Issuu on Google+

# 3 4 • 1 6 . 04 . 1 4 • M E L B O U R N E • F R E E • I N C O R P O R AT I N G

TA K I N G O N T H E S E X I S T C R I T I C S

eat

RESTAURANT AURANT ETIQUETTE QUETTE

tour

CALLINGG ALL CARS

tour

JOSSS STONE

comedy

CHRIS RIS TAYL TAYLOR YYLOR & ANDREW HANSEN

the music | the lifestyle | the fashion | the art | the culture | you


2 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 3


4 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 5


themusic 16TH APRIL 2014

“I ALSO BELIEVE FOR THE CONTINENT OF AFRICA THAT THIS IS OUR TIME – THIS GENERATION IS THE BEGINNING OF CHANGE, THIS GENERATION THAT UNDERSTANDS MOST.”

#034

INSIDE FEATURES The Jezabels Joss Stone Seun Kuti Yacht Club DJs Calling All Cars Andrew Hansen Blak Wave Hunx & His Punx Jason Isbell Charlie Musselwhite 2 Autumns, 3 Winters Robben Ford The Bad Shepherds Black Lips

REVIEWS Album: Perfect Pussy Live: The Magic Band Arts: MICF ...and more

THE GUIDE Cover: Record Store Day Eat/Drink: Restaurant Etiquette Record Store Q&As Frontlash/Backlash Indie News/Q&As Opinion Gig Guide

WHITE FACE BY CARLY SHEPPARD. PIC: GREGORY LORENZUTTI

“AS AN INDIGENOUS PERSON, THE IDEA OF A ‘NEW GRAND NARRATIVE’ IS ALWAYS ABOUT LOOKING AT GRAND NARRATIVES OF NATIONAL IDENTITY AND HISTORY.” - BLAK WAVE CURATOR TAHJEE MOAR (P26)

ANOTHER INSTALMENT OF BALL PARK MUSIC’S EXCLUSIVE TOUR DIARY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

review

NEW EP FROM PERTH PUNKS THE DECLINE. STREAM EXCLUSIVELY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU ALL WEEK

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

“SEYMOUR EXPERTLY SWITCHES FROM IRATE TO SENSITIVE PERSONA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DEMANDS OF EACH SONG, MOST OF WHICH EMPLOY THE EXTENDED, FLUTTERINGNOTE UNISON FINISH.” - BRYGET CHRISFIELD REVIEWS HUNTERS & COLLECTORS (P34) BLISS N ESO. PIC: COLE BENNETTS

The End

web 6 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

feature

- SEUN KUTI (P20)

SEE WHAT GOES ON BACKSTAGE AND ON STAGE AT A BLISS N ESO SHOW WITH AN EXCLUSIVE GALLERY FROM THEIR NEWCASTLE GIG ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Bryget Chrisfield

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Stephanie Liew

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch vic.giguide@themusic.com.au

SENIOR CONTRIBUTOR Jeff Jenkins

CONTRIBUTORS Aleksia Barron, Atticus Bastow, Steve Bell, Emma Breheny, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Oliver Coleman, Rebecca Cook, Adam Curley, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Dan Condon, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Sam Fell, Tim Finney, Bob Baker Fish, Cameron Grace, Tom Hawking, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Samson McDougall, Tony McMahon, Fred Negro, Matt O’Neill, Josh Ramselaar, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Stephanie Tell, Izzy Tolhurst, Simone Ubaldi, Glenn Waller, Matthew Ziccone

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 16 APRIL - 22 APRIL 2014

lol

buy

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER Kane Hibberd

PHOTOGRAPHERS Andrew Briscoe, Holly Engelhardt, David Harris, Jay Hynes, Lou Lou Nutt

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Brett Dayman

ADVERTISING DEPT Leigh Treweek, Tim Wessling, Bill Deeble, Jessica Wainwright sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR

UK comedian Jen Brister is back with her show Wishful Thinking, in which she grapples with her desire to be more politically active but also go to the garden centre, too. Our reviewer Chelsea Attard says of the show, “Brister enthrals us with political musings, stories of being blacklisted from gay bars, and what being middle-aged is all about.” Oh, and her impressions of her Spanish mother will make you snort-laugh. See her at The Tuxedo Cat until 20 Apr.

All hail vinyl, with all of the pops and crackles that make it such a warm and fuzzy listen! Head to your local record store and part with some hard earned on 19 Apr to support Record Store Day and remember to use the #RSDAus hashtag to share what you’re doing. Hit up recordstoreday.com.au for inspiration.

Nicholas Hopkins

ART DEPT Eamon Stewart, Brendon Wellwood, Julian De Bono, David Di Cristoforo vic.art@themusic.com.au

ADMIN & ACCOUNTS

He’s en route to our shores, via assorted fields, and if his recent We Got Love album is anything to go by, we’ll see you on the dancefloor when Shit Robot (aka Marcus Lambkin) plays New Guernica on 19 Apr. Will he resemble a robot? We sure as hell hope so.

Loretta Zoppos, Shelley Neergaard, Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson, accounts@themusic.com.au

DISTRO Anita D’Angelo distro@themusic.com.au

SUBSCRIPTIONS store.themusic.com.au

CONTACT US Tel 03 9421 4499 Fax 03 9421 1011 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au 584 Nicholson St, Fitzroy North 3068 Locked Bag 2001, Clifton Hill VIC 3068

MELBOURNE

dance


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au

JEFF LANG

OUT OF HIS MIND

IN HEARTS WAKE

HEART ATTACK

After their regional announce last week, In Hearts Wake have stepped it up a notch with a full list of national headline dates to launch their new record Earthwalker. Alongside a huge supporting cast which includes Dream On Dreamer, Being As An Ocean, Endless Heights (not appearing in WA) and Sierra, the Byron boys will perform 4 Jun, YMCA HQ, Perth (all ages); 5 Jun, Amplifier Bar, Perth; 7 Jun, Corner Hotel, Melbourne; 8 Jun, Arrow On Swanston, Melbourne (all ages); 11 Jun, Zierholz, Canberra; 12 Jun, The Small Ballroom, Newcastle; 13 Jun (18+) & 14 Jun (all ages), Bald Faced Stag, Sydney; and 15 Jun, The Tempo Hotel, Brisbane. The full tour is proudly presented by The Music.

LOVE RUNS DEEPER

Like Father, Like Son is the emotive story of two families thrown together after its discovered their young sons were switched at birth. Engaging, engulfing and ultimately refreshing, it’s a piece of cinema that challenges your perception of ‘family’, and makes you realise that paternal love is thicker than blood. The Japanese film was a jury prize winner at last year’s Cannes Film Festival and is screening in select movie theatres around Australia from tomorrow.

CRASH LANDING

Following on from last week’s John Newman support announcement, Saskwatch are excited to inform they’ll be bringing their funk soul loving back for some headline launch dates in support of their second record Nose Dive. Catch them 18 May, Bond University, Gold Coast (1pm); 13 Jun, Soundlounge, Gold Coast; 14 Jun, The Zoo, Brisbane; 19 June, The Small Ballroom, Newcastle; 20 June, Oxford Art Factory, Sydney; 21 June, ANU Bar, Canberra; 27 Jun, Settlers Tavern, Margaret River; 28 Jun, Amplifier, Perth; 29 Jun, Mojo’s Bar, Fremantle; 4 Jul, Karova Lounge, Ballarat; and 5 Jul, Corner Hotel, Melbourne.

BE THE BEST

One does not simply credit themselves as being “the greatest rock’n’roll band in the world” if they don’t have the chops to justify it. That’s why we’re stoked with the impending arrival of Arizona legends Supersuckers. Put on your clean undies because your pants are going to be rocked right off! The band perform 19 Jun, The Zoo, Brisbane; 20 Jun, Manning Bar, Sydney; 21 May, Ding Dong, Melbourne; and 25 Jun, Astor Theatre, Perth.

HEAR WHAT THE FOX PLAYS

Responsible for some of the finest electronic sounds to come out France throughout the past decade, music and fashion label Kitsuné continue to design the standard others try to emulate. Now, returning to Down Under for the second time, is the Kitsuné Club Night Australian Tour, headlined by producer du jour Pyramid – get a smooth serving of beats 9 May, Laundry Bar, Melbourne; 10 May, Chinese Whispers, The Underdog, Brisbane; 16 May, The Bakery, Perth; and 17 May, Civic Hotel, Sydney. Synth sweetheart Chela will also appear at the Perth and Sydney events.

“MORRISSEY, ARMS FOLDED, NOT CLAPPING ALONG TO THAT PHARRELL SONG” AND WITHOUT A STITCH TO WEAR TIM SIEDELL [@BADBANANA]. 10 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Aussie guitar virtuoso Jeff Lang is adding to his formidable canon with new record I Live A Lot In My Head These Days, and will showcase the new songs this winter. Proudly presented by The Music, catch the launch tour 7 Jun, Fly By Night, Fremantle; 8 Jun, Ravenswood Hotel; 12 Jun, Brass Monkey, Sydney; 14 Jun, Heritage Hotel, Bulli; 25 Jun, Lizottes Central Coast, Kincumber; 26 Jun, Lizottes Sydney, Dee Why; 27 Jun, The Basement, Sydney; 28 Jun, Camelot Lounge, Sydney; 29 Jun, Lizottes, Newcastle; 4 Jul, Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh; 5 Jul, Thornbury Theatre; 11 Jul, Mullumbimby Town Hall; 12 Jul, Brisbane Powerhouse; 18 Jul, Williamstown RSL; 19 Jul, Street Theatre, Canberra; and 20 Jul, Beav’s Bar, Geelong.

EARTH

GIVE YOURSELF AWAY

They conquered in the ‘90s, disappeared for roughly ten years, then returned in the mid‘00s to continue their reign. Earth helped define what we now know as drone metal, so experience a religious awakening when the Americans play 17 Jun, Crowbar, Brisbane; 18 Jun, Rosemount Hotel, Perth; 19 Jun, Manning Bar, Sydney; and 21 Jun, The Hi-Fi, Melbourne. They also play Dark Mofo in Tasmania.

JANELLE MONAE AND KIMBRA

SISTER 2 SISTER

Few double bills in 2014 will hold a flame to the pop/soul experience set to explode on Australian stages next month, with the mighty Janelle Monae and Kimbra ready to shake the good vibes right out of you. These two incredible performers will lead full bands on the Golden Electric Tour, happening 16 May, Challenge Stadium, Perth; 19 May, Hordern Pavilion, Sydney; 21 May, Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre; and 26 May, The Plenary, Melbourne.


WED 16TH APRIL

SAT 19TH APRIL

MELBOURNE UKULELE KOLLECTIVE BEGINNERS’ CLASS

DJ COACH

6PM

MRS SMITH’S TRIVIA

8PM

8PM

FRI 18TH APRIL

OLIVER PATERSON 6PM

SUN 20TH APRIL

DJ BARNEY 5PM

$10 JUGS OF MID-STRENGTH BEER MONDAY - FRIDAY

EAT IN OR TAKE AWAY

DAY MON

NE & WI ROO .99 $

9

$10 BURGERS 12-4PM MONDAY - THURSDAY

THE SP RTING CLUB

M

WEDNESDAY 16TH APRIL

2 FO ON- FRI AND R 1 MAIN OF B $14 JUG S OAG S GY S AND BEFO PSY

SIMPLY ACOUSTIC

AUSTIN BRADY DIANA ROUVAS SARAH MARTIN AND JIMMY CUPPLES

RE 6P

M

Wed April 16th

Thurs April 17th

10 RS

Richie 1250 shakes the shack

E

OR (BEEF MI) HALOU

SATURDAY 19TH APRIL

KAIN BORLASE TRIO

From 7pm

BURG

6:00PM FREE

SUNDAY 20TH APRIL

Sat April 19th

Andrew Lowden goes solo From 8pm

Sun April 20th

$14 JUGS OF BOAGS AND CIDERS WEEKDAY BEFORE 6PM

James Darling duo play from 7pm

WED

RAYNARD CREEGAN MARIANNE DIGS GREEN’S DIARY ANGEL ENSEMBLE

2:00PM $10

8:00PM

MONDAY 21ST APRIL

CAT AND CLINT 5:00PM FREE WESLEY ANNE’S LAUGH 8:00PM TUESDAY 22ND APRIL

14 AGS OF BO JUGS IDER ALL C AND IGHT N $

Open

Mon - Thu 3pm - late Fri - Sun 12pm - late Live Music Bookings wesleyannebookings@gmail.com www.wesleyanne.com.au

27 WESTON ST, BRUNSWICK Tues - Fri 4pm till Late Sat & Sun 12pm till Late

8:00PM $30

FLYING ENGINE TRIO 6:00PM FREE “MOVEMENT 9” & PAPA G AND THE STARCATS 8:00PM

From 8pm

$

6:00PM FREE

FRIDAY 18TH APRIL

Trivia with Duane & Jay. Prizes! Cheap jugs!

TUES

7:00PM FREE

THURSDAY 17TH APRIL

ASK US AB DISC OUT OUR O COMP UNTS FO R LIME NTS!

SIMON AND DAVE FUNKEL

6:00PM

WEDNESDAY 23RD APRIL

SIMPLY ACOUSTIC

7:00PM FREE

AUTUMN SPECIAL 2 for 1 on selected mains, weekdays before 6pm and all day monday OPEN FOR LUNCH MIDDAYS FRIDAY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY bookings: 9482 1333

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 11


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au

ROYAL BLOOD

BLOOD BROTHERS THE PHONCURVES

LOTTA CURVES

Brisbane grrl duo The Phoncurves are heading on tour, bring along their new EP, Heartstrings, due out 2 May. Self-produced, engineered and written, the album includes singles Heartstrings and Lover, and an ethereal vibe, thanks to their knockout harmonies. The Phoncurves hit Boney, 6 Jun.

SEEING GHOSTS

Norwegian playwright Henrik Isben’s Ghosts is going to be revived and will make you feel more alive then ever. Directed by the acclaimed Gale Edwards, starring Linda Cropper and Pip Edwards, Isben’s masterpiece critiquing marriage and social convention will leave audiences thrilled. Opening night is 22 May at Southbank Theatre, The Sumner, and it runs from 17 May to 21 Jun.

YUMMY LEMONADE

Every child’s favourite drink, pink lemonade, is also the name of Melbourne quintet Closure In Moscow’s second LP, to be released on 9 May. In celebration, the self-aware face-melters will be touring, hitting Evelyn Hotel, 10 May; and Pelican Bar, 17 May.

PLAY IT AGAIN

DMA’s add 28 Jun at Shebeen Bar to their slew of headline dates following their well received debut EP. Dustin Tebbutt announces a 15 May show at Northcote Social Club after the 16 May date sold out.

TO INFINITY

Sydney’s Infinity Broke are launching their debut album River Mirrors (available on CD and on limited edition vinyl) by heading on tour down the east coast. The group, made up of Bluebottle Kiss members Jamie Hutchings and Jared Harrison, plus Scott Hutchings and Reuben Wills, recorded the album over two weekends in rural NSW. Head to The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine, 8 May; and Kelvin Club, 9 May.

BAD AND DUMB

Following their signing to label Ivy League, and the release of their new single Dumb Ideas, Bad//Dreems will be heading on an independent record store tour. Catch an intimate yet raucous, packedin yet spaced-out set from the Adelaide lads at Record Paradise, 31 May.

RAPPIN’ SCIENCE

Baba Brinkman’s The Rap Guide To Evolution will break down Aussie stages this May and June. Merrigong Theatre Company will be putting on the production that has wowed punters at Edinburgh and off Broadway, an exploration of evolution, through reworkings of popular rap songs. It’s on at Arts Centre, 3 – 7 Jun.

STONE COLD KING

Appearing on stage for the first time since 2005, CW Stoneking will take parts in a Heavenly Sounds tour, playing a stripped-back set in St Michael’s Uniting Church on 13 Jun.

DALLAS DOPE

Local rockers Dallas Crane are gearing up to hit the road once again for the launch of their new single Get Off The Dope. The guys will be heading to Caravan Music Club, 26 Apr and Spotted Mallard, 25 Apr.

THRICE THE METAL

Brutal Tasmanians Psycroptic are joining forces with sonic mass murderers Aborted and technical death metal band The Schoenberg Automaton for the Necrotic Repression Tour which will hit The Hi-Fi on 14 Jun.

TAKE PART IN ART

Melbourne Fringe Festival is on a hunt for artists of all fields, from visual art to cabaret, to take part in their upcoming festival line-up. Expressions of interest to perform or exhibit in a Fringe Hub venue are from now until 27 Apr. Details at melbournefringe.com.au.

PHFATTY BOY

South African independent electronic rappers PHFAT are heading on a self-funded tour this May in support of their latest single Lights Out. For the last two years the group have been pulling support slots for the likes of Public Enemy and The Used, while gaining airplay in their home country. Head along on 10 May, Laundry Bar.

“YOU TWEET IT BEST, WHEN YOU TWEET NOTHING AT ALL.” A SELF-PERPETUATING PROPHECY FROM MICHAEL WILLIAMS [@MMCCWILL] 12 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Brighton duo Royal Blood will bring their brute power and primal, chaotic hooks to Corner Hotel on 1 May. Head along to hear their mix of rhythm, aggression and blues. Proudly presented by The Music.

LA MAMA AUTUMN SEASON LAUNCH

MAMA MIA

Artistic Director and CEO of La Mama Theatre Liz Jones has announced the 2014 Autumn Season. Some highlights include Encore, a new creative partnership with fortyfivedownstairs that will bring back productions Mein Kampf and My Life In The Nude. Also in the season is Mark Wilson’s Unsex Me, Phoebe Anne Taylor’s The Art Of Fucking and Daniel Lammin’s The Cutting Boys. The theatre will also have two shows in the Melbourne Cabaret Festival: May And Alia Do Pirates! and Songs From The Movies. For more info head to lamama.com.au


51 BRUNSWICK STREET, FITZROY (CNR GERTRUDE) PH 03 9415 6558 | WWW.THEWORKERSCLUB.COM.AU

     P

THURSDAY 17 APRIL RESIDENCY

ANIMAUX PLAYWRITE THE GROVES

FRIDAY 18 APRIL

CLOSED SATURDAY 19 APRIL ROOFTOP SINGLE LAUNCH

CLAGG

FULL UGLY – ALBUM LAUNCH TIM RICHMOND ELA STILES (BUSHWALKING)

SUNDAY 20 APRIL

LONG WEEKEND DJ SPECIAL

EVERY MONDAY! TWERKERS CLUB 7PM BAD NEWS TOILET DJ SET

TUESDAY 15 APRIL

WEDNESDAYS IN APRIL

JIMMY JUNK HEART KYAARN OSCAR GALT

(RESIDENCY) SUPPORTS THIS WEEK: DREAMINʼ WILD CREPES

THURSDAY 17 APRIL

FRIDAY 18 APRIL

+ GUESTS FROM 9:30PM $1.50 POTS | $3 PINTS $6 JUGS | FROM 4-10

THE INFANTS

RESIDENCY

THE DARJEELINGS FRIDA WISHFUL

SAGAMORE

SATURDAY 19 APRIL

STOPPING ALL STATIONS PRESENTS

ʻVERY GOOD FRIDAYʼ

MAYFIELD

JACK AND THE KIDS THE MAX RUDD BAND SARAH KABBANI

STEVIE & THE SLEEPERS PAPA G AND THE STARCATS ALONE WITH TIGER DJ SAUL KNIGHT

SUNDAY 20 APRIL

THURSDAY 24 APRIL

FRIDAY 25 APRIL

TEENAGE LIBIDO

ʻBOOK OF LOVEʼ SINGLE LAUNCH MOJO JUJU, PALM SPRINGS DJ WOODY MCDONALDS

(SINGLE LAUNCH)

BONE JAIL PURSE MCBAIN

SATURDAY 26 APRIL

THURSDAY 1 MAY

FRIDAY 2 MAY

(SINGLE LAUNCH) HIDING WITH BEARS TOM KLINE

I KNOW THE CHIEF

ALBUM PREVIEW OCEAN PARTY

(SINGLE LAUNCH) MANGELWURZEL KING EVIL DJ LOVELY CLEARWATER

FRASER A GORMAN ACTS REVELATIONS

ANGUS MCLEAN PRESENTS

TANYA BATT

DAVE GRANEY

SCRATCH DADDY BLACK NIKO NIKO

SUNDAY 11 MAY

SATURDAY 17 MAY

WITH LOWER PLENTY

(ALBUM LAUNCH) PEPPERJACK

OLD OUT!

MATT BAILEY & BAND BJ MORRISZONLE, SAILORS & SWINE (DUO), VISUALS BY KEITH DEVERELL, DJ APPLEJACK

adamNOTeve PRESENTS: THE RED LIGHTS HALCYON DRIVE

FRIDAY 16 MAY GARETH LIDDIARD

MONDAY 21 APRIL

RUBY TUESDAY

FALLOE

COMING UP:

SUNDAY 18 MAY

FRIDAY 23 MAY

GARETH LIDDIARD THE UPSKIRTS

SUNDAY 8 JUNE FRONTIER TOURING PRESENTS:

WITH JIMMY TAIT (DUO) MINDS A BURDEN TOUR RON POPE (ARVO ALL AGES | EVENING 18+) CASH FOR GOLD SOLD OUT!

IRON BARK BBQ IN THE WORKERS KITCHEN! POP UP RESTAURANT - FINE SMOKED MEATS

TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT WWW.THEWORKERSCLUB.OZTIX.COM.

TUESDAY 22 APRIL RESIDENCY

UP UP AWAY

() ($&

HORNS OF LEROY LAZERCATZ 2000

$! 

WEDNESDAY 23 APRIL “SHADY LANE”

& ($&

SLEEPY DREAMERS

 #'

COMING UP

'( ($& $!%)&(&#&'

THE KARMENS

TIX AVAILABLE THRU OZTIX: ANIMAUX – THURSDAYS IN APRIL DOA – CAN (APR 24) KOOYEH (APR 26) LORD – 25TH ANNIVERSARY (MAY 3) MARIE WILSON ALBUM LAUNCH (MAY 9) CLOSURE IN MOSCOW ALBUM LAUNCH (MAY 10) THE BEEGLES/GREG STEPS DUEL EP LAUNCH (MAY 17) DECIMATUS + ORPHEUS (MAY 24) 351 BRUNSWICK STREET FINNTROLL – FIN (JUNE 20)

THE ADOLESCENTS – USA (JULY 5) 03 9419 5500

')" ($& + ($&

s+"+'- +#!"t $!'!"( $! ' !#&"

$!("&'  $!(#" (&* &' ()'

"$&

$!+ - (&*

www.evelynhotel.com.au

351 BRUNSWICK STREET

(74AD=:4=$>4C $44;'CA44C8A42C;H>??>BC84%D44=*82!0A:4C $7>=4  FFFC743AD=:4=?>4C2><0D

03 9419 5500

www.evelynhotel.com.au

@

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 13


local news vic.news@themusic.com.au

BIRD’S THE WORD

CHRYSTA BELL

Shining Bird released their album Leisure Coast around the same time that Ernest Ellis put out their album, Cold Desire. To celebrate the simultaneous release of both these albums, the two bands are teaming up and touring the east coast in a co-headline tour. On 9 May, they’re sharing the stage at The Workers Club.

DANCING IN THE DARK

Illusive Touring and Funf Touring have been working collaboratively and rigorously to create a unique travelling dance event. With the wonderfully peculiar DJ styling of Hot Chip and Matthew Dear coupled with live performances from Henry Saiz, Guy J, Cosmin TRG and Xosar, Melbourne will be introduced to the boutique electronic experience, HOLEANDCORNER, at Shed 14, Docklands on 7 Jun.

LEAPING OFF

From 4 – 20 Jul, the City of Yarra and over 40 of its beloved music venues, will be taken over by Leaps And Bounds Music Festival. It features performances Dan Brodie, Charles Jenkins, Jon Von Goes and more, as well as bus tours, Music Victoria industry panels and a music industry training and information summit for young people.

FOMO OF MOFO

The line-up for MONA’s Dark Mofo festival (12 – 22 Jun) includes puppetry and animation in It’s Dark Outside; 20,000 Days, a film about Nick Cave’s 20,000th day on earth; and Amiel CourtinWilson’s film Ruin. There’s music from femme fatale Chrysta Bell (presented by David Lynch), The Bronx, SUNN O))), Earth, Total Control, HTRK, Kirin J Callinan and more. Info about the festival’s large-scale public art, food, music, film, light and noise can be found at darkmofo.net.au.

“YOU WERE A SPARKLING, LOVELY PERSON WHO SHOWED ME SUCH KINDNESS. REST EASY, PEACHES.”

WHAT’S YOUR POISON?

The line-up for this year’s Poison City Weekender has been revealed. The threeday event takes place at Corner Hotel on 22 Aug, The Public Bar and The Curtin on 23 Aug, and wraps up at Reverence Hotel on 24 Aug. Acts performing include headliners Knapsack, Michigan’s Pity Sex, The Bennies, Luca Brasi, Harmony, Wil Wagner, Lincoln Le Fevre, Paper Arms and tons more.

@LORDEMUSIC MOURNS THE PASSING OF PEACHES GELDOF.

LAST SCARE

Big Scary round out a whirlwind 12 months since the release their celebrated second LP Not Art with a show at Ormond Hall on 11 Jun, with support from Jonti – their last headline show in Australia for some time.

LOVING BEASTS

Twin Beasts, formerly The Toot Toot Toots, release their newest album, Badlove, produced by Burke Reid (The Drones, Oh Mercy), on Thursday. In honour of their achievement they’re heading on a sevendate tour, and hit Corner Hotel, 6 Jun.

HITTING OUT

LINDI ORTEGA

SINGING TIN STAR

Up and coming Canadian singer Lindi Ortega is blazing music trails with the international success of her new album Tin Star. Blending old-fashioned country music with a 21st century edge, Ortega performs at The Toff in Town, 22 Apr. 14 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Another Hits & Pits sideshow has been announced with The Casualties, Big D & The Kids Table and Heartsounds heading to Reverence Hotel on 15 May. The Casualties have nine hardcore-punk studio albums to show off, Big D will be bringing a ska bend to the show, and Heartsounds will add an element of skate-punk to proceedings.

MAY OH MAY

See Amaya Laucirica at Beav’s Bar, Geelong, on 15 May; The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine, 17 May; and The Curtin, 24 May, as she embarks on an east cost tour in support of her new full-length, Sway, which features guest vocals from Adalita and more.

CRAVINGS

My Friend The Chocolate Cake is not just your nickname for your snack food of choice, it’s the name of a band who’s releasing an exclusive live album, the eighth album release of their 25-year career. They also embark on a national tour next month, playing The Substation, 31 May and Caravan Music Club, 7 Jun.

IRISH PATRIOTS

Prepare for a whole lotta crowd-singing and Guinness-sloshing when Irish folk music legends, Chris Kavanagh & The Patriots, land at Forum Theatre on 13 Jul. Kavanagh’s show is a haunting tribute to The Legend of Luke Kelly, supported by folk-rocker Paddy Casey, who returns after a four-year hiatus.

A LOCAL HOMAGE

The legacy of legendary singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson will live on locally with Tim Freedman from The Whitlams taking his Freedman Does Nilsson – A Live Imagining shows on the road. On 18 Jul it comes to Arts Centre.


ANZAC DAY SPECIAL “RON S PENO & THE SUPERSTITIONS” Friday 25th April 5 to 7 pm Last Melb Show for 6 Months $10 Tickets Now on trybbooking.com\eoyd book early as spots are limited! 197A BRUNSIWCK ST FITZROY 3065 (03) 9417 5955

“Live At The Lomond” “Liv THU 17TH 8:30PM

SAT 19TH 9:30PM

SUN 20TH 5:30PM

9:00PM

8:00PM

WEDNESDAY16TH APRIL

JAKE BUGG (2ND SHOW) TICKETETEK.COM.AU, PH 132 849 & OUTLETS

THURSDAY 17TH APRIL

JAKE BUGG

THURSDAY 24TH APRIL

ARMADA NIGHT

FRIDAY 25TH APRIL

SKID ROW/ UGLY KID JOE

TICKETETEK.COM.AU, PH 132 849 AND OZTIX.COM.AU, PH 1300 762 545 & OUTLETS

TUESDAY 29TH APRIL

GOOD FRIDAY

THURSDAY 1ST MAY

(

)

TICKETS FROM TICKETEK.COM.AU

SPECTRUM

KARNIVOOL

THE CA ARTWHEELS (C CD LAUNCH)

FRIDAY 9TH MAY MINISTRY OF SOUND AUSTRALIA PRESENTS

(Oz rock legends)

KEN MAHER, K AL WRIGHT & TONY HARGREAVES (Acoustic roots)

TUE 22ND

TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS

JOHN NEWMAN

(Up country family band)

SUN 20TH

EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS

GREENS DA AIRY ANGEL ENSEMBLE (Contemporary folk roots)

FRI 18TH

TUESDAY 15TH APRIL

IRISH SESSION

(Hey diddle diddle !)

 ALL GIGS   FREE 

~ EXCELLENT RESTAURANT AND BAR MEALS

TICKETS FROM OZTIX.COM.AU

TRANS NATION TUESDAY 13TH MAY

RUFUS (3RD SHOW) TICKETS FROM TICKETEK.COM.AU

WEDNESDAY 14TH MAY

RUFUS (2ND SHOW) THURSDAY 15TH MAY

RUFUS

20 - 30 BOURKE ST CITY - 9650 0180

WWW.PALACE.COM.AU

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 15


music

KEEPING VIGILANT On a rainy Tuesday afternoon in Newtown, The Music met up with The Jezabels’ Hayley Mary to talk feminism, the distinction between high and low culture, and being on The Brink. She chats to Hannah Story. Cover and feature pic by Cybele Malinowski.

T

here’s something refreshing about speaking to The Jezabels. There’s a sense of honesty and earnestness about everything from their music to the state of the music industry coming from Hayley Mary, frontwoman for the internationally beloved group. She’s clad in all-black with thick eyeliner; it’s a gothic outfit in line with her interest in the style, the music and even the literature. She talks freely as we walk the streets of Newtown

pub-rock, they love The Drones, they love dudes singing raw music, and I know what we could do to get a good review from all the people that have always and will always hate us, but I don’t ever want to do that. Because I feel like what I do is quite a girly thing and I don’t ever want to change it to get the recognition of the fathers of music criticism. I want to keep going despite them. “I think the other thing is that it’s cool to stay somehow alternative, because I know what happens to girly music is that it becomes mainstream. I know that we are becoming more and more mainstream

ourselves, that’s one thing I’d like to do, but I don’t really think of myself as a role model. I just kind of am just an angry person that seems to be on this mission for god knows what reason. I don’t even know what I’m doing most of the time, to be honest. I just kind of wing it.” Mary ties this idea of masculine music criticism to a distinction between “masculine” high culture, and things that are more feminine. “I’m cool with getting a negative review if it’s intelligent and thought-out and all that stuff, but I think that sometimes people just dismiss us completely. I’ve been called things like histrionic, and I’m cool with that, but they think it’s a bad thing, whereas I think I’m doing it on purpose because I’m alluding to gothic literature or something that they just haven’t read. “There’s a whole tradition of stuff that appeals to women that is considered low culture and crap, but sometimes I just think it’s because it appeals to the feminine side of people that it’s considered low culture. It’s something that’s started bothering me as I got into this industry, if you look throughout history at what is considered crap, or the standard of bad, it’s also, I don’t think coincidentally, defined by who likes it, and it’s always teenage girls. And the standard of what’s good for music is always middle-aged men that like it. I don’t think that’s a coincidence. I think it’s inherently the kind of sexist standpoint of music criticism.”

“WHAT I DO IS QUITE A GIRLY THING AND I DON’T EVER WANT TO CHANGE IT TO GET THE RECOGNITION OF THE FATHERS OF MUSIC CRITICISM.”

without umbrellas, about where to go for lunch or indeed, the nature of music criticism itself. When asked about their nomination (and subsequent win) at The Rolling Stone Awards for Single Of The Year for The End, Mary is frank. “I always feel more hopeful about People’s Choice Awards than I do about Critic’s Choice Awards for us. I feel we’re a little bit more of a people’s band.” They certainly perceive themselves in that way and attract a wide cross-section of people to their shows. “We just attract really normal kind of anyone people, like there’s not a type, there’s not a style, there’s not a scene, there’s just a lot of single 40- or 50-year old men, a lot of young girls, a lot of couples, a lot of gay guys and gay girls, a lot of just anyone and everyone. It’s really just very mixed. I don’t think they have anything in common with each other particularly, it’s just that they are all at our show… It’s a good and a bad thing because sometimes a scene can help you, but also I guess it’s cool to resonate with just the common person for no apparent reason.” Critically however, the circumstances seem different. Mary has a lot to say about the way The Jezabels’ albums and EPs have been received. “The one thing I don’t want to give into is certain streams of criticism that require that old-fashioned notion of authenticity you have to have to be good, particularly in this country. They love 16 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

and therefore our critics will hate us even more, but the thing I’d love to do as a band and as a person, is to stay good and also be popular and prove that those things are not mutually exclusive. A lot of bands do it, like Depeche Mode, and The Pixies who we supported recently. And they’re great, great pop bands that are alternative, subversive and amazing, and they’re pop. I just feel like in this country in particular there’s this misunderstanding. We don’t mind international bands who do it, but we don’t want our own bands to do it or something. Maybe our own bands don’t have the avenues to do it. I’d like to be a pop band and continue to be

She admits that sometimes she feels resentful, but then acknowledges her way of dealing with the challenges of working in a male-dominated industry. “I try not to think about it way too much but I do think about it way too much. You try and surround yourself with good people, that’s how you deal with it. It’s not the hardest life, I live, I live a pretty easy life.” These challenges are part of the reason The Jezabels consider themselves a feminist band. Originally their material was quite overtly gender-focused, as a reaction to the music prevalent in Mary and keyboardist Heather Shannon’s hometown of Byron Bay: hardcore and blues. Now their music also talks about age. “Age is, kind of everyone can relate to that, getting older, becoming cynical or whatever. But I think you could argue that it still is more pertinent to women because they get less sexy as they get older, whereas men can become more sexy. “I remember reading an interview with Kylie Minogue once, talking about that – how pop stars have to get plastic surgery and look great, particularly women, but rock stars who are more often men, they can be Keith Richards and look really uncool, well not uncool, but look cool by being old and haggard. It’s not really just about looks; it’s just about that life cycle where you start feeling like you’re less valuable to the world, and you’re less up with the times and technology and stuff.


NO ROLE MODEL Mary doesn’t see herself as a role model, although she admits that The Jezabels have a clean image, one far removed from that of the woman who arguably generated the most talk in 2013: Miley Cyrus. “I don’t think we consciously try to have a clean image but I’m just into gothic stuff so I don’t really like to get my skin out too much. It’s probably insecurity rather than being against it or anything like that.

I’m sure that’s not a gender issue but it does definitely get women down, I think, maybe moreso than men.” It becomes clear that Mary struggles with the same issues around gender and self-esteem as many other women, young and old. “I’m definitely a lot more confident than I actually am when I’m on stage. I feel more powerful on stage than I actually feel. It’s kind of like you can be what you want to be on stage, so I sort of can define who I want to be; perhaps someone with a strong voice and someone who’s smart as well as attractive and all of these things you can pretend to be and people might believe you if you do it convincingly. Off stage I don’t feel like any of these things, I feel like I have no voice whatsoever and that I’m just a weak little person.” Mary and the rest of The Jezabels – Shannon, drummer Nik Kaloper and guitarist Sam Lockwood – head out on tour this month following a gap of more than 18 months since their last string of Australian headline shows. They played the Laneway circuit soon after they returned home from touring and recording second album, The Brink, in London, and were admittedly daunted about playing after “the biggest act in the world” Lorde. “‘Will they still like us? Will they remember us?’” Mary wondered. But they’re more at ease now. “I’m glad to be back and people have been really good to us so I don’t

“I think that it’s good to experiment with female sexuality a bit more. I guess it depends on whether you think you need to be a role model or whether you think that your job is to provoke discussion, like Miley Cyrus. If you think that the artist’s role is to provoke discussion, then she is a very important artist at the moment, she’s probably the best. But if you think that it’s her job to be a role model, which I tend to think it isn’t, because the role model people think she should be portraying is a very conservative one, I think she does it quite tastelessly and sort of without reason – but I also think we wouldn’t be talking about this if it wasn’t for her, so I kind of like her in that way. I like when women do it with some kind of impact and we talk about it.”

know, you can’t tell what’s going to happen, but we’ve had a really great reaction. I’m stoked about it.” The tour is an excuse to show off The Brink, a more focused album from the quartet than their talked-about debut LP, 2011’s Prisoner. “The first thing I think is that it’s more coherent, it’s more song-driven, and it’s warmer,” says Mary. “It’s probably more optimistic, musically. Lyrically it might be ambiguous; it’s kind of a bit depressing at times, but if we look at the lyrics in the context of the songs I think it’s a more positive record in general, which is the result of us being in a more negative place I think when we wrote it. We were actually all quite troubled at the time of writing but we got through it via writing. It sounds really wanky but it was quite therapeutic writing that album. The result of it is leads people to believe that it’s probably more vacuous because it’s not as dark but it’s that ‘We need to write a record that’s not as dark, otherwise we’re going to feel shit’. “It’s about hope, really; so was Prisoner though, hope and fear, and kind of teetering between them both. But I think it’s more hopeful, it’s more pushing towards the hope side of the spectrum.” WHAT: The Brink (MGM) WHEN & WHERE: 2 May, Palais Theatre; 3 May, Groovin The Moo, Bendigo THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 17


music

IN SESSION

That would be a laugh! I’d love to hear that! Mel C has an amazing voice and she’s really lovely.”

Midway through recording her seventh album, soulpop icon Joss Stone takes some time out to bring Andy Hazel up to speed on resurrecting lost songs, the Spice Girls and her ambitious touring plans.

W

hen Joss Stone plans a world tour, she really doesn’t mess around. “The idea is to play at least one show in every country in the world,” she explains keenly and without a flicker of doubt. “After Australia and New Zealand, we’re in Dubai, then Europe. We’re in the process of booking everywhere else. I want to play a show, look about the place, see what good we can do while we’re there, and see what music we can listen to while we’re there. In Australia, I’m hoping to find some music that originates in Australia. Rather than sitting in my hotel, I’ll get out and about and see what’s going on.” This ambitious tour may not be as far-fetched as it seems for someone with the career trajectory of Stone: TV talent contest winner at 13 and multi-million seller at 17. “I’d like to go further into Australia. Dive right into the middle of the country and see what happens. The whole tour will be documented on my website every two or three days. We’ll post a short video from each place, maybe put a documentary together later, but for now it’s just something fun people can follow.” Our interview finds Stone taking a break from recording her forthcoming album in her newly finished home studio. “I’m in the process of recording it right now. In fact at the moment I’m cutting violin – they’re in the other room. After I chat to you we’re back to it.” While the as-yet-unnamed album is very much a workin-progress, Stone claims it will be “a lot more grooveoriented. There are lots of ideas going round, and I don’t want to say what they are yet. It’s got a reggae backbone. It’s a bit hip hop and R&B. It’s not really the usual wailing vocal thing I’ve done in the past.” While Stone may be focusing more on rhythm than before, she won’t be abandoning her first love anytime soon. “Soul music is an expression of emotion. It’s

feelings, and whether or not you like the notes being played is irrelevant in soul music. Actually, as I get older it bothers me more, but soul music is just music that’s meant. That’s what I like about it. If it meant something to me as a little girl, it will never not mean

In a career marked by lending her rich voice to revitalising obscure soul songs or duetting with other artists, Stone still has many unfulfilled ambitions. “There are a lot of people I want to work with, but there’s not one person I think, ‘Fuck I want to nail that person down and just do it.’ If the person wants to collaborate with me, it’s going to be a really good piece of music. If that person isn’t passionate, forthcoming, or hard to find then it was never meant to be. But, if you don’t ask you don’t get,” she qualifies, before considering Music, her duet with reclusive neo-soul icon Lauryn Hill. “That took a long time not because she was holding out, but because it’s hard to get hold of her. I knew she was right, and I knew it was in the stars, so I kept trying and she did it. It was a beautiful thing. I felt very honoured.” The songs Stone is most famous for singing, she reminds listeners, aren’t hers. “In interviews, I always made a point of saying ‘This song is not my song, it’s by the Isley Brothers, or Womack And Womack or

“IF IT MEANT SOMETHING TO ME AS A LITTLE GIRL, IT WILL NEVER NOT MEAN SOMETHING TO ME.” something to me. It’s the same with pop songs. Some of the Spice Girls’ songs I danced around to aged ten still make me smile, and they mean something, that’s never going to change. A lot of pop songs now, they don’t really sit close to your heart in the same way.” Would collaborating with Mel C be out of the question? She laughs loudly at the suggestion. “Wow!

whoever’ because it’s important people type that in and see where this song came from, why it’s lived for so long and who inspired it,” she says avidly. “Super Duper Love was a song we hardly changed at all. Sugar Billy [Garner] wrote it and he’d lived his whole life pretty much unknown and almost no one had heard it. Because I did it and people heard it, he died a happy man and I hold that close to my heart. I didn’t know half of these songs for very long before I recorded them either. I was shown something by [producer] Steve [Greenberg], and I showed it to someone else, so it’s a circle, really.” WHEN & WHERE: 17 Apr, Palais Theatre; 18 & 21 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 19


music

IT’S TIME The message is the thing for Seun Kuti – it’s time Africa stopped being a pawn for multinationals. Of course, he wraps that message in Afrobeat. He talks to Michael Smith.

Y

oungest son of the legendary Nigerian multiinstrumentalist and activist Fela Kuti, Seun Kuti “inherited” his father’s 16-piece band, Egypt 80, in 1997, when he was just 14, on Fela’s death. Over the ensuing 17 years, Seun has steadily built on his father’s legacy while putting his own stamp on the musical style Fela created – Afrobeat, a heady, highly percussive mix of Nigerian traditional Yoruba music, jazz, Ghanaian highlife and funk. The third album, A Long Way To The Beginning, from Kuti and his crossgenerational band will be released here in April.

music

“It was a title that came from a time of looking back. It’s always good to look back at where you’re coming from to see how far you’ve come, and also reassess your journey. Who could believe that the band is still here, 17 years after [Fela’s] death? I believe that this is a new beginning for us as well, after our first two albums, where we repositioned ourselves in a place where we can be considered as a force on our own now, even without the greatness of my dad. It took us a long time to get here. And I also believe for the continent of Africa that this is our time – this generation is the beginning of change, this generation that understands most.

Most people don’t [know] that only 200 Africans were educated when Africa got independence in 1960 [Nigeria gained independence that year] – so we only had 200 graduates to control the whole continent, so you can understand why our people could be easily hoodwinked. People couldn’t understand the system they were asked to run. But I believe with this generation, even though only ten per cent of us are educated up to secondary school level, this is the most educated Africa has ever been. This is a beginning for us, and this beginning, I also wanted to reflect it in my message. So there are two meanings, or two different moments in my life and my ideology, in terms of me and the band, and Africa as a whole.” The new album inevitably continues Kuti’s virulent criticism of the impact of the world’s multinationals and the geopolitical bodies established to further the West’s post-WWII idea of international stability touched upon on 2011’s From Africa With Fury: Rise. So the song, IMF, becomes a chant against the International Monetary Fund, recast as International Mother Fuckers. “Don’t forget to always let people know that they’re impacting negatively, to exploit and destroy. All the topics on the record, they are perspectives, convictions I had. I’ve never felt like I needed to say as much as I have on this record, even on [album track] Higher Consciousness, where I go deep into the brainwashing of the young African mind with the nonsense on our radio, on our TV, teaching young black people negativity about Africa. Every young kid in Africa wants to be white!” WHAT: A Long Way To The Beginning (Cartell/Inertia) WHEN & WHERE: 16 Apr, Melbourne Recital Centre; 18 & 19 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay

PERMANENT FLUX Putting the final pieces of their new party puzzle into place, Gaz Harrison talks about the good times clusterfuck that is Yacht Club DJs with Benny Doyle.

“I

t’s been a process this one; it’s just been a time thing,” sighs Gaz Harrison when asked about Yacht Club DJs’ new mixtape, Oddity Number 5. “You know when you do anything for too long and you start to get buggy and burnt out? Well I’ve been locked in the studio since just after Christmas and I’ve pretty much done it every single day, including Sundays, because I’m a bit of a slave driver and if I get lazy I won’t make myself work all night. But I think this is our best [mixtape] yet. It’s our catchcry I swear to god, but we think this one is really good.” As Yacht Club DJs, the Ballarat scamp along with equally hairy pal Guy Chappell have turned absurdist mash-ups into an art form, and what started as something to fill in the gaps between more standard band gigs has seen them called on continually for our country’s biggest festivals, and even led to them being handpicked by Mumford & Sons to close their North American Gentlemen Of The Road Stopovers late last year. “People that came to it all just had this openminded love of music; everyone was approaching that music like a raver would go to a rave festival,” Harrison remembers. “People were just really accepting and would give you everything back.” Influenced by the likes of Old Crow Medicine Show and The Vaccines, Harrison says some of the styles

20 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

they heard on the road have wormed their way onto this next release, but if you’ve listened to a Yacht Club mixtape before you already know the boys are happy to let their imaginations run wild. When asked what was influencing their track selection this time, Harrison responds, “Earth”. That pretty much captures the ethos of the pair, who will casually rip through every era and style you can imagine before turning the pieces into a coherent piece of music that will keep you stomping with glee. Yacht Club DJs are conducting a club tour to launch Oddity Number 5, but Harrison reveals they might have another surprise,

admitting the duo’s anticipated debut EP might be ready in time for these shows. The DJ/producer and multi-instrumentalist says plenty of trial and error has led to an eclectic first release that respects the hot mess of Yacht Club, but it’s been crafted in a more ‘together’ fashion, at least as together as Gaz and Guy can be. “Every song has a genre, but there are a lot of genres in what we write,” Harrison says, mentioning surf pop, electro, punk, hip hop and 3am Berlin techno all in the same breath. “We’re just picking tracks we feel present well together, and then we’re going to eventually work to doing an album where we get fully weird. This is a weird EP, but if you consider it in the realm WHAT: Oddity Number 5 (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 17 Apr, Karova Lounge, Ballarat; 18 Apr, The Prince


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 21


“It’s a lot of lazy bedroom techno,” Montgomery opines. Though sonically different from previous releases, Raise The People maintains focus on tempos and rhythms. “It’s always better not to think about the live thing and just focus on making a good song,” explains Ing, a statement perhaps more attuned to a “lazy bedroom techno” artist than a kicking three-piece. Demos for the album, as for the band’s previous two, were recorded with friend Tom Larkin. Chasing further challenges, and resisting complacency, the band aimed high, with legendary producer Tchad Blake (The Black Keys, Phantom Planet) on the top of their list. Busy with recording a time-rich, betterfinanced, major label band, the trio waited before choosing to go with local producer Steve Schram (San Cisco, Eagle & The Worm). “I’ve always been a massive fan of big pop hooks,” says Ing, explaining the choice. “When his name came up we said ‘sweet’. We hit it off straight away, we wanted to push ourselves and he wanted to push us even further.”

music

CALLING THE SHOTS When Andy Hazel catches up with two thirds of Calling All Cars – frontman Haydn Ing and bassist Adam Montgomery – the pair identify a musical theme that seems to be emerging via a lot of bands these days. “Lazy bedroom techno,” as Montgomery calls it.

A

fter several years of solid touring and becoming regular features in the charts and on triple j, rock trio Calling All Cars have been mysteriously quiet since 2011. Despite a 2013 tour with Kingswood, and several secret shows under the name Werewolves, the band explain their absence and why a year off to write and record an album soon turned into three. “It was down to a lot of things: record labels, who we were going to get to produce and record with – we had a lot of options and we wanted to try something different, but we’re always thinking about international as well,” explains singer-guitarist Haydn Ing. “That was the whole focus,” adds bassist Adam Montgomery. “We wanted a label where we were getting international support. We had to hang out for it a bit longer, but it worked out for the best. We’re moving to the UK at the start of May, as soon as this tour finishes. We don’t really know where yet. The label wants us to go to London, but we’re thinking maybe Manchester; it’s better for touring. We thought, ‘It’s stupid not to go, we’re a rock’n’roll band!’ We’re just going to pack up, take our guitars and see how we go.” Signing to Cooking Vinyl, a label with a base in London and an office in Australia, seems like an ideal move for a band with one of the best honed live shows in the country who are also keen to break new ground. With new album Raise The People about to be released, the timing couldn’t be better. Not named for political- or zombie-related reasons, the album instead serves to remind audiences what the band does best: move people. “Big Day Out this year was really interesting,” explains Ing. “Everyone was like this [frowns and crosses his arms].” “There was a lot of indifference,” Montgomery adds. “When high-energy bands like Grouplove or The Hives came on, they got the place moving and it was so cool to see that.” 22 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Renowned for their blazing live shows and relentless touring schedule, Calling All Cars have not only opened for AC/DC, Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age – playing to tens of thousands of punters – but also bring the same energy to all ages shows in country towns, as they’re planning to do on their typically thorough forthcoming national tour. “Country towns don’t get bands through as much, so they tend to get more involved,” Montgomery muses. “But it doesn’t matter where you are,” Ing continues, “it’s down to the band playing a good show. Big Day Out ten years ago, bands that got the opportunity to be on the main stage really went all out: they’d spend money on backdrops, looking good and play for their lives. Now, I don’t know... A lot of the bands we saw were really lazy, there seems to be a theme going on,” he laughs.

“WE THOUGHT, ‘IT’S STUPID NOT TO GO [TO THE UK], WE’RE A ROCK’N’ROLL BAND!’ WE’RE JUST GOING TO PACK UP, TAKE OUR GUITARS AND SEE HOW WE GO.” “We wanted to do something weird,” agrees Montgomery. “He’s a bizarre guy to work with – doesn’t give a fuck about the process of recording as such, it’s all about vibing.” Schram, who turned out to be friends with Blake, passed the album on; the big man’s advice: “Don’t re-record”. “He dug it, he said it was an eclectic album,” says Ing. “So maybe 60% of the album is the original demos we recorded in Tom’s studio live.” “After we finished the demo, we cut things up and moved things around and that’s more the production [Schram] did,” adds Montgomery. “They came together a bit more as a cohesive thing after we spent time with him.” The first taste of this collaboration, Werewolves (a song Ing describes as being about “a night of really intense sex”), and its suitably NSFW video, has divided fans. “We’re not surprised,” laughs Montgomery. “But there’s no pressure. We’re just excited to finally play it live.” WHAT: Raise The People (Cooking Vinyl) WHEN & WHERE: 18 Apr, Mynt, Werribee; 19 Apr, The Loft, Warrnambool; 20 Apr, Torquay Hotel; 23 Apr, Karova Lounge, Ballarat; 24 Apr, Corner Hotel


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 23


24 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 25


comedy

BEING SILLY

have stirred the pot – Hansen’s song regarding the deaths of celebrities in particular pushed the boundaries of insensitivity and brilliance.

The Chaser’s Andrew Hansen steps over The Music on his way to rehearsal, but stops to chat to Matthew Ziccone ahead of he and fellow Chaser Chris Taylor’s One Man Show.

“I

should say there is a pile of your magazines that I step over when I go to my rehearsals; it’s used to chock open the theatre door.”

Andrew Hansen and Chris Taylor are leaving the rest of The Chaser to hit the stage and in their One Man Show. “It’s something that Chris and I have wanted to do for a very long time, is to do a two-hander sketch show, playing various silly characters and bursting into lots of songs. Finally

we had this big span of time to do that.” Hansen and Taylor are the more bizarre side of The Chaser group but what they bring is a classic, ballsier side of comedy. In the past their antics

It’s a hard task for the musical duo. On TV it’s easy for Hansen to rip out one song; an hour of comedy is pushing Hansen and Taylor. “I’m trying to get my head around all the songs especially because I do each song in different character and it becomes hard after about the tenth song and trying to figure out a different voice you can sing in without sounding like the same guy.” Hansen continues, “We have a right wing commentator singing a song, an annoying hipster singing about his addiction to cable TV dramas and how he doesn’t talk about anything else. Which is also Chris and me.” In a world where imitation versions of The Off ice and Louis CK flow through the comedy world (what Hansen calls “those real subtle sitcoms that don’t have a laugh track, about people in awkward situations, that has been quite fashionable for the past 14 years”), it’s nice to see them going to the alternative: classic satire and absurdity. “There is sort of a postcomedy happening now,” Hansen explains, “where you have to go far beyond what has been thought and said and way beyond the style that has gone before. I suppose there is something to be said for getting up and being silly and delivering some jokes.”

WHAT: Andrew Hansen & Chris Taylor: One Man Show WHEN & WHERE: 23 – 26 Apr, Athenaeum Theatre

art

COLLECTING IDENTITY Curator Tahjee Moar talks to Cyclone about identity, necessary dialogues and a few Blak Wave highlights.

M

elbourne’s biennial Next Wave Festival, dedicated to young and emerging artists, is back – and in 2014 it entails a festivalwithin-a-festival: Blak Wave. Blak Wave’s diverse program of multimedia art projects and talks, as well as a unique tie-in book, will challenge perceptions of contemporary Indigenous art practices, culture and identity. Steaphan Paton’s performance piece, My Bullock Modified, utilises a 3D app to recreate conflicts between Aboriginal landowners and European settlers, while Carly Sheppard’s dance production White Face, explores the ongoing impact of assimilation policies. Tahjee Moar, a Torres Strait Islander, is one of Blak Wave’s guests – and curators. Moar currently works as an educator at the Art Gallery of NSW. She’s likewise a member of the YOLK Collective, their mission to foster and publicise up-and-coming artists. “I guess, as an Indigenous curator, your role is to connect people with artists and communities, and provide a platform for the voices of those artists and communities,” Moar says. Moar, who joined Blak Wave after its artists were selected, has chiefly co-curated and edited the Blak Wave book. “The book is basically trying to capture intergenerational dialogues and the voices of emerging and established artists – and documenting personal and collective experiences... I think it’s not very common for a publication on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander 26 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

arts to be written by all Indigenous authors – so it’s almost a first in that respect.” Ultimately, the Blak Wave text provides a “glimpse into the future of what the next generation of Indigenous artists may look like”. The theme of 2014’s Next Wave is “New Grand Narrative” – ironic for Indigenous peoples who’ve had to fight to be the authors their own histories. “As an Indigenous person, the idea of a ‘New Grand Narrative’ is always about looking at grand narratives of national identity and history and things like that. A ‘New Grand Narrative’ would be proposing new perspectives.” Many of the contributions to the Blak Wave book

WHITE FACE BY CARLY SHEPPARD. IMAGE: GREGORY LORENZUTTI

highlight the intersection between the political and the personal – and some are also negotiating feminist, queer and post-globalised or post-structural identities. “[Blak Wave is] really creating a space for more dialogues to take place because I think, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, we’ve come so far in the arts – we actually have that recognition now – that it’s time to push that further and say, ‘What else haven’t we looked at, what are some of the other issues that need to be talked about?’ and connecting that to the present and issues like [the fact that] Aboriginal people aren’t recognised in the Constitution… There’s a lot of things that are still unresolved.” WHAT: Blak Wave WHEN & WHERE: 16 Apr – 3 May, Next Wave, various locations


OUT OF THE GARAGE Be afraid, be very afraid – Hunx & His Punx are angry and taking their aggressive new brand of punk to the streets. Frontman Seth Bogart tells Steve Bell about getting bored with the garage rock scene and his inherent need to fuck with things.

F

or years now California-bred reprobates Hunx & His Punx have been concocting slightly sleazy takes on the musical styles of yesteryear, whether it be ‘60s rock, doo wop, punk or garage (to name but a few). Their recently-released album Street Punk, however, showcases a harder and more aggressive side to the band’s trashbag aesthetic, a shift which frontman and chief miscreant Seth Bogart explains was entirely intentional.

“Well I was really just super-sick of getting lumped in with the whole ‘garage’ world, because I feel like I don’t really belong or something,” he muses. “I really just like punk music or pop, so I just decided that I wanted to go punk. When we play live we always like enjoy playing the really fast songs, so we kinda wrote a few of them as a joke and then got really serious about it. But Shannon [Shaw – bass] and I wrote that album in like a week and recorded it basically. It actually wasn’t intense at all, it was the easiest thing in the world – it was so weird and easy. I feel

like it was just meant to be or something, but it was a big relief to just be able to just yell.

music

“[The garage scene] is just a bunch of boring straight guys. I’m from more of a gay pop scene, so after a while I just kinda got sick of it. And so much of it’s so fucking shit and so boring – Shannon’s band [Shannon & The Clams] is really great, but there’s just not a lot of it that I like. And I prefer punk, so it just seemed natural to do that.” Some of tracks on Street Punk such as Don’t Call Me Fabulous clock in at less than 30 seconds, definitely never threatening to outstay their welcome. “The whole album’s only about 20 minutes but I have ADD so I don’t think I could have done it for any longer – the last song’s four minutes, so without that it’s really like a 15-minute album,” Bogart laughs. “I’m surprised that our label went for it, but they did. I think shorter is better, but now it makes me want to write a 20-minute song just to fuck with things. “I mean those really short songs just happened on tour when we were just joking around. I don’t think they’d be very good if they were extended, but we often play them over and over – I like to make them play it twice at least, sometimes more. [Don’t Call Me Fabulous] kind of started because Shannon and I were really drunk in Europe after a show and she was complaining because some gay guy kept going to her, ‘You’re so fabulous!’, and she was, like, ‘I hate that! It either means you’re gay or you’re fat!’ Then I just started laughing uncontrollably, so we decided that we’d make an ‘anti-fabulous’ song.” WHEN & WHERE: 17 Apr, Copacabana; 18 Apr, Boogie Festival, Bruzzy’s Farm, Tallarook

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 27


music

FINDING DIRECTION It’s a rock’n’roll redemption tale. Jason Isbell faced and beat his weaknesses, made the album of his career, and even got the girl. Ross Clelland follows the geography of Southeastern.

A

s his classic Southern gentleman’s drawl honeys down the line, you feel Jason Isbell would be good conversational company perched on the next barstool over a few glasses. “Yeah, it could start like that,” he conditionally agrees. “Problem was I was a good hang for about 45 minutes to about an hour-and-a-half, but that’s about when I’d had the too many to be charming anymore. And things could get really dark, really quick.” The inward chuckle that followed suggested some memories preferred forgotten. Due to those now openly admitted human frailties hinted at there, Isbell’s career has seen some peaks and troughs. Some early notice as a songwriter saw him

drafted into Drive-By Truckers around the turn of the century, where his talent got squeezed by that band’s founders Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley taking the lion’s share of tunes on the three albums to which he contributed. Come 2007, he exited DBT – the official line being “amicable parting”, but later hints from both sides suggest otherwise. There followed some country-rocky albums with his own band, The 400 Unit – taking its name from a local psychiatric ward – and solo tours with Justin Townes Earle and Ryan Adams adding to his reputation, both musical and otherwise.

music

But personally, things were pretty much going to hell. “I was always pretty self-aware, so I was maybe lucky enough to see the bottom before I actually hit it,” he candidly explains. “Kinda realised I could be heading for some major health problems, and knowing I maybe wasn’t fulfilling my whole potential as a songwriter and a performer. And relationships were getting strained – basically, I just felt like shit all the time.” So he stopped. “There wasn’t any kind of intervention or anything. But a lot of people who helped – my wife, particularly.” Said wife is Amanda Shires, solo artist in her own right, her voice and violin now often musical foil for Isbell’s songs. His realisation and ongoing recovery came to centre Southeastern, an album of sometimes cauterising honesty and emotion – and mostly just the man and his guitar. Was it always meant to be so raw, so honest, so therapeutic? “The question is probably what else would I have to talk about if I hadn’t gone through getting sober? It still would have been as honest, but I’m not sure it might have been as interesting – if ‘interesting’ is the right word.” But some rules haven’t changed. “You still gotta do the work. For me to be really engaged in what I’m making, it’s got to be really strong lyrically. I mean, I really love some good ol’ bonehead rock’n’roll, but I just can’t hold my own interest doing that stuff.” WHAT: Southeastern (Spunk) WHEN & WHERE: 16 & 17 Apr, Northcote Social Club; 18 Apr, Boogie Festival, Bruzzy’s Farm, Tallarook; 19 Apr, Meeniyan Town Hall

THE BLUES NEVER DIE There is no other blues harp player quite like Charlie Musselwhite. He talks with Dan Condon about being in a city “loaded with the blues”.

W

hen Tom Waits wants a harmonica player, he calls Charlie Musselwhite. When INXS needed to sample some harmonica on Suicide Blonde, they called Charlie Musselwhite. There aren’t many who won’t look straight to this blues harp gun when they need the best. “Some of my earliest memories that were exciting to me were the street singers in downtown Memphis. Most of them were blues singers; I’d just stand on the street and hear them playing the blues,” he recalls. “I just loved the music and there was something about it being out of the street like that that made it so special, it just drew me in. “So much was going on there; rockabilly and gospel and blues and hillbilly and R&B. Stax Records and Sun Records were there, the Hi [Records] label with Willie Mitchell – all kinds of music was happening. Rockabilly seemed like it was invented there, Johnny and Dorsey Burnette lived across the road from me. There were gospel tent meetings; sometimes you could just be walking down the street and hear some music, you’d follow the sound to hear some band playing somewhere.” Chasing work in the factories as a young man he moved up Highway 51 to Chicago, where he fell in with a blues scene that seemed unbelievable at the time and is just astonishing to hear about now. 28 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

“You had a lot of clubs, all over the south side of the Chicago playing blues. You could go and hear Muddy Waters, Sonny Boy Williamson, Little Walter, Howlin’ Wolf – the city was loaded with the blues, live blues, all over town. It felt like a kid bein’ in a candy store. You just don’t have those choices anymore – they had so many choices in one place it was really astounding.” He has nearly 30 fulllength records to his name, and countless collaborations with some of the world’s greatest. Not bad for a guy who didn’t have aspirations to become a professional musician. “I didn’t have a goal or

plan to be a musician. I’d been meeting guys that played and learning from them, but just because I loved the music – I didn’t think it would go anywhere. Even if it hadn’t ever gone anywhere I’d still be playing it, it was just something that I had to do. All those guys I learned from – the old-timers I knew in Memphis and the not-so-old-timers in Chicago, if I had’ve known where this was going I’d have paid a lot more attention.” While Musselwhite is saddened by the fact so many blues greats are passing away, he does think there’s plenty of promise in the future of the blues. “It seems to be bigger than ever. In my travels I’ve found there are people playing blues in every country, from Canada to Brazil. It’s not a fad, there’s more substance to it than that. People hear and they’ve got to hear more of it. Even if they can’t understand the lyrics, they understand the feeling.” WHEN & WHERE: 17 & 18 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay; 21 Apr, Palais Theatre


DECONSTRUCTED WATCH Anthony Carew talks to star Vincent Macaigne and director, Sébastian Betbeder, about monologues and mixed media.

V

incent Macaigne has entered the building. At a foreign-press junket run with military precision, the unexpected arrival of French cinema’s unlikely ascendant star has sent underlings scattering. Conversations with the director (Sébastian Betbeder) and co-actors (Maud Wyler and Bastien Bouillon) of the Macaignestarring 2 Autumns, 3 Winters have been scheduled, but here comes the star o’ the show, blowing in off the street, looking as rumpled and wry as he is on screen.

Macaigne has been all over French screens in the past year: from 2 Autumns, 3 Winters, to his rock’n’roll turn in Tonnerre, his acclaimed Age Of Panic performance, and César-nominated role in rom-com La Fille Du 14 Juillet. One major English newspaper dared declare him

the ‘new Dépardieu’, more on appearance than demeanour. That demeanour is softlyspoken and utterly droll, in stark contrast to the wildly animated and garrulous Betbeder. “Sébastian had a very specific idea of the movie,” Macaigne says, of their work on 2 Autumns, 3 Winters, “and I was drawn to the different approach he was going to take.” That approach is a kind of cinematic scrapbook, in which a 20-something romanticdrama is assembled as postmodernist collage: shot on eight different film stocks, filled with self-reflexivity and metareference, with Macaigne delivering a running, fourth-wall-defying monologue to-camera.

“[Betbeder’s] ideas were very precise: sometimes when we were shooting a scene that we knew was going to come next to a monologue, you could tell Sébastian was already editing in his mind. Standing delivering monologues in front of a green backdrop, we didn’t know how it was going to be combined; what this patchwork was going to look like. He was the only one with the whole picture in mind, so we just had to trust him.”

film

“I really like this idea of mixing different media, different genres, and I thought that the movie would be successful if I can manage to have many references that feed into it, where all these conflicting ideas would interact,” explains Betbeder. “I wouldn’t like to start on a straightforward project that goes from A to Z with a classical plotline and structure. Whenever I start working on something, I immediately look to see how I can break the structure, how I can deconstruct it, how I can make something that feels more like a hybrid than yet another normal story about love and friendship.” 2 Autumns, 3 Winters is filled with endless cultural references, Macaigne’s monologuing, at one point, surveying the cinema of Judd Apatow. “If I want to depict three years in the life of people who are like my friends, it would be impossible any other way,” Betbeder says. “They are people who read, go to the movies, go to concerts; if I was to keep that out of the story, it just doesn’t make sense, it’s ridiculous. I think that French cinema is shy about this; that they don’t want to show what feeds people’s culture. That bothers me. If you show that a character likes a certain painter, or Joy Division, or Alain Delon, it can say more than a very long monologue.”

WHAT: 2 Autumns, 3 Winters WHEN & WHERE: 18 Apr – 9 May, ACMI

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 29


music

SHOULDN’T BE AFRAID It took just one visit for The Bad Shepherds to prove their musical credentials – frontman Ade Edmondson talks to Steve Bell about his relief at finally stripping away the artifice.

W

hen UK folk outfit The Bad Shepherds first toured Australia in 2013 most of the attention they garnered was due to the presence of comedy legend Ade Edmondson (best known for his portrayal of psychotic medical student Vyvyan Basterd in cult comedy The Young Ones) as the band’s mandolintoting frontman. That tour, however, proved emphatically that the outfit – who predominantly play frenetic folk versions of punk standards – are far more than a novelty proposition, and this time around it’s all about the music.

“There’s a benefit about being well known sometimes, and sometimes there’s a negative to it. The aspersions of us being a vanity project went on for a number of years, but we have been paying our dues and we’re still going and we’re still playing rammy little rock crowds – which is where we like playing – so I think everyone realises that it’s beyond that now. “I think once you get three albums in on a project like this you have evidence backing what it is. The truth is that Troy [Donockley – uilleann pipes, cittern, whistles] is a musical genius, and together we work very well.

music

It’s all based on that relationship really, it’s growing as we get better musically at expressing ourselves.” The Bad Shepherds’ recent third album Mud, Blood And Beer contained the band’s first recorded originals, but Edmondson concedes the punk standards that they revitalise in the folk form that really give the band its power. “How can I say this without being big-headed... it’s a bloody good idea, and we do it rather well,” he smiles. “I think that’s why it goes down well. There’s all sorts of factors going into it; one is the fact that we’re nominally playing recognisable songs – even though you don’t really recognise them until we’ve finished them generally – but we have that in our back pocket, that people are aware of what they’re listening to, even though it’s been transformed and they’re listening to it in a different way. And then we kind of surprise them with how good those songs are, compared to how they think they are – a lot of people think that punk songs are just a lot of aggression and shouting and spitting and swearing, but they’re a lot more complex than that. “It was an extraordinary burst of songwriting that era, by teenage kinda gits who were producing a load of adult material, it was just brilliant. It’s very hard to find an equivalent these days. Country music is the nearest equivalent to punk I think, it’s the only genre that deals with adult stuff, and the only thing that isn’t solipsistic – that isn’t self-centred. All of today’s pop music – all the stuff in the charts – is just so boring! It’s devoid of any social context, it has no meaning – it just bores the shit out of me.” WHEN & WHERE: 18 Apr, Thornbury Theatre; 19 Apr, The Bridge Hotel, Ballarat; 20 Apr, Caravan Music Club

A FRESH TAKE A simple recording problem led Robben Ford to record a completely different album to the one he’d envisaged, as he explains to Michael Smith.

I

t all seemed pretty straightforward – book a series of shows, record them and release the best performances as the next album. It didn’t quite work out that way though for veteran blues/ jazz guitarist Robben Ford; the result instead is his new album, A Day In Nashville, almost literally cut in one day in Nashville’s Sound Kitchen Studios. “The whole concept began with three shows we recorded last April in Europe,” the southern California-based Ford begins, “to be released as a live record. But we got back and listened to them and just didn’t think [the quality] was good enough, so my co-producer Rick Weaver said, ‘Let’s cut the whole thing over again and do it in a day in a controlled environment with an invited audience.’ So that’s what we did. “Once we realised we wanted to do something that we were happier with, I wrote a bunch of songs quickly. The original recordings were pretty much live versions of [2012 album] Bringing It Back Home, so I took the opportunity [to start] writing, wrote five songs and pulled something out of my past – the song Top Down Blues, I’d actually written that years ago and tried to record it a couple of times but it never really fit; this time it worked really well – and then we had three covers.” While A Day In Nashville ended up a very different album from Bringing It Back Home, the eventual

30 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

connecting thread was the use of the same instrumentation – two guitars, keyboards, bass, drums and trombone – albeit different musicians. Ford’s first instrument was actually saxophone, picking up the guitar three years later at age 13. Regarding the use of trombone, he feels, “it’s nice to have an alternate voice on board, something that sounds different yet complementary and brings a fresh dimension. You know, a tenor saxophone would be a complete bore, but the trombone is delightful – at least to me.” As it happens, ironically, it’s the sax that has helped define Ford’s distinctive

sound as a guitarist. “Initially I sounded like Mike Bloomfield,” he admits. “He was my first hero, and I was influenced a bit by Elvin Bishop as well, but I was so interested in jazz I’d listen to saxophone players more than any other particular instrument. I was a big fan, of course, of John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Roland Kirk and all these tenor players, and Miles Davis’ trumpet was also a big influence on me. “So I developed an individual quality fairly early in my career because I wasn’t imitating guitar players – I was trying to imitate saxophone players. My musical personality was always pretty strong, pretty forthcoming. I was always very passionate about it,” he chuckles, “right or wrong.” WHAT: A Day In Nashville (Provogue/Mascot) WHEN & WHERE: 18 Apr, Corner Hotel; 19 & 20 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay


PARENTAL ADVISORY STICKLERS Black Lips’ latest video clip came with a viewer discretion warning, but the band ask ‘What’s the point?’ when any kid can just type ‘porn’ into Google. Andrew Mast met up with all four in Austin.

I

t’s easy to find the members of Black Lips amidst the upmarket finery that is the lobby of Austin’s Embassy Suites. Bass player Jared Swilley and guitarist Ian Saint Pé Brown excuse the absence of the other half who have made a dash back to their rooms to rehydrate. They are midway through a week of intensive promotional work, for their new Underneath The Rainbow album, at the annual SXSW industry gang bang.

Swilley politely chats Australia until the others arrive. “Honestly, I didn’t have super high hopes,” he recalls of their first visit here. “‘Cause before we came to Australia, we were pretty much living in England. I was like, ‘I hope it’s not just some weird ex-colony.’ But once we got there…” Drummer Joe Bradley and rhythm guitarist Cole Alexander walk up at this point. Immediately Bradley picks up on the subject at hand and promises a return soon, “Of course. The

sooner the better. There’s talk about a Japan tour.” Swilley adds, “I heard, like, December.”

music

Saint Pé Brown has another reason for enthusing about Australia. “For the young kids that don’t know,” he says, “Masters Apprentices is one of my favourite Australian bands. “We search this music out - that’s what we do. We love this stuff. We love all kinds of music but within whatever genre you consider us, I put Masters Apprentices in that genre.” Bradley adds, “Eddy Current Suppression Ring too.” Now all the Lips warm to the topic, and props go out to Total Control, UV Race, The Missing Links and Beasts Of Bourbon. Bradley then reveals they once recorded with Bourbons’ Spencer P Jones in Paris, “but it never came out”, says Swilley. What did make it out this year though was their VNSFW vid for ...Rainbow’s first offering Boys In The Wood. The southern gothic clip landed on YouTube with a viewer discretion warning. “What is the point of having that now?” muses Alexander. “Almost any kid with access to the internet can just go to Google and write ‘porn’ and then…” Talk returns back around to that video. Alexander admits, “I thought it was going to freak more people out.” Saint Pé Brown disagrees; “It wasn’t all that shocking.” Swilley adds, “It made my girlfriend really uncomfortable. That’s why I said to do it. They said they were gonna get an actor to do it and I was like, ‘Well… I can’t think of any other instances where someone was raped in their own video.’ Could you imagine Prince agreeing to be raped in his own video?” WHAT: Underneath The Rainbow (Vice/ADA)

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 31


ALBUM OF THE WEEK

★★★★½

album reviews

PERFECT PUSSY

THE MENZINGERS

POD/Inertia

Epitaph/Warner

A band that makes cacophonous, bratty noise being the toast of the year? No, this isn’t the turn of the century, but instead a pleasantly abrasive surprise. New York noiseniks Perfect Pussy annihilated all-comers at SXSW this year and left with a legion of bloodied fans in their wake. But with all ‘Next Best Thing’ tags, it has to be given with a dose of sardonic reality, surely?

There’s a deep-seated anger that reveals itself in short, sharp bursts throughout The Menzingers’ fourth record Rented World – the follow-up to 2012’s remarkable On The Impossible Past. For the rest of the time, it’s brutally honest lyrics that take control of the wheel and total everything in their path.

Rented World

Say Yes To Love

Say Yes To Love more than lives up to these raised expectations – it obliterates them and the last remnants of a carefully maintained sanity with an energised tirade against anything and everything. The five-piece play with the hiss of a rolling four-track before channelling their inner chaos on opener, Driver, followed without more ado with the roar of Dig and Bells. It’s in the melodicism of Advance Upon The Real and Interference Fits that some

more of the genius of Perfect Pussy comes through. These are considered song songs, not just a bunch of kids throwing perfectly calibrated bolts of noise into the abyss. The sludge and squall hides the fact that these guys know what they are doing. Yet amidst the maelstrom of chugging abrasion that will shear off bank vault doors, it’s Meredith Graves that pushes the band into another gear. Her lyrics may be self-effacing and confrontational (“And I want to eat myself/And I want to fuck myself ”), yet the vicious energy becomes life-affirming to the point of revelation. Brendan Telford

KELIS

Spending most of their time on the road – Australia’s seen them three times in as many years – they’ve honed their sound to one that records just as well as it comes across on stage. It’s rare to find such compelling songwriting in punk rock these days, and few truly understand the power of putting it all, mentally and physically, on the line like The Menzingers. This is punk rock that bleeds true emotion. Daniel Cribb

The Cautionary Tales Of Mark Oliver Everett

Ninja Tune/Inertia

32 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

While Rented World will struggle as a whole to outshine On The Impossible Past (they really nailed it with that one), tunes such as In Remission, Bad Things and The Talk stand as some of The Menzingers’ best and most catchy work to date. If you want a chorus rattling around your head for a week, you only have to run

through opener I Don’t Want To Be An Arsehole once or twice.

EELS

Food

It’s been a long time since Kelis metamorphosed from the future funk and R&B of her earlier material to the surprising David Guetta-assisted disco house diva shenanigans of Flesh Tone. Adopting a gospel soul stance on a concept album loosely themed around food, Kelis continues to surprise with yet another stylistic shift. Kelis’ previous attempts to capture the imagination of mainstream audiences has to date been hit and miss but on this release she seems to have abandoned glitter-dusted dreams of pop stardom entirely. Instead Dave Sitek and her 13-piece band grind out the old-school funk, soul and gospel flavours of this album. Kelis’ sultry vocals are served unto our ears on a luscious bed of strings and horns. The mix works around her distinctive voice and Sitek, possibly fascinated with Phil Spector, has given this album a loud, rich, organic texture that recalls the dusty grooves of yesteryear. The album kick-starts

It seems something has pissed these guys off big time – whether it’s an internal or external turmoil this reviewer’s unsure – and the lyrics on this record’s 12 songs come across as a way for them to sort through it.

★★★★

E Works/[PIAS] Australia

★★★½ with the glorious feel-good vibes of a generous all-day Breakfast, while generous servings of Jerk Ribs, Friday Fish Fry, Cobbler and Biscuits N’ Gravy ought to earn Kelis a Michelin hat for her culinary skills as she satiates listeners’ appetites for soulful introspection and crunchy deep fried pop hooks. She gets pink on Floyd and drifts into dreamy reverie. Food cooked with love always tastes better and despite the song titles Kelis sings with great honesty about love affairs and when things get steamy food is just a replacement for sex. Guido Farnell

With each album you tend to find the Mr Everett either looking inward or outward. As the title suggests, this is himself in reflective mode. And regrets – he’s got a few. Lots, even. There are obvious ones, like Agatha Chan – he knows he should have stayed with the girl with “the aching eyes”. But elsewhere it’s more existential, as simple and complicated as Parallel’s “Waking up lost, in a world I didn’t know”. The mood is weary and downbeat, a contrast after the somewhat more buzzy energy – and perhaps slightly slapdash nature – of the previous Wonderful, Glorious. This is Chamber Eels, with string section hums here and there. Opening instrumental Where I’m At is a wheezy brass overture; the resigned shrug of Series Of Misunderstandings muses over what sounds like a

★★★½ music-box winding down. It’s music for grown-ups, possibly with the realisation there might be fewer years ahead than behind him. He knows the Mistakes Of My Youth, but realises he might still make some of them again. And maybe darkly celebrate that he can. Eels enthusiasts will be comfortable with this latest intimate communiqué from the Everett bunker. He’s still happily unhappy to dig around in the dusty corners of his psyche and tell you about it. And if you’re prepared to listen to some uncomfortable home truths, you’ll probably learn something. Ross Clelland


singles/ep reviews

★★★

★★

YACHT CLUB DJS

MARC HOULE

January

Create/Control

Items & Things

True Music

In their first examples of original material, this mash-up duo offer a concoction of punchy electronica that carries off like a celestial arcade game. “This is not art/this is not music,” we’re told with an air of self-awareness by a commanding, artificial voice in slapdash opener TINA. While funkified party anthem Undertow is heavy on the grooves and low on the originality, Fingertips’ faux attitude-laden vocals in Real Talk might induce a cringe or two. But fun techniques like off-kilter slap-bass still inform a solid, accessible dance mix. They play The Prince on 18 Apr.

Too soft and trebly to pack a punch, Fusion Pop conveys a lot of style and little substance via maddeningly repetitive techno. For all attempted moody artistry, this title track could pass for a stripped-back Lady Gaga song with its robotic chants of, “Fusion! Pop. Fusion! Pop”. Meanwhile, the garbled, recurring, “Hello friend,” – the only lyrics to the track of the same name – is more irksome than spooky. After a while it’s enough to drive anyone into a paranoid fit. Despite some pleasantly odd disjointedness, there’s not enough to detract from these tracks’ tedious melodies.

LESTER THE FIERCE Anita Lester’s romantic, nostalgic musings drape over a swaying slide guitar, melancholic bass and gentle finger-picking. The lyrics are a love poem: snapshots of all sides of a passionate affair.

JAI WAETFORD

Get To Know You Sony More vanilla than your average boy band song, in solo boy form. Padded out with melismatic “Ooh”s (preferable to the actual paint-by-numbers, tween crush lyrics to be honest) and onetwo-pause-and-four drum beat.

No 1

Stephanie Tell

Fusion Pop

Stephanie Tell

★★★½

OLD MAN LUEDECKE I Never Sang Before I Met You True North Earthy, plucked banjo permeates this twee acoustic offering from Canadian troubadour Chris Luedecke, who simultaneously feels like your cool dad/daggy friend. The homely lilt of his voice carries the rhythmic simplicity of opener Baby, We’d Be Rich, which recalls Paul Simon folksiness. Later songs don’t equal this track’s cute smarts and wormy, energetic little melody. However they achieve exactly what they set out to, maintaining the light and honest quality of this down-toearth storyteller. He plays Flying Saucer Club, 4 May; Burrinja Café & Bar, Upwey, 6 May. Stephanie Tell

CHANCE THE RAPPER The Writer Independent This one’s clearly aimed at haters: of his ‘slow’ music and those who can’t see past the Acid Rap to something deeper. Heartfelt lyrics tumble over crackle noises, warped piano strikes and loose percussion. The intro pan will tickle the ears too.

AFFAIRS OF MEN This Will Hurt Independent An instance where the debut single sounds quite obviously like a first effort. They’ve got one riff, try to vary drum beats to differentiate sections and melody is non-existent.

LEBELLE

When You Wake Up Independent A barrage of guitars and a steady, pounding drum is balanced by Sheri Motiekaitis’ delicate-butassured vocals, backed by ghostly harmonised echoing. Progressive rock with a rush of feeling.

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live ★★★½

★★½

OUR MAN IN BERLIN

THE YEARS

Firestarter

Indoor Shoes

Blending subdued electro tones into languid guitar music, Is It Right? conveys a brand of fluid indie-pop that glides along without trying to jump out of the speakers. While more twitching production makes its mark in the bolder, buzzing title track, the quintet’s combination of high, echoing vocals and intricate, twinkling melodies generally feel akin to a poppier Air. Rhythmic guitar and Haydn Mansell’s soaring notes fuse effortlessly together in single Airhead as drums gently patter in support. However it’s closer Lonely Arms that truly embodies their airy, cinematic aesthetic.

Amid dreamy sequences of mild disco beats and high drama dynamic shifts, you’ll detect more than a whiff of boy band from this Canadian smoothpop outfit. Kevin Lyle’s soulful vocals try too hard to be sultry, instead conjuring an incredibly generic pop sound. The combo of this affected technique and their meaningless lyrics (“She’s got high-heels on/She’s a bad girl and she knows it”) inform an overall worn-out quality. Despite romantic tones and a full, hazy texture, their attempted poignancy just feels plastic. You can certainly hear the strings being pulled behind the scenes.

Stephanie Tell

Stephanie Tell

Is It Right?

Into The Fever

THE BIRDS OF SATAN

The Birds Of Satan - The Birds Of Satan I, A Man - Gravity Wins Again Wake Owl - The Private World Of Paradise Kevin Devine - Bulldozer The Amazing Snakeheads Amphetamine Ballads Liz Green - Haul Away Tycho - Awake Paolo Nutini - Caustic Love

Stephanie Liew THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 33


live reviews

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS Palais Theatre 11 Apr Hunners merch has gotta be right up there: Footy scarves in three different team colour choices, coaster sets, stubby holders – all very ‘Strayan. There are also many fans wearing multiple earrings in single ears, which is a blast from the past. When are those chain-thread earrings gonna make a comeback? “Welcome to the Hunters & Collectors democracy,” Mark Seymour says and memories of Surf Life Saving Club discos come flooding back as soon as the band crank into opener Talking To A Stranger, complete

say during Seymour’s tender phrasing – didn’t think punters in this demographic could get so wasted and act so oblivious! A lot of toilet breaks are taken during Where Do You Go?: an underrated song complete with killer sing-along chorus. Seymour’s vocal is hoarse to close out Stuck On You, but the frontman certainly wears a dark, long-sleeved collared shirt well. Those dirty riff combos in Say Goodbye get us all on our feet, dusting off moves from the ‘80s. Hunters & Collectors’ commercial hit Holy Grail’s riff really does evoke Boston’s More Than A Feeling. Electric guitarist Barry Palmer’s joy is palpable and his precision playing throughout 42 Wheels – a rumbling, discordant masterpiece Seymour introduces as a “trucking song”

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

with Richard Lowenstein’s accompanying sticky-tape face video clip. A band that utilises French horn has never been so macho. The audience sing along with Blind Eye (Walk Away) in full voice – “Don’t take no for an answer” – and immediately Doug Falconer’s effortless drumming style is on display. Seymour’s storyteller delivery comes complete with grand gestures and his diction pulls focus toward Australiana lyrical content: “I’ll live on the dole or I’ll die on the dust” (Inside A Fireball). “Wow, we’re in a theatre,” Seymour marvels before belting out True Tears Of Joy. This Morning is an absolute behemoth – two songs in one. It’s a shame latecomers shuffle into the row behind us at this point and have a lot to 34 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

(which Seymour dedicates to the asylum seekers before plugging Palm Sunday’s Walk For Justice For Refugees march). The Horns Of Contempt truly define Hunners and our closer tonight sees Jack Howard aptly demonstrating The Slab dance during the menacing, rhythmic powerhouse of the same name – “...And everything will be alright.” Bryget Chrisfield

TORA, ALTA, THE LOVELY DAYS Evelyn Hotel 13 Apr First to warm up for Byron Bay five-piece Tora is The Lovely Days, a four-piece who hail from the same trouble-free

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

– makes seemingly impossible progressions look oh-so easy. It seems Tony Abbott bashing is becoming an onstage banter staple these days and When The River Runs Dry’s chorus certainly takes its time coming in within the arrangement. The row in front sways with arms around each other’s shoulders, prematurely, during Do You See What I See? (and revisit this bonding exercise later for Throw Your Arms Around Me). Seymour expertly switches from irate to sensitive persona in accordance with the demands of each song, most of which employ the extended, fluttering-note unison finish. The lengthy encore includes Hunters & Collectors’ moving take on I Believe To My Soul by Ray Charles and (of course) Throw Your Arms Around Me

closely aligned, sonically, with fellow Melbourne producer Oscar Key Sung, but would also fit snugly alongside an act such as Darkside. When Tora take to the stage, it’s clear there is unique solidarity between the band. They claim their moniker is derived from the Greek word for now and this is refreshingly true of their sound and presence. Early on there is a sense of being part of something rare and inimitable. This gig is one of four east coast shows to mark the release of Tora’s These Eyes single. Harmonies are often complex, but always flawless throughout and each note is struck with conviction. They open with an instrumental piece Get Like It (from their

HUNTERS & COLLECTORS @ PALAIS THEATRE. PIC: DAVID HARRIS

beach town but have been “jus chillin in melbs” of late (according to their Facebook). Their sound is warm and reminiscent of the ‘60s and The Lovely Days excite a large and enthusiastic dancefloor, which is impressive for a support act. Next up, Melbourne duo Alta make the most of the modest Evelyn Hotel stage with transforming visuals spreading across several cubes stacked in an entrancing L-shape under the DJ booth. Sweating like she’s “doing fucking bikram yoga, yo!” talented vocalist Hannah Lesser flexes her extraordinary range and lung capacity during the set. Her talent is matched by producer Julius Dowson’s original arrangements. Closing with the striking, recurring “Tell me” lyrics, Alta seem

self-titled EP of 2013) and the second track Offering solidifies the fact that this set will be a tight one. A sixth member joins Tora onstage from the beginning of their set, assisting with rhythms on a drum pad. However his presence is more significantly noted when he freestyles throughout the end of Future Man, an addition that’s welcomed warmly by the crowd. An encore is called for, and, without any unnecessary fanfare, Tora return. From beginning to end, the shared vocals of Toby Tunis, Jai Piccone and Jo Loewenthal are truly moving and spectacular to watch. If the ambient melodies aren’t enough, Tora’s vocal mastery keeps their audience deeply engaged. Izzy Tolhurst


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 35


live reviews

ST LUCIA, THE GRISWOLDS Corner Hotel 8 Apr Tonight we bear witness to an ‘80s pop reboot, the musical era that has crept steadily back into the zeitgeist via recent synth-pop explosions. It starts tonight with The Griswolds. Singer Chris Whitehall, clad in a red velvet jacket and gold earrings, is style and substance. His crisp vocals lead a near-flawless sound from the Sydney group. Their fivevoice gang vocals on Mississippi are outstanding. It adds a punk aesthetic to the purity of their pop. Shimmering synths signal it’s time for St Lucia, Jean-Philip Grobler’s pet project. Opener The Night Comes Again has all the elements of a stadium pleaser. The slow build intro, Grobler’s windswept

of everything Grobler is trying to achieve with St Lucia: Synth-pop imagined through a framework of ‘80s stadia. His band, sharing in the revelry of tonight’s jamboree, back him up expertly. It’s wall-towall dancing as twinkling synth rides atop bouncing bass and thundering tom drums. There isn’t a stationary soul in the house. Grobler repeatedly belts out, “Hold on to your heart,” to close the song. His vocal command matches his charismatic presence. The set takes a quick detour with a cover of Rufus and Chaka Khan’s Ain’t Nobody. Grobler plays the pantomime smouldering star well. When The Night closes the set with one last jolt of elated energy. For a band that wear their influences like a badge of honour, St Lucia somehow still manage to incorporate a sound and style all their own. Ryan Butler

THE GRISWOLDS @ CORNER HOTEL. PIC: MATT ALLAN

hair and the band’s cascading harmonies and rolling drums recall every joyous musical moment of the ‘80s. As a frontman, Grobler plays the hesitant star to perfection. His confused delight upon hearing the crowd’s hearty singing is sincere and spurs his fans on further. “I’ve got a feeling we will never get closer than this/I can’t imagine there’s a way to get closer than this,” Grobler and crowd sing with parallel passion on Closer Than This. Given St Lucia are relative newcomers, these lyrics may prove prophetic as their career trajectory sees them playing to larger crowds. We Got It Wrong layers a swinging Supertramp guitar sound onto thudding house beats. All Eyes On You acts largely as a breather before Elevate kicks in. Now it’s really party time. Elevate is a snapshot 36 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

their instruments. It’s this last point they seem most interested in exploring: bass solos, drum solos, flute, guitar, gong solos – it’s all here, with varying fidelity to actual Frank Zappa songs. Addressing something we all wish to know via a song called The Eternal Question, its chorus “What was Zappa really like?/ Did he fly into a rage?/I bet he smoked dope all the time/And did he really shit on the stage?” is answered amiably by the song’s writer and band saxophonist Don Preston (“Uh…no!”). At the end of a set that makes us appreciate how Zappa injected humour into jazz, we get his most pop moments and set highpoints – Go Cry On Somebody Else’s Shoulder and Peaches En Regalia – by which time the audience are largely onside and the band seem delighted. From a bandleader who celebrated his musicians’

ST LUCIA @ CORNER HOTEL. PIC: MATT ALLAN

THE MAGIC BAND, GRANDMOTHERS OF INVENTION Corner Hotel 11 Apr The long-haired, middle-aged, mostly male audience eagerly assembles around the stage. Though many express their obvious glee by standing still and expressionless, as if about to spot a rare train, anticipation crackles. Soon, the somewhat older Grandmothers Of Invention amble on, smile, and ease into Call Any Vegetable. You don’t have to be a manic Frank Zappa fan to see that his one-time sidemen have had extremely interesting lives, and know their way around

and Diddy Wah Diddy follow, but rather than play it safe the band – comprising sexagenarians in cargo pants and loose t-shirts – go for, and nail, some of the most complex sounds ever to crack a Top 50 album chart. The band themselves are phenomenally sharp with only guitarist Zoot Horn Rollo’s smiling, sagging visage betraying any errant years, even as his fingers move like Errol Flynn undoing a blouse. Hot Head, Click Clack, Golden Birdies, Owed T ’Alex and an almighty Steal Softly Thru Snow are only narrow highlights over a set full of jaw-dropping rhythmic shifts, stabbing guitar riffs and deep bluesy rasping vocals. It’s a privilege to witness such influential pioneers in 2014 and to hear these distant transmissions burn so brightly. Andy Hazel

ST LUCIA @ CORNER HOTEL. PIC: MATT ALLAN

creativity by giving them room to stretch out, we get one who channelled musicianship into songs spanning several minutes that explode with ideas. “We are The Magic Band playing the music of Captain Beefheart!” the band members shout helpfully in unison, before jumping in the air and exploding into My Human Gets Me Blues, the first of many songs from the gamechanging Trout Mask Replica album. Led by one-timedrummer Drumbo, the show highlights his incredible voice, musicianship and personality. Were it not for the utterly unique force of personality/ songwriting genius Captain Beefheart, it would be at risk of becoming The Drumbo Show. The bluesy Low Yo Yo Stuff

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live

Art Vs Science @ Corner Hotel Tyga @ Palace Theatre Rat & Co @ Shebeen Bar Nai Palm @ The Curtin


MICF reviews

JARUCCKE:

TIEMY: DR PROFESSOR NEAL PORTENZA Tuxedo Cat to 20 Apr The mood of tonight’s crowd is a mix of anticipation and anxiety, as Dr Professor Neal Portenza interacts with audience members unpredictably. The show is loose and spontaneous, and his long hair and beard, jaunty red beret and poorly applied makeup only add to the madness. Highly animated and oozing confidence, Portenza encourages crowd participation and at one point even drags his own girlfriend from the audience, much to her horror. If you’re looking for structured stand-up you can forget it, but if you’re keen to see a performer work a crowd on the fly, this might just be your bag.

K

D

SINGLE WHITE SLUT

ADVENTURE PEACH

Arts Centre: Fairfax Studio to 20 Apr

Town Hall: Lunch Room & Trades Hall: Evatt Room to 20 Apr

Tim Key’s Single White Slut will mess with your mind. It’ll mess with the conventions you believe comedy to hold and it’ll have you intrigued, confused and most of all, sincerely satisfied. Theatre, dance, poetry, improvisation and comedy collide for an hour-long performance like no other at this festival, for Key is truly one of a kind. He may have starred alongside Anne Hathaway on the big screen and played Alan Partridge’s sidekick, but it’s Key’s daring and inventive comedy that’ll see him reach the world audience. Brendan Hitchens

The opening night of Jack Druce: Adventure Peach was a sweet and delicious reminder that the best comedy in life is free… Well, free of excessive fanfare at least. Druce captures the unbridled pleasure of childhood adventures and details how they evolve into humbler, but no less comical adult experiences, walking us through some of his greatest achievements and milestones. These include, but are certainly not limited to, being Aqua Donut’s toughest and most BBQ-knowledgeable employee, to extracting a value system from the game of UNO. Izzy Tolhurst

Glenn Waller

THAEWAESXOIMSE:

OF

VIVA LA VIDA LOCA LAS VEGAS The Famous Spiegeltent to 20 Apr Through song, The Axis Of Awesome poke fun at Candy Crush, Game Of Thrones, iPhones and dubstep. Ultimately Viva La Vida Loca Las Vegas is built around their hit and closing number, Four Chords, a song now over six years old and that’s amassed in excess of 17 million YouTube views. Tonight we’re treated to an updated version referencing Miley Cyrus, Flo Rida, Avicii and Demi Lovato among others. The energy in the room matches that of a genuine rock concert. Brendan Hitchens

MORE REVIEWS

themusic.com.au/reviews/comedy

HEADLINERS Town Hall: Lower to 20 Apr Sean Cullen kicks off tonight’s diverse line-up of American (and Canadian) comedians, his weirdo shtick and improv audience interaction failing to garner more than polite, scattered chuckles. The strained atmosphere continues with Aparna Nancherla, whose observations on topics like depression and online dating, despite ringing true, simply don’t compel you to do more than smile. Luckily, Dave Merheje lifts the mood and pace, lanky arms constantly gesticulating as he speeds through why he’s resentful of Canadians being considered ‘nice’. A grinning, charismatic Wil Sylvince ends the night on a high note. Stephanie Liew

STUART DAULMAN IS THE PRINCIPAL

ADRIENNE TRUSCOTT’S ASKING FOR IT

Imperial Hotel to 18 Apr

Portland Hotel: Portland Room to 20 Apr

Step into the office of school principal Stuart Daulman – or more accurately, Mr Stuart Daulman-Is-The-Principal, the principal character of this sharp new offering. Moving around the peculiar office set, yelling at his secretary and, occasionally, at the audience, Daulman masterfully produces the story of a day in the life of an eccentric, sub-social figure who is trying to operate in the real world of angry parents, badly behaved students, and four o’clock appointments. This is a great example of a show where the audience has no idea what’s going on or what will happen next, but is too busy laughing to care.

Wild Wau Wau Sister Truscott is a veteran performer but makes no secret she’s a stand-up newbie – and structurally, Asking For It is a bit raw and breathless, forcing some premises down blind alleys, dwelling too long on others. However, her charm and incredible stage presence hold it together. For a show billed with full-frontal nudity and rape jokes, it’s not actually that confronting. It’s not quite a merciless deconstruction of rape joke culture – this is comedy, not activism. With a deft touch, Truscott gets the balance right.

Lessons With Luis Hashfagz

MICF NEWS Victoria’s Matt Stewart wins the 2014 Raw Comedy Title. The 2014 Barry Award nomniees are: Celia Pacquola, Denise Scott, John Kearns, Kyle Kinane, The Boy With Tape On His Face, Tryqve Wakenshaw and Tim Key.

Baz McAlister

Harry Hughes THE MUSIC • 9TH APRIL 2014 • 37


38 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


the guide

RECORD STORE DAY Answered by: Scarlett Stevens (San Cisco) Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? New Boots And Panties!! – Ian Dury. I like to play Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll when I DJ. First record you bought? Elephant – The White Stripes. Record you put on when you’re really miserable? The Stone Roses. Diana – Diana Ross always puts me in a good mood though. Record you put on when you bring someone home? Al Green’s greatest hits. Most surprising record in your collection? In Memoriam – Fritz Wunderlich and a ‘70s Christmas compilation, both gifts from Tim at Mills. Last thing you bought/downloaded? The latest Broken Bells!

Pic: Court McAllister. THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 1


music

N T DEAD YET ADALITA

TIM DALTON

T

his Saturday, there will be lines out the front of your local record store, because 19 Apr is Record Store Day, an international “holiday” for music-lovers and musicians alike. Musos will be making in-store appearances and releasing oneoff specials across the globe, and you’ve got to get in early to get the vinyl atop your wish list. The Australian ambassadors for Record Store Day are musicians Marcia Hines and Dan Sultan; and behind-the-scenes masterminds, Tim Dalton and Ian Hunter; while Adalita has been dubbed a ‘supporter’ due to her prior commitment to Bluesfest. They’ve each got their own reasons for wanting to be involved. Adalita says that records are close to her heart. “I grew up going to record shops and loved going through all the vinyl and looking for my favourite bands and going home with a new plastic covered album; it was such an exciting feeling. Record shops were places to hang out too and find out about music, mostly from the record store owner who always knew just about everything about music.” Tim Dalton, one-time recording engineer and tour manager for the Beastie Boys and Elvis Costello, says he “wanted to involve myself in Record Store Day as I’ve spent my entire adult life dedicated to music. Music, and modern life in general, these days tends to be about instant gratification. What I like about Record Store Day is a chance to reflect upon the actual product’s creation”. In 2013, vinyl albums were the only physical products to grow in sales; in monetary terms, they were up 53.31 per cent from 2012, with 137,658 albums sold at a value of $2,839,822. We don’t want to drown you in statistics, but the ‘Vinyl Renaissance’ is a thing. Dalton reckon that’s because “Vinyl is metonymic, it’s an artefact of value, it proves that you are serious about music to your peers. Buying vinyl gives a perceived value; spending $20-25 on a record feels like it’s worth it versus spending that same amount of money on a file that you really can’t touch or feel. It’s tactile, has a unique odour and it’s still seriously cool.” Adalita agrees. “I reckon it’s the size of the vinyl. It’s like a big nice square coffee table book. It’s a beautiful 40 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Vinyl isn’t just for hipsters anymore; vinyl sales are up 77 per cent, with more people than ever going analogue. Hannah Story gets the scoop on Record Store Day from Australian supporter Adalita Srsen, and ambassador Tim Dalton.

thing basically so it’s conducive to being treasured. And there’s a ritual involved, you know, turning on your stereo, selecting the vinyl, taking it out, putting it on the turntable, putting on the needle and swapping the sides. There’s a little of you invested in it.” Both Dalton and Adalita affirm that record stores are an integral part of Australia’s music scene. Adalita says that “[Record stores] are passionate about music. And it’s also a meeting place; all sorts of great butterfly effects happen because of record stores… Music is so essential to so many people’s lives. We need to make sure we’re being active and getting out there and showing our passion for music too.” For Adalita, this year’s Record Store Day is especially important, as it sees the release of her solo album on vinyl for the first time. “I’m so excited. It’s such a satisfying feeling and I’m really happy with the sound quality, it’s just exactly what I think vinyl should sound like. And it’s funny but it’s really given the record a new lease of life sonically.”

WHAT’S UP FOR GRABS? Here’s the exclusive releases that The Music office are lusting over:

“IT’S AN ARTEFACT OF VALUE”

Adalita Adalita Deluxe double vinyl issue of Adalita’s selftitled debut. It’s the first vinyl pressing of Adalita in solo mode, limited to only 500 handnumbered copies, on blood- and gold-coloured 180gm vinyl. Nice.

Head On/Pill King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard The first track from 2013’s Float Along Fill Your Lungs, the 15-minute epic Head On/ Pill will be released on a multi-coloured 12” picture disc, via UK’s Heavenly Sounds. Only 300 copies worldwide. So psych fiends will be falling over themselves for this one.

Face To Face The Angels Don Bartley remastered this classic late ‘70s Angels album from the original analogue tapes using vintage studio gear. On 180gm vinyl. For fans of Doc Neeson and co.


record store day vic.live@themusic.com.au

RECORD STORE DAY FOCUS

Rotates between latest offerings from Beck and Tony Joe White.

RECORD STORE DAY FOCUS What’s on high rotation on the store stereo at the moment? Harmony, Postblue, Luca Brasi and Screamfeeder.

What does a record store offer that clicking or tapping a button can’t? Record stores are a “destination” for vinyl lovers... with advice and service you just can’t get online.

Opening hours: Monday – Thursday, Saturday, Sunday, 10am – 6pm; Friday, 10am – 9pm.

Reports of the death of physical product have been exaggerated – discuss: The ABC recently reported that vinyl sales have doubled in the last year and we’re importing more vinyl than we ever have before so if the physical product is dead, no one’s informed our customers! Digital is great for convenience but nothing beats holding that physical product!

What does your store specialise in? New and used vinyl of all genres, including high end audiophile labels. We also stock new and used CDs, DVDs, books and the Pro-Ject brand turntable.

What have you got planned on Record Store Day? On top of some great rarities and RSD specials, we’ll be having Geoff Achison performing live at 2pm... plus free vouchers and records!

What’s on high rotation on the store stereo at the moment?

Website link for more info? qualityrecords.com.au

GEOFF ACHISON

QUALITY RECORDS ...PLUS Answered by: Max Mays (media manager) Address: 269 Glenferrie Road, Malvern

What does a record store offer that clicking or tapping a button can’t? The social aspect: chatting music, hearing about new bands etc.

POISON CITY RECORDS Answered by: Andrew Hayden (owner) Address: 400 Brunswick St, Fitzroy Opening hours: Monday, 12 – 5pm. Tuesday, closed. Wednesday & Thursday, 11am – 5.30pm. Friday, 11am – 6pm. Saturday & Sunday, 11am – 5pm. What does your store specialise in? Punk/indie/garage/hardcore vinyl, CDs and tees. Labels like Dischord, Matador, SST, Resist, SideOneDummy, Merge, No Idea, Run For Cover, Tiny Engines and No Sleep Records.

Reports of the death of physical product have been exaggerated – discuss: In mainstream/popular music this maybe true, however a niche store like ours generally caters to a more passionate music consumer who (thankfully) continue to buy physical product – especially vinyl. What have you got planned on Record Store Day? We usually do a RSD exclusive release or repackaged version. This year it’s a screen printed jacket/ new art version of The Smith Street Band’s current 10”. Website link for more info? poisoncityrecords.com

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 41


record store day vic.live@themusic.com.au

RECORD STORE DAY FOCUS

a 40-year-old company that prides itself on customer service and expert advice. We have a comprehensive range of high quality hi-fi equipment and accessories all at competitive prices. What’s on high rotation on the store stereo at the moment? Jason Isbell – Southeastern, touring shortly. Beck – Morning Phase. We encourage everyone to bring in their on music when auditioning equipment.

TIVOLI HI-FI

What does a record store offer that clicking or tapping a button can’t? A social atmosphere of robust musical discussion and recommendations. We listen to our customers’ needs and recommend accordingly.

Answered by: Geoff Haynes (general manager)

Opening hours: Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 6pm; Saturday, 9.30am – 5pm; Sunday & Monday, closed.

Address: 155 Camberwell Rd, Hawthorn East

What does your store specialise in? Tivoli Hi-Fi is

42 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

Reports of the death of physical product have been exaggerated – discuss: Vinyl is an experience, a ritual, something tangible to play and cherish. Everything

that went into making an album is more palpable. Unfolding sleeves with amazing artwork, proper liner notes and lyrics you can read! People will always come back to vinyl the sound is more natural and expansive. What have you got planned on Record Store Day? Our tame technician Tony McKay will doing a free check on your stylus and turntable calibration. We will be offering 10 per cent off the sticker price off all records, turntables, phono pre amps and vinyl accessories. Website link for more info? tivolihifi.com.au


eat/drink

DINING OUT DON’TS Illustration Sophie Blackhall-Cain.

CLICK

PLAY WITH CANDLES

Do not ever click your fingers to attract the attention of a waiter. Raising your hand or waving is acceptable in some situations if you do it with a smile, but clicking? Waiters aren’t dogs. You wouldn’t whistle at them. So don’t click.

Yes, we are aware how much fun it is to shove the corners of serviettes into the flames of tea candles, but imagine how annoyed the waitstaff are when they see all those ashes and blackened tissues lying on the table. Unless you’re tipping big to apologise, bury your pyro 14-year-old self deep down, at least until the next backyard bonfire.

LICK PLATES You might argue you’re showing appreciation to the chef; you loved the dish so much you want to savour the very last smears of sauce. Well maybe ask the waitstaff to pass on a compliment rather than assaulting other patrons’ eyes with the off-putting image of your tongue being dragged across the plate.

ALTER YOUR ORDER USE YOUR PHONE This one is up for debate, and it all depends on who you’re with (and how judgemental they or you are), the formality of the restaurant and the occasion. Instagram/ Twitter-browsing is only okay if you’re all doing it, at a casual eatery. The odd text is fine if you need to respond quickly. For some, any phone-related usage that isn’t urgent may be frowned upon. But we can probably agree that a one-minuteplus phone convo at the table is at best awkward and at worst insultingly rude.

GLOBAL ETIQUETTE What’s rude/weird here but cool in other countries, and vice versa. Milky coffee after lunch/dinner It’s not an insult or anything, but in Italy if you order a cafe latte or cappuccino to drink after lunch or dinner you might be considered weird as Italians see milky coffees are more of a breakfast-time thing. Try a short black instead. Burping In certain Middle Eastern and Asian cultures, China and India being two examples, no one will bat an eyelid if you burp. It might even be considered complimentary depending on the context. Slurping Can you really enjoy a bowl of ramen or wonton noodles if you’re too busy concentrating on not making

Unless you’ve got dietary restrictions, don’t be that difficult person who asks for X dish but without this and that, oh and can you please also add this and make sure that X thing is cooked in exactly this specific way I like.

any noise? In countries like Japan, China and Hong Kong (but not all Asian countries) it is perfectly acceptable to slurp up your noodles – just don’t be super loud and obnoxious about it; the slurping should happen naturally, not forcefullly. Eating with hands Hands are the original utensil. Just make sure you don’t use your left hand in places like India, the Middle East and parts of Africa, as that’s considered the unclean hand... THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 43


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

JUST VISITING

ALBUM FOCUS While touring Australia, Europe and fitting in time to surf, we managed to create something of which we are truly proud.

NAHKO & MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE Answered by: Nahko Bear Why are you coming to visit our fair country? Embarking on our third tour and our debut at Byron Bluesfest! Is this your f irst visit? Third time around. First was last January and second was with Xavier Rudd in October. Amazing experience! How long are you here for? Twoand-a-half weeks. Not long enough! But a good run to spread the high vibes of true storytelling.

struggle, mining industry madness, amazing social culture. Any extra-curricular activities you hope to participate in? Surf, elder catch-up, music with some of the greatest Aussie musos, and some time in the bush. What will you be taking home as a souvenir? Stories, knowledge, and a warm heart. Where can we come say hi, and buy you an Aussie beer? 18 & 20 Apr, Bluesfest, Byron Bay; 27 Apr, Thornbury Theatre. Website link for more info? nahko.com

What do you know about Australia, in ten words or less? Geographical beauty, Indigenous

CARAVÃNA SUN Answered by: Ant Beard Album title: AYA Where did the title of your new album come from? We needed something that encompasses everything we stand for as a band. AYA is a lifestyle, the way we play and the way we live. How many releases do you have now? Our debut record Rising Falling pays homage to our roots, while AYA focuses on our raw live energy. How long did it take to write/ record? We road-tested the tracks live for a few years and recorded over two months.

ENGINEER PROFILE

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? We recorded the album in an old water tank in the Currumbin Valley, with a bird’s-eye view of Mt Warning. If that doesn’t conjure up some wild emotions, I don’t know what will! What’s your favourite song on it? All That I Know. We recorded the end in one take. By far my favourite track to play live. Will you do anything differently next time? Yeah, for sure! I’d focus on finding amazing locations and people to record with. I’ve realised how much I become a product of my surroundings. Atmosphere is everything! When and where is your launch/ next gig? 18 Apr, Bar Open; 20 Apr, Baha Tacos, Rye. Website link for more info? caravanasun.com

HAVE YOU HEARD

What do you like to see from an artist or band in the studio? Honest and raw performances that have a progressive flow on effect, and inspire the rest of the band and myself to not only match the intensity of that “moment”, but to surround and surpass it.

SAM JOHNSON Business: Three Phase Studios and freelance producer/engineer What areas of engineering do you specialise in? Producing so that my engineering doesn’t interfere with creativity. What is your favourite kind of project to work on? A preproduced studio album (through rounds of demos), that is booked solid from drum tracking straight through to mixing. Are there any pieces of gear that you couldn’t get by without? Good mic preamps and rooms, well serviced instruments... but really, prepared band members is most vital. 44 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

What notable acts/projects have you worked with/on? The Smith Street Band, The Bennies, Apart From This and 50 Lions have achieved indie award nominations and radio support. Do you have any words of wisdom for those wanting to become an audio engineer? Keep your head down and your thumbs up. Website for more info? threephasemusic.com/recording

JUDE PERL How did you get together? I tricked my band members into thinking we were meeting up for a Bruce Willis movie marathon, then I started singing at them... I’m just joking! It was a Stephen Segal marathon... Sum up your musical sound in four words? Funky, silly, sexy, un-sexy. If you could support any band in the world – past or present – who would it be? Flight Of The Conchords. You’re being sent into space, no iPod, you can bring one album – what would it be? Straight From The Heart – Patrice Rushen.

Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Getting to play my single live on Fox FM and being interviewed by Ella Hooper and Ben Wasley. I think I ruined the whole “rock’n’roll” aspect by wearing a zebra onesie. Why should people come and see your band? If you come I will give you one of my chips and be your best friend... Salt and vinegar? When and where for your next gig? 23 Apr, Northcote Social Club – my last original show in Melbourne till November. Website link for more info? judeperl.com


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

ALBUM FOCUS

SINGLE FOCUS What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? I don’t remember. I wrote it eight months ago and recorded it two months later. I’ve been listening to a lot of Velvet Underground. They’re one of the deepest pools of inspiration for any songwriter.

NUN Answered by: Steven Harris Album title? Nun How many releases do you have now? Two physical releases Solvents 7” (Nihilistic Orbs 2012) and a self-titled LP and CD (Aarght & Avant! Records). How long did it take to write/ record? Roughly a few months, we staggered it over summer of 2013 and finished it off in winter the same year. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? I think the process of recording what we play live was the main inspiration.

Having the opportunity to focus in and recreate our deliberate sonic landscape.

FRASER A GORMAN

What’s your favourite song on it? Wow, that’s hard to say because I know all the songs so intimately, but I’m quite partial to Suppress Electricity.

What’s the song about? Tongue-incheek lyrics, as far as songs that I write go, it’s more directed at the groove rather than the narrative.

Will you do anything differently next time? That’s hard to say, quite possibly as a progression, largely due to the nature of the old gear falling apart and getting replaced leading to new sounds and ideas. When and where is your launch/ next gig? Our debut album launch is on 19 Apr at The Curtin. Website link for more info? facebook.com/nunxmelbourne

Single title? Book Of Love

How long did it take to write/ record? It was recorded at Newmarket Studios in North Melbourne. And then at various houses. It was a simple song to write and record and neither took too much time out of my life. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? The song Book Of Love is a first taste of my forthcoming debut album to be released this winter.

We’ll like this song if we like... Milkshakes, pub footy, Old Bar, Lamb in Fitzroy after Old Bar. Kicking the footy at Vic Park. Riding your bike. Do you play it differently live? We had four beautiful and talented backing vocalists on the track: Harmony’s vocal trio, and Sara Retallick. Not sure if they’ll sing at this gig; hopefully at the album launch... When and where is your launch/ next gig? The Workers Club, 24 Apr (Anzac Day Eve). Support from Mojo Juju and Palm Springs. Going to be an absolute ripper. Website link for more info? store.milkrecords.com.au/ track/book-of-love

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 45


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LIVE THIS WEEK

CANINE CAPERS

Photos hilariously ruined by dogs pooping/rooting in the background. Better than photobombing.

SKIN FLICK Under The Skin’s trailer. Jonathan Glazer, you’ve done it again.

LOSE YOURSELF TO DANCE Daft Punk slipmats. Want.

WHEELS OF STEEL

BACKLASH WE WILL NOT

Will I Am’s launching a ‘smartwatch’ in July? Yeah, sure, because it’s already so easy to navigate smartPHONES with fat thumbs.

IRISH PASTIME

GENTLE GIANTS

NIGHT TERRORS

Growing up on the rain soaked streets of Dublin, Gallie (pictured) rapidly became absorbed in the city’s old ballads and songs, which would form an intrinsic part of his own history and songwriting. Experience it at The Drunken Poet on 17 Apr.

In a style that’s somewhere between the avant-classic of Wilco and the hypnotic pop of Wild Beasts, Darling James (pictured) sees James O’Brien take centre stage once again. He plays The Sporting Club on 20 Apr as part of his month-long residency.

Following the recent release of their bluesy Dwell Breaker single, fuzz-rock trio Atolls (pictured) will launch their sophomore EP New Dream at Shebeen Bar on 17 Apr. They’re joined by The Demon Parade and Local Group on the night.

HE SELLS SEALS

RETRO COUPLES

DEAD FLESH

Distinctly fresh and deliciously nostalgic funk producer Freekwency releases new album Seal The Deal, which features a range of guest artists. The launch at Ferdydurke on 19 Apr sees Vocoder perform with Inkswel, Amin Payne and M5K.

Wielding masterful poetic and soulful integrity, Diana Rouvas is bewitching in live mode. Her sound is home to the raw tenacity of the music industry in the ‘60s and ‘70s. She plays Wesley Anne on 17 Apr with Sarah Martin and Jimmy Cupples.

Head down to The Bendigo, Collingwood, on 20 Apr, Easter Sunday to witness a skullcrushing variety of metal acts. The smashing five-band line-up features Abraxxas, Demonic Cowboys, Cryptic Abyss, Flesh Of The Earth and Mason.

REBEL KIDS

INDENTICAL TWINS

VIRTUAL WAR

Sydney band Bed Wettin’ Bad Boys (pictured) have released a full-sized record to critical acclaim and some indifference. Sharing the stage with The Stevens, Soma Coma and Hour House, check out this Boogie sideshow at The Curtin on 20 Apr.

Driving new single Halves from post-punk rockers The Infants (pictured) flows with restrained, ethereal vocals, unassuming percussion and luxurious melody. They play The Loft, Warnambool, 11 Apr; Barwon Club, 12 Apr; The Workers Club, 17 Apr.

In celebration of his debut EP Holograms, Oscar Key Sung (pictured) plays Howler on 19 Apr. From infectious dancefloor hits to minimalist slow jams, he draws on diverse muses to create a distinctive brand of alt-R&B. Banoffee and Guerre support.

OLD FOES Are we the only ones who don’t give a shit about a Friends reunion show?

COUCHELLA Live streaming from Coachella. Must start planning and actually attend next year for a chance to dance next to Leo DiCaprio!

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

PRE ORDER NOW STORE.THEMUSIC.COM.AU 46 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 47


the guide vic.live@themusic.com.au

LIVE THIS WEEK

OLD TIMEY

TWO TIX TO PARADISE

NECK MARKINGS

Finally being let out of their cave after a writing hiatus, ragged outfit Howlin’ Steam Train (pictured) make their explosive return to the stage at Spotted Mallard on 17 Apr. Joining them for a night of rock‘n’roll shenanigans will be The Scouts.

Playing a free concert at Record Paradise on Record Store Day 19 Apr will be Mighty Boys, Sun God Replica and more, plus guest DJs. Goes from 12 – 7pm, with added Taco Truck, Paradise Bar, loadsa new local and reissue vinyl and many exclusive RSD releases.

Sydney’s garage-pop trio Bloods (pictured) take the stage on 20 Apr for a Boogie sideshow. They’re joined by Melbourne’s Bored Nothing, Scotdrakula and Sunbeam Sound Machine for The Liberty Social’s first Famous Friends night.

FAKE UNION

COLOURFUL CREW

JOHN DOE

After five years on the scene, Toy Boats have unleashed their debut album, Wedding Town onto the world. Filled with mellow, acoustic, indie-rock jams, they launch it at Northcote Social Club on 18 Apr with Colossvs and Isaac De Heer.

Back from a strung-out UK tour of shows, Teenage Mothers will soon release an album, but not before they play The Public Bar on 17 Apr. Blistering quartet You Yangs, banging newbies Grey Gardens, and the crashing Orange support.

On 17, John Citizen will tear (or gently persuade) the roof off The B East. An indierock quartet, their music is an eclectic mix of hook-driven anthems, harmony-layered ‘60s-inspired pop, as well some straight-up heavy rock.

TAKING OFF

MEXICAN HAIRLESS

KISSING FEVER

Following up the release of debut EP Good Advice, Up Up Away (pictured) bring their smooth neo-soul and explosive funk to Evelyn Hotel every Tuesday in April. Their 22 Apr show features the sounds of Horns Of Leroy and Lazercatz 2000.

From what began as the drunken ramblings of local group of miscreants, A Gazillion Angry Mexicans (pictured) just released their debut EP. Check them out at Reverence Hotel on 19 Apr with Grindhouse, Cotangent and Two Headed Dog.

Eclectic singer-songwriter Lincoln Le Fevre (pictured) might not be a punk, play folk or be from the country, but he’s unlike any other. Along with his band The Insiders, Jen Buxton and Kissing Booth, he plays The Curtin on 17 Apr.

WITH ANIMALS

CYCLICAL SOUNDS

ROYAL RUMBLE II

Set to launch their debut EP Sea Hearts, Sans perform at Grace Darling Hotel on 18 Apr. The indie-pop quartet have had a great response to single Bluebird. They’ll be supported by a stellar local line-up of Stonefox, Vallee and When We Were Small.

Celebrate the change in season on 20 Apr with awesome atmosphere, a bass-heavy dancefloor and luscious techno beats at Loop. Backed by stunning visuals, DJs on the night include Alleyycat, Daisycutter, Miss Behaviour and more.

On 17 Apr, enjoy a night of musical thrills and spills at Flying Saucer Club as Eugene Hamilton takes on jazz vocalist Hetty Kate for a night of power cabaret, going head-to-head for the second time. They’ll cross a broad variety of genres and styles.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 48 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… ED KUEPPER The Return Of The Mail-Order Bridegroom Valve THE AFGHAN WHIGS Do To The Beast Sub Pop/Inertia THE MENZINGERS Rented World Epitaph/Warner TYCHO Awake Ghostly International/Inertia


opinion HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC BY JEFF JENKINS BLUEBIRD OF HAPPINESS Look up “sans” in the dictionary and you’ll find that it means “without”. But press play on Bluebird, the single from new Melbourne band SANS, and you’ll discover they lack nothing when it comes to pop thrills. This Bluebird flies high. It’s chirpy and cheerful, making you want to hit repeat. “Holy cheeses,” Dom Alessio wrote, “this song is fun.” Later, he tweeted that the song was “the funnest 3mins 28secs you’ll have today”. Dom was the first to play Bluebird on triple j. “We were super excited,” singer Amanda Norman says. “The second time was just as exciting,” adds guitarist Stacey Cicivelli. “We didn’t know about it in advance, so it was a huge surprise to hear it on the triple j breakfast show. That was a big week for us.” SANS call their sound “fast and loud and girly and synthy”. Amanda and Stacey met at

high school. “I was actually trying to convince Amanda for a while that we should play together, but she was a little nervous about it,” Stacey recalls. Amanda: “It wasn’t until Stace threatened to ask someone else that I actually agreed!” Stacey is multi-talented – she also plays in Skyways Are Highways and is a life member of the Essendon Netball Club. “I’m Essendon born and bred,” she says, “and I love the Bombers! Couldn’t barrack for anyone else.” SANS did their first gig, at Grace Darling Hotel, only nine months ago. They return to the venue on Friday [18 April] to launch their debut EP, Sea Hearts, which was produced by Ben McCarthy (Kate Miller-Heidke, Pete Murray, Washington). Ben liked them so much, he asked to join the band. He’s now the SANS bass player, alongside drummer Frank Morda (who also plays in Ceres).

SANS

HOT ASH

STORE IT

Is there anything Ashley Naylor can’t do? As Even celebrate their 20th birthday, Ash has become a permanent member of The Stems. He’s also playing with Dan Sultan and Paul Kelly, and, as part of Melbourne International Comedy Festival, he’s even playing with Police Academy sound effects star Michael Winslow.

Vinyl is back, so it’s time to rediscover the joys of your local record store. This Saturday is Record Store Day. Basement Discs have got live acts all day, including Georgia Fields, Jen Cloher and Mike Rudd.

MAMA MIA Great to see Mia Dyson in News Corp’s list of Australia’s best guitarists. She came in at number 21 (Ian Moss was on top; where was Ash Naylor?). Mia’s new album, Idyllwild, is out 6 June.

10 TO (6)1 Happy Birthday to Peter Garrett, who’s 61 today (16 Apr). After Peter finishes his book, how ’bout some more Oils shows? HOT LINE “In this life there are choices, but time won’t wait here for you” – Pseudo Echo, Things You Like.

THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 49


opinion OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

PUNK AND HARDCORE WITH SARAH PETCHELL

Wu-Tang Clan are making very exclusive music. There will be just one copy of their new double-album Once Upon A Time In Shaolin, which they’ll flog to some rich, Forbes-readin’ collector after a series of listening sessions globally. Ironically, in the ‘90s the Wu followed Master P’s No Limit Records by saturating the market with (iffy) music. But this latest ‘stunt’ is about restoring music’s status as an artistic commodity in the digital age. Happily, a wave of young MCs like Schoolboy Q (aka Quincey Hanley), touring Australia in June, are honouring hip hop’s old skool values and repping the streets, while exploring fresh musical angles. The LA gangsta is aligned with Top Dawg Entertainment alongside his Black Hippy cohort Kendrick Lamar. Hanley recently dropped his highlyanticipated major label debut, Oxymoron – a US charttopper. Oxymoron has spawned notable singles, including the shuffling, yet chiptuney Collard Greens and eerie Man Of The Year. The former college footballer reflects on his descent into gangbanging – and life as an OxyContin user/ dealer. Is Oxymoron redemptive? Hmmm. Despite Hanley’s muchvaunted gangsta rap redux, his default musical aesthetic is inherently East Coast – closer, in fact, to the Wu with their murky, occasionally buckled beats. Listen to The Alchemist’s subtly wonky, piano-looped RZA knock-off, Break The Bank. Aside from Top Dawg’s in-house producers, Hanley has also worked with Tyler, The Creator. Pharrell Williams handles Los Awesome – a nasty synth epic! @therealcyclone

SCHOOLBOY Q

50 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

I hate those terrible bumper stickers bogans put on the back of their cars that say “Like It Or Leave It”. Like a lot of Australia’s population, one side of my family immigrated from Europe in the ‘50s and ‘60s and I find ignorant statements like that really offensive. KORN

Elitism gives me the shits. Throughout the various corners of the scene(s) and its associated internet I’ve been the victim of, a witness to, and a part of the problem itself throughout various cycles as many trends have risen and fallen over the last decade. Having come out the other side, however, I thought I’d share this little epiphany with the world. Most listeners that stick around long enough grow from being that clueless little kid with their entry level bands, to someone with a wider and more ‘respectable’ knowledge of what heavy music has to offer. It’s kind of the same as going through high school in many regards: your first couple of years are going to be filled with cautiousness as you work out who your friends are, and intimidation as you decide what subjects you want to focus on – that phase might even last you the entire duration of your journey. You might go from being bullied, to being the bully, or it could break you entirely. Some might have had enough and drop out into the real world after Grade 10, but if you stick around and jump through the hoops, getting to the end of Grade 12 isn’t exactly the most difficult thing in the world to do. Hell, in this country the government will even pay you to take a specific focus into higher learning after that. Still want that hypothetical medal? What’s the point in trying to make that insecure teenager who’s just discovered The Amity Affliction and Bring Me The Horizon, and thinks they’re the pinnacle of heavy music (and if you want to argue in terms of success, well, they are) feel worse than he probably already does? If

you just somehow suddenly came from nowhere to be into Nails and Watain then honestly, good for you and your older brother, but even still I’m sure there’s gotta be at least a few Trivium or Korn mp3s hiding on a broken hard-drive somewhere. Maybe it’s just because the internet gives people such an easy platform on which to be aggressive and mean that the opportunity to tease and torment is just too easy not to take, but I wonder what one has to gain from the next evolution of schoolyard bullying, or why it is that some people will just choose to perpetuate that cycle forever. Sometimes though I guess you have to be cruel to be kind. If you know someone just getting into heavy music who thinks Capture The Crown is a perfectly legitimate band, well maybe a slightly belittling nudge in the right direction is justified. However, I can almost guarantee that some kid who has just discovered one of the more intelligent bands from the newer generation like say, Northlane, is almost definitely going to have a better worldview and perception of what music is capable of than your average person who takes on board whatever the mainstream is feeding at the time. If you’re one of those outspoken types but can’t tell the difference between the two bands dropped in this paragraph, then it’s possibly time to just leave the kids alone. Heavy music is growing, but it’s still a minority and we’re essentially all in this together. Educating someone might not have the immediate payoff like teasing someone can, but the feelings it can create in the long run are indeed more gratifying. Can’t we all just get along?

But I think I’ve found one situation where this statement is applicable, at risk of sounding like a hypocrite. Particularly when it’s coming out of the mouth of a privileged American who has decided to relocate to Australia, Bert McCracken, lead singer of The Used. In a recent interview, McCracken said he would rather go to gaol than participate in Australia’s political system – he believes compulsory voting to be undemocratic, which I understand (to an extent) given the American political system. I like the idea of compulsory voting. I think it’s a way to make sure everyone can stand up and be counted, and everyone can have a say in our government. Sometimes it backfires (last election for example) but I also know a number of friends and acquaintances that didn’t vote then because they found it a futile activity. And look where that landed us… Compulsory voting stops (most) of us from being entirely apathetic about the political process. It makes us engage with issues and pay attention to what is going on around us. As a scene we constantly engage in talk about social issues like equal rights, and environmental issues. Maybe used up, over the hill emos should look back to their roots and re-engage with that. wakethedead@themusic.com.au

BERT MCCRACKEN OF THE USED. PIC BY THOMAS GRAHAM


opinion INTELLIBLE FLOW

GOOD TIMING

THE GET DOWN

HIP HOP NEWS & COMMENTARY WITH ALEKSIA BARRON

A COMICS GUIDE TO COMEDY WITH KIRSTEN LAW

FUNKY SHIT WITH OBLIVEUS

THUNDAMENTALS

Sydney trio Thundamentals are close to having a ‘moment’. They’ve done well up until now, with their strong 2010 debut album Sleeping On Your Style and the critically adored 2011 follow-up Foreverlution, but 2014 could be their breakout year. In Supercoach terms, they’re ready to go from being a promising $400K player to a bona fide gun in the $550K range. It’s easy to become cynical about popularity in the music business, especially now when instant success seems easier than ever to come by. However, Thundamentals’ development over the last few years goes to show that hard work can pay off. They’ve toured relentlessly, building their audience each time. They’ve made the most of opportunities – the effort they put into their cover of Matt Corby’s Brother for triple j’s Like A Version won them a whole new group of fans and boosted their profile. They’ve made an effort to connect with their fanbases, and it’s paid off when you look at the strong response to their recent singles Smiles Don’t Lie and Something I Said. Of course, this all hinges on their next album. So We Can Remember will be released on 2 May, the same day as their sold-out gig at Corner Hotel. Due to popular demand, they’ve added a second show on 1 May. Selling out your album launch tour before the album has even been released is always a good sign, although, in music, you’re almost never too big to fail – even Lady Gaga spent 2013 battling disquiet over her weak album sales. Hopefully So We Can Remember delivers on its promise, because these up-and-comers look primed for a tilt at the top tier.

Ah comedy… what an absolute riot, huh? A pussy riot, that is. I was going to talk about character and sketch acts, and whimsy and imagination this week, but no – it’s clearly time for a feminist rant. Let’s begin with the Herald Sun’s Alice Fraser write-up and the fact that the comedy community is so far past accepting reviews that focus on female performers’ looks that they forcefully and openly condemn the practice. This was this week’s “proud of Melbourne comedy” moment number one. Proud moment number two was seeing Catherine Deveny’s fabulous battle armour in the flesh and noting that, among the hordes of dyedin-the-wool baby boomer femmos in the audience, there were also some young men. Who were laughing. At the right bits. In 2014 it seems outrageous that I have to be moved by this, but I am. Let’s face it – it seems outrageous that we need a comedy show about an accomplished and prolific writer dealing with faceless jerks that call on her to kill herself. Proud moment the third happened last night, in the room where Dayne Rathbone’s swinging penis left last year’s audiences titillated. Here, I witnessed Adrienne Truscott and her very brave bush. Truscott’s show is drawing crowds and, although some are certainly there for the wrong reasons, the show resonates with anyone who’s ever experienced public vulnerability. And

that includes most women and many men (and people who aren’t either of those things) who’ve ever walked down a street. In a festival program chock full of, literally, tonnes* of women it’s fucking shocking that most of them still have to remind us that misogyny sucks. Zeitgeisty as this whole “Feminist Renaissance” is, it is also here for a reason. Without going into those reasons, I want to acknowledge how effective a medium comedy is for dealing with such things. It’s possibly the most effective way of pointing out any social injustice, because comedy – whether preaching to the converted or not – allows for the easy dissemination of values. Lucky for us, most comedians and all of the good ones are progressive thinkers. Despite this, the comedy climate in Melbourne in 2014 is one in which a fledgling female comedian can ask for a spot at an open mic night and be asked to show her tits to the promoter. But it’s also one where incidences like these occur at pretty low rates. Because, thanks to the internet, to the tenacious and brave women who keep working despite the handful of handsy douchebags out there, and to the awesome male allies who welcome and support women in the industry, female comedians in Melbourne have a growing voice and a powerful presence. *actual combined weight. Deal with it.

ADRIENNE TRUSCOTT

SASKWATCH

Hello Get Down massive, it’s been a cracker of a month with a lot on. Case in point, I stumbled into one of the coolest venues I’ve stumbled into north side (and I’ve stumbled into a lot of them): The Rum Diary Bar. Walking down Brunswick Street on a Saturday night, hearing proper deep funk blaring out of the speakers and seeing a packed venue with a great vibe was all I needed to make my way in. Anyways, the music policy is tight and the drinks flow proper, so I suggest you make it down. Also of hype worthiness is the return of Melbourne’s Saskwatch with their new album Nose Dive released last week through Northside Records. First single Born To Break Your Heart is tearing up triple j and all the usual online spots with its melancholy groove and rainy-day soul, but it’s got to be the catchiest song I’ve heard all year. Big things are coming for this act so get in while the getting is good. Also big on the laser pointing and chainsaw toughness scale is the latest club banger from Nick Thayer, Worlds Collide. Revolver had its Late Show crew drop a remix each and the tropical, Super Mario Bros Nintendo vibe from LewisCan Cut got my vote. Find the lot on SoundCloud and, while you’re there, grab the new Thayer/A.Skillz collab Drop The Funk for that Finger Lickin sound we’ve come to cherish over the years. With that, I’m outta here. THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 51


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Merri Creek Pickers + Laura Imbruglia + more: Old Bar, Fitzroy

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Morcheeba, Chali 2na: 16 Apr Corner Hotel

Cotton Blues Band: 21 Apr Palais Theatre

Seun Kuti & Egypt 80: 16 Apr Recital Centre

Aaron Neville, Dr John & The Nite Trippers: 21 Apr Hamer Hall

Jake Bugg: 16, 17 Apr Palace Theatre Jimmie Vaughan, Nikki Hill: 17 Apr Corner Hotel India.Arie, Joss Stone: 17 Apr Palais Theatre Calling All Cars: 17 Apr Easter Festival Bendigo; 18 Mynt Lounge Werribee; 19 The Loft Warrnambool; 20 Torquay Hotel; 23 Karova Lounge Ballarat; 24 Corner Hotel KC & The Sunshine Band, WAR: 18 Apr Hamer Hall Robben Ford: 18 Apr Corner Hotel Suzanne Vega: 19 Apr Recital Centre Seth Lakeman: 19 Apr Thornbury Theatre

Jake Bugg + The Creases + The Growl: Palace Theatre, Melbourne India Arie + Joss Stone: Palais Theatre, St Kilda Best of Both Sides Festival: Penny Black, Brunswick

Larry Graham & Graham Central Station: 23 Apr Corner Hotel Devon Allman, Gregg Allman, Gov’t Mule: 23 Apr Forum Theatre The Wailers, Sly & Robbie & The Taxi Gang: 23 Apr 170 Russell Owen Campbell: 23 Apr Bennetts Lane; 24 Beav’s Bar Geelong; 26 Babushka Lounge Ballarat Steve Earle & The Dukes, Kasey Chambers: 24 Apr Forum Theatre Booker T Jones, Valerie June: 25 Apr Corner Hotel Ozomatli: 26 Apr Corner Hotel Harmony: 26 Apr Howler

North Mississippi Allstars: 20 Apr Corner Hotel

Residual: 27 Apr The Toff In Town

Trixie Whitley: 20 Apr Northcote Social Club

KT Tunstall: 29 Apr Recital Centre

Buddy Guy, Charlie Musselwhite, The James

2014 Australia Jazz Bell Awards: 1 May Regent Theatre The Jezabels: 2 May Palais Theatre Stonefield: 2 May The Prince Groovin The Moo: 3 May Prince Of Wales Showground Bendigo The Decline: 7 May The Bendigo; 8 May Reverence Hotel Arctic Monkeys: 9 May Rod Laver Arena Bliss N Eso: 10 May Ballarat Showgrounds; 15 Bendigo Showgrounds; 16 Flemington Racecourse

Heavy Judy feat. Children Overboard + Honeybone: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

GIG OF THE WEEK TRIXIE WHITLEY: 20 APR NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB

WED 16

Kreator + Death Angel: 170 Russell, Melbourne

Julien Wilson Quartet + Felucca: 303, Northcote Sammy J & Randy: Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne Fluorescent Organs + Facemeat + Congratulations Everybody: Bar Open, Fitzroy Tift Merritt: Basement Discs (In-Store), Melbourne

Morcheeba + Chali 2na + The House of Vibe: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Ali Hughes: Bar Nancy, Northcote

Saidah Baba Talibah: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne Seun Kuti & Egypt 80: Melbourne Recital Centre (Elisabeth Murdoch Hall), Southbank Jason Isbell + Tift Merritt: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Lilith Lane & Her Many Wives + Ron Peno + Saint Jude: Old Bar, Fitzroy Jake Bugg + The Creases + The Growl: Palace Theatre, Melbourne

Kingswood: 24 May The Hi-Fi

The Acoustic Sessions feat. Lakyn + Emma Beau + Jessica Jade: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

Jeff Lang: 4 Jul Caravan Music Club Oakleigh; 5 Thornbury Theatre; 18 Williamstown RSL; 20 Beav’s Bar Geelong The Beards: 16 Jul Karova Lounge Ballarat; 17 Barwon Club Geelong; 18 170 Russell; 19 Theatre Royal Castlemaine; 20 Spirit Bar & Lounge Traralgon The White Album Concert: 15 & 16 Jul Hamer Hall Something For Kate: 18 Jul Forum Theatre

THU 17

Sammy J & Randy: Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne

The Bell St Delays + Dan Parsons: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

The Audreys: 14 Jun Ormond Hall

The Almost + Young Lions + Drawing North + Oceans To Athena + Deadlines: Wrangler Studios (All Ages), West Footscray

Empra + Peta Evans + My Piranha: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Frente: 22 & 23 May Arts Centre; 24 Theatre Royal Castlemaine

Hard-Ons: 12 Jun Karova Lounge Ballarat; 13 The Wool Exchange Geelong; 14 Corner Hotel; 15 The Bridge Hotel Castlemaine

Justice Crew + Jai Waetford: Wendouree Centre for Performing Arts, Wendouree

Cactus Jam + Phantom Panda + Zod Thorax: 303, Northcote

Boz Scaggs + Russell Morris: Palais Theatre, St Kilda

In Hearts Wake: 7 Jun Corner Hotel; 8 Jun Arrow On Swanston

Kevin Bridges: Trades Hall (New Ballroom), Carlton

Milkshake + Where Were You At Lunch + Glacier: Boney, Melbourne

DZ Deathrays: 15 May Karova Lounge, Ballarat; 16 Corner Hotel

Free Your Mind ft Northlane: 31 May, 1 Jun The Hi-Fi

Sagamore + Dreamin’ Wild + Crepes: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

Echo Drama + The High Society: Bar Open, Fitzroy Kings Of The North: Barwon Heads Hotel, Barwon Heads The Harpoons: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Plastic feat. Boris The Blade + Antagonist AD + Party Vibez + Disasters + Aggressor: Colonial Hotel (Upstairs), Melbourne Plastic feat. The Almost + Summerset Avenue + Young Lions + Drawing North: Colonial Hotel (Main Room), Melbourne Hunx & His Punx + Shannon & The Clams + The Gooch Palms + Miss Destiny + Special Guests: Copacabana, Fitzroy Jimmie Vaughan + Nikki Hill: Corner Hotel, Richmond Animaux + Playwrite + The Groves: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Laura K Clarke + Kate Bart: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Royal Rumble II feat. Hamilton + Hetty Kate: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick

Wine, Whiskey, Women feat. Chelsea Morgan + Jasmine Beth: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne

Eurosmash! + Die Roten Punkte: Forum Theatre, Melbourne

Collage with Mushroom Giant + Acoustic Fax + The Glorious + Mission Brown: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda Sean McMahon: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North Michael Franti & Spearhead + Sheppard: The Prince, St Kilda Twin Axes: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Nigel Wearne: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy Florelie Escano + Dru Chen + Miss Goldie + Chelsea Wilson + DJ Saul Knight: The Toff In Town, Melbourne

Hideaway + Hands of Hope + Ever Rest: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood Elvis Costello & The Imposters: Hamer Hall, Melbourne Money For Rope + The Bowers + The Owls: Howler, Brunswick Yacht Club DJs + Remi + Godwolf: Karova Lounge, Ballarat Plastic feat. Ego + Yo! M.A.F.I.A + Tranter + Tomderson + more: La Di Da, Melbourne Greens Dairy Angel Ensemble: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Jason Isbell + Tift Merritt: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 52 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

A1-Flex + Large &Vision + Yaw Mullato + MC Yung Philly + The Rudy V: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar), Footscray Boyeur + Maeflower + JP Klipspringer: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran Bang feat. Dream On Dreamer + Boris The Blade + Glorified + Hunt The Haunted: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne Atolls + The Demon Parade + Local Group: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne Justice Crew + Jai Waetford: Shepparton Eastbank Centre, Shepparton Dave Matthews Band + Gary Clark Jr: Sidney Myer Music Bowl, Melbourne Chris Pickering + Emma Heeney: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Paul Woseen (The Screaming Jets): Spirit Bar & Lounge, Traralgon When Terror Unites feat. Impetuous Ritual + Altars + Vahrzaw + Demonreich + Bastardizer + Wolfe: The Bendigo, Collingwood Seattle Fix + Free Radicals + Reel Tapes + The Dull Joys: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Lincoln Le Fevre & The Insiders + Jen Buxton & The Slaughterhouse Five + Kissing Booth: The Curtin, Carlton Gallie: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Shihad + Villany + My Echo: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda Xzibit + Young De + DJ Invisible + Briggs + Mr Hill & Rahjconkas + more: The Espy (Front Bar ), St Kilda Mallee Songs + Bob Harrow: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North Spoonful: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Devendra Banhart + Mouth Tooth: The Prince (Band Room), St Kilda Good Friday Eve with Teenage Mothers + Grey Gardens + Orange: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Stella Angelico + Gena Rose Bruce + Brooklyn Queenz: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Naked Bodies + The Stiffys + A Gazillion Angry Mexicans: The Tote, Collingwood The Infants + Mangelwurzel + King Evil + DJ Lovely Clear Water: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Kevin Bridges: Trades Hall (New Ballroom), Carlton


THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 53


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Diana Rouvas + Sarah Martin + Jimmy Cupples: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote

The McQueens + Friends: Revolver Upstairs, Prahran

Austin Brady: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/6pm), Northcote

Boogablue Long Weekender + The Shotgun Wedding: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

The Cambodian Space Project + Kids In Cults + The Braves: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

The Executives + Funky Rabbit + Lady Oscar + Tankt: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

FRI 18

Kora + Cocoa Jackson + Ms Butt + Blair Stafford: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Morning Harvey + The Citradels + The New Pollution: Alia Art House, Collingwood

Shortfall + Seven Days Falling + Animal Hands + Listerdale + more: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda

Sammy J & Randy: Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne

Matt Walker: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg

Spunk Machine: Baha Tacos, Rye

Yacht Club DJs + Remi + Godwolf: The Prince, St Kilda

Caravana Sun + Cyclo Timik: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Watts On + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

Boogie #8 feat. Gary Clark Jr + Pond + Jason Isbell + Vic Simms & The Halfway Revue + more: Bruzzy’s Farm, Tallarook

Lachlan Hicks + Mara Threat + JMS Harrison + Isaac De Heer: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Spencer P Jones: Cherry Bar (5.30pm), Melbourne Stone Revival + The Black Alleys + Citizen + Brockway Lights: Cherry Bar, Melbourne Robben Ford + Devon Allman: Corner Hotel, Richmond Oliver Paterson: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick Eurosmash! + Die Roten Punkte: Forum Theatre, Melbourne Sans + When We Were Small + Vallee + Stonefox: Grace Darling Hotel (Band Room), Collingwood The World At A Glance + Oedipus Rex + Feverteeth + Midwife + Diploid: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood KC & The Sunshine Band + WAR: Hamer Hall, Melbourne Vibesquad + Spoonbill + Damn Moroda + Monkey Marc + more: Howler, Brunswick Calling All Cars + The Love Junkies + The Sinking Teeth: Mynt, Werribee Toy Boats + Post Blue: Northcote Social Club, Northcote

Seth Lakeman + Carus Thompson: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury Kevin Bridges: Trades Hall (New Ballroom), Carlton

Boogie Fest Warm Up Show with + Pond + Peter Bibby: The Curtin, Carlton

Foxtrot + Break The Wall + Cabin Fever + Kings Cup: 303, Northcote

Boris The Blade: Arrow On Swanston (All Ages), Carlton

Mayfield + Stevie & The Sleepers + Papa G & The Starcats + Alone With Tiger: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

Sweet Felicia & The Honeytones: Union Hotel, Brunswick

SETH LAKEMAN: 19 APR THORNBURY THEATRE

Record Store Day feat. + Clag + Full Ugly + Tim Richmond + Ela Stiles: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Jenny Broke the Window + I Know The Chief + Jack Stirling: Shebeen Bar, Melbourne

Doctor Dru: Fake Chow, Geelong

Boogablue Long Weekender + Dan Lethbridge + Damon Smith + David Cosma + Adam Coad: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill

Beggers Banquet Celebration with Hetty Kate + Taylor & Brown: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Eurosmash! + Die Roten Punkte: Forum Theatre, Melbourne

The Grand Rapids + Bad Valley + Brieve: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

SUN 20

Viva La Vida Loca Las Vegas + The Axis of Awesome: Spiegeltent, Melbourne

Mal Webb: 303 (4pm), Northcote

Very Good Friday feat. Buddha In A Chocolate Box + Centre & The South + more: The Workers Club, Fitzroy

Suns + Benny Boi + Pink Lips: Grace Darling Hotel (Basement), Collingwood

Boris The Blade: Swan Hill Town Hall (All Ages), Swan Hill

Caravana Sun: Baha Tacos, Rye

Adrian Edmondson & The Bad Shepherds: Thornbury Theatre, Thornbury Kevin Bridges: Trades Hall (New Ballroom), Carlton Movement 9 + Papa G & The Starcats: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Flying Engine Stringband: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/6pm), Northcote Plague Doctor + Melbourne Cans: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy

SAT 19

Sammy J & Randy: Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne Fats Wah Wah: Baha Tacos, Rye Aye Candy + Secrets Of The Venus Horse + Extreme Wheeze: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Julian Clary: Her Majesty’s Theatre, Melbourne Oscar Key Sung + Banoffee + Guerre: Howler, Brunswick The Kremlings + Rick Moranis Overdrive + Sewercide: Karova Lounge, Ballarat Spectrum: Lomond Hotel, Brunswick East Jason Isbell + Tift Merritt: Meeniyan Town Hall, Meeniyan Suzanne Vega: Melbourne Recital Centre, Southbank Shit Robot: New Guernica, Melbourne Alex Lloyd + Special Guests: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Bob Harrow + Miss Eileen & King Lear: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Quarterhorse: The Drunken Poet, Melbourne Gloryhammer + Largerstein + Bane Of Winterstorm + Aquilus: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda Diafrix + Miracle + Cocoa Noire + Very Handsome Men + more: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda

Adrian Edmondson & The Bad Shepherds: Caravan Music Club, Oakleigh The Resignators + The Outsiders + Bravo Juliet: Cherry Bar, Melbourne North Mississippi Allstars + Special Guests: Corner Hotel, Richmond The Morning After Girls + House of Light + Strangers From Now On: Ding Dong Lounge, Melbourne Barney: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick

Hugh Laurie & The Copper Bottom Band: Palais Theatre, St Kilda

Andrew Nolte & his Orchestra: The Pinnacle, Fitzroy North

The Cartwheels: Lomond Hotel (5.30pm), Brunswick East

The Moonee Valley Drifters: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg

Ken Maher, Al Wright & Tony Hargreaves: Lomond Hotel (9pm), Brunswick East

Bada Bing feat. Left For Wolves + Raise Atlantis + Spook The Banshee: Pier Live (Pelly Bar), Frankston

Boogie #8 + Various: Bruzzy’s Farm, Tallarook

A Gazillion Angry Mexicans + Grindhouse + more: Reverence Hotel (Front Bar ), Footscray

DJ Shmelsson: Edinburgh Castle Hotel, Brunswick

Nun + Repairs + Soma Coma + Prolife + Freejack: The Curtin, Carlton

Boogie #8 + Various: Bruzzy’s Farm, Tallarook

Carribean Cookout #4 + Lotek + Jesse I + Sista Itations + Muma Doesa + Al Good + more: Ferdydurke (Noon), Melbourne

The Lucilles: Retreat Hotel (5pm), Brunswick

British India + Guests: Corner Hotel, Richmond

Beaster Mini-Fest 2014 feat. Three Quarter Beast + Two Headed Dog + Space Junk + Master Beta + Claws & Organs + Baboon Rebus: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick

Pat Wilson & The Bare River Queens + Murdena + Bec Gorring: Bar Open, Fitzroy

Calling All Cars + The Love Junkies + The Sinking Teeth: The Loft, Warrnambool

The Twoks + Special Guests: Bella Union, Carlton South

Ten Cent Pistols + The Groves + Bill & The Jerks: Cherry Bar, Melbourne

Adrian Edmondson & The Bad Shepherds + Special Guests: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine

OPA: 303 (8pm), Northcote

Hightime + Foxtrot: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Best of Both Sides Festival: Penny Black, Brunswick

Best of Both Sides Festival: Penny Black, Brunswick

Jasmine Rae + Jessica-Jade + Danielle Rancie: Revolver Upstairs (8pm), Prahran Bang feat. My Echo + Admit One + The Sweet Apes: Royal Melbourne Hotel, Melbourne

Skateistan Cambodia Benefit feat. The Out Of Towners + Murder Rats + more: The Public Bar, North Melbourne Yanamamo: The Sound Bar, Werribee Thomas Oliver: The Toff In Town, Melbourne When Terror Unites feat. Tzun Tzu + Laceration Mantra + Destruktor + Frown + Black Jesus + more: The Tote, Collingwood

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

54 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014

All Year Round + Set The Record + Brighter At Night + Set The Record + Danger! Earthquake! + The Just-Us League: Wrangler Studios (All Ages), West Footscray

Justice Crew + Jai Waetford: Geelong Arena, North Geelong

Clowns + Mesa Cosa + Bad Vision + Weedy Gonzalez: Old Bar, Fitzroy

Chris Wilson: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

Kain Borlase Trio: Wesley Anne (Front Bar), Northcote

Velociraptor + Donny Benet: The Tote, Collingwood

Indie Record Story Day + Eagle & The Worm + Georgia Fields + Jen Cloher + Mike Rudd + more: Basement Discs, Melbourne

La Danse Macabre with + Brunswick Massive: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

Andy Phillips & The Cadillac Walk: Sound Bar, Rosebud

Gorsha + Inches + Faces: Victoria Hotel (9pm), Brunswick

Trixie Whitley + Special Guests: Northcote Social Club, Northcote Mountain Goat Beersoaked Sunday + Midnight Woolf + Murder Rats + Goofyfooter: Old Bar, Fitzroy Holidays On Ice feat. Angie Hart + Georgia Fields: Open Studio, Northcote Justice Crew + Jai Waetford: Palais Theatre, St Kilda


the guide vic.gigguide@themusic.com.au Best of Both Sides Festival: Penny Black, Brunswick

Honky Tonk B-Benders: The Drunken Poet (4pm), Melbourne

Jules Boult & The Redeemers: Rainbow Hotel, Fitzroy

The Bona Fide Travelers: The Drunken Poet (6.30pm), Melbourne

Steel Birds + The Killdeers: Retreat Hotel (8.30pm), Brunswick Damon Smith: Retreat Hotel (5pm), Brunswick Apart From This + Old Love + The Union Pacific + Diploid + more: Reverence Hotel (6pm), Footscray Boogablue Long Weekender + Tiaryn + Jane McArthur: Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill Viva La Vida Loca Las Vegas + The Axis of Awesome: Spiegeltent, Melbourne Spencer P Jones: The Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine Dogsday + Sarge & The Nuked + The Surf Thang: The Brunswick Hotel, Brunswick Bed Wettin’ Bad Boys + The Stevens + Soma Coma + Hour House: The Curtin, Carlton The Let Your Hair Down Girls: The Curtin, Carlton

Sweet Felicia & The Honeytones: The Standard Hotel, Fitzroy

Daryl Braithwaite + Dale Ryder Band + Diva Demolition + more: The Espy (Front Bar), St Kilda Cosmic Psychos + Bad// Dreems + The Pretty Littles + Drifter: The Espy (Gershwin Room), St Kilda AC/DShe + DD & the Damaged Goods + AK’s Mixtape: The Espy, St Kilda Famous Friends with Bloods + Sunbeam Sound Machine + Bored Nothing + Scotdrakula: The Liberty Social, Melbourne Mick Dog’s Boneyard: The Post Office Hotel, Coburg Sun-Dazed - Dub, Afro & World + Various Artists: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda Sunday School + Big Dead + Orlando Furious + Document Swell + Breves: The Public Bar, North Melbourne

Von Grimm Presents + Child + Agonhymn + Broozer + more: The Tote, Collingwood Calling All Cars + The Love Junkies + The Sinking Teeth: Torquay Hotel, Torquay Kevin Bridges: Trades Hall (New Ballroom), Carlton Alex Hamilton + Oli Dear: Victoria Hotel, Brunswick Raynard Creegan + Marianne Digs: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Green’s Dairy Angel Ensemble: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote Matt Walker: Yah Yah’s, Fitzroy Dan Brodie & The Grieving Widows: Yarra Hotel (6pm), Abbotsford

MON 21

The Darjeelings + Frida + Wishful: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy Aunty Stingray’s Bingo Club: Ferdydurke, Melbourne The Woohoo Revue: Flying Saucer Club, Elsternwick Aaron Neville + Dr John & The Nite Trippers: Hamer Hall, Melbourne

TUE 22

Up Up Away + Horns Of Leroy + Lazercatz 2000: Evelyn Hotel, Fitzroy

Voices In The Attic feat. Lorin Elizabeth + Abdul Hammoud: Ferdydurke, Melbourne Iron & Wine + DD Dumbo: Forum Theatre, Melbourne

Buddy Guy + The James Cotton Blues Band + Charlie Musselwhite: Palais Theatre, St Kilda

Jeff Beck + Beth Hart: Hamer Hall, Melbourne

Best of Both Sides Festival: Penny Black, Brunswick

Ainslie Wills + Elana Stone: Retreat Hotel, Brunswick

The Black Molls + Monte Diamontes World Famous Drag Superstars: The Prince (Public Bar), St Kilda

John Mayer + Grace Potter & The Nocturnals: Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne

Bad New Toilet (DJ Set) + Jimmy Junk Heart: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Cat & Clint: Wesley Anne (Front Bar/5pm), Northcote

Gloryhammer + Lagerstein + Guests: Barwon Club, South Geelong

The Doobie Brothers: Palais Theatre, St Kilda

Lindi Ortega + Steve Smyth + Domini Forster: The Toff In Town, Melbourne Ruby Tuesday + Animal Shadows + Vowel Movement + Listerdale: The Workers Club, Fitzroy Simon & Dave Funkel: Wesley Anne (Band Room), Northcote

classies classies.themusic.com.au

REHEARSAL STUDIOS RATES: (GST INCLUDED) SMALL LARGE Monday - Friday 11am-5:30pm $35 $45 Monday - Friday 6pm-12midnight $60

$70

all sessions

$55

$65

day sessions

$55

$65

Weekends Public Holiday Solo Practice

Mon-Fri 11am-5:30pm $15

Solo Practice

with a drum kit or amp

$20

GROUND FLOOR | OPEN 7 DAYS

9415 7177 www.midianrehearsals.com

2 York St Richmond

ADVERTISE HERE CALL: (03) 9421 4499 OR GO TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014 • 55


56 • THE MUSIC • 16TH APRIL 2014


The Music (Melbourne) Issue #34