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2 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014


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4 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014


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themusic 25TH JUN 2014

#044

JOSHUA CONSANDINE’S I CANNOT KNOW, BODYTORQUE DNA. PIC: JEFF BUSBY

INSIDE FEATURED Skaters

Story Of The Year

review

Knock-off films Lloyd Cole Little Bastard Ben Lee Confession The Last Impresario (Gracie Otto) Phantogram Tom Vek Two Faces Of January Pierce Brothers Usurper Of Modern Medicine

REVIEWS Album: Every Time I Die

Live: Reclink Community Cup Arts: It Cannot Be Stopped ...and more

THE GUIDE

Cover: Francesco Tristano

“ACROSS THE EVENING WE GET THE ROMANCE AND BEAUTY EXPECTED FROM BALLET BUT WE ALSO GET A SUBSTANTIAL HELPING OF AUSTERE, ALMOST FASCIST RIGOUR.”

“THE MILITARY ULTIMATELY WINS AND EVERYONE RETIRES TO THE BAR FOR A ROUND OF VICTORY TEQUILA SHOTS.” MITCH KNOX WAXES LYRICAL ABOUT KNOCK-OFF FILMS (P20)

PAUL RANSOM REVIEWS BODYTORQUE DNA (P36)

NEED TO KNOW WHAT NEW MUSIC TO SPEND YOUR CASH ON THIS WEEK? CHECK OUT OUR RELEASE WRAP-UP ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

GET THE LOWDOWN ON WHAT’S HAPPENING IN AUS INDIE LAND ONLY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

BEN LEE

feature “I ACTUALLY THOUGHT I WAS MAKING A RECORD THAT WAS ESSENTIALLY MUSIC TO DIE TO. BUT LO AND BEHOLD, THESE CATCHY CHORUSES STARTED COMING OUT.” BEN LEE (P25)

WHO’S MAKING MOVES IN THE LOCAL CHARTS? GET ALL THE DETAILS

Eat/drink: Artisan wine

ONLY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

Frontlash/Backlash Indie News/Q&As Opinion Gig Guide

THE BRONX @ 170 RUSSELL. PIC: JAY HYNES

6 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

review

“IT’S PRETTY COOL WATCHING CAUGHTHRAN PERFORM NOTE-PERFECT WHILE CROWDSURFING AND WARDING OFF THE HANDS OF PUNTERS WHO ATTEMPT TO GRAB HIS NADS.” BRYGET CHRISFIELD REVIEWS THE BRONX (P34)


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Bryget Chrisfield

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Stephanie Liew

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch vic.giguide@themusic.com.au

SENIOR CONTRIBUTOR Jeff Jenkins

CONTRIBUTORS Aleksia Barron, Steve Bell, Emma Breheny, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Oliver Coleman, Rebecca Cook, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Dan Condon, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Tim Finney, Bob Baker Fish, Cameron Grace, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Samson McDougall, Tony McMahon, Fred Negro, Matt O’Neill, Josh Ramselaar, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Stephanie Tell, Glenn Waller, Matthew Ziccone

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 25 JUNE - 1 JULY 2014

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When Hugo Race & True Spirit played The Workers Club way back in 2010, all left with jaws on the floor. You really don’t wanna miss them this time, because they don’t play often enough. So be sure to head on down to catch the band on 29 Jun at Retreat Hotel with another legend, Mark Snarski, on support duty. And entry is free!

Oz Comic-Con is back, celebrating the best of pop culture for one massive weekend at Royal Exhibition Building. The event, taking place 5 & 6 Jul, will feature appearances from Robert Englund (Freddy Krueger), Game Of Thrones stars Kristian Nairn (Hodor) and Daniel Portman (Podrick), Richard Dean Anderson (MacGyver) and many more. We have five double weekend passes to give away. To enter, head to themusic.com.au.

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Locked Bag 2001, Clifton Hill VIC 3068

When Glass Animals tell you an act is gonna be huge, you listen and such is the case with Sohn (pronounced like John but with an ‘S’). See you at Ding Dong Lounge guarding precious dancefloor real estate on 25 Jun. MELBOURNE

go


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au DMA’S

GAME OF THRONES EXHIBITION

INCREASE YOUR KNOWLEDGE, JON SNOW SOUNDS OF NOW

After delivering year after year, we don’t expect anything less than amazing from BIGSOUND Live, but we still can’t help but be shocked by the epic list of acts the industry conference has roped in for the 2014 instalment, happening throughout the Fortitude Valley Entertainment Precinct, 10 & 11 Sep. The varied bill has a little bit of everything, with highlights including Blank Realm, D.D Dumbo, Lanks, DMA’s, Gold Fields, L-FRESH The LION, Kingswood, Luca Brasi, Major Leagues, REMI, The Bennies, Thelma Plum, Bad// Dreems, Sydonia and Yeo. We can assure you, however, that this is just the tip of the iceberg. Get the full line-up at theMusic.com.au – with the event proudly presented by The Music.

JUST THE DARKNESS

Supported by a small ensemble of musicians, Nick Cave will tour Australia late this year, performing a rare series of solo concerts with tracks selected from across his formidable catalogue. Settle in with one of Australia’s most notorious frontmen when the 56-yearold Prince of Darkness plays 27 & 28 Nov, Fremantle Arts Centre; 3 Dec, Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre; 4 Dec, Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre; 11 & 12 Dec, State Theatre, Sydney; and 16 Dec, The Plenary, Melbourne

DON’T FRET NOTHING

Long recognised as one of the most technically accomplished guitar players on the planet, Joe Satriani will be taking us to school when he brings his mammoth world tour to our shores. Unstoppable Momentum is the title of Satriani’s latest full-length and, really, you couldn’t sum up the bald professor’s career any better. He plays 4 Nov, The Tivoli, Brisbane; 6 Nov, State Theatre, Sydney; 8 Nov, Palais Theatre, Melbourne; and 11 Nov, Astor Theatre, Perth.

DESTROY TOMORROW

I Killed The Prom Queen, The Ghost Inside, In Hearts Wake, Bury Tomorrow and Hellions – does a bill come much bigger than that? The heavy hitters will unite for the Rise Of Brotality tour, which will rumble through Belconnen Magpies, Canberra, 5 Sep*; Cambridge Hotel, Newcastle, 7 Sep; Byron YAC, 9 Sep*; Arena, Brisbane, 12 Sep; UNSW Roundhouse, Sydney, 14 Sep*; 170 Russell, Melbourne, 19 Sep; Phoenix Youth Centre, Melbourne, 20 Sep*; and Capitol, Perth, 28 Sep (*all ages), but will also hit a load of other venues too. Find the closest gig to you on theMusic.com.au.

CHEW ON THIS

For the first time in two decades, Pop Will Eat Itself will touch down on Australian shores, the current line-up featuring original member Graham Crabb, legendary vocalist Mary Byker and powerhouse tub thumper Jason Bowld (Killing Joke). They play 31 Aug, Rosemount Hotel, Perth; 5 Sep, The Zoo, Brisbane; 6 Sep, Manning Bar, Sydney; 7 Sep, The Hi-Fi, Melbourne.

FLUME

NORTHERN LIGHTS

If you’re looking at a Top End holiday, then you might as well tie it in with Darwin Festival, with more than 100 events happening over 18 days, 7 – 24 Aug. International and Aussie music acts include Soweto Gospel Choir, Marlon Williams, Adalita, Seekae and Bobby Alu, while there’s also theatre, comedy, art, cabaret, dance, food, culture and so much more.

“SO UNFORTUNATE THAT WAR GETS BETTER RATINGS THAN PEACE.” @GREGPINELO SUMS UP WHAT’S WRONG WITH MANKIND. 10 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

The lethal Game Of Thrones season finale has many gagging for season five and, though the world’s most watched television series isn’t back until 2015, all the wonder and intricate details of the seven kingdoms comes to Sydney. If you haven’t seen enough twincest, amputated hands or dead Starks, Game Of Thrones: The Exhibition takes place at the Museum Of Contemporary Art, 1 – 5 Jul, celebrating the release of season four on Google Play.

LOUD AND CLEAR

Once again, Listen Out has served up a bill that completely captures the dancefloor sounds of now, with the 2014 line-up simply huge. Try this on for size: Flume (in his only 2014 Australian shows), Chet Faker, Zhu, Schoolboy Q, Four Tet, YG, Ta-Ku, Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs (DJ set), Shlohmo, Bondax, Yahtzel (DJ set), Young Fathers, Golden Features, Tkay Maidza and more. Get amongst it 27 Sep, Centennial Park, Sydney; 28 Sep, Ozone Reserve, Perth; 4 Oct, Observatory Precinct, Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne; and 5 Oct, Brisbane Showgrounds.


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local news vic.news@themusic.com.au THE JEZABELS

ALDOUS HARDING

HARDING UP

Christchurch local Aldous Harding has been capturing hearts left, right and centre with her songs. She’s soon to release her debut self-titled album and will showcase her live performance at The Public Bar on 6 Jul, as well as support Tiny Ruins at Northcote Social Club on 8 Jul.

DEVILICIOUS

HAIL THE QUEENSCLIFF

Queenscliff Music Festival has announced more acts on its line-up. Joining already announced teasers Stonefield and The Bombay Royale will be The Jezabels, Xavier Rudd, The Waifs, Kasey Chambers, The Church, Perfect Tripod (Eddie Perfect and Tripod), Hiatus Kaiyote and DD Dumbo. There will be even more headline names to come, as well as international guests. QMF takes place from 28 to 30 Nov.

EMBRACE IT

Proudly carrying on his family’s musical legacy, singer-songwriter and multiinstrumentalist, Jake Clemons, embarks on his first Australian tour in support of his debut self-released EP, Embracing Light. See him at The Toff In Town, 13 Aug; The Substation, 14 Aug; and Flying Saucer Club, Melbourne, 15 Aug.

TONIGHT AT SIX

Cheer up, emo kids, because You Me At Six and Tonight Alive are joining forces to tour Australia this September. See the UK and Aus pals tear up the stage The Hi-Fi, 9 (under-18) & 10 Sep.

STEP TO IT

The second event by Society of Tastemakers & Elegant People (STEP) is all about ‘The Critic’. A panel of Australian music critics will come together at The Toff In Town on 16 Jul to talk about the business and creative sides of music criticism. The night will be capped off by a live performance from Rat & Co.

WHAT’S THE HUBBUB

In large cities, space is at a premium, and almost paradoxically, so is a sense of community. Enter: The Hub. Designed as a workspace for people to develop ideas, collaborate and network, The Hub Melbourne also links to the community of Hubs across the world. Visit hubaustralia. com for more information.

ONLINE SENSATION

Melbourne grunge-hop five-piece Jakubi have amassed almost five million listens on Soundcloud over just 12 months, with new single Couch Potato drawing 30,000 plays in just three days after premiering on trendsetting US blog Hilly Dilly. Catch them on 1 Aug at Mynt, Werribee and 2 Aug at Ding Dong Lounge.

RED RETURN

Melbourne’s Red Ink return to Australia triumphant, after thrilling the UK and Germany with their infectious indiepop tunes. Having reached upwards of 250,000 YouTube views with no funding and no label the boys are back with a new self-titled EP. Red Ink will play 5 Jul, 2 Aug and 6 Sep, Flanagans, Frankston.

“IT’S CRAZY WHAT HAPPENS WHEN DESTINY’S CHILD GETS PLAYED IN THE CLUB.”

THEY JUST KNOW HOW TO GET EVERYONE JUMPIN’, JUMPIN’, @MATCANT. 12 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

You should be scared, or very excited. The band known for creating the biggest circle pit of all time at Download 2007, the demonic Devildriver have locked horns and joined forces with the crowd-frenzying contemporary metal gods Whitechapel for a decimating tour that hits 170 Russell, 7 Sep.

CONAN LIVE

Hear UK band Conan’s apocalyptic and suffocating brand of doom metal in the flesh when they tour Australia for the first time off the back off second album Blood Eagle. They play a venue TBA on 11 Sep, Old Bar on 12 Sep and The Tote on 13 Sep. Antipodean sludge doomers Yanomamo will be supporting.

STAY DIRTY

Sticky Fingers’ new album, Land Of Pleasure, landing 1 Aug, is sure to instigate some rock’n’roll rave parties. Catch the lads when they launch the record 10 Oct, 170 Russell, Melbourne.

ON A SLIDE

Indian Grammy-nominated slide guitarist Debashish Bhattacharya is playing at Arts Centre Fairfax Studio, 16 Jul. He will perform North Indian (Hindustani) classical songs with a twist with his brother Subhasis Bhattacharjee on Tabla and Sukanya Bhattacharya on vocals.

HUSKY

HUSKY VOICES

To celebrate newly-released single I’m Not Coming Back, Husky are setting out on a capital city headline tour. Fans can hear them perform songs from their debut album Forever So, as well as new material, at Northcote Social Club, 18 Jul.


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THE MUSIC â&#x20AC;¢ 25TH JUNE 2014 â&#x20AC;¢ 13


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au

LEAPS’ LIVING LEGENDS

ALI E

Leaps And Bounds Festival presents the Living Legends series at The Tote. On 11 Jul, it’s all about Kim Salmon; 12 Jul, Spencer P Jones; and 13 Jul, Charlie Owen. These three legends won’t be performing themselves, instead letting other musos (Gareth Liddiard, Penny Ikinger, Dan Kelly and Adalita just a few names among them) pay tribute to them while they kick back.

KICKING IN ALL CORNERS Narrated by David Wenham and directed by Michael Stringer McIntyre, Aussie Rules The World is a sports/travel documentary that looks at our national footy code as AFL tries to go global. National premiere screenings are on 23 Jul, Village Crown; 8 Aug, Village Cinemas, Geelong; and 13 Aug, The Regent, Ballarat.

OFF THE MAP

Electronic wunderkind Kilter will be demanding your dancefloor attendance when he criss-crosses the country, touring soonto-be-released EP Shades. The Sydneysider will be getting ‘er done 12 Jul, Shebeen Bandroom. He’ll also make an appearance at Splendour In The Grass, 25 Jul.

BACK FROM THE SEA

STRANGER TIMES

The ever prolific Ali Edmonds (aka Ali E) is returning to her solo project, after being busy with Damn Terran, Heavy Beach and Little Athletics. The first taste from her forthcoming album is single We Are Strangers, and it’s a killer. Ali E performs with a full band at The Workers Club, 18 Jul with Grand Prismatic and Bad Family.

SHORT STANDING

Catch Sub Pop garage-rockers The Dwarves on 17 Oct at Evelyn Hotel as they bring 30 years of huge live shows (with the likes of Nirvana and Green Day) and punk attitude to Australian audiences.

NEW BOYCE ON THE BLOCK

Boyce Avenue are a YouTube boy band with the skills to back it up and will be showcasing those in September. The Brothers Manzano bring their latest seven-track EP, released this year, No Limits, along for the ride, playing a mix of covers and originals on 5 Sep, Princess Theatre.

A decade since it landed in our lives, A Song Is A City, the second record from Eskimo Joe, is coming back on our radar, courtesy of a solo acoustic tour from EJ frontman Kav Temperley. Temperley plays 1 Aug, Northcote Social Club; 2 Aug, Karova Lounge, Ballarat; and 3 Aug, Beav’s Bar, Geelong.

“TWEET NUMBER TWO. ALREADY BORED.”

RELENTLESS TOURING

Catch Morning Glory and The Bennies on a co-headline tour this September. It’s the former’s first-ever sojourn down to Australia to which they’ll bring their politi-kil punk to a new audience. They hit up Barwon Club, Geelong, 24 Sep; Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 25 Sep; and Evelyn Hotel, 26 Sep.

DAVID ROSETZKY

MIND THE GAPS

The Australian Centre for the Moving Image will host the new video installation by critically acclaimed Melbourne artist, David Rosetzky. Gaps is a free exhibition embodying Rosetzky’s ongoing exploration of personal identity and the relationship – or ‘gaps’ – between self and other through speech, movement and dance. On display at Gallery 2 from 5 Aug. 14 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

YA GOTTA GIVE IT A LITTLE TIME, @IRAGLASS.

SHE BANGZ

GETTING PLAYED

CAUSE AND EFFECT

JETHRO AGAIN

Pop fans best be practicing their twerking when Miley Cyrus brings her Bangerz arena tour to Australia, tongue and all. Expect the outrageous when the divisive 21-year-old makes fans blush on 10 Oct, Rod Laver Arena. Tickets on sale now with prices starting from $100+BF.

William McInnes and Sigrid Thornton get together for the first time since Seachange in MTC’s upcoming production of The Effect. The play, by award-winning UK writer Lucy Prebble, explores the notions of love and happiness in a chemicallycontrolled world. Opens 21 Aug at Southbank Theatre, The Sumner.

MAYBESHEWONT

UK post-rock band Maybeshewill have announced they will tour Australia for the first time this September. The Leicester-formed outfit will be showing off songs from their fourth album Fair Youth, due out this August, and will be supported by Sydney trio Solkyri. Rock out 30 Sep, Northcote Social Club.

Project QUAD with Southgate presents Play Me, an innovative program of Melbourne’s best video art, animation and short films playing at Southgate Cinema. See moving image artworks on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings from 8 to 31 July. For the full program, see southgatemelbourne.com.au. Ian Anderson returns to Australia in December to play songs from Jethro Tull’s huge back catalogue. The British kings of the experimental rock concept album earned themselves quite a following through the ‘60s with their non-commercial music and guitar grooves. See him at Palais Theatre, 15 Dec.

KING BIRD

Having recently signed to New World Artists, King Parrot are ready to head on an Australian east coast tour. The thrash outfit have a new drummer in Todd Hansen to debut at the shows; see ‘em 25 Jul, Ding Dong Lounge; 26 Jul, Wrangler Studios; 26 Jul, Barwon Club, Geelong; and 28 Jul, Karova Lounge, Ballarat.


Thu 26th June

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197A BRUNSIWCK ST FITZROY 3065 (03) 9417 5955 THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 15


music

TAKE A BITE You have to be doing things right to stand out from the scene in New York City. Luckily, Skaters’ songs are just as charming as the story behind the band. Michael Ian Cummings explains to Benny Doyle why battling has its benefits.

M

ichael Ian Cummings is shuffling the footpaths of Brooklyn, trying to find a quiet place to take this call. The Big Apple has acted as Skaters’ home base for a few years now, and without its constant stimulation the band probably wouldn’t have given us a debut album as entertaining as Manhattan. After making introductions at an LA house party in 2011, Skaters frontman Cummings and English guitarist Josh Hubbard made a pact of sorts when the pair reconnected in New York a few months later – they would play a gig before Hubbard boarded his flight home, giving the pair a limited window to get some songs down and make it happen.

the pair still only had that one balmy evening in Los Angeles to go off. And although the frontman confirms they got along famously on first introductions, he’s quick to add that it was strange starting a band with someone he barely even knew. “We both knew that we were good at being in bands, because we’d all done it before,” Cummings says. “But there’s always that big question mark and you don’t know what’s going to come out of it, or if it’s going to last a week or ten years, so you’ve got to take a leap of faith a little bit and just hope that the other people are as into it as you are.”

present their friends’ various artistic pursuits. The quartet were embracing New York’s underground DIY ethics to generate interest, and it paid off, with the band landing a deal with Warner to release their first LP, Manhattan. Although three of Skaters four members grew up away from the city – Cummings and Rubin just outside of Boston, Massachusetts, and Hubbard in Hull, England – New York is their home, an integral part of the band’s aesthetic and identity. “I’d fallen for it before,” Cummings says regarding the city’s charm. “I’d lived here before and my family is from here, so it wasn’t new to me or anything. But living here full-time for the foreseeable future, you definitely have a different attitude towards the city compared to someone that’s just visiting. When you’re visiting it’s just like, ‘Who cares, this is crazy!’ When you live here you have to figure out how to do it.” The vocalist/guitarist admits their adopted base has allowed the four-piece to develop at a faster pace, and has presented opportunities that otherwise would never have formed. “You’re kind of surrounded by potential fans all the time, and you’re out meeting new and interesting people, and everyone is doing something in a similar field, whether it’s art, photography, fashion, whatever,” Cummings

“YOU COULD HAVE THE BEST FRIEND AND THEN WHEN YOU DECIDE TO LIVE WITH THEM ALL OF A SUDDEN THEY SMELL LIKE DEAD FISH.”

“We didn’t really have any expectations at that point,” Cummings begins, taking solace off the streets in a friend’s apartment. “We set a date so that it forced us to do something, but I’ve never done that before, just booked a show and then get the songs together, so we were all a little on edge but it got the job done and we got the first show out of the way, then it was clear what we had to do. If you don’t go for it you just sit around waiting to do it, like you say, ‘Oh, we’ll do it when this comes together,’ or ‘We’ll play shows when this happens.’ Sometimes you need to just book it, [but] it’s kinda turned into something that we weren’t expecting.” Rounding out the quartet is Cummings’ longstanding percussion pal Noah Rubin, and bassist Dan Burke, a gun-to-acquire type musician who was well regarded in their local scene as a back-end player who could get the job done. However, the rocket up the arse really came from Hubbard. “He just showed up, and he was only in town for three months, so we used his limitations and we didn’t really anticipate even playing y’know,” remarks Cummings. “He just showed up and we were like, ‘Okay, maybe we’ll get together,’ and he was just like, ‘Nah, I came here to start a band, I want to play shows,’ and even though we didn’t have a band or songs he didn’t seem bothered by it.” Like any one night stand though, you don’t really know if genuine chemistry is there. When Hubbard called Cummings out of the blue after arriving in New York, 16 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

In a way Skaters originally stood as something of a musical sharehouse – the guys got along great, but could they live in each other’s pockets? Cummings laughs in agreement. “You could have the best friend and then when you decide to live with them all of a sudden they smell like dead fish,” he relates. Still, there was a foundation to work on from the outset, with Cummings having written five demos before Skaters was officially formed. These tracks became the band’s first EP, 2012’s Schemers, which they dropped as a freebie to generate buzz. Developing concurrently with all of this was the band’s zine, Yonks – an artist-driven publication designed to connect and

tells. “And you’re all in the same boat in the city, like everyone is hustling to get their thing accomplished. Because of that it allows you to move quickly; you can just meet anyone you need to meet because they’re at the bar. It’s not hard to navigate your next step, you just put yourself out there and people throw stuff at you, you take it and you try not to miss too many opportunities. “You’re just one of the many bees in the hive, and everyone is fighting for the honey,” he continues. “You gotta want to [live in New York City]; obviously it’s not for everyone. It’s kinda cutthroat when it comes down to it, like if you don’t get this show someone else will, if you don’t capitalise on your opportunities someone else will. There’s a level of competitiveness that keeps you on your toes, and at the same time just the energy in the city is pushing you forward. If you stop doing stuff you really notice it because everyone else is doing so much around you. You feel like you’re not making the most of it. Rent is too expensive to just sit on your arse.” Before the Skaters boys were taking their rock’n’roll licks worldwide, they could be found shaking and stirring of a different kind, slinging drinks in some of the most happening bars in the city. And although the work was definitely not as glamorous or adored as touring the globe in a guitar band, Cummings’ late nights on the bottles gave him an uninterrupted view of the cartoonish nightlife New York offers up. It made sourcing stories for lyrics a breeze, and from the suggestive To Be Young


In NYC to the reckless abandon of Nice Hat, Manhattan lets you live those moments, the record playing out as a series of short stories about what it’s like to be young, wild and free, standing at the centre of the universe. “There’s definitely not a day that goes by that you don’t see something crazy,” Cummings agrees. “If you put yourself out there you see crazy shit, so the city is just going to give you those stories, but it’s whether you can pick up on them. It’s one of those things where you’ve just got to be open at all times and be willing to get into situations you wouldn’t normally get into, if nothing more just for the experience of it. “When I listen to the record and I listen to some of the songs it reminds me of something that felt so long ago, but it wasn’t that long ago, it was written in the now,” he concludes. “And that was the most important thing, to try and write about what we saw and what we knew, and not try and pretend we were great philosophers and that we were trying to teach life lessons. There’s no preaching y’know what I mean, it’s just observation and insight.” WHAT: Manhattan (Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 26 Jul, Corner Hotel; 27 Jul, Splendour In The

BS (BEFORE SKATERS) Clearly a band like Skaters, one that can just form ‘overnight’, isn’t actually built on 24 hours worth of skills. If you’ve got the audaciousness to make rock’n’roll happen in an instant, then you’ve also got the talent to keep your ambition together. In Skaters case, the boys had done time in a variety of acts, some well known, some not so much. Without these bands, you wouldn’t be listening to Manhattan. The Paddingtons This is the band British guitarist Josh Hubbard earned his stripes in. The raucous indie rockers from Hull had considerable success in their native Blighty, with four charting singles during 2004-5. They also generated a (justified) reputation as an arse-kicking live proposition, with relentless gigging earning them support slots with The Cribs and spots on Reading Festival. The Dead Trees American instigators Cummings and Noah Rubin took their wonky indie strains coast to coast, bouncing between Boston, Portland and Los Angeles. Their sound probably references the latter city more than any other location, with chirpy harmonies and guitar tones that make you nostalgic for times that you never knew. Dirty Pretty Things Post-Libertines, concurrently-Do(ug)herty/Moss, pre-million dollar Hyde Park gig, Carl Barât formed DPT in an attempt to keep on rocking while his former best mate played with glass pipes. Although never a full-time member of the band, Hubbard found himself in the line-up briefly when Barât fell from a motorbike during a boozing session in 2006. Lads, eh?

Grass, North Byron Parklands THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 17


music

STREETS OF YOUR TOWN

vibe in the air, and it’s something that he can tangibly feel from the crowds.

Story Of The Year frontman Dan Marsala tells Benny Doyle how an album about small city America has taken a bunch of friends around the world and back.

“I

t’s weird, it brings back a lot of memories – the mindset that we were in 11 years ago, when we were actually writing the songs and recording them; I was 21 or 22 years old at that point, it was just a whole different world. But it’s cool thinking back to writing those songs and the memories that [they] bring up; so much crazy stuff goes through your head.” Dan Marsala is discussing the personal emotions that have been dug up since Story Of The Year hit the road roughly 12 months ago to celebrate the ten-year anniversary of their 2003 debut Page Avenue, a record that ironically provided the quintet with a ticket out of their hometown of St Louis, Missouri – “a shitty urban city [that] attracts great, sad music” – by reflecting on life in the sprawl. “It was about friendships and growing up in St Louis, and the stuff that goes through your head when you’re a 21-year-old kid trying to make something out of yourself,” explains Marsala. “Every song had an underlying meaning of that somehow.” Self-proclaimed “weird kids” that wouldn’t take no for an answer, Story Of the Year weren’t daunted by cutting their first album. They went for broke from the getgo, enlisting Goldfinger’s John Feldmann to stir their bubbling post-hardcore pot into something digestible, and the end result, Page Avenue, stands as a product of determination and youthful ambition, one that went against the existing local music scene of the time. “There was maybe one or two bands that had ever been signed from St Louis,” Marsala recalls. “At the time we had Nelly, the rapper; he had just blown up and he’s from the same area, but that was it. Rappers were everywhere at that point, but for rock bands it was pretty slim. But us getting bigger and getting signed back in the day and becoming the successful band we are, we have definitely created more of a scene that has come up behind us, because bands from St Louis realised you can be successful from here, that’s possible. It’s the Midwest,

there’s not a lot going on, but we were just lucky.” However, as much as Page Avenue is undeniably St Louis – from the album title and cover art to the lyrical content within – it’s also

“The album has stood the test of time, and people still love it the way they did ten years ago,” the vocalist enthuses. “It was a time when the scene we were in, and kinda currently still are in, it was a time when it broke, and it was a big time for this heavy/screamo/ emo/hard music – whatever it’s classified as now. And it was special to a lot of people. Ten years listening to any album, you’re going to have a lot of memories attached – people are going to grow fond to it.” And that’s why anniversary shows are continually successful – the emotions surrounding them run a little deeper. Because you can come into contact with a song anytime during your day-to-day – at the shops, in a cab, watching TV – but when you listen to a full-length repeatedly, you stop hearing the music and begin living with it, getting intimate with the sonic intricacies, cover art and liner notes. Albums are bodies of work that soundtrack some of life’s great moments, but can also take care of you when things

“TEN YEARS LISTENING TO ANY ALBUM, YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE A LOT OF MEMORIES ATTACHED.” a record that offers a clear message of hope, something that stands unaffected by boundaries and borders. Marsala agrees, admitting that these Page Avenue shows – where the band run through the entire album as well as adding a best-of selection from their catalogue – have really driven home the level of passion people hold for the record, and the band as a whole. There’s a different

go pear-shaped, and they do this while also giving you an intimate insight into the heart and mind of another. It’s pretty much the ultimate form of art. With this considered, Marsala asks that fans be vocal when Story Of The Year arrive. Seek the band out and share your memories with them; he guarantees they’ll listen. “I love hearing people’s interpretations of our music or just something that happened at one of our shows,” Marsala says. “It’s super cool to hear how much crazy stuff [happened] and how much we’ve impacted other people’s lives over ten years. [There’s] a lot of great stuff we’ve been seeing: a lot of tattoos, lyric tattoos especially. [That’s] kinda weird though,” he laughs, “because it’s like, ‘Yeah, I wrote that in my bedroom and now it’s permanently written on your arm.’” WHEN & WHERE: 29 Jun, 170 Russell


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 19


film

KNOCK IT OFF Mitch Knox breaks down five knockoff films that just don’t give a damn.

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ost of the time, it feels like there isn’t an original thought on the planet left to be had. You’ve no doubt, in your lifetime, heard countless songs that use the same chord patterns, or similar melodies; you’ve seen shows like CSI and NCIS and SVU all blur into a single mega-adventure of attractive people talking about DNA; and like three million people post internet threads daily that start with the words, “Am I the only one who...” when the answer is clearly, every single time, “No, no you are not; now, kindly remove yourself from my sightline, you sheltered cockwit”, regardless of how that question ends.

CHOP KICK PANDA

But still, that doesn’t mean we should stop trying altogether, right? But if that is the case, no one seems to have told the people who made these movies. Or, more likely, someone did tell them, but as with everything else in their lives, they just didn’t give a shit. Chop Kick Panda The truly shameful Chop Kick Panda is one of a glut of Disney/Pixar/DreamWorks rip-offs that popped up – somewhat surprisingly – on everyone’s favourite, shadily accessed streaming movie service, Netflix, a couple of years ago. (Netflix merely distributed, not produced, the films.)

ATLANTIC RIM

Not content with merely hosting a hollow shill of the already hollow animated Jack Black vehicle Kung Fu Panda (and not just one, either), Netflix went full Balinese street market with their animated feature range for a while there, dropping a slew of films with blatantly plagiarised concepts that included What’s Up: Balloon To The Rescue!, The Little Cars (at least eight of them), The Frog Princess, Animals United (a Madagascar rip-off ), and Tappy Toes, because imagination, effort and originality are for chumps. Chop Kick Panda centres on Zibo (not Po), a janitor (not noodle-shop employee) in the panda and/or general anthropomorph kingdom. Not content with his mundane everyday life of mopping up monkey sweat and crane shit from the floor of his dojo, Zibo dreams of one day becoming a master of the martial arts (this part is exactly the same). Somehow, in a little more than 40 minutes, Zibo manages to achieve his dream of becoming a living weapon before facing off against the nefarious tiger (not snow leopard) who threatened his people’s way of life, or his dojo, or whatever. I’ll be honest – I didn’t get all the way through it. I have a feeling that he probably wins, though. Atlantic Rim Atlantic Rim is a very subtle homage to little-known machines-vs-monsters flick Pacific Rim that takes the themes of international focus, representation and co-operation championed by the latter film and starspangled skullfucks them into an American-as-guntoting-apple-pie cavalcade of massive things beating the living (or artificial) Christ out of each other in and around the general vicinity of the United States before the military ultimately wins and everyone retires to the bar for a round of victory tequila shots. I’m not kidding – that’s how this movie ends. Not with the protagonists experiencing quiet reflection on an escape raft after narrowly getting out with their lives. Just out, getting hammered, because it’s Tuesday. No big. 20 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

TRANSMORPHERS

Probably the most tragic thing about Atlantic Rim – a production of notorious ‘mockbuster’ sausage factory The Asylum – is that relatively renowned Hollywood screen vet Graham Greene ended up in it as the clearly out-ofshape admiral in charge of humanity’s last-ditch effort at survival. Keep in mind, this is the same man who was once nominated for an Academy Award for getting through making a very, very long film with Kevin Costner without committing murder-suicide.

Transmorphers Another Asylum masterpiece, 2007’s Transmorphers actually had the least ground to make up, quality-wise, between itself and the original, “superior” version. And yet, despite the low, low bar set for them by Bay and LeBeouf, The Asylum still decided to just turn in whatever happened to be left on the camera at the end of the day’s shooting. The linguists among you will notice, of course, that the word ‘Transmorphers’ makes zero sense, which should give you a fairly accurate indication of precisely how much effort went into every other aspect of this film. Quick English lesson: the prefix ‘trans-’ means ‘across’, ‘beyond’, or ‘changing thoroughly’; ‘Transformers’ cross or change forms. That makes sense, as much as a movie about warring, sentient alien robots throwing down on Earth can make sense. But Transmorphers – ‘changing changers’ – is total gibberish, and I kind of hate The Asylum for rolling with it when they could’ve gone with Multiformers or Roboshifters or Big Friendly Terminators. To continue reading, head to bit.ly/1oW8vI4.


NOISY AGAIN

music

Lloyd Cole is returning to Australia in solo mode, but his new album Standards finds him returning to the rock band dynamic of his youth. He warns Steve Bell to under no circumstances call his music ‘Americana’.

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K-bred singer-songwriter Lloyd Cole has been plying his trade for over three decades now – first fronting acclaimed outfit The Commotions and then in various solo guises – and in recent times had been treading quiet, predominantly acoustic ground, until new album Standards found him for all intents and purposes returning to his rock’n’roll roots. “The records that I’ve been making haven’t so much been acoustic – they’ve been quiet,” Lloyd muses. “Broken Record [2010] had a full band but the lead instruments on the top were predominantly acoustic, even though there were drums and bass. But I’ve presenting the tours primarily as solo acoustic performances. [Standards] sounds like a record made by a real band, even though it wasn’t really – it was Fred [Maher – drums], Matthew [Sweet – bass] and I in LA, and then the rest was overdubs done at home. “It’s possibly still a bit too soon to say where it stands in the scheme of things, but I’m happy with it. It’s certainly helped my so-called career in a few countries where it’s done more than the record’s I’ve released in the last few years – people have been generally very positive about it. I don’t want to be too cynical by suggesting that all I seem to need to do is add drums and an electric guitar for people to like it, but I’m pleased with it. I thought I’d stopped making this kind of music and I didn’t really think I’d make any more records like this for a while, and it’s quite nice to do that it’s possible and it makes me feel a little more optimistic about records that I might want to do in the future. I’m not really ruling any particular type of record out of the question anymore.” Positive response aside, Lloyd attests that it was refreshing making some noise again in the studio. “Yeah, it was great fun,” he continues. “I’d just about forgotten how to play electric guitar. What was bizarre really was that the last time the three of us would have played together was probably 20 years before, and as soon as we started playing it was exactly the same as it had been before and both of them just naturally came up with ideas that I liked and wouldn’t have thought of. It was lovely. “When I started working on songs for this record I imagined it would be probably 50 percent rock songs

with Fred and Matthew and 50 percent quiet stuff that I did on my own, but I guess I was looking forward to working with them and it inspired me to write more songs that fell into the rock’n’roll thing, or inspired me to arrange songs that might

write the press release – said, ‘A fantastic slice of Americana!’, and I was, like, ‘Oh, for heaven’s sake!’” Ever since the early days of his storied career Cole has taken inspiration from both sides of the Atlantic. “I was actually just making a list of my influences for a written interview, so let’s see – Bolan, Bowie, Buzzcocks, Magazine, Isaac Hayes, Dylan, Cohen, Kraftwerk, Kristofferson,” he reels off. “Roughly half are from North America and half from the UK. The genre of music that

“IT INSPIRED ME TO WRITE MORE SONGS THAT FELL INTO THE ROCK’N’ROLL THING.” have been recorded a different way that way. “On Broken Record I was happy with the record but I wasn’t happy with the amount of people who called it ‘Americana’ – I don’t particularly like the phrase Americana – so I just thought on this record that I wouldn’t have any pedal steel, no banjos and no pedal steel and then nobody can bloody call it Americana then! And sure enough the first person I showed it to after finishing the record – the guy the record company wanted to

I decided to try and work in – even though wide – is initially music derived from American folk music as compared to British folk music. British folk music makes me thing of groups like Fairport Convention and dancing around maypoles, and the harmonic content and feel of that music has never been attractive to me, whereas the Bob Dylan stuff which came from Woodie Guthrie which came from blues guys, that’s always held an attraction.” Which is unsurprising given that Cole’s been getting Dylan comparisons since The Commotions’ 1984 debut Rattlesnakes. “Somebody has to be the new Dylan every year and I was it for a couple of years,” he smiles. “It’s fine, it’s kind of an honour, I guess.” WHAT: Standards (Tapete/The Planet Company) WHEN & WHERE: 26 Jun, Caravan Music Club; 27 Jun, Thornbury Theatre; 28 Jun, Theatre Royal, Castlemaine; 29 Jun, Flying Saucer Club THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 21


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THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 23


music

BASTARD SQUAD Sydney seven-piece Little Bastard are on a mission to save traditional music from the hands of wastrels. Founding member Ross Tipper tells Steve Bell to thrash it out or not bother.

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or the last couple of years a pall has been cast over the land in regards to old-time instrumentation such as banjos, fiddles and mandolins, with a perception having been ushered in by bands like Mumford & Sons and The Lumineers that these are solely instruments of the devil and responsible for producing nothing but commercial dross. But something’s been brewing in the suburbs of Sydney’s Inner West to fight this unfair indictment, a concoction which throws together bluegrass instruments, the spirit of rock’n’roll and a healthy dose of raucous tomfoolery – the product being a sevenheaded beast known collectively as Little Bastard. Their reputation for ferocious and fun live shows has preceded them for years, but now they’ve added to their rapidly growing legend with the release of their eponymous debut long-player. What makes Little Bastard such a powerful opening gambit is substance rather than style – it matters not what genre these tunes belong in, because at the end of the day it’s just a collection of really well crafted songs. And, as is so often the case, it all started with completely humble aspirations. “Johnny [Took – vocals/guitar] – who’s the main singer-songwriter – and I, we’d been in different bands around Sydney,” explains Ross Tipper (vocals/ percussion/harmonica). “I remember us chatting in a pub in Newtown and saying that we really wanted to be in a band where we all want to tour... Soon Eddie [Rowe] – our fiddle player who went to school with Johnny – came onboard and we all started jamming, then it just seemed to happen and suddenly we had seven people, then almost eight and then almost ten: we ended up having to cull it at seven. Our mandolin player Trev [Davies] met our drummer Liam [Hoskins] for the first time on stage during a show – we were playing at The Annandale, then after a song it was, like, ‘Oh shit, hey man I’m Trev, nice to meet ya. Next song!’” As the band started to coalesce so too did a vision of how they wanted Little Bastard to stand apart from their contemporaries. “From the outset we were a little bit fed up with the way that country music is done in Australia,” Tipper continues. “It really seemed reserved 24 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

for an older generation, and we weren’t seeing any relatively young, energetic, passionate players doing country and bluegrass stuff. We really wanted to try it, and now so many people come to our shows and say, ‘I don’t really like country

Channel], adult contemporary country music label. We just wanted to keep it real. We’d rather play with just rock bands – anyone who’s doing something that’s energetic and just a bit more out there. A lot of bluegrass bands I’ve seen in the last few years – everywhere, not just in Sydney – it’s really technical and everyone’s just standing there looking at their shoes. They have great chops, but we really prefer playing with anyone who’s just going to thrash it out and have a good time, while keeping the musicianship intact obviously. Everyone should thrash it out a bit more and just party – it’s not a recital.”

“WE ALL GREW UP PLAYING IN ROCK BANDS, SO IT’S ULTIMATELY THIS KIND OF PUNK BLUEGRASS CRAZINESS.” music but you guys are alright’ kinda thing. And we’re, like, ‘Yeah, well you should probably try and suss out some more country music then!’ “We’re not really a bluegrass band at all though, because I think a traditional bluegrass band would probably laugh at us. We all grew up playing in rock bands too, so it’s ultimately this kind of punk-bluegrass craziness. We just wanted to play fun country bluegrass-punk and not be bogged down by any CMC [Country Music

And they’ve even reconfigured their lineup as they hit the road to introduce Little Bastard to the rest of the country. “This is the first tour where we’re going to have a drum kit and an electric guitar and stuff like that – we want to beef it up and make it more like it sounds on the record, rather than our usual touring line-up which is pretty much all acoustic with a cajon instead of a drum kit,” Tipper tells. “The live show needs to be rocking. I don’t think we ever want to get bogged down in doing one thing – I think it will be constantly changing and evolving.” WHAT: Little Bastard (ABC/Universal) WHEN & WHERE: 3 Jul, Karova Lounge, Ballarat; 4 Jul, Northcote Social Club; 5 Jul, Baha Tacos, Rye


HELP THE AGED After volunteering and working with the dying, Ben Lee tells Dylan Stewart that he “thought [he] was making a record that was essentially music to die to”, until the catchy choruses kept flooding in.

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or a global pop star, Ben Lee doesn’t feel the need to conform. After the success of his 2005 smash Catch My Disease, it would have been acceptable for Lee to churn out pop-by-numbers hits as so many have done before him. Instead, his career has crisscrossed the musical landscape via his latest two records, 2011’s concept album Deeper Into Dream and last year’s South American hallucinogen-inspired Ayahuasca: Welcome To The Work. Critically accepted yet commercially lukewarm, Lee’s 2014 effort will see him come full circle. “I thought I was about to make my most experimental album yet,” he says from his adopted home of Los

Angeles of his upcoming record, Love Is The Great Rebellion. “I’ve been volunteering as a hospice worker this year and working with the dying. I’ve been very interested in how music interacts with those states of consciousness and how it can support people in these different situations… So I actually thought I was making a record that was essentially music to die to. But lo and behold, these catchy choruses started coming out. It soon became clear that there was a voice coming through that was something a little more what my audience is used to.” While a release date is still to be

determined – “later in the year” is all he’ll let on – Lee is previewing the new record by playing a couple of intimate Australian club shows. Supported by The Voice alumni Danny Ross, he’s looking forward to getting up close and personal with his audiences: “[These shows] will be really stripped-back, but it’ll be nice to have some layers and some harmonies. I’ve always enjoyed the ability as a songwriter to pull it back to its simplest elements, which is harder to do if you’re a band or a song and dance. It’s one of virtues of folk music or singer-songwriter music – you can always bring it back to guitar and vocals.”

music

The setlist is a work in progress, but with a catchy new record in the pipeline surely there’ll be some Love Is The Great Rebellion songs mixed in with the hits? “I think you do have some freedom with smaller audiences. For people who like my music it felt like I was making a classic Ben Lee record, so I’m looking forward to playing some new songs. In saying that, if you come to my show, I don’t think it’s unfair of you to expect me to play Catch My Disease; I think that’s a pretty fair expectation as a consumer,” he laughs. “I can always promise that I’ll do my best. I will show up to play and connect with my audience. I’m always trying not to just go through the motions or be a robot and be mechanised in my approach. “I really want to get behind this record. I’m told that this music is accessible and it’s music that I think, if given a chance, a broader audience will like, so I’d really like to support it a bit.” WHEN & WHERE: 2 Jul, Howler; 5 Jul, Festival Of Voices, Federation Concert Hall, Hobart

BIRTH AND DEATH

music

The unthinkable has occurred – outspoken metalcore mainstay Michael Crafter has mellowed. Well, as much as the Confession main man can. Brendan Crabb jumps into the pit.

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t seems an unlikely prospect for an Australian heavy music persona who inspires bile-spitting (his Twitter profile proclaims “YOU ALREADY HATE ME”) and adoration in equal measure, but Confession vocalist Michael Crafter insists he’s matured somewhat. “A few years ago I was a fucking idiot. I talk some shit on it (new album, Life And Death); there’s songs where I call a few things out, and swear a bit. But I’m definitely heaps mellower than I used to be. “Before I had the baby, I had a totally different life. I was living in Melbourne in an apartment and eating out, just going out all the time. Now, I live in the suburbs in a house with my family, and I cook dinner… An exciting night for me is going to a show. So I guess I’m just a bit calmer, a bit more mellow and more settled down in life.” The joy of fatherhood in the ex-I Killed the Prom Queen vocalist’s life was counterpointed by a close friend’s death from cancer. Shortly after, both his parents were also diagnosed with cancer. He channelled said pent-up anger, sorrow and depression into Confession’s new disc, featuring the track Fuck Cancer. “It should have been the best times of my life, but at the same time I was dealing with some of the most horrible things I’ve ever had to deal with.” A further indicator of the growler’s changed mindset is his reaction to the A Wild Crafter Appeared Facebook page,

a collection of memes featuring home-rown heavy-hitters. “At first I was like, ‘Is this guy taking the piss out of me?’” he laughs. “I was like, ‘Holy shit, this guy’s made a fullon effort.’ My mum’s like ‘Me and your dad look at it all the time, we have a laugh and think about how funny it is.’ That’s great. At least it’s bringing a smile to their faces. It definitely brings a smile to a lot of people’s faces… If it’s gonna bring a smile to someone’s face, that’s good I reckon. It’s got a lot of popularity, that’s for sure. It might be helping out me more than anything.” Crafter hopes fans embrace Confession’s California-recorded third full-length,

featuring appearances by friends from The Amity Affliction, Northlane and Misery Signals. “I’m getting older; I don’t know how many more CDs I’m going to sing on, if any. So I feel like I put everything on the table with this one, everything from the darkest and best points of my life. I feel like this is the best songs I ever got to sing on and lyrics I got to put down… I feel like I’ve had a good run, and who knows, maybe this will be the last CD I ever do. Or maybe people might still like Confession enough for us to do another CD in the future. You just never know when you’re about to turn 33. Who knows what the future could bring?” WHAT: Life And Death (Resist) WHEN & WHERE: 27 Jun, The Workers Club; 28 Jun, Arrow On Swanston THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 25


film

ALMOST FAMOUS After meeting Michael White at Cannes Film Festival, director Gracie Otto had the idea for her first feature-length film: The Last Impresario. She talks to Hannah Story.

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bviously he probably let me start making the film because I was young and blonde,” 27-year-old director/actress Gracie Otto admits to The Music. She’s talking about her debut feature film, The Last Impresario, which premieres in Australia at the Sydney Film Festival this week. The film charts the life of acclaimed Scottish film producer Michael White, whose list of credits needs to be read to be believed – from the original British stage production of The Rocky Horror Show to Monty Python And The Holy Grail to Yoko Ono’s first London exhibition. By speaking to White and to his son, lovers,

LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND KATE MOSS. PIC: MICHAEL WHITE

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friends and admirers, people from Ono to John Cleese to Anna Wintour, The Last Impresario paints a picture of a man described as an “impresario”, a “playboy”, a “gambler”, and “the most famous person you’ve never heard of ”. Otto met White in Cannes in 2010: “He was kind of this enigma because he had all these exchanges with people and he’d keep on taking me out all night until five in the morning to these parties, but also he looked, like, 80 years old.” Otto says she saw him as a “high roller” and had no idea about his rich professional and personal history. Then after discovering

that White was selling his huge collection of personal effects and memorabilia at Sotheby’s, Otto knew there was a story here. To make the film she travelled between Europe, America and Australia to interview White and his friends, initially as a one-woman crew. Then she gathered archival footage and was given access to White’s personal collection including hundreds of candid photographs of White with his famous friends, as taken by White himself. Last July Otto showed White an unfinished cut of the film. “I wanted to make sure that he liked the film. Even though there’s good things in it and bad things, at the end of the day I would hate to have made a film that he hated or didn’t want anything to do with after all this time. It was always intended to be a positive film about him, not ripping him to shreds… All he really cared about was that he didn’t want a shot of him with walking sticks, because he was saying to me on the phone, ‘I feel pathetic with these walking sticks’… They’re still in there because I said to him, ‘You’ve got walking sticks, they have to stay, you can’t cut them out.’” Beyond the thrill of finding herself face to face with the likes of Jack Nicholson, who declined to be interviewed, and Kate Moss, Otto says she learned a lot from the film, and from White as a person. “I think I learnt a lot from Michael mainly and his story because he’s such an inspiration. All the health challenges and everything, y’know, he was really on his last legs. A couple of months ago I was in the hospital with him in LA, he got sick again, and now he’s in a wheelchair, and he still bounced back. He still doesn’t give up on life.” WHAT: The Last Impresario In cinemas 26 Jun

DARE TO DREAM BIG

The vision for Phantogram was always ambitious, as Sarah Barthel admits to Anthony Carew.

“F

rom the beginning of Phantogram, our goal was always to be the biggest band in the world,” says Sarah Barthel. And Phantogram – the band Barthel splits with Josh Carter – certainly have enough pop chops for a bona fide crossover, their second LP, this year’s Voices, debuting in the US charts at #11. But they come from indie music roots; their first record, 2009’s Eyelid Moves, came out on Barsuk, and was big on shoegaze sonics, leading the band to open for acts like The Antlers, Beach House and School Of Seven Bells. Given indie music’s tendency towards selfeffacement, hearing Barthel confess Coldplay-esque ambition borders on shocking. How does this band, born in a barn in upstate New York, dare to do so? “I don’t know, to be honest,” Barthel considers. “It probably says something about how we are as people. We just really believed in our ideas, and our sound. I guess when you have that kind of self-belief, when it’s really unshakeable you can set high goals and allow yourself to dream big.” It marks an interesting contrast to how Barthel grew up. She “always liked singing”, but never considered it an artistic outlet let alone a possible career. It was only in 2007, when her childhood best friend, Carter, invited her to work with him in the studio following their graduation from college, that the 31-year-old even considered making music.

26 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

“I was a visual artist, so I’d never thought of ‘sound’ as a way of expressing myself, and no idea I had that side of me. At the start, Josh had such clear ideas about what he wanted to do, and the skills to be able to do it. He really invited me into this world and asked me to be a part of it. I was fascinated by his songs and his production, and he taught me how to produce and record my own ideas.” Their goals, in the beginning, weren’t just to be the biggest band in the world, but to make “new, fresh-sounding music”. This meant no homages to old albums, and no attempts to latch onto current trends, be they in pop or on blogs. “We looked

to bands like Outkast and The Flaming Lips,” Barthel says, “not for how they sounded, but how they were able to create their own world.” Initially calling themselves Charlie Everywhere, they settled on a far better name and started playing around New York, obsessing about making flyers and posters (“we always had a visual aesthetic that was just as important as the music”). Since then, they’ve found themselves playing to escalating audiences – from “five to 50 to 500 to 5000 people” – moving, in their own way, closer to their earliest ambition. “As artists and musicians, you need to have some sort of motivation to keep going,” Barthel admits. “At the beginning, before anyone had ever heard our music, that’s how we knew we wanted to do this. We weren’t half-arseing it, this wasn’t a hobby. We really wanted to be the biggest band in the world.” WHAT: Voices (Universal) WHEN & WHERE: 25 Jul, The Prince; 27 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 27


music

LOCALISED LOOP

Tom Vek doesn’t sample, but when he does he samples himself. Sort of. Benny Doyle is up at night to get (the inside story on) Luck(y).

A

lthough he’d prefer to “do a Beyoncé” and just drop his completed albums out of the blue, Tom Vek (Thomas Vernon-Kell if we’re getting formal) knows he has to play the promotional game to “educate new fans”, which is why he’s talking The Music through his third record Luck at the musicianpunishing time of 9am. However, after chatting to the 33-year-old Londoner for a bit you realise that even if he despised the process he’d probably be too polite to complain, such is his charming nature and dry wit.

There’s plenty worthwhile to talk about though, with Luck seeing the eclectic solo creator at his most abrasive and elegant, Vek bonding those vibes through invention and reinvention. “Cool noises” is what he’s interested in finding – exploring the evolution of a rock song. His stream-ofconsciousness approach to lyrics, meanwhile, has once again given his songs ambiguity, though he’s closer to a pure harmony than ever. Luck is garage music, but it’s made in the future, by one man who treats his songs like a puzzle, placing and removing elements until he completes the track humming in his mind.

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“Those two words that you used before, abrasive and elegant, are perfect in terms of the attitude I wanted to get – these opposites that you want to live together,” Vek comments. “The greatest minimal music is just so full and has so much in the space between the notes. But a lot of the time, putting stuff on and taking stuff off; it’s a lot of experimentation, a lot of noise, and then you just pull one thing out in all the mess that happens to crystallise into something interesting on its own accord. “It’s become a thing that I’m quite proud of, that there’s no sampling – I play everything – but I still have been influenced [by sampling],” he continues. “Most of my favourite music growing up was samplebased, but because I wasn’t a record collector and I didn’t have the decks, there wasn’t immediate opportunities for me to try and sample from a record. But it inspired me – I learned the drums playing along to DJ Shadow, breaks, stuff like that. Also, recording myself, I do feel like I’m sampling [me]. “There’s this one side of my character that’s just recording loads and loads of nonsense, and then there’s this other person that just walks in and goes, ‘I’ll just have that, I just want that bit,’” Vek adds. “And there’s always that hope that I can just get away with it – like there are examples on the album where there’s just one motif, one loop, but it’s trying to get a whole song together around that one thing. “It’s like writing a great rock riff – you can listen to that for four minutes – and I think that culture is there in hip hop as well. I’m just trying to incorporate those great bits, I suppose.” WHAT: Luck (Moshi Moshi/[PIAS] Australia)

FACING OFF

Screenwriter Hossein Amini talks to Anthony Carew about finally crossing into being a filmmaker.

“O

nce you’re a screenwriter, it can be a struggle to convince people to take you seriously. They assume that you must’ve ended up writing because you’re not particularly visual,” laments Iranian-born Hossein Amini, who grew up in England and longed to be a filmmaker. It took 20 years of screenwriting – with work ranging from Michael Winterbottom’s Jude to Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive – before Amini would finally make his directorial debut with an adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s touristsin-Greece crime-thriller The Two Faces Of January, which he first read 25 years ago. “I thought as a film student it’d be easy to get it made, that it’d make a good first film, because it’s really an intimate story of three people. But it wasn’t. And I kept on, over the years, trying – and failing – to get it made.” Wait, he thought making a period movie on location in a foreign country was going to be easy? “I was very naive,” Amini laughs. “Even on the eve of production, I don’t think I really knew just how hard it was, even in places like Crete, to find shots that don’t reveal the 21st century.” Amini decided to film freely, taking out offending anachronisms by CGI, an approach at odds with his desire for visual classicism, which came from studying Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Sheltering Sky and “every ‘60s European movie he could find” to get the right visual – and period – tone. “I felt if I used a non-classical shooting style, it could snap the audience out of that 28 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

time period. There was a Michael Mann film, Public Enemies, where you were really aware that this was a film shot in the 2000s, and you didn’t get to sink into that time period. I wanted to make sure that [my film] never looked too modern, or got too tricksy, which is an easy trap to fall into as a first-time director, eager to show everyone what you can do.” The Two Faces Of January comes with stars. Both Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst encountered the script independently and approached Amini. “Those were two really pleasant calls to receive,” Amini admits. The director yearned to cast Oscar Isaac as the third wheel after seeing him on

KIRSTEN DUNST AS COLETTE MACFARLAND & VIGGO MORTENSEN AS CHESTER MACFARLAND IN THE TWO FACES OF JANUARY

Drive, and at first had to fight for the idea, “but as soon as the Coens cast him in Inside Llewyn Davis, the producers were biting my head off to cast him as soon as possible.” Adapting someone previously brought to screen by Hitchcock, René Clément and Anthony Minghella made Amini feel as if he was “part of a tradition” of Highsmith films. “Even though they’re ostensibly crime novels, Highsmith’s hero was Dostoyevsky and she saw the thriller as just a form to use to explore human psychology. That’s what’s fascinating to me about [The Two Faces Of January]: these aren’t psychopaths; these are very ordinary people that’ve accidentally fallen into an extraordinary situation, this vortex of crime, jealousy, competitiveness. In normal circumstances, they could’ve got along famously. But, it’s Greece, it’s tragedy, it’s a thriller; and they fall into this world where, instead, they only do damage to each other.”

WHAT: The Two Faces Of January In cinemas 19 Jun


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music

ROAD TO GLORY

Busking siblings Pierce Brothers have found success by bringing their street spontaneity to the stage. Pat Pierce talks to Benny Doyle about “stupid twin things”.

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police siren whirs in the background but Pat Pierce assures The Music there’s nothing to worry about: “It’s definitely not for us, it’s for someone else – we’ve got a permit.” Pierce Brothers – Pat and his identical twin brother Jack – have just clocked off after another successful day busking on Bourke Street, though if things keep going the way they are they might not need the ‘day job’ anymore. By the time you read this the pair will have probably sold out a fifth and final night at Shebeen Bandroom, an incredible feat for an independent act that’s received

minimal radio airplay. “It’s blowing our minds,” Pat gushes. “Hopefully if it takes off completely I can just spend my time surfing and writing music – I’d love to just do that.” As well as offering the perfect platform to roadtest tracks from their latest EP The Night Tree, busking has also filled the boys with the kind of captivating charisma that can win a room over in an instant. Pat agrees that it’s helped the brothers engage the crowd better during their own club shows. “When you’re a street performer you just do everything you can to keep people’s interest, and that translates directly to our live show – [ Jack]

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will end up in the rafters!” Pat laughs. “The other day he jumped up and was hanging off the lighting poles on the roof, and the crowd was going mental, then I went under him and he dropped onto my shoulders and started hitting the roof. It’s stupid twin things.” That stupid twin thing though – that intrinsic connection – is something that brings so much both musically and personally. But even Pat admits it’s hard to define. “On stage we know where the other one is going – we’ll start jamming something out and we don’t even need to practice it, we’ll just go with it. Playing every single day for four-to-five hours helps too. “It just gets easier and easier to make something up and have it not fuck up on us,” says Pat. “We can do something on the fly, but actually pull it off.” Before they fell in love with folk and roots music, heavy rock was their poison, an influence of their older brothers. “Metallica was our first concert we went to, and we’re folk musicians!” Pat exclaims. “But the first song we ever learnt to play – Come As You Are by Nirvana – we couldn’t even hold an acoustic guitar, we had to put it on our lap. It was the early-to-mid ‘90s, so it was just that classic grunge stuff that got us started.” Once they entered high school, however, Pat and Jack discovered John Butler. Things haven’t been the same since. “We started doing shows when we were 15, just as an acoustic duo. But we were never really good at adding other people into the band, so one thing led to another and it’s just evolved – this is where it naturally went.” WHAT: The Night Tree (Independent/Gaga Digi) WHEN & WHERE: 26, 27 & 29 Jun, 1 & 2 Jul, Shebeen Bandroom

MARVELLOUS MEDICINE Ahead of a national tour for their new album, Usurper Of Modern Medicine’s Steven Hughes and Cameron George sit down with Kane Sutton to chat about crazy times in Japan and creating an LP.

“I

’ve got this album coming out and I said to myself, when it’s time to come out I’m gonna make room for it so we can actually do all the shit we need to do, and of course, when you want to make that time, the universe comes at you like, ‘Hey, here’s all this amazing shit,’” Hughes begins as he takes a gulp of beer. Their first full-length album, Omniliberation, was released last week after the trio produced an EP in 2011 and another in 2012. “It was the first time I’ve ever done a full-length, and for some reason, it felt almost intimidating because of how much care was taken for it, and that’s why it took two years. Creating an EP is like a little dip into what an artist is trying to capture sound-wise and style-wise, so we were very conscious about doing something full-length, and we did want to take our time with it. Previous projects I’ve played in, we’ve really rushed putting together an album because it’s such a heavy process sometimes and you’re stuck in that mixing stage, and you’re conflicted about how things sound when you listen to it over and over. It’s good to be a perfectionist, but you have to be careful. You’d think of new things halfway through which would change your perspective on what you’ve already done.” Both guys Hughes and George have been to Japan with the band and for their own enjoyment; however, Hughes

30 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

was not expecting to end up on a Japanese game show. “Being featured on a bizarre Japanese TV show has to be one of the best achievements of my life.” Hughes laughs. “It’s the thing dreams are made of. You’d think as a white guy living in Australia that you’d be the last person featured on a show like that. I didn’t know any of the jokes being made but they were definitely laughing at me.” The new album steps back slightly from the instrumental and experimental side of things and shifts its focus towards vocal compositions and a more concentrated

sound. While the sound may be a little different to their EPs, Hughes and George insist their live shows will be as intense as ever. “The live version is definitely a lot more ball-tearingly wild,” George explains, “and that’s how a live performance should be. I hate going to gigs of bands I love and it sounds like the record. Nothing saps my excitement more than that. I want to see unhinged. I’d prefer to see a shit performance than that. Nothing’s better than when a band has a technical issue on stage and has to deal with it, and you go, ‘Alright, show me what you got.’ I’m just keen to see how people react to this album. I want people to listen to it. There’s been a lot of heart and soul poured into this record and I’m really fucking proud of it.” WHAT: Omniliberation (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 27 Jun, Catfish; 30 Jun, Northcote Social Club


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 31


ALBUM OF THE WEEK

★★★★

album reviews

EVERY TIME I DIE

5 SECONDS OF SUMMER

Epitaph/Warner

Capitol/EMI

Few bands are more consistently ferocious than Every Time I Die. With each new record you go in kind of expecting the grip around your neck to loosen a little – you think they’ll mellow out. But then you hit the play button and shake your head in disbelief because those stone-cold motherfuckers continue to outdo themselves.

5 Seconds Of Summer have been running on exceptional luck for a while now: discovered by One Direction’s Louis Tomlinson via YouTube, going from the backyards of western Sydney to opening arena shows for a pop juggernaut, they’ve notched up their fair share of iTunes #1 spots based entirely off pre-orders. Fans will be the first to exclaim that their debut has been a long time coming by pop standards.

From Parts Unknown

From Parts Unknown is like a bolt of lightning hitting the fuse of a rocket up your arse. There is only one period of solace – if you can call it that – Moor, but even that gets ugly after a disjointed piano/vocal introduction. For the rest of the time you are getting brutalised, with every element of the band’s sound beating down on you until you completely surrender. It’s fucking fantastic. As always, Keith Buckley acts as king agitator out front, spitting intellectual venom with the driest of wits, while the twin guitar

5 Seconds Of Summer

attack of Jordan Buckley and bearded hulk Andy Williams manages to operate at the ridiculous warp speed set by drummer Ryan Leger. Converge’s Kurt Ballou does an incredible job finding production balance within detonating tracks like The Great Secret and If There’s Room To Move, while The Gaslight Anthem’s Brian Fallon nails his vocal contribution on Old Light. Continuing to pick up steam right until the final jagged notes of Idiot, From Parts Unknown kicks like a mule from front to back, leaving you dazed by the end of it all, in need of a cigarette and a good lie down. Benny Doyle

What we have here is earnest, by-the-numbers pop-punk music; songs for windmilling across stage with swinging guitars around their necks, to sing to girls with ‘heart’ eyes in the front rows of shows; songs that’ll eventually be played in stadiums with voices echoing all the nagging, catchy choruses. The double-hit opener of She Looks So Perfect and Don’t Stop sets the tone for the record’s entirety: a fun, gallivanting affair of jagged

ENO • HYDE

SPANISH GOLD

Warp/Inertia

Dine Alone/Cooking Vinyl

Just a few weeks after the release of previous album Someday World, the particularly fecund collaboration of uber producer Brian Eno and Underworld’s Karl Hyde has yielded yet another album’s worth of tunes. However, High Life stands apart from their previous work in that it isn’t merely a collection of tracks that didn’t quite make Someday World.

Ever wonder what would happen if you combined the talents of the guitarists from City & Colour and Brownout with My Morning Jacket’s drummer and The Black Keys’ producer? Spanish Gold is your answer, and their debut record South Of Nowhere is a funky, soulful compilation.

High Life

The duo have previously flirted with Afrobeat but had inserted it into a fractured and awkward fusion of pop, polyrhythms and minimalist repetition. This time around Eno and Hyde have opted for less of a sound clash, turning out a more straightforward whiteboy Afrobeat funky sound awash with a distinctly English experimental sensibility. For instance, the album’s opener pits a funky rhythm guitar against dreary depressive lyrics. It’s a bittersweet start that blindsides us to the joy of DBF and 32 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

★★½ guitar riffs, claps, nasal harmonies and a whole lot of heart. The theme is girls; strong girls who are in charge of their actions (Good Girls), girls they miss (Beside You), girls they’re definitely a little infatuated with (Kiss Me Kiss Me). Unsurprisingly, their downfall is a drastic lack of variety. There’s not much to the pop-punk formula, and 5SOS aren’t reinventing it. English Love Affair’s choppy riffs are a rare moment of difference, but they could spend more time exploring the broader scope of the genre they’re emulating. They could stand to drop the American accents too. Sevana Ohandjanian

South Of Nowhere

★★★½ Moulded Life, which showcase these dudes at their Fela Kuti and James Brown funkiest. These tunes see the duo shifting away from highly textured synthetic soundscapes for what sounds like a more stripped, almost back band-based approach. The six tracks, clocking in at anywhere between four and nine minutes, have a much looser, improvised feel than their first album. Drifting back into more familiar territory, Cells & Bells finds them working with synths to create a glimmering ambience into which vocodered voices drop lyrics about growth, regeneration and new beginnings. A rewarding listen from a couple of old hands who know how to play this game. Guido Farnell

Inspired by Laredo, the Texas border town where guitarists Dante Schwebel and Adrian Quesada grew up, the album is embedded with electric riffs and heavy bass lines – an apt homage to the frenetic spirit of a dangerous city marred by drug-cartel, gangland warfare. Opener One Track Mind sounds like a Black Keys spin-off, but considering two of Spanish Gold’s members (Patrick Hallahan and Dante Schwebel) supported The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach on his solo tour, it’s no surprise. The title track follows: a gripping tale

★★★★ of a desperate man, bolstered by a tension-building beat. Middle track Day Drinkin sports a befitting name for a melodic number that should be listened to poolside, with a margarita in hand. And lead single Out On The Street manages to relate the dangers of living on the US/ Mexican border in the form of a very danceable tune. On its first spin you’ll notice that South Of Nowhere has an easy and genuine groove to it. Second time around you might take in more of the dark, lyrical storytelling. And by the third you’ll be wishing you could splice a few other bands together to form a sound as smooth as Spanish Gold’s. Ash Goldberg


singles/ep reviews

★★

★★★★

ACROSS THE SWARM

AKOUO

We Are Strangers

Independent

Die High Records

Independent

Across The Swarm is cooked so far ‘to taste’ that it’s poisonous. Brutally indiscernible and pushing its ‘extremity’ on you, this brand of death metal will induce déjà vu. Wrapped up in a menacing tone, this Italian outfit deliver your standard amalgamation of speedy, spluttering drum patterns, thrashed power chords and a pig squeal-rusty screamo vocal. There’s the occasional interesting intrusion of techno beats, or funky drum solo, but these are few and far between. This EP will satisfy those with a penchant for abrasive murk, but otherwise it sits firmly on the niche pile.

Akouo, the moniker of Tasmanian local Ryan Farrington, delivers a rhythmic electronic release that proves both chilled-out and gripping. There’s a lot of cohesion between these tracks. From opener Last Time we’re treated to a heady dose of glitchy, stuttered, hip hop beats that are littered with buoyant shimmers and popping chimes. Farrington’s echoing vocals never dominate, but blend an introspective dimension into these nuanced dance tracks. Coloured with the balance of high, watery tones and low synths, this collection lets us down gently with clacking closer Seas Roll On: the perfect, slow-mo comedown.

ALI E

Scenes of desolate and existential Australian everyday life underline Ali E’s gripping grunge-pop/post-punk dirge; shards of helplessness and false happiness cutting through rough and crunchy guitars. Hurts so good.

SEETHER

Suffer It All Concord Music Group The staccato, grungy hardcore verses seem at odds with the melodic, glam-rock chorus. There’s a forced anger that morphs into sugarcoated ‘grit’: grunts with sing-song BVs. Bizarre.

Across The Swarm

Stephanie Tell

DARCY BAYLIS

Mesa

Stephanie Tell

Mother& Father

Sad, Horny And Blue Independent Sad? Yep. Horny and blue? There may be a reason for that. This is ‘class clown at a high school talent show’ material. Joke band: emphasis on the ‘joke’. Guess everybody needs something.

JESSIE WARE Tough Love

Island/Universal Jessie Ware’s gorgeous high notes are wrapped in a blanket of soft synth riffs and percussion like a faint pulse. Gentle and understated, with Ware’s velvety vocals the focal point. Stephanie Liew

Downtime This minimalist two-track release revels in contemporary electronica fashion. Darcy Baylis relies heavily on the soft disco beats purveyed by ultra-current local artists such as Oscar Key Sung, however Baylis adopts a somewhat poppier approach. The first track reveals a keen vulnerability in his delicate R&B-style vox, which glide over a restrained pounding. His affinity for a soulful rhythm comes to the fore, complemented by the chirpy melody of an augmented flute. Gentler followup Ecstasy is a more repetitive beast, though Baylis’ sweet vocals are still undeniably charming. He plays Boney on 27 Jun.

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/album

Universal

PORKCHOP PARTY

How Can I Live?/ Ecstasy

Stephanie Tell

BROODS

Lyrically filled with hesitation, uncertainty and anxiety, but there’s no second guessing in the click-stomp beat, bouncing synths and Georgia Nott’s pondering vocals.

★★★

★★★½

★★½

LAURA PALMER

THE D.Y.E

Independent/Deep Red Records

Obese

Laura Palmer

Sorry For The Stickers

While this EP may not possess the subtle intrigue that David Lynch fans might expect, enthusiasts of scrappy punk rock will find a lot to love in these sharp, chordy tracks. Despite frontman Niam Hegarty’s purposefully sloppy singing, he manages to carry a decent vocal line and grubby screech when required. Hints of laziness come to the fore in the execution of closer Notes From The Underground, which really plays up Laura Palmer’s grimy, garage aesthetic. But relinquishing this band to the pub-rock category doesn’t do their snappy melodies justice. They play 303 on 11 Jul.

Spun with an ultra-positive outlook, this retro-styled release comprises slow, onepaced rapping and sluggish scratching. No Matter The Weather sets the sunny, Aussie hip hop mood in which a whistling flute proves an obvious Hilltop Hoods wannabe move. In addition, nostalgic number Rewind The Clock captures the essence of elevator music with its loungey vibe and chipper horns. This Melbourne outfit haven’t evolved with the times to more intricate genre tastes, rendering their line, “’90s were the peak of beats and hip hop,” both self-consciously ironic and unfortunate. They play The Espy on 20 Jul.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Milky Chance – Sadnecessary Davidson Brothers – Wanderlust The Knife – Shaken Up Versions Nightmares On Wax – N.O.W. Is The Time Various/Deetron – Fabric 76 G-Eazy – These Things Happen Vacationer – Relief Rescuer – Anxiety Answering Mumbai Science – Déjà vu Plastikman – EX

THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 33


live reviews

THE BRONX, HIGH TENSION, FREAK WAVE 170 Russell 17 Jun Believing we’re arriving in time for the always excellent High Tension, cue confusion when a pack of dudes hit the stage. Our answer appears on 170’s wall, where set times have been printed out for display: Freak Wave are up first. Self-described (on their Facey) as a “semi professional stunt band”, they’re not good enough yet for it to not be annoying that they’re so loud it’s impossible to chat. High Tension, on the other hand – where to start? Obviously with their captivating frontdemon Karina Utomo who looks like

The Bronx are not here to fuck spiders. Brad Magers’ chugging bass drives False Alarm and the band’s overall sound is brutal. Caughthran definitely does a reccie before each gig to work out the potential for crowd interaction and just how many climbing areas there are in each venue. The nuggety, Angry Andersontype refers to Melbourne as “the thinking man’s capital of Australia” in comparison to Brisvegas (where The Bronx kicked off this tour). He also dedicates a song to “all the dicks in the house”, as opposed to women who he admits usually get this honour. How can you not cheer on a bunch of dudes who are so obviously in awe of each other’s abilities and clearly don’t take what they do for a crust for granted? “I need this as much as y’all fuckin’ do,” insists Caughthran

HIGH TENSION @ 170 RUSSELL. PIC: JAY HYNES

an angel, but sings like the devil inhabits her vocal cords (plus, her hair’s so long at the moment that she conjures flashbacks of Sadako, the welldwelling spirit from The Ring). Guitarist Ash Pegram, from Utomo’s previous band Young & Restless, and The Nation Blue’s bassist Matt Weston and drummer Dan McKay round out High Tension’s line-up and lock into rhythms that wrench all eyes and ears stageward. Utomo constantly spits on the stage and screeches, “JOIN THE PARTY!” in a way that makes it sound like a terrifying prospect. The Bronx frontman Matt Caughthran watches with interest from sidestage, nodding vigorously to the beat. High Tension are international-ready, and in Utomo we have our very own Karen O, but on the heavier side of the spectrum. 34 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

from his Coles bottled water, he confesses, “This is the first time I’ve ever brought water onto the stage – the rider has already run out.” A gentleman at the bar kindly comes to the party, buying Snarski a gin and tonic. No need to apologise for his performance: Snarski’s marvellously melancholic and mournful voice brings the right amount of menace and melodrama to a compelling set. “I wrote this song for Elvis,” he explains, introducing a song about willow trees. “Only problem was he died 15 years before I wrote it.” Here’s hoping Snarski spends more time in Melbourne. Tonight is also a Melbourne return for Perry Keyes, “the Sydney Springsteen”, who hasn’t paid us a visit since 2010. This is only his second gig in 18 months. “I’m dipping my big toe back

THE BRONX @ 170 RUSSELL. PIC: JAY HYNES

as he jumps into the thick of the circle pit clutching his mic. It’s pretty cool watching Caughthran perform note-perfect while crowdsurfing and warding off the hands of punters who attempt to grab his nads. After Caughthran power-crowdsurfs from mixing desk to the stage in record time, in comes the blistering Ribcage, which boasts a notably more melodic chorus vocal. The Bronx definitely achieve what they set out to tonight, and this Tuesday night gig surpasses the energy of a Friday night blowout.

21 Jun Support act Mark Snarski apologises to the crowd. Sipping

Perched atop a stool, wearing a blue baseball cap, Keyes

PERRY KEYES, MARK SNARSKI Flying Saucer Club

Perry Keyes might not be a household name, but every visit to the bar brings another encounter with a fine Australian songwriter. There’s Missy Higgins! There’s Steve Hoy! There’s Greg Macainsh! They know how great Keyes is. This week we farewelled the legendary Jim Keays and we welcome Perry Keyes back to Melbourne. A legend in the making. Jeff Jenkins

PAINTERS & DOCKERS @ RECLINK COMMUNITY CUP. PIC: JAY HYNES

into the cesspool of showbiz,” he smiles before introducing a new song called Raymond John Denning. Whereas Snarski’s set has a sense of theatre, Keyes’ songs are rooted in real-life Redfern. Melburnians might not be familiar with his locales and characters, but they can relate to his dark tales, where “growing up can make you sad” and “falling backwards is easy”. There are not many happy endings in Keyes’ songs. “Here’s another song about bad parenting,” he notes wryly, launching into 1982 from his most recent album, Johnny Ray’s Downtown. He dedicates Will You Shine? to his own mum, explaining, “I think every songwriter should write at least one song for his mother. If you have ten or 11, then that might be a problem.”

Bryget Chrisfield

previews tracks from his forthcoming album, Sunnyholt. The songs are epic but intimate, beautifully brought to life by a stellar band, featuring a group of multi-instrumentalists, including bass player and producer Grant Shanahan and drummer Lloyd G, who also provide some sweet, soulful backing vocals.

RECLINK COMMUNITY CUP Elsternwick Park 22 Jun A happy, scarf-toting crowd ambles into sunny Elsternwick Park as the sound of Lou Reed sneering about life in New York pours from the PA. After the kid-tastic entertainment of Elmo & Friends, first act of the day Fraser A Gorman draws a curious audience into the shadow of the stage. Gorman’s breezy windows-down-volumeup style of country-rock belies his smart lyrics and rich voice, qualities that elevate “animal country jam” Shiny Gun and the outdoorsy Dark Eyes. A sterling piano-driven cover of the day’s theme song Perfect Day tinkles


live reviews and booms before Gorman’s recent single Book Of Love. The Smith Street Band’s ruckus bursts across the oval like a splintering hangover, their ferocious dry guitars and muscular energy a wake-up call to latecomers. Singer Wil Wagner, a man not afraid of swearing loudly in front of awestruck, earmuffed toddlers, drives the gutsy furious set and yanks up energy levels as kickoff approaches. At half-time Saskwatch, who boast nearly a football side’s worth of members, blast their addictive brand of brassy funk. New single A Love Divine and recent release Born To Break Your Heart are both excellent examples of pop-soul. Their cover of Gorillaz (ft Lou Reed)’s Some Kind Of Nature is a deft

New World Order. Saskwatch join them for You Know You’re Soaking In It, which is dedicated to ex-manager Lobby Loyde and “the Australian who donated [Stewart] their liver”. Kill Kill Kill sees the Rockdogs cheerleaders join and immediately make every gig not featuring cheerleaders seem lame. With most songs dedicated to a deceased friend and a burst of The Angels’ Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again, it’s a poignant, arse-kicking, life-affirming set. Exciting Burundi rappers FLYBZ step up for Painters & Dockers’ Let’s Give It A Go and win many new fans. Nude School is dedicated to Christopher Pyne. The typically excellent Reclink Community Cup music programming emerges victorious yet again. Andy Hazel

MICHAEL CINI (ROCKDOGS CAPTAIN) & TEX PERKINS @ RECLINK COMMUNITY CUP. PIC: LUCINDA GOODWIN

tribute and slots nicely into a set that sounds as if Amy Winehouse made a comeback record. “Enough of that,” says MC Jonnie von Goes, dragging attention away from the recently completed footy game (which the Rockdogs won by nine points). “There were young people for Elmo, slightly older people for Fraser A Gorman and The Smith Street Band, slightly older people for Saskwatch and now we’ve got really old people for this one! A bushfire couldn’t kill them. An atrophied liver couldn’t kill Paul [Stewart]. They’re indestructible! They are Painters & Dockers! Who the fuck are you!?” Stewart plays the belligerent court jester in shorts and buttoned suspenders, slapping his arse and poking out his tongue. “Ha! We’re still alive, believe it or not,” he says before introducing a searing, explosive take on 1991’s

that doesn’t evoke the glares of curmudgeonly do-gooders and, if you’re reading this, you probably missed it. Boo. A somewhat tatty looking DJ Lance Rock (the poor bastard’s doing three of these shows a day) dances out on stage and introduces his gang of besuited misfits. It takes a couple of songs to realise you’re not gonna get through the thing without buying your kid a glowstick, so a quick trip to the merch stand is required to quell the tears – at least for a while. Adalita (!) makes a brief appearance to belt out a less sweary version of her fabulous Blue Sky, and the bloody creatures (and robot) don’t even do her the courtesy of a backing dance. She’s amazing (as usual) and brings it for the oldies.

YO GABBA GABBA! (ADALITA) @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

YO GABBA GABBA!

Palais Theatre 21 Jun If the names Muno, Foofa, Brobee, Toodee and Plex mean nothing to you, chances are you’re either: a) some lucky childless bastard living out an extended adolescent fantasy; or b) a bad parent. Truth is, Yo Gabba Gabba! is as much about you, the parents (the non-parents gave up reading 28 words ago) as it is about little Johnny and Lucy. Finally there’s a kids show that sets clever lyrics to wicked beats, and they kindheartedly brought it (along with a fuckload of merch) back to Australia. Here’s a chance to get to a daytime gig

Beyond the mad beats, it’s the sentiments that Lance Rock and the freaks share with the kiddies that set this show apart from all the other children’s crap that’s out there. These guys tell kids the truth and there’s not a whole lot of condescension or gobbledegook. Lance Rock makes statements like “Listening and dancing to music is awesome,” and this resonates with the kids because it’s fucking real. Likewise, songs such as Hugs Are Fun, Dancing’s Easy and I Like Bugs tell it like it is – none of the Yo Gabba Gabba! material is wrapped in patronising shit, they treat the kids with a certain level of respect and their parents queue for the merch desk in recognition of this. Win-win.

times, 20-odd-minute halves (unfortunately separated by a way-too-long-for-a-14-monthold intermission). There’s plenty of freaky-ass techno and hip hop beats, but the injection of dreamy R&B (I Like Bugs), a Flaming Lips-style freak-out (All My Friends Are Different), folk-pop (Don’t Be Afraid) and kosmische (Peekaboo – a musical highlight) make for an enjoyable and not-too-repetitive ride. Oh yeah, and filling Palais Theatre with bubbles blows the sensory cortexes out of 1,000 kids’ heads – a spectacle that, on its own, is worth the trip down Punt Road. Samson McDougall

YO GABBA GABBA! @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live

DUNE RATS @ CORNER HOTEL. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

Dune Rats @ Corner Hotel The Babe Rainbow @ The Workers Club Bastille @ Festival Hall

There’s just enough variation in tempo and musical style to keep it engaging for the twoTHE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 35


arts reviews

CIRCUS OZ: BUT WAIT… THERE’S MORE! Circus

Birrarung Marr to 9 Jul With the meta But Wait... There’s More!, the playfully punk and bolshy Circus Oz has ‘gone’ hip hop, recruiting charismatic conscious MC/singer/comic Candy Bowers as blingmaster. Meanwhile, Indigenous star Dale Woodbridge-Brown proves an adept hip hop dancer – and acrobat. With the stage design a decaying theatre, Circus Oz considers the impact of hyperconsumerism, technology and mass entertainment. Reality talent shows are spoofed with vet Matt Wilson playing ‘judge’ – and Bowers parodying (possibly) Iggy Azalea. Still, the troupe demonstrates a spectrum of traditional circus artistry – unicycling, with some surprisingly balletic routines, trapeze, juggling

HYPRTXT festival the work is based on Strindberg’s essay, The Defence Of A Fool. The patriarchal poster boy’s essay is adapted to juxtapose and highlight current day gender politics. The work starts slow with an unnecessarily loud droning soundtrack that leaves the audience’s ears ringing and cursing sound designer Kirby Medway. The “play within a play” reveal is clichéd in its execution, eliciting eye-rolls rather than the intended surprise. Nevertheless, from these early indiscretions, the work recovers well. The interplay between all performers is nuanced and confronting. It’s Catherine McNamara, however, who makes the show. McNamara moves effortlessly between the misogynistic Strindberg and the solitary female actor, “Catherine”, being continually manipulated and ostracised by the “bros club” she’s being forced to work with. The play, needless to say, is viciously funny. The work’s greatest strength, moreover, is its complete determination to shine the blazing light of hypocrisy on itself and its audience. The Defence, despite its jittery

fairy plums. Moreover, it’s an intriguing exploration of the sheer physicality and athleticism of ballet. If one were being brutal, one would simply say Bodytorque DNA is a genetic mix of classical technique and contemporary introspection. In other words, the bare staging, geometric choreography and expressive lighting of 21st century dance is performed with a live orchestra and en pointe. However, that would be a somewhat reductionist assessment because there’s a stark and sculptural beauty to all five pieces that hints at much deeper intentions than simple crossbreeding. Rather than singling out specifics, it’s enough to say there is a kind of marriage going on. Across the evening we get the romance and beauty expected from ballet but we also get a substantial helping of austere, almost fascist rigour. Coupled with frequently severe lighting and set to music by, among others, Gorecki, Bodytorque DNA is ballet for today: edgy, industrial and sometimes

THE DEFENCE

CIRCUS OZ. PIC: ROB BLACKBURN

and pole-climbing – backed by a taut, versatile micro-band. Bowers’ hip hop-style skits enhance the neo-vaudeville affair, providing continuity and satire. She also brings a fresh edginess. In acknowledging ‘street’ culture, Circus Oz has assumed a powerful new relevance.

beginning, is great theatre and an important creative piece.

disturbing, but with the body beautiful front and centre.

Benjamin Meyer

Paul Ransom

Dance

Dance

Cyclone

Arts Centre to 24 Jun

THE DEFENCE Theatre

HYPRTXT Festival Hub, Tuxedo Cat to 28 Jun Chris Dunstan’s The Defence is an acerbic satire that leaves nothing but bone. Part of MKA’s 36 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

BODYTORQUE DNA Bodytorque, from Australia’s flagship dance company, has given local audiences a chance to see ballet in an entirely different context. This quintuple bill of shorts is a tutu-free exploration of contemporary choreography exploring the idea that the art form is all princesses and

IT CANNOT BE STOPPED Chunky Move Studio to 29 Jun As part of Chunky Move’s Next Move programme, three young choreographers were invited to make work with the full support of the company. Benjamin Hancock’s Princess and Atlanta Eke’s haunting and nigh on deranged Fountain are exceptional

solo pieces. Meantime, Paea Leach’s The Lines Of Birds takes the audience out of its comfort zone; and not just because it’s performed outside. What unifies this triple bill is the gutsy creative approach. Eke’s Fountain is particularly raw and at times flat out confronting. Hancock’s gender-mashing podium piece Princess is at once straightforward and layered with ideas about dynasty and importance. Although cynics may point out the inherent narcissism and deliberate strangeness of much of what passes for contemporary dance, this young trio both flirt with and rise above this; and largely this is because they have the courage of their vision and the tenacity and flair to pull it off. Paul Ransom

MAMA ALTO: COUNTER DIVA Cabaret

The Butterfly Club In a small central theatre, cabaret star Mama Alto performs a

BODYTORQUE DNA

passionate and very personal concert, exploring the role of the diva in five medleys. Pianist Tiffanni Walton, the show’s musical director, is the only accompaniment on stage, and the duo work in perfect harmony through several heartbreaking ballads. Alto’s fragile voice is unfaltering and lulls you into another world. The strength that is found in the words is genuine, and the emotions experienced hurl the audience through the life of a “sexually and racially ambiguous” chanteuse. As Alto writes in the program: “I was lost but now am found, and I found myself through music.” Harry Hughes


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 37


38 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014


the guide

FRANCESCO TRISTANO

How did you get your start? There was a massive piece of furniture at home. When I touched it (or walked over it!) it made sounds. I later learned it was a piano. Lessons soon followed, as well as countless sessions of improvisation and composition. Sum up your musical sound in four words? I’ll make that three: piano, techno, groove. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? Brandt Brauer Frick is the name of today’s premier, avant-garde contemporary electronic (acoustic) band. They are based in Berlin though at times it seems they live on another planet. You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album, what would it be? I only know the island version! In space, I’d take a techno album. How about Carl Craig’s Landcruising? Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? That was recently: I showed up for a gig, didn’t see any piano on stage. The backline crew told me “there’s no piano”. So I had to go by plan B, ie a couple of keyboards as well as an old, untuned piano found backstage. Rock’n’roll basically means you have to be prepared for plan B – always. Why should people come and see you play? Because they might have a good time! Possibly, they could discover the piano in a contemporary setting, not in the old-fashioned way. The program is hot and fresh, and so is Alice Sara Ott: one of the most talented pianists of her generation. When and where for your next gig? 2 Jul, Melbourne Recital Centre, with Alice Sara Ott – two pianos. Website link for more info? francescotristano.com

Pic: Aymeric Giraudel THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 39


culture

FROM LITTLE THINGS The charm of Adelaide Cabaret Festival reaches far beyond its program and the theatres it resides in; Celtic metal, onstage insulin shots and thought-provoking street art destroy Daniel Cribb’s preconceptions of the city.

C

offee brings people together – or at least people who are half-asleep at airports. Stirring two sugars into the world’s most expensive coffee, a conversation is sparked up with a fellow Adelaidebound traveller. He’s headed to South Australia to catch up with friends and is quick to make a remark about the city’s nightlife. It’s an interesting misconception, and Adelaide seems to get somewhat of a bad rap when it comes to the perceived vibrancy of its nightlife in comparison to the rest of the country. Perhaps being labelled the City Of Churches sees a younger audience switch off. One thing’s for sure: whatever Adelaide does, it does religiously and the Adelaide Cabaret Festival is testament to that. Into its 14th year, the festival consumes the city for three weeks in June, and this year’s saw Kate Ceberano round out her three-year tenure as artistic director, helping coordinate 470 artists in over 170 performances. Admired comedic actor Kathy Najimy is first on the schedule with the debut of her semi-autobiographical

CABARET FESTIVAL BOUND FOR SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Theatre plays host to Paul Capsis’ Little Bird, which is on show for the entire festival’s duration. Multi-award winning playwright Nicki Bloom has constructed Little Bird perfectly for Capsis, and sees the one-man musical drama use simplicity to great effect. Subtle changes in lighting, the occasional prop, and songs by Cameron Goodall (The Audreys) and Quentin Grant (When The Rain Stops Falling), all come together to create the perfect playground for Capsis to bring the twisted fairytale to life.

One of the great things about Adelaide’s city is its size. Walking is often the most convenient mode of transport and perhaps why street art plays such a big part in the city’s aesthetic. Local, well-respected street artist Fredrock really shines at the back of music venue Jive and the mural wall in the venue’s car park is now dubbed the Wall Of Fame. Scattered throughout the city are various black and white sketches accompanied by handwriting. Most people walk by, paying little attention, but if you look closer, they tell interesting stories. Street artist and arts writer Peter Drew spent the past seven months gathering 36 sketches and brief stories from seven asylum seekers, living in Adelaide, who came by boat and were detained upon arrival. At the end of May/start of June he blew them up and plastered them around the city for a project titled Bound For South Australia. Ali Rezai, who contributed 20 drawings to the project, details intimate details of his journey to Australia, and in one, draws his mother crying as she says goodbye. Being illegally installed, some have already been removed. It’s a little odd going from thought-provoking street art back to the Festival Theatre, but makes you appreciate the Cabaret Festival all the more. Back at the main hub, Ceberano is casually walking around the foyer, no doubt soaking up the success of her final year as artistic director. Najimy rushes past, heading to one of the venue’s smaller rooms. “Thank you! Best show I’ve ever done,” she says of a passing compliment about her work on King Of The Hill. Everyone’s hustling to Space Theatre, which is set up like a jazz lounge and awaiting the arrival of Cecilia

CABARET FESTIVAL CECILIA LOW IN THEY SAY SHE’S DIFFERENT

CABARET FESTIVAL KATHY NAJIMY AND DANIEL CRIBB

“THE SHOW BEGINS WITH NAJIMY LYING ON A TABLE, RECREATING A MOMENT IN HER LIFE IN WHICH SHE WAS MID-COLONOSCOPY WHILE HAVING A CASUAL CONVERSATION WITH LIFE-LONG IDOL BETTE MIDLER.” solo stage show, Lift Up Your Skirt, at the iconic Festival Theatre. You might know her from her extensive film career – most notably Sister Act, Hocus Pocus and Rat Race. To this writer, it’s as the voice of Peggy Hill in King Of The Hill that Najimy takes the cake. Talking a mile a minute, the show begins with Najimy lying on a table, recreating a moment in her life in which she was mid-colonoscopy while having a casual conversation with life-long idol Bette Midler. Darting between comedy and serious content stemming from her involvement as an activist, it is an emotional one-sided conversation breaking down the argument against gay marriage followed by an onstage insulin shot for her type one diabetes and musical number Skinny Arse Diabetes that truly shows the diverse nature of the Hollywood personality’s skillset. It seems one of the goals the Adelaide Cabaret Festival had when choosing their program was to ensure its attendees were thrown into the deep end. Her Majesty’s 40 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

Both Lift Up Your Skirt and Little Bird are mentally exhausting and energising at the same time. Maybe a quiet drink somewhere would be a nice way to round out the evening? Nope. A Celtic metal show at a nearby venue concludes that night’s festivities. You don’t have to enjoy metal to find comfort in a room full of metalheads dressed like Vikings going insane to heavy music backed by fiddles – all on a Thursday night.

Low for her new show, They Say She’s Different, which made its debut last night. With ‘70s funk rock fuelling a musical recreation of the life of Betty Davis, sitting down almost seemed criminal. One hour seemed far too short a time – and not just because Low is trying to cram 20 years of history, giving great detail into Davis’ relationships with once-husband Miles Davis and close friend Jimi Hendrix. The premiere at Adelaide Cabaret Festival is in preparation for Melbourne Fringe, and it seems a lot of new shows are trialled in Adelaide. The city’s architecture may be old – in ’64, the underground sandstone cellars and tunnels of my hotel were used by The Beatles to escape fans – but its cultural relevance is far from outdated; it’s leading the world in many ways, as evident in events such as the Cabaret Festival. Daniel Cribb was flown to Adelaide as a guest of South Australian Tourism Commission.


eat/drink DRINK UP

THE SHAW DAVEY SLUM 171–175 Elgin St, Carlton

facebook.com/ theshawdaveyslum Answered by: Lauren Miller

What’s your bar’s specialty drink? Sour Warhead cocktail, featuring Absolut, Apple Puckers, Blue Curacao, pineapple juice and lime juice. Tastes of sour/tart apple flavours with a quick finish and extra sweet

and sourness when sipped from the rim. What makes your bar different? The entire bar is an homage to the golden age of 1960s Australia. The entire dining menu is a tribute to this era, with items such as a giant parma breaded with cornflakes, or calamari with dehydrated Vegemite salt. The drinks menu doesn’t disappoint on this front either, with cocktails such as Fairy Bread and Mint Slice to give you a taste of your (slightly more adult) childhood! Who will I meet at your bar? Being so close to

Melbourne Uni, The Slum is unquestionably a favourite among students. The cheap drinks don’t hurt that reputation, either! The Slum is also a popular place for many to start out a night, as our rooftop is open Thursday–Saturday from 5pm, with DJs spinning only the most swingin’ tracks from 7pm til late on a Friday night. Lunchtimes often see busy corporates taking advantage of our $10 lunch specials. Best hangover cure? Our mega parma goes down a treat.

WINO PLAYLIST

To please your ears while you’re sippin’. Alligator Wine – Screamin’ Jay Hawkins Lilac Wine – Jeff Buckley Red Red Wine – UB40/Neil Diamond Little Old Wine Drinker Me – Dean Martin

HOT SPOT

The Wine Song – The Youngbloods

SOUTHGATE MOVEABLE FEASTS

The Wine Song – The Cat Empire

This winter, Southgate presents Moveable Feasts, just another opportunity for Melburnians to savour culinary delights from the world over right here in this fine city. Moveable Feasts aims to cater to the changing dining trends in Melbourne. Over three courses of various cuisines, guests will be guided from restaurant to restaurant by a host who will share the stories behind Melbourne’s famous waterside eateries. Moveable Feasts, which is a reincarnation of Southgate’s popular Progressive Diners, runs from now until 4 Aug at 12pm Sundays and 7pm Mondays.

Symphonic Metamorphosis Of Wine, Women And Song – StraussGodowsky

Book online at southgatemelbourne.com.au.

Red Wine Lips – Lisa Mitchell All The Wine – The National Summer Wine – Lee Hazlewood & Nancy Sinatra

DRINK UP

THE LEVESON 46 Leveson St, North Melbourne theleveson.com Answered by: Ms Spoor What’s your bar’s specialty drink? All the craft beers! On tap we have Holgate, Feral, Two Birds and Coburg Lager. What makes your bar different? One of the best multi-functional venues in Melbourne, we are a bar and restaurant, holding

functions and events! Our main bar boasts five big screens and fireplaces. With a great mix of acoustic artists, DJs and all the sport we show, we have something for everyone. Weekly happy hour Monday through to Thursday 5.30pm–6.30pm then Friday 5–7pm. Our courtyard is functional even in the winter with the retractable roof. Who will I meet at your bar? People between

the ages of 25–45. Nurses, students, doctors, flight attendants and various other trades and business around North Melbourne area. What’s the design/ atmosphere of your bar? Polished floorboards, high ceilings, courtyard and a wrap-around bar with ample seating and

a large-ish range of local and imported beers. The Leveson is trendy and upmarket. Full restaurant facilities cater for a corporate clientele during the day. The daytime feel can be rather sunny, with the white walls providing a bright, light feel.

THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 41


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

EP FOCUS

ALBUM FOCUS Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? We were holed up in an old church-cum-studio in the bush an hour or so out of Brisbane. That alone was quite inspiring.

DELSINKI RECORDS

you will like this EP.

Answered by: Craig Johnston EP title? Tokyo Rose How many releases do you have now? This will be my second release under Delsinki Records. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? The title track was inspired by Iva Toguri and other female broadcasters in WWII; she was jailed for treason by the United States after the war.

When and where is your launch/next gig? My EP launch is at Ministry of Art, St Kilda, 25 Jun. It involves music, body art, photos and paintings, all in the gallery. Website link for more info? delsinkirecords.com

What’s your favourite song on it? My favourite is Everybody’s Waiting. It’s probably the weirdest we got on the album... I like weird.

THE MIDDLE NAMES Answered by: Ben Wells Album title? I Need Space Where did the title of your new album come from? It’s based around not having the need to rely on anyone but yourself and only allowing the people you want in your life. How many releases do you have now? This is our first release as The Middle Names.

Will you do anything differently next time? Nah, I’m quite proud of the finished product... I mean there’s always little things but as a whole I’m happy. When and where is your launch/next gig? 28 Jun, The Penny Black. Website link for more info? themiddlenames.com

How long did it take to write/ record? It took about six months to write, though some of the songs are a little older, and we spent a month in Brisbane recording it.

What’s your favourite song on it? My favorite track on the EP is Tokyo Rose. We’ll like this EP if we like... If you like pirates and cowboys

SINGLE FOCUS

TASTE TEST

and it’s part one of an EP that we will get out some time over the coming year. There’s a video for it, that will be out soon too.

FIFTH FRIEND Answered by: Leonardo Caltabiano Single title? My Little Girl Wants A Gun What’s the song about? I think the title’s pretty self-explanatory. We’ve all been there more or less... How long did it take to write/ record? I wrote it almost a year ago, recorded it late last year. The actual writing part probably took about a week, and the session was just the one day. We tend to work fast. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Well, it’s available for download online, 42 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

What was inspiring you during the songs writing and recording? Hmm, lots of different things, bands, people... and Tarantino movies. I watch those a lot, possibly too often even, if that’s possible, but they just get better every time. We’ll like this song if we like... A hot cup of coffee and a cigarette for breakfast. Do you play it differently live? We tend to play everything a little different live, it’s a different space and we like to approach performance with risk. Anything can happen up there and we love that. When and where is your launch/ next gig? 27 Jun at Cherry Bar. Easily my favorite place to play. It’s gonna be a highly exciting night, and well be giving out copies of the single for free.

CLAN ANALOGUE Answered by: Nick Wilson – Label Manager, Clan Analogue The best record I stole from my folks’ collection was: Not many good records in my parents’ collection, but inherited a great Tongan choir LP from my grandmother. The record I put on when I’m really miserable is: Time Out Of Mind by Bob Dylan, or maybe No More Shall We Part by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds. The record I put on when I bring someone home is: Echo Dek by Primal Scream or Yes To Fear, Yes To Desire by Panoptique Electrical. Both

perform the required function. My favorite party album is: Station To Station by David Bowie has the right dose of funk and intensity. The record I’m loving right now is: Neneh Cherry’s new album Blank Project has a great stripped-back sound, blending a classic and modern vibe. When and where are your next gigs: ‘Gear Shift’ electronic music jam night at Loop on the last Wednesday of each month. Wednesday 25 Jun features Zen Paradox headlining. We’ll have another great act for 30 Jul. Website for more info: clananalogue.org


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

BIRTHDAY BASH

HAVE YOU HEARD

whittled down to a phenomenal gut-splitting 60 seconds.

CASH SAVAGE & THE LAST DRINKS Answered by: Cash Savage How did you get together? A few of us fell from the sky the rest of us grew from the ground and then we all met at the Old Bar. Sum up your musical sound in four words? Country. Drinking. Blues. Drinking. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? Kate Bush. Failing that, Saint Jude with 100 free burgers. You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album – what would it be?

Strange Days – The Doors. Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Three-car highway food fight with Twin Beasts (formerly The Toot Toot Toots) just outside Brisbane. We won. Why should people come and see your band? Saint Jude are fucking awesome. We are alright as well. When and where for your next gig? The B.East’s second birthday with Saint Jude and free burgers. Friday 27 Jun. Website link for more info? cashsavage.com.au

THE B.EAST Answered by: Guy Daley How old is the venue turning? Two years old! What are the highlights of the past year? SO MANY! Our new awesome menu and the creation of our world famous in East Brunswick Death Star Fries (the unholy union of chilli cheese sauce, gravy and hot sauce on our fries). No guesses what Chef was smoking when that one came along. The Live & Cookin’ band night kicking off and showcasing awesome talent from around Australia for FREE every Thursday. Our B.East Burger challenge record time getting

What’s the craziest/weirdest thing that happened in the last year? Watching a table of massive steroid freak weightlifters come in and all try the B.East Burger Challenge and fail miserably after two bites! OR the time that meth-head backpacker tried to make out with the chef after he ate the Red Eye Pulled Pork Burger (seriously). What sort of celebration is in order? Double headlining is Cash Savage & The Last Drinks and Saint Jude (pictured). 100 free burgers for the first 100 customers. We intend to celebrate ALL things BEASTLY with an evening of cowboys, honkytonk, burlesque, sliders on skates, banjos and tequila fountains. Website for more info? theb-east.com / facebook. com/thebeastburgers

THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 43


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LIVE THIS WEEK

OH NICKI, YOU’RE SO FINE! Nicki Minaj admits she’s “obsessed over” Chris Lilley after watching Ja’mie: Private School Girl. She was the only good thing about The Other Woman and girlfriend just keeps growing in our estimation.

FINN-TASTIC The new season of So You Think You Can Dance US has commenced and it was pretty fun to clock Neil Finn’s head on a billboard outside LA’s Orpheum Theatre during the first audition show.

THE SKY’S THE LIMIT The skydivers who landed in the middle of Elsternwick Oval to open this year’s Reclink Community Cup, hooning in at great speed – spectacular!

BAD BUFFALO

THEORY OF THIRDS

MUST BE DREAMIN’

Sydney’s garage-punk fuzzmeisters The Bad Reaction (pictured) go head to head with local trash’n’rollers The Buffalo Club at the Town Hall Hotel, 28 Jun. Considering both bands feature alumni from other local killer acts, you can expect a doozy.

In a night of firsts, energetic rockers Temple will be reborn as Prymal with a brand new line-up, while fellow Melburnians The Tesla Theory (pictured) are set to release debut EP Third Dimension at The Bendigo, 28 Jun.

Four-piece Dreamin’ Wild (pictured) are bringing their own unique brand of psychpopping tunes to The Pinnacle’s beer garden on 26 Jun, joined by Basic Spirit. Free entry. Grab a beer and bliss out.

FEB IN JULY

CLASS IN SESSION

HOW U LIVIN’

Brisbane Americana/folk artist Josh Rennie-Hynes is set to bring tunes from his first full-length album, the recently launched February, at Wesley Anne on 26 Jun, with help from support acts Steve Grady and Emilee South.

Astronomy Class’s Mekong Delta Sunrise, featuring vocalist Srey Channthy (The Cambodian Space Project), pays tribute to a lost Cambodian generation, drawing on hip hop and Khmer pop music. Launching at Northcote Social Club, 27 Jun.

By the time Darcy Baylis finished high school he’d released a 7” and an acclaimed LP, and toured his live show nationally under his moniker, Naminé. He’s now released an EP, How Can I Live?/Ecstasy, under his own name. Boney, 27 Jun.

ON THE DOCK

INCREASING

HAARLO THERE

Blues enthusiasts prepare yourself for “Justin Townes Earle doing a Nick Cave murder ballad”, as Tom Dockray (pictured) brings debut EP Iron Suit to The Catfish for two sets of Tennessee goodness on 29 Jun.

Prior to releasing debut EP Gradient and performing at Splendour In The Grass, The Creases (pictured) are headed to Shebeen Bandroom on 28 Jun to give Melbourne a taste of what they have in store.

From Glasgow comes Open Swimmer (aka Ben TD), who performs his dreamy, playful tunes in solo mode at Retreat Hotel, 26 Jun. Soulful and synthy duo Haarlo (pictured) are also playing, then lo-fi-electro-Afropopper Sweets end the night.

LET’S GET COOKIN’

DOING DALLAS

PROJEKCTED

To celebrate the release All My Friends Are Cooked, their first single from their second EP Relentless Dreamtime, shoegazing trio Warmth Crashes In are hitting The Workers Club with Step Panther and a cast of friends on 28 Jun.

Having backed up an opening slot on Eminem’s Rapture tour with a European tour of his own, New Zealand hip hop sensation David Dallas is in rare form. Catch the Dallas doing his thing at The Espy on 28 Jun.

Don’t miss your first and possibly last opportunity to witness The Crimson ProjeKCt’s prog-rocking brilliance, as the enigmatic trio play an awe-inspiring three-hour set at The Hi-Fi on 26 Jun.

IT’S A BIRD IT’S A PLANE NO IT’S A ROCKDOG. PIC: LUCINDA GOODWIN

BACKLASH MONEY TALKS

To those who snuck through a hole in the fence to avoid paying the $10 donation to get into Reclink Community Cup, you better have bought your body weight in beers/ snags to make up for it.

FRAME SHAME Has anyone else noticed the state of Channel Seven weekend sports presenter Timmy Watson’s glasses frames of late? Even Tootsie’s are more masculine.

PHONE HOME Cab drivers who remain on the phone for their passengers’ entire journey, are they getting continuous live directions or just chatting away? Either way, it’s not very comforting.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 44 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

LIVE THIS WEEK

A LITTLE BIT O’ RITA

ALTA YOUR STATE

EAST IT

Rita Satch (pictured) is set to show off her powerful vocals and launch her self-titled second EP at The Toff In Town, 26 Jun, supported by Roscoe James Irwin (solo), Albert Salt and DJ Mike Gurrieri.

Alta (pictured) and Amin Payne are playing their last Melbourne show before heading off to tour Europe for a couple of months. Head to Evelyn Hotel on 27 Jun to cheer them off and have a boogie and bevo with them.

After a bit of a lull on the ol’ gig front, East Brunswick All Girls Choir (pictured) bring their effortless blend of late ‘90s garage and distorted country/ blues to The Tote on 28 Jun to launch their debut LP, the stunning Seven Drummers.

SPIEGEL-TENT

ROYAL LINE-UP

CLASSY LADS

Having played with the likes of Buddy Guy and Peter Frampton, Lloyd Spiegel is certainly on the list of Australia’s best guitarists. On 29 Jun he’s bringing his high energy blues stylings to The Drunken Poet.

On 28 Jun it’s gonna be a total ska-fest at Reverence Hotel, with legends The Kujo Kings, Admiral Ackbar’s Dishonourable Discharge, King’s Cup and Del Lago playing punky dance tunes from go to whoa.

Lo-fi outsider pop is set to take over the floor of Victoria Hotel on 27 Jun, when krautpunk rockers Gold Class share the stage with the deranged catchiness of Orlando Furious and the revolving cast that is The Shifters.

THE LANE WAY

INTO THE COSMA

FLOAT ON

Before heading off on a European tour, Lilith Lane (pictured) & Her Many Wives have opted to ditch the piano and replace it with some raucous guitars for their last Aussie show on 29 Jun at Labour In Vain.

After impressing crowds last time around with his ‘50s- and ‘60s-inspired acoustic rock‘n’roll, singing troubadour David Cosma (pictured) is headed back to the front bar at Edinburgh Castle Hotel on 27 Jun.

Queensland roots, rock and reggae act The Floating Bridges (pictured) return to Melbourne on their Loose Change Tour, bringing two nights of soulful, spirited vibrations to Bar Open, 27 & 28 Jun and Evelyn Hotel, 29 Jun.

IT’S ALL GRAVY

LONDON CALLING

GRIDLOCK

Soul food and the blues go handin-hand, so (aptly named trio) Collard Greens & Gravy are transforming GH Hotel into a Mississippi-esque juke joint for a night of swingin’ blues on 29 Jun.

The sound of the London underground comes to Loop, 27 Jun with some of our best local selectors 2Fuddha, A13, Baddums, Galtier, Gingus and Tony Black. UK garage, UK funk, dubstep, grime and all things bass from 10pm till late.

Following the release of their video for new single Family Home, Teeth & Tongue will continue their album launch tour for Grids at Howler on 28 Jun, with help from Montero, Darren Sylvester, Palm Springs and New War DJs.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… EVERY TIME I DIE From Parts Unknown Epitaph/Warner SEETHER Isolate And Medicate Caroline THE ZEBRAS Siesta Lost And Lonesome BOK BOK Your Charizmatic Self Night Slugs/Inertia THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 45


opinion HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC BY JEFF JENKINS CAPTAIN JACK All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. Jack Howard is one of the hardest working people in showbiz but, fortunately, playing is his work. Jack has just released a wonderful album, Day Of The Dog, with his band The Long Lost Brothers. He’s also a member of The Break – the surf/space rock outfit featuring Midnight Oil’s Rob Hirst, Jim Moginie and Martin Rotsey, and Violent Femmes’ Brian Ritchie – and he does a tribute show, Jack Howard & The Ambassadors Of Love Play Bacharach & David. And, of course, Jack is a member of Hunters & Collectors, who are heading to New Zealand later this year to play with The Rolling Stones, following their triumphant Australian reunion tour, which included two shows with Bruce Springsteen. Did Jack meet The Boss? “No, dammit.” What about The E Street Band’s horn players? Is there a horn

46 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

players’ union? Do you hang out together? “Jake Clemons watched us from side of stage, but the timing was bad between our sets. So much for the brotherhood of horns!” Day Of The Dog is Jack’s sixth solo album. It’s a collection of superb, soulful pop from a consummate musician who knows that “less is always more”. The album showcases the stellar playing of all-star band The Long Lost Brothers – guitarist Nicky Del Rey (Intoxica), bass player Mark Ferrie (Models), pedal steel player Ed Bates (The Sports) and drummer Cal McAlpine (The Large Number 12s). Asked to describe the band, Jack calls Nicky “the riffmeister! Like country gold”. Mark is “rich, like a fine single malt whiskey”. Ed is “the magician, the conjuror of sound”, and Cal is “my rock, the wind beneath my wings”. Jack Howard & The Long Lost Brothers launch Day Of The Dog at Caravan Music Club on 27 June.

JACK HOWARD

SMASH HIT Melbourne’s Vaudeville Smash have scored a big World Cup goal with their song Zinedine Zidane closing in on one million YouTube views. France leads with the most views, followed by Poland and then Australia. MONDO-MANIA Mondo Rock play at Palais Theatre on 28 June to celebrate the Aztec re-release of 1981’s Chemistry. Filled with hits (State Of The Heart, Cool World, Chemistry, Summer of ’81), it’s one of the greatest Australian pop albums. “And I’m a bit annoyed we didn’t follow through with that pop sound on

the next album,” Ross Wilson tells Howzat! “I think we were seduced by the competitive spirit of pub rock. With bands like the Oils and The Angels, you really had to rock your arse off to make an impression in the pubs and clubs.” TOP TWEET Guns N’ Roses’ Duff McKagan paid tribute to an Aussie legend: “RIP Doc Neeson. Axl Rose and Izzy turned me on to The Angels back in ’85. Got 2C and play with and know Doc a little later. Excellent man.” HOT LINE “A simple plan is always best” – Jack Howard, Try Again


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 47


opinion OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

PUNK AND HARDCORE WITH SARAH PETCHELL

Lately, magnate Gina Rinehart flossed about “jealousy-inspiring profits” in a mining magazine column (!). New York MC/ actor/mogul 50 Cent, aka Curtis Jackson, is similarly preoccupied with ‘prosperity’ on his comeback, Animal Ambition. One journo has suggested that Fiddy advocates “right-wing” economics. However, it’s not so simple, considering the How To Rob rapper’s origins in America’s mega-ghetto. Entrepreneurialism isn’t necessarily perceived negatively in hip hop – it’s about selfempowerment, something ultimately symbolic for the wider (black) community. Besides, Jackson, whose ventures include self-help books, is subversive. He’s commodified his experiences of poverty – and street life. Animal Ambition is a throwback to ‘90s gangsta rap. It could pass for a mixtape with joints like the raw opener Hold On. Unfortunately, Jackson mostly relies on obscure producers – none impressing – while his sole ‘buzz’ guest, neo-gangsta ScHoolboy Q, is relegated to the ‘bonus’ Flip On You. The token commercial song, Smoke, featuring slept-on R&B type Trey Songz, is a poor man’s Ayo Technology, its Eurodance synths passé. Dr Dre helmed it, but In Da Club it ain’t. However, the major fail here? Jackson doesn’t adequately explore the contradictions of black wealth creation. In recent times his rival Kanye West has better articulated, and soundtracked, just that. Ironically, today Fiddy is perhaps more brilliant as an actual businessman. @therealcyclone

50 CENT

48 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

There are a few redundancies in modern punk and hardcore. It seems to me that it’s when people start forgetting the core values of our scene that the most ridiculous ones take to the forefront.

SVEN & STUMPY

I’ve been lucky enough to spend the last week or so on the road with a few outstanding and quite contrasting death metal bands: the multinational, Belgium-formed Aborted and Tasmanian legends Psycroptic. Brisbane lads The Schoenberg Automaton have also been playing main support every night. The headliners just dropped by Sydney ABC to guest program some upcoming Rage instalments and at the time of writing we’ve just passed the halfway point of the ten gigs. Things kicked off with a long drive to Adelaide to arrive the night before the first show. Before even seeing them play, something that really struck me as strange about Aborted was how well their line-up seems to gel. Though the band has been around since 1995 with vocalist Sven de Caluwé at the helm, the other current members have only been a part of things since 2009 and 2012. In my experience, such unstable line-ups lead to an awkward band dynamic, but these guys all seem to have known each other for a lot longer. When I got to see them play to a surprisingly decent Adelaide turnout the next night, I was truly blown away by how tight and heavy they were. I jumped back in the van with The Schoenberg dudes and it was off to Melbourne for a crowd about 400-strong and a killer gig all around. Battling rough hangovers, we gradually made our way to Albury – a regional NSW town that was a bit of a wild card for the tour. Turns out Albury goes hard, with a little over 100 locals making it out on a Sunday evening for an intense floor show in a pub’s function room.

During Aborted’s set, a prosthetic leg suddenly flew across the pit, after falling off a local who goes by the name of Stumpy. In one of those ‘definitely haven’t seen it all’-type tour events, the leg was then eventually signed by all members of the touring bands. Aborted and Psycroptic eventually went off to their hotel, but Schoenberg and myself ended up staying at Stumpy’s house. His living room was full of medieval weaponry and retro video games – many fun battles were had before we all gradually slipped off into dreamtime. The next evening, Canberra brought it pretty damn hard for a Monday with results that surprised all involved. I bailed out in Sydney the morning after to go to work, and the tour continued on to Newcastle for a reportedly fun but kind of average show. After sleeping in and nearly missing my ride, I jumped back in the van on the way to Wollongong. Being up against the State Of Origin match on a Wednesday night would probably not give big numbers anywhere, but those in attendance made sure the bands were aware they were appreciated, with some crazy pit antics, endless free drinks and a lot of fresh cotton slung. Although Psycroptic’s logo is placed above Aborted’s on the poster, technically it’s a co-headlining run. When the tour was originally announced there was a slight outcry from select Aborted fans concerning them not headlining, but it’s been cool to witness Psycroptic outselling Aborted on merch sales almost every night and generally receiving a slightly more robust crowd response, regardless of their slot. Australian domination!

So what’s the redundancy of which I speak? It’s the attempt by venues and promoters to place a ban on moshing or crowdsurfing at events. The first few dates of Vans Warped Tour have kicked off in the US and fans at the shows were greeted by prominent signage that said: “No moshing/ crowdsurfing. You mosh, you crowdsurf. You get hurt. We get sued. No more Warped Tour.” I understand the attempt to pass liability from the promoter to the individual. It’s about moving responsibility for the individual’s actions away from the promoter to avoid litigation. I’m also aware that this isn’t the first time a promoter has done it – festivals have done so in the past, even going so far as to fine bands that promote that behaviour among its fans. But I can’t help feeling a little empty at seeing signs like that. Moshing and crowdsurfing are a way for the crowd to get involved in the show – to release energy and show a form of appreciation for the effort and energy the band is expending on stage. Sure, sometimes things can go awry, but it’s often a case of the few ruining the experience of the many. With the knowledge that reported growing pressure from corporate sponsors was behind the move, it makes me sad that this is further proof of the increasing corporatisation of something I love. wakethedead@themusic.com.au

COULD CROWDSURFING BE OUTLAWED? PIC BY ROHAN ANDERSON


opinion TEENAGE HATE

TRAILER TRASH

BUSINESS MUSIC

ROCKIN’ AND ROLLIN’ OUT OF CONTROLLIN’ WITH TIM SCOTT

DIVES INTO YOUR SCREENS AND IDIOT BOXES WITH GUY DAVIS

WHEN YOUR CLUB NEEDS A BOSS WITH PAZ

WHITE VOID

Since forming in 2009, the Copenhagen-based Posh Isolation label has made a sizeable dent on the punk scene with their list of mysterious/arty post-punk/noise/ electronic artists. Formed around “the Mayhem scene”, so named after the Copenhagen club where many of the artists hang out and play, bands such as Puce Mary, Iceage, Sexdrome and others who appeared on the 2013 compilation Dokument #1 have come to represent the dark and brooding music coming out of the Danish capital. The latest release, White Void, is the solo project of Frederik Lind Köppen, the young drummer for Communions who released their debut EP through Posh Isolation earlier this year. Whereas Communions play bright, anthemic rock, White Void dips into a blackened postpunk with melodic folk guitars in the vein of early Pink Reason or Merchandise. The label describes it as, “Young and unbalanced heart throbbing rock music,” and they are on the money. Low Life’s Dogging is one of the best releases of 2014. The Sydney three-piece, who have recently added Shogun from Royal Headache on rhythm guitar, play punk that is served up with a healthy dose of humour, honesty and heathenness. I’ve been talking this up to everyone since it came out but I think Lewis who runs Adelaide label No Patience sums up Low Life best when he says, “Watching them live brought to mind the late ‘80s when British skinheads discovered meth and started going to raves and realised running shoes were more comfortable than boots and easier to steal, but still wanted to play rock’n’roll.” Too true. They launch the album 28 June at Boney.

I’ve enjoyed my share of big ticket titles over the last couple of months – X-Men: Days Of Future Past showed that there’s room for style and invention in superhero movies; Edge Of Tomorrow was put together with the precision of a Swiss watch, reminded audiences why Tom Cruise has been a star for the last couple of decades and gave notice that Emily Blunt should be a star for the next couple. But in writing this, I’ve had to restrain myself from looking up the names of some of this year’s other supposed box office behemoths. Nothing springs to mind immediately. There was Godzilla, I guess, but that hasn’t really lingered in my memory. It didn’t disappoint by any means, and parts of it even excited, but I can’t see myself revisiting it any time soon. But it’s not just me thinking or feeling that, apparently. People with actual good taste and working brains have made similar comments on the subject lately, with my man Matt Zoller Seitz penning a piece that bemoaned “the visual and rhythmic sameness” of many recent superhero movies and Avengers director Joss Whedon seconding the claim with statements such as, “People have made it very clear that they are fed up with movies where entire cities are destroyed, and then we celebrate.” (That’s pretty rich coming from a dude who levelled half of NYC in his own movie, Joss. I kid, I kid!) “Shots of people fighting inside and atop collapsing and burning structures all feel basically the same,” writes Seitz. “Sometimes the camera shakes a little, sometimes a lot. Giant creatures roar and stomp in more or less the same way, across CGI’d

landscapes rendered in more or less the same way... At some point somebody straps on power armour or climbs inside a robot. Machines bash other machines for a while. The bashing is choreographed and shot and edited pretty much as you expect, with few aesthetic surprises. You hear metal groaning and rubble crashing to earth. Walls crumble, craters open, bridges collapse. The bigger the canvas, the more boringly typical the action becomes. Boring action makes hash of any character beats that the filmmakers and actors went to the trouble of setting up.” I realise I’m quoting a lot of other writers this time around, but that’s because a) I’m lazy, and b) they’re smart. Take Drew McWeeny, one of online pop culture’s founding fanboys, and his take on spectacle overload having a wearying effect on moviegoers: “We are living in an age of casual magic, and it has numbed everyone on both ends of the equation.” That’s a pretty nifty summation of the circumstances we’re in right now... and when I say ‘we’, I probably mean a generation of fans who’ve had our minds so comprehensively blown by everything since Star Wars that our dopamine receptors are on the fritz. Colin Trevorrow, director of next year’s dinosequel Jurassic World, may have the best handle on things when he says this: “We’ve all been disappointed by new instalments of the stories we love. But with all this talk of filmmakers ‘ruining our childhood’, we forget that right now is someone else’s childhood. This is their time. And I have to build something that can take them to the same place those earlier films took us.”

EDGE OF TOMORROW

FABLICE

Melbourne’s FLYBZ (Lil Fablice and his nephew G-Storm) have just released their new single What’s Poppin In Your City alongside SA’s Break N Enter. It’s part of the musical identity for Fablice who has proved to be a powerful entertainer. I’ve seen his work with Melbourne’s traditional Burundi drum ensemble, guiding the youngsters, youth and elders through the heritage and actions of their native drumming. Recently his performance of Kuruyo Musi (a Kirundi Song with strong Gospel message) alongside MC Zidee Jay as part of Fed Square’s Africa Day 2014 was my first introduction to the fresh generation of traditional African dance music in Melbourne. Fablice produces most of his own tracks with Reason and Pro Tools. To date he has worked alongside Paul Kelly, Diafrix and Ella Hooper producing and collaborating. He is also forming relationships with Melbourne’s underground hip-hop acts such as Motley, Mantra and Bangs. So far it has been a musical journey with lots of diversity dispersed among travel and displacement from his home in Burundi to the outskirts of Melbourne. This is reflected in his lyrics, which are sentimentally generated by journeying through Burundi and Rwanda’s genocidal wars. From time spent in his homeland, Fablice has cited Ben Rutabana – a political musician and army infantryman – as a great musical influence. Fablice informed Business Music that he shares a similar message to Rutabana, one of “encouraging people to never return to what [they] went through, which was Genocide”. Look out for the new FLYBZ track on YouTube. THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 49


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Usurper Of Modern Medicine: 27 Jun The Catfish; 30 Northcote Social Club

Cafe Bellarine; 16 Baby Black Cafe Bacchus Marsh; 17 The Bridge Hotel

Little Bastard: 3 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 4 Northcote Social Club; 5 Baha Tacos Rye

Something For Kate: 18–20 Jul Forum Theatre

Bonjah: 4 Jul Cherry Bar; 5 Yah Yah’s; 4 Oct The Hi-Fi Jeff Lang: 4 Jul Caravan Music Club Oakleigh; 5 Thornbury Theatre; 18 Williamstown RSL; 20 Beav’s Bar Geelong Remi: 10 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 11 Corner Hotel The Beards: 16 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 17 Barwon Club Geelong; 18 170 Russell; 19 Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 20 Spirit Bar & Lounge Traralgon The White Album Concert: 15 & 16 Jul Hamer Hall Melody Pool, Marlon Williams: 17 Jul Beav’s Bar Geelong; 18 Fitzroy Town Hall; 19 Caravan Music Club; 20 Major Tom’s Kyneton; 14 Aug Ararat Hotel; 15 Harvester Moon

WED 25

Kele + Odesza + Hayden James: 170 Russell, Melbourne Fight Club + Stephen Magnusson: 303, Northcote McBain + Loose Teeth + Crotch + The Creases: Bar Open, Fitzroy Trivia: Bayswater Hotel, Bayswater Melbourne Folk Club feat. Raised By Eagles + Steve Smyth + Rowena Wise: Bella Union, Carlton South Humpday Project + Various DJs: Chelsea Heights Hotel, Chelsea Heights Horsehunter + Guests: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Morning Melodies + Janene Joy: Commercial Hotel, South Morang Super Unsigned Music Festival feat. Lizards On Ice + Crash & Burn + Dario & Elise + Taylah Carroll + Jessica Holt + Searching In Silence: Corner Hotel, Richmond Sohn + Japanese Wallpaper + Downtime DJs: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne Dizzy’s Big Band + Peter Hearne: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

Sky Ferreira: 23 Jul The Prince Tune-Yards: 24 Jul Howler Grouplove: 25 Jul 170 Russell Metronomy, Circa Waves: 25 Jul Forum Theatre Skaters: 26 Jul Corner Hotel Foster The People: 28 Jul Palais Theatre Jungle: 29 Jul Corner Hotel Sleepmakeswaves: 1 Aug Corner Hotel

GIG OF THE WEEK DAVID DALLAS: 28 JUN THE ESPY

Ball Park Music: 4 Oct, Forum Theatre; 8 Karova Lounge Ballarat; 11 Wool Exchange Geelong Gorguts: 14 Nov Northcote Social Club Thy Art Is Murder: 13 Dec The Hi-Fi; 14 Community Centre Ringwood

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Great Britain Hotel, Richmond Bare Toes Into Soil + Kerang Jefferson + For Aeons: Horse Bazaar, Melbourne Free Like Me + The Wild Comforts: Laundry Bar, Fitzroy Morning Melodies + Auora Mackill: Manhattan Hotel, Ringwood Jess McAvoy + Cat Canteri: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick The Acoustic Sessions feat. Ariela Jacobs + Guests: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Keith Urban + Sheppard: Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne Woodlock + Walker: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne Grudgefest feat. Atomic Death Squad + Cordell + Bombs Over Brunswick + Feverteeth: The Bendigo, Collingwood Open Mic Night + Various Artists: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Ninox + The Flying So HighO’s + Lala: The Curtin, Carlton Wine, Whiskey, Women feat. Ali E + Leisha J: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

The Nuclear Family + Flour: The Old Bar, Fitzroy

Brent Parlane: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East

Toyota War: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Public Bar Comedy + Various Artists: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Bedrock + DJ Ontime: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston

Richie 1250: The Sporting Club, Brunswick

Sweets + Haarlo + Open Swimmer: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Fortress Of Narzod + A Basket Of Mammoths + Two Headed Dog + Pedro Rodriguez & His Inner Daemons + Hidden Venture: The Tote, Collingwood

Trivia: The Sporting Club, Brunswick Nigel Wearne: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy Dead Brian + Vacant Smiles + Alice D: The Toff In Town, Melbourne The Controls + A Strange Day + The Solicitors: The Tote, Collingwood Waltz + Junipers + Gillivan: The Tote (Upstairs), Collingwood New Gods + Grizzly Jim Lawrie: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Tinie Tempah: Trak Lounge Bar, Toorak

THU 26

Kickin The B at 303 feat. Sam Cope & The Trained Professionals: 303, Northcote The Arcane Following + The Rims + Alex Latham + Mariah Jayne + The Tried: Bar Open, Fitzroy Animaux + Arthur Penn & The Funky Ten + Horns Of Leroy: Boney, Melbourne Lloyd Cole: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh Next feat. Anchors + Admit One + The Playbook: Colonial Hotel, Melbourne Karaoke: Commercial Hotel, Werribee

Cabin Fever + Bottlecaps + Hopes Abandoned + Postscript: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Arabela + Morning After Morning + Waltz: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Keith Urban + Sheppard: Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne Pierce Brothers + Timberwolf: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne Pure Pop feat. Charles Jenkins & the Zhivagos + Bad Family: St Kilda Memo, St Kilda Amethyst Close + I Confess + Arcadian + To Light Atlantis + Rejuvenate: The Bendigo, Collingwood Matt Malone: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Dead Wolves + Submarine + The Black Alleys + Stone Revival: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Fem Belling + John Montesante Quintet: The Commune, East Melbourne Winter Moon + The Lost Fridays + Robot Mugabe + The Lovely Days: The Curtin, Carlton Zenita: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne High Nights + Who’s This? + The Hunted Crows + The Payback: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Collage + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda

Marek Podstawek + Friends: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond Fulton Street + Alone With Tiger + The Executives: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

The Crimson ProjeKCt: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

The Electric I + Purple Tusks + Karate Boogaloo: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Fame Music Radio (live streaming event) + Bounty Hunter + 62nd Silence + As Crows Fly: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda

Red Lantern Colony + You & Your Friends + Fierce Mild: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

Richie 1250 & The Brides of Christ + Sugarfed Leopards + Pink Tiles: The Gasometer Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Kindred Studios (Bar of Bengal), Yarraville

Sean Simmons: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg

Trivia: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick

Ben Salter: Labour In Vain, Fitzroy

8 Foot Felix + Friends: The Luwow, Fitzroy

Thursday Night Live + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 50 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

The Naysayers + Tequila Mockingbyrd + The Dead Threads: The Vineyard (11pm), St Kilda Boyeur + The Peeks + Briony Mackenzie: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Anna’s Go-Go Academy: Victoria Hotel (6.30pm), Brunswick Josh Rennie-Hynes + Emilee South + Steve Grady: Wesley Anne, Northcote Kain Borlase Trio: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote Harry Hookey: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

FRI 27

Hot Dub Time Machine + Special Guests: 170 Russell, Melbourne Ceres + Initials + Regrets + Employment: 303, Northcote The Paper Kites + Phebe Starr + Airling: Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne El Moth + The Floating Bridges: Bar Open, Fitzroy Darcy Baylis + Urban Problems + DJ Luke Neher + Downtime DJs: Boney (Midnight), Melbourne Jack Howard + The Long Lost Brothers + Charles Jenkins + Matty Vehl: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh Usurper Of Modern Medicine + Guests: Catfish, Fitzroy Karaoke: Chelsea Heights Hotel (Sports Bar), Chelsea Heights Trivia: Commercial Hotel, Werribee


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 51


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Pseudo Echo + Guests: Corner Hotel, Richmond Cam Giles Webb + The Collective: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond David Cosma: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Front Bar / 6pm), Brunswick DJ Knave Knixx: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Beer Garden), Brunswick Nathan Kaye: Elwood Lounge, Elwood City Bush Dance with Sal Kimber + The Bush Band: Fitzroy Town Hall, Fitzroy Magic Hands + Lehmann B Smith + Shadow Feet + Peter Joseph Head: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood Simone Page Jones: Grant Street Theatre (Lionel’s Bar), Southbank Nosaj Thing + D Tiberio + Andreas Fox: Howler, Brunswick Toni Swain & Dust Radio: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Absolutely 80’s + Brian Mannix + Scott Carne + Dale Ryder + David Sterry: Matthew Flinders Hotel, Chadstone Dale Winters Duo: Melbourne Public, South Wharf Joan As Police Woman: Melbourne Recital Centre, Southbank DJ Spen: Ms Collins, Melbourne Kirin J Callinan: National Gallery of Victoria, Southbank Astronomy Class + 1/6 + Danielsan + Presto: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Short Stack + Television: Ormond Hall (All Ages), Melbourne Karaoke: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston Past To Present: Precinct Hotel, Richmond Heavy Judy feat. Mesa Cosa + Royston Vasie + DJ Kezbot: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Frankenbok + Moustache Ant + Enter Reality + Bury The Fallen: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Planet X: Royal Hotel, Sunbury Pierce Brothers + Timberwolf: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne Kiss Tribute Show: Somerville Hotel, Somerville The Ramshackle Army + The Tearaways + Nathan Seeckts & The Dead City Lights + All We Need + Jay Stevens: The Bendigo, Collingwood Brooke Russell & The Mean Reds: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine

Brain Cancer Research Benefit feat. Angry Seas + Strathmore + Teen Kong + Laser Brains: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Fudge + DJ Craig: Pier Live (Flanagans) , Frankston

Traditional Irish Music Session with Dan Bourke & Friends: The Drunken Poet (6pm), Melbourne

High Society: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

Mr Palmer Band: Precinct Hotel, Richmond

Manisha: The Drunken Poet (8.30pm), Melbourne

The Stormy Mondays + Slime Dime & The Prairie Kings + DJ Xander: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Bon Jovi Tribute Show + Cuckoo For Caca (Faith No More Tribute) + Whole Lotta Zep: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda

The Kujo Kings + Admiral Ackbar’s Dishonourable Discharge + Del Lago + Self Help: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray

Chris Russell’s Chicken Walk + Spoonful + Rattlin’ Bones Blackwood + Junk Horses: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Gatherer + The Burning Sea + Have/Hold: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Chris Doheny: Royal Hotel, Sunbury

Midnight Alibi + The Tesla Theory + TWSS + The Famous Will: The Espy (Basement), St Kilda

Bang feat. Antagonist A.D + Emerson + Decimate: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne

Mykki Blanco + Special Guests: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

Rewind 80s: Seaford Hotel, Seaford

Garage AGoGo + Bad Reaction + The Kave Inn + DJ Sye Saxon + Barbara Blaze + The Gogo Goddesses: The Luwow, Fitzroy

The Creases + Guests: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne Pierce Brothers + Guests: Spirit Bar & Lounge, Traralgon

Guzzler + The Bengal Tigers: The Middle Ferntree Gully Hotel, Ferntree Gully

Nathan Kaye: St Andrews Hotel, St. Andrews Riley Pearce: The Astor Theatre (The Astor Lounge), St Kilda

Amaya Laucirica + Corey Snoek: The Old Bar (6pm), Fitzroy House of Laurence: The Old Bar (8.30pm), Fitzroy Major Tom & The Atoms: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Dark Arts: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Steph Brett: The Sporting Club, Brunswick Lot 56: The Thornbury Local, Thornbury The Love Bombs + Magic Bones + Modesty: The Tote, Collingwood DJ Grizzly Adams + The Ever Cold + Only I + Ever Rest: The Tote (Upstairs), Collingwood Deez Nuts + Confession + Hand Of Mercy + Thorns: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

ASTRONOMY CLASS: 27 JUN NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB

SAT 28

Mesa Cosa + High Vis: 303, Northcote

Deez Nuts + Confession + Hand Of Mercy + Thorns + Free World: Arrow On Swanston (All Ages), Carlton The Floating Bridges + The Electric I: Bar Open, Fitzroy Kiss Tribute Show + Kiss Thiss: Burvale Hotel, Nunawading Raw Brit + Mick Pealing: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh

Lloyd Cole: Thornbury Theatre (Ballroom), Thornbury

Strange Tenants + Utter (No) Nonsense (feat. Richard Bruce) + Loonee Tunes: Corner Hotel, Richmond

The Shuffle Club: Transit Rooftop Bar, Melbourne

Who Said What: Cramers Hotel, Preston

Gold Class + The Shifters + Orlando Furious: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick

The Cairos + Nova Heart + Flyying Colours: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne

Village Sounds + Chris G: Village Green Hotel, Mulgrave

Sarah Maclaine + John Montesante Quintet: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

La Concert + Various Artists: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Trio Agogo: Wesley Anne (Band Room / 6pm), Northcote Buried Feather + The Metal Babies: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

DJ Fergus: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick Bear The Mammoth + Glass Empire + Cat Or Pillar + The Black Galaxy Experience: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Daniel Champagne + The Tiger & Me Duo: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Greenman Alliance + The Great City + Only I + The Advocates + Swim Through Seasons + Ever Rest: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Teeth & Tongue + Montero + Darren Sylvester + Palm Springs + New War DJs: Howler, Brunswick The Stillsons: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy Aintree Sweet: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Joan As Police Woman: Meeniyan Town Hall, Meeniyan Jason Singh + DJ Scott Thompson: Melbourne Public, South Wharf Tracy McNeil & The Good Life + Small Town Romance + Dan Parsons: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Short Stack + Television: Ormond Hall (All Ages), Melbourne Mondo Rock: Palais Theatre, St Kilda The Middle Names + Sans: Penny Black, Brunswick

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

52 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

Prymal + The Tesla Theory + Damn That River + Witness to Treason + Selling Time: The Bendigo, Collingwood Dave Wright & The Midnight Electric + Little Murders: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine The Archaic Revival + Motherslug + The High Drifters + The Superguns: The Brunswick Hotel (9pm), Brunswick Tired Breeds + Mayweather + Gladstone + Max Goes to Hollywood + The Shadow League + Foley: The Brunswick Hotel (2pm), Brunswick Meet You Downstairs In The Bar+Tom Dickins: The Butterfly Club (9pm), Melbourne Best of The Cabaret Fest + Various Artists: The Butterfly Club, Melbourne Lucas Miller + Gzutek + Bee: The Curtin (Band Room), Carlton The Shivering Timbers: The Drunken Poet (9pm), Melbourne Hellhounds + Phil Para Band: The Espy (Front Bar / 6pm), St Kilda David Dallas + Daylight Robbery + Mose & The Fmly + Peezo + Bwise: The Espy (Front Bar / 9pm), St Kilda Eye Of The Enemy + Envenomed + Sunslave: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda


THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014 • 53


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Avair + Lung + Josh Cashman + The Spitting Swallows + Half Breed Heroes: The Espy (Basement / 8pm) , St Kilda Katchafire + Special Guests: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne Cherry Devine + The Gogo Goddesses + Bruce Milne + DJ Jumpin’ Josh: The Luwow, Fitzroy Mara Threat + Jess Locke: The Old Bar (3pm), Fitzroy Dead Wolves + River of Snakes + The Morrisons + My Piranha: The Old Bar (8.30pm), Fitzroy Boney M feat. Maizie Williams: The Palms, Southbank Zoe K: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Kodiak Throat + Guests: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Chris Pickering + Emma Swift: The Sporting Club, Brunswick Holy Moses Heartache + Noriko Tadano: The Toff In Town, Melbourne East Brunswick All Girls Choir + Strangers From Now On + Tender Bones: The Tote, Collingwood

WOODLOCK: 25 JUN SHEBEEN BANDROOM

TTTDC + Ageing: The Tote (Front Bar / 4pm), Collingwood Slow Grind Fever + Richie 1250 + Pierre Baroni + Mohair Slim: The Tote (Upstairs), Collingwood Warmth Crashes In + Step Panther + Esc + Galaxy Folk + A Strange Day: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Lloyd Cole: Theatre Royal, Castlemaine The Bad Reaction + The Buffalo Club: Town Hall Hotel, North Melbourne Old Timey Music Jam with Craig Westward: Victoria Hotel (5pm) , Brunswick

Lloyd Cole: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Low Life + Vacuum + Power: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood Tangrams + The Primary + Worm Crown + Wasp: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Sunday Hip Hop with N’Fa + M-Phazes + Flagrant + DJ Peril + MzRizk + more: Howler (3pm), Brunswick Lilith Lane & her Many Wives: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy

Green’s Dairy Angel Ensemble: Wesley Anne (Front Bar / 6pm), Northcote

Paul Hicks & The Yard Dogs: Lomond Hotel (5.30pm), Brunswick East

The Music of The Beatles - 50 Years of Australian Beatlemania + Various Artists: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Ken Maher, Al Wright & Tony Hargreaves: Lomond Hotel (9pm), Brunswick East

Yarraville Laughs feat. Adam Hills + Matthew Hardy : Yarraville Club, Yarraville

SUN 29

Story Of The Year + Left For Wolves + Clowns: 170 Russell, Melbourne The Brae Grimes 5tet + Pod: 303 (4pm), Northcote Nathan Kaye + Maryse: 303 (7.30pm), Northcote Preston Skate Massive + Bosko Rock + Stone Desert + Jarek: Bar Open, Fitzroy The Cairos + Nova Heart + Special Guests: Beav’s Bar, Geelong DJ Dozen Matter: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (Beer Garden / 5pm), Brunswick The Floating Bridges + Jackjackjack + Slowjaxx & the Kozmic Love Orkestra + Centre & The South: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Tim Rizzoli: Melbourne Public (2pm), South Wharf Graveyard Train + Cherrywood: Old Hepburn Hotel, Hepburn Springs Sam Vandenberg: Precinct Hotel, Richmond Josh Rennie-Hynes: Pure Pop Records, St Kilda Glenn Ford & The Record Machine: Rainbow Hotel (4pm), Fitzroy Hugo Race & The True Spirit + Mark Snarski + Alison Ferrier Band: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Initials + Tyler Richardson + Tom Langon: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar / 3pm), Footscray The Large Number 12s: Royal Oak Hotel (4pm), Fitzroy North Passionate Pianists + Paul Grabowsky + Bob Sedergreen: Ruby’s Music Room (6pm), Melbourne Pierce Brothers + Timberwolf: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne

Benefit For Barry feat. Cabin Fever + Razor Cut + Lion Fight: The Bendigo (2pm), Collingwood Grumpy Neighbour: The Bridge Hotel (4pm), Castlemaine Twisted Pistol + Citizen: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Flash Company + Lloyd Spiegel: The Drunken Poet (4pm), Melbourne Dale Ryder Band + Gary Eastwood Express + DJ Roc Landers: The Espy (Front Bar / 5.30pm), St Kilda Sunday Assembly feat. Cisco Ceasar: The Gasometer Hotel (Band Room / 4.30pm), Collingwood Modesty + Dark Fair: The Old Bar, Fitzroy Liz Stringer: The Post Office Hotel (4.30pm), Coburg Sunday School + Various Artists: The Public Bar (4pm), North Melbourne Sunday School + Various Artists: The Public Bar (4pm), North Melbourne Greens Dairy Angel Ensemble: The Sporting Club (5pm), Brunswick The Sideshow Brides: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy Bobby Fox - The Fantastic Mr Fox: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Fraudband + Atom + The Impossible No Goods + The Jape Squad + Gorsha + The Shabbab: The Tote, Collingwood Archer + Kenny Joe Black: The Workers Club, Fitzroy The Quietly Spoken Sons Of Lee Marvin: Victoria Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Pear & The Awkward Orchestra: Wesley Anne, Northcote Pork Chop Party: Yarra Hotel (5pm), Abbotsford

MON 30

Huanchaco: 303, Northcote Playwrite + Kalacoma + Sweets: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Pierce Brothers + Timberwolf + Sean Pollard: Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne

30/70 + Lazercatz 2000: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood

Trivia: The B.East, Brunswick East

Monday Night Mass feat. Mangelwurzel + Spermaids + Usurper Of Modern Medicine + Lalic: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Paul Williamson’s Hammond Combo: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy Dear Monday feat. Marcus Hayden + Emily Soon + Tyne James-Organ + Zach Rembrandt: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Passionate Tongues Poetry hosted by Michael Reynolds: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Monday’s Covered + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda I Do Like Mondays feat. Simon Gardam + Glow/ Song + Rituals + Document Swell: The Old Bar, Fitzroy The Black Molls: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda DJ Street Spot: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

TUE 01

Klub MUK: 303, Northcote Morning Melodies - Christmas in July + Brendan Scott: Bayswater Hotel , Bayswater Rich Davies & The Devil’s Union: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Never Cheer Before You Know Whos Winning: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Fresh Industry Showcases + Various Artists: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 54 • THE MUSIC • 25TH JUNE 2014

Comedy Lockdown + Various Artists: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne

Discovery Night feat. Jagape + Young & Pretty + Indigo Caves: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Trivia: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Brightside Live Music Showcase + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda Ruby Tuesday feat. Dear Plastic + Fortunes + Winterplan: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Moulin Beige: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote


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The Music (Melbourne) Issue #44