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2 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


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themusic 14TH MAY 2014

#038

ARCTIC MONKEYS @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: KANE HIBBERD

INSIDE FEATURED The Black Keys Chromeo

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK ACTRESS YAEL STONE (P27)

Samurai Cinema: The Way Of The Warrior King Parrot The Menzingers

review

Brant Bjork Metronomy Tune-Yards Orange Is The New Black Things Of Stone & Wood Russell Howard St Vincent

REVIEWS Album: Wagons Live: Cut Copy Arts: White Face ...and more

“YOU GET THE SENSE THERE’S NO SHORTAGE OF CREATIVE JUICES ON PLANET ARCTIC MONKEYS. THEIR LONGEVITY IS ENSURED.” BRYGET CHRISFIELD REVIEWS ARCTIC MONKEYS (P34)

WHO IS SET FOR CHART GLORY THIS WEEK? FIND OUT WITH OUR MIDWEEK FIGURES WRAP-UP. ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

tour diary

THE GUIDE Cover: PBS Radio Festival Eat/Drink: Good Beer Week Frontlash/Backlash Indie News/Q&As Opinion

“WE ARE CHANGING THE CONVERSATION, AND I CAN’T TELL YOU HOW EXTRAORDINARY IT IS TO BE PART OF THAT.”

WHAT HAVE OUR INDIE ARTISTS BEEN UP TO YOU ASK? FIND OUT–

ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

DUSTIN TEBBUTT

EXCLUSIVE TOUR DIARIES FROM PROGROCKERS ALITHIA AND INDIE-FOLK SINGERSONGWRITER DUSTIN TEBBUTT. ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU.

Gig Guide WINDS OF WOERR

“GELA HAS BROUGHT TOGETHER AN ALL-FEMALE CAST AND CREW TO TELL OF THE FOUR WINDS.”

HARRY HUGHES REVIEWS WINDS OF WOERR (P36)

review 6 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Bryget Chrisfield

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Stephanie Liew

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch vic.giguide@themusic.com.au

SENIOR CONTRIBUTOR Jeff Jenkins

CONTRIBUTORS Aleksia Barron, Atticus Bastow, Steve Bell, Emma Breheny, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Oliver Coleman, Rebecca Cook, Adam Curley, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Dan Condon, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Sam Fell, Tim Finney, Bob Baker Fish, Cameron Grace, Tom Hawking, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Samson McDougall, Tony McMahon, Fred Negro, Matt O’Neill, Josh Ramselaar, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Stephanie Tell, Izzy Tolhurst, Simone Ubaldi, Glenn Waller, Matthew Ziccone

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 14 MAY - 20 MAY 2014

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ART DIRECTOR Brendon Wellwood

ART DEPT

We have ten double passes up for grabs to see Under The Skin at a preview screening on 27 May at 6.30pm at Cinema Nova. This is a film adaptation of Michael Faber’s sci-fi novel, directed by Jonathan Glazer. Scarlett Johansson stars as an alien seductress who scours the countryside of Scotland in search of human prey. Come on, who wouldn’t want to see a ScarJo alien literally devouring men?

Usually when you head into Mario’s on Lygon Street it’s because you’re led by your stomach and require a good feed. From 21 May however, The Unseen Beatles exhibition – a rare collection of photographs of The Beatles taken by British photographer Robert Whitaker – will be lining the restaurant’s walls.

David Di Cristoforo, Eamon Stewart, Julian De Bono vic.art@themusic.com.au

ADMIN & ACCOUNTS Loretta Zoppos, Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson, Niall McCabe accounts@themusic.com.au

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CONTACT US Tel 03 9421 4499 Fax 03 9421 1011 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au 584 Nicholson St, Fitzroy North 3068 Locked Bag 2001, Clifton Hill VIC 3068

Animation and animated art is a constantly evolving artform. You can score some behind the scenes insights into the DreamWorks creative process most Thursdays throughout the DreamWorks Animation: The Exhibition run at ACMI from 17 Apr – 23 Oct at 6pm. Plus, these Animated Conversations are absolutely free! MELBOURNE

listen


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au BONJAH

ANBERLIN

BURN OUT BRIGHTER

If you’re an Anberlin fan, then don’t let the band call it a day without saying goodbye. The melodic alt-rockers recently announced they were putting a full stop on their 12-year story, but not without a world tour, stopping in their favourite destination (see: Australia). So open your hearts and minds to the Floridian fivepiece one last time when Anberlin perform 3 Sep, Metropolis, Fremantle; 6 Sep, The Hi-Fi, Brisbane; 7 Sep, UNSW Roundhouse, Sydney (all ages); and 9 Sep, Forum Theatre, Melbourne. Making these shows even more memorable for punters will be The Getaway Plan, who will support on all dates.

WILD AND FREE

Melbourne-via-New Zealand four-piece Bonjah are launching their latest record Beautiful Wild with shows right around the country later this year. Experience their explosive grooves live 4 Jul, Cherry Bar, Melbourne; 5 Jul, Yah Yah’s, Melbourne; 14 Aug, The Northshore Tavern, Hillarys; 15 Aug, Indi Bar, Scarborough; 16 Aug, Amplifier Bar, Perth; 17 Aug, Dunsborough Tavern; 19 Sep, Newtown Social Club, Sydney; 20 Sep, Cambridge Hotel, Newcastle; 4 Oct, The Hi-Fi, Melbourne; 10 Oct, The Zoo, Brisbane; 11 Oct, Racecourse Hotel, Ipswich; and 12 Oct, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden, Gold Coast. Tickets on sale now, proudly presented by The Music.

THE BOYS LIGHT UP

Oz rock fans right around the nation are going to be raising their tins to the news that James Reyne is going to be revisiting the entire songbook of Australian Crawl live on stage with a full band of gun players. Don’t sit on this guys – Reyne assures us that this is the closest thing to a reunion you’re going to get – so make sure you pick up some tickets and experience all Crawl, all night long! Tour happens 1 & 2 Aug, The Palms, Melbourne; 9 Aug, The Tivoli, Brisbane; 15 Aug, Enmore Theatre, Sydney (with special guests Dragon!); and 23 Aug, Astor Theatre, Perth.

HAUNTINGLY LOVELY

New Zealand chanteuse Tiny Ruins will be crossing the Tasman with a three-piece band to run through her luscious new album Brightly Painted One, with the reliably fantastic Shining Bird getting amongst the fun to spread the word about their brand new 7”. Catch the two acts 1 Jul, Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane; 2 Jul, Newtown Social Club, Sydney; 3 Jul, Anitas Theatre, Wollongong; 4 Jul, Goodgod Small Club, Sydney; 5 Jul, Mojo’s Bar, Perth; and 8 Jul, Northcote Social Club, Melbourne.

You might have seen her on The Ellen DeGeneres Show... Or The Tonight Show With Jay Leno... Or Good Morning America. If not, you’ll be able to catch Ingrid Michaelson later this year when she visits Australia for a run of capital city dates. Known for her transcending voice and choice ukulele skills, the indie darling will take the stage at Metro Theatre, Sydney, 19 Sep; Corner Hotel, Melbourne, 20 Sep; New Globe Theatre, Brisbane, 21 Sep; and Fly By Night, Perth, 24 Sep.

RON POPE

IT’S BACK ON!

Plenty of hard rock lovers were left lingering earlier this year when New Zealand/Brit alt. riff force I Am Giant, but clearly the guys had some epic ulterior motives as they’ve just announced the release of their second full-length Science & Survival (out 4 Jul on Sony). They’ll launch the brand new album – a record the band calls “bigger, heavier and more intense” – with shows at The Rev, Brisbane, 6 Aug; Amplifier Bar, Perth, 7 Aug; Cherry Bar, Melbourne, 8 Aug; and Spectrum, Sydney, 9 Aug.

“YOU CAN’T ASK FOR ANYTHING GREATER THAN THE TRUTH” TRUE THAT EARL [@EARLXSWEAT]. 10 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

FLICKING THE SWITCH

RENAISSANCE MAN

Ron Pope has done everything himself, on his own terms, which makes his global success even more humbling. At 30 years of age and already ten albums into his career, the Brooklyn musician is showing no signs of slowing down, with an eleventh full-length, Calling Off The Dogs, set for a release early next month, perfectly coinciding with a return to Australian shores. Catch Pope 6 Jun, Princess Theatre, Brisbane*; 7 Jun, Factory Theatre, Sydney*; 8 Jun, Workers Club, Melbourne (afternoon: under-18s; evening: 18+); and 13 Jun, Astor Lounge, Perth* (*all ages).


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THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 11


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au

BABA BRINKMAN

RAP SCIENCE

TAKING BACK SUNDAY

IN THE BANK

TAKEN AND USED

Having just completed a massive sold out tour of the USA, Taking Back Sunday and The Used are now coming to our shores to play a co-headline tour. The two pop punk heavyweights tear up the stage at 170 Russell, 25 Aug.

CLASSICAL ROCK

The Australian Chamber Orchestra presents Timeline, a show that travels through 42,000 years of musical tradition, from the first rumblings of melody in Australian Aboriginal culture to the thrashing sounds of Radiohead and the Sex Pistols. The ACO is joined by electro-duo The Presets, and a cappella groups on 1 & 2 Jun, Hamer Hall.

WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

DIVINE/DOPE KNOWS

Alt-rockers Zoophyte are back to their funk-influenced roots with the release of new single The Empire. The Melbourne guys officially launch the single in the Gershwin Room at The Espy on 30 May.

MATT & MARTY

Dr Martin Taylor MBE, UK jazz and fingerstyle guitarist, along with Matthew Fagan are conducting some performances and masterclasses on the following dates: 20 May, Wangaratta Performing Arts Centre (both); 23 May, Wodonga Jazz Basement (performance); 28 May, Milanos Tavern, Brighton (class); 29 May, Bennetts Lane (performance); 30 May, Meeniyan Mechanics Institute (performance).

ALMOST FAIMOUS

Spewing out positive energy and infectious good times, FAIM will be taking their Perth punk flair nationwide. The quintet launch new single Means To Their Ends 28 May, The Bendigo and 29 May, Reverence Hotel.

UK dance label Defected Records are bringing Kenny Dope, one half of Masters At Work, as well as Ibiza stalwart Sam Divine, over to Australia to celebrate the imprint’s 15th anniversary at Ms Collins, 8 Jun.

RECKLESS ROMANTICS The Love Junkies are hitting the road nationally to launch their roaring new EP Flight Test, stopping by Shebeen Bar, 13 Jun. Fans of the EP won’t wanna miss the energetic, atmospheric live rendition.

SILLY BOY

It’s tour time for Melbourne indiepop two-piece Boyeur, who are headed on the road with their debut EP, Gold Street, out 30 May. They launch the EP at The Workers Club on 26 Jun.

Perth rapper Coin Banks, who first came to our attention as one part of The Stoops, has a debut EP, Heads, which he’s getting ready to launch this June. He plays Laundry Bar, 13 Jun; and The Espy, 14 Jun.

LENDING A HAND

British India have got The Pretty Littles for The Curtin, 29 May. Chet Faker brings Rat & Co with him 13 – 16 Jun, Forum Theatre. Airling supports James Vincent McMorrow at Forum Theatre, 27 May. On 15 Jun at Grace Darling Hotel, The Bennies and a local high school band will rev up the crowd before Dune Rats perform; to be that band, send three of your tracks to stuff@ ratbagrecords.com. For their Karova Lounge show on 19 Jun, Bel Air supports, and for the Corner Hotel show on 20 Jun, The Bennies, Drunk Mums and Wod will open.

THE SOHN RISES

The alternately acoustic and electronic vibes of Vienna-based artist SOHN capture the mystery and loneliness of a night owl. See the singer blend soulful melodies with killer electro beats at Ding Dong Lounge, 25 Jun.

OH BOY!

They haven’t finished their regional tour of Australia yet, but indie-pop quintet Boy & Bear are already asking for more, booking September shows. See them, with guests Holy Holy, at Palais Theatre, 5 Sep.

“CAN’T BELIEVE @SMH FIRED GEORGE CLOONEY ALREADY. HOPE BEN FRANKLIN IS OK”

MAT WHITEHEAD [@MATWHI] IS CONCERNED. 12 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

New York-based Canadian rapper Baba Brinkman is bringing with The Rap Guide To Evolution at Arts Centre Melbourne’s Fairfax Studio on 6 & 7 Jun. The show presents a unique species of hip hop theatre which incorporates the accuracy of a scientific expert to communicate the facts of evolution and origins of hip hop culture.

NEW GODS

MUSIC AND MASTERPIECES

On Friday evenings at the NGV from 27 Jun to 29 Aug, view Italian Masterpieces from Spain’s Royal Court: Museo del Prado after hours and enjoy talks, great food and wine, DJs and music performances from the likes of Kirin J Callinan, Owl Eyes, Teeth & Tongue, New Gods, Ben Watt and more. Visit ngv.vic.gov.au for details.


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THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 13


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au PREDESTINATION

CIRCUS OZ

FEELING MIFFED

MIFF has announced this year’s opening film is the Spierig Brothers’ new feature, Predestination. The sci-fi and crime story stars Ethan Hawke, Noah Taylor and Sarah Snook. Opening night takes place at Hamer Hall, 31 Jul. Applications for volunteers and for a new Critics Campus intensive lab are now open at miff.com.au. The festival runs 31 Jul–17 Aug.

CUTTHROAT INDUSTRY

Melbourne indie distro company Video Archives is releasing their first acquisition, the highly acclaimed psycho-drama-horror film Jugular. They’ll be launching the low-budget scare 14 May at Thousand Pound Bend.

SPACE JAM

Professor Brian Cox, the British rock starturned-particle physicist and BBC presenter, is headed on a national tour, Making Sense Of The Cosmos. Hosted by Adam Spencer, the stage show is a look through space and time. See it at The Plenary, 18 Oct.

ANDREWS ORIGINALS Coming to Australia for the first time, DJ Jessie Andrews will be playing Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 6 Jun; and The Bottom End, 21 Jun.

AS THE SUN RISES

Astronomy Class ie Ozi Batla, Chasm and Sir Robbo, are set to hit the road. The music, created with help from Srey Channthy, draws on Khmer pop music. They’ll be playing Newtown Social Club on 20 Jun.

SLIPPING

Razor-sharp, Pool (No Water) is a theatre show that unravels the ideals of friendship, the morality of art and the jealousy and resentment inspired by success. Showing at Goodtime Studios from 1–10 Jun.

NERDS UNITE

Nerdlinger are going on their own headline tour to praise the launch of new single Church Of Punk Rock. Catch ‘em at 303, 12 Jul.

NO MISTAKE

Busby Marou are headed down the east coast with Darren Middleton and Karl S Williams to showcase new single My Second Mistake. They’ll woo Corner Hotel, 8 Aug. 14 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

NO CLOWNING AROUND

To celebrate World Circus Day, Circus Oz has released their long-awaited 2014 ensemble members. The crowd of 12 will create and score the company’s new show But Wait… There’s More, which premieres on 18 Jun and runs to 13 Jul. Prepare for the usual acrobatic antics, with a dash of slam poetry, electro tunes and hip hop jams.

MIDNIGHT COWBOY

The sweet, lonely country tunes of elusive singer-songwriter Archer will ring around The Workers Club in Melbourne for three unique nights. His simple music will captivate on 15, 22 & 29 Jun.

“IF ANYTHING MIRANDA DEVINE’S ENTIRE CAREER HAS BEEN BASED AROUND THE CONCEPT THAT WORDS SHOULD BE MEANINGLESS”

JAMES COLLEY [@JAMCOLLEY] ON NOT-SO-DEVINE.

LET SPARKS FLY

OOOH FOXY

TALES OF URBAN SUBURBIA

45 ACROBATS

Before he takes Splendour up a notch, Chrome Sparks will be heading to Howler on 25 Jul. The man otherwise known as Jeremy Malvin has some electronic trump cards up his sleeve, including songs from his brand new EP Goddess.

We premiered their latest video and now we’ve got the scoop on tour dates for Hands Like Houses. The Canberran rockers take their tales of suburban woe to Pier Live, 20 Jun and The Royal Melbourne Hotel, 21 Jun.

THE SUMMER OF ART

The Melbourne Recital Centre has just announced it’ll be leading the Victorian government’s new Jan/Feb 2015 arts project, Summer In Southbank. The Recital Centre will work with local and national arts organisations to enliven the Melbourne Arts Precinct with free and lowcost interactive artworks on the street.

Irishman Bobby Fox, who’s known not only for the other part of that Miranda Kerr single, but for being on the Australian stage in Mamma Mia! and Jersey Boys, will share his debut album, The Fantastic Mr Fox, at The Toff In Town, 15 & 29 Jun.

After premiering in 2010, with more than three million people in 25 cities being enthralled by the production, Cirque du Soleil will be bringing Totem back to Australia, visiting Flemington Racecourse on 21 Jan.

GOING STRAIGHT

Straight Arrows’s second album Rising is a punk-flavoured psych record, due for release in June. With guests TV Colours, they hit up Northcote Social Club, 12 Jul.

FRINGE-DWELLERS

Artist Registration for the 2014 Melbourne Fringe Festival is now open to all artists at melbournefringe.com.au ‘til 23 May.


sat 17th May All Star Lineup

HARVEY CARTEL Two Sets from 5 to 7 pm

Sun 18th May

BACKWOOD CREATURES Coming Soon to The Labour

JVG GUITAR METHOD CD Launch 24th & 25th May

DIRTY YORK 31st May

FOOD AT THE LABOUR Uncle Dougy’s BBQ New Winter Menu On the Roof Top Fri, Sat, Sun 197A BRUNSIWCK ST FITZROY 3065 (03) 9417 5955

THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 15


music

HIGHLY EVOLVED Want The Black Keys to continue sounding the same? Well, according to Patrick Carney, you’re “psychotic”. The drummer tells Benny Doyle why The Beatles are the benchmark and how Danger Mouse made him see things in a different light.

D

ropping the revs back after the runaway success of 2011 album El Camino, The Black Keys have once again shaken the ideals of what a ‘garage two-piece’ is capable of with their eighth studio offering Turn Blue. A hypnotic body of work – far denser and more lucid than anything the band have created previously – the album sees Carney and longtime running mate Dan Auerbach getting weird and wonderful, with a light psychedelic blanket wrapping up their trademark highway rock’n’roll.

want to push something out as fast as we could,” Carney reasons, “we wanted to take a moment to slow things down.” Burton – who’s currently touring Broken Bells’ second record, 2014’s After The Disco – has been producing The Black Keys since 2008’s Attack & Release, and has long been considered part of the family. “Since the first day we talked to him on the phone we felt connected to him,” smiles Carney. “We’ve known him now for like seven years, and we’ve been working together for seven years so he’s one of our best friends really, and he’s most likely the only producer we’ll ever work with because when we go

I learned from the first time we worked with him that that’s the only way it works, you’ve got to share in the creativity if you’re going to ask for it. “He’s taught me one important lesson: that if you don’t try it, you can’t dislike it. And that is something that I think everybody needs to learn; it’s maybe one of the most important life lessons that I’ve learned, and Brian taught it to me through a very stern conversation in 2007. I was shooting down some idea and he pulled me outside and basically told me that, and since then I’ve had to tell the same thing to five or six bands that I’ve worked with.” Two-and-a-half songs from the Michigan sessions still ended up getting used on Turn Blue though: the beginning of first single Fever “up until the breakdown at the end”, It’s Up To You Now and Gotta Get Away, the “fastest song we’d ever written” according to Carney. “We weren’t going to put [Gotta Get Away] on the record, but we decided that the record was, if you go in on the lyrics, it’s pretty heavy and kinda sad and twisted,” he says. “But we wanted to put that song at the end just to lighten the whole experience a little bit. I know Captain Beefheart used tricks like that on [1967 debut] Safe As Milk, where he put this song I’m Glad right in between the two heaviest songs, just to lighten the mood a little bit. “The thing about those three songs is that they’re the three fastest songs on the record,” Carney adds, “and

“I’D ACTUALLY FEEL LIKE WE’D BE THE DEFINITION OF A FAILURE IF OVER THE COURSE OF A DECADE OUR RECORDS SOUNDED EXACTLY THE SAME.”

El Camino took the band places they could have only dreamed of when they were slugging it out in the bars of Akron, Ohio, a decade before. They headlined Coachella, filled New York’s Madison Square Garden – a sell-out in 15 minutes no less – and the pair once again found themselves on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards, trumping the three gongs they received for 2010’s Brothers by taking home four statues, winning Best Rock Album and Producer Of The Year in the process. Hell, Carney even got into a social media spat with Bieber and his Beliebers. Before those 2013 Grammys the band had been working in a Michigan studio, cutting an entire record in ten days. However, the album the pair were left with sounded like El Camino 2.0. Arguably the songs were solid – great even – but there just wasn’t enough creative evolution. Carney remembers, “After all that shit we just realised that we’d been going at it strong since 2009 and that we should take a little breather.” However, he’s quick to clarify that the “breather” still only equated to four weeks off, the band touring South and North America while frontman Auerbach’s relationship dissolved behind the scenes. Still, it was enough time for the pair to decide they were going to return to the studio with good friend and long-time collaborator Brian ‘Danger Mouse’ Burton, ditching the Midwest for the sunny surrounds of Los Angeles, California to cut another record. “We didn’t 16 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

into the studio it’s like a three-man team, he kinda joins the band for the record – he writes with us, then we all produce it. We all have equal say.”

that makes sense because we were coming straight off the El Camino tour and playing all the fast material from that record and thinking in that world, and we switched gears heavily when we went to LA. But those songs were ones we kept going back to and they seemed to make sense in the context of the record.”

And considering the last two Black Keys’ records have come from entering the studio with no material, the results of the working relationship speak for themselves. “We respect his opinion to the point where he’s able to get things done that he wants to get done, and same thing goes when he’s dealing with us,” says the drummer. “And we always feel pleased with the outcome. A lot of times when you go into the studio with a producer it can be really hard to let go and see where it goes, and Dan and

What strikes you during your first few spins of Turn Blue is how apt the title is for the entire body of work. These are songs that you can get lost in and be held down by. Straight-up stomping rock moments are sparse, drifting guitar solos are plentiful, and the overall dreaminess of the release once again gives The Black Keys’ catalogue a new lean, the record peeling like an onion with every spin. Carney says that his favourite records growing up had that same immersive effect on him. “Led Zeppelin II is a record like that, that I can get really lost in, because they’re almost not songs, they’re just riffs and beats and space and vocal parts, and I think the way they utilised the form of a song that always fascinated me. But y’know, there’s different records, like Pavement’s Slanted And Enchanted – the first time I heard that it was like a fifth generation dubbed cassette, and it had this noise/haze over the whole tape, and it made it feel really mysterious and really detached; it was sloppy, and it was sometimes difficult and sometimes really hooky, at least to me. And I’ve always been


HEAVYWEIGHT HELP Even with the internet making the most absurd personal connections seem possible, it was still weird to be informed late-March about The Black Keys’ new record by earnibbling, tiger-petting, former heavyweight boxing champion of the world Mike Tyson. “I thought it would be cooler if someone else tweeted it, and Mike Tyson, he was the perfect candidate because it feels real wrong but at the same time makes sense,” chuckles Carney. “It makes sense because it makes no sense.” Proving that what you put out you get back, the support came about after The Black Keys gifted Tyson a song of theirs for a documentary the 47-year-old boxer was making. Tyson was real grateful, said if they ever needed a favour just ask, and a drunk text from Carney later, Mike Tyson was punching the keys. “For me part of the fun of putting a record out now is that we have access to more resources, including Mike Tyson,” says Carney. “Dan and I, we take our music really seriously, but we don’t take ourselves that seriously, and that’s an Akron, Ohio mentality; you can do something, but don’t own it, don’t live it, don’t pretend that you’re this... What I’m trying to say is that a lot of record promotions that have been happening recently are kinda self-important. On our radar we definitely wanted to sidestep that.”

fascinated by that, [being] able to make a record that you kinda want to live inside of.” The evolution of The Black Keys sound has been gradual yet inevitable, and Carney wants to keep change as a constant in the future. “To expect someone to not grow musically or personally in like a decade is kinda psychotic,” he scoffs. “I wouldn’t want to be making those [older] records again, I’d actually feel like we’d be the definition of a failure if over the course of a decade our records sounded exactly the same. Dan and I are huge fans of The Beatles, they’re our favourite band, and you go listen to the first record, I Want To Hold Your Hand, and then you hear the B-side of Abbey Road; I mean, you can hear it’s the same voices, but everything’s changed. That’s like the benchmark of success to me, and one day, hopefully, Dan and I can make a record that is somewhere on that scale. We haven’t yet, and I don’t think we ever will, but just knowing that exists, that you can see this band in eight years go from point A to point Z is a reminder why I want to make music.” Those musical heroes that Carney has namechecked during our chat – Beefheart, Zeppelin, Pavement, Beatles – you can hear all those influences and more swirl around in Turn Blue. Because what The Black Keys are doing is

experimenting with past traditions to create something exciting for the present, and even if they don’t continue the golden run they’re currently enjoying, they’ll be satisfied nonetheless. “This record, I think it’s our best record,” Carney gushes. “But I thought Brothers was our best record when we made that, I thought El Camino was our best record when we made that. I’m just really happy with it, but if it’s not as successful as either one of those records I will not be upset, I will actually be completely content with that.

“Dan and I have gone from making a record in a basement and no one really hearing it for a while, and then finally people started paying attention – actually, Australia was the first place where people really started paying attention to our second record [2003’s Thickfreakness]. But we’ve gone from basically playing to no one in the US to headlining festivals around the world, playing these big shows and getting awards, and just having the knowledge of that – the journey from beginning to now – is enough for me to feel content with our career forever.”

WHAT: Turn Blue (Nonesuch/Warner) THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 17


music

IT’S NOT A FETISH They bang on about Hall & Oates and boast sounding like George Michael and Roxette, but don’t call it nostalgia. Chromeo’s Dave 1 and P-Thugg convince Andrew Mast they dig new music by Drake as well.

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t’s midway through a week of SXSW promo in Austin, Texas but Chromeo are on. The Canadian disco-soul duo attack each interview with the verve of new young things trying to win their first wave of media attention. Propped up in the first floor lounge of the Hampton Inn, P-Thugg (Patrick Gemayel) is blinged out and relaxed into a giant sofa chair while Dave 1 (David Macklovitch) sits excitedly on the edge of his matching chair. Both stylish in black, both in love with their new album White Women. The pair see their fourth album White Women as their most collaborative effort to date – working with Solange and Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig as well as upcoming production duo Oliver. Having previously worked with Solange as she was reinventing herself as a hipster pop princess, Chromeo refuse to take credit for her newfound coolness. “We didn’t help Solange in any way,” says Macklovitch. “She was already killing it – she’s the total package.” But he will take acclaim for another act’s sudden hipster cred. “I’ll take credit for us and Hall & Oates,” boasts Macklovitch. “And Daryl [Hall] would be the first to say that ‘coz we went to war with that band’s name. People went ‘What! Hall & Oates!’ for so long. We went to war.” One track on White Women in particular seems to cement Chromeo’s musical nostalgia, the slow-burning Old 45s. But Macklovitch argues, “This is not us listening to old records but listening to a record like the Drake single – which is the same 100 bpm tempo – and, it’s like, this is a great groove, we should do something at that tempo too. It’s dancey but in a different way.” The last song recorded during the White Women sessions – finished the day before mastering began – is a collab with Oliver. Macklovitch continues, “They have the same sort of hip hop/funk/disco culture as we do. They actually wrote that song… And it’s got that George Michael thing – kinda ‘80s rockabilly effect on the voice, the chorus gets real big and the guitar solo is pure Roxette but it sounds modern. My parents like that.” Ahem, there’s that nostalgia thing again. Macklovitch disagrees, “The thing with us is it could be Leo Sayer or 18 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

it could be Blood Orange. We’re not fetishists for old music. Our whole schtick was that we were gonna draw from this whole obscure part of the musical canon that people overlook. Once that’s established we’re in dialogue with… You know, we’ll listen to an Andre 3000 record for inspiration.”

Gemayel adds, “It’s the whole point of what we do – to get it out there. The more the merrier – it’s great to have a little scene, a little competition.” In fact, Chromeo believe they owe Australia some kudos for influencing their own sound. Macklovitch is keen to express his love for “dope Australian underground, slept on ‘80s group Flash & The Pan”. It seems they were put onto the Australian pop duo (made up of iconic Australian musical team and ex-Easybeats, Harry Vanda and George Young) by French electronic producer Philippe Zdar. Macklovitch recalls, “He was like, ‘Dude, it’s so crazy, you sing like one of my favourite singers in the ‘80s, Flash & The Pan.’ But because of his French accent I could

“WE’RE NOT FETISHISTS FOR OLD MUSIC.” But Macklovitch does admit they are best known for being inspired by an ‘80s sound, “I think everybody knows that we went to war for this kind of music. When people thought that the ‘80s began and ended with New Order. And we went to war for the codpiece.”

never understand what the group was. It took me four years for me to be in a room with him and YouTube it – ‘Flash & The Pan… that’s what you were saying!’”

They are also aware the sound they drew from that inspiration has itself inspired imitators – especially in Australia. “We’re aware,” says Gemayel pointedly. “I don’t wanna call them imitators,” interrupts Macklovitch.

And there is one stop they have to make when back here. “The Palazzo Versace is waiting for us on the Gold Coast,” confesses Macklovitch. “They’re waiting for P to return all the stolen pillows…” Gemayel adds, “…And glasses and ashtrays and towels.” Macklovitch laughs, “There’s stolen merchandise from the Palazzo Verasce that needs to be returned. So just for that reason we will return.”

He’s hoping they can hook up with Flash & The Pan next time they are in Australia… Which will be when? Well, they’re not exactly sure. “What we would like to do in Australia for once is to do a string of hard ticket [headline] shows – it’s just very hard financially,” muses Macklovitch. Gemayel adds, “We usually go out there for festivals.” Macklovitch: “But we will probably do that again, it’s fun.”

WHAT: White Women (Parlophone/Warner)


ALL IN THE CODE Richard Sowada talks to Anthony Carew about the legacy of the cinematic samurai.

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amurai movies had a glorious heyday in the 1950s and ‘60s – huge domestic success in Japan, bountiful international and cinematic influence – yet, by the early ’70s, the glory days were over. A new program at ACMI, Samurai Cinema: The Way Of The Warrior, erects a worshipful shrine at the feet of the genre, looking at both its classics and less-heralded works, with a scattering of contemporary and curiously-related films. Samurai Cinema begins and ends with Akira Kurosawa, who’s represented by his iconic, forever-imitated pictures Rashomon, The Seven Samurai, The Hidden Fortress and Yojimbo. “It’s hard to get away from Kurosawa,” laughs Richard Sowada, ACMI’s Head of Film Programs, who

SAMURAI CINEMA: RASHOMON

assembled the Samurai Cinema season. Why dust off this old genre? Sowada sees the persistence of samurai films within the popcultural canon, far beyond their native culture, as being a sign of their continued relevance and sure universality. “The Bushido code – rectitude, courage, benevolence, honesty, loyalty, mercy, honour – those are just human themes,” Sowada references the moral codes of Japan’s ancient warriors, which tempered the violence of the military life with Shinto and Buddhist beliefs. “That’s why I think samurai cinema has so long been appropriated by Western cinema, because the core of the stories is so strong, so true to so many.”

Sowada himself “fell backwards” into samurai movies, his love of ‘70s Spaghetti Westerns invariably leading to the films that inspired them. Samurai Cinema features three famous examples of Japanese cinema being freely adapted (and/or ripped off ) by more famous American pictures, Yojimbo providing the template for Sergio Leone’s A Fistful Of Dollars; The Seven Samurai officially remade as the Western, The Magnificent Seven, and The Hidden Fortress being stripmined by George Lucas when writing Star Wars. Rather than showing these director antecedents, Sowada has programmed George Stevens’ 1953 Western, Shane, which isn’t influenced by samurai movies at all. Why? “It has all the tenets of the Bushido code, and [lead character] Shane basically is a samurai, the way he walks into town, and exists outside of these two opposing sides.” The other outsider films are Jim Jarmusch’s 1999 hip hop/samurai/Mafioso mash-up Ghost Dog: The Way Of The Samurai (“Ghost Dog is interesting in that it’s about someone who is a samurai, and who deeply respects the code of a samurai, but it’s not actually a samurai movie”) and Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1953 French crime-thriller, The Wages Of Fear. And new-millennial samurai-movie revivalism is represented by Yôji Yamada’s graceful Twilight Samurai and Takashi Miike’s hyper-violent 13 Assassins.

film

The program is divided into three ‘chapters’ – Courage, Honour and Honesty – drawing back on the tenets of the warrior. “I looked at the little groups of islands that would collect when I put these films all floating together. Even though I couldn’t do a program for all seven tenets, I really wanted to structure them by the Bushido code.” WHAT: Samurai Cinema: The Way Of The Warrior WHEN & WHERE: 16 May – 1 Jun, ACMI

THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 19


music

GETTING SERIOUS King Parrot. Do they still need an introduction? The Melbourne grindthrashers have already conquered Australia and have their sights set on overseas domination. Bassist and funny man Wayne Slattery downs a coffee with Lochlan Watt.

“O

ur opinion on the band is that it’s hard work. It’s a working class job – that’s what you can make it. You might not get paid lots of money, but you can travel the world, and that’s what I’ve realised anyway,” comments Slatts, a member known more for his comedic genius than bass skills. Formed in 2010, the intense and unpredictable five-piece delivered their debut EP, The Stench Of Hardcore Pub Trash, in 2011, but didn’t really start truly flogging Australian highways and airports until their 2012 debut album, Bite Your Head Off. Three incredibly well received and generally hilarious video clips, an international re-release through Candlelight Records, heaps of Australian tours later, the band has just returned from their first gig in Singapore, a slot at the giant Hammersonic Festival in Indonesia and six weeks on the road in the USA. “Basically it was like starting a new band again,” he admits. “In Australia you start off, build a band, and then you build a profile. We obviously had a little bit of presence there already, so it was really awesome to rock up to places where we thought there was going to be no one there, and there’d be a bunch of people that had driven from surrounding areas driving up, saying they thought they’d never see us, so that was amazing.” Speaking of people driving to come and see them, even Phil Anselmo of Pantera and Down fame showed up at one of their shows. “We played in Baton Rouge, and he lives in a property about an hour out of town. We obviously played at Soundwave, and Down were awesome enough to get us up to play a song with them. They kept in touch basically. They’d been sending us emails saying ‘We might come, Phil’s pretty pissed but we might come,’ and yeah last minute they arrived literally 20 minutes before we played. The singer of this support band, he was pretty pissed by that stage, and he was like ‘Look over there man, you see who that is? You like Pantera? That’s Phil Anselmo, man!’ and I was like ‘Yeah, he’s actually here to see us.’ It was a pretty chuffed moment! And then I was like ‘And I think we’re staying at his house!’ He was having 20 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

a ball man – smashing Long Island iced teas up the front, lifted Youngy [Matt Young, vocals] up and ran around with him.

walking around in socks and crocs, showing us his pet cemetery where he’d buried all his animals over the years, to where they called their beach, which is a lake with a bunch of sand… He was just relaxed, telling us stories of the history of Pantera, it was amazing.”

“Then Ari [White, guitars] and Squiz [Andrew LivingstoneSquires, guitars] jumped in the truck with him and his wife drove. For the hour-and-a-half drive

It’s hard to keep it together on the road for a lot of bands, but despite being in their 30s and 40s, King Parrot seem to have gotten the mix just right. “There was several times across the six weeks where I just couldn’t believe that we hadn’t punched each other the fuck out. There’s been no serious arguments… sometimes alcohol’s involved and people are dicks.

“I NEVER THOUGHT I’D BE IN PHIL ANSELMO’S BEDROOM.” he just pumped Portal and King Parrot and he couldn’t even speak. By the time we all pulled up Phil was up for about two minutes and just crashed out. Another surreal moment, his wife goes ‘Come and look at him, he’s sleeping really weird!’ Being in Phil Anselmo’s room and just seeing him passed out with his arm holding up his head... I never thought I’d be in Phil Anselmo’s bedroom. Sitting around his house the next day, walking around his property… Awesome scene of Phil Anselmo

Sometimes alcohol’s not involved and people are still dicks. But it’s compartmentalised and it’s fine. We made the decision a while ago to treat it fucking seriously, and don’t party until after the show.” While King Parrot will tear it up for Australian audiences most of this month, they’ve set aside some time to work on album number two before most likely heading off back overseas. “Ari’s probably the hit machine – he’ll bring stuff to the table and we’ll just work around it. It’s cool… There’s a couple there that I think have a heaps more hardcore-punk edge, like Against Me!, that whole vibe… not Against Me!,” he giggles. “What the fuck am I talking about? I can’t even remember who the fuck I’m talking about. But it’s definitely got that more hardcore punk edge to it.” WHEN & WHERE: 29 May, Colonial Hotel; 30 May, The Loft


THE HARD YARDS

done in my life,” Barnett adds. “And it’s definitely not something I would ever want to do now, but at the time it was fucking great and now, this is fucking great.”

Until a few years ago, falling asleep to the smell of animal faeces and sounds of intercourse were nothing out of the ordinary for The Menzingers. Co-lead vocalists/ guitarists Tom May and Greg Barnett sit down with Daniel Cribb to detail their rise to success.

“I

spent all day getting drunk in a pool!” The Menzingers guitarist/vocalist Greg Barnett declares to a sold-out Rosemount Hotel, halfway into their Australian tour supporting local punk legends The Smith Street Band. But touring life hasn’t always been so easy for the Pennsylvania four-piece, and while they’ve a slew of friends in countries all around the world that show them unrelenting hospitality, there was a time...

“It was wild,” guitarist/ vocalist Tom May admits, sitting in the beer garden of a small Irish pub whilst in Perth. “Greg and I stayed at a punk house in Savannah, Georgia and we just walked into a room and this guy just pointed to a corner and was like, ‘Yeah, you guys can stay right there, just don’t lift up those buckets because there’s dog shit under there.’ And there was a crusty punk couple just making out in the corner. But at the time, it wasn’t bad at all; we just got wasted every day.” “That’s the thing. Looking back, those first couple of tours were my favourite tours I’ve ever

music

They’ve hit Australia three times in as many years – in 2012 with Soundwave, 2013 supporting Pennywise and now with The Smith Street Band. “Basically touring for us really picked up after Chamberlain Waits [2010]. After Chamberlain Waits, we kind of found ways to make it work and now, I don’t know, it just feels comfortable, it feels like being home in a sense,” Barnett says. “It’s crazy to say that I can sit in Perth and be comfortable. I’m on the edge of the world.” “I think you made a really good comparison yesterday when you compared it to a sailor’s life,” May adds. “You’re kind of just gone for an extended period of time and that’s all you know. Then you come home for a bit and it’s weird, you live a dichotomous life like that.” Their third trip here brings the band’s new record, Rented World, an album truly reflective of their past few years while being a little darker at times. “I think a lot of it has to do with getting older,” May explains. “You can’t foresee what’s going to happen five years from any point in time and as the world changes and things get different for us, we try to relate that out to other people and hope they can relate to the emotions.” “I think if I was going to generalise anything with this record, there is more of a conscious effort to look at what’s going on around you and just better it,” Barnett adds. “I think we’re just getting too old to avoid life anymore. We kind of just have to make those grown-up decisions and be a bit more responsible than we were in the past.” WHAT: Rented World (Epitaph/Warner)

GETTING ON WITH IT

music

The eternally positive Brant Bjork chats with Benny Doyle about obeying his creative muse and the inspiration he finds in the desert.

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onsidering Brant Bjork and his Kyuss Lives! bandmates were squeezed by former allies Josh Homme and Scott Reeder in 2012 for copyright infringement on a name Bjork created, you could’ve expected the 41-year-old to be a little bitter with the music game. But after reclaiming Kyuss under the guise of Vista Chino – the power of which was seen firsthand on this year’s Big Day Out – Bjork was a man reinvigorated. He returned home and threw himself into a six-week writing stint which has brought a new set of songs to life. Calling in from Joshua Tree, California, Bjork says he “dug real deep for these tunes”, estimating he penned around 50 demos before culling that number back to a workable 12 tracks. “I’m very excited,” he warmly drawls, “I can’t remember the last time I was this excited. The rock is rolling for sure. “There’s definitely a throw-shit-against-the-wall-androll-with-it [mentality], but I’m just excited about doing this record with this band, so I went a little deeper than I normally would, just really following my muse and totally obeying it and not settling for anything that wasn’t totally on [that] level.” The “low desert punks” that he’s pulled together as part of this new unit are all old friends, with the three men – Dave Dinsmore (bass), Bubba Dupree (guitar) and Tony Tornay (drums) – holding some serious cred thanks to

time spent in Che, Void, Hater and Fatso Jetson, to name but a few acts. “I shot for the moon and the stars putting this thing together,” Bjork smiles, “and we’re all on the same page and all doing our own thing. But for this particular unit I just primarily needed guys that are cool and a pleasure to be around, because the music is always ultimately going to reflect the collective band and them as people and their vibe, so it was important to me that I put a unit together that we can sit down, have dinner and drinks and just enjoy each other’s company.” When talking about the music though, the multiinstrumentalist stresses

that this is going to be a hard rock record. He needed players that could bring “fire and power” to a collection of songs, conjuring up the dominant imagery of the Californian desert and allowing the heat to practically radiate from the music. Bjork might call Los Angeles home these days, but he knows where his heart lies. “The desert is a mysterious place even to people who live here. There are still things that are never discovered and energies and questions. It’s an intense environment, and this band represents that. How people perceive [the desert], what they make of it, what their perspective is, how they romanticise it, that’s part of the entertainment for me, so I just do what I do, we do what we do together, and we’re excited to see how people react to it.” WHEN & WHERE: 29 May, Ding Dong Lounge THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 21


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THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 23


music

READY TO MINGLE Joseph Mount admits that Metronomy’s latest album doesn’t bring the party, but as Benny Doyle learns, the music is about more than just instant pleasure.

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etronomy’s record from earlier this year, Love Letters, has the vibe of a Wes Anderson film. The instrumentation is awkward, the lyrics politely passive, and the overall quirkiness of songs like Love Letters and Reservoir paint the sort of pictures that would probably be shared between Margot and Richie Tenenbaum. But don’t go thinking these Love Letters of Metronomy’s are being sent out into the world from a literal place. Mount clarifies. “I’m not the kind of person that is trying to be a confessional songwriter or anything like that. I take ideas from my life but there’s a point where it becomes a fantasy. It wouldn’t be a very nice thing to do to my girlfriend, I don’t reckon, to get into the nitty gritty of things.” Rather than working for the immediate gratification of others, Mount has made a record that not so much forces people to work for their joys, but more so encourages listeners to hang around and see where the experience takes them. “The first time you listen to this record you’re not going to be like, ‘Whoa! Par-ty!’,” laughs the 31-yearold. “But if there’s something about it you like, even if that’s a tiny something, if you keep going back to it it’ll get more and more rewarding.” The Brit goes on to call Metronomy’s fourth full-length a body of work which is “part of this bigger picture”, but also a record that, on another level, simply reflects where he was at while writing and recording. “This one definitely is the most precise record I’ve made – I feel like the songwriting is refined,” Mount says. “But with each record I definitely feel like I’m getting closer to distilling, or bottling, the essence of Metronomy.” Now a fully formed four-piece – the current state of a gradual evolution which began in Mount’s Devon bedroom, shifted to London in trio form before growing into a four-piece based between London and Paris – Metronomy cut Love Letters in the English capital at Toe Rag Studios, a space that looks more vintage science laboratory than high-tech studio for the stars. It’s an analogue fetishist’s wet dream, and a place where Mount 24 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

was really able to shape the classic sound of the record. “When you’re [recording to] tape and you do little things with it, you realise how so many modern effects basically come from people just screwing around with tape,” he remarks. “And just having

making an LP which is most exciting for Mount. “I really like being able to get ideas out of my head onto a record,” he says. “Being able to make something out of nothing, I’m really into that, and how you can start a day with nothing and finish with a song that never existed. And I don’t have that instant gratification in anything else that I do; I’m not a sculptor or a painter. It’s the only thing that I get that sense of achievement from.” Visiting for Splendour In The Grass, Metronomy will tie their starkly different recordings together – the bedroom electro of Pip Paine... (2006), the nerdtronica

“WITH EACH RECORD I DEFINITELY FEEL LIKE I’M GETTING CLOSER TO DISTILLING, OR BOTTLING, THE ESSENCE OF METRONOMY.” this physical thing makes you look at [the recording process] differently. “I wanted to make myself learn something, and to record like that is a real shock to the system. It’s just a challenge, and I feel happy now to go and spend two years touring the record because when I was making it I sort of gave myself a mental workout... but I’m alright now.” And it’s that sense of wonderment when

across Nights Out (2008) and the tropical yacht rock of 2011’s Mercury-nominated The English Riviera – with an entirely giving live show. Mount calls it “an opportunity to show how they do all come from the same place”. “It makes more sense when you’re seeing those tracks mingling with one another in a set than it would if you were just listening to them all in a mix,” he reasons. “I feel like the live show has really hit a point, and I’m just very proud of it at the moment. There’s something about having that back catalogue, that wealth of material that you can draw on, [which makes it] feel like a complete thing – we’re having a lot of fun with it at the moment.” WHAT: Love Letters (Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 25 Jul, Forum Theatre; 26 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 25


music

REAL THING Brendan Telford speaks to Tune-Yards ringleader Merrill Garbus about how autonomy and subversion can also be fun.

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une-Yards isn’t necessarily an easy proposition, a musical act that revels in both familiar beats and compositions, however colourfully deconstructed, all driven by energetic percussion and a powerful yet acrobatic voice, all from the diminutive yet exuberant frame of Merrill Garbus. Take 2011’s whokill, for example, a second release that shirks the lo-fi, vocal-looped idiosyncrasies of her debut record, Bird-Brains, for a more flamboyant yet chaotic approach, mashing together genres with a freer, more fervent sense of experimentation. Garbus herself was moving from New England to California whilst dealing with the rising acceptance of her musical endeavours with a growing sense of pride yet wanting to push things as far as they could conceivably go. Nikki Nack finds Garbus much more in tune with what Tune-Yards is, and whilst many of the tropes she’s employed previously have become cemented in these new tracks’ DNA; there’s a sing-song simplicity here, a childlike sense of maniacal glee that foreshadows Garbus’ confidence. “The challenge for a musician is that you don’t have all that much perspective on anything until you have the opportunity to get out from under the loud and painful and mysterious place that your own headspace can be,” Garbus laughs. “I’m glad it came out with a playful tone because I wanted to write pop songs and danceable songs, songs that felt lovely to create but then carried with them a whole lot of new challenges.” One such challenge was utilising hip hop beats in many of the tracks. Garbus had to wrestle with the notion of giving up some autonomy in creating the album to get the desired sound she wanted, with producers Malay (Frank Ocean, Alicia Keys, Big Boi) and John Hill (Rihanna, Shakira, M.I.A.) coming into the frame. Garbus is quick to assert that nothing was compromised, only augmented by the experience, as these producers themselves seem to be interested in music that takes something and deconstructs it before putting it back together in an iconic way. “Inviting strangers into my world to be a part of the musical process was really challenging for me, but it ended up being a very comfortable experience. Me and Nate (Brenner) both have a history of listening to hip hop and that being the music we were interested in growing up, so if we

26 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

were going to let people become a part of what we do, it would be leaning towards that than, say, a psychedelic rock approach. I will speak for myself when I wanted my love (for hip hop) to show. Having two producers was scary but they brought different experiences and approaches from their standpoint of R&B and

on Tune-Yards too, and I want to be loud about being a woman producer because you don’t hear much about women being a part of that particular process. Many women are producing their own and other people’s music, and I have always wanted to be open and proud that I was one of those people. I cling on to my producer role and I still have that; only five or six songs were truly co-produced by (Hill and Malay). But I think we have moved on from that possessiveness of an album to the point that we just want it to be the most awesome thing that we can make, and they helped us achieve that. We are teaching ourselves, and we are gonna take our lessons where we can get them.”

“I CLING ON TO MY PRODUCER ROLE AND I STILL HAVE THAT” reggae; they have brought out some of the loudest soul influences in albums of the last decade. There were things that we simply would not have considered, but they in turn considered us and what we wanted to do. “Both of us still found ourselves thinking why do we need anyone, we’ve done it all on our own thus far. We are both essentially trying to make a living producing music; Nate produces other people’s music as it is. I’ve been a producer

Above all else, Nikki Nack showcases Garbus as an idiosyncratic presence whose effervescence and prescient intelligence combine with her eclectic instrumentation and vocal prowess. “I think Nikki Nack shows that we are in this for the long haul. Without sounding pompous and saying we are better this time, I can truthfully say I don’t know what we really did differently. All I can say is this is what happened this year. For me it’s always about improving, about learning to be quicker with my hands or my voice, to be a better musician. I don’t read or transcribe music very well but I do feel that my skills are growing, I’m growing with confidence and learning not to compromise. Basically to be able to play exactly what I hear in my head is getting better. It’s better that it’s out here than cooped up in there.” WHAT: Nikki Nack (4AD/Remote Control) WHEN & WHERE: 24 Jul, Howler; 26 Jul, Splendour In The Grass, North Byron Parklands


THE NEW ORANGE Yael Stone wanted to scare herself. And what better way to do so than to pack her bags and shift to the other side of the world? Guy Davis chats to the actress about Orange Is The New Black.

S

ydney actress Yael Stone had been racking up some impressive credits on stage and screen at home, but her yearning for “an adventure quest” saw her relocate to New York City. She hadn’t been stateside long before she auditioned for a TV comedy-drama about life in a women’s prison. The show was Orange Is The New Black, adapted from Piper Kerman’s memoir of life behind bars by Weeds creator Jenji Kohan, and Stone landed the role of Lorna Morello, whose red lipstick and distinctive east coast accent has made her one of the series’ most notable characters. Orange Is The New Black

YAEL STONE AS LORNA IN ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK

has been warmly received by critics and audiences alike, with a second season set to air soon and a third season recently given the green light.“It’s good to be a little bit terrified,” she says. “I’ve found America has been a little more open for me when it comes to film and television. I was able to do so many wonderful things in the theatre in Australia, and I was so lucky to be able to do that, but working on Orange... here I’ve been able to have a real inventive experience creatively. I’ve been able to create a space around myself and then create something within that space.” Stone initially auditioned for the

role of Nicky Nichols, Lorna’s jailhouse lover, but admits she wasn’t quite right for the role. But the show’s casting directors saw something in her that suited the part of Lorna, and when Stone was given a scene to read she went for it, aware that sometimes the best course of action is “to be willing to fall flat on your face and make an absolute fool of yourself ”.

tv

“Sometimes taking that leap of faith is a good move!” she laughs. One of the boldest moves Stone has made in her portrayal of Lorna is the character’s voice, a BostonNew Jersey hybrid that has bemused a few US viewers but delighted more. “I’ll take the delight. I’m just happy no one has asked me to leave the country!” The cast has been praised by admirers of the show, not only for the line-up’s talent but also its diversity. But even though the actors are “black, white, Hispanic, gay, straight, transgender”, the discussion surrounding the actors and their characters has become less about gender and sexuality and more about people and personalities. “We are changing the conversation, and I can’t tell you how extraordinary it is to be part of that.” Orange Is The New Black’s first season is now available on home video, and new episodes will be airing on Showcase in June. Stone says the show will be going deeper and darker in terms of character and storylines. “While it’s essentially a comedy with some dramatic moments, even the comedy has a very black Jenji Kohan feel to it. Season two has a lot more of that.” WHAT: Orange Is The New Black Season 1 is now available (Roadshow). Season 2 will screen on Showcase in June.

THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 27


music

DRINK TO THE MEMORIES Things Of Stone & Wood’s frontman Greg Arnold recalls to Steve Bell how his life was altered irrefutably by an impossibly catchy two-person memory catalogue.

M

elbourne folk-rockers Things Of Stone & Wood burst onto the Australian scene in 1992 with their excellent debut long-player The Yearning, and in particular its memorable second single Happy Birthday Helen. While far from the band’s only musical highlight – The Yearning’s first single Share This Wine scored them an ARIA in 1993 for Best New Talent – it’s Happy Birthday Helen which is bound to

have lighters in the air when the original line-up reforms this month for their first shows in years. “Not since 1997 have we actually done a gig,” smiles frontman/ songwriter Greg Arnold, “but it’s actually amazing, there’s just a chemistry with those four people that’s really exciting to be a part of. It’s one of those weird things with bands that you can’t really explain – if you just ask a band to play a G-chord and it sounds good in that combination, it’s just one of those bands and it fires up.” Arnold reflects happily on that initial burst of

comedy

fervour. “It was a weird time for us; we were a sort of ‘corner of a pub’ band really for those first few years from 1989 to 1992, and I remember when Share This Wine came out and got a lot of radio play around the whole country and that really surprised us that anyone would play us without having seen us live. Then Happy Birthday Helen came out and just hit this bigger nerve out there and that really did change everything for the band. “I actually lecture in songwriting nowadays, and I suppose in a good way I have to look at my experiences with that song, because it honestly is a two-person memory catalogue – only two people know what that’s all about really – but when I’m speaking to songwriters I say, ‘I think people like to hear sincerity and the truth.’ It had a bit of a vibe and was very much of its time, in a nice way. It’s just a beautiful thing to have in your life really.” While that initial success proved difficult to replicate, Arnold harbours no regrets. “By the late ‘90s my musical interests were changing pretty radically, and you start going off in a different direction and sometimes the band just doesn’t take those journeys all together. I suppose for us it’s really lovely for us to have something in the catalogue that stands out as a perfect moment where everything collided – the live band, the songs, the response to the band, the recording production and everything – it just seemed to all really happen on that first album and those early EPs. There was pressure to follow it up, but I suppose we were just stuck in that funny place of not wanting to do the same thing again.” WHEN & WHERE: 24, 25 (matinee) & 28 May, Northcote Social Club; 6 Jun, Flying Saucer Club

WHAT’S NEWS? Funnyman Russell Howard chats with Baz McAlister about weird news and dying on stage.

B

ritish comedian Russell Howard is perhaps best known to Aussies for his Good News show, shown here on Foxtel’s Comedy Channel. With its blend of topical stand-up and bite-sized, easilydigestible news nuggets, it attracts huge audiences of 5 million viewers each week when aired on the BBC. “It’s disposable telly really, just daft stuff about the news, but the young ’uns seem to have latched on to it,” the unassuming Bristol-born comic admits modestly. The show has enjoyed nine seasons in the past five years, and Howard says with the vast amount of bizarre news stories unearthed each day, the show has the fuel to run and run. “Because of the 24-hour news channels, these huge corporations that are churning out news even when there isn’t any, that’s when you get some of the best stuff, when they’re scrabbling around. The hardest thing is convincing audiences this array of crazy stories are true. Luckily in Good News we can show a headline or show footage, but if you try to do that in (live) stand-up, people won’t believe you. Like, there was this story last year where a woman had tried to kill her husband by putting poison in her vagina and she’d encouraged him to go down on her...” It’s a story that, by that logic, probably won’t make it into Howard’s new stand-up tour, Wonderbox. “The title comes from this wonderful thing German families do where they literally have a box full of little mementoes and each 28 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

has a story attached, and they pass it from family to family.” Howard has performed in Australia before, with a spot at Melbourne Comedy Festival in 2007 and a smaller hit-and-run tour in 2011 that included towns such as Darwin and Colac – but despite not having done much stand-up since falling down the TV rabbit hole the past few years, he says he’ll be match-fit. “I’ve been doing gigs around the (London) comedy circuit and it’s been really good fun, going up with bits of paper and trying things out. Some nights you’re going on and dying but you kind of have to, really, to try stuff out. It would be like Coldplay going on stage at Wembley

and going ‘It was all green ... nope ... It was all blue ... nope, that’s not going to fucking work. Yellow, that’s it!’” After his Aussie run Howard will be returning to hometown Bristol to film a DVD. The Music recalls another comic Bristol native, Stephen Merchant, lamenting once in a podcast that Bristol didn’t roll out the red carpet every time the prodigal son comes home. Does Howard expect the hometown hero treatment? “Well, Stephen did a lot of stuff away from Bristol, so he conquered the world before he came back,” Howard suggests. “Whereas I’ve done every shitty gig – and nice gig – in Bristol, and I still do loads of small gigs there. For instance there’s a pub gig you can do, a 60-seater called the White Bear. And the only time there’s a red carpet there is when someone’s been glassed. Classy it ain’t.” WHAT: Russell Howard: Wonderbox WHEN & WHERE: 18 & 19 May, Athenaeum Theatre; 20 May, Hamer Hall


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 29


music

LIVING THE MAKE BELIEVE It’s been a massive couple of years for Annie Clark and she simply won’t sit still. On the eve of the release of her self-titled fourth album, the lady chats to a gushing Ben Preece about all things St Vincent.

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t Vincent has been moving at breakneck speed in the last couple of years, releasing and touring her third album, Strange Mercy, in 2011, before leaping immediately into a project called Love This Giant with none other than David Byrne. It seemed in this time, the world really started to catch on to what can only be described as the genius-like traits of Annie Clark. Her new self-titled record again has appeared very quickly and here she is sounding even more assured, more confident and more inspired than ever. “It’s a bit of blur for me, actually,” she confesses, “because basically the creative process is more mysterious to me now that it has ever been. I used to talk about it with this, like, false authority like I knew and I remembered how everything was created and I knew, you know, everything! I was out on tour for a year-and-a-half between Strange Mercy and then right into Love This Giant, but I hadn’t had any time to properly sit down and write anything. But I had collected a whole bunch of ideas; you know, I would wake up in the middle of the night singing a melody and begrudgingly get up and put it into my iPhone so I wouldn’t lose it. You live your life and you have stories and you have things you want to say, so I got back after Love This Giant – the first leg of that tour – and I thought I was going to take some time off and just readjust and, I don’t know, whatever, do what people do. But I realised that the best way to simplify where I had been was to start writing and just write my way through it. It was a great way to do it because I didn’t feel any pressure because I don’t think anyone was expecting a record from me so soon. I just approached the record with a whole lot of confidence and abandon.” Clark says that with St Vincent, she “wanted to make a party record for a funeral” and there isn’t a better way to sum it up overall – the album spills over with hooks and grooves but not by scarifying the substance, the mindful lyrics and outright intelligence. “I was out there touring Love This Giant with David [Byrne] and people were really inspired to dance,” she explains. “The show was choreographed and there was just a lot of movement and freedom. I don’t know how 30 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

conscious it was but this time around I wanted to make something that people wanted to dance to that was very groove orientated, but I also wanted to make sure that it had heart and all that. “I don’t really spend a lot of time trying to fit in,” Clark continues. “I try to make music that I like and I believe and I think

I’m very aware of this idea of how things are supposed to be, but sometimes how things actually are is absurd or bizarre. So the thing that I sometimes do artistically is – consciously or not – is take something that is recognisable and conventional and then just turn it about 30 degrees clockwise and then there’s something in that form that I recognise but this is a slightly new take on it.” And with a sly hint of a festival appearance later this year, Clark admits to being in a good place, somewhere she fancies as a truly unique way of living. “We live in a world that, for a lot of people, the world of ‘living your dream’ is not on the table. People have tough lives and have nowhere near the access to opportunities

“THE CREATIVE PROCESS IS MORE MYSTERIOUS TO ME NOW THAT IT HAS EVER BEEN.” is interesting. I trust my intuition about what is interesting and I trust that I have ears and I’m a human being and if I like and if I believe in it, then it’s going to resonate with people. How many people, that’s always the question mark, but I don’t sit back and worry about how many might relate. I trust this universal uniqueness of humanity.

or quality of life that we have access to. There are lots and lots of talented people with a similar work ethic who don’t get to do what they love and make a living out of it. It’s a very rare thing – I get to make believe all the time and make a living out of it. But also I can connect with people doing that – that’s the best thing. All the other stuff, the traditional trappings of fame and the like, I am sure that’s fine because, let’s face it, who doesn’t like a free drink once in a while, but that’s very low on the list of things that really matter.” WHAT: St Vincent (Republic/Caroline) WHEN & WHERE: 22–24 May, Howler


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 31


ALBUM OF THE WEEK

★★★★ ½

album reviews

WAGONS

ARCHIE BRONSON OUTFIT

Acid Rain And Sugar Cane Spunk Henry Wagons and his enigmatic band come together once again to unleash their first studio album since 2011’s Rumble Shake And Tumble, this time joined at the helm by the iconic Mick Harvey on production and multiinstrumental duties. Hold On Caroline gently opens the record with its soft and reassuring keys, before Wagons insists, “We’re going to go on the ride of your life.” From here, the tempo, grandeur and urgency increase through bold orchestration, wailing vocals and a militant beat, suggesting we’re in for something bigger and bolder than ever delivered by the band. Subsequent tracks maintain this notion, taking the listener on a high octane journey from Australia’s pubs all the way to America’s swamps, offering chances to recuperate along the way with more demure tracks such as Why Do You Always Cry and Never Going To Leave, before finally coming home to

Wild Crush Domino/EMI

settle down with a whisky in Dust In The Hall. While the journey is brilliantly mapped out, what’s most successful about this record is the fact that for arguably the first time, Wagons’ vocal charisma is matched, and at times even bettered, by moments of sheer genius in instrumentation – the horns in Hold On Caroline, the funky bongo percussion in Hundred Years Or Six Foot Down, the slow-burning synth intro of Search The Streets and the jarring of the flute in amongst Summer Liquor’s rockabilly swagger. With Acid Rain And Sugar Cane we’re gifted an absolutely stunning body of music. Jazmine O’Sullivan

CHROMEO

Opener Two Doves On A Lake is brilliant – it’s loud, and full of heavy, reverberating electric guitars. In White Relief emits a gospel melody reminiscent of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, and Love To Pin You Down is a soulful ballad. Cluster Up & Hover stands out as a rich amalgamation of stylised Archie Bronson Outfit distortion, with Windett’s seemingly strained falsetto voice and Garwood’s colourful horn. However, the following track Glory Sweat And Flow fails to maintain the pace as the record hiccups into a twominute light, happy-pop melody. Fortunately, it’s a slight misstep in an otherwise stalwart album. Ash Goldberg

Upside Down Mountain

Parlophone/Warner

32 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

Recording for the first time without founding member Dorian Hobday, the remaining duo of Sam Windett and Arp Cleveland have enlisted the services of Kristian Robinson as a live collaborator on production and analogue synthesiser duties. Long-time friend Duke Garwood also provides his baritone sax to five of the nine tracks, giving Wild Crush a vibrancy and lacking in earlier Archie Bronson Outfit works.

★★★½

CONOR OBERST

White Women

Just as the party was flagging, Canadian novelty-funksters Chromeo return with a nude cannonball shot into the pool, coming to the surface with a firework between their teeth and a bottle of vodka in each hand. Dave 1 and P-Thugg’s fourth album, White Women, picks up where 2010’s Business Casual left off, with a few tweaks to the mix to keep it interesting. As one would expect the overarching sound is based on the usual, playful, early ‘80s disco-boogiefunk-pop, the dumb fun of opening track, Jealous (I Ain’t With It), ticking (or tickling) all the boxes before the duo begin to mix things up a bit. Toro Y Moi brings a slightly more delicate edge to Come Alive, while Over Your Shoulder shows a more sensitive side to Chromeo as they take on women’s body image issues with an unexpected, yet undeniable, Steve Miller Band influence. A match made in heaven, the

Four years on from the release of their lauded LP Coconut, Archie Bronson Outfit have returned with Wild Crush. Filled to the brim with roaring riffs, ripping guitar solos and heavy distortion, the fourth LP from the English act is a successful production of the kind of psychedelic blues-rock we’ve come to expect from the group.

Nonesuch/Warner

★★★½ ever-wonderful Solange joins the boys again for Lost On The Way Home; sadly not Losing You 2.0, yet nice stuff just the same. Elsewhere various influences are forced at keytar point into the sound: George Benson-esque jazz fusion on Hard To Say No, OMD-Ringwald ‘80s teen movie nonsense on Play The Fool, old school house on Frequent Flyer and Studio 54 disco-stringsmeets-sax-noodle on closer Fall Back 2U. Where Chromeo could have fallen into cookie cutter comedy tributes to the likes of Prince and One Way, they’ve instead approached White Women with a more widescreen view, and sound all the better for it. Darren Collins

Upside Down Mountain is the ninth solo album for Bright Eyes’ Conor Oberst. That makes it difficult to listen to without remembering the 20-odd years of angst and ‘emo’-indie that led us here, all the way through to his more recent exploration of Americana and alt-country. It’s also impossible to extract this album from the events of the last six months, wherein his other band Desaparecidos dropped out of Big Day Out due to an emerging rape allegation. At just 34 years old, Oberst remains a formidable figure in indie-rock, even as his subject matter has evolved from the free sex, heartbreak and suicidal urges of his youth all the way to his current preoccupation with aging and death. Even after all this time, he remains a clever songwriter and a storyteller, in touch with the emotions that most of us stuff right down into our bellies. He captures

★★★ their rawness, regardless of whether he’s holding an acoustic guitar or sounding anguished, crying out about lost love. At the same time his music now is more subdued, although it still comes with his signature nasal lilt, and the welcome addition of an indie-rock song about boredom and fear. That song is Desert Island Questionnaire, a tune that is at times incisive – “a toast to the ennui of our times” – which is an apt description of the rest of the album. It all floats on by without fully capturing your attention, although the almost upbeat and strangely optimistic Hundreds Of Ways certainly comes close. Hannah Story


singles/ep reviews

★★

MICHAEL JACKSON & JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE Love Never Felt So Good Epic/Sony It’s a testament to the man that he can sound so current after all this time (though clearly that’s partly thanks to Timberlake). JT’s inclusion makes the posthumous release easier to digest. Timeless, buoyant disco soul.

LANA DEL REY West Coast Interscope/Universal That grainy, cinematic sound remains in the chorus, but the verses are more gritty (The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach’s production shining through?), with bluesy, soulful guitar, hypnotic tempo changes and a sluggish drum beat.

★★★★½

★★★

BOYEUR

FAIT

FOX & FOWL

Gold Street

Atmosphere

Fox & Fowl

Independent

Independent

MGM

The eerie, toy-box chimes of Gold Street’s numerous interludes are a welcome distraction from this duo’s sub-par pop songs. Their overuse of operatic instrumentation, such as dramatic strings and piano, clashes with their tacky R&B instincts. Although it maintains the duo’s overall saccharine vibe, Cupid’s steady beat ensures it’s the EP’s best track. However My Darkest Dream really pushes their cutesie harmonising into super earnest, boy band territory. Their vocals often jar with the music. Syrupy track This Town’s Too Big For The Two Of Us notably evokes an amateur feel. They play The Workers Club on 26 Jun.

A contemporary orchestral piece, Elise Higgins’ solo project is a ponderous and captivating example of instrumental artrock: complex but never too busy. Swelling between moods and moments with satisfying shifts in tempo, Atmosphere traverses a haunted, cinematic terrain. Featuring jangly guitar and rumbling bass, subdued opener Koto is a particularly fluid, slow-motion soundscape. Gently edging towards a glimmer on the horizon, it flows seamlessly into Slow Glow, which introduces more pounding drum patterns. But it’s the grungier Surrender To that really opens the floodgates, pulling off its dynamic shifts with aplomb.

Queensland-based in location and spirit, Fox & Fowl have put out a squeaky-clean companion for a beachside holiday. Brimming with honking horns and a decidedly positive energy (that will certainly grate some), this colourful collection should appeal to lovers of ultra bubbly indie-pop. Opener Jungle Punch sets the pace with some endearing xylophonic tones, launching into a frenetic concoction of cheery tropical sounds. A potential radio favourite, Neon Colours is comparatively chilled-out, while still offering retrained hints of their upbeat vibes and knack for sunny rhythms. They play Rochester Castle Hotel on 24 May.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

JESSE MCCARTNEY Superbad

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/album

Eight0Eight Records McCartney looks and sounds about 12 and Superbad’s a cringeworthy, JT-funk knock-off. The video will give you secondhand embarrassment. Shoulda called it quits after Beautiful Soul.

★★★½

★★½

LUNA GHOST

RICKI-LEE

Luna Ghost

All We Need Is Love

Morocco

Independent

EMI

True Music

Armed with a spaced-out and ghostly quality, this foursome offer an engrossingly coherent release that will appeal to dedicated shoegaze fans. A strong beat pumps within sonic opener The Sea and is maintained throughout these lengthy spates of groove-laden psych-rock, from the clanging Future End to the dynamic Switch On; Chris Robertson’s strained vocals feel incredibly distant amid Luna Ghost’s all-encompassing wallof-sound. Turning these up at times would give melodies an extra layer and compete with the band’s wonderfully noisy, bass-driven fuzz. They play at Alia Art House on 24 May.

Flaunting the generic, catchy pop we’ve come to expect from Ricki-Lee’s signature soulful, nasal pipes, this EP won’t inspire a “revolution of love”. The title track perfects its tried-and-true brand of wholesome dance stylings, building dutifully to a satisfying chorus. While the acoustic version of this song plays on its earnestness with simple piano chords, Minx’s EDM remix is plastic and derivative. An uninspired, pseudo-emotive ballad, her unplugged cover of Avicii’s Wake Me Up is similarly unnecessary. Revelling in its own mediocrity, this release ensures it’s accessible to everyone without making an impression on anyone.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

SHELLEY SEGAL Attempts to be an insightful commentary about Morocco’s drug use, poverty and gender inequality, contrasted with its vibrant tourist culture, but falls flat as a basic, MOR acoustic ditty from a privileged view.

AL PARKINSON Like This Independent Parkinson’s low, lovely timbre balances the gentle plucking of ukulele strings and held bass notes. The folky serenade swells up, with humming violin and xylophone keys throwing their weight behind Parkinson’s harmonies.

Swans – To Be Kind The Middle Names – I Need Space Sarah McLachlan – Shine Andrew Jackson Jihad – Christmas Island Mick Harvey – Intoxicated Man/ Pink Elephants (re-issue) Owls Of The Swamp – Atlas Boris The Blade – The Human Hive Vallenfyre – Splinters

Stephanie Liew THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 33


live reviews

ARCTIC MONKEYS, POND Rod Laver Arena 9 May At the moment, mercurial Perth outfit Pond is a hairy, five-headed, psychedelic music-making beast. Tonight they choose a Christmas colour palette – red and green – which shrouds them in light and there’s even a couple of strands of Christmas tree lights woven through their gear. The band members resemble dorm-sharing stoners performing at a University Union Night. Afroed bassist Joseph Ryan and drummer Jay Watson share spokesman duties and it doesn’t take long before we’re swept up in their mystical majesty. Frontman Nick Allbrook sits on the edge of the stage with his guitar, legs dangling over like Kermit The Frog singing

Frontman Alex Turner prowls through Arabella, minus guitar but with swag to spare. “Are you ‘appy to ‘ave us back?” he enquires. You wouldn’t wanna be on the other side of drummer Matt Helders’ pummels, but could watch the motion of his sticks all night: they’re all a blur, like Road Runner’s legs in full flight. There are a total of six musicians onstage and Turner is bookended by two hirsute guitarists. Don’t Sit Down ‘Cause I’ve Moved Your Chair, all syncopated emphasis and understated sexiness, elicits a new kind of stink face with raised-eyebrow twist. Dancing Shoes demonstrates the fact that this band’s lyrical and songwriting chops were always present and Turner sure has transformed into a “sexy little swine”. Heck, their debut I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor single (2005) sounds equally as vibrant just under ten

ARCTIC MONKEYS @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: KANE HIBBERD

Rainbow Connection. They really are a riff-building behemoth and You Broke My Cool takes us there. As the towering “AM” lighting rig is constructed upstage, an endless stream of teens harass Andy Lee (who is seated in the row behind us) for selfies. Some of these kids probably first discovered Arctic Monkeys through Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High? Others present however, were there in 2006 watching what once was a spotty group who lacked stage presence, but played material from their debut album perfectly. Now with five long-players under their effortlessly on-trend belts, their show is a stylish affair and Arctic Monkeys exude the confidence to match their achievements. Big screen footage throughout is in tasteful, flattering black and white, the musicians looking sartorially flawless. 34 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

Howler 7 May

The roof over the dreamy garden oasis is closed at Howler tonight. DJ Chris Gill from Northside Records spins some funky vinyl while the punters wander in. Kirkis then pound out their head-bopping, shoulder-popping, fast-paced beats. Frontman/bass player Matthew Kirkis leads the sixpiece band and ambient soul with touches of jazz makes for luscious experimental sounds that we embrace and enjoy. Gill then turns MC for Beat Battle: three-DJ mix-off championship for the best remixed Kirkis track. Although a cool idea, Beat Battle feels like an unnecessary delay.

ARCTIC MONKEYS @ ROD LAVER ARENA. PIC: KANE HIBBERD

years on. Some speccy, mirrorballassisted lighting turns the stadium into a constellation. Turner plays proper complex guitar patterns while singing, far from the casual, rhythmic strum adopted by many a frontman. “I don’t wanna go, but I gotta,” Turner bemoans before main set closer 505. We lure them back and Arctic Monkeys bravely hit us with two sauntering, foreplay numbers – One For The Road and I Wanna Be Yours – before Turner tells us he’s been wondering something all night: R U Mine?, which comes at us complete with flawless falsetto and paralysing drum flourishes. And what’s most exciting is: you get the sense there’s no shortage of creative juices on planet Arctic Monkeys. Their longevity is ensured. Bryget Chrisfield

HIATUS KAIYOTE, KIRKIS

the frontlady says, “We know we can trust you, Melbourne.” After 60 incredible minutes of wild future-soul, the show closes with The World It Softly Lulls, a song Nai Palm dedicates to the silver tooth she’s getting next week to mark her 25th birthday. Catch them up close throughout this Wednesday residency before they’re rightfully embraced by the R&B/soul elite worldwide. Annelise Ball

FATTI FRANCES, COCKS ARQUETTE, VACUUM, NERVE Grace Darling Hotel 9 May Thick dry ice fills this lowceilinged basement to the brim,

FATTI FRANCES @ GRACE DARLNG HOTEL. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

Punters surge close to the stage ready and waiting for the main attraction. The heat is palpable enough to make the sweat start dripping and sends one poor fainting dude to the floor. Hiatus Kaiyote finally start letting loose their intricate, rhythmic, feverish sounds. Lead vocal/guitarist Nai Palm’s face is decorated with glitter, black dots and a silver chain that connects her nose and ear piercings. No less than five videographers circle the stage to capture the action. Their song Nakamarra, which is the only Australian R&B song to ever score a Grammy nom, is received with whoops of delight. The elated looks passing between keys player Simon Mavin, drummer Perrin Moss and bass man Paul Bender are a pleasure to watch. Nai Palm sings with her whole face, pale blue eyes wide in exertion as she gets lost in her own intoxicating jam. The band debut a new song because,

which sets a shadowy scene. Seemingly decked out for a modern-day pagan ritual, the room is simply lit by flickering candles that line the walls, one of which is (strangely) being filmed by tonight’s headlining act. Opener Nerve (or, what appears to be only half of the duo) blends a dense mixture of guitar and computerised elements into noisy, industrial techno. Distortion is laid on thick, offering echoing vocals over a frenetic, paranoid beat. A couple in the crowd bop their heads in appreciative unison. Vacuum’s soundcheck is a test in eardrum resilience and this turns out to be true of their loudly buzzing set as a whole. The two women are purveyors of rhythmic, junkyard electronica. Their commanding, spoken-word vox power over the screeching beats and layered loops, which are produced by


live reviews the enthusiastic smacking of synth pads. Their staggered harmonising is difficult to pull off, however, and occasionally jars.

impressively sprawling sets that showcase the individuality of each act’s multi-genred approach.

Grinding outfit Cocks Arquette draw a dedicated group of fans into the cavernous basement for a unique taste of piercing apathy. Characterised by unmelodious thrashing, the band unleash a messy spell of dark noise-rock with a touch of ‘90s grunge. Vocalist Simon J Karis hangs from the ceiling’s low rafters and stumbles aggressively across the floor while giving the mic hell against the backdrop of urgent strumming. He switches from furious spoken-word rambling to full-on screamo blow-outs. Impressively evoking the feeling of pessimism and utter hopelessness, Karis is much like the musical equivalent of Munch’s painting The Scream – if it sported an Adidas hoody.

BLACK CAB

Stephanie Tell

Yah Yah’s 10 May

Before the good people of Cherry Bar take on the running of Smith Street’s favourite dive, the outgoing Yah Yah’s team celebrate the end of an era with one last Saturday night show. Black Cab take a break from producing their fourth album to appear onstage: lead singer Andrew Coates undertakes synth, laptop and lead vocal responsibilities with style; James Lee takes care of all knob twiddling while evidently blissed-out in the vibe of the thing; and drummer Wes Holland bashes a cymbals-only kit to add extra punctuation to

BLACK CAB @ YAH YAH’S. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

In stark contrast to her supports, the ambient nature of headliner Fatti Frances (aka Raquel Solier) sees the room littered with colourful beams of light that filter through her long, dark hair in an atmospheric fashion. The crowd has petered out slightly, which adds to the intimacy of Solier’s performance. Sparkling, ponderous, and sleep-inducing (in a good way), her intricate disco sensibilities feature a stuttering drum machine that fuels an incredibly gradual, withheld build-up. Her introduction of in-your-face vocals, in the vein of The Knife’s Karin Dreijer Andersson, provides some extra texture and attitude. Towards the end of her set, Solier steps up the danceable beats with She’s Watching, offering some spacey, ‘80s nostalgia akin to a trippy arcade game. Calmly, Solier closes this night of four

the driving beats. The music is seductive yet soothing and the crowd slowly enter trance-like states while they dance. The show’s so compelling that it’s over before anyone notices the time. Howls for an encore bring the band straight back on for one last round of pumping electro beats. One punter is overheard telling her girlfriend, “I think that was the best gig I’ve been to.” This is well-deserved praise for the band booker. Annelise Ball

CUT COPY, TOUCH SENSITIVE 170 Russell 9 May As we head down into the basement of 170 Russell, that

moustachioed Pizza Guy (also known as Touch Sensitive) is working the floor with his trademark, chugging discohouse. Complementing what is essentially a laptop set with live bass, Touch Sensitive bounces about the stage with a cheesy grin on his face looking very happy with himself. Across his short, 45-minute live set, Touch Sensitive doesn’t let his disco-house get too camp on us. He concentrates instead on producing solid, funky vibes that help get this evening’s dance party off to a fine start.

So Haunted has the crowd grooving but there’s plenty of love in the room when they let rip with Hearts On Fire. There isn’t much talk in between songs, but eventually Whitford acknowledges that the band spend too much time overseas. He is obviously thrilled to be playing to an eager hometown crowd and Meet Me In A House Of Love feels entirely appropriate. Coming on like a massive hit of serotonin, Lights & Music inspires no less than seven dudes onto shoulders for most of the song. Encoring with Walking In The Sky and Need You Now, these tunes provide the sweetest comedown. Cut Copy free our minds with their music, at least for the rest of the weekend.

As Cut Copy take to the stage, fans let all their excitement out with a collective gasp of astonishment that breaks into enthusiastic shouts of encouragement with hands waving madly in the air. Expectation runs high as the quartet prepare to unfurl

Guido Farnell

BLACK CAB @ YAH YAH’S. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

the feel-good, acid-house machinations of their latest album. “This house is mine,” asserts Dan Whitford as We Are Explorers cranks up under a show of blinding, coloured lights. The live versions to which we are treated tonight introduce most of Cut Copy’s songs into the squarely, four-on-the-floor, feel-good bounce of house music. Take Me Over speaks irresistibly to the hips and feet but it is merely a prelude for the ecstatic summer of lovin’ highs of Free Your Mind, which unleashes complete mayhem among the crowd. Whether they are working from a particularly New Order-esque electro pop template or aping an Andy Weatherall remix of Primal Scream, Cut Copy’s influences have always been rather obvious but come at us with irresistibly infectious hooks and beats.

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live

TEMPLES @ CORNER HOTEL. PIC: ANDREW BRISCOE

Temples @ Corner Hotel PHFAT @ Laundry Bar DJ Premier & Pete Rock @ 170 Russell

THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 35


arts reviews

YELLOW MOON

individual elements figuring boldly into the imagining of the world, working as an ensemble to truly bring Greig’s storytelling to life.

Southbank Theatre to 16 May

Marty Shlansky

Theatre

MTC’s Yellow Moon is dynamic, elegant and captivating. Everything about this production fits together snugly, almost perfectly, and this unity is key to its success. Combining a contemporary British setting with American folklore and visuals, with an uncompromisingly Australian performance to boot, the play creates a surprisingly pleasing synergy. Scottish playwright David Greig’s language is incredibly expressive, carrying with it a context that continuously gives sense to the fast-moving narrative without overdoing it. The story is told

WHITE FACE Dance

Footscray Community Arts Centre (finished) A contemporary performance piece directed, choreographed and performed by Indigenous artist Carly Sheppard, White Face explores the fragile space between Indigenous and non-Indigenous worlds – where the worlds clash and connect. Sheppard challenges us to rethink where we draw lines between the two, and we, in turn, are more than willing to listen. Sheppard and collaborator Ryl Harris fill the stage for an

YELLOW MOON. PIC: JEFF BUSBY

as somewhat of a ballad with vignettes, with the narrative’s frame of reference shifting acrobatically to find the most interesting characters to narrate at a given moment and to elaborate tension. The actors’ ability to maintain momentum and blend action and narration seamlessly cannot be overpraised. With a dynamic mixture of graceful poetics and poignant, believable dialogue, Greig effectively evokes the world of the play in the voices of the characters. The approach to design has clearly taken this into consideration. As an example, THE SWEATS (aka Pete Goodwin) provides a haunting sound design that hovers behind the action, contemplative and expansive. When sound embodies a part of the action on stage, it is natural and essential to the play. The entire production follows this approach, with the 36 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

through the Next Wave festival, SEETHrough tells the story of Sean, an Aboriginal man and Jorvn, a white man. The narrative focuses on their intimate and intense friendship as they grow together and ultimately apart from childhood to adulthood. While the themes of the work are interesting and have much to offer, the overall execution of the work is lacking. The prose is dense and the stage design boring. The “hypnotic” sound and lighting design hypnotises the audience to sleep. While Colin Kinchela’s performance is solid, Gavin Walters come across as monotonous, delivering lines so wooden they have a tinny ring. Further, while the work presents an interesting amalgamation of two distinct cultural backgrounds, it does not attempt to educate the audience in either. This

SEETHROUGH. PIC: EUGYEENE TEH

hour with poetic synchronised movement that hypnotises the audience with gentle but assertive fluidity. Sometimes fighting, sometimes working in tandem, the dancers move effortlessly around each other through the space. Though we are lulled, the performers have us on the edge of our seats, and when Sheppard breaks character and delivers an extremely confronting monologue – undoubtedly related to her own experiences – we are bowled over. Paired with excellent lighting design and a haunting score, this is a fantastic original offering. Harry Hughes

SEETHROUGH Theatre

Malthouse Theatre (Finished) From the Ilbijerri Theatre Company and presented

unfortunately sees a multitude of references whoosh over the audience’s heads. SEETHrough is a sadly lacklustre work.

Gela has brought together an all-female cast and crew to tell of the Four Winds: a “way of life” in her community. All four performers portray one of the winds: Kuki, Sager, Naigai and Ziai, and as well as two beautifully choreographed synchronised sequences, each dancer has their own solo performance, portraying their idiosyncrasies and following traditional dance techniques passed down through Gela’s family. Accompanied by a fusion of traditional and modern dance music, Winds Of Woerr thoughtfully draws the audience momentarily into an exciting world that runs in parallel to our own. Harry Hughes

WINDS OF WOERR

MORE REVIEWS

themusic.com.au/reviews/arts-review

Benjamin Meyer

WINDS OF WOERR

THE DOUBLE

Theatre

Northcote Town Hall (finished) Winds Of Woerr retells the ancient story of the Four Winds of the Torres Strait Islands, choreographed, performed and directed by Ghenoa Gela, and advised on the adaptation by her mother and other elders of the Torres Strait. Inspired to tell the stories of her culture (“the surprise on people’s faces when I tell them the Torres Strait is in Queensland is priceless” reads the accompanying notes),

The Double Hex Fluvial Godzilla Film Carew


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 37


38 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


the guide

Answered by: Edd Fisher How did you get your start in radio? I got my start by doing a short announcer course at SYN FM covering the basics technicalities of announcing and operating a desk. Once I completed the course, I applied for a show at PBS. After a few fill-in shows around the station, Tomorrowland got its first regular spot in the graveyard shift on 3 Mar 2011. What makes you mad for music? The constant search for music, unearthing rarities or discovering new, boundary-pushing material. Finding great music and sharing it with a wider audience.

PBS RADIO FESTIVAL

How would you describe your weekly Tomorrowland show on PBS? Tomorrowland is a show that connects the past and present with a narrative consisting of diverse and evolving musical styles. A tip of the hat to the past with strong focus on the future. What makes PBS unique as a radio station? PBS has some of the most diverse and well programmed music shows of any station in the world. Although a local station with a strong sense of community-focused programming, PBS is of global calibre and scope. Some of the presenters and shows are as good as it gets! Can you give us a sample of f ive songs that have been on high rotation in your life lately? Asphalt Jungle – Freakin’ Time Pt 2; Andrew Ashong – Special; Glenn Underground – Weapons Of Peace; Levon Vincent – ??? and Sandra de Sá – Olhos Coloridos. What are some of the incentives offered when one signs up/renews their PBS membership during the Radio Festival? Signing up during Radio Festival puts you in the running to win some great prizes, but the best reward is the warm fuzzy feeling you get through contributing and becoming a part of one of the key cultural institutions that keeps Melbourne’s music scene so diverse and exciting. When is PBS Radio Festival and how do we pledge our support? Runs between 12 – 25 May. Call 8415 1067 or sign up at pbsfm.org.au online. Pic: Lisa Businovski THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 39


eat/drink

GOOD BEER WEEK It’s back for its fourth year, running from 17 – 25 May. Celebrate the nation’s beloved brown bevo all around Melbourne. Here are some of our reccs. Head to goodbeerweek. com.au for more info.

FOODIE See if you can taste the difference between two pigs, one raised on Brown Ale and the other on Pale Ale at Merricote, 18 May. Match artisan cheeses and craft beers at Milk The Cow, 19 May. Vietnamese food meets beer experiments at Uncle St Kilda, 20 May. Try beer ice-cream made using liquid nitrogen at Bimbo Deluxe, 21 May.

BEER LOVER Some kickass female brewers of Victoria take over the taps at The Fox Hotel all week and visit 18 May. Eight brewers face off at Terminus Hotel, 17 May – the public

decides who wins. Yeastie Boys talk about their brewing process over six beers and six courses at East Of Everything, 19 May. Tea and beer come together, along with a delish vego spread, at Storm In A Teacup, 20 May.

BEER 101 Tasting paddles and 10” pizza $10 deals at The Penny Black, yes please. Beer safari brings your beers from around the globe at South Wharf Promenade, 17 May. Warm up with James Squires beers matched with mini-pies at Geebung Polo Club. Cookie and Little Creatures host a craft beer-making session, 20 May.

BEER GEEK

PIC: JESS SHAVER

One-day brewing courses to get your homebrew system started, at Vibe Hotel Carlton,

PIC: JESS SHAVER

17 & 19 May. Lovers of sour beers, head to Sourfest II at Penny Blue, 21 May. Go around the world in eight beers at Shebeen Bar, 21 May; part of the proceeds go to charity.

GOOD TIMES Get in the mood at the GBW opening party at Forester’s Hall, 17 May: bands, DJs, special guests, drinks offers and free entry. Double Happiness is serving up bubble tea... made with beer (bubble beers?). Drink craft beers while doing crafts at Thread Den, 17 & 18 May. Board games, Kaiju! beers and grub at Romulus & Romulus, 18 May.

CHECK OUT TV SHOW ALCOHOL There have been imitations before but this is the first time the official Duff Beer – a true premium lager that holds a clean, crisp and refreshing taste, featuring a deep golden colour with caramel aromatics and a hint of fruit – packaged in that iconic can – will be released globally. In Australia, it’ll be available at BWS and Dan Murphy’s from 28 May. On the other side of the spectrum, Real Housewife Of Melbourne Jackie Gillies and her husband Benwho’s-a-rockstar have released their ready-to-drink cocktail range, La Máscara, in flavours Cloud Apple & Mint Mojito, Raspberry & Lime Cosmo and Espresso Martini. It’s available now from Dan Murphy’s.

40 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


eat/drink GOOD BEER WEEK FOCUS

THE FITZROY PINNACLE 251 St Georges Rd, Fitzroy North fitzroypinnacle. tumblr.com

brews from Mountain Goat, Mornington Brewery and 2Brothers, not because they’re beers of the moment but because they’re consistent and quality brews. What kind of beer turns you off? Does not compute… Mmm beer.

Answered by: Leigh Wilkes What’s on at your venue for Good Beer Week? We keep the good beer flowing 365 so there is always something new and different to try! Good Beer Week always produces some extra special kegs for our guest taps. What’s the beer of the moment? I’m thinking

What is the best late night snack to eat after you’ve had a fair few beers? I really can’t think of a food that doesn’t taste better after beer! I’m pretty keen on Sparrow’s Philly Cheese Steaks though! Best hangover cure? More beer does the trick, or a Bloody Mary if you’re a lightweight.

HOT SPOT FOUND FESTIVAL The Industrial School and Magdalen Laundries @ The Abbotsford Convent, 17 – 25 May. 9am-midnight daily. Found is a multi-platform arts and not-for-profit event that addresses the history of the site as a prison for ‘lost and wayward’ women which operated for over 100 years. The festival’s packed with the work of more than 100 artists, performers, comedians, musicians, film screenings and speakers including Karen Pickering, Clem Bastow, The Rebelles, Dr Lucy Ward, Geraldine Hickey, Sex Cake Monster, Carly Fern and more. The Magdelen Laundry room also hosts an exhibition, featuring the artworks of 20 locally and internationally renowned artists. Full program at foundinitiative.com.

GOOD BEER WEEK FOCUS

THE CATFISH 30 Gertrude St, Fitzroy facebook.com/ thecatfishfitzroy Answered by: Kieran Yewdall What’s on at your venue for Good Beer Week? We are open from midday till 1am all through GBW but from the 21 – 25 May we will have the upstairs bar taken over by All Tomorrow’s Breweries, which is a pop-up bar from NZ’s

favourite microbrewery The Yeastie Boys, who have hand-selected small breweries from all over NZ that have never been brought to Aus. There will be free bands playing every night during the pop-up too. What’s the beer of the moment? What mood am I in? When the sun pops out Bridge Rd’s Harvest or if it’s a bit colder the Nail Stout from WA.

FREE EVENTS @ GBW

What kind of beer turns you off? Any one of the big local players, especially the major ones pretending to be micro – so full of chemicals, they’re just headaches waiting to happen. What is the best late night snack to eat after you’ve had a fair few beers? It has to be a Sparrow’s Philly

Workshop For those keen on grain brews there’s the Brew-In-A-Bag workshop at Preston Shire Hall, 17 May. Info sesh Like beer but think you could brush up on your knowledge of the many kinds? Here’s an interactive lesson at Little Creatures Dining Hall, 23 May. Rare stuff At 5pm every day at The Local Taphouse a limited amount of extremely rare or unusual beers from around the world will be available for Aussies to enjoy for the first time ever. There might be some surprise guests, too. Beer Safari Get a Safari Passport from Cookie, The Toff In Town, Boney or Revolver Upstairs and run around the city finding clues, answering trivia questions and getting stamps to win big prizes.

Cheesesteak, or their onion rings. I’m not just saying that, trust me, everybody needs to try one. Even the vego option is outstanding. Best hangover cure? It has to go to The Catfish’s Bloody Mary. I’m not even sure what Mike’s secret is, but they are quickly building quite the following. THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 41


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

EP FOCUS

SINGLE FOCUS What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? I originally wrote it about a big, bearded and bald barista but it’s now more about all the beautiful people in my life... The people around me during the writing and recording were incredibly inspiring.

FOX & FOWL Answered by: Elliot Goard EP title? Fox & Fowl How many releases do you have now? This is our debut release – so just the one!

Club, Grouplove, Vampire Weekend, The Jungle Giants.

AL PARKINSON

When and where is your launch/next gig? 24 May, Rochester Castle Hotel.

Single title? Like This

Website link for more info? foxandfowl.com

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Our collective experiences travelling the world and then moving to Brisbane together.

Answered by: Al Parkinson

What’s the song about? It’s about those moments when someone makes your day go from like this... to like this! How long did it take to write/ record? It didn’t take long to write, maybe a day. Recording took a little longer than expected but I’m really glad we took the time we did with it!

What’s your favourite song on it? Neon Colours. More of an emotional, evocative song than the others and touches on some great memories for us.

Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Nope, this one is on its own! I will be starting to record my first album this year though, weeeeeee!

We’ll like this EP if we like... Jinja Safari, Two Door Cinema

EDUCATION FOCUS

COLLARTS Answered by: Emiko Hunt (Communications Coordinator) What’s the question you’re asked most by prospective students? We are often asked about the practical industry experience we provide to students. We also have a range of industry connections, which allow students to gain experience off campus. For example, our exclusive education partnership with Laneway Festival allows students behindthe-scenes work experience under the guidance of festival staff. What is the biggest misconception of the music industry students have? There is a misconception 42 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

with many people, not just students, that there isn’t work in the music industry. This is not true! According to The Australian Live Music Census, the live music industry in Australia provides nearly 15,000 full-time jobs – and that’s just in live music. We believe there is nothing better than working in a job you love. Where’s the best place to hang out on campus? We have a warehouse-style campus and the heart of it is the auditorium (our large performance space). In summer we open up the garage-style door, have a barbecue outside and relax on beanbags while music students entertain us with their tunes. When can we f ind more info? Collarts is holding an Open Day on 17 May, 10am-3pm. More info at collarts.edu.au. Photo supplied is a Collarts Audio Production student gaining work experience at St Jerome’s Laneway Festival.

We’ll like this song if we like... Strings, sweet bass lines, ukuleles, bad days turning into great days, colourful walls and surprises. Do you play it differently live? I usually play solo when I perform, so yes, it sounds different. At the launch I have some pretty babin’ ladies playing violin and doing some sweet harmonies! When and where is your launch/ next gig? The launch is 17 May at The Aviary Creative Hub. It’s going to be completely acoustic and the beautiful James Kenyon is supporting me! Website link for more info? facebook.com/ alparkinsonmusicpage

JUST VISITING

POISON IDEA Answered by: Jerry Lang Why are you coming to visit our fair country? I am coming on tour with my band Poison Idea and to visit friends. Is this your f irst visit? No, I have been to Australia once before in the early 1990s. How long are you here for? Almost two weeks. What do you know about Australia, in ten words or less? Some of the world’s best bands come from Australia. Any extra-curricular activities you hope to participate in? Pubs (see Cosmic Psychos).

What will you be taking home as a souvenir? Lifelong memories, new friendships and great experiences. Where can we come say hi, and buy you an Aussie beer? 17 May, The Bendigo Hotel. Website link for more info? facebook.com/pages/Poison-IdeaOfficial-/366089496806858


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

EP FOCUS

ALBUM FOCUS How long did it take to write/ record? Who knows? You decide! How long does a new reality or dimensions in honesty, purity and healing take to evolve? Neither a probe, an exploration nor an experiment. Tender Bones is you! Listen! Just listen!

We’ll like this EP if we like... Lo-fi tape recordings, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, The Beatles, Ariel Pink, King Gizzard, Pond. When and where is your launch/ next gig? 17 May at Evelyn Hotel. Its a double EP launch with our good mate Greg Steps. Empat Lima and The Lovely Days as supports.

THE BEEGLES Answered by: Ash Briody

Website link for more info? thebeegles.bandcamp.com

TENDER BONES Answered by: Craig Peade

EP title? Daytime

Album title? Tender Bones EP

How many releases do you have now? Two EPs: The Beegles and Daytime.

Where did the title of your new album come from? A lack of imagination due to the energy and commitment afforded to the recording and lovingly hand-crafted cover packaging. There is also a history of eponymously selftitled debut records including the fucking RAMONES!

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? I really got into using reel-toreel tape machines. Every song was recorded on the same day it was written which inspired the “first take is the best take” idea.

How many releases do you have now? Apart from some limited edition cassettes of early live recordings/ noodlings, this is Tender Bones’ debut EP!

What’s your favourite song on it? My Head Exploded. Written for our trumpet player’s birthday. It’s about a brutal chilli tequila he made.

SINGLE FOCUS

CLAUDE HAY & THE GENTLE ENEMIES Answered by: Claude Hay Single title? Borracho What’s the song about? It’s about accidentally drinking to much. “Borracho” is Spanish for drunken male tourist. Regret.... How long did it take to write/ record? I wrote about six months ago and then showed it to the band; they’re freaks...they nutted it out in about three seconds. Spent a day in the studio then maybe a couple days mixing. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? It’s just the first thing we have

We’ll like this song if we like... Rock riffy stuff... Something you can sing to. Do you play it differently live? I tend to change things live a lot, but not this one yet. After ten/15 shows it might. When and where is your launch/ next gig? 15 May, The Public Bar. Website link for more info? claudehay.com.au

What’s your favourite song on it? Like good parents, we don’t choose favourites. When and where is your launch/ next gig? Yah Yah’s, 24 May with Electric Guitars, The Broken Needles, Hot Palms and Leo Mullins (ex-Small Knives, 2 Litre Dolby). Website link for more info? facebook.com/tenderbones

CABARET FOCUS within restricted definitions. It is intimate, immediate, stunning, and built upon the intoxicating combination of power and intimacy.

done together as a band. After this tour there’s going to be heaps of writing going on. Lots of time in the shed. What was inspiring you during the songs writing and recording? I scored this vintage amp for nothing. It was in someone’s basement since the ‘70s, they said basically it’s mine if I want. Fired it up, that riff just came out with the vocal melody.

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Jake Phillips’ engineering; along with respite, rejection, beguilement, cyclones, blackouts, volcanoes active and dormant (includes ash clouds), intimate disclosures, all things failing (like power or love), sweet relief, extreme leisure sports and F1.

MAMA ALTO What is your favourite Billie Holiday song to sing? Perhaps Lady Sings The Blues – it captures her aura so poignantly. Are there any other artists you would consider doing a tribute show for? I adore Sarah Vaughan… I’m doing jazz sets of her music at The Butterfly Club in September. My dear friend Bridgette Allen and I plan to recreate the Carmen McRae & Betty Carter duet concert. What do you love about cabaret? Cabaret is so engaging because it is a performative realm where neither audience nor performer need to be contained

What do you love about playing in Melbourne? Melbourne is my hometown, and home to some of my favourite venues – The Butterfly Club, Chapel Off Chapel, Village Melbourne, beautiful places to sing in with such warm, brilliant, loving staff and communities. What is Mama Alto’s ethos? Mama Alto is defined by ambiguities – perceived as racially and sexually ambiguous, transcending gender, and juxtaposing fragile vulnerability with formidable potency. When and where for your show? An Audience With Billie Holiday starring Mama Alto is at Chapel Off Chapel until 25 May. Website for more info? chapeloffchapel.com.au Pic by Alexis Desaulniers-Lea. THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 43


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LIVE THIS WEEK

GOLDEN OLDIES

Have y’all heard Lancelot’s new tune ft Ngaiire, Ain’t Nothin’ Goin’ On But The Rent? Yes, it’s a cover of Gwen Guthrie’s 1986 single, but there’s no harm in educating the kiddies who are just discovering the joys of the dancefloor all-nighter.

IT’S A GAS Jerk Balloons with messages such as, “You’re a douchebag,” and, “I hate you” – the perfect gift for your frenemy.

DIZZY NEW HEIGHTS Jonah From Tonga brought the LOLs. And we can’t wait to see more from Lazarus House (aka Spaz House) teacher Mr Joseph.

CLAWS ARE OUT

TWO TO TANGO

COLD NIGHTS

Indie-punk band Claws & Organs (pictured) have released their new single Bite My Lip off their new EP I Am Scum And Nobody Should Love Me and are hitting the road. You can catch the alternative ‘90s rockers at Alia Art House, 17 May.

Melbourne-based duo Annie & Bern (pictured) have just released their debut album Here Comes The Love and to celebrate they are bringing their upbeat, romantic vintage-pop to Glenlyon General Store, 16 May and Cosmopolitan Hotel Trentham, 18 May.

Stepping into the intersection of electronica, dance, and artrock, Winterplan (pictured) and Arundel head off on tour, taking their live show to The Curtin, 16 May, in support of Arundel’s new EP Channels and Winterplan’s new single, Eyes In The Dark.

NOAH’S ART

A NIGHT OF LEE

CONDENSED TUNES

The melancholic melodies of singer-songwriter Noah Earp can be frothed over at The Workers Club, 15 May, where he’s launching single Bound For Glory. The poet fuses guitar fingerpicking and electronic textures with folky underpinnings.

At Spotted Mallard, 17 May, The Stu Thomas Paradox plays Lee Hazlewood. In addition to Lee’s great music including the Nancy Sinatra hits, there’ll be projections, paintings and spoken interjections from Hazlewood himself.

Loop’s Condensed Milk brings Operative agent Nam and Bee Ampersand from F*ck The Radio to produce some great tunes on 16 May. There’ll also be from Melbourne’s dynamic duo Cocoa Noire and CDMK’s own Amin Payne & Jackson Miles.

A DAZE WORK

CITIZEN RAP

ROLLIN’ IN

At The Curtin on 17 May, get the first subtle tasting of what Hollow Everdaze (pictured) have ready for the near future. They’ve released their new single Sugar, the first single from the band’s upcoming selfproduced EP I Will Not Fear.

Songwriter and self-taught rapper Citizen Kay (pictured) has become a key player in the Australian and international hip hop scene. The Raise A Glass rapper is blaring full steam ahead and is not be missed at Shebeen Bar, 16 May.

After international success The Vernons (pictured) are hitting Melbourne off the back of their latest single, Rollin’ Back To You. With their unique contemporary blues-rock sound, the dapper lads will produce a captivating performance at Boney, 15 May.

ROBBING RUNE

WHIMSICAL WOMEN

CAN’T STOP THE BEAT

He may seem new to the electronic music scene, but Rune Reilly Kölsch has sold millions of records over the world and is acquainted with Lady Gaga. The ‘romantic techno’ will leave you in a state of euphoria. See Kölsch at Brown Alley, 16 May.

The Drunken Poet’s weekly celebration of female songwriters, ‘Wine, Whiskey, Women’ welcomes Canadian songstress Claire Jenkins and Dutch multiinstrumentalist pair Mayia to the fold. All that is needed is you, this and every Wednesday.

The band that brought us the infectious blended tunes of ska/ pop/soul/reggae/rock is back. After overwhelming success on their last 2012 Australian tour, The English Beat’s tickets will sell out fast. Catch ‘em at Caravan Music Club, 16 May.

THE FOBBA-LICIOUS CREW

BACKLASH THE GREAT PROVIDER?

Does anyone know how Jimmy Barnes appearing on their new advertisement is supposed to make us wanna go with Telstra?

CARRIED AWAY All those “Keep Calm...” products have the opposite effect. Talk about OVERLOAD!!!!!

MILKING IT Was anyone else baffled by Poland’s Eurovision entry and the sexy milkmaids in particular? Apparently subtitles would have clarified funny/ ironic lyrical content.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 44 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

LIVE THIS WEEK

CATCH A VILLAIN

GATHER ‘ROUND, FOLK

CALLUM’S TREAT

On 16 May, Evelyn Hotel plays host to Villainettes (pictured). Blending the diverse styles of the band members, their indie sound is created from a dark and strange place. Synth-like guitars, pumping beats and hypnotic, gritty bass define their music.

Multi-award-winning country/ folk songstress Rach Brennan (pictured) draws on the echoes of her father’s boozy Irish singalongs and her own experiences to craft playful songs. Backed by a five-piece band, she plays Evelyn Hotel, 18 May.

The swamp-country blues and psychedelic edge sound of Callum (pictured) will tantalise your taste buds. Debuting his self produced LP, the multiinstrumentalist will perform at Retreat Hotel, 15 May, with his band The Big Order.

DEEP BLUE

COOKIN’ A FEAST

GOOD EAR WEEK

The music may be contemporary but his roots are deep; master of the blues Dan Dinnen is set to grace the stage of The Catfish, 18 May. Fingerpicking acoustic guitar, tasty blues harp and warm soulful vocals will get all toes tapping.

Time to get those elbow joints working again because every Thursday The B.East’s Live N’ Cookin Sessions are flowing with cold beers and hot music. This time ‘round Mark Snarski and Sara Retallick will take to the stage, 15 May.

Victoria Hotel in Brunswick is hosting a slew of great acts during Good Beer Week, including The Queen & Convict on 18 May; Matt Walker & Lost Ragas on 19 May, Bored Nothing and Ocean Party on 20 May and more.

FIELDS OF MUSIC

SWAY ME

For the month of May, solo songstress Georgia Fields (pictured) will dazzle audiences at Retreat Hotel every Tuesday. Previewing material from her new album Astral Debris, her postcard-perfect pop collides the astral with the ordinary.

Amaya Laucirica (pictured) embarks on a national tour to celebrate the release of her third album, Sway. Sway combines elements of dream-pop, janglepsych and atmospheric rock. Catch Laucirica and band at The Bridge Hotel, 17 May.

WEREWOLVES AND OTHER CREATURES

EDINBURGH’S MEN

MEAN MUSIC

LIGHTNING BOULT

The Beach Boys and ‘80s grungeera rock is the inspiration behind Melbourne’s 19th Century Strongmen. Their rich vocal arrangements and strong pop sensibilities is why they are regulars at Edinburgh Castle Hotel. See them 16 May.

Boozy nights, bad decisions, redemption and love: a typical Saturday night, or, the subject matters of Brooke Russell’s songs. Set to swoon and serenade audiences with her band The Mean Reds, she plays at Wesley Anne, May 15.

Mining the vast well that is traditional American music, be it jazz, blues, country, whatever, singer-songwriter Jules Boult explores and develops these traditions in his own way. See Boult at The Drunken Poet, 18 May, with Lloyd Spiegel.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Zevon & The Werewvoles Of Melbourne (pictured) are hitting Cherry Bar, 18 May, with support from Backwards Creatures. They will be launching their new EP, Black Diamond Ring.

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… CONOR OBERST Upside Down Mountain Nonesuch/Warner WAGONS Acid Rain And Sugar Cane Spunk NORTHEAST PARTY HOUSE Any Given Weekend Stop Start/Inertia LCD SOUNDSYSTEM The Long Goodbye: Live At Madison Square Garden Parlophone/Warner THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 45


opinion HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC BY JEFF JENKINS TRUE BLUE Susy Blue’s new album Nobody’s Somebody features a classic song called Cheer The Fuck Up. “Your troubles are your teachers,” Susy sings, “your storm’s just in a cup, so cheer the fuck up.” It’s a message song. “It was definitely a bit of a pep talk to myself,” Susy reveals, “at a time when I was being indulgently melancholy. It was inspired by this Buddhist nun telling us that sometimes you have to be firm with your mind, like you would a child about to hurt themselves. Hence the expletive to snap me out of it.” Susy actually had a lot of fun making the album with producer Shane O’Mara. She’ll never forget Shane smashing 40 op-shop glasses in a wheelie bin to get samples for Fell From A Wall. “Shane was great at arranging the parts in an unpredictable way, so it stayed fresh and interesting.” Nobody’s Somebody follows Susy’s self-

46 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

produced debut, Curly Girl. “I think it’s good to relinquish a bit of control to someone who can be objective about your little song babies, as sometimes when you’ve written them and played them live a zillion times, it’s hard to change them.” Susy also relies on advice from her biggest fan – her mum. She’s given Susy some zingers over the years, including, “Don’t get pregnant so a man will stay with you.” Mrs Blue is always spruiking Susy’s music – she even sold a CD to her dentist. And when Susy borrowed her mum’s car, it had just two CDs in the stereo – the Susy Blue EP and Curly Girl. Susy initially intended to call the new album “Songs For No One”, before her violinist’s boyfriend suggested Nobody’s Somebody, which comes from a line in the opening track, Murder Bolero. “It’s about a psychotic, jealous lady who warns her lover she’ll kill him if he leaves her: “I’d rather be alone than know you’re nobody’s

SUSY BLUE

somebody.” Susy Blue launches the album at The Toff In Town on Sunday afternoon (18 May). ACID TRIP The new Wagons album Acid Rain And Sugar Cane wasn’t a breeze to make. While recording at Mount Martha’s Goldview Studio, Henry Wagons’ pregnant wife Mel broke her leg. But it was a happy ending, with a beautiful baby girl, Casper, and a cracking album, which is out this week. IDOL THOUGHTS A belated Happy Birthday to singer, author and the second Australian Idol winner, Casey Donovan, who turned 26 on 13 May.

MARVIN, THE REUNION Fresh from launching the fab Four Hours Sleep album, Angie Hart, Bill McDonald and Peter Luscombe now focus on the Frente reunion (at Arts Centre, Playhouse on 22 & 23 May). Frente’s debut Marvin The Album entered the US charts 20 years ago this week. It peaked at number 75, but spent five months in the Top 200. HOT LINE “If you venture far enough, you’ll come back to the start.” – Susy Blue, Messy’n.


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 47


opinion OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

PUNK AND HARDCORE WITH SARAH PETCHELL

The big drawcard at 2014’s Splendour In The Grass is OutKast – and they’ll be exclusive. Happily, Kelis Rogers will perform sideshows in Melbourne and Sydney. The cult R&B maverick is promoting her sixth album, Food, recorded with TV On The Radio guitarist Dave Sitek. The Harlemite sings figuratively of (soul) food here – her signature hit was entitled Milkshake – but she now has a secondary career as a celebrity chef, having trained as a saucier at Le Cordon Bleu. Food is a feisty feast. Introducing the album is Knight, Rogers’ young son with ex-husband Nas, on the suitably bright Breakfast. Ironically, Food signals a return sonically to Rogers’ progressive debut, Kaleidoscope, masterminded with the then emerging Neptunes – and containing the alt Caught Out There. (Fun fact: Rogers dated Pharrell Williams – it ended badly.) Rogers and Sitek have laid down some homely, organic and oldfashioned soul-funk with live musicians – Sitek applying barely discernible electronic production touches (cue: the percussive jam Cobbler). There’s no vestige of the EDM heard on 2010’s will.i.amfacilitated Flesh Tone – or the post-dubstep Rogers cut with Skream. Jerk Ribs, the lead single, dips into Afrobeat. Friday Fish Fry is bluesy rock, Stones-style, Rogers’ voice huskily sexy. Change is dramatically psychedelic. Rogers has chosen an obscure cover – of Labi Siffre’s folksy Bless The Telephone. Girlfriend is in a good place – Rumble suggests that she’s even forgiven Nas. @therealcyclone

KELIS

48 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

ORIGIN

A couple of months ago a guitarist by the name of Jake Kaiser hit me up on the old Facebook, asking if I might know of anyone that would be keen to fill in on vocals for his band Eternal Rest. The Brisbanebased death metal group had just announced a tour in support of US deathgrind maniacs Origin, with like-minded Melbournites A Million Dead Birds Laughing also along for the ride. With the blessing of their former vocalist I offered to lend my pipes for the run of six shows. First up was Perth... on a Tuesday night. Such a combination of factors is always a tough sell, and the progressive metalcore opening act Dawn Of Leviathan played to an almost completely empty room at the Amplifier Bar. DeathFuckingCunt fared a little better, and their brutal slamming death metal was actually quite impressive. After revising the lyrics countless times, my first set with Eternal Rest seemed to go down pretty well, and I only had to ‘death metal’ my way through a small handful of vocal lines. I didn’t catch much of AMDBL for the sake of catching up on my breath. Despite a crowd that was probably just shy of 100, Origin brought it, and brought it hard. Not content to allow the crowd to sit still in technical wonder, vocalist Jason Keyser initiated a two man wall of death – basically picked the two most drunk volunteers in the audience and got them to run headfirst into each other. This sparked chaos, and soon there was so many stage dives and mic grabs that it could have been mistaken for a Terror show. Eternal Rest had already toured with Origin before in

Japan last year, and after the set their guitarist Paul Ryan decided to initiate me into the fold with giant ‘shots’ of vodka. I don’t remember leaving the venue. Nursing a pretty mean hangover, we flew into Adelaide the next morning. Tonight’s show was a licensed/all ages affair at Fowlers Live, although apart from a couple of kids running around in giant ear muffs it seemed to be a bit of an older audience. Tzun Tzu and In The Burial provided quite brutal sets as openers, and this time I watched AMDBL’s complete technical wizardry. It was my turn to be the designated driver – nothing much exciting took place after the gig for us. There was a slight miscommunication about what flights of mine had been booked and what hadn’t, so in lieu of a plane ticket, the next morning I jumped in the van with Origin at 5am and headed to Melbourne. The members of the band have played for groups like Skinless, Gorguts, The Red Chord and many more. I was in a weird, exhausted, stinky and uncomfortable kind of heaven just listening to their stories from the last 20 years. The Corner Hotel was next. Despite being down a guitarist because of a broken leg, Whoretopsy destroyed. Fresh from two months of overseas touring, King Parrot stole the show. Hard work pays off and there is no better school for a band than the road. Exhausted and sleep deprived, I left shortly after Origin started to go sleep in my own bed for six hours. We’re halfway through the tour, check in next week to hear about the rest!

I call this week’s column, ‘When Merch Ideas Go Too Far’. And, clearly, Glenn Danzig is of the same opinion, considering he is suing former Misfits bandmate, Jerry Only, for his willy-nilly licensing of the logo all over the place, despite a 1994 agreement where Danzig and Only agreed to co-ownership of the Misfits trademark and related imagery. According to court papers, Danzig is also claiming Only filed for federal trademark in 2000 without listing Danzig as one of its owners and that Only threatened to withhold licensing rights to companies if they dealt with Danzig. Does this merch-related madness need to stop? Probably. Here are a few examples of products that have had the Misfits logo attached to it: bikinis, motocross gear, ugg boots, incense holders (thanks for posting that on the SFL Instagram, Stu!), as well as the usual t-shirts, hoodies, Converse shoes, lighters, bobble heads and keychains. The list is about as endless as the imaginations of the people who bootleg merch and sell it at your local markets. We’re left with a semblance of a formerly great band that is whoring itself out in a fashion only rivalled by KISS. And while I may think that the Misfits ain’t the Misfits without Danzig, there is still a fanbase out there that deserves to be treated better than Only appears to be treating them. Because ugg boots, bikinis and motocross gear are so punk rock and all. In the meantime, does anyone else think it’s hilarious that they’re fighting over a logo they ripped off in the first place? wakethedead@themusic.com.au

MISFITS BIKINI


opinion INTELLIBLE FLOW

TRAILER TRASH

THE GET DOWN

HIP HOP NEWS & COMMENTARY WITH ALEKSIA BARRON

DIVES INTO YOUR SCREENS AND IDIOT BOXES WITH GUY DAVIS

FUNKY SHIT WITH OBLIVEUS

REMI

Some songs are so good live that you almost hope you never hear the recorded version. Every music lover knows that tracks that burst open like popcorn in the sizzling heat of the stage sometimes remain hard, flavourless kernels in the recording studio. Others simply don’t live up to the beauty of their live performance and, as much as it pains this columnist to admit it, Remi’s new single Tyson may just fall into the latter category. Live, Tyson is a showstopper of a track: a set-closing powerhouse that never fails to drive audiences over the edge. The stripped-back clapping beat and Remi’s unfailingly tight lyrics, coupled with a chorus to die for, make Tyson a true live classic. The recorded version, which is getting some serious airtime on triple j at the moment, doesn’t quite reach the same level. Tyson is a track that thrives on the hot, close energy of a packed venue. In the recording studio, it seems to have lost its jagged brilliance just a bit. Sensible J and Dutch have tried to beef up the beat for airplay, but some of the futuristic samples thrown into the new mix feel a bit out of place. If you want to hear the track for yourself, it’s available on Remi’s YouTube page (youtube.com/ remtron3000). But if you want to hear it properly (ie live), tickets to the launch gig for his upcoming album Raw x Infinity are in order. The show is happening at Corner Hotel on 11 Jul, and tickets are available at cornerhotel.com.

As I write this, it’s been a few hours since I saw Jonathan Glazer’s Under The Skin, and it’s still, well, under my skin. Stylistically bold and confronting, it’s also emotionally and intellectually challenging in a way precious few films seem to be nowadays. Indeed, there are times when it feels more like a Rorschach test than a movie. That may seem like a less-than-ringing endorsement but, let’s face it, there are times when being bombarded by superheroes and special effects is just the ticket and then there are times when having your cage rattled by a film is exactly what’s required. And Under The Skin may well rattle yours violently. Glazer, the director of Sexy Beast and Birth, has spent nine years working on Under The Skin – “finding the right language for it” is his description of the development process – and the end result is worth it. It seems wrong to say it’s unique, but at the same time it does feel unlike anything else. Comparisons can be made to other works – Nicolas Roeg’s The Man Who Fell To Earth kept emerging in my mind, as did other films of Roeg’s – but Under The Skin often felt intensely human and (appropriately enough) completely alien at the same time. The film follows an alien that takes the form of Scarlett Johansson, which is probably enough to get a few punters through the door. The fact that she uses her Scarlettesque allure to attract and then consume a variety of Scottish fellas may draw in a

few more. But Under The Skin is more interested in the way Johansson’s character regards the world she moves through, the people she observes and engages with and even the strange new body she inhabits. It’s a sensory experience, this film, with both the filmmaker and star using everything at their disposal to help the viewer regard things in a new way. Glazer’s approach to shooting the film adds to this. He had Johansson interact with members of the public who didn’t know they were being filmed (they later signed releases if they were happy to be part of the finished product) and the resulting scenes have a compelling mix of naturalism and tension. Combine that with some scenes that verge on the surreal and experimental and Under The Skin has a beautiful, bracing sense of imbalance. There’s no telling which way it will go. There’s also no single definition of what it’s about or what it’s saying, which may infuriate as many viewers as it engages. But like, say, the best of David Lynch’s work or recent brain-capsizers like Upstream Color, it’s one of a kind. “It’s a wave we’re on: some people will ride it, and some don’t want to get wet,” Glazer told Rolling Stone. “It’s asking a lot of people, but the films that ask more of me are the films that ask nothing of me. Because if they ask nothing of me, it’s a real effort to sit and watch something which is carelessly presented. This is just looking to make a connection. I’m hoping people will connect.”

UNDER THE SKIN

GIORGIO MORODER

Sticking strictly to the digital realm this month, I was trolling through the Monkeyboxing website recently when I happened upon the latest Dropshot edit of Papa Was A Rolling Stone. Let’s just say I made a mess of things, because this has got to be one of the best disco edits I’ve heard in years. Spacey and Giorgio Moroder-ish in more than one place, funky and catchy as all hell – it’s got it all. I suggest you get in while the getting is good. While you’re there, grab the latest Filthy Rhythm, Dirty Soul Volume 4 for all your ultra-groovy needs. My MacBook Pro is smoking to the touch, because this comp is that hot. I call the Honest Lee Re-Edit of The Explosions classic Hip Drop the crowned winner, not because it’s that different, but because it brings a few new breakdowns that the original doesn’t. Honourable mention goes to the skanky, Chipmunks-inspired version of Midnite Hour from Chrispop, because Mr Picket never sounded this funky. Another you should be on is from the fine folks at GED Soul Records and the smoothed-out, laidback vibes of DeRobert & The Half-Truths. They’re giving away a free download of their Goin’ Places jam on the label’s SoundCloud page and it’s some southern fried, funky, funky soul that makes me imagine those soul revues I never got to attend, but hear all about from those folks who are old enough to know. With that, I am out of here. THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 49


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Thursday Night Live + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Bliss N Eso: 15 May Bendigo Showgrounds; 16 Flemington Racecourse The Audreys: 15 May The Golden Vine Bendigo; 13 Jun Kyneton Town Hall; 14 Ormond Hall DZ Deathrays: 15 May Karova Lounge Ballarat; 16 Corner Hotel The Disappointed: 22 May The Tote Frente: 22 & 23 May Arts Centre; 24 Theatre Royal Castlemaine Kingswood: 24 May The Hi-Fi Free Your Mind ft Northlane: 31 May, 1 Jun The Hi-Fi Yeo: 6 Jun Northcote Social Club In Hearts Wake: 7 Jun Corner Hotel; 8 Jun Arrow On Swanston Our Man In Berlin: 7 Jun Rochester Castle Hotel Hard-Ons: 12 Jun Karova Lounge Ballarat; 13 The Wool Exchange Geelong; 14 Corner Hotel; 15 The Bridge Hotel Castlemaine The Bronx: 17 Jun 170 Russells

WED 14

Claude Hay & The Gentle Enemies + The Groves + The Ivory Elephant: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

New Empire: 19 Jun Northcote Social Club; 21 Sub Bonjah: 4 Jul Cherry Bar; 5 Yah Yah’s; 4 Oct The Hi-Fi Jeff Lang: 4 Jul Caravan Music Club Oakleigh; 5 Thornbury Theatre; 18 Williamstown RSL; 20 Beav’s Bar Geelong Remi: 10 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 11 Corner Hotel The Beards: 16 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 17 Barwon Club Geelong; 18 170 Russell; 19 Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 20 Spirit Bar & Lounge Traralgon

Zod Thorax + Phantom Panda Power Wizard Smasher + Power Wizard Master Smasher + The Ivory Elephant: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

GIG OF THE WEEK DZ DEATHRAYS: 15 MAY KAROVA LOUNGE BALLARAT; 16 CORNER HOTEL Austin Floyd + Telecastro: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy

DZ Deathrays + Palms + Foam: Karova Lounge, Ballarat

Scott Matthew + Tom Lee Richards: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: Kindred Studios (Bar of Bengal), Yarraville

Something For Kate: 18–20 Jul Forum Theatre

Slow Club feat. Sheek Stain & The Creep + The Braves + Jungle Jungle: The Tote, Collingwood

The Stetson Family: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East

Sky Ferreira: 23 Jul The Prince

The Hounds Homebound + The Karmens + Darcy Fox: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

The White Album Concert: 15 & 16 Jul Hamer Hall

Tune-Yards: 24 Jul Howler Grouplove: 25 Jul 170 Russell Metronomy, Circa Waves: 25 Jul Forum Theatre Skaters: 26 Jul Corner Hotel Foster The People: 28 Jul Palais Theatre Jungle: 29 Jul Corner Hotel

Trivia: Morwell Hotel, Morwell

Simply Acoustic: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Morning Melodies + Margaret Dennis: Westside Hotel, Laverton

THU 15

Open Mic + Various Artists: Balaclava Hotel, St Kilda East Young Mavericks + Sans + Cider Tree Kids + Halcyon Drive: Bar Open, Fitzroy Kiyomi Vella + Ben Hazlewood + Mali-Koa Hood: Barwon Club, South Geelong

Chris Young Quartet: 303, Northcote

Dustin Tebbutt + The Tamborine Girls: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Songrider’s Club + Various Artists: Baha Tacos, Rye

Rufus + Special Guests: Palace Theatre, Melbourne

Centre & The South + Jen Knight & The Cavaliers + Jaju Choir + The Ray Guns: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Trivia: Pascoe Vale Hotel, Pascoe Vale

Bliss N Eso + Horrorshow + Seth Sentry + Ceekay Jones: Bendigo Showgrounds, Bendigo

Chris Wilson: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

The Vernons: Boney, Melbourne

Trivia: Bayswater Hotel, Bayswater

The Acoustic Sessions feat. Joshua Aiello + Joshua Bienstein: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

Melbourne Folk Club + Marlon Williams + Mick Thomas + Suzannah Espie: Bella Union, Carlton South The You Yangs + The Rolling Blackouts + Cool Sounds: Boney, Melbourne Humpday Project + Various DJs: Chelsea Heights Hotel, Chelsea Heights Janis Joplin Tribute with Major Tom & The Atoms + Stevie & The Sleepers: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Super Unsigned Music Festival feat. Mantis & The Prayer + Eran James + The Rift + Chasing Lana + Allison Turek + The Moody Spooks + Cornerstone + Jeffry’s Cabbage: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Next feat. Trainwreck + Rejuvenate + Wonders: Brown Alley, Melbourne

Alyx Dennison: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Morning Melodies + Nadia Andrews: Bundoora Hotel, Bundoora

Morning Melodies + Brian Muldoon: Somerville Hotel, Somerville

Stella Angelico + DJ Vince Peach + Pierre Baroni: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Max Savage & The False Idols: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick

Next feat. Train Wreck + Rejuvenate + Wonders: Colonial Hotel, Melbourne

Open Mic Night + Various Artists: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Karaoke: Commercial Hotel, Werribee

Wine, Whiskey, Women feat. Mayia + Claire Jenkins: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

The English Beat + The Ska Vendors + The Resignators: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Collage with Since We Kissed + Matt Katsis & The India Black + Robbie Elliott + Curtis Why: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

She Rex + Lepers & Crooks + Guests: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne

Alice D + Salad Days + James Maloney & The Mad Dog Harrisons: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Hits & Pits Round 3 feat + Strung Out + Face To Face + The Casualties + Unwritten Law + Ten Foot Pole + Death By Stereo + Big D & The Kids Table + Masked Intruder + Heartsounds + Implants: The Hi-Fi (6pm), Melbourne

Hiatus Kaiyote + Sex On Toast: Howler, Brunswick

Junk Horses Duo: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North

Caroline Almonte: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/6pm), Southbank

Public Bar Comedy + Various Artists: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Dizzy’s Big Band + Peter Hearne: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

Amaya Laucirica: Beav’s Bar, Geelong

Aracanids + Marek Podstawek + Friends: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond Morning Melodies + Brian Muldoon: Eltham Hotel, Eltham Cabbages & Kings + Guests: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Bloodhounds On My Trail + The Hondas + From Oslo: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Arrester + White Caves: Grace Darling Hotel, Collingwood

Sonic Theatre + Various Artists: Loop (8pm), Melbourne Trio Anima Mundi: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/6pm), Southbank 2014 Bach Competition + Various Artists: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall/3pm), Southbank Dustin Tebbutt + The Tamborine Girls: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Back to the Local + Gary Eastwood + Various DJs: Palace Hotel, Camberwell Rufus + Special Guests: Palace Theatre, Melbourne Bedrock + DJ Ontime: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston Trivia: Powell Hotel, Footscray Callum & The Big Order + Scurvylicious + Grace Anechka + Oli: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick The Casualties + Big D & The Kids Table + Heartsounds + Anchors: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Dan White + Discovery Of A Fox + Son of Wise Eyes: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Take Us To Vegas + Castles + Oh Pacific + Oh Wanderer + Along Shorelines: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Frida + The McQueens: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne Gold Gull + Damn The Moon: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Sean McMahon & The Moon Men: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Lieutenant Jam + Tina & The Boys Aloud + EEO + Three Quarter Beast + Vision Street + Damn That River: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Rad Navajo + Hungry & Foolish + The Sand Dollars: The Curtin, Carlton Spencer P Jones + Dan Lethbridge: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne The Audreys + Guests: The Golden Vine, Bendigo Surfing In Hawaii + Haircut + Ern Malley: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 50 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

April Maze + The Acfields + Kate Crowley: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Slow Club feat. Thee Nodes + Soma Coma + Masses + Leather Lickers: The Tote, Collingwood Senyawa + Robin Fox + Marco Fusinato + Morbid Anal + Gurner: The Tote, Collingwood Noah Earp + Dear Plastic + Hey Frankie: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Anna’s Go-Go Academy: Victoria Hotel (6.30pm), Brunswick Tex Perkins + Charlie Owen: Wellers, Kangaroo Ground Jennifer Kingwell + Mechanical Pterodactyl + The Kill Love: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Brooke Russell: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote Gorsha + Ohms + The Shifters: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

FRI 16

Fear Like Us + Daysworth Fighting + The Union Pacific + Initials + Regrets: 303, Northcote The Sweets: Bar Open, Fitzroy She Rex + Lepers & Crooks + Guests: Barwon Club, South Geelong Lowlakes: Basement Discs (In-Store/12.45pm), Melbourne Home Room Fridays + Various DJs: Berwick Inn Hotel, Berwick Casey & Adam: Berwick Inn Hotel (Club Lounge), Berwick The Ancients + Twerps + Krakatau: Boney, Melbourne The English Beat + Little Murders: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh Absolutely 80s feat. Brian Mannix + Scott Carne + Dale Ryder + David Sterry: Chelsea Heights Hotel, Chelsea Heights Karaoke: Chelsea Heights Hotel (Sports Bar), Chelsea Heights Spencer P Jones: Cherry Bar (5.30pm), Melbourne Wolfpack + Laser Brains + Sexy/Heavy + The Maggot Men: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Trivia: Commercial Hotel, Werribee DZ Deathrays + Palms + Foam: Corner Hotel, Richmond Rewind 80s + DJ Lou: Croxton Park Hotel (Over 28s), Thornbury Winterplan: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne Kunjani: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond Rav Thomas: Doncaster Hotel, Doncaster


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 51


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au 19th Century Strongmen: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick

Astro Boys: Royal Hotel, Essendon

Dirt River Radio + The Mighty Kings: Elsternwick Hotel, Elwood

Bedrock feat. Lee Harding + Superfly DJs: Sandbelt Hotel, Moorabbin

Villainettes + Guests: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Citizen Kay + Tkay Maidza + Baro: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne

Lost Patrol: Ferntree Gully Hotel, Ferntree Gully

Good Beer Week feat. Frozen Ponies + Guests: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Bliss N Eso + Horrorshow + Seth Sentry + Ceekay Jones: Flemington Racecourse, Flemington Respect: The Soul of Aretha Franklin feat. Fiorelie Escano & Band: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick

Sings Lee Hazlewood + Stu Thomas Paradox: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Cash Savage & The Last Drinks + Guests: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine

Triple J’s One Night Stand feat. Illy + Rufus + Dan Sultan + Violent Soho + The Jungle Giants + WZRDKID + Triple J: Nowingi Place (All Ages), Mildura Jamie Hay + Liam White + Lincoln Le Fevre: Old Bar (3pm), Fitzroy Fourteen Nights At Sea + Gold Class + O Littleblood + more: Old Bar, Fitzroy

KIYOMI VELLA: 15 MAY BARWON CLUB GEELONG; 17 GRACE DARLING HOTEL

2Cellos: Forum Theatre, Melbourne

Xenos + Broozer + Order Of Chaos + Headless: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Rufus + Special Guests: Wool Exchange, Geelong

Dragon: Frankston Arts Centre, Frankston

Winterplan + Arundel + Habits: The Curtin, Carlton

The Shards + Grandstands + King Evil: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Passerine + Echo Drama: Grace Darling Hotel, Collingwood

Traditional Irish Music Session with Dan Bourke & Friends: The Drunken Poet (6pm), Melbourne

Babba: York on Lilydale, Mt Evelyn

GMA + Disasters + Oedipus Rex + The Maggot Men + Kinesthesis + Mammoth Graveyard: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Various Artists: Hallam Hotel, Hallam Prayer Babies: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Various Artists: Mac’s Hotel (Bistro), Melton Various Artists: Manhattan Hotel, Ringwood Timothy Stevens: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/6pm), Southbank Tex Perkins + Charlie Owen: Milanos Tavern, Brighton Take Us To Vegas + Ocean Grove + Set The Score + Cards After Midnight: Mooroolbark Community Centre (All Ages), Mooroolbark Various Artists: Mountain View Hotel, Glen Waverley POW Fridays + Far Away Stables: Mynt, Werribee Dustin Tebbutt + The Tamborine Girls: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Gary Eastwood + Various Artists: Palace Hotel, Camberwell Karaoke: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston Heavy Judy feat. The Infants + Blackwood Jack + DJ Kezbot: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick Left of Wolves + Rivalries + Jack The Giant Killer + Architects Of Evolution + Along Shorelines + Eyes Of The Sleepers: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray Man From The Meteor + Guests: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Jeff Dunham: Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne Planet X: Royal Hotel, Sunbury

Ben Smith: The Drunken Poet (8pm), Melbourne Apollo Brown + Motley + Fluent Form + One Sixth + Eloquor: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda Fallen Ends + Stronger Than All + Arabela + A Day Of Storms + Road Train: The Espy (Basement), St Kilda Septicflesh + Fleshgod Apocalyspe + Mephistopheles: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne The Rechords + Louis Kings’ Liars Club: The Luwow, Fitzroy Sun God Replica + Don Fernando + The Kremlings: The Public Bar, North Melbourne 2AM Slot with Levitating Churches: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Ed Kuepper: The Substation, Newport Thee Nodes + The UV Race + Gentlemen + Cuntz + Ausmuteants: The Tote, Collingwood Slow Club feat. The Galaxy Folk + Rara + Snowy Nasdaq + Premium Fantasy + Jonny Telafone + Orlando Furious: The Tote (9pm), Collingwood Scratch Daddy Black + Niko Niko + Slocombe’s Pussy: The Workers Club, Fitzroy White Caves + Monnone Alone + Zone Out: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick Village Sounds + Chris G: Village Green Hotel, Mulgrave Band-aoke: Waltzing Matilda Hotel, Springvale Kath Haling + Craig Johnston: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote The Boys: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote

Kristen vs The Spider: Young and Jacksons (Chloe’s Bar), Melbourne Adam 12 + Scott-E: Young and Jacksons (Main Bar), Melbourne

SAT 17

Heidi & Friends: 303 (4pm), Northcote

Essie Thomas + Queen Beaver + The Monday Project + Kylie Bloodstain: 303 (7pm), Northcote Kink feat. Circle Twerk + Bam Bam + Sex Cake Monster + Carly Fern + more: Abbotsford Convent (The Industrial School), Abbotsford Dave Graney: Baby Black Cafe, Bacchus Marsh Papa Chango: Bar Open, Fitzroy Copyrite: Beaches of Mornington, Mornington Women of Soul feat. Candice Monique + Chelsea Wilson + Florelie Escano + Lisa Faithfull + Christina Arnold + Stella Angelico + May Johnston: Bella Union, Carlton South Four Door + Lace Curtain + Lucy Cliche + Free Jack: Boney, Melbourne

Airway Lanes + Four Letter Lies + Justin Murphy Band: Elsternwick Hotel, Elwood Blak Roots + Wassawumba + Kone Express + more: Emerge In The West, Footscray The Beegles + Greg Steps + Empat Lima + The Lovely Days: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Powerstryde + Guests: First Floor, Fitzroy Cash Savage & The Last Drinks: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Janelle Monae + Kimbra: Forum Theatre, Melbourne The Straight 8s: Gasolina, Southbank Kiyomi Vella + Ben Hazlewood + Mali-Koa Hood: Grace Darling Hotel, Collingwood Chips Rafferty + Sailors & Swine + RB Greaves: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Sound City - Over 28s Saturdays + Stand And Deliver: Hallam Hotel, Hallam

Threezzacrowd: Lincolnshire Arms Hotel (The Linc), Essendon

Avi Avital: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall/7pm), Southbank Alexander Boyd: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/7.30pm), Southbank Various Artists: Mountain View Hotel, Glen Waverley Mushroom Giant + Anna Salen + The Black Galaxy Experience + Shiver Canyon: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

52 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

Fats Wah Wah: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy Dogsday + James Kenyon + DJ Xander: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick The Superguns + The Australian Kingswood Factory + The Supporters + Two Headed Dog: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Everything BUT Metal Charity Karaoke Night + Various Artists: Reverence Hotel (Band Room), Footscray The Cactus Channel + Tulalah + Mike Gurrieri: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran James Howlett: Royal Hotel, Sunbury Radio Kaos: Royal Hotel, Essendon Bang feat. + Perfect Fit + Aviar + Modern Astronomers: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne Band-aoke: Sandringham Hotel, Sandringham

Good Beer Week feat. The Drunken Poachers: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Soapbox Saturdays + Various DJs: Mac’s Hotel, Melton

John Montesante Quintet + Rebecca Mendoza: Dizzy’s Jazz Club, Richmond

Fudge + DJ Craig: Pier Live (Flanagans), Frankston

Harvey Cartel: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy

Howlin’ Steam Train + Quarry Mountain Dead Rats + Horns Of Leroy: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Tim McMillan Band + Secret Tsunami + Toehider: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne

Closure In Moscow + Sons of Rico: Pier Live (Pelly Bar), Frankston

Gang Of Youths: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne

Ivan Zar & The ZarBar Blues Band: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East

Who Said What: Cramers Hotel, Preston

Closure In Moscow + Special Guests: Pelican Bar, Frankston

Various Artists: Keysborough Hotel, Keysborough

Ed Kuepper + Rob Snarski: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh

Jonny Craig + Kyle Lucas + The Wild Life + Red Beard + We Disappear + The Lost: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Karaoke: Pascoe Vale Hotel, Pascoe Vale

The Firetree: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Al Parkinson + James Kenyon: The Aviary Creative Hub, Abbotsford Poison Idea: The Bendigo, Collingwood Amaya Laucirica + Special Guests: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Guests + Since We Kissed + Terrible Lizard + Donnie Dureau: The Brunswick Hotel (9pm), Brunswick Tinsley Waterhouse Band: The Brunswick Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Hollow Everdaze + Sunbeam Sound Machine + Sagamore + Trophy Wife: The Curtin, Carlton


THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014 • 53

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the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Homesick Rays Mild Bunch: The Drunken Poet (9pm), Melbourne

Strine Singers: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy

Old Bar-Toons: Old Bar (6pm), Fitzroy

Rock Godz feat. Kissasylum + Foovana + Paranoid + Metal Is The Law: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda

Susy Blue + The Twoks: The Toff In Town (3pm), Melbourne

Marcus Blacke + Andrew Swift + Alexis Nicole: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Primitive Calculators presents Little Bands #3 + Various Artists: The Tote (2pm), Collingwood

Georgia Fields + Hollie Joyce: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Arcane Saints + The Pass Outs + These Wild Animals + The Hellhounds + Phil Para: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Gareth Liddiard + Jimmy Tait: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Queen & Convict: Victoria Hotel (5pm), Brunswick

Hits & Pits Round 3 feat. Strung Out + Face To Face + The Casualties + Unwritten Law + Ten Foot Pole + Death By Stereo + Big D & The Kids Table + Masked Intruder + Heartsounds + Implants: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

Wellness TV: Wesley Anne (Band Room/12pm), Northcote Refractions: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/5pm), Northcote Dutchound: Wesley Anne (Band Room/7.30pm), Northcote

Garry 7’s Elvis Experience: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North

Daryl Roberts: Winelarder (5pm), Brighton

Max Goes to Hollywood + The Shadow League + Foley! + Angry Seas + Georgia Maq: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Jonny Craig + This Wild Life: Wrangler Studios (All Ages), West Footscray

2AM Slot with various Artists: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

MON 19

JP Klipspringer + Slow Dancer + Sirjoseph + Nearly Oratorio: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Drunk Mums + Miss Destiny + Wod + Rayon Moon: The Tote, Collingwood Hierophants: The Tote (Front Bar/4pm), Collingwood Cocks Arquette + Dead Boomers + Repairs: The Tote (Upstairs/9pm), Collingwood Falloe + Pepperjack + The Promises: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Cosmo Cosmolino: Theatre Royal, Castlemaine MCW Ballroom Brawl 5 + Various Artists: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury Bounce Sessions with J-Trick: Universal Nightclub, Bendigo Old Timey Music Jam with + Craig Woodward: Victoria Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Thomas Hugh + Bill Jackson + Shannon Bourne: Wesley Anne (Band Room/2pm), Northcote Broni: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/6pm), Northcote The Guilts + Cabbages & Kings + Zoe Fox: Wesley Anne (Band Room/8pm), Northcote Dragon: West Gippsland Arts Centre, Warragul

303 Funk Jam: 303, Northcote

SHE REX: 15 MAY DING DONG LOUNGE; 16 BARWON CLUB GEELONG; 17 KAROVA LOUNGE BALLARAT; 18 THE GOLDEN VINE BENDIGO Zevon & The Werewolves of Melbourne + Backward Creatures + DJ Max Crawdaddy: Cherry Bar (2pm), Melbourne Brian El Dorado + Andy McGarvie Trio + Pony Girl & The Outsiders: Cherry Bar (7pm), Melbourne Annie & Bern: Cosmopolitan Hotel, Trentham DJ Dustin: Edinburgh Castle Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Rach Brennan + Kate Bart + Ike Ruckman + Pat Wilson & The Bare River Queens: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Caribbean Cookout #5 + Lotek + Jesse I + Sista Itations + Muma Doesa + more: Ferdydurke (12pm), Melbourne Tex Perkins + Charlie Owen + Adalita: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Japanese Wallpaper + Rat & Co + Lanks: Grace Darling Hotel (All Ages), Collingwood

Various Artists: Westside Hotel, Laverton

Sunday Sessions + Various Artists: Keysborough Hotel, Keysborough

Far Away Stables: Wrangler Studios (All Ages), West Footscray

Backwood Creatures: Labour In Vain (5pm), Fitzroy

Skyscraper Stan & The Commission Flats + The Kebab Shop Punch Up: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

Roundhouse Gang with Tracey Miller + Peter Baylor: Lomond Hotel (5.30pm), Brunswick East

Tex Perkins + Charlie Owen + Adalita: Yarraville Club, Yarraville

Ken Maher, Al Wright & Tony Hargreaves: Lomond Hotel (9pm), Brunswick East

Unlimited: Young and Jacksons (Chloe’s Bar), Melbourne No Drama with Scott-E: Young and Jacksons (Main Bar), Melbourne

SUN 18

Kinematic + Mansion: 303 (3.30pm), Northcote

Chris Wilson: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

Trivia: Excelsior Hotel, Thomastown

My Dynamite + DD & the Damaged Goods + The Bakersfield Glee Club: Retreat Hotel (5pm), Brunswick

Roberto Prosseda: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/6pm), Southbank

Andrew Swift & The Rattlesnake Choir + Andrew Kitchen + Desperateens: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar / 4pm), Footscray Fields, See & Mason: Royal Oak Hotel (4pm), Fitzroy North

Monday Night Mass feat. Thee Nodes + Red Red Krovvy + Dribble + AD Skinner: Northcote Social Club, Northcote I Do Like Mondays feat. Popolice: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Kustom Kulture Rockabilly Meltdown + Various Artists: Shoppingtown Hotel (All Ages), Doncaster

Dear Monday feat. Mary Webb + Brett Franke + Greg Steps + Jamie Lee Davidson: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

The Seven Ups: Spotted Mallard (4.30pm), Brunswick

Passionate Tongues Poetry + Various Artists: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Kim Salmon: The Bridge Hotel (4pm), Castlemaine The Juice + Lasercatz + The Hypnotic: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick The Let Your Hair Down Girls: The Curtin (4pm), Carlton Lloyd Spiegel: The Drunken Poet (4pm), Melbourne Jules Boult: The Drunken Poet (6.30pm), Melbourne

She Rex + Lepers & Crooks + Guests: The Golden Vine, Bendigo

Teeth & Tongue: National Gallery of Victoria, Southbank

Astha Tamang Maskey + Rohit Shakta + Albatross: The Hi-Fi, Melbourne

Various Artists: Oakleigh Junction Hotel, Oakleigh

Ears Wide Open 2 + MSO: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank

Jimi Hocking: Seaford Hotel, Seaford

Avi Avital: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall/5pm), Southbank

Mudlark + Vishnu Keys + Snowy Nasdaq: Bar 291, Brunswick

Morning Melodies + Col Perkins: Deer Park Hotel, Deer Park The Kilniks: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Sunday Sessions + 4 String Phil: Lucky Coq (4pm), Windsor

OPA: 303 (8pm), Northcote

Cherry Jam: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

High Tea + Steve Miller Band + Flour: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Dale Ryder Band + Gary Eastwood Express + DJ Roc Landers: The Espy (Front Bar/5.30pm), St Kilda

Tin Alley + Deathflight + Lazarus Mode: Northcote Social Club (2pm), Northcote

Trivia: Balaclava Hotel, St Kilda East

The Four Scoops: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North Sunday School + Various Artists: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Monday’s Covered + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda The Black Molls: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda Broadway Unplugged + Various Artists: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Matt Walker & The Lost Ragas: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick

TUE 20

Cash For Gold + Vallee: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Crooks & Queens: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Jazz In The Attic + Nathan Slater: Ferdydurke, Melbourne American Brass Quintet: Melbourne Recital Centre (Salon/6pm), Southbank Wax Lyrical + Patrick Evans + Ruth Katerelos + Suzette Herft + Chris Lazzaro + Ed Nass: Murmur Bar, Melbourne

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 54 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014

Never Cheer Before You Know Whos Winning: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Fresh Industry Showcases + Various Artists: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Melbourne Blues Appreciation Society with Andy Phillips & The Cadillac Walk: Royal Standard Hotel, West Melbourne Good Beer Week feat. Various Artists: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Trivia: Spotted Mallard, Brunswick Trivia: The B.East, Brunswick East Discovery Night feat. Devil Monkey + Siren Sun + Tyto: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Trivia: The Club Hotel, Ferntree Gully Trivia: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Brightside Live Music Showcase + Various Artists: The Espy, St Kilda Open Mic Night with Nicolette Forte & Friends: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda Trivia: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Trivia: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy Christopher Coleman Collective + Domini Forster + Kelly & Jane (The Nymphs) + Claire Sullivan + Benjamin James Caldwell + Ben Whiting: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Bored Nothing + The Ocean Party: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick NMIT Showcase + Various Artists: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote


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56 • THE MUSIC • 14TH MAY 2014


The Music (Melbourne) Issue #38