t know it at all, which is even better. I’m just very, very lucky to be in a band with her.” Listening to the affable guitarist, it’s clear he truly believes in his friends and loves what they do. But for their wealth of unique individual talents, the three band members of London Grammar are all an integral part of a greater, more powerful whole, a fact they value more than ever after chatting with one of the world’s biggest groups. “A massive namedrop, but when we met Coldplay they stressed that importance to us, so we don’t ever take it for granted, how important the chemistry of the band is,” Rothman says. “They’ve always respected that chemistry and that’s arguably why they’ve been around for so long and have been so successful, [and] I think we’ve learnt the importance of feeling that [too]. “If any one person thinks they’re beyond the band then the band would cease to exist. And it’s easy to go that way,

it can just happen, like particularly from a lead singer point of view, and again this is where Hannah as a person, I have so much respect for her because she is such a star that really she could do it without me or Dot, but she knows that it doesn’t necessarily mean that it would be right. Like, how rare is it that you’re in a band whose music actually connects with people? So you have to accept the chemistry of the band.” WHEN & WHERE: 22 Jul, Festival Hall; 25 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands

THE GLOBAL FREQUENCY After making direct mention to the role our national youth radio broadcaster has played in the Australian success of London Grammar, Rothman is queried about triple j’s global reach and whether or not the station is as recognised and respected as we’d like to believe. As it turns out, our local tastemakers are worldwide influencers too. “I wasn’t aware of the station until we started getting played on it, no,” he acknowledges. “But it quickly became apparent when you talked to people in the industry, like our record company or our managers, they quickly explained it to you and they knew exactly what it is and how it’s essentially the equivalent of [BBC] Radio 1 in terms of its cultural significance with the younger audience. “It’s funny though, once you learn that and the more time you spend in the industry, triple j comes up a lot, especially in America; with the success of Lorde and that kind of thing they look towards it big time. You go to a lot of the big independent stations over there like KCRW and KXPN and they all talk about triple j as influencing their playlists. So undoubtedly it’s not just an Australian thing – people are very aware of how quickly [triple j] picks up on new music – it’s undeniable really.”

THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 15


music

PEGGING BANANAS Straight Arrows’ Owen Penglis has coined a new genre to describe their latest record, but despite all his muso know-how, he can’t fathom one Joel Madden. He chats to Hannah Story.

“I

don’t know how one guy could eat so many bananas,” muses Owen Penglis. He’s put down his tea and his copy of The Troggs’ Reg Presley’s conspiracy theory book Wild Things They Don’t Tell Us. Instead, he’s talking about Straight Arrows’ recent Standard Bowl gig, one of their first since they finished recording second album Rising. “Beforehand they were filming some kind of commercial and that dick from Good Charlotte who’s on TV, on The Voice [ Joel Madden], he was there doing an ad and they asked us to be the background music of the ad and we said no. They had all this fruit for him backstage, like all these bananas and shit, so that’s where all those bananas came from that we pegged out at the audience.” And that’s a Straight Arrows show in a nutshell: pegging bananas and throwing toilet paper into the audience, shouting into the mic about bad tempers and mind control, and sometimes cocking up the songs. And Penglis attributes their high energy to excitement, not illicit substances. “It’s just the excitement, you know, we’re all really good friends, and usually you get to the venue like five hours beforehand and set your equipment up and then try not to get too drunk before you have to play. And it’s really hard to do that when you’re sitting in a pub for five hours. So usually we’re kind of drunk and just so excited and happy to be playing that it just comes across like that I suppose.” And on cocking up – “[You] can’t really take yourself too seriously if you’re having trouble playing your guitar. We’ve gotten better now. You can’t take yourself too seriously if you’re just onstage making mistakes. I guess people can relate to that – everyone makes mistakes, and we’re saying it’s cool to fuck up on stage and it’s cool to sound shitty.” It’s that shitty sound that led Penglis to coin his own genre for Rising: mid-fi. “That’s pretty much me trying to make up something so people would stop calling us a lo-fi band. I guess we got characterised as that because all these early 7-inches we recorded, it was just one microphone and a cassette four-track, I guess they sounded pretty shitty and at the time I thought they sounded pretty 16 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

good, they were like the best I could manage. So medium fidelity means it sounds a little bit better but not stupid and polished or something. “I find something appealing in music that doesn’t sound like

them because it sucks having some dude playing drums at 9pm next door. I would record while everyone was at work during the day and stop before they got home. I did the whole Palms album here, I’ve done quite a few records here... And this one lady moved in next door and knocked on the door while I was recording something and started screaming at me and called the police and all this stuff and I’d never even met her before or seen her. I was like, ‘Okay, that’s cool, I’ll stop now.’ And the

“I COULD WASH DISHES OR DELIVER PIZZAS BUT I THINK MUSIC SOUNDS A LOT BETTER THAN THAT.” it’s had a team of guys polishing it for a year; there’s something more direct and more human about stuff that is full of mistakes and weird noises and fuck-ups.” The group – rounded out by Rising Fortune’s Angela Bermuda, Palms’ Alex Grigg and Adam Williams – started to record the album at Penglis’ home studio (his loungeroom and kitchen), before a new neighbour complained, and they packed up for a studio space in Kings Cross. “We’ve always had really cool neighbours and I try to be really mindful of

next day I started up again and she came back again and she made it really difficult – and then she moved out.” It’s other projects, including work producing The Frowning Clouds and Royal Headache, that kept Penglis and co. from making the follow-up to 2010’s It’s Happening sooner. But the creative tap doesn’t stop dripping – not for long anyway. “Sometimes it’s not happening, you can’t beat yourself up. You’ve just got to do something else – go buy a sandwich and read the newspaper... Sometimes you’ll spend a couple of weeks on someone else’s record and then at the end you’ll be like, ‘I just want to not listen to guitars for a few days.’ But what else am I going to do? I could wash dishes or deliver pizzas, but I think music sounds a lot better than that.” WHAT: Rising (Rice Is Nice) WHEN & WHERE: 12 Jul, Northcote Social Club


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 17


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THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 19


music

MYSTERIOUS SPECIES As teenagers they wanted to be “the next Libertines”, but thankfully Jungle found their own soul groove. Co-founder T lets Benny Doyle into his circle of trust.

“I

’d like you to know me as T ‘cause I think we’re friends now, we’ve had a good chat, so that would be good, man.”

A casual 20-minute conversation – that’s all you need to be welcomed into the Jungle family. And The Music fast finds out that this is very much a family. Still fresh to the stage, having only taken the project live last October, the London collective arrive for Splendour ‘14 and will be fronting up as a five-piece unit, made up of good friends with incredible talents. “It’s so cool to share the experiences with people that you love and trust,” smiles T. “I’m very much of the opinion that they’re as much a part of Jungle as I am and as J is, because I can step off stage and I can let those musicians stand there and represent the emotion and ethos of the project, and that’s a really cool place to be. Everyone that we work with really represents [the group] in their own individual way, and at the end of the day, Jungle is bigger than all of us, so it’s just about our little individual contributions towards that greater picture.” The modern soul act have created a stir in the past 12 months, no doubt aided by the fact that the duo at the heart of the group simply go by ‘T’ and ‘J’, and that, oh, no one knows what the fuck they look like. Listen to their self-titled debut, however, and you quickly discover that those superficial elements are probably the most boring things going on with Jungle, the new record sounding lived-in in the smoothest of ways. T laughs when talking album flow, admitting almost sheepishly that the band’s sound guy played a crucial part in organising the tracklist. But he gets serious when discussing the record’s accomplished edge, saying the songs “are such an intrinsic part of who we are”. “We use a lot of found sounds,” he says. “I go and make field recordings – I love sitting, like watching a boxing match in east London and you’re just sitting there with your recorder, and then you take it home, put your headphones on and close your eyes, and you’re immediately back in that space with the crowd and the

sound of the bell and the shuffling of the feet on the canvas. And trying to get things like that into our music takes it to another dimension. It’s almost like bringing the energy of 1000 people into a track, and that makes it feel warm and much more stable and emotionally secure.”

songs that spoke honestly to them, removing the fear and paranoia from their egos. “You’ve got to trust yourself,” T stresses. “If you’re too busy asking for other people’s opinions then you’re not busy enough making music that you think you’re going to enjoy yourself.” Jungle call Shepherd’s Bush home, but T admits he doesn’t think they consciously made a west London sounding record. “Obviously people draw comparisons between Gorillaz and stuff like because Damon [Albarn]’s based in west London, and our label [XL Recordings] is based there too. But it’s more of a subconscious thing – you pick up the energy. You spend so long living in an area that’s busy, you have to digest information so quickly in order to keep up with the pace of life here, and that translates into your subconscious, definitely. “Also, Shepherd’s Bush is a massive culture clash,” he continues. “You have a huge Australian population, South African, Irish, Afro-Caribbean, Saudi Arabian community. So there’s loads of different food, music, smells, sights, sounds.” And although it closed last year, there was always the shining beacon to Aussie expat

“JUNGLE IS BIGGER THAN ALL OF US, SO IT’S JUST ABOUT OUR LITTLE INDIVIDUAL CONTRIBUTIONS TOWARDS THAT GREATER PICTURE.” After a childhood spent scraping in fights and running away from their parents, music became the centre of J and T’s universe around the age of 15 when they started their first band – “We thought we were going to be the next Libertines or something,” he chuckles. However, things really came to a head last year when the pair, dissatisfied with the music they were creating, focused on writing

hedonism in London, the Shepherd’s Bush Walkabout. “The amount of times I nearly ran over people dressed as like Super Mario on a Sunday night,” T cackles. So what is Jungle? According to T, it’s the result of 25 years of being alive. “Naturally you digest so much culture and information and life in your existence as you grow up,” he finishes, “and sharing those experiences [with J] makes them more vivid when you come back to explaining them a little bit more.” WHAT: Jungle (XL/Remote Control) WHEN & WHERE: 27 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands; 29 Jul, Corner Hotel


theatre

HUNGRY LIKE WOLVES ALEX DIMITRIADES AND GREG STONE REHEARSING GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS WITH DIRECTOR ALKINOS TSILIMIDOS

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n 1984, American playwright David Mamet wrote the play Glengarry Glen Ross, a biting satire on American greed that described the power-fest of big business and the humanity that gets smashed along the way to making it succeed. The play joined a throng of other artistic productions charting the same themes, like the film Wall St and the novel American Psycho. It won a Pulitzer Prize and then became the 1992 festival hit film starring Al Pacino and Alex Baldwin. This year, The Melbourne Theatre Company stage a remount opening 5 Jul starring Alex Dimitriades and under the guidance of film and theatre director Alkinos Tsilimidos. Such a staging is consistent with the company’s recent focus on presenting the full gamut of theatre forms, from challenging independent pieces to proven mainstagers. Tsilimidos, for one, thinks that this particular play warrants not only its accolades but a contemporary audience. “There’s no question that I wouldn’t do it,” he says during a quick-fire break in rehearsals, “and I think it was a great idea from [MTC Artistic Director] Brett Sheehy to do it. It’s a timeless piece that’s like a microcosm of our society and economy.” The play sees four salesmen in a real estate agency pitted against each other to sell land to a list of questionable potential investors. The best two stay on to bathe in pools of cash, the other two get fired. As in the recent Leo DiCaprio film, Wolf Of Wall Street, the agents regularly do whatever it takes to sell. Underhand tactics, lies and deception are all means of survival in the game. The play’s dramatic motivating force is the quest to get hold of the ‘Glengarry’ list, an index of the best leads, the potential investors with the most money and the biggest propensity to buy. The company’s arsehole management hold these details. Getting hold of the Glengarry leads is essential to winning; essential to survival. Cue the kind of viciousness that Kevin Spacey (who was also in the film) channels as a congressman in the HBO series House Of Cards. “When men are forced to act in such a competitive way – given that drive to achieve at all costs – it’s violent,

ruthless,” Tsilimidos explains. “It’s like a microcosm of the GFC. You can see that these guys could create the GFC, their own kind of very micro-version of it. The issues, the themes, they’re timeless and they keep bothering us.” Today, with the ongoing sub-prime mortgage

Long before Wolf Of Wall Street, one American playwright had the whole viciousness of business sussed. Director Alkinos Tsilimidos talks to Simon Eales about a timely revisiting of a classic American play. critique to its audience. “I thought, ‘Why?’ There was no reason to update it. I thought let’s just go back into time and look at it. I think the point will come home that if we’re in the ‘80s then, jeez, it’s not that much different to today. Technology’s changed but the greed remains.” Mamet’s ability as a playwright too is integral to delivering the fast-paced, ruthless atmosphere of Glengarry’s board meetings and backroom bargains. “There’s a rhythm to Mamet. It’s all in his intentions and it’s so easy to fall out of line or get sidetracked from it. He’s intense and engaged, so you have to stay focused.”

“TECHNOLOGY’S CHANGED BUT THE GREED REMAINS.” fiasco in the US and its ramifications around the world, these issues and this behaviour from big business, as Tsilimidos says, continue to influence our lives. “Glengarry is about selling the American Dream and the play gives a real idea of just what it takes to do that and at what cost.” But MTC’s production is not an ‘update’. There’re no emails here, no faxes. Paradoxically perhaps, Tsilimidos thinks this is an important aspect of really bringing the play’s

Like Mamet’s, Tsilimidos’ own career straddles film and theatre, so a comparison between the two seems natural. “He’s written some pretty entertaining books when it comes to his transition into film,” Tsilimidos points out. “I think that’s what I like most about him – it’s a giggle – from a Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, thrown into the world of Hollywood. I just love the way that he still manages to maintain his artistry. “I come from the world of film into the world of theatre, so it’s slightly different, but on an intellectual level I completely understand. The thing is, Mamet actually cares about what he does, and that’s sometimes a rarity.” WHAT: Glengarry Glen Ross WHEN & WHERE: 5 Jul - 9 Aug, Southbank Theatre, The Sumner THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 21


music

BREAKING NEW GROUND Paul Noonan of Dublin’s Bell X1 catches up with Jazmine O’Sullivan to chat about simplifying their songs, creative contempt and of course, meat pies.

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ell X1 have consistently released chart-topping albums since their inception back in 2000; however, with their sixth record, Chop Chop, frontman Paul Noonan explains that the trio needed to switch things up a bit. “What we talked about a lot in the studio was shrinking the palette, in that we wanted to use far less instruments and not get distracted or carried away with new toys. So it’s a pretty traditional record for us for the most part, just guitar, bass, drums and piano. Also, we did most of the touring [promoting the album] as a fourpiece. I’m usually the singer and frontman, but I played

theatre

drums on this recent tour. At one stage we all played different instruments and that was great.” Elaborating further, Noonan reveals, “We’ve been wanting to work with Peter Katis for a long time – he helped make a lot of the records we love from bands like Interpol and The National, and the stars finally aligned and we recorded with him in a studio in Connecticut. The one thing about that was, we only had two weeks to do it, because we also wanted Thomas Bartlett [The National, Antony & The Johnsons] to co-produce the record. Both of them were only available for this two-week period in January last

year and we’d never recorded that quickly before. It was an entirely new thing for us to be in a studio for such a short time and feel like we’d nailed it.” Noonan believes the time frame forced the group to be much harsher with themselves and their music, a process made easier by the many years they’ve spent together. “There’s a sort of familiar contempt that develops from spending so much time with each other,” Noonan laughs. “You can be rude arseholes, and it’s okay! Also in the studio you can communicate without having to spell things out, you don’t have to do a whole lot of talking. At this stage we can arrive at things by intuition; we know how to read each other.” Having had the privilege of opening for bands like U2 in their career and earning a plethora of musical accolades along the way, Noonan is thrilled to finally be bringing the Bell X1 experience Down Under. “Heading to Australia is something we’ve wanted to do for a long time. I suppose we felt the first records didn’t really break through enough, until now. When you head over to a country for the first time there’s always that sense of breaking new ground and building things from the ground up – you feel like you’re converting people a room at a time.” And it’s not just the tour Noonan is excited about with his first visit: “I believe the pies are something to try! Our first record was produced by Nick Seymour of Crowded House, who lives here in Dublin, and he would make these meat pies with white pepper and they were amazing! I look forward to trying the experience Down Under.” WHAT: Chop Chop (Belly Up) WHEN & WHERE: 3 Jul, The Hi-Fi

A DARKER DOWN UNDER

In her new project Twin, Paige Rattray explores the disappointing side of our country. She speaks to Harry Hughes.

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win is a complex new play from exciting independent theatre company Arthur. The first of their three-part Myth Project, it follows Ana, who falls into a “dark, alternate world of riddles and dreams” after her twin’s sudden disappearance, mixing opera-noir, cabaret and naturalistic drama.

often “very disappointed” in her home country. “It’s a bit of push and pull, and you see us struggling with that throughout the show.”

The epic Myth Project comes from a team that has developed an excellent reputation since their founding in 2011 through a run of acclaimed plays, including Cut Snake which won Best Writing at the 2011 Melbourne Fringe Festival and is touring again this year. In 2014, Twin has been selected as part of the Melbourne Theatre Company’s NEON Festival of Independent Theatre. Arthur, a partnership between director Paige Rattray and producer Belinda Kelly, came about from a shared interest in works that were often not being programmed. “So we thought, ‘What the hell, we’ll put some of these plays on,’” says Rattray.

Known for their intensified visual style in previous works, Twin will be no different. Rattray claims that the tone of the NEON promotional photo reads well visually for the rest of the play. Her and set designer Dave Fleischer collaborate on the sets and follow the motto “simple and bold”.

Though she’s reluctant to give much away about the plot – “It’s one of those plays you just want to drop people into and see what they come out with at the end” – Rattray confirms that it definitely will make an assessment about modern Australia, a theme that Arthur’s plays consistently deal with. The director describes the “alternate world” that Ana enters as “the dark rumblings underneath this top layer; the darker side of Australia”. She says that she feels mixed views and is

Arthur’s regular collaborators Amelia Evans, Duncan Graham and Dan Giovannoni wrote the work together and have remained close with Rattray throughout the development process. “We’re very

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CATHERINE DAVIES, PERFORMER IN TWIN. PIC BY HOLLY ENGELHARDT

honest – if something’s not working we tell each other.” This feedback loop is essential to success: “For all of those voices to share the one vision is really important; you all need to be in the same world to make sure everyone knows their place.” This is a huge effort given there are 43 actors on stage – 34 being Launceston College Ensemble students – as well as having a large crew. The risk that this creates is what fuels Rattray’s passion for theatre. She tells The Music about the first screening of a film she made, when she strangely missed the fear of something going wrong. “It’s the live performance [that interests me]; what you see on stage one night, you’re never going to see again. As a director, once the curtains open and the lights go up on stage, you have to relinquish control, and I actually really enjoy doing that.” WHAT: Twin WHEN & WHERE: 10 – 20 Jul, Neon Festival, Southbank Theatre, The Lawler


SONGS FROM THE MARGIN With shows in Glasgow, London and Cannes followed by an 11-date tour of France taking up much of the first half of 2014 for Jeff Lang, Michael Smith catches up with him ahead of his Australian tour.

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eff Lang’s 15th album, I Live In My Head A Lot These Days, is quite the curious collection of songs, at least lyrically, what with the opening cut, Watch Me Go, featuring a mugging, and closing track, The Promise Of New Year’s Eve, a gentlemanly bit of break-and-enter. “My basic latent criminality’s the link – well spotted!” Lang chuckles before explaining how this batch of

songs came together. “It was the usual accumulation process of songs written over the past two years. A song like Standing On The Shore is a good example. I actually wrote that song as scribblings in the margins of another song that I was sort of consciously trying to write from a particular point of view as an exercise. Halfway through I kind of knew it wasn’t working – those things rarely do for me – but in the process I’d had these seemingly random things come to me that I’d scribbled in

the margins, and I looked at them and realised that song was actually good. That’s the way it works best; things just subconsciously come through and I’ll sing it and hear it and go, ‘Wow, okay, cool. So that’s what that’s about,’ like a listener, as opposed to getting out your tool kit and hammering out songs. Petra Goes To The Movies; I just saw that line in a magazine article. It just sort of jumped out as kind of a cool line, and then I went out to the kitchen and just scribbled down a bunch of verses, picked up a guitar and that riff sort of fell out as I was reading the verses, ‘cause they had a rhythm to ‘em. I played it to Allison, my wife, and she said, ‘Where’d that come from?’ ‘I dunno!’ That one needed a little craftsmanship, had to pull out the hammer and the saw and kind of make a patio for it, ‘cause it needed a middle section.”

music

While the overseas touring has essentially been solo, Lang put in a performance in Glasgow with his latest side project, Maru Tarang, featuring Sydney-based tabla master Bobby Singh along with north Indian musicians Asin Langa and Bhungar Manganivar. “And the good thing about that? No shortage of curry! I was in Glasgow for six days and I must have had ten curries – great!” he laughs. “Seriously though, those guys are tremendous. There’s actually a record in the can that’ll probably come out early next year.” WHAT: I Live In My Head A Lot These Days (ABC/Universal) WHEN & WHERE: 4 Jul, Caravan Music Club; 5 Jul, Thornbury Theatre; 6 Jul, Old Hepburn Hotel, Hepburn Springs; 20 Jul, Beav’s Bar, Geelong

TIP OF THE ICEBERG

film

There may be hope for the future of Veronica Mars, as star Jason Dohring reveals details of a confirmed spin-off and the possibility of the show’s return to Daniel Cribb.

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t’s been seven years since we saw Jason Dohring riding waves on Neptune Beach as Logan Echolls on Season Three of Veronica Mars. When the show was cancelled in 2007, fans were left in limbo, until creator Rob Thomas launched a Kickstarter campaign last year that made crowdfunding history. Seven years later fans still had a burning passion for the show, raising $5,702,153, and thrusting the characters of the cult hit back into the spotlight. A swarm of Marshmallows (yep, that’s the name given to Veronica Mars fans) will no doubt venture to Oz Comic-Con to chat about the film, and other works Dohring has been involved with in recent years. For Dohring, it’s the perfect opportunity to give something back. “I snuck into a theatre, just to see what people thought of it and you know, the credits went dark after everything and somebody shouted out, ‘We did it!’, and everybody started cheering, and I was like, ‘Dude, that is so cool. What a unique experience’… One person saw me and then it was just a disaster; I was there for an hour-and-a-half just taking pictures,” he laughs. Fans were teased with a Season Four trailer in 2007 that never eventuated to anything, and while many had lost hope for a revival, it seems that Thomas may have always known something else would arise. “I think with a few episodes to go, the network went up to Rob and said, ‘We’re not really sure if you’ll be coming back, so

if you want to maybe wrap things up you should maybe do that,’ and he did the exact opposite in true Rob fashion and just left everything totally open, which turned out to be one of the biggest selling points in getting more of this story told.” If you thought the Veronica Mars film signalled everything was over, think again; Thomas planted loose ends to potentially revisit in the future. “He left a couple of loose ends; he didn’t tie it all up like real nice… You know, [the characters] talk about ‘This is just the tip of the iceberg’, in regards to how corrupt the police force is, and I think

JASON DOHRING AS LOGAN ECHOLLS WITH KRISTEN BELL AS VERONICA MARS IN THE VERONICA MARS FILM

after that sheriff went down, then maybe it opens the door for Keith [Mars] to take the position and possibly uncover corruption.” If that wasn’t enough, it’s been confirmed that Ryan Hansen – who plays Dick Casablancas on the show – has been given his own spin-off, Play It Again, Dick. The spin-off will feature Hansen playing himself trying to get the character of Casablancas his own show. Although not much else has been announced yet, Dohring reveals he and Kristen Bell (Veronica Mars) have been approached to appear and are keen. “I hope I get to be a part of it and I love Ryan and love working with him as well, he’s just such a super guy… They contacted me several weeks ago and we’ll just see what happens... I think we’re all just waiting to get done with the projects we’re on.” WHAT: Oz Comic-Con WHEN & WHERE: 5 – 6 Jul, Royal Exhibition Building THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 23


music

ALL DAY HIP HOP

my wrongs.” I wrote the whole thing while I was really drunk and recorded a demo. When I woke up the next day I liked the song because it captured another side of me from usual, so we kept it.

We get Allday aka Tom Gaynor to tell us about being a “control freak wanker” and writing a love song to opioids on Startup Cult.

dance

You Always Know The DJ

Anything But Sober

This is probably my favourite song on the album at the moment but it was a total headfuck to record. Sometimes when I can’t get a song right I just leave it for ages and go back to it eventually. That’s what I did with this song for like six months. Eventually we got it to a place where I was cool with it and it’s coming out as the next single. I actually directed the video clip for it as well, which I guess means I’ve ascended to a new level of control freak wanker-ness.

I wrote this around New Year’s when I was on a houseboat with my friends. We sometimes go on what are essentially drug and alcohol binge trips up the Murray River but this one fell in the middle of my album so I felt like I had to get some work done. My friend came into my room when I was working on songs and asked to hear some. Then he basically told me he didn’t really like my new music and he preferred when I was more ‘raw’. That was the reason for the line “My friend told me he didn’t like my songs, blame it on the drugs, let me right

Taking Hold Taking Hold takes it right back in the opposite direction to clouds. It’s actually not about a girl, it’s about codeine. I really ate too many Panadeine tablets for a while and this song is kind of a weird heartbroken love story to opioids. That sounds kind of fucked up so you can just apply it to a girl or boy if you want. This is actually one of my favourite songs because a lot of people told me it was a bit slow for the album, so it became like the runt of the litter. There’s some of my favourite lines on this one too: “You always come back like a boomerang, bittersweet pootie-tang still running through my brain.” I actually can’t believe I said pootie-tang on an album, I’m disgusting. God Starve The Queen I thought of this track name and I knew I had to name a track this. It’s way more electro than anything else on the album but again, I just liked it so I kept it anyway. I think a rock band need to cover this, because this song should have been a punk song, not some weird rap singing thing. I just realised recently that “God starve the Queen, run around” sounds like I’m forcing a girl to go on a diet. But it was intended to be a starvation of power, not food. Keep the junk in yo’ trunk, gurl. Read the full track-by-track on theMusic.com.au. WHAT: Startup Cult (ONETWO)

DOWN TO YOUR CHOR’ The inaugural Keir Choreographic Award is a big win for contemporary dance in this country. Our in-house choreography correspondent Paul Ransom talks to finalists Brooke Stamp and Sarah Aiken, and Dancehouse AD Angela Conquet.

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hen former Next Media CEO, Phillip Keir and his wife Sarah Benjamin set up the Keir Foundation in 2004 it was specifically to “foster innovation and excellence in arts”. In the context of the Australian arts landscape, the vibrant and risk-taking realm of contemporary choreography is perhaps the best fit for such an initiative. The inaugural Keir Choreographic Award, with its $30,000 first prize and emphasis on the commissioning of new works will go some way to providing overdue profile to this country’s independent dance makers. With eight semi-finalists preparing to ‘compete’ over a two-week period at Dancehouse in Melbourne (before the final at Carriageworks in Sydney later this month), the choreographic heat is on; and according to Dancehouse’s Artistic Director Angela Conquet, the Keir is the most important prize ever in Australian contemporary dance: “There is a lot of private and philanthropic attention that goes to major dance companies, but so little private giving goes to the independent sector, so that’s one really amazing thing about this.” For the artists involved, it’s not simply the cachet of being one of the eight selected, as Melbourne-based choreographer Brooke Stamp explains: “The really brilliant thing about this context is the support we’ve been given. It’s very rare to have production support and 100 hours 24 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

of studio access, which is something that dancers and choreographers need almost more than finances. Normally, you’d be writing applications to funding bodies and waiting round for months for them to reply.” Fellow finalist Sarah Aiken concurs: “I pretty well had a couple of months to bring this together. It’s like a concentrated development, which is really exciting because so much of this funding cycle thing is about waiting around.” However, the very nature of the award does beg the question: what is choreography? “I think that a lot of people in this award are thinking about choreography as being grounded in

BLUE FACE BY ATLANTA EKE (VIC)

the body but moving beyond that and into objects, visual art and sonic spaces,” Stamp says. “They are thinking about choreography more broadly than ‘steps’ and in that sense I think it will be more up to the audience. In other words, will this context alter their thinking about what they’re seeing?” This is no mere academic point, as the Keir also has a ten grand audience favourite prize. In the normally tight knit, co-operative universe of independent dance making (and appreciating), this could well shift the focus onto picking winners. Aiken, however, is quick to laugh off the idea. “I mean, who are we making the work for? Are we making work for an X-Factor audience? I don’t think so.” With the eight semi-finalists ready to debut their 20-minute pieces before judges and punters alike, Conquet reflects, “You can call dance many things but at what point does it become choreography? And what do we mean by new?” WHAT: Keir Choreographic Award Seasons WHEN & WHERE: 3 – 13 Jul, Dancehouse


ANIMAL INSTINCTS Jack On Fire frontman Ben Blakeney has turned his back on religion for murderous mountain music, writes Benny Doyle.

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arrying the rough and tumble traditions of bands like The Drones and Graveyard Train with more cinematic passages of refrain, Jack On Fire create the sound of a sunburnt country without having to lean on clichés and colloquialisms. But you’ve only got to look at the cover of their new record I Am Animal to realise there’s something more intriguing than the norm found here. Using everything from papier mâché to ground paprika, artist Alyce Brandner has created a surreal, swampy piece that captures the essence of the album according to Ben Blakeney. “When Alyce first sent us photos of the scene [we were blown away], she absolutely nailed

it, particularly with the creatures,” he gushes. “But the colours she used were bang on, and especially with the title track song I felt [the set] encapsulated that for sure.” When Jack On Fire wrote and recorded their 2009 debut Stranger Cain, the alt-country group were in the process of relocating from Perth to Melbourne, and band members, for the most part, were working autonomously on individual tracks. With I Am Animal, the quintet created together, bouncing ideas off each other in the studio and working the songs up from there. “I always wanted to get into the studio to see what it was like to come up with stuff on the fly, having

that creative process with everyone,” admits Blakeney. “The songwriting process can get quite stale if the songs have been hanging around for a while, so we did try and be a bit more spontaneous this time around, and it was really enjoyable.”

music

In the past, Blakeney sourced a lot of his lyrical inspiration from his religious upbringing, but as he remarks, “I left that way of life a few years ago. I just wanted to move on and write about some other things.” With this second full-length the focus was on average stories and personal reveal instead, much like the old country tracks that Jack On Fire, and Blakeney specifically, love. “I’m a huge fan of country music – mountain music sort of stuff. And that music to me is absolutely the roots of punk music, because all those songs are traditionally about death, murder, having hard times, drinking yourself silly. It’s absolutely the essence of working class humans in general,” he reasons. “Back in the day when we first started we probably took a bit more from country music. Now, lyrically we still do, song subject we still do, but musically I think we’ve progressed towards our own style for sure. “Country and western, the core of those songs is incredible, what they were singing about in that mountain sort of stuff is phenomenal, and if you break down any song today it’s almost exactly the same subject matter, people trying to get through whatever they’re trying to get through,” adds Blakeney. “The heart-on-a-sleeve certainly comes from that country essence and the mountain music stuff for sure. People always think about the Nashville stuff, but there’s a lot more to it.” WHEN & WHERE: 5 Jul, The Curtin

MUMS RULE

music

For Lily Allen, motherhood is no barrier to either making music or social commentary, as Liz Galinovic discovers.

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ily Allen sounds tired, mildly pissed off and a bit wary, like she’s sick of courting controversy and reluctant to open her mouth in case she says something controversial. It’s a week after she released a video of herself dancing topless in a spandex fat-sucker, resulting in a Twitter biff with former Apprentice star and columnist for England’s The Sun newspaper, Katie Hopkins. “She’s just a stupid woman whose whole purpose in life is to look at the things that people are talking about and be horrible about them,” Allen says casually about the woman who called her a “short-arse mother in big pants”. “That’s all she does. If you read her column it’s nothing ever positive about anything. It’s just her sensational views and it’s so derogatory – a nasty piece of work.” No stranger to being criticised online, by celebrities and general internet users alike, it’s no wonder her first album in five years, the amusingly titled Sheezus, sees Allen lay down her usual spray of cleverly penned return criticism, delivered in a saccharine voice over upbeat pop tracks. “I really like URL Badman,” Allen says of the track in which she takes pot shots at internet trolls, whom she refers to as the Internet Warriors “who can’t spell”. “It’s about people that have a lot to say on the internet and not necessarily nice things. I think there’s a lot of crap that goes on on the internet that doesn’t necessarily need to. I think it serves a purpose of making some

people think that they have a much more significant voice than they actually do.” Sheezus is easy on the ears, incorporating a range of musical styles from pop-rock to AutoTuned R&B. But the sharpest aspect is the lyrics, statements about women in particular. Despite claims the title track is a bitch session about everyone from Beyonce to Lorde, it’s on tracks like this and Hard Out Here where Allen makes her most incisive and witty quips about everything from periods to calling for men to “forget their balls and grow a pair of tits”. “I think the world, in a weird way, has taken a few steps back in the way that we view and treat

women – especially in modern media and pop culture. And I’ve always made a comment on pop culture and what’s going on in the world in my music, so it seems silly for me not to address that. “I think the media pits women against each other and that’s counterproductive. So I wrote a song (Sheezus) that I felt dealt with that. And, if you listen to the song, you can pretty much gauge what my thoughts are on that.” Young, intelligent and a mother of two, while Allen was pleased to be back in the studio, she returns with that added familial challenge. “It’s tough, as any working mum will tell you... But, you know, it’s something that people have been doing for decades so, it’s not easy, but it’s not new.” WHAT: Sheezus (Regal Recordings/Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 24 Jul, Festival Hall; 27 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 25


★★★★

album reviews

SIA

1000 Forms Of Fear

Love Of Cartography

Monkey Puzzle/Inertia Four years after We Are Born, Sia could sit back, drink pink lemonade and be generally LA fabulous. To stave off the boredom she can do the odd spot of writing for someone else (Rihanna, Beyoncé, Katy Perry and Britney Spears all have her to thank for hits). So does Sia need to do long-players for herself anymore? Probably not, but thank fuck she does them anyway.

ALBUM OF THE WEEK

SLEEPMAKESWAVES

1000 Forms Of Fear kicks off with Chandelier, a song truly worthy of the great clip that accompanies it, and takes us back to a bit of vintage Ms Furler next with Big Girls Cry (break-up ballad plus chorus at just the right tempo – gorgeous). She taps into a similar sentiment with Straight For The Knife and while this could have taken us to full Adele (aka ‘I hate that bastard, here’s a whole album about my broken heart’), here Sia’s lyrics and delivery are just offbeat enough, just removed enough. We’re left feeling pity with rather than for her.

Bird’s Robe/MGM

There’s still some crying stuff here, and even some violins to back it up, but damn, she plays it just so. See also Fire Meet Gasoline if you’re wanting an epic, slightly explosive, tale of starcrossed lovers. One thing missing is an obvious piece of playful pop (no Clap Your Hands to be had here), but then there is Cellophane, which sounds like a Spaghetti Western on a slow day. Taking a genre she loves and marching it proudly beyond the clichés – well done, girl, well done. Liz Giuffre

For eight years now, Sydneysiders sleepmakeswaves have been proving that you don’t need a lead singer to create thoughtful, heavy music. Through their instrumental pieces they create brooding soundscapes that conform neither to time signatures nor normal song structures. Love Of Cartography is the follow up their 2011 ARIA-nominated ...and so we destroyed everything. While fans of the first album will no doubt latch onto this record like limpets to a well worn rock, it represents a step back from the sprawling songs on their debut. Sure, with ten tracks spanning 55 minutes there’s room for sleepmakeswaves to explore each piece on Love Of Cartography, but as a whole the album is slightly more accessible than ...and so we destroyed everything. Some of that accessibility might come down to the partnership

THE ACID

ALLDAY

Infectious/Liberator

ONETWO

Building significant chat firstly because of their initial mystique and secondly by the sum of their renowned parts – Aussie artist/ producer RY X (Ry Cuming), British producer Adam Freeland and American professor/ producer Steve Nalepa – The Acid made waves with a selftitled EP last year, from which Basic Instinct has become the calling card. By way of simple musical elements – a lonely kick drum, a nylon-stringed guitar melody and double-tracked vocals that intimately share every movement of Cuming’s mouth – it’s difficult to deny as it builds to a climax at once jagged, aching, fleeting and even a touch uncomfortable. It’s also indicative of the album as a whole.

Don’t let the lackadaisical, chilled-out style of Adelaide rapper Allday fool you. The lyricist means business on his debut album, creating something that sounds as carefully thought out as it does spontaneous.

Liminal

Full of organic crackles, nuances and instrumentation, Liminal’s beauty lies in its ability to team these elements with minimalist electro from the depths of late nights in dark rooms. Though its main currency, it’s not all 26 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

★★★★ with producer Nick DiDia, whose work with Karnivool and Powderfinger among others has created seminal rock albums not out of place on FM radio. And while sleepmakeswaves might still be a fair distance from sitting on the Triple M high-rotation playlist, lead single Something Like Avalanches is not the only track that situates the band a little bit closer to the mainstream. There’s nothing wrong with appealing to a wider audience, and if it helps that audience to discover the intelligent, challenging sound that sleepmakeswaves create, then it can only be a good thing. Dylan Stewart

Startup Cult

★★★★ delicately constructed gloom; there’s an air of confidence through understated sexiness that begins with opener Animal – at times reduced to drum programming and the hum of a waiting microphone – mostly because of the droning, apocalyptic sample work. The eeriness of Ghosts, meanwhile, is balanced by a killer vocal melody that will transpose well in a club environment. There’s little attempt to demand attention across Liminal; it’s a somewhat lonely body of work, though the sound bed of sparse yet dynamic moods demands repeat listens and great contemplation. Tyler McLoughlan

“I can literally rap forever” Allday tells us on slick opener Got It, which kicks off this contrasting album filled with stories of his childhood and teenage years, chasing his dreams and, um, “chasing pussy”. Yep, the North American rap influences are heavy on Allday’s Startup Cult, despite what his Aussie accent may tell you. Several moments on the record give you the hint the rapper is a fan of melancholy king Drake – particularly on the double entendre style of Fuckin and current single Right Now. And like the Canadian hip hop star, Allday can also hold a decent tune. But this is not a rip-off record by any means. Where Allday

★★★½ differs from the other rappers of the world is in the humour and quirkiness laced throughout his work. On Wolves, he rhymes about everything from UFOs to Zooey Deschanel and admits he was drunk while he wrote Anything But Sober. You get the impression Allday doesn’t take himself too seriously, but views his work in a different light. Other highlights include God Starve The Queen and Wasting Time, but it’s hard to pick standouts when, overall, the album is pretty damn good. Startup Cult is one of the most refreshing debut Aussie hip hop releases, period. Sally-Anne Hurley


singles/ep reviews

★★

TENNIS

Never Work For Free Communion Shiny, carefree indie-pop with a sound that’s romantically retro but not dated. Sparse and laidback but danceable, it’s all driven by the silkysweet vocals of Alaina Moore. Cute but not cutesy.

AUGIE MARCH

After The Crack Up Dark Satanic Records/ Caroline Might please previous Augie March fans, but if your reaction to their meandering, drippy sound was, “This is okay,” in the first minute then, “Will this never end?” in the last two, then chances are you won’t like this.

ORPHANS ORPHANS

A GIRL’S A GUN

★★★½

FRACTURES

LILO PEAKS

Create Control

Independent

Whether rockabilly, soul or stadium, this Sydney quintet’s various approaches to rock’n’roll are equally grating. The title track attempts a swanky ‘60s vibe but, like the rest of these dreary tracks, is dominated by frontwoman Lucia Neville’s showy vocal gymnastics. Her harsh rock growls and affected gasps resemble Shania Twain. In single More Than A Wink, she throws around those trite “wah”s and “yeah”s indiscriminately. Delivering yowling guitar solos and heavy riffs, the band are clearly technically proficient but, armed with a theatrically sensual aesthetic, they fall prey to self-indulgence.

Melbourne-based artist Mark Zito delivers a brand of layered, fluid indie-rock that softly patters and broods. His well worn (but nicely executed) contemporary sound is underpinned by a cloudy atmosphere which, at times, transforms into something epically cinematic. For instance, his style of soft percussion becomes punchier in Twisted, piercing his usual ‘gliding not grasping’ approach. Other highlights include sweet groove Cadence, thanks to its contemplative piano melody, while the windy, swarming beats of Ghosts inform a captivating bonus track to close the EP. He plays at Northcote Social Club on 9 Aug.

This debut from New Zealander Alicia Lineham blends ambient, crawling electronica with experimental indie stylings. Fusing warm, soulful vibes with a detached coolness, her rhythmic beats support committed spouts of clanging pop vocals. Minimalist track Bedroom Talks has an illusory effect, combining wavering synth tones with spooky girlish vox. Single Kicks succumbs to a more traditional pop hook, but the synth-laden slice of electronica proves a winner with its sultry, horns-driven finish. At times, the EP’s disjointed layers jar. However there’s always something tinkering beneath the surface to keep you listening.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Head Up, Above The Clouds Independent

Fractures

Snucks Pt I

Orphan

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/album

Amplifire Brisbane musos from other bands get together to make dense, lighthearted, grungy and euphoric (yes, all at the same time) rock that suits parties and pubs. Anywhere you can gyrate, really.

SLOW CLUB

Suffering You, Suffering Me Moshi Moshi/Caroline Motown that feels hollow. As good as Rebecca Taylor’s vocals sound, the song swings between being stiff and overwrought, never finding that confident balance.

AMERIIE

What I Want Columbia/Sony Five years later Ameriie (extra ‘I’ now) is back, laying energetic R&B melodies, soulful harmonies and fast, funky bongos over that perky Apache guitar riff sample. Irresistibly groovy and fun as hell. Stephanie Liew

★★★½

★★½

SMOKESTA FT JULIE GORDON

★★★★

GLASVEGAS Secret Truth

You Ain’t Ready

Cooking Vinyl

Purdy – Body Variations

Emotif Recordings

Harmony James – Cautionary Tales

Pepped up and frantic, You Ain’t Ready captures a harsh, industrial landscape. A spaceship taking off, the zoom of racing car laps, robotic laser shooters – it’s a purely sensory Grand Theft Auto experience. Primed for gym junkie appreciation, the opener/ title track is a sour kick-off. There’s a clear ‘90s influence in its ultra-repetitive nature and attempted dynamism by way of cheap volume adjustments. Gordon’s augmented soulful pipes are too artificial, slotted coldly into the rest of the track. Though this release flirts with ambience, it’s overly speedy and cluttered – a fist pumper’s dream.

Despite a certain throwntogetherness, Secret Truth has various gems to offer. The timeless single/title track is a warmly accessible opener, which conveys a longing, emotional force. This vulnerability is seen again in the raw, a cappella version of Choices, which showcases James Allan’s honest Scottish lilt. While melancholic pop ballad Neon Bedroom Blues channels The Smiths in its wandering, plucked guitar, a live version of Youngblood is the only hint of the outfit’s noisepop inclinations. Its satisfying, distortion-laden guitar crescendos are coloured by deep, stormy synths: an exciting closer to an otherwise heartfelt EP.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Jessica Lea Mayfield – Make My Head Sing Brianna Carpenter – On So It Goes David Blyth – Winter Song Kim Cesarion – Undressed

THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 27


live reviews

HUGO RACE & TRUE SPIRIT, MARK SNARSKI The Retreat 29 Jun As soon as Mark Snarksi commences, he immediately shushes what seems like a raucous buck’s party comprising punters all decked out in Savers garb – they could not have chosen a more inappropriate venue for aforementioned revelry. If you close your eyes, Snarski’s timbre evokes Nick Cave – even his speaking voice. His banter’s great, but overwhelmed by the din of this dinner-time crowd. When introducing his final song, Snarski

three-part harmonies are flawless and Higher Power wards off evil spirits. Race delivers such understated, poetic banter in between songs and that impossibly deep baritone silences all in earshot – the audiobook industry beckons. Some pleasurable bass vibrations rumble through the floor, drum patterns impress but never dominate and a traditional song that Race introduces as Poor Boy transports us somewhere bleak – vicarious trait loneliness. Everything comes so naturally to Race and co. The notes and rhythms embody each virtuoso as they masterfully extend sections and then finish in perfect sync. They use an invisible language up there that’s undetectable no matter how closely one concentrates.

HUGO RACE & TRUE SPIRIT @ THE RETREAT. PIC: CHRISSIE FRANCIS

quips: “Glad to see some of you out and not watching House Rules.” There’s sartorial excellence onstage all night and collared shirts and well-cut strides make a welcome change from the band-member uniform we usually witness these days: denim, T-shirts and trainers. The venue’s exposed beam stage structure has Western touches – a bull skull and “Welcome” wallhanging featuring lassoing cowboy included – which suit both of tonight’s acts. Even Hugo Race & True Spirit’s sound check/ introductory jam is worth shutting up for as the four musicians lock into each other’s grooves with ease. The energy Race brings to a room crackles with spontaneity, plus the anticipation one is about to experience greatness. Instantly, some Crystal Ballroomtype characters emerge as if they’ve trammed it across from St Kilda circa-1979, standing or gyrating in appreciation. Those 28 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

loop stations in The Catfish’s bandroom, they get to work layering sound. The room is almost bereft of people as they begin, which doesn’t help matters in the feedback department. Although guitar and saxophone add an organic element along with occasional keening vocals, the soundscape being created suffers from a poor mix and slightly-off timing. Hopefully the pair will work on ironing out the wrinkles. Next up is the experimental, noise-oriented Duck Duck Chop. The duo combine moments of ear-shredding fuzz guitar with hard-hitting drums. Dissonance and pregnant pauses are employed to dramatic effect during set opener Destroy

USURPER OF MODERN MEDICINE @ THE CATFISH. PIC: DARCY RAHN

A random out in the beer garden post-show commends the band’s performance, but also shares his surprise as to the “serious” nature of attendees. Huge Race & True Spirit play with the gravitas these songs demand and, in turn, their congregation worships. Bryget Chrisfield

USURPER OF MODERN MEDICINE, WHIPPED CREAM CHARGERS, DUCK DUCK CHOP, IO The Catf ish 27 Jun Once two-piece, IO, have finished setting up laptops and

The majority of people in the crowd here tonight are from the support bands, unfortunately, but this isn’t stopping Perth headliners Usurper Of Modern Medicine from doing what they came here to do. Starting with the rollicking Motorolla Borealis from latest LP, Omnliberation, the group immediately face sound issues, which are a taste of hassles to come. Having arrived in Melbourne from Sydney with only carry-on gear due to airport/airline ineptitude means they are playing an “ultra stripped-back, superloose set”, which is a shame given the wall of sound they would prefer to punch out. A screen backdrop features projected solarising images that

LLOYD COLE @ THORNBURY THEATRE. PIC: JUSTIN TAPP

Objects 1 & 2 and a pedal board provides aural backing as their show progresses. Set highlight comes in the form of Low Vibes, with its frenetic hi-hat rhythm and abrasive guitar. Ambling onto The Catfish stage (floor), Whipped Cream Chargers add a touch of swag to proceedings with their more conventional, and blues-driven, dynamic. Featuring more people in the group than the last two bands combined, various members take turns standing on a riser to ensure everyone has enough space. A teardrop axe and bowl-cut salad within the group complement their psych-rock sound, which is accentuated by a peppering of surf guitar and creeping bass. Singer, Sebastian HarrisonNaish, switches between playing keys and working the mic, breaking into a shimmy when the mood strikes.

shift and blend as the band work within their restricted means. Deadreamers sounds skeletal compared to the LP version and bassist/lead vocalist Steven Aaron Hughes’ voice is swallowed up in the dry mix. Above Or Beyond is abandoned due to equipment failings but they suck it up and soldier on, finishing their set with Tangent Man. The most animated of the four acts tonight, UOMM should be commended for having the ‘nads to play given their situation, and props to the guys for losing themselves in their work, regardless. Glenn Waller

LLOYD COLE

Thornbury Theatre 27 Jun “If you enjoy a song you don’t recognise tonight, it’s almost certainly from Standards,” quips


live reviews indie-pop troubadour Lloyd Cole. The self-deprecating Brit is, of course, referring to his newest material, from last year’s ‘comeback’ set. He’s the self-aware type – he knows he’s playing to an ageing fanbase, who have tonight left the kids at home (“stop checking your texts, your eldest child can deal with it”) to come and hear the ‘80s hits. And, Cole, alone on stage with just acoustic guitar, delivers those hits alongside the so-called unrecognisable songs. Across two sets, Cole plays strippeddown versions of the songs ‘80s indie kids loved when he was leader of Lloyd Cole & The Commotions, alternapop’s prince to Morrissey’s queen. Are You Ready To Be Heartbroken?, 2CV and Forest Fire resonate with extra melancholy 30 years on from their appearance on Cole’s debut Rattlesnakes. You can feel the (filled-to-capacity) audience bristle with nostalgia and regret as he sings 2CV’s even-more-poignant now, “We were simply wasting

Butterfly. Proving too that his songwriting skill, like his voice, has remained intact over the passing years, the new Standards songs sit in his set as comfortably as the old ‘standards’. In fact, last year’s single Period Piece already feels like a long-lost treasure, given its subject matter of ageing and looking back on a life lived as he sings, “I am not afraid to die”. (And, just to hear the word “chagrin” used in song is enough to remind you how special Cole is.)

time”. However Rattlesnake’s centrepiece Perfect Skin – the BIG hit – is tossed out with flippancy as Cole drops in jokey asides, changes lyrics (“At the age of ten she looked like Brigitte Bardot” – not Greta Garbo – well, makes much more sense, really…) and then quickly moves on. Cole’s voice is as rich as when it first warmed our ears and his guitar playing is far more skilful than he is ever given credit for. The sound at Thornbury Theatre is beautifully crisp – and no one in the room talks, or even moves, as he plays – so even the quietest of moments are heard by everyone as if standing front of stage. And, the timbre of the guitar can be appreciated in every corner of the room. Other Commotions’ back catalogue highlights included Easy Pieces’ Lost Weekend (1985) and Mainstream’s fan-favourite Hey Rusty (1987). Cole also selects carefully from his ‘90s solo period, delivering the likes of Undressed and

Fittingly, Cole’s encore features Bob Dylan’s I Threw It All Away as, like Dylan, Cole has survived the heady heights of commercial fame and the bottomed-out lows of industry disinterest. Tonight shows a reborn Cole who has earned the right to eternal admiration for breathing life into his past while continuing to write songs that effortlessly blend with his legacy and have the potential to be firm favourites in the future.

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live

BOBBY FOX @ THE TOFF IN TOWN. PIC: MICHAEL PREBERG

Bobby Fox @ The Toff In Town Teeth & Tongue @ Howler N’fa @ Howler Ceres @ Bar 303

Andrew Mast

arts reviews delves into the performativity of this period of mental illness: ‘A’ is a star not because her suffering is remarkable but because she can make it visible whenever Charcot tells her.

PHOTOGRAPHS OF A. PIC: JEFF BUSBY

PHOTOGRAPHS OF A Theatre

MTC Lawler to 6 Jul Daniel Keene is without doubt one of our nation’s most accomplished playwrights and yet Photographs Of A feels more like an anthology of staged poems than theatre. This anthology, performed by the remarkable Helen Morse, tells of ‘A’, star of 19th century Paris, whose demonstrations of hysteria earned her doctor, Jean-Martin Charcot, the title ‘Father of Modern Neurology’. Keene’s writing

Morse’s exquisite performance and Keene’s rhythmic, musical text capture something of that fleeting moment of change from girl to woman: the beautiful, contradiction of simultaneously craving attention and privacy. Photographs Of A moves at snail’s pace and deliberately resists dramatic elements such as climax and drama. The set is minimal and music, never heard. The play asks the audience to slow its metabolism to the pace of the naked words. It’s hard work. At times it feels almost too polished, lacking urgency and treating the words with a reverence that doesn’t always benefit them. Push through it: inside is a sophisticated and very troubling condemnation of gender relations, society’s treatment of mental illness and life under the microscope. Fleur Kilpatrick

THANK YOU, THANK YOU LOVE Theatre

HYPRTXT Festival Hub, Tuxedo Cat finished For those who’ve missed the talk on the street: MKA have brought together a mid-winter festival of new writing, HYPRTXT, and it’s hot. Tonight’s treat was Thank You, Thank You Love, a collection of five, short, text-based works by Tobias Manderson-Galvin. Not five plays... definitely not what you’d call plays. This show is as far as you can get from the “well made play” while still residing in a loose definition of theatre. And damn, they do it well. This frenzied, subversive, anti-theatre explosion of energy hits you hard. Kinda like you’d dropped a repeater fireworks box over an open flame then looked down to see what would happen. A journey through chaotically poetic language, perfectly structured missed cues, a burlesque dance

introspective and a spaceman monologue was not even slightly marred by the multitude of real missed cues and dropped lines... mostly because the audience couldn’t actually work out what was ordered and what was chaos. An overreliance on self-awareness inched dangerously close to selfindulgence, but even this was just another technique used to subvert our expectations. Special mention must be made of the impeccable performance from an endearing Sam Young, definitely an actor to keep your eye on as he rises to fame. A must-see show for anyone who’s ever found themselves bored by capital T “Theatre”. You’ll love it. Or not. MKA won’t care either way. James Daniel

THANK YOU, THANK YOU LOVE. PIC: SARAH WALKER THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 29


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the guide

THE GOOD PERSON OF SZECHUAN Answered by: Genevieve Giuffre (actor) Describe your show in a tweet? A coward punch delivered by Gummo, bouffon and East 17 in a Maccas toilet. What sets this piece of theatre apart from others? Its Mercury is just about to come out of retrograde but its Saturn has returned and it’s been tipped on its left axis at the 11th hour. It’s Brecht on a guerrilla grid of grand chaos. It’s very different to Campbell Hall’s school production of The Good Woman Of Setzuan which took place in the fall of 2011 and can be viewed on YouTube, parts one to four. What’s your favourite cross-cultural play and why? I have a few and as Prime Minister of Acting for Victoria I will say this current production of The Good Person Of Szechuan for exploring our Western perception of Asian culture, The Sovereign Wife for exploring Australian identity and Cabbage Patch Kids Go To Hawaii, which I haven’t made yet. That work will explore a group of cabbage patch kids getting on a plane. Do you think Western theatre is getting more diverse and why? It’s a very exciting time for us; we get to work with Meng Jinghui at Malthouse Theatre. The experience is thrilling, hilarious and one of a kind and it sure as hell beats going to seed in a hamster wheel of repression. What was the biggest challenge of putting on this play? Balancing the dream and the nightmare, finding the revelry in both. When and where? 2 – 20 Jul, Malthouse, Merlyn Theatre

Pic: Pia Johnson

THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 31


eat/drink

HOT STUFF The fiery world of chilli sauces; each of them brings a unique burn. Illustration Sophie Blackhall-Cain.

SRIRACHA

MEXICAN HOT SAUCE

Traditional Thai sauce – the most recognisable brand of which (in Western countries) is Huy Fong Foods’ version, with its clear plastic bottle/rooster logo/green nozzle packaging. Good for dipping, on fried chicken, and in pho.

Peppery as hell. Heats your whole mouth.

TABASCO The more vinegar-y cousin of the Mexican hot sauce.

CHILLI OIL

GOCHUJANG

Chilli paste-infused oil? Yeah, baby. A Sichuan cuisine staple, this one’s good in soups and stirfries. It’s a smoother burn that warms your chest.

Korean chilli paste made of red chilli, glutinous rice, fermented soybeans and salt, with a rich and piquant flavour.

SAMBAL

PIRI PIRI

Rich and intense, this Indonesian/Malaysian seafood-based chilli sauce (with heaps of varieties) gives anything a good punch. Works well with lemon/lime. Use sparingly.

South African/ Portugese chilli sauce (also spelled peri peri) with base ingredients of chilli, lemon, oil, red bell peppers and garlic.

CHECK OUT HANDSOME DEVILS CO Have you ever thought, “Geez, I wish there was somewhere I could go to buy hot sauces and men’s grooming products all in one go”? Well, say hello to Handsome Devils Co. They sell three kinds of hot sauces: Chipotle, De Arbol and Savina. And for the outside of your mouth, they have two kinds of Beard Oil, Shave Oil and Aftershave Balm. If you’re wondering what kind of birthday gift to buy that beardy mate of yours who likes spicy food, look no further. handsomedevilsco.com

32 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014


eat/drink DRINK UP

CHECK OUT

SORRYTHANKSILOVEYOU.COM

THE CARLTON 193 Bourke St, Melbourne thecarlton.com.au Answered by: Bremeline Muthurajah What’s your bar’s specialty drink? The Dark Side of The Moon – Ron Xacapa XO, Pedro Ximenez, caramel, coffee and chocolate. Who will I meet at your bar? Artists, hipsters, people about town, travellers, divas dancing late into the night and young professionals kicking back after work.

What’s the design/atmosphere of your bar? The Carlton (overseen by Wally the Ostrich and Gerald the Giraffe) is a decadent and dimly lit space with cosy booths, a dining room and a luscious outdoor balcony. Hasti Bala is a sensory labyrinth of velvet booths, wild tropical vines and a DJ booth framed by an elephant head. Then climb to the top of the stairs to discover Palmz, a vibrant rooftop bar where tropical flora juxtaposes the city skyline. Best hangover cure? Jalapeñoinfused Bloody Mary.

Sorrythanksiloveyou.com is an online store selling gourmet food, fresh flowers, craft spirits and handmade accessories and homewares sourced from around the world. Think premium single malt distilled in the Tasmanian highlands, natural beard oil and hand creams from Portland General Store, and handmade Italian leather baby booties made by a second generation Melbourne-based cordwainer. Sorry Thanks I Love You has partnered with boutique florists around the country so that they can deliver fresh, distinctive arrangements the same day they’re ordered. With international shipping and complimentary gift wrapping, Sorry Thanks I Love You has been designed for simple, meaningful gift-giving. Pictured: Yokoo Gibraan scarf

THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 33


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

EP FOCUS

HAVE YOU HEARD You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album – what would it be? I’d burn a CD of Fugazi’s Repeater and sneak on a mix of Screamfeeder, Archers Of Loaf, Husker Du, Front End Loader, Lungfish, Samiam and Magic Dirt to fill up the CD.

MARILLA HOMES EP title? Angel Song How many releases do you have now? Three. Inner Whirl (2011) and Marilla Homes & The Housemen released Settler’s Wife this week too! Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? This is a massively healing album for me. I stopped singing ENTIRELY in 2010 after I got PTSD from workplace bullying working in opera. And here I am vocally naked, singing solo a cappella originals!

around a fire in Brunswick, drinking muscat and eating toasted camembert.

FREAK WAVE

We’ll like this EP if we like... Beautiful vocal music in a natural acoustic setting. It was recorded live in a country church so the reverb is massive. Solo a cappella originals, with soaring improvs and heart-melting lyrics.

How did you get together? Went to Mike’s for a beer, heard demos he and Neil wrote, showed them to Lombi, had a jam, decided on a stupid band name – BOOM! Freak Wave started. Recorded our first 12” soon after.

When and where is your launch/ next gig? Album launch is at the Boite World Music Cafe (North Fitzroy) at 8pm on 5 Jul. Website link for more info? studiomarillahomes.com

What’s your favourite song on it? Muscat Woman. I wrote it with Ushonah Hutchings, sitting

Answered by: Andy Hayden

Sum up your musical sound in four words? Unpolished, swinging, fuzzy, indie-rock. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? Australian band: Midnight Oil (late-‘80s era, in a pub). Overseas band: Husker Du.

TASTE TEST

The best album to comedown to is: The King Wolf never comes down.

The f irst record I bought with my own money was: The King Wolf has no need for cash. The King Wolf takes what he needs, to eat, love and rock. The record I put on when I’m really miserable is: The King Wolf is never miserable, The King Wolf is only hungry. The record I put on when I bring someone home is: When the King Wolf brings someone home, he might feast to Muddy 34 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

The most surprising record in my collection is: The King Wolf only likes heavy and dirty blues.

SEX ON TOAST

The last thing I downloaded was: The King Wolf devoured Push The Sky Away.

Album title: Sex On Toast

The record I’m loving right now is: The King Wolf can hear the sound of Howl At The Moon. When and where are your next gigs? 5 Jul at The Catfish. Two sets. Free show. Website for more info: facebook. com/kingwolfmusic

When and where for your next gig? 5 Jul at The Hi-Fi with Violent Soho and 2 Aug at Reverence Hotel with Obits (USA). Website link for more info? freakwaveband.bandcamp.com

to record. It contains a plethora of overdubs and up to 13 different musicians per track.

My favorite party album is: The King Wolf likes to party to Led Zep.

The best record I stole from my folks’ collection was: When the King Wolf left his pack to go hunting alone, he took only the blues and his claws.

Why should people come and see your band? Because we’re in the prime of our lives – physically and musically. You could argue otherwise and stay home though.

ALBUM FOCUS

Waters, Freddie King, Howlin’ Wolf or RL Burnside.

KING WOLF

Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Touring USA and Europe a few times with my old band, A Death In The Family. The feeling of traveling with mates and playing music you created to people on the other side of the world is a remarkable thing.

Answered by: Angus Leslie Where did the title of your new album come from? It comes, really, from the essence of our music and the feeling we get when we wake up in the morning and douse ourselves with the finest Belgian spring water and fart. How many releases do you have now? Technically three. Our first two records are live albums with a lot of noise, improvisation and shouting on them... How long did it take to write/ record? The album took about two years to write and one year

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Yes. Gloria Estefan, robots, chlamydia Justin, Prince, Tonay, daddy’s shoes, the studio perfection of Mr Bungle’s California, Steely Dan’s Aja, Brian Wilson’s Pet Sounds and The Time’s What Time Is It?. What’s your favourite song on it? It’s gotta be the Latin synthfunk banger Takin’ Over, due to it being a way for you to dance. Will you do anything differently next time? Yes. We will throw a doberman in a vat of jelly and record the sounds of us giggling at the highest possible pitch whilst smoking egg whites in a pipe. When and where is your launch/next gig? 5 & 6 Jul, The Toff In Town. Website link for more info? sexontoastmusic.com


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 35


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LIVE THIS WEEK

RADIO STAR

When Ellie Goulding filled in for BBC Radio 1 DJ Zan Lowe last week, she gave Violent Soho’s Covered In Chrome a spin.

WHAT A PISSER! Slim Thug’s incontinence tweets, eg. “I think ima need a diaper I lightweight peed on myself tryna run to the restroom this the 2nd time it’s happened a lil shot out”.

SKULL CANDY There’s a portion of DZ Deathrays’ rad-as-fuck Reflective Skull on SBS 2’s current promo = major cred. DZ DEATHRAYS. PIC: KANE HIBBERD

NOT PLAIN

THE GUN SHOW

SEE-THROUGH JAM

Leave the real world behind, as Cilla Jane’s (pictured) chilling vocals and haunting cello bass lines whisk you away to a country/folk-induced dream world. See her perform on 4 Jul at Edinburgh Castle Hotel.

Has the winter gloom got you missing buff bodies and tanned skin? Get your fix of biceps and sun rays with punk rockers Muscle Beach (pictured) playing their first ever headline show at The B.East on 5 Jul.

Originally an indie-roots bedroom project for singersongwriter Ed Tripodi, Marmalade Ghost (pictured) will be in full band mode for the release of their debut single This Chest Of Drawers at Evelyn Hotel on 2 Jul.

HELLO HAWAII

DRUNKEN DAYLIGHT

FAREWELL SAL

Melbourne-based French/ Hawaiian blues guitarist Emilee South is bringing her debut EP Aloha, Au Revoir to Catfish as part of the Leaps And Bounds Festival and her own Hawaiian July tour on 6 Jul.

To celebrate the release of their new album The Daylight Express, Tobias Hengeveld and his band are hitting The Drunken Poet on 4 Jul for a night of honest Aussie folk-narratives.

Sal Kimber is taking her homegrown alt-country on a tour of the US. But before she leaves us for an American summer, she’s playing one last Melbourne show on 2 Jul at The Drunken Poet’s Wine, Whiskey, Women.

CAST OFF

BENNY BOY

SUNDAY SKIES

Following impressive performances at festivals like Glastonbury, Shambhala, and our own Breakfest, UK funky breakbeat DJ Featurecast (pictured) is playing a free show at The Espy front bar on 4 Jul.

Fresh off a four week European tour, Ben ‘Gumby’ Gumbleton (pictured) is embarking on a solo tour of the country, playing all your favourite Benjalu songs with an acoustic twist at Baha Tacos, 3 Jul; Elwood Lounge, 4 Jul; and Retreat Hotel, 5 Jul.

Skyscraper Stan & The Commission Flats (pictured) are setting up at the Yarra Hotel for a month-long residency, playing shows Sundays in July, and they want your cash! Check out their PledgeMusic campaign to help complete their debut album.

SEXY SANDWICH

WILDE HEARTS

TASTE THE INDIE

What’s the best thing since sliced bread? Sex On Toast! The cult favourite nine-piece, all-male ‘80s synthy pop-rock group continue their domination of the local scene with a show on 5 Jul at The Toff In Town, supported by Horns Of Leroy.

Award-winning Melbourne country artists Lachlan Bryan & The Wildes and Dan Waters are teaming up with Americana sweethearts The Weeping Willows to give southern country sound an Aussie twist. On 4 Jul at Revolver Upstairs.

On 6 Jul The Taste Of Indie Collective presents Bad Hobbits, Brett Franke and George Borthwick & Okkey Sumiyoshi Duo at Wesley Anne, plus Bad Hobbits, Niko Niko, They Move Like Wolves and Chinese Handcuffs at Brunswick Hotel.

BACKLASH

WE PREFER DORIS DAY’S VERSION How has Justice Crew’s Que Sera tied the record for longestrunning local number one? They are tied with the greats of our chart past: Austen Tayshus and Savage Garden. (Yes, it’s a fourway tie with Gotye but surely it’s too soon to pick on him...)

BAD We know we probably shouldn’t have tuned into Autopsy: Michael Jackson’s Last Hours, but how were those reenactments!? So craptacular that we may even have to go back for seconds and tune into Autopsy: Whitney Houston’s Last Hours this week.

HUSH, LITTLE (FAKE) NORI So the story goes that Kim Kardashian pushed her daughter through LAX airport in a pram last week while telling paparazzi to “keep it down”. And now the baby was allegedly a doll?

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 36 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

LIVE THIS WEEK

PLUM LOVER

IN DA (FOLK) CLUB

MIX IT UP

Celebrating the release of her first single How Much Does Your Love Cost from forthcoming EP Monster, Thelma Plum (pictured) is bringing her new band to the Northcote Social Club stage on 5 Jul.

David Bridie will be joined on stage by Daniel Champagne for one last show as part of Melbourne Folk Club on 2 Jul at Bella Union, before jetting off to “Canadia” with Frank Yamma (pictured with Bridie) for their Australian Stories tour.

Melburnian rockabilly four-piece La Bastard are bringing the party back home with a slew of new songs, hitting the Retreat Hotel stage on 3 Jul with Brisvegas swamp-blues group Transvaal Diamond Syndicate (pictured) and The Mockingbird.

GET FRUNKY

SPACE OUT

GIG FOR ALL AGES

Join in the tribe vibe on 5 Jul for Funky Freak Show, presented by Loop. Get frunky with sets from Bellatrix & Olin, Maxi Basshead, Alleyycat, and Ollie Wilkes & Monkey Paws. Prizes for best dressed freak!

The self-described “deranged, deluded, and loud rock‘n’roll band” Space Junk are taking up a Wednesday residency at The Tote, starting 2 Jul. The fuzz-rockers from a planet not so far far away will be joined by Drifter and Uptown Ace.

On 6 Jul at The Gasometer Hotel from 2.30pm, Client Liaison and Animaux take to the stage for the first all ages (alcohol free) gig in a Victorian pub for over 20 years, celebrating the amendments to the regulations of Victoria’s Liquor Control Reform Act.

WATCH THE SASS

MAJOR BLOODS

YEAH YEAHS

Nine-piece Melbourne soul group Saskwatch (pictured) are set to play a second show at the Corner Hotel on 3 Jul as part of their Nose Dive album tour, having already completely sold out their first show on 5 Jul.

The NRL State of Origin series may have only added fuel to the fire between participating states, but NSW punk brats Bloods (above) and QLD dream-pop kids Major Leagues (below) call a truce for a show on mutual turf at Shebeen Bandroom on 3 Jul.

Three guys walk into a bar… and buy it. That’s right, Yah Yah’s is re-launching! And they’re celebrating with a month of gigs, including Palace Of The King (pictured), 10 Jul; Sly Faulkner, 11 Jul; and Dead City Ruins, 12 Jul.

CAESAR SALAD

NIGHT OWL

CROOKED BONES

Cisco Caesar celebrate seven years of existence with a party at The B.East on 4 Jul. Stuff your face with their all-American menu while listening to what happened when a bloke from the Midwest met Caesar Slattery.

Friday Nights at Italian Masterpieces at the NGV has kicked off, and following Kirin J Callinan is Owl Eyes on 4 Jul. View Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court: Museo del Prado after hours while listening to ‘80s pop synth sounds.

Crooked Colours are proud to announce the release of their new EP, In Your Bones. They’re taking it around the country on their first-ever national tour, stopping by Shebeen Bandroom on 4 July with Deja and Artist Cartels DJs in tow.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW Remedy ATO/[PIAS] Australia SIA 1000 Forms Of Fear Monkey Puzzle/Inertia ALLDAY Startup Cult ONETWO KNAPSACK Day Three Of My New Life (reissue) Poison City THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 37


opinion HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC BY JEFF JENKINS BEDROOM MAKEOVER If you’re an artist, or planning to pursue a creative career, Funemployed is the best $25 you’ll spend. Part-memoir, part self-help book, part-guide to the creative world, it’s much darker than the title suggests. A career crisis prompted Justin Heazlewood to do the book. “Consider this my black box recorder,” he writes, “with jokes.” As The Bedroom Philosopher, punters have pondered: is he a musician or a comedian? Funemployed shows that Heazlewood is a damn fine writer. There’s a lot more to him than Songs From The 86 Tram. The book starts with the Artist Test: “Are you self-aware, self-starting, self-destructive, self-taught, self-obsessed? If you ticked three or more then you’re qualified!” The book is unbelievably comprehensive, covering personal issues – depression and jealousy – as well

38 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

as the business side, including “the unglamorous world of home admin. It’s all the stuff the rock’n’roll biopics edit out, and 70 per cent of the job… At no point in a Bob Dylan documentary do you see him standing in line at the post office”. Funemployed is filled with zingers. “Artists are a clusterfuck of insecurities,” Heazlewood writes. “AC/DC told us, ‘It’s a long way to the top.’ In Australia, it’s a short way to the middle.” And there are some disturbing stats: “While Australia has the sixth biggest recorded music market in the world, it ranks 34th in terms of the proportion of local artists in our recorded music market (25 percent) … with the US at 93 percent and Japan at 81 percent.” The book features brutally honest interviews with other artists. “With a lot of the arts, you never arrive,” Angie Hart says. And Mick Thomas states: “I reckon if you could change one thing in history, one

JUSTIN HEAZLEWOOD

word – when Gough Whitlam came into power he said, ‘We’ll have a youth music network.’ If he’d changed the word ‘youth’ to ‘alternative’, I think it would have been better.” Ultimately, this book is depressing. “If you thought rationally about an artistic career, you’d probably quit while you were behind,” Justin concludes. But it’s an essential read. THE LEGEND LIVES ON Jim Keays’ posthumous album is going to be called Age Against The Machine. LEE CLUB Previewing his new album Love Is The Great Rebellion, Ben Lee

plays at Howler tonight (2 Jul). The album will feature backing vocals by Two And A Half Men star Jon Cryer – Duckie from Pretty In Pink. Ben explains that Jon “won a ‘sing backing vocals on a Ben Lee album’ experience at our kids’ pre-school fundraiser”. HIP HIP Fresh from launching Pseudo Echo’s fine new album Ultraviolet, Brian Canham turns 52 on 3 Jul. HOT LINE “And I don’t mind just lounging around, doin’ stupid things” – Little Bastard, Just Won’t Do.


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 39


opinion OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

PUNK AND HARDCORE WITH SARAH PETCHELL

Mid-year album wraps are now a media thing. So far 2014 has seen few classic urban issues. Alas, some event albums have underwhelmed (like Pharrell Williams’ G I R L)… Beyoncé’s sensational eponymous “visual album” surfaced in midDecember, narrowly missing many 2013 ‘best of ’ lists. Queen Bey is emulating her adventurous lil’ sis Solange – but Beyoncé, its key song Drunk In Love with Jay Z, has re-established her relevance in the avant-soul age. Meanwhile, soul-house diva Katy B returned with the multifaceted Little Red, pulling off an edgy piano ballad in Crying For No Reason. Lana Del Rey has supposedly deserted hip hopsoul with the sublimely miasmic Ultraviolence but, shoegazey vibes aside, it’s actually steeped in urban culture, West Coast sizzurpy R&B. Del Rey even flips gangsta – and ratchet – tropes. On the rap front, Schoolboy Q’s Oxymoron stands out, Los Angeles’ neogangsta lately rocking Australian crowds. And, while everyone is gettin’ Iggy wit’ it, Angel Haze’s (initially leaked) Dirty Gold is surely 2014’s most slepton record, the Detroit femcee/ singer intelligently combining EDM and alt-rock with sharp, autobiographical lyricism – Black Dahlia is celestially cathartic. Besides, Battle Cry, featuring Sia, is up there with any Eminem anthem. Haze’s recent bangin’ 22 Jump Street theme with Ludacris wastes her talent. This year has also yielded landmark Australian albums from Darwin nightbus-riders Sietta (The Invisible River), N’fa Jones (Black + White Noise) and REMI (Raw X Infinity, with input from neo-soulsters Hiatus Kaiyote). @therealcyclone

ANGEL HAZE

40 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

THE NECROTIC REPRESSION TOUR

I was fortunate to have hit the road last month with a trio of diverse technical death metal acts – Europe’s Aborted, Tasmania’s Psycroptic and Brisbane’s The Schoenberg Automaton. The Necrotic Repression tour was a whirlwind ride, consisting of ten shows in just as many days, and having last week recapped Adelaide, Melbourne, Albury, Canberra, Newcastle and Wollongong, that brings us to… Sydney. The ride back straight after the Wollongong show was pretty entertaining. I jumped back in the van with Aborted and Psycroptic, and the vibes were mixed. A few of us were pretty drunk, and a few of us not so drunk and perhaps starting to get a little irate over the conditions. Psycroptic’s fill-in bassist Sam pulled out his pipe and we started having a good go at some herb before Aborted guitarist Mendel flipped out and starting yelling at us. Psycroptic vocalist Jason was ‘five years ago’ drunk and thankfully able to boldly ramble his way through breaking up the awkward silence that followed. We woke up nice and early to head along to the ABC studios where Aborted and Psycroptic would both record their own Rage guest host segments. Some people say that it’s seen as the crowning moment of Australian music – that point where you know you’ve made it. Psycroptic perhaps recognised this and seemed a little nervous about the whole thing, while Aborted spoke in fake German accents and took the whole thing as a bit of fun. Factory Theatre can be a daunting venue when it’s empty… you wonder how well it might fill out. Those fears didn’t last too long, however, and it was pretty epic

to see an entire room raising the horns for Psycroptic. Danny from Aborted, while having made a habit of playing second guitar for the last song in each Psycroptic set so far, took a few more tracks for a spin with impressive results. Skoling too much beer while loading out, I experienced my first spew of the tour in the carpark, before jumping back in the Schoenberg van. One quick stop for kebabs, and the highway to the Gold Coast was hit. After convincing a Malaysian restaurant that guitarist Shayne was in fact named Gavin, and that it was Gavin’s birthday, we received some complimentary deep fried ice cream, sang Happy Birthday, and loaded into Shark Bar. It was a fairly quiet night, behind the merch desk especially, though I unexpectedly caught up with some old friends from school, and it still looked like fun up near the stage. We had two shows in Brisbane to end it all, the first of which was at The Brightside. Though a dude stole some merch straight off the desk before disappearing into the mosh, the show was sick. The after-party gradually moved from Crowbar to the garage of my old place in New Farm, with some of us not getting to bed until 7am or later… perfect for the 2pm doors on Sunday at all ages venue The Lab. In true Brisbane all ages death metal form, it was quite the modest audience to end the tour with, though Aborted nonetheless managed to muster up a circle pit. We packed down, said our goodbyes, and went our separate ways. As far as tours go this was probably one of the most mature and professional runs I’ve been on, though that certainly didn’t detract from the true meaning of death metal – having fun.

When the angry ranga, Frank Carter, announced that he would be stepping down from his duties as singer for English band Gallows, I was disappointed. I was convinced that Carter was the heart and soul of the band. I guess I was extra dubious of the future of the band postCarter, particularly when ex-Alexisonfire Wade MacNeil was announced as Carter’s replacement. Boy was I wrong. The band released their third and self-titled record in 2012 and it felt like the energy and spark that I fell in love with had been rekindled. Musically, the record sounded like the debut. It’s fast, brash and totally abrasive. Having a Canadian at the helm gives the lyrics more of an international flavour, focusing on broader issues rather than the typically English themes of the first two records. So what am I saying? Change is good. And if the track from their forthcoming 7” is anything to go by, this change continues to be a good thing for Gallows (the two-track record drops 4 July). The same applies to Code Orange, formerly Code Orange Kids. Their 2012 full-length brimmed with promise. Later this year, their new album, I Am King, will be released, and if the title track from the album is anything to go by, perhaps dropping ‘Kids’ from the band name is a reflection of the leap in maturity not just in terms of age, but also in terms of song craft. It’s easy to fear change. The important thing is not to get caught up in it. You may be surprised at what you find. wakethedead@themusic.com.au

GALLOWS


opinion THE LOOKING GLASS

DANCE MOVES

GOOD TIMING

A JOURNEY THROUGH ARTS WITH HELEN STRINGER

NEW CURRENTS WITH TIM FINNEY

A COMICS GUIDE TO COMEDY WITH KIRSTEN LAW

THE INTERVIEW

In “you’ve got to be shitting me” news poly-hyphenate, James Franco, and his soulmate, Seth Rogen, have sparked an international incident over their upcoming movie The Interview, which features a plot to assassinate North Korea’s eternal leader, Kim Jong-un. In a sane and rational response, Kimmy has called on the US government to stop the movie from being released or risk really big, scary consequences. The film must be stopped, lest the rest of the world come to the conclusion that Kim is completely fucking insane, a perception he is absolutely not fuelling by getting his knickers in a serious twist over obvious satire. The North Korean official news agency relayed a statement from foreign affairs which insisted that the movie “is the most blatant act of terrorism and will absolutely not be tolerated.” Really, Kim Jong-un? Because I would think making an actual plan in the actual real world to hurt your top level leadership would be the most blatant act of terrorism you could conceive of. A movie made by a celebrated stoner and his bro-mantic life partner? Not so much, because, you know, it’s fiction. North Korea has threatened to take “merciless countermeasures” if Washington refuses to ban the movie. Watch out Hollywood, Kim Jong-un is coming. No need to panic just yet; North Korea’s forward forces consist of a fleet of row boats steered by starving peasants, so it’s going to take a little bit of time for Kimmy to get to you. Start panicking in, say, four years.

I’ve written before about what some of my friends and I have taken to calling the UK dance “interzone”: that space between house, UK garage and Northern bassline typified by the masterful sets of DJ Q. The tag captures both the nascent, embryonic quality of the music and its status as an in-between genre, an eclectic composite of many apposite parts. I have a knee-jerk suspicion of eclecticism as an aesthetic, though, given that usually it’s more about showing off one’s record collection than doing anything new or exciting. So it’s gratifying to be able to chart the rise of some core interzone artists who are more concretely welding together its divergent signifiers into an identifiable narrative. PVC (short for Purple Velvet Curtains) exemplifies the hard core of the emergent sound on tracks like She Can Get It and You Know My Man, the disparate influences collapsed into grooves of slippery, unstable 4/4 beats that seem never quite to resolve, dancing around doomy basslines and mysterious vocal samples, the grooves simultaneously compelling and slightly off-putting, sweet and sour. PVC’s new EP, Learn To Fly travels further down this oddball rabbit hole, the title track in particular emphasising the ambivalent, multivalent flavour of his productions, evoking the dense, dank sweetness of pungently ripe fruit, off yoghurt and (let’s be honest) weed. Taiki & Nulight is the misleading moniker for Erka Chinbayer, whose sound leavens PVC’s queasy syncopation with a fondness for a rifftastic rave sound. Take Me Up is effectively a hymn to the history of UK

hardcore, its churning bassline attack framing the same Loleatta Holloway vocals now indelibly defined by their use in Omni Trio’s peerless early jungle anthem Renegade Snares. Take Me Up is a fine example of how this music has absorbed UK garage’s aesthetic of hesitation, even when riding more consistent four-tothe-floor beats. But Chinbayer can go all out on the syncopation front as well: IAEATD (It Ain’t Even About The Dough) is a headwrecking darkside 2-step epic. Shift K3y (aka Lewis Jankel) ploughs a similar sonic furrow to Taiki & Nulight, but brings a songwriterly twist to the table. Last year’s What We Had deploys garage, trap and R&B motifs in a blend of sleazed-up smoothness. Shift K3y not only enjoys the highest crossover potential of the artists profiled here, he’s already doing it – his chipper single Touch peaking at #3 in the UK. With its warm piano chords and Jankel’s falsetto vocals, Touch emphasises Shift K3y’s key points of difference from his peers, but it does so within a tough assemblage of blurting bass and rippling beats. My sentimental favourite version of Touch is a DJ Q bootleg that reunites its melody with Teedra Moses’ airily gentle vocals, perversely underlining the muscularity of Shift K3y’s arrangement. Perhaps best of all though is Make It Good, where Jankel breathlessly serenades ecstatic house vamps before plummeting into a maelstrom of Pon De Floor-style pitched-shifted vocal cut-ups. More than its sheer catchiness, what shines through this music is how alive it is to its own possibilities, and how gleefully it exploits them.

DAYNE RATHBONE

There’s so much to tell you this week. To begin with… Phuklub! The cult Sydney comedy night started in Melbourne last week and it made me v excited. Run by Nick Capper and Blake Mitchell, Phuklub’s formula is comedians, plus the internets, plus whatever the audience and promoters want to throw at them (eg Grain Waves, thickened cream, Domino’s peri-peri chicken pizza). The next Phuklub is 20 Jul at Club Voltaire – you’d be silly to miss it. While the Fancy Boy collective’s ABC Fresh Blood sketches are decidedly more conventional than their MICF show, the monthly thing they’re bringing our way will surely boast more Mr Cum than you’ll care to see anywhere, ever. For those who missed the Golden-Gibbo-winning Fancy Boy Variety Show, you have been given another chance. Don’t fuck it up! The first Fancy Boy Monthly Super Show!! is at The Toff In Town on 10 August. Last week also saw the commencement of Sketch Sunday at Club Voltaire (aka new home of Phuklub). This is another room from Character Cavalcade’s Kieran Bullock, who continues to provide non-standup alternatives to the people of the Melbourne comedy scene out of the goodness of his heart. Yes, Melbourne winter gives good lolz.

SHIFT K3Y

What also gives excellent quality lolz is the new documentary TV series Dayne’s World, which is all about Dayne Rathbone, resident penis-flapper and darling of MICF 2013. Give it a watch at daynes-world.tumblr.com. THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 41


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Lonesome: Yarra Hotel, Abbotsford

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Little Bastard: 3 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 4 Northcote Social Club; 5 Baha Tacos Rye Bonjah: 4 Jul Cherry Bar; 5 Yah Yah’s; 4 Oct The Hi-Fi Jeff Lang: 4 Jul Caravan Music Club Oakleigh; 5 Thornbury Theatre; 18 Williamstown RSL; 20 Beav’s Bar Geelong

Sky Ferreira: 23 Jul The Prince

Skaters: 26 Jul Corner Hotel

WED 02

Foster The People: 28 Jul Palais Theatre Jungle: 29 Jul Corner Hotel Sleepmakeswaves: 1 Aug Corner Hotel Ball Park Music: 4 Oct, Forum Theatre; 8 Karova Lounge Ballarat; 11 Wool Exchange Geelong Gorguts: 14 Nov Northcote Social Club Thy Art Is Murder: 13 Dec The Hi-Fi; 14 Community Centre Ringwood

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Musicland, Fawkner

Tim Pledger’s Sandwich Jesus + Slipper + Louise Goh’s Laa: 303, Northcote

Kishi Bashi + Special Guests: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Josh Rennie-Hynes: Babushka Bar, North Ballarat

Jemma & The Clifton Hillbillies + Adrian Stoyles: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Trivia: Bayswater Hotel, Bayswater David Bridie + Daniel Champagne: Bella Union, Carlton South Rebecca Barnard & Billy Miller’s Singalong Society: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh Two Headed Dog + Stone Revival: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Trivia: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (8pm), Brunswick Beginners’ Class with Melbourne Ukulele Kollective: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (6pm), Brunswick Shady Lane + The Sweets + Marmalade Ghost + Stax Osset: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Ben Lee + Danny Ross: Howler, Brunswick 4Tress + Triumph Over Logic + Sammy Owen Blues Band + Demonic Cowboys: Laundry Bar, Fitzroy Morning Melodies + Auroa Mackrill: Matthew Flinders Hotel, Chadstone Alice Sara Ott + Francesco Tristano: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank Trivia: Morwell Hotel, Morwell

Aquila Young: Bar Oussou, Brunswick

Grouplove: 25 Jul 170 Russell

Remi: 10 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 11 Corner Hotel

Melody Pool, Marlon Williams: 17 Jul Beav’s Bar Geelong; 18 Fitzroy Town Hall; 19 Caravan Music Club; 20 Major Tom’s Kyneton; 14 Aug Ararat Hotel; 15 Harvester Moon Cafe Bellarine; 16 Baby

Kingston Crown + Jaju Choir: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Tune-Yards: 24 Jul Howler Metronomy, Circa Waves: 25 Jul Forum Theatre

The White Album Concert: 15 & 16 Jul Hamer Hall

Little Foot + Sammy Owen Blues Band + James Teague + MJ Maguire + Za Za + more: 303, Northcote

Something For Kate: 18–20 Jul Forum Theatre

Violent Soho: 5, 6, 17, 18 Jul The Hi-Fi

The Beards: 16 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 17 Barwon Club Geelong; 18 170 Russell; 19 Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 20 Spirit Bar & Lounge Traralgon

FRI 04

Black Cafe Bacchus Marsh; 17 The Bridge Hotel

The Acoustic Sessions feat. Em Boyd + Ash Ball: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

GIG OF THE WEEK TINY RUINS: 8 JUL NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB

THU 03

Cam Scott Hammond Group: 303, Northcote

The Guilts & Arrester: The B.East, Brunswick East

Karaoke: Chelsea Heights Hotel (Sports Bar), Chelsea Heights

Dr Piffle & The Burlap Band + Eaten By Dogs + Chores: The Bendigo, Collingwood

Bonjah + Red X + Gena Rose Bruce: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Milwaukee Banks + WZRDKID: Boney, Melbourne Soul In The Basement + Reverend Funk & The Horns Of Salvation + DJ Vince Peach + Pierre Baroni: Cherry Bar, Melbourne MySpace Emo Party with Masketta Fall + The JustUs League + The Spinset: Colonial Hotel, Melbourne Karaoke: Commercial Hotel, Werribee Saskwatch + Hollow Everdaze + Jim Lawrie: Corner Hotel, Richmond Trivia: Cornish Arms, Brunswick

The Kilniks + The Sand Dollars + Dayrigs + The Final Eclipse Of The Heart: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy David Carlin + Sarlin + I’m Frankie: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Greeves + Diamonds Of Neptune + The Lovely Days: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

BJ Morriszonkle + Dear Plastic + Great Earthquake: The Gasometer Hotel, Collingwood

Little Bastard: Karova Lounge, Ballarat

Max Planck & The Survival Experts: The Prince, St Kilda

Janis Siegel: Melbourne Recital Centre, Southbank

Young Liberals + The Shifters: The Tote (Upstairs), Collingwood

The King’s Singers: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elizabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank

Space Junk + Drifter + Uptown Ace: The Tote, Collingwood

The Rebirth of Cool + Mr Lob + Guests: Penny Black, Brunswick

Hayden Calnin + Lanks + Ruby Whiting: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Simply Acoustic: Wesley Anne, Northcote The Pass Outs + King Mammal: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Gallie: Labour In Vain, Fitzroy

La Bastard + Transvaal Diamond Syndicate + The Mockingbird: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Callum & The Big Order + The Dead Heir: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray

Jack Barclay + Twin Ages + Del Boca Vista + You and Your Friends: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Mandy Meadows + John Montesante Quintet: The Commune, East Melbourne Grenadiers + My Echo + Magic Bones + Holliava: The Curtin, Carlton Open Mic Night + Various Artists: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Man From The Meteor + Empra + The Dividers + Smoke Stack Rhino: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda Bell X1 + The Phoncurves: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne Christmas in July - Morning Melodies + Brian Muldoon: The Middle Ferntree Gully Hotel, Ferntree Gully The Adelaide Crows + Teaser Pony + Plebs: The Old Bar, Fitzroy Van Walker: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Burn City Underground: Hip Hop Night + Various Artists: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Bec Laughton + Five Mile Town + Gena Rose Bruce: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Anna’s Go-Go Academy: Victoria Hotel (6.30pm), Brunswick

Transvaal Diamond Syndicate: Catfish, Fitzroy

Spencer P Jones: Cherry Bar (5.30pm), Melbourne Trivia: Commercial Hotel, Werribee Cookin On 3 Burners + Daniel Merriweather + Kylie Auldist + Jason Heerah + Mantra + 1/6 + more: Corner Hotel, Richmond Bayside Over 28s + Stand And Deliver: Daveys Hotel, Frankston Cilla Jane: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Front Bar), Brunswick DJ Shmelsson: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Beer Garden), Brunswick Friday Wine Down + Various Artists: Elsternwick Hotel, Elwood Benjalu (Acoustic): Elwood Lounge, Elwood Funk Buddies + The Bon Scotts + Pear + more: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Morning Melodies + Brendan Scott: First & Last, Hadfield Performing LA Woman + Hugo Race & The True Spirit + Shannon Bourne: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Beautiful Beasts + Zed Eppelin + Mya Wallace: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood Dan Brodie: Grumpy’s Green, Fitzroy Springsteen/Mellencamp Show: Hallam Hotel, Hallam

The Boys: Wesley Anne, Northcote

Saskwatch + Special Guests: Karova Lounge, Ballarat

Trappist Afterland: Wesley Anne, Northcote

Meyhane feat. Stavrina Dimitriou + Byron & The Gypsy Cats: Kindred Studios (Bar of Bengal), Yarraville

Andy Phillips & The Cadillac Walk: Whole Lotta Love, Brunswick East Palace Of The King + Contangent: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 42 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

Jeff Lang + Liz Stringer: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh

Mondo Rock: Basement Discs (In-Store / 12.45pm), Melbourne

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Collage + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda

I Heart Dancehall feat. Andy Ites + So Fire + DJ Nero + Mr Fish + more: Brown Alley (10pm), Melbourne

Bloods + Major Leagues + Guests: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Elsternwick Hotel, Elwood

Wine, Whiskey, Women feat. Sal Kimber: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Shiftee X: Boney, Melbourne

Benjalu (Acoustic): Baha Tacos, Rye

Masketta Fall + more: Rubix The Venue (All Ages), Brunswick

Holyoake + The Narrows + Shut Up Jackson: The Curtin, Carlton

Plugged In Thursdays with The Dead Elected + Motion Liners + Kids From The Mill: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

Little Bastard: Basement Discs (In-Store / 12.45pm), Melbourne

Next Crop - Indie Hip Hop Showcase feat. High Nights + Frame MC + Eskk Emcee + Filosopher + more: Laundry Bar, Fitzroy


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 43


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Mac’s Over 28s Fridays + DJ Rohan: Mac’s Hotel, Melton

Tinsley Waterhouse Band: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Dale Winters Duo: Melbourne Public, South Wharf Janis Siegel: Melbourne Recital Centre, Southbank

Meet You Downstairs In The Bar + Tom Dickins: The Butterfly Club (9pm), Melbourne

The King’s Singers: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elizabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank

Jack On Fire + Howl At The Moon + Greta Mob: The Curtin, Carlton

Various Artists: Morwell Hotel, Morwell

Julian Bryne + Dan Dinnen: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Einsteins Toyboys + All About Steve: Musicland, Fawkner

Best of the Fest + Kikhail + City Sharps + Twin Ages + Aaron James + Cornerstone: The Espy (Basement), St Kilda

Young Maverick + Guests: Mynt, Werribee

Phil Para Band + The Hellhounds: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Owl Eyes: National Gallery of Victoria, Southbank Little Bastard + Sheriff + The Strange: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Linda Cable: Paris Cat Jazz Club, Melbourne Past To Present: Precinct Hotel, Richmond Heavy Judy feat. Dead City Ruins + Peeling Sun + DJ Traffic Jam: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick The Perfections: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Follow Me To Tennessee feat. Lachlan Bryan + Dan Waters + The Weeping Willows: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Bootleg Rascal: Sooki Lounge, Belgrave Combo Pacifica: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Cisco Ceasar + Jolly James: The B.East, Brunswick East Broozer + Dread + Wildeorness + Zombie Motors Wrecking Yard: The Bendigo, Collingwood Callum & The Big Order + Offspring of Convicts: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Bloodwolves + Dead Architect + Removalist + Solis + Iscariot: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Andy Phillips & The Cadillac Walk: The Dava Hotel, Mt Martha Traditional Irish Music Session with Dan Bourke & Friends: The Drunken Poet (6pm), Melbourne Chris Wilson: The Drunken Poet (8.30pm), Melbourne Best of the Fest + Rhythm + James Caddy + Sacad Days + Winona Forever + Kid Sidney: The Espy (Basement), St Kilda Andre + Slow Dancer + Mersey: The Gasometer Hotel, Collingwood The Holidays + Thief: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne Various Artists: The Irish Times, Melbourne No Stairway: The Middle Ferntree Gully Hotel, Ferntree Gully Leaps & Bounds Festival feat. Mightiest Of Guns + Cherrywood + Junk Horses + Ghosts On The Highway + DJ Draw 4: The Old Bar, Fitzroy

Violent Soho + The Smith Street Band + Special Guests: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

THE HOLIDAYS: 4 JUL THE HI-FI Collard Greens & Gravy: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg

Soul Safari + The Putbacks + MzRizk: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Strathmore + As a Rival + We Disappear + Gladstone: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Ben Wright Smith + The Hello Morning + Ali Barter: Boney, Melbourne

Rich Davies: The Sporting Club, Brunswick

The Hornets: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh

Poprocks At The Toff with Dr Phil Smith: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

King Wolf: Catfish (Front Bar), Fitzroy

Zond + Beaches + Deaf Wish + Stations: The Tote, Collingwood The Angel & Baby Chain + Rayon Moon + Flour + Sheek Stain & The Creep: The Tote (Upstairs), Collingwood Mojo Juju + Frank Sultana: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Graveyard Train + Marlon Williams + Dr Piffle & The Burlap Band: Theatre Royal, Castlemaine The Music of James Taylor + Sun On The Moon: Thornbury Theatre (Velvet Room), Thornbury

HQ Over 28s + DJ Chris G: Chelsea Heights Hotel, Chelsea Heights Hell City Glamours + Don Fernando + My Dynamite + The Dukes of Deliciousness + DJ Bobby Lou: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Saskwatch + New Gods + Jim Lawrie + Fraser A Gorman: Corner Hotel, Richmond Various Artists: Cornish Arms, Brunswick Who Said What: Cramers Hotel, Preston DJ Severin: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Beer Garden), Brunswick

Rory Ellis: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick

The Adolescents + Special Guests: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Flying Engine Trio: Wesley Anne (Front Bar / 6pm), Northcote

The Music of James Taylor + Sun On The Moon: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick

Songwriters in the Round + Various Artists: Wesley Anne, Northcote

Cash For Gold + Five Mile Town + Stax Osset: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

Col Elliott: Wonthaggi Workmans Club, Wonthaggi Redcoats + Child + Fuck The Fitzroy Doom Scene: Yah Yah’s (8pm), Fitzroy Sly Faulkner: Yah Yah’s (6pm), Fitzroy Brown River - Yarra Songs feat. Mick Thomas + Peter Lawler + Angie Hart + Charles Jenkins + Cookie Baker + Peter Ewing + Bruce Hearn + Mark Ferrie + Little Brown River Band: Yarra Hotel, Abbotsford

SAT 05

Surrender + Postscript + The Approach + Retrace: 303, Northcote Little Bastard: Baha Tacos, Rye Col Elliott: Bairnsdale RSL, Bairnsdale

Dale Gorfinkel: Grant Street Theatre (Lionel’s Bar), Southbank Riflebirds: Labour In Vain, Fitzroy Preston Skate Massive + Spyndrift + Olin + Stone Desert + more: Laundry Bar, Fitzroy Tommy’s + Scat + DJ Craig Williams: Matthew Flinders Hotel, Chadstone Jason Singh + DJ Scott Thompson: Melbourne Public, South Wharf Janis Siegel: Melbourne Recital Centre, Southbank Kill TV + Spidey + MisSstA: Mr Boogie Man Bar, Abbotsford

Musicfest + Iron Madness (Iron Maiden Tribute) + Coverdale (Whitesnake Tribute) + Kiss The Vyper + Stronger Than All + 77 + more: Musicland (Backstage), Fawkner Thelma Plum + MTNS + Hein Cooper: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Red Ink: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston Mr Palmer Band: Precinct Hotel, Richmond The Three Kings: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy Ben Whiting + Benjalu (Acoustic) + DJ Soul Loco: Retreat Hotel (Front Bar), Brunswick Beacons + The Quarters + The Dividers + Ebolagoldfish + Foxtrot: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray A Million Dead Birds Laughing + Norse + Aeon Of Horus + Hadal Maw + Apparitions Of Null: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Whodafunkit + Special Guests: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Bang feat. Ocean Grove + Belle Haven + Ever Rest: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne Soul-A-Go-Go + Various DJs: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne The Flybz: South Melbourne Town Hall, South Melbourne Mustered Courage + The Stray Hens: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Johnny Pav + Tim J Quinton: Tanswells Commercial Hotel, Beechworth Muscle Beach + Blue Stratos: The B.East, Brunswick East Grind Till Death + Iconic Vivisect + Morbid Anal + The Seaford Monster + Brutonomy + The Maledict: The Bendigo, Collingwood Adalita: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Transvaal Diamond Syndicate + Cotangent + Two Headed Dog + Dumb & Bored: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 44 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

Various Artists: The Irish Times, Melbourne Tracy McNeil & The Good Life: The Loft, Warrnambool Jess Locke + Virginia Villian: The Old Bar (3pm), Fitzroy The Sunday Reeds + Sooky La La + The Dead Heir + The New Pollution + DJ Dirty Garry: The Old Bar, Fitzroy Richie 1250 & The Brides of Christ: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Nebraska + Old Love + Have/ Hold + mnttaB: The Public Bar, North Melbourne 2AM Slot with The Bennies: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Sex On Toast + Horns Of Leroy + Up Up Away: The Toff In Town, Melbourne The House deFrost Drag Ball & 6th Birthday! + Various Artists: The Toff In Town (11.30pm), Melbourne Clagg + Sons of the Ionian Sea + Hotel Wrecking City Traders + Dire Fate: The Tote, Collingwood Monday Night Mass presents Bum Creek + School Girl Report: The Tote (Front Bar / 4pm), Collingwood Kirkis + Black Vanilla + Martin King + Sui Et Sui + Peace Pie + NO ZU: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Jeff Lang + Chris Russell’s Chicken Walk + Liz Stringer: Thornbury Theatre (Ballroom), Thornbury The Long Stand: Union Hotel, Brunswick Johnny Gibson & The Hangovers + Riley Beech: Union Hotel, Brunswick Old Timey Music Jam with Craig Westward: Victoria Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Colour For The Grey + Holliava + Sunday Chairs: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote The Tipplers: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote Bonjah + Red X + Gena Rose Bruce: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy


THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 45


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au

SUN 06

Rich Davies & The Devil’s Union + Ayleen O’Hanlon: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Darebin Songwriters Guild: 303 (3.30pm), Northcote OPA: 303 (8pm), Northcote

Never Cheer Before You Know Whos Winning: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

The Ugly Kings + The Black Alleys + Bad Uncle + Twisted Pistol: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Fresh Industry Showcases+Various Artists: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

The Adolescents + The Go Set + The Bennies + Batpiss + The Kremlings + Wolfpack + Japan For: Barwon Club, South Geelong

Comedy Lockdown + Various Artists: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne Trivia: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick

Benjalu (Acoustic): Bended Elbow, Albury

A Concert Of Tom Waits Songs performed by Stewart D’Arrietta + Band: Caravan Music Club (3pm), Oakleigh Emilee South: Catfish (Front Bar), Fitzroy The Three Kings + Transvaal Diamond Syndicate + DJ Max Crawdaddy: Cherry Bar (2pm), Melbourne Dick Diver + Hierophants + Steve Miller Band + DJ Mikey + Joe Kokomo: Copacabana (12pm), Fitzroy

Kissing Booth + Udays Tiger + Employment: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray

Galliano & The Sommavillains: The Purple Emerald Lounge Bar (4pm), Northcote

Emily Ulman + Phil Gionfrido + Jacky Winter: Kent Street Bar & Cafe, Fitzroy

Lincoln Le Fevre + Virginia Villian + Jack Livingston: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar / 3pm), Footscray

Sex On Toast + Swooping Duck + Dx Heaven: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

Monday Night Mass feat. Early Woman + Pearls + Toothache + Sweet Whirl: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Fields, See & Mason: Royal Oak Hotel (4pm), Fitzroy North The Band Who Knew Too Much: Spotted Mallard (4.30pm), Brunswick

Trivia: Cornish Arms, Brunswick

Itchy Scabs: The Bridge Hotel (4pm), Castlemaine

Various Artists: Cornish Arms, Brunswick

Chinese Handcuffs + They Move Like Wolves + Niko Niko + Bad Hobbits: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Barney: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Beer Garden), Brunswick Great John Himself + Road Train + Whitehall: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Benny & The Dukes + Guests: Kindred Studios (Bar of Bengal / 4pm), Yarraville Backwood Creatures: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy Tim Rizzoli: Melbourne Public (2pm), South Wharf Musicfest + Various Artists: Musicland (Backstage), Fawkner Jam At Musicland Sundays + Various Artists: Musicland (MainStage), Fawkner Jeff Lang: Old Hepburn Hotel, Hepburn Springs Easy Now Allstars: Penny Black, Brunswick Sam Vandenberg: Precinct Hotel, Richmond The Harmaniax: Rainbow Hotel (4pm), Fitzroy Laura Imbruglia + Willow Darling + Cat Canteri: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Trivia: The B.East, Brunswick East

THE ADOLESCENTS: 5 JUL EVELYN HOTEL

Life Pilot + Guests: Bridge Builders (All Ages), Lilydale

Joe Guiton + Dave Savage + Simon Wilson + Taylor McKnight: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Tobias Hengeveld: The Drunken Poet (4pm) , Melbourne

Gareth Liddiard + Sara Retallick: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

Mick Daley & The Corporate Raiders: Union Hotel, Brunswick

Monday’s Covered + Various Artists: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Johnny Pav + Tim J Quinton: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick

Elizabeth Barker: The Gasometer Hotel (Front Bar), Collingwood

Maeflower with The Sons of May + Harrison Storm: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

I Do Like Mondays + Lanark + Breve + The Noise Pollution + Dean Anthonisz: The Old Bar, Fitzroy

Ruby Tuesday feat. Amistat + Sarlin + DJ Lovely Clear Water: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

The Architects: Wesley Anne (Front Bar / 6pm), Northcote Bad Hobbits: Wesley Anne, Northcote The Architects: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote Jessica Jade: Whole Lotta Love, Brunswick East

Dale Ryder Band + Stand And Deliver: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Skyscraper Stan & The Commission Flats : Yarra Hotel (5pm), Abbotsford

Client Liaison + Animaux: The Gasometer Hotel (All Ages / 2.30pm), Collingwood

MON 07

Violent Soho + The Smith Street Band + Special Guests: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

Bootleg Rascal: Bended Elbow, Albury

Phake Phur: The Post Office Hotel (4.30pm), Coburg Sunday School + Various Artists: The Public Bar (4pm), North Melbourne

Songwriters Collective + Various Artists: 303, Northcote

Morning Melodies + Brian Muldoon + Rick Charles: Berwick Inn Hotel, Berwick Formless Mondays + Hoodlum Shouts Duo: Catfish (Upstairs), Fitzroy

Broadway Unplugged with Gillian Cosgriff + Ali Calder + Josie Lane + Lucy Maunder + more: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Ceres: Winter Blues Festival (7.30pm), Echuca TUE 08 Zoe Ryan & The Dandy Lion + more: 303, Northcote Philippe Perez 3CR Radio DJs: Catfish, Fitzroy The Underhanded + A Basket Of Mammoths + Maladaptors: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Celtic/Folk Session + Various Artists: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Alisa Weilerstein: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elizabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank

Cherry Jam: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Morning Melodies + Rick Charles: Moreland Hotel, Brunswick

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Cornish Arms, Brunswick

Tiny Ruins + Shining Bird + Aldous Harding: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Trivia: Elsternwick Hotel (Sports Bar), Elwood

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

46 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014

Brightside Live Music Showcase + Various Artists: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Layla & Rhi Fibbins: Union Hotel (Arvo), Brunswick

Ha Ha’s @ Yah Yah’s feat. Nick Cody + Tommy Dassalo + Karl Chandler + Kate McLennan: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Wayward Breed + Empire of Poets + Ravenswood: The Old Bar, Fitzroy

Trivia: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Dear Monday feat. Sasha Marsh + Gus McKay + Kate Anastasiou + Intamelodies: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Riley Beech + The Old Married Couple: The Drunken Poet (6.30pm), Melbourne

Graveyard Train + Marlon Williams: The Loft, Warrnambool

Offspring of Convicts + Little Miss Remembering + Chambers + Click: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Sex On Toast: The Loft, Warrnambool Josh Rennie-Hynes + Steve Grady + Georgia Spain: The Old Bar, Fitzroy Trivia: The Public Bar, North Melbourne


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REHEARSAL STUDIOS

Ad ID: 5-13949

REHEARSAL ROOMS SoundPark Rehearsals and Recording Northcote. Great Rooms, weekday $50. Weeknights/ Weekends From $65. Parking, Storage and gear hire. Phone 0425 706 382. Soundparkstudios. com.au Ad ID: 5-13948

RATES: (GST INCLUDED) SMALL LARGE Monday - Friday 11am-5:30pm $35 $45 Monday - Friday 6pm-12midnight $60

$70

all sessions

$55

$65

day sessions

$55

$65

Weekends Public Holiday Solo Practice

Mon-Fri 11am-5:30pm $15

Solo Practice

with a drum kit or amp

$20

GROUND FLOOR | OPEN 7 DAYS

ADVERTISE HERE CALL:

(03) 9421 4499 OR GO TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

9415 7177 www.midianrehearsals.com

2 York St Richmond

THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014 • 47


48 • THE MUSIC • 2ND JULY 2014


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