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30.03.16 Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Sydney / Free / Incorporating

BUBBLEGUM OR BRILLIANT?

Issue

132


  

   

1 April | 7:30pm Tickets $15 | Concession $13 | Child $10

   

CASULA POWERHOUSE ARTS CENTRE 1 Powerhouse Road Casula 9824 1121 | casulapowerhouse.com 2 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

7 - 10 APRIL Tickets $15 | Concession $13 | Child $10


WITH SPECIAL GUEST

MIKE LOVE “The best effing voice I’ve ever heard.” MTV

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

“The crowd became a sea of smiling faces and dancing feet”

ILUKA

“you feel every sweaty note, a full-tilt, damn the torpedoes showcase”

THE BRAG

STAR TELEGRAPH

TONIGHT !

30

WED MAR FACTORY THEATRE

TONIGHT ! WED MAR

BLUESFEST

SIDESHOWS “Each song burst with relentless energy... his guttural wails contrasting with the dreamy plucking of his guitar”

30

METRO THEATRE

THU MAR

THU MAR

“Stax of glorious noise.”  DAILY MAIL UK

31

FACTORY THEATRE

FINAL SHOWS!

NEWCASTLE 31 SOLD LIZOTTE’S OUT!

TWO-TIME GRAMMY AWARD WINNER FIRST SOLO TOUR IN OVER 20 YEARS

NZ HERALD

STEPHEN FERRIS (FBI)

TOMORROW !

TICKETS FROM BLUESFESTTOURING.COM.AU 02 6685 8310 & THE VENUES MORE INFO FROM BLUESFESTTOURING.COM.AU

BEST SELLING SINGLE S.O.B / 1ST AUST. TOUR

WITH SPECIAL GUEST DJ

“part living history, part concert, all uplifting experience…” THE WASHINGTON POST

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

EAGLE & THE WOLF

“a swampy four-on-thefloor romp” MASS LIVE

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

JERRY JOSEPH

TOMORROW ! THU MAR

31 SELLING THE BASEMENT FAST!

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

ALL OUR EXES LIVE IN TEXAS

TOMORROW ! THU MAR

31 SELLING METRO THEATRE FAST!

THIS FRIDAY !

1

W/ SPECIAL GUEST

VICTOR MARTINEZ

FRI LIMITED FACTORY APR TICKETS THEATRE

THIS SATURDAY ! SAT APR

FACTORY SEATED THEATRE 2 FULLY

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 3


4 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016


Saturday 9th April Friday 1st April

031 Rock Show Sports Bar

Mental As Anything + The Radiators + Steel City Muthfunkas Waves

Saturday 2nd April

Access Ft. Carmada, Elf Road Waves

Saturday 9th April

Dylan Joel (Free) Sports Bar Coming soon:

Sunday 3rd April

Steve Edmonds Band (FREE) Sports Bar

Sat 16/4 - Shannon Noll Sat 23/4 - King parrot Sun 24/4 - Black Sorrows Sat 11/6 - Ganggajang + Spys Vs Spy + Urban Guerillas

www.towradgibeachhotel.com.au 170 Pioneer Road, Towradgi 2518 | 02 42833 588

WED 30TH 7PM

HIGH TIDE SOUND SYSTEM PRESENTS:

LEVEL ONE

COOL ~ TIDE (VAPOUR PARTY)

FRI 1ST 9PM

WITH HIGH TIDE DJ’S AND FEATURE ACTS BASEMENT

THU 31ST 8PM

BASEMENT

FRI 1ST 8PM

BOTCH HOUSE PRESENTS:

AT THE VALVE

LEVEL ONE

ELECTRO PARTY WITH MAX FRICKER, CANVAS, SEKWENSA, ORDER 66, HEAVY HANDS

“KANG”

PUNK ROCK SHOW SUPPORTED BY “51 PERCENT” , “POSSIBILITY OF TWO”, “HACK THE MAINFRAME” AND MANY SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT 2ND 9PM

BASEMENT

SUN 3RD 7PM

COMING UP

FOOL’S GOLD :: INNA RIDDIM

BASS, JUKE, GRIME, GARAGE, DANCEHALL, DRUM’N’BASS PARTY FEAT: A.L.F. , LUPR, ANOMIE, LETABRUTHAKNOW, MACADAM, SLICE, DTECHMC

VENOM CLUBNIGHT ALTERNATIVE/METAL/ROCK CLUB NIGHT SUPERHERO PARTY FEAT LIVE PERFORMANCES BY MANY SPECIAL GUESTS

“ROCK SHOTS”

ROCK’N’ROLL SHOW SUPPORTED BY “KILL YOUR HEROES” AND MANY SPECIAL GUESTS

Wed 6 April: Rock’n’Roll Show with “Victa” supported by “Three Speed Machine” , “Tony Abbott And The Great Regret”; Thu 7 April: 8pm Basement: Rock Show with “Bad Absalom” supported by “Pearshaped Orange” , “Samurai Lullaby” , “Hey, Lady!”; Fri 8th April: 8pm Basement: Death Fn Metal 7 feat; “Autolysis” , “Annihilist” , “Terrorential” , “Enfield”; 9pm Level One: Roots Run Deep Hipe Hop Showcase feat: Jygantix, Point One Clique, Next Calibre, Kazi A, Jamari On Marz, Jeff Kondek, Izzy, Aeonic, Yakobi, 316, The Keggles, Jannah Beth Music, Talakai, Ra’asel Cool, Hypenotic; Sat 9 April: 8pm Basement: Heavy Metal Show with “Convent Guilt” supported by “Hellbringer” , “The Corps” , “Decrepit Soul”; 9pm Level One: Elektrocute One Year Anniversary party Cosmic Carnival Costume party feat: Electro, Industrial, Futurepop, EDM, 90’s Cheese, Donk by DJ’s Danjer, Disposable and many more; Sun 10 April: 5pm Basement: Punk Rock Show with “Durry” supported by many special guests

Expect lightning fast twin fiddles, Tex Mex, Louisiana blues, pedal steel, classic country & plenty of mayhem Andrew Richardson

DATE Wed 6 Apr from 7pm. Tickets $15 After a sold-out Summer of huge shows this all-star collective of Blues, Jazz, Country and Western Swing musicians are back to blow your music-loving minds again this April. The Swing Drifters is a 9 piece supergroup of Australia’s most sought after ‘first call’ live and recording musicians - Felicity Urquhart, Stuie French, Michael Vidale, Garry Steel, Hamish Stuart, Clare O’Meara, George Washingmachine, Michel Rose and Andrew Richardson.

www.thebasement.com.au

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 5


Music / Credits

Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Publisher Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

Immortal Tunes

Group Managing Editor Andrew Mast

National Editor – Magazines Mark Neilsen Arts Editor Hannah Story

Gig Guide Editor Justine Lynch gigs@themusic.com.au

Disturbed

Disturbed’s hiatus is well and truly over. After last year’s Immortalized release, the hard-rock legends have announced they’ll be headed our way in November for a mammoth tour – 12 Foot Ninja supporting.

Contributing Editor Bryget Chrisfield

Editorial Assistant Brynn Davies, Sam Wall Contributors Adam Wilding, Andrew McDonald, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Brendan Crabb, Brendan Telford, Cameron Cooper, Cameron Warner, Carley Hall, Cate Summers, Chris Familton, Chris Maric, Christopher H James, Cyclone, Daniel Cribb, Danielle O’Donohue, Dave Drayton, Deborah Jackson, Dylan Stewart, Eliza Berlage, Evan Young, Guido Farnell, Guy Davis, Hattie O’Donnell, James d’Apice, Jonty Czuchwicki, Kane Sutton, Kassia Aksenov, Liz Giuffre, Lukas Murphy, Mac McNaughton, Mark Beresford, Mark Hebblewhite, Matt MacMaster, Mitch Knox, Neil Griffiths, Paul Ransom, Mick Radojkovic, Peter Laurie, Rip Nicholson, Roshan Clerke, Ross Clelland, Sam Murphy, Samuel J Fell, Sarah Braybrooke, Sarah Petchell, Sean Maroney, Sebastian Skeet, Sevana Ohandjanian, Simon Eales, Steve Bell, Tim Finney, Tom Hersey, Tyler McLoughlan, Uppy Chatterjee, Xavier Rubetzki Noonan

Anything But He blew away Aussie audiences at Soulfest 2014, and now rapper and Oscarwinning Golden Globe owner Common is returning to our shores for a four-date tour. Brooklyn-based Talib Kweli will be joining him at each gig.

Photographers Angela Padovan, Cole Bennetts, Clare Hawley, Jared Leibowitz, Josh Groom, Kane Hibberd, Leila Maulen, Pete Dovgan, Peter Sharp, Rohan Anderson Advertising Dept Georgina Pengelly sales@themusic.com.au Art Dept Ben Nicol Felicity Case-Mejia Admin & Accounts Niall McCabe, Bella Bi, Ajaz Durrani accounts@themusic.com.au Distro distro@themusic.com.au

Common

7,399

Koral & The Goodbye Horses

Subscriptions store@themusic.com.au Contact Us PO Box 2440 Strawberry Hills NSW 2012 Suite 42, 89-97 Jones St Ultimo Phone (02) 9331 7077 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au

— Sydney

6 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

The amount in dollars at the time of writing that Ne Obliviscaris have pledged to them per month from their Patreon campaign, a fan membership program aimed at keeping them on the road.

Hello Horses Adelaide alt-rockers Koral & The Goodbye Horses have detailed a run of Australian tour dates this year, taking the tour as a chance to showcase the best parts of their Nocturnes EP.


Arts / Li Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Line’s Cast

Cast

Australians are getting the chance to see one of the participants of the Britpop era. Cast have announced their first ever trip to AUS/ NZ shores in May for a six-date tour, as well as an impending album release.

Punch Brothers

Are you Leaving for the Country - Guy Maestri

Sound Palette

Heavy Hitters Brooklyn’s own Punch Brothers will be returning to Australia for a national tour come August in support of their 2015-released fourth studio album, Phosphorescent Blues, which hit #1 on the US Bluegrass Chart and #4 on the US Folk Chart.

The line-up for Art Of Music 2016 has been released. Many artists have created a piece inspired by an Australian tune to donate to the fundraiser including Lucy Culliton, Laura Jones, Stan Dryden, Nicholas Harding and more.

The Meeting Tree

Branch Out In support of their forthcoming single, Life Is Long: Slow Down!, Aussie hip hop duo The Meeting Tree are embarking on a national tour this April and May. Fans can also catch them at Groovin The Moo festival.

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 7


Music / Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Maid For Walking

Accompanying the release of their latest single Girl Power recently – a tune that’s sound is only out-classed by its message – Newcastle pop-punk outfit Maids have announced a series of east coast shows for this April.

Maids

Amy Schumer

WorkXx It As of April, Xx Comedy Central is coming to Australian TVs directly via Fetch TV, Inside Amy Schumer, Drunk History and Workoholics are now all freely streamable.

140 The amount, in $US million, that Hulk Hogan was awarded after Gawker published a snippet of a sex tape involving him. 8 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Atlas Thugged WA rapper Mathas is riding the wave of acclaim from the recent release of second LP Armwrestling Atlas all the way to a national tour, unveiling brand new single Bravo Troll in the lead-up to his impending sojourn.

Fear Like Us

Never Fear, Succour’s Here Newcastle-bred, Melbourne-based folkpunk outfit Fear Like Us have announced the release date for new album Succour, due out in a couple of months, as well as accompanying tour dates.


Arts / Li Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Frontlash Violent Soho

The boys make another appearance here, this time for nabbing the #1 album in the ARIA album charts, keeping the likes of Gwen Stefani and Iggy Pop at bay.

Living On

Melburnian rock’n’rollers The Living End have dropped details for their seventh album, Shift — their first since 2011’s ARIA-winning The Ending Is Just The Beginning Repeating — as well as news of a national tour later this year.

How Big, How Blues, How Beautiful

The Living End

Mathas

Bluesfest wrought five amazing days at Byron Bay, soundtracked by audience fave performances by The National, Kendrick Lamar and more.

Back In Rose

Of Spice

Anjum Anand

Dubbed the Nigella of Indian cuisine, British-Indian chef Anjum Anand is creating a 12-part series, Anjum’s Spice Stories, in Mornington Peninsula. The series celebration of the best cuisine has to offer and begins airing in April.

While it might be amazing if speculation was true that Axl Rose might front AC/DC, one can’t imagine Angus Young putting up with any of Axl’s shit and having him turn up three hours late for a gig.

The National @ Bluesfest. Pic: Peter Sharp.

Backlash V Bad

Summer Flake

Hello Summer Summer Flake is putting feet to streets in May for the release of her much anticipated album Hello Friends, due out in April. In celebration of the tour the artist has filmed a clip for Wine Won’t Wash Away.

Lashes

A Pinch

Well we saw Batman V Superman and we probably made the Sad Affleck face throughout the entire film. We had high hopes but it was muddled and obviously just serving as a stepping stone to future Justice League films and not working as a standalone movie.

Euro Got To Be Kidding

Two words: “Eurovision Asia”. Honestly, the name needs work, and that’s the least of its problems...

No Stone Unturned We’re not that excited by the prospect of Stone Roses recording new material – remember Second Coming wasn’t all that. But maybe the intervening two decades have given them their songwriting mojo back. THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 9


Music / Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Happy Campers

Melbourne indie-punk trio Camp Cope have announced they will make tracks all the way down the east coast for a run of shows later this year, when they head out in support of their debut album, S/T.

Camp Cope

Rene Redzepi and Kylie Kwong

Self-Titled Aussie troubadour William Crighton has a brand new album to share with the world — out today on ABC Music/Universal — and he’s determined to do just that with a celebratory run of shows across the east coast this April and May.

Future Tastes The G20 of the food world, MAD is a not-for-profit building a worldwide community of “cooks, purveyors and thinkers”. This year it’s bringing a huge lineup of local and international culinary innovators to Sydney to discuss the future of food. Chanel

theMusic.com.au: breaking news, up-to-the-minute reviews and streaming new releases Whatevs Nietzsche Those who mourned the loss of Goodgod Small Club’s curated line-ups when it was sold and rebranded as Plan B Small Club rejoice. Vivid LIVE have announced the bill for this year’s Goodgod Super Club, with stellar acts likes Chanel. 10 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016


Arts / Li Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Shiny & Chrome

[Formerly The Hi-Fi Bar & Venue]

The Screaming Jets are back with their first studio release in eight years, banging LP Chrome, and they’re keen to get it on the road. To those ends the band have announced a massive national album tour in May.

TIX + INFO

1300 724 867 MA XWATTS.COM.AU SOLD OUT

The Screaming Jets

SAT 16 APR

DILLON FRANCIS USA

And I used a period because contrary to popular belief I strongly dislike exclamation points!

SAT 23 APR

‘EARTHCORE WARM UP’ FT.

BLISS ISRAEL

FRI 22 APR

VIC MENSA USA

- Never change @kanyewest.

William Crighton

SAT 23 APR

Ekko

Kidgeeridge’s Killing It Due to the overwhelming talent displayed at the recent Kidgeeridge Music Festival Battle Of The Bands, the top three bands; The Somedays, Quite Like Pete and Ekko have been invited to join the festival line-up instead of just the winner.

MISS INK AUSTRALIA 2016 SUN 02 Oct

‘DRAG FEST 2016’ ERROL FLYNN BOULEVARD, ENTERTAINMENT QUARTER, MOORE PARK, SYDNEY

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 11


Music

Babymetal’s Su-Metal (Suzuka Nakamoto) used to think metal was “loud and even a little bit scary”, as was laying down a track in English, she tells Jonty Czuchwicki (in perfect English).

L

ove it or hate it, Babymetal are here to stay with their second album Metal Resistance. Those who derided the combination of metal and Japanese idol music as a fad have been proven inherently wrong by Babymetal’s unrelenting momentum. While the project has been criticised - none of the onstage members (including the instrumental musicians) are primary songwriters in the band, the band undermines the hardworking underground metal community of metal musicians - it is clear that Babymetal just want to express and inspire with their music. Sure, the project could have been much so much cooler had vocalists Sumetal, Moametal and Yuimetal birthed the concept for Babymetal of their own accord. Yet Babymetal are less concerned with their formation, and more concerned with what’s to come, insisting that this is only just the beginning and promising that the project will evolve as its members grow and learn more about the metal genre. Lead singer Su-metal, aka Suzuka Nakamoto, says that “with the second album Metal Resistance we challenged ourselves to [try] many new genres that we have actually never done before... Even in the future, we are not going to stop here. We definitely want to explore music even further, and metal even further”. Though not a crystal clear answer as to whether Babymetal will incorporate elements of black metal, doom or grindcore into their future sound, Metal Resistance is a technical leap above their self-titled debut, with later track Sis.

I don’t know metal enough to be able to go to that step just yet. I have to learn more about metal before I can take on the reigns of a composer or a lyricist.

12 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Anger featuring a decidedly death metal intro, while Tales Of The Destinies is a progressive adventure. Nakamoto has yet to contribute her own lyrics to Babymetal, and the reason behind this is endearing. As she describes in her own words; “It is true that when I first started out in Babymetal that I had no idea what metal was. In fact at that time in my life I only thought of metal music as being loud and even a little bit scary. Now that we are exposed to metal, all forms of metal, my perspective on metal has really changed. In fact I feel that metal is a type of music that is very much easier to get into than expected. I do think that writing something would be interesting, but at the same time I feel that I don’t know metal enough to be able to go to that step just yet. I have to learn more about metal before I can take on the reigns of a composer or a lyricist.” Fortunately, she says, “Yuimetal and Moametal, the other two members of Babymetal, they actually have written some songs and lyrics before. It must be that they enjoy doing it because sometimes when we are travelling together for example the two of them will be writing or humming a song or a tune and it always ends up being very catchy and something that sticks into your head. They are probably more interested in writing the music.” For Nakamoto: “I am already taking on a very big role in just trying to develop the song or convey the song when I am on stage. I am having a lot fun just doing that so at this time my focus is all on that.” The way Nakamoto’s perspective on metal has changed has become a major theme of the new album. “Metal music is something that actually hits you in the heart.” she says, “It has a very strong image. Metal music as a whole is very powerful, in fact it’s not like people say that it’s very depressing or anything, in fact I feel that metal music helps you to move forward in whatever you do. It’s also very motivating at times.” Nakamoto goes on to further explain this theme: “The lyrics are very positive, there’s a lot of things that can be very motivating to the listener, for example even for ourselves. In particular, the song Road Of Resistance, the lyrics speak about going through uncharted paths in life, exploring unknown territories and believing in yourself... It really reflects what we were doing last year on our world tour for example, trying out different things and experimenting with different genres of music.” Metal Resistance also features the first English language performance in a Babymetal song. For Nakamoto, The One


On The

Babymetal have performed on the same grounds (Donington Park) as Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple at the legendary Download Festival, and have hit the road in America as primary support for Lady Gaga. “At Download I went to watch Slipknot.” says Nakamoto. “Obviously the performance and stage was simply amazing. I remember the drums were rotating on stage and things like that, I feel like Slipknot put a lot of emphasis into performance as well to make sure that the fans enjoy their show. That’s something I hope, that maybe one day Babymetal will also be able to do something as bold as that.”

was the most difficult song to lay down in the recording sessions, but subsequently became the song she is the proudest of on the record. “The One is the first song I have performed in English so it was not very easy for me,” begins Nakamoto. “I am now studying English, but I realised how difficult it is when you are trying to enunciate something in song versus when you’re speaking. I had to go through training but this will be the first song that’s all in English, which means that it’s also the first song that all the fans will be able to understand. I can’t wait for the fans to listen to the song and I can’t wait for people to listen to the message that is within the song.” Although effort is clearly being made to make a stronger connection with international fans, Nakamoto does not feel this will disassociate Babymetal from their roots, elaborating that “for now Japanese lyrics are obviously very important for us as well because that’s who we are, but it doesn’t mean that we will never sing in English again and, you know, when the opportunity arises definitely

that’s something that could be in the books for us as well”. In fact, while the majority of the record was recorded in Japan, some of the opus was laid down in Australia. “When I was in Australia I was stuck in the studio the whole time and didn’t really see much.” says Nakamoto of her trip Down Under. “I managed to walk around a little bit in the city but really that was it. I hope to be able to come back again, perhaps on a tour, maybe in the future.” Though largely all work and no play, Nakamoto describes the highlight of the entire recording process as celebrating her birthday in Australia. “I celebrated my birthday [in Australia], because I was abroad it was the first time I was presented with cupcakes as my birthday cake instead of a proper cake. That was really fun for me, I thought, celebrating my birthday in the studio.”

What: Metal Resistance (RAL/Sony)

As for being Gaga’s opening act: “In the beginning the fans were not reacting very warmly towards us because they didn’t know what was going on, but towards halfway throughout the show I saw the fans reacting very positively, getting into the show, singing along, dancing along, and that made me feel like regardless of who we perform in front of, regardless of what kind of music people listen to it feels as if Babymetal are able to cross that barrier of genre’s and language and still be able to convey what we do as a group. That was a really amazing experience for us.”

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 13


Music

Unexpected Developments He’s champing at the bit to get back out on stage with The Last Shadow Puppets, but right now Miles Kane is getting some practice reining it in. By Bryget Chrisfield.

J

ust prior to our chat, Rachel Brodsky’s SPIN article on The Last Shadow Puppets, during which the writer describes the discomfort she felt while warding off Miles Kane’s “meant-to-be-funny advances” during their face-to-face interview, went viral. So does Kane have anything to add? “As [the article] said I wrote a note explaining, you know, humour or whatever,” he says, sounding noticeably uncomfortable. Kane’s apology to Brodsky was published as part of the feature, but the

It’s been a while since I’ve performed live and that’s me favourite bit about bein’ in band — or bein’ a singer — is performin’, d’you know what I mean?

writer pointed out that although she appreciated Kane’s note it didn’t make her “feel better”. “I mean, that’s all I wanna say about it, really, to be honest,” Kane evades. “I don’t know what else I can say, you know.” Would he say it was a misunderstanding? “Yeah, totally.” During our interview Kane’s responses are a lot more measured than we’re used to. When told we enjoy the bromance he has with Alex Turner, his other musical half in The Last Shadow Puppets (fans refer to the pair as Milex), he simply says “thank you” followed by, “I don’t know what to say to it”. Kane calls Los Angeles home these days. “I was spendin’ a lotta time here,” Kane explains, “’cause, you know, some of our friends live ‘ere and Alex moved ‘ere a coupla years ago. So I was sort of back and forth

14 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

and then I kind of fancied a change in me life.” So did relocating Stateside prompt the duo to sport leisure suits? Kane chuckles, “I think I watched The Sopranos too much.” Not Sexy Beast then? “That as well,” he allows, “and Goodfellas, yeah — all that shit.” Bad Habits, the first single to be lifted from The Last Shadow Puppets’ second album, knocked us sideways when it first blasted through the speakers and has been on high rotation ever since. “It’s a bit of a wild card, that song,” Kane admits. On the live performance segments of the Bad Habits music video, Kane tells, “When we were recording the record... there was this little bar sort of in Malibu and one evening we went to the bar, we had a few gin and tonics and there was this rock band playing covers in the bar. And we asked if we could play a song, and our friend had a video camera and so we ended up playin’ Bad Habits in this, like, dive bar. It wasn’t set up, it was just an off-the-cuff thing and we managed to film it, you know.” The single is atypical of Everything You’ve Come To Expect, the rest of the album tracks adopting a much more chilled vibe; so much so that this scribe can imagine the title track playing in a lounge scene in the next Bond film. “Well, wouldn’t that be lovely!” Kane enthuses. “Let’s set that up now.” String arranger extraordinaire Owen Pallett is back on board for this record and Kane reveals, “On this one I guess we kind of wanted to have the same approach as much as we could, you know, using James [Ford, producer] and, you know, gettin’ Owen in as well, ‘cause he did such a good job [on 2008’s The Age Of The Understatement] and he’s such a talent that we would’ve been fools not to, really... We were sittin’ at the grand piano and he was writin’ all the parts as we were recordin’ them so it was a very nice experience.” On his musical calling, Kane shares, “It was somethin’ I’d dream of, you know? I’d always sing in the mirror and I’d daydream in school about bein’ in a band or whatever. I don’t feel I’m capable of doin’ anything else, really, d’you know wha’ I mean? And I guess I’m fortunate enough that, you know, I’ve done it for this length of time — hopefully for a lot longer. “We’re serious about what we do. It just feels normal. I can’t really explain it, d’you know what I mean? It’s just an exciting process, you know? Like even now in rehearsals with the lads, and the band — and it’s like I’ve missed that even. It just feels good even bein’ in a room, goin’ over the songs, gettin’ ready to go on tour ‘cause it’s been a while since I’ve performed live and that’s me favourite bit about bein’ in band — or bein’ a singer — is performin’, d’you know wha’ I mean? Bein’ out there on that stage.” Last time Kane toured our shores was back in 2011 (“ages ago”) for Falls Festival and Kane jokes, “I think I had eyeliner on on that tour, d’you know wha’ I mean? That’s how wild that was.” Kane estimates the last time he graced a stage was “a coupla years ago or a year and a half ago”, before concluding, “So, yeah! Get me on there.”

What: Everything You’ve Come To Expect (Domino/EMI)


T!

THE FUSEBOX

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 15


APRA Song of The Year Nominee

Birds Of Tokyo

In the lead-up to the APRA Awards, we grabbed some of the Song Of The Year nominees to talk about how their nominated songs came to be. Here’s Glenn Sarangapany from Birds Of Tokyo to talk about their song Anchor. What’s the song about? Anchor is an apology for the times that we weren’t there for the people closest to us. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? We spent two years living in the USA away from our families and friends. It was sweet fun, but the disconnection sometimes took it’s toll and found its way into the music. Was this song something that came together easily, or did you have to work on it? Over time (quite a long time, heh), as lyrics were being written, the the song revealed itself and we had to totally abandon our comfort zones to create a sonic world that serviced the story. What came first in this instance — the lyrics or the music? And is that how you write generally? We usually write music and lyrics at the same time. In this case, once we had our chorus lyrics, we were able to go back and rewrite the rest of the track. If not you, who would you like to see win the Song Of The Year award and why? Tame Impala for Let It Happen. Because it’s a fucking sick tune.

16 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Music

By The Tail

Following a visit to the States alongside New York’s St Lucia and a string of sets at SXSW, Tigertown’s Alexi Collins tells Tyler McLoughlan it’s time to head home for a national tour/victory lap.

T

igertown has been a solid name on the Australian scene since the release of their eponymous debut EP in 2011, spurred further by the big love generated by the ethereal folky synth sound of follow-up single What You Came Here For. As one of the vibe acts of SWSW in 2015, the Sydney quartet signed to influential American label Neon Gold. Now, Keys-player Alexi Collins is reflecting on their new EP Lonely Cities from the band’s Airbnb pad in LA — as they prepare for another attack on SXSW. “It’s been pretty crazy,” he begins with a chuckle of disbelief. “That came out while we were here in America, so every morning we’d wake up to something new — be it a review, or we’ve recently just hit two million plays for one of our songs on Spotify. We’ve never seen that number written next to our name anywhere so that was exciting... It’s definitely the best reaction we’ve had to anything we’ve released before. It’s really exciting when things like [a debut play on Beats 1 radio show, hosted by] Zane Lowe and the whole Hype Machine stuff happens. I think we don’t really know how to react, but it’s been really exciting... “Just releasing the EP was a really big deal for us,” he continues. “We had a show

in New York and we have our EPs printed on orange vinyl, which is very exciting to have our music on records because that’s our preferred way to listen to music, but a fun part of that night was a guy from our record label turned up with one of our orange vinyls with cup cakes on it.” With the accolades piling up for Tigertown, a family band consisting of husband-wife duo Chris (guitar) and Charlie Collins (vocals/synth), with the former’s brother on keys and sister Elodie on bass, the Collins parents must be feeling slightly less anxious about their eggs being quite literally in one fickle music industry basket. “Our mum is definitely still our biggest fan!” Collins laughs. “We might wake up to a lot of Twitter notifications or something but it’s because our mum signed up to Twitter and would like and retweet everything she sees with the word Tigertown in it. We’re very thankful for that! I’m still suspicious that a lot of the triple j plays we’ve had have just been requests from Mum... We’ll definitely put her on the door for our Sydney show,” he says generously ahead of the band’s seven-date national tour kicking off in April. “America has really just been the dress rehearsal for the Australian tour. We’re so excited to come home and play Australia again because we haven’t really done a proper Australian tour for about two years, so we’re dying to get out and see our friends again.” Beyond that, Collins is still keeping mum. “We’ve been working on some more music and we’re looking forward to releasing that towards the end of the year. I think that’s all I should say.”

What: Lonely Cities (Inertia) When & Where: 1 Apr, Newtown Social Club


THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 17


Music

The End? They invented heavy metal way back in 1969 but now Black Sabbath are calling it quits. Mark Hebblewhite cornered riffmeister extraordinaire Tony Iommi to ask if this really is the end.

W

hen veteran metal bands claim that they are ‘retiring’ eyebrows are often raised. In Black Sabbath’s case this is particularly pertinent. Ozzy Osbourne first ‘retired’ in the early 1990s and, after many decades of saying that there would never be a new Sabbath album, 2013 brought us 13. So are the band’s current claims that this is indeed their final-ever tour sincere, or just a case of clever marketing? “I don’t think you’ve ever really heard that ‘this is the end’ in the past,” says a very determined Tony Iommi. “This is the end — definitely; we’ve had a great run but you have to

I can’t work to the level I did before. I have to think about that and, as much as I love to play, I can’t handle the actual touring anymore.

stop somewhere. With my illness [in 2012 Iommi was diagnosed with lymphoma] I can’t work to the level I did before. I have to think about that and, as much as I love to play, I can’t handle the actual touring anymore. I have to play it safe now, and we all talked about it and we decided that this would be the last tour and the last time we’ll be playing live in Australia. “Don’t get me wrong, there’s no problem with the shows — the band has been sounding great. But it’s the rest of the stuff in between that I find it difficult to deal with — especially travelling late at night.” One of the unique elements of this tour is that the band have unveiled four unreleased tracks from the 13 sessions, which, backed with some live numbers, are being sold at the band’s shows in the form of a CD 18 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

bearing the obvious title of The End. Will the band be making them available to a wider audience? “At the moment they will just be available at the shows. I’m not sure if they will go to the full market,” admits Iommi. “The original plan was to go in and do another album but then we decided not to do that and go on tour instead. I thought it was a real shame to waste the tracks we hadn’t used from the last album and we came up with the idea of doing the album that we would sell at the shows. So far the fans seem to be liking them and it’s allowed us to do something really different for people coming to the shows.” Although he’s enjoyed the first North American leg of the tour, Iommi admits that playing in Australia is always special for him. After confirming that the band intends to play the same setlist that has been wowing fans from Toronto to Houston (with the long-neglected likes of After Forever and Hand Of Doom making a welcome return), Iommi shares some of his favourite memories of Australia. “We first came down to Australia very early in our career,” he says. “I’ve got a lot of great memories of Australia but one in particular I’ll never forget. Our first time there we played the Myponga festival — we had a fantastic time, the promoter treated us like gold and rented some cars for us which we were driving around on the beach. One of the cars got stuck with the tide coming in, so I went down to try and tow it out and I got stuck. It was a bit embarrassing, really, trying to tell the promoter that, ‘Well, there were four cars but now two of them are underwater’,” laughs Iommi. While all the focus is currently on the classic Ozzy Osbourne-fronted version of Black Sabbath, many forget that Iommi played with a range of different musicians under the Sabbath banner. Iommi is more than happy to open up about the ‘forgotten years’ of Sabbath. After confirming his desire to re-release a range of out-ofprint Sabbath albums featuring Tony Martin, Iommi turns to the contentious Born Again LP that featured the talents of one Ian Gillan and even inspired the cult classic Spinal Tap. “I really wanted to re-mix Born Again because originally we had a lot of problems mastering it and it came out sounding very muffled,” says Iommi, in reference to the album’s long-awaited re-release that hit shelves in 2011. “In the end, though, we couldn’t find the original tapes. We tried to trace them but it turned out to be very difficult to find out where they went.” Iommi is also happy to shine some light on another long-discussed corner of the Sabbath universe. After reuniting with Ronnie James Dio in 1991 for what would become the Dehumanizer album, Iommi had a brief falling out with the diminutive frontman and called in exvocalist Tony Martin to fill the gap. Many Sabbath fans have speculated that as a result of this brief interlude there exists a version of Dehumanizer with Tony Martin on vocals. “No I don’t remember that,” laughs Iommi as he smashes many a Sabbath nerd’s fantasy. “We went in and played some of the stuff with Tony but we didn’t do any recording.”

When & Where: Apr 23, Allphones Arena


JESABEL

BASSIK

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THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 19


APRA Song of The Year Nominee

Jarryd James

In the lead-up to the APRA Awards, we grabbed some of the Song Of The Year nominees to talk about how their nominated songs came to be. Here’s Jarryd James to talk about his song Do You Remember. What’s the song about? It’s about nostalgia and it’s about mistakes and learning to live with them. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Being away from home. Being by myself in a city that I didn’t yet feel at home in. Was this song something that came together easily, or did you have to work on it? It only took a few days. I think it just flowed out so easily because I wasn’t trying to ‘work’ at all, was just trying to be honest. What came first in this instance — the lyrics or the music? And is that how you write generally? I always do music first and then lyrics. For me, the music sets the scene for the words and incites them. Has the song changed by playing it live, or do you still perform it pretty much the way it was originally written? I think maybe it has a bit more energy when the boys and I play it live. I think that’s common — that’s the nature of live performances of songs. If not you, who would you like to see win the Song Of The Year award and why? Let’s just chop it into four equal pieces and give it to all of them.

20 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Music

New Goals

Trivium frontman Matt Heafy tells Brendan Crabb about how practicing jiujitsu motivates him to set “impossibly high goals”.

T

hroughout seven albums Florida quartet Trivium have gradually transformed their audience from media darlings and metal pin-up boys to a broad cross-section of heavy music devotees. After spending many years honing instrumental prowess and establishing a profile, vocalist/ guitarist Matt Heafy has revelled in building another craft from the ground up: Brazilian jiu-jitsu. “It’s really cool, it’s a community kind of like metal,” he gushes. “I’ve met a lot of people on the road that I’ve become close to, purely from training. It’s been an amazing experience. I’ve been singing and playing guitar since I was about 13 years old, so I haven’t really known what it is to have to learn something new and develop a skill in a short amount of time. “When I first started it was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done. The first couple of months all I wanted to do was quit. I was always sore, it didn’t make any sense to me. After seeing the proper amount of time it started to click, to make sense. It’s my escape from everything and the only thing in life where my brain isn’t going a million miles per hour. When I’m playing guitar and singing at a show, I can still be thinking about other things. But when I’m doing jiu-jitsu, nothing else is there. Which I really love.”

He says the sport’s extensive, multi-tiered belt system means there’s always goals to strive for, akin to continually seeking to improve as a musician. “To be a great jiu-jitsu practitioner, there’s absolutely no shortcuts. The only way you get good at it is putting in tonnes of work and time. “What jiu-jitsu’s done for me, as far as being in Trivium, is shown me what it is to create a regiment and practice schedule again. One of my favourite songs to sing, that I’m not going to sing publicly yet because there’s still a lot of work to do, is For The Greater Good Of God by Iron Maiden. That’s something I am committed to being able to sing perfectly. Not to be as good as Bruce [Dickinson], but to be able to sing it well. What jiu-jitsu’s done for me is shown me that it is important to have goals... I think it’s a positive/futile, but great way to live your life, to set impossibly high goals and work towards them.” This newfound outlook has likely enhanced Heafy’s onstage stamina as they support latest release Silence In The Snow. He talks to The Music after a two-month US tour amid freezing conditions in longuntapped markets. The frontman doesn’t wish to be so self-important as to suggest they’ve arrived in a major fashion, but believes their following is perpetually growing. “As the band gets bigger, you play more concentrated shows with more people coming out to specific shows, versus you playing scattered around. But the last US tour was more than what we used to do in the early days, because we decided to play a bunch of towns, cities and venues that we’d never played before. So it was kinda back to the basics of being a band again on the last run.”

When & Where: 16 Apr, UNSW Roundhouse




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THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 21


APRA Song of The Year Nominee

CW Stoneking

In the lead-up to the APRA Awards, we grabbed some of the Song Of The Year nominees to talk about how their nominated songs came to be. Here’s CW Stoneking to talk about his song The Zombie.

What’s the song about? The song is about zombies. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? I wanted to talk about zombies. I wanted to invent a dance craze. I wanted to write a rap song. Was this song something that came together easily, or did you have to work on it? It came together easy, then I worked it a lot and drained the life outta it, I returned to the primal ideas of the song and rescued it in the nick of time before recording. What came first in this instance — the lyrics or the music? And is that how you write generally? Both at the same time, but then the lyrics took some working over to get right. Usually that’s how it tends to go… sometimes. Has the song changed by playing it live, or do you still perform it pretty much the way it was originally written? Pretty much the same. If not you, who would you like to see win the Song Of The Year award and why? I don’t know who else is in it, I don’t care who wins it.

22 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Lit

Full Marx

Best known for his manic turns on The Young Ones, Alexei Sayle has had a fascinating journey and he tells Steve Bell that his memoir’s default is aimed at the funny bone.

A

lexei Sayle made a huge mark on the comedy scene in the early ‘80s, first with his distinctive stand-up act — a tightly wound, manic persona perpetually clad in an ill-fitting suit and pork pie hat, found either dousing the crowd with vitriol or embracing the surreal and the absurd with open arms — and then as part of the ‘alternative comedy boom’, which culminated in his numerous zany characters that coloured The Young Ones each episode (including the whole unforgettable Balowski clan). But his new memoir Thatcher Stole My Trousers — the follow-up to 2010’s Stalin Ate My Homework — takes up the story in the early ‘70s, when a young Sayle moved from Liverpool to London with a head full of Marxist revolutionary ideals and a thirst to change the world. What follows are some most excellent adventures, a ton of weird vocations, and finally a firsthand account of one of the most fertile comedy movements in history. The book’s main strength, however, is Sayle’s wonderful way with words and canny ability to spin a yarn, no real surprise given that he’s penned numerous acclaimed novels and short stories over the last three decades. “[The tone’s] not consciously based on anybody but I guess you’re influenced by

all the stuff you’ve read,” he offers. “I’ve chosen to view it through a humorous lens — you could write the same events and make them dark if you chose to — but I’ve chosen to see the comic possibilities in things. Not always, but that’s my sort of default position. I guess there’s stuff like Gerald Durrell’s My Family And Other Animals and stuff like that which maybe unconsciously influenced me. Obviously I’m a great fan of semi-comic writers like Evelyn Waugh, and I suppose I was thinking to some extent about Dave Sedaris and people like that — in a different sense, because this is a libertarian turning real life into humour.” While recounting the genesis of The Young Ones Sayle admits that he demanded that the writers craft him a different character for each episode so that he wouldn’t be “stuck as one person”. “I sometimes think I was being a bit of a prick for insisting on doing that really,” he laughs. “In a way it’s the whole thing the book’s about — it’s not a stupid decision, but it’s a decision that makes life more complicated for myself. They could have written a much-loved character for me, that would have been nice. People loved Rik or Vyvyan or Neil more than they loved me because I wasn’t a very lovable character. “With what I do on The Young Ones, some of it’s character acting when I play say Jerzy [Balowski] or Brian Damage, but some of it’s then just bits of my stand-up act or bits of stand-up that I’ve written especially for the show. And my stand-up act was not me really it was just a performance. I’m not at all like the guy in the tight suit really, and I used to be surprised that people would think I was going to be.”

What: Thatcher Stole My Trousers (Bloomsbury Circus)


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WWW.MANNINGBAR.COM BAND BOOKINGS DAVE BATTY: DAVE@CUSTOMMADE.COM.AU VENUE HIRE KELSEY RIMMER: K.RIMMER@USU.EDU.AU THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 23


Eat/Drink

Foodie TV

The Katering Show

Television cooking has always been an Aussie favourite, whether it be daytime, primetime or online, someone’s whipping up a feast on screen. 2016 is coming up with a fresh new wave of food and cooking shows. Xavier Fennell gives us a taster of what to select from the buffet that’s out there. Heston Blumenthal

Inside Heston’s World On The Menu: Three Michelin Star chef, Heston Blumenthal moves his entire restaurant The Fat Duck, from Bray in Berkshire England to Melbourne Australia. The four part doco follows Blumenthal as he grabs his cutlery, crockery, staff and hard to source menu items before jetting 16,000 kilometres in order to put it all back together again.

The Katering Show On The Menu: The Katering Show is the journey of a food intolerant and an intolerable foodie. The darkly hilarious web show features the awkward and satirical humour of Kate McCartney and Kate McLennan, two women capable of tearing shreds from the generic style of daytime food programs. Doggy bag: You probably won’t learn how to make any real food as the show usually finishes with both McCartney and McLennan commenting on how bad the final dish is. You will however, laugh your arse off as the women get sidetracked with backhanded comments on each other’s personal lives and less than subtle jabs at every cliché ever used to create a cooking show. Bookings: The Katering Show has (sort of) made it to the big leagues, after gaining a huge following through YouTube they’ll be streaming a new series through ABC’s iView from April.

River Cottage Australia

Doggy Bag: A great insight into the blood and bones of what goes into relocating and re-establishing a restaurant in a new city. Bookings: Premieres 31 March at 8.30pm on SBS

River Cottage Australia On The Menu: Follow the story of Paul West, the once Tasmanian chef who now calls River Cottage Farm in Tilba, NSW home. The show sees West inspire and teach potential cooks how to create dishes from the homegrown produce of the farm.

Boys Weekend On The Menu: Bask in the joy of seeing four very well known Australian TV chefs pre-stylists and weight loss programs. Back in the ‘00s TV chefs Miguel Maestre, Manu Fiedel, Gary Mehigan and Adrian Richardson explored unique and lesser known parts of Australia and the local cuisine they find in those spots. Doggy Bag: It’s all blonde tips and cargo pants. Bookings: Reruns screening Fridays 7.30pm on Food Network 24 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Boys Weekend

Doggy bag: Season four is set to be full of solid, homegrown recipes that are easy to recreate at home, with this season’s focus on food wastage and how take make the most of your food. Bookings: 8.30pm Tuesday nights on Lifestyle FOOD


THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 25


TV

Eyes On The Prize Tackling the darkest role on Game Of Thrones, Alfie Allen tells Daniel Cribb he hopes Reek’s storyline gets grimmer on the “political soap opera drama with swords”.

J

etlag has hit Game Of Thrones star Alfie Allen hard when he picks up the phone during a Melbourne promo run. “It won’t affect my amazing answers,” he laughs. It’s not the first time the English actor his been to Victoria, recalling a time when he was 10 years old and his father, Keith Allen, filmed The Bite with Hugo Weaving in the state. “I haven’t been back to Melbourne in years, but I loved it back then and I’m loving it even more now as an adult.” It was these kind of experiences that helped shape his introduction into film and TV and ultimately secure the role of Theon Greyjoy (now known as Reek) in the

I play Theon, then I play Reek, then I play Reek pretending to be Theon. As an actor, you can’t really ask for more than that.

massive HBO hit, a character whose multiple dimensions leading into season six have given Allen a wealth of elements to play with. “It’s obviously been pretty tough and it’s taken me to dark places, but I don’t think I’ll ever get an opportunity to play a character like this again,” he says. “I get to basically play three different characters in one person; I play Theon, then I play Reek, then I play Reek pretending to be Theon. As an actor, you can’t really ask for more than that. “My dad said to me years ago that acting is all about the eyes, and when I didn’t really have much to say in seasons four and five I had to do a lot of acting with just my eyes, so that was challenging and interesting.” He’s tight-lipped at the mention of the new season, and with good reason. Any spoilers or scoops would 26 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

surely result in an internet meltdown similar to that when the season six trailer dropped, not that Allen would necessarily be aware of it. “I barely know how to open my own emails, mate,” he laughs. But he does have some thoughts on why it’s had such a massive impact and has created such an epic global community. “When it first came out, it had the fantasy tag attached to it, where really, now, it’s more of a political soap opera drama with swords. I know it’s sort of weird to say, but it’s a family show, a family drama. There’s sort of different motivations going on in different families and I think that mirrors politics and countries, if you can represent countries as families.” As far as Reek’s destiny goes, Allen has conflicting views on the matter. “As a person, I would like to see Reek get to a nicer place and see him flourish into another man, but as an actor, I just want to see what they are going to offer up, and if it gets darker, that will be just as exciting as if it didn’t. I’m just up for a challenge, really, and I would like to see how much darker they can make the storyline.”

What: Game Of Thrones Season Five (Roadshow)


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THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 27


Music

Giveaways

Constant Surprises

Here are some sweet giveaways you can week this week. Head to theMusic.com. au/win for more details.

Community DVDs and props

Drummer/singer Mimi Parker tells Anthony Carew that Low just did its thing, day by day and hope to continue doing it “for a while longer”.

“I

Where To Invade Next Tickets

The Hunger Games Mockingjay Part 2 DVD

28 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

t’s very minimal music,” says Mimi Parker of her band Low. This isn’t exactly breaking news. Across 23 years and 11 albums - from 1994’s I Could Live In Hope to 2015’s Ones And Sixes - the Minnesota trio have been making slow, quiet, beautiful music built around the harmonies of Parker and her husband, Alan Sparhawk. “Some of the songs are very, very sparse. I look at those bands that have eight, nine, ten people onstage, and they have such safety in numbers. Being surrounded by a lot of people making a lot of noise, it’s a real security blanket. But, for us, we’ve always been very naked up there, and felt very self-conscious about it.” When Low began in the early-’90s, their music was a reaction against the loud, distorted, macho posturing of grunge and it often confused or annoyed listeners. “When we first started touring,” Parker recounts, “we’d roll into towns and play like a new band night, where we were on the bill with numerous other acts. People didn’t know what they were in for. There was a lot of talking, and sometimes some outright hostility, but we got used to that.” Parker grew up in “the middle of nowhere” in rural Minnesota, singing country and gospel songs with her mother and sister, playing drums in the school marching band and seeking out ‘alternative’ LPs from the

few record stores within a couple of hours’ drive. “I was listening to whatever ‘weird stuff’ I could get my hands on. Like Camper Van Beethoven, the Violent Femmes and early REM, or HÜsker DÜ and The Replacements, who were both Minnesota bands. I had friends who knew I liked ‘weird’ music, so they’d give me records.” Both singing with her family and listening to more DIYtype bands inspired Parker to hope to make music. “I was always pretty shy, but it was something I could dream of, imagine doing. Of course, what I do now is pretty different to anything I ever could’ve imagined,” she says. Even when Low began, neither she nor Sparhawk ever had grand ambitions, or long-term dreams. “Honestly, from the beginning we were never really confident about what we do,” Parker admits. “We thought ‘Let’s start this band and let’s play a show.’ So we did that. And then we did a another show. Then we made a demo. Then we made our first album. Every new thing that we did was a surprise to us. We never, ever took it for granted that it could be a career. That seemed crazy to us. We knew we were doing music that was never going to appeal to the masses, that was never going to be commercially huge and successful. We really would just take it one step at a time, one day at a time. “After our first record came out, I remember setting out starting to write songs for the next one. It just felt so strange. I was worried that we wouldn’t be able to write anything new or interesting. Even to this day, you still never know; the music industry is so unpredictable. I’m hopeful that we’ll be able to do this for a while longer, but we’ll see. We’re acting as if it will continue, that’s about all we can do.”

When & Where: 8 Apr, The Factory Theatre


Indie Indie

Comedy At The Quay

Black Rheno

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Have You Heard

Have You Heard

Personal Best Records

Answered by: Phil Burriel — Marketing And Brand Manager

Name Ryan Miller (vocals)

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When did you start making music and why? We formed 20+ years ago. Stray Cats were a huge influence and music was an important part of rockabilly culture. It was a natural progression to want to play it. Eventually we got creative writing our own music.

Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? Would have to be Smash Hits Experience — Jimi Hendrix

Why should punters visit you? Monday nights we are bringing the finest in stand-up comedy to the Paragon. With the Best Australian and international comedians smashing it out, there isn’t a better way humanly possible to spend a Monday. What’s the history of the event? It’s a brand new night held in a legendary venue produced by the best in the business. Any advice for first timers who want to visit the event? Yeah, you are going to get hit in the laughter part of your face. Don’t say we didn’t warn you. Who’s performing this time around? A blend of international and national comedy weapons. And a little sprinkle of up-andcomers. No matter the week or the names on the bill, it will brilliant. Do you have any plans for the event in the future? It’s a weekly show, so tell everyone. Except ISIS. But still come well-rested and prepared for comedy Armageddon. When and where for your next event? Same time, same place. Monday nights. Website link for more info? hotelparagon.com.au/articles/ Gig_Guide/30

When did you start making music and why? Around 2002, because music rules! I mean what’s better than rocking out, singing along and going absolutely nuts to your favourite tunes? Sum up your musical sound in four words? Stoner, sludge, grind, groove. If you could only listen to one album forevermore, what would it be and why? Shit me, what a question. Playing the top five game is one thing but now you’re going straight to the heavy stuff. I still find it hard to go past Toxicity by System Of A Down. Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Sitting in a park eating cheese and drinking grapefruit juice. Why should people come and see your band? Because music is cool and we like to play it, because the government has your phones tapped, because Humphrey B... When and where for your next gig? 26 Mar, The Basement, Canberra; 16 Apr, Housefox Fest, Narrabeen RSL, Sydney. Website link for more info? http://blackrheno.com/

Sum up your musical sound in four words? Rockabilly and roots music. If you could only listen to one album forevermore, what would it be and why? Rock This Town by Stray Cats: traditional rockabilly music with attitude, unlike many rockabilly bands today who play it safe. Concentration now seems to be on authenticity, not individuality or creativity. Stray Cats brought a new life to rockabilly music. Greatest rock’n’roll moment of your career to date? Touring with Chris Isaak, Ross Wilson and Richard Clapton for Day On The Green in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. Later we found out we were hand-picked by Chris Isaak himself, a real honour.

First record you bought? Led Zeppelin IV in the ‘80s Record you put on when you’re really miserable? I don’t get miserable, but if I did, The Ramones’ Rock To Russia Record you put on when you bring someone home? Barry White’s Greatest Hits, of course. Most surprising record in your collection? I would have to say The Muppet Show LP. Last thing you bought/ downloaded? The Morning Of The Earth boxset. When and where are your next gigs? 1 Apr, UniBar, Wollongong; 2 Apr Factory Floor Website link for more info? facebook.com/thenewchrists/

Why should people come and see your band? Because three of us are good looking. When and where for your next gig? 3 Apr, Sydney Rock’n’Roll And Alternative Market, Manning Bar Website link for more info? rocknrollmarket.com.au

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 29


The Last Waltz brought together rock’n’roll royalty to pay tribute to The Band’s last gig, a gig which was filmed by Martin Scorsese and turned into a concert film. Now with The Last Waltz Revisited, a whole bunch of Aussie singers will, yes, revisit the event, singing the classic tracks out front of an extended RocKwiz Orchestra (with added horn section!). Held in Melbourne last year, it’s Sydney’s turn on 1 & 2 Apr as the Opera House hosts the event. Here are some of the singers on the night to talk about The Last Waltz and the gig.

In Focus Tim Rogers

Olympia

The Last

Waltz Revisited

Paul Dempsey

Olympia

Will you sing your songs true to the original or put your own spin on things? I know the originals like the back of my hand but I’ll go with wherever the moment takes me.

Olympia What made you choose the particular songs you’re performing on the night? I actually taught myself to play guitar watching George Benson on YouTube and experimenting with Joni Mitchell tunings, so it’s been a privilege to revisit that while playing Mitchell’s Coyote.

Richard Clapton Do you remember the first time you saw The Last Waltz? What were your impressions? In 1976 when it was first released to cinemas. Considering it featured pretty much every one of my iconic idols I was suitably awestruck. 30 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

The Last Waltz

Vika Bull Will you sing your songs true to the original or put your own spin on things? Linda and I actually do get to sing a couple of leads and we sing them true to the original — why would we fuck them up?

Tim Rogers Come on, own up — who are you jealous of on the night because they’ll be singing a song you really wanted to sing? I’m essentially jealous of Paul Dempsey so anything he touches, but sharing a stage with Kevin Borich is a dream so it all evens up

Kevin Borich What made you choose the particular songs you’re performing on the night? Those songs were in my ballpark – rock ‘n’ blues.


THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 31


OPINION Opinion

Trai ler Trash

Rancid

Wa ke The Dead Punk And

I

’d like to pose a question to start of this week’s column: what obligation does a band have to their Hardcore fans to tour? I mean, The Beatles famously stopped touring in 1966, before finally imploding as a band With Sarah in 1970. But that’s The Beatles. What about in punk and hardcore? Petchell Rancid are the best example of this. The band last toured Australia in 1998, and famously haven’t been seen on our shores since. This is something that Australian fans feel really strongly about, especially considering they’ve toured the US and Europe numerous times since. Things came to a head on social media in the last week or so, when a series of targeted ads were advertising exclusive Rancid merch for Australian fans — stubbie holders and the like. Fans of the band did not take kindly to this, one going so far as to tell the band that they could go fuck themselves. Does the band actually have an obligation to tour? Yes, it’s a bummer for their fans, but shouldn’t we just be used to it by now? Touring is expensive. And touring Australia is a nightmare to coordinate — do you fly from city to city or do you drive? Do you fly all the way to Perth or do you stick to the east coast? We can’t just expect that bands will tour here because we want them to.

Get It To g et her The Life Of Pablo on TIDAL

Hip Hop With James D’apice

M

usic, business and the internet. Forever intertwined. On social media it was Hudson Mohawke venting about being unpaid for his Drake and Yeezy beats. Jay-Z has taken another step in his TIDAL takeover by removing his classic albums Reasonable Doubt, Blueprint and Blueprint II (and his very non-classic album Blueprint III) from all streaming services except for his. Kanye continues to play with our

32 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Marvel’s Daredevil

hearts by releasing an updated version of The Life Of Pablo on T***L. In real life Vince Staples took the antiSpotify stance further when he hopped up at a Spotify SXSW event and thanked his hosts for paying his fees, “to make up for what [they have] done to me and all my musical friends”. Speaking broadly, there are two available views. First, distribution models and contract disputes mean vastly less than the music. As listeners, we should leave the nonsense aside and focus on the mark art leaves on our souls. The second view is, essentially, that the medium is the message. Ceding control of how music is delivered to us is very similar to ceding control of what music is delivered to us. To ignore how we get our music puts us at risk of remaining ignorant of all but the most middleof-the-road. I’m of the view that our duty to ourselves is to think. As has been said in other circumstances: the standard we walk past is the standard we accept. So, I issue an open invitation: pay attention the business behind how your music gets to you. It may well decide how your future sounds.


OPINION Opinion

Dives Into Your

O

n the big screen, the Screens superheroes of Marvel Comics And Idiot Boxes tangle with the odd moral dilemma With Guy Davis when they’re not tangling with supervillains, but it’s generally the case that their ideas of good and bad are presented in black and white. On the small screen, however, things can be a little more complicated. That’s especially the case when it comes to Marvel’s costumed crimefighters with TV series airing on streaming video service Netflix. Kicking off the Marvel-Netflix teamup was Daredevil, which brought a tough, gritty atmosphere and an ethically complex approach to its story of Matt Murdock, blinded since childhood by a freak accident that enhanced his remaining senses to a superhuman degree. A defence lawyer by day, Murdock’s desire for justice led him to confront wrongdoers by night as the masked vigilante known as Daredevil. Daredevil’s methods weren’t always pretty, but they got results. However, as we all know, a hero’s work is never done. And with season two of Daredevil, now airing on Netflix, The Man Without Fear must deal with some new characters. Despite its comic book origins, the Daredevil series isn’t what you’d call kids’ stuff. Like the first season, these new episodes push the envelope when it comes to TV violence, and the new characters aren’t shy when it comes to trading blows or squeezing triggers. Giving Daredevil — played by UK actor Charlie Cox, showing an understated strength and confidence as he gets more accustomed to the role — a run in the vigilante stakes is a lone gunman the police have nicknamed The Punisher. Dismissing Daredevil as a “half-measure”, The Punisher is hell-bent on making New York’s criminal element pay for its sins. Unlike his fellow vigilante, though, The Punisher makes them pay with their lives. “What I think is special about [this season], and what’s courageous about the way that it’s been written, is that these are all damaged and hurt people,” Bernthal said at a media event in the US earlier this year. “The idea of the greater good, and the idea of the effect that these people and their actions are having on society, is residual.

That’s something they have to come to terms with.” And then there’s Elektra (Elodie Yung, charismatic and captivating), Murdock’s former lover who reappears on the scene after a long absence. She’s just as proficient at kicking butt as Murdock but her sense of right and wrong is, shall we say, a little skewed. And that makes the chemistry between them all the more combustible. These characters — and many more — all collide in a story where heroism, villainy, right and wrong all have varying shades of grey, and the combination of that moral ambiguity and hard-hitting action gives Daredevil a sharp edge. “One of the themes of this show, and this season particularly, is ‘What is it that makes a hero?’” said Cox. “What the writers do, and we hopefully can bring to life, is that they present characters who on the surface aren’t always heroic and their acts aren’t always devoid of selfishness. Matt Murdock at times is incredibly selfish. He believes something is the way that it should be, and that this is how it needs to be dealt with. He doesn’t care what other people think.”

Expect lightning fast twin fiddles, Tex Mex, Louisiana blues, pedal steel, classic country & plenty of mayhem Andrew Richardson

DATE Wed 6 Apr from 7pm. Tickets $15 After a sold-out Summer of huge shows this all-star collective of Blues, Jazz, Country and Western Swing musicians are back to blow your music-loving minds again this April. The Swing Drifters is a 9 piece supergroup of Australia’s most sought after ‘first call’ live and recording musicians - Felicity Urquhart, Stuie French, Michael Vidale, Garry Steel, Hamish Stuart, Clare O’Meara, George Washingmachine, Michel Rose and Andrew Richardson.

www.thebasement.com.au

The most important resource for the music industry Now available online www.industry.themusic.com.au

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THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 33


Album / E Album/EP Reviews

Album OF THE Week

Lucianblomkamp Bad Faith

Good Manners Records

★★★★½

In his follow up to 2014’s Post-Nature, Melbourne producer Lucianblomkamp develops, enhances and improves upon all of his strengths, while cutting ties with elements from his debut that were clunky or awkward on this stellar second LP Bad Faith. The 12-track opus is conceptually binding, possessing the flow and execution of the soundtrack to a feature film, where the weight of the would-be imagery falls entirely on the production skills of Blomkamp. Bad Faith is as atmospheric, moody and engaging as the title would suggest. Jagged beats and washes of synths characterise early track Eleven & 22, and intelligent instrumental samples such as the gentle guitar strings polarise in later track Copy Of A Copy. Bad Faith is a much more mature expansion of the conceptual world founded in Post-Nature. The record elicits a strong emotional response from the listener as each new track erases the memory of the previous from your mind, whether with the simplistic minimalism of album closer Eternal, or the dissonant machinated cognitions of opener Decay. It’s this effect that will have you turning the album back to the beginning upon conclusion. Jonty Czuchwicki

The Last Shadow Puppets

Explosions In The Sky

Everything You’ve Come To Expect

The Wilderness Spunk

★★★★

Domino/EMI

★★★★ Fans of British rock rejoice! The Last Shadow Puppets have finally released a follow-up to their 2008 debut. Alex Turner of Arctic Monkeys has once again teamed up with his long time pal and collaborator Miles Kane to create Everything You’ve Come To Expect. If there’s anything we’ve come to expect from this all-star duo, it’s ‘60s guitar riffs and swoon-worthy harmonies laced with just a hint of that British egoism for theatrical effect, and once again the boys do not fail to deliver on all fronts. From the soft croon of Turner on Miracle Aligner to the heavy guitar and biting snarls from Kane on Bad Habits, not to mention the cheeky verses in Sweet Dreams, TN, “it’s like everyone’s a dick without you baby”, the boys have really 34 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

outdone themselves. Unsurprisingly, the record is brilliantly produced, the syncopated rhythm of The Element Of Surprise doesn’t miss a beat and the slightly eerie harmonies in the dreamy title track leave a lasting impression. Both Kane and Turner have relocated to the US since the last record and, while there’s certainly a more noticeable American tinge to their sound, Everything You’ve Come To Expect is still a predominately British affair. Let’s just hope we don’t have to wait another eight years for these two to write another record together. Clare Armstrong

In the early to mid 2000s, Austin instrumentalists Explosions In The Sky opened eyes to a new wave of post rock bands with their commanding musical style and incredible musical cliffs built on soft-loud style of arrangements. The Wilderness is a natural continuation from 2011’s Take Care, Take Care, Take Care with the band further removing their use of heavy percussive lines, crashing cymbal plunges and sharp guitar constructs, instead developing in musical patience as tracks lift ever so slightly to build large and emotive musical movement on top of the quartets already stark performances. Featuring a multitude of stammering electronic sounds set right from the title track, the record pushes preconceived expectations aside of what an

Explosions In The Sky record should sound like - the soft-loud dynamic is still in place, but the band have taken their more recent experience with film scores to create an amazing and thought provoking narrative of nine free-flowing tracks as opposed to the largely episodic previous releases. The flickering atmospheric echoes and strong piano-driven record may take some focus away from drummer and key member Chris Hrasky, but gives back a completely new layer for the band and what will be seen as a pivotal release in their catalogue. Mark Beresford


EP Reviews Album/EP Reviews

Babymetal

Black Mountain

Charles Bradley

Pet Shop Boys

Metal Resistance

IV

Changes

Super

RAL/Sony

Jagjaguwar/Inertia

Daptone Records

x2/Kobalt

★★★

★★★½

★★★½

★★½

The very definition of a guilty pleasure, nothing divides the opinions of metalheads more than the respective merits of Babymetal. It’s like a great metal sea parting. They’re either a genius inversion of metal tropes or mega-corp slaves. Not too many surprises here on their second album; complex, rangy tunes and a vast, mechanoid production that obliterates all in its path. The songs stand up reasonably well next to those of their debut, but in trying to write stadium anthems they make the patented Muse mistake of pushing the ‘apocalypse’ button a bit too hard.

It’s been six long years between proper albums for Canadian psych rockers Black Mountain. But instead of using the time to deliver the out-andout classic they’ve promised with previous releases, IV is a somewhat uncertain mixture of absolute crackers combined with tracks that peter out and seem like unfinished ideas. Sabbath-style guitars crank out some serious riffs in epic rockers Mothers Of The Sun and (Over & Over) The Chain, while psych trip-outs like Defector and Space To Bakersfield give Tame Impala a run for their money. But the brilliance of these songs only serves to demonstrate what a classic this album may have been.

Soul singer Charles Bradley has the sheer passion to will even mediocre songs out of their uninspired moors and turn them into deeply personal ballads. This approach, involving the combination of a strong faith in the power of music and the belief that America could be a welcoming place, permeates The Screaming Eagle Of Soul’s third album. It’s a smouldering and reflective affair, as the multiple songs with the word ‘change’ in their titles attest, embracing a strikingly contemplative tone. This sense of maturity makes for a pleasantly surprising turn from a man known for his emotional excessiveness, ultimately serving to make him seem more dignified than ever.

With 2013’s Electric set going fully electronic, Chris Lowe completed his journey to becoming a one-man, one-finger maestro. Directed from the sidelines by producer Stuart Price, and Neil Tennant his faithful Master Of Ceremonies, it is an absolutely fabulous rejuvenation. With Price back again, Super continues the hedonistic, sweaty nightlife, relentlessly refusing to rest for one minute, riffing on trance (noticeably Age Of Love on Inner Sanctum) and employing Canal St cliches on Burn. We get it - the Boys still know how to party, but Super leaves one craving substance. Perhaps Superficial would have been a more appropriate title.

Paul Barbieri

Roshan Clerke

Mac McNaughton

Christopher H James

More Reviews Online Big White Teenage Dreams

theMusic.com.au

Loose Tooth Saturn Returns

Mogwai Atomic

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 35


Album / E Album/EP Reviews

Andrew Bird

Yeasayer

Bibio

Are You Serious

Amen & Goodbye

A Mineral Love

Loma Vista/Universal

Create Control

Warp/Inertia

Black Stone Cherry Kentucky Mascot Label Group

★★★★

★★★★

★★

★★★

A new album from Andrew Bird is always an exciting prospect. He is both artist and artisan, creating complex chamber pop constructions that often boast exquisite beauty. His latest release is another great example of Bird’s penchant for (re) invention, revealing a far more urban sensibility than his bucolic previous efforts. This collection has a harder edge, a late ‘70s soul vibe that has bounce and swagger, and while it’s still bathed in light and warmth it’s a cockier album that is energised and invigorating.

Brooklyn art rock trio Yeasayer have toned down their bright and bold krautrock stylings ever so slightly for their fourth album, closing the door just a tad on the brash, erratic pop that pushed them onto the global stage with 2010’s Odd Blood. There’s still plenty of zany synth motifs (I Am Chemistry, Gerson’s Whistle) going on, and Chris Keating and Anand Wilder’s pitchy wails (Silly Me, Dead Sea Scrolls), but throughout all songs there runs more regular structures which give the album some breathing space to take it all in. Divine Simulacrum and Uma are the highlights and are as delightfully odd as their titles.

A Mineral Love was intended to be “a celebration” of Bibio’s “love of the craft of record making”. On it, his diverse influences are poured into a pot and smelted into one gloopy strain of inoffensive, lounge-lite pop. The unpredictable edges of Bibio’s early work have been taken off, and the whole thing glides down like some kind of toxic yacht rock that’s reminiscent of ‘80s plastic soul merchants Johnny Hates Jazz or Jamiroquai on holiday. Someone tell him to stop reminiscing and get back to work.

Titling the record after their home state and returning to essentially the same studio surrounds as their debut a decade ago, the accompanying narrative heavily implies a ‘going back to the roots’ affair. Not that Black Stone Cherry have often strayed far from their southern-fried hard rock template. Although there’s filler and over-wrought balladry, they craft muscular riffage and accessible choruses. Soul Machine flaunts an infectiously funky groove, punctuated by female backing vocals. Covering Motown favourite War could seem a novelty, although copious energy elevates it. Kentucky mightn’t score many new converts, but the already initiated will raise a whiskey glass in approval.

Matt MacMaster

Christopher H James

Carley Hall

Brendan Crabb

More Reviews Online UV boi L-UV

36 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

theMusic.com.au

Three Trapped Tigers Silent Earthling

Listen to our This Week’s Releases playlist on


THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 37


Live Re Live Reviews

Kendrick Lamar @ Allphones Arena. Pic: Josh Groom

Modest Mouse @ Enmore Theatre. Pic: Josh Groom

Kendrick Lamar @ Allphones Arena. Pic: Josh Groom

Modest Mouse @ Enmore Theatre. Pic: Josh Groom

St Paul & The Broken Bones @ Metro Theatre. Pic: Hayden Nixon

D’Angelo @ Sydney Opera House. Pic: Averie Cole

38 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

Kendrick Lamar Allphones Arena 23 Mar

Sampa The Great was just that — great. The Zambian-born lyricist exuded energy and the crowd, particularly the moshpit, lapped it up. Another local hip hop star and recent collaborator of Sampa’s on For Good, Remi, joined her on stage for some hyping and rapping and the vibes were good — the both of them have enviable flow and are sure to have attracted a new stack of fans tonight. Chants of, “Kendrick! Kendrick!” echoed throughout the Arena as the middle front section of the moshpit got a bit more animated than the rest of the crowd, surging forward. Shit got loose tonight, you could feel it then, and it’s still reverberating

Everyone’s lights on their cell phones were held up to set the Arena alight.

now. The main act’s band emerged on stage, took a few selfies and then got stuck into warming things up. Our man Kendrick Lamar strolled out, casual but focused, and paused at the mic for an insufferably long time (is he overwhelmed? Contemplative? Trying to create a spectacle?), all while the crowd continued to cry out, frenzied. He smiled, turned around to go have a laugh with his band. Like his Melbourne gig, Lamar turned back and got Sydney going with “This dick ain’t... free!” — we knew it was coming, we didn’t

give a shit. He conducted the audience through the rest of the song — arms rising for the “free”, the crowd happy just to be involved. It’s then time for Wesley’s Theory, the crowd pulsing, practically throbbing, jumping up and down, arms outstretched towards their leader: “How everybody doin’ tonight?” Lamar is quite the showman, running across the stage, but he has tempered this with restraint, standing, eyes closed, hands expressive, behind the mic stand most of the time and letting his rapidfire rap take the lead. The crowd is skewed young — it means there were a lot of phones out pretty much all the time, which was kind of distracting, and we’re not sure how good the footage was going to be on a phone being flung through the air like that. But hey, who can resist that beat? You can’t not dance. There were plumes of weed smoke going up often, paired with some uncomfortable in-seat grinding. It seemed that the crowd responded best to tracks off 2012’s good kid, m.A.A.d city (say Backstreet Freestyle, Swimming Pools (Drank) and Bitch Don’t Kill My Vibe) and 2011’s Section 80 — all about the thumping bass, rather than Lamar’s experiments with a kind of nu-jazz mash-up. The crowd were practically subdued during verses for These Walls. That’s just fine, although the latter gave the band a spotlight under which to shine. But hey, the expected hits got the expected reaction, Lamar said. “Make some noise for yo’self,” and followed it up with King Kunta and I to close the main set. They are bloody joyous, a celebration. First encore Alright was an 18,000strong dance party, a moment of affirmation, and included a tribute to the late A Tribe Called Quest member Phife Dawg, everyone’s lights on their cell phones held up to set the Arena


eviews Live Reviews

alight. Lamar teased us: “Stop, turn this shit up...” before making to leave, “Let’s go home”. He returned with another, “Nah, we gonna be alright,” and a high kick. He left the stage to the Boris Gardiner sample from Wesley’s Theory, only to return with a second encore, undertaken crouched, in A.D.H.D. “I will be back. I love y’all.” “[The second encore] included a tribute to the late A Tribe Called Quest member Phife Dawg, everyone’s lights on their cell phones held up to set the Arena alight.” Hannah Story & Sally-Anne Hurley

Modest Mouse, Pearls Enmore Theatre 21 Mar Did people leave Modest Mouse content yesterday? Maybe not. But not for want of trying? Or maybe because they didn’t really care? They didn’t have to care? They definitely left quite the bump out job — when we arrived the stage was jammed with amps, two drum kits, gear strewn everywhere. When we left, there was a huge truck

We got it all... almost. outside — presumably to take all that gear up to Byron Bay for Bluesfest this Easter long weekend. Epic. Melbourne band Pearls are our openers — they’ve expanded to a five-piece since their debut record Pretend You’re Mine came out last year, which has allowed them to expand musically too. They’ve now got the scope for synth, guitar lines, keys, bass, held together by breakneck drumming from Ellice Blakeney.

Playing some new songs they seem to have broken away from the lush dream-pop of their earlier work, moving along to something rockier with a bit more grit and sass, vocalist and guitarist Ryan Caesar at its centre. They finished the set with their best song, the catchy single Big Shot. Even people not familiar with the band’s ears pricked up — this has definitely had some rotation on local radio, is a pop hit, is something you can immediately sing along to. An impressive set. We’re introduced to Modest Mouse by the sound of wasps, or bees, or flies, whatever, insects buzzing, the sound swelling, almost deafening by the time the band emerge. They didn’t ever play Float On, so if you’re reading for that, click away, be disappointed, like some of the crowd were at the end of the two-and-a-half-hour set (on a school night! Gasp!). We got two encores, we got the drawl and jocular banter of Isaac Brock, the glue that keeps the eight-piece together, we got a set that spanned their six studio albums, in particular last year’s Strangers To Ourselves, their first full-length in eight years. We got it all... almost. We’ve got eight people on stage at almost all times, right off the bat with fast-paced opener Invisible and Of Course We Know, and a huge collection of instruments: two drum kits, assorted percussion, strings, trumpets, guitar, bass, double bass, ukulele, banjo... It just keeps going. Brock is to the right of the stage and sometimes his vox are drowned out, because boy wouldn’t it be hard to rise over the din of at least eight instruments (can we repeat: two drum kits; and a ninth member on trumpet emerging intermittently)? He’s open to outfit changes, donning a beanie only to discard it a song later, emerging for the first encore sans sensible button-up (he has

a T-shirt now), and wipes his sweaty face throughout the set with a handkerchief handmade for him with their name sewed on it — just in case he forgets. The set leans towards their rockier catalogue, there are no moments of quiet contemplation here, the ones that break up a record, and when there is, like on Tiny Cities Made Of Ashes and 3rd Planet, they’re given a sense of urgency, the pace seemingly sped up. There’s no dumping of the outros here either, horns, double bass and all, we’ve got it, lending the set a sense of tension and carefully curated discord through the likes of Never Ending Math Equation and Lampshades On Fire. What’s always been most exciting about Modest Mouse were their unconventional song structures, rapidfire witty lyrics twisting around each other, the idea of distinguishing between verse, bridge, chorus silly. In the live arena it’s easy to see how this works, everything sounding and looking larger (thanks Grey Ice Water; Pups To Dust; The Ground Walks, With Time In A Box), the lights timed to changes in tempo. It’s also clear just how charismatic band leader Brock is, the group looking to him for direction, subdued on stage compared to his jerking around brandishing his guitar, sometimes overhead (“It’s so hard not to be a dick all the time,” he says). And he takes breaks to take sips of “tea”, before moving on stage like a man possessed for Doing The Cockroach, Bukowski, March Into The Sea and Dashboard. Then we’re all Out Of Gas. It’s encore time — introduced with the sound of cicadas? Or wasps again? Oh God, it’s building. We’re treated to Shit In Your Cut, Sugar Boats, Missed The Boat and The Good Times Are Killing Me, the audience holding out for a Float On that never comes, even as roving strobe lights illuminate the

whole theatre. At around 11pm it’s time for our second encore, introduced with those bloody insects again — swat ‘em away. We’re given Satellite Skin, I Came As A Rat, Ocean Breathes Salty and Strangers To Ourselves to say goodbye, and we’re sated. Hannah Story

Alice Terry, St Paul & The Broken Bones Metro Theatre 21 Mar Alice Terry gave a spirited performance opening for the main attraction. Her thunderous voice was complemented by beautiful lyrics and soul-infused musicianship. She had an enchanting presence on stage to shake the rainy day blues.

Man, y’all came ready. I like it!’ said the frontman. The anticipation grew as the clock pushed towards 8.30pm. The room filled as people battled the wet weather to witness St Paul & The Broken Bones make their debut performance in Australia. The soul band from Birmingham, Alabama took Sydney by storm, warming up for a string of shows at Bluesfest over Easter. These guys are the real deal, boasting a solid and tight group of accomplished musicians. The drummer, Andrew Lee, while a little uptight, eased his way into the gig, showcasing his diverse talents in songs like a cover of The Beatles’ I Want You (She’s So Heavy) and Grass Is Greener. Guitarist Browan Lollar, and bass player Jesse Phillips created nuance in the stockTHE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 39


Live Re Live Reviews

More Reviews Online theMusic.com.au/ music/live-reviews

Tweedy @ Factory Theatre Rhiannon Giddens @ Factory Theatre Kamasi Washington @ Metro Theatre The Selecter @ Factory Theatre Lord Huron @ Oxford Art Factory

standard soul scores, breathing new life into the ever-enduring genre. Each added shades of blues, Lollar incorporating elements of funk and Phillips with hints of jazz. The keys, played by Al Gamble were immaculate and fit very well with the flow. The horn section gave admirable performances also, providing light, shade and colour. The effect was larger than life and seemingly timeless. But the show was stolen — of course — by the gallivanting frontman, Paul Janeway. He was out-of-his-skin good, a spectacle to behold with a barnstorming voice developed in a childhood of gospel and then applied seamlessly to soul. It’s easy to see why Janeway has been pegged as the white reincarnation of Otis Redding when he belts out some of Redding’s biggest hits like Try A Little Tenderness and Shake with all the zeal and energy of that immortal marvel of Southern soul. The band played with tenacity and vivacity, spurred on by a thankful and humbled audience and the frenetic and commanding Janeway. “Man, y’all came ready. I like it!” said the frontman, visibly wowed by the reception the band found on their first outing Down Under. Here was a gig proving soul music is alive and well across the world.

night. Coming on stage just after 9.30pm wearing a striking white hat and a waistcoat made of black feathers, neo-soul superstar D’Angelo and his band The Vanguard built the crowd up into a frenzy. With a main set that clocked in just on the hour, D’Angelo got straight down to business,

D’Angelo @ Sydney Opera House. Pic: Averie Cole

opening the set with Voodoo’s Devil’s Pie, then strapping on his outlandish black and silver signature guitar for a rock-heavy Funkadelic cover of Red Hot Mama. Looking relaxed and happy to be on stage, D’Angelo prepared the Sydney crowd for the hour ahead saying, “I know this is the Opera House and all but we came here to rock your socks off.” And they most certainly did. With The Vanguard locked into a tight, thick groove,

Shaun Colnan

D’Angelo Sydney Opera House 21 Mar After waiting 14 years for the follow-up album to D’Angelo’s world-conquering Voodoo, the enigmatic artist’s Sydney fans didn’t mind the one-hour 40 minutes D’Angelo left them waiting at the Sydney Opera House on this wet Monday

40 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

D’Angelo was given ample space to seduce the audience with songs old and new, including Roberta Flack’s Feel Like Makin’ Love that D’Angelo recorded for Voodoo and new album Black Messiah’s politically charged The Charade. Paying plenty of attention to the front couple of rows, D’Angelo fist-bumped

Just enjoy a band that seems to be having a helluva good time, with a bit of father-son bonding.

the men and crooned to the women, shimmied his hips and returned to the mic after a song with a new embellishment to his outfit whether it be a different hat or the addition of a long, hooded cardigan. With the audience eating out of the palm of his hand, and the floor of the Concert Hall a hot, writhing dance party, the R&B icon sat at the piano for the first song of the encore teasing the audience with the first bars of biggest single Untitled (How Does It Feel). After a couple of false starts, D’Angelo delivered on his promise and, with his band joining him on stage, he exuded a smooth, unrestrained sexuality. In the Opera House’s 50-year history there’s been a lot of acts to grace the Concert Hall stage, but few can boast a show as hot as D’Angelo. Danielle O’Donohue


Arts Reviews Arts Reviews

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice

An

Jen Kirkman

Evening With Jen Kirkman Comedy

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Film In cinemas

★★★ I didn’t want to dislike Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice entering the cinema, and I don’t completely dislike it now that I’ve made my escape. But as this lumbering superhero blockbuster lurches from one dimly lit and/or destructive sequence to the next, I could feel the initial interest and even admiration I felt during its early stages diminishing to a low ebb. Once you skip over the umpteenth recounting of Batman’s origin, Dawn Of Justice plays a neat trick by replaying the climactic city-wrecking smackdown from Man Of Steel at a street-level perspective, with billionaire Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) speeding into the mayhem that threatens to lay waste to his company’s Metropolis skyscraper and the employees within. It’s a bold and compelling way to set up Affleck’s Bruce/Batman and Henry Cavill’s Superman as potential adversaries, but sadly it’s pretty much the last time director Zack Snyder displays much cohesion in Dawn Of Justice’s tone, dramatically or thematically. In place of clear, focused storytelling with an underlying moral standpoint or ethical conflict, the movie offers sub-Sorkin speechifying, heavy-handed bombast and grim portent. To sum up the story: People are increasingly untrustworthy of Superman’s God-like powers and bad habit of racking up collateral damage; tired of taking down sex-traffickers and other such scum, Batman takes it upon himself to rid the world of Superman; twitchy megalomaniac-in-the-making Lex Luthor plays them both again one another for his own reasons; Diana Prince (Gal Gadot) saunters in and out of scenes until she reveals herself as Wonder Woman and enthusiastically shows the lads how this butt-kicking thing is done. At least it looks like we’ll have Affleck in the Batsuit for a couple more movies — he has a powerful presence and his Dark Knight growl is my favourite Bat-voice to date.

Comedy Store, 22 Mar

★★★★ The Comedy Store feels like a New York comedy room. You wouldn’t think so, wandering through the Entertainment Quarter, then up several flights of stairs, but the low lighting, the flameless candles, the table service — it feels warm in this room, the crowd eager to laugh. And do they laugh — Rhys Nicholson opens for us, borrowing from last year’s

show Forward (a good taster for what we can expect at Bona Fide next month!). His delivery is on point, and jokes about being mugged (“I want you to know this was random. This was not a hate crime”), touring Ipswich, and taking care of his relationship’s “collage needs”. Nicholson is a brilliant comic — and at only 25 we can expect much much more. Jen Kirkman looks younger than 41, but she wouldn’t want us saying that. She dives right into improvising about the events of her day, mainly using the section to rail against a hairdresser who “hadn’t heard of her” and dismissed her as a comedian. Then it’s into prepared material, something for everybody — from people who saw her live in 2015, to those who caught her Netflix special, to newbies. Sections on being a single woman, relationships, catcalling and more are Kirkman at her best — unashamedly feminist and dynamic, exploring what it means to be a woman “of a certain age”, who wants to stay home and certainly doesn’t want to be pitied. A closing bit on road rage reveals more about Kirkman’s psyche than some would care to know — but is hilarious, and what we love about her, unabashed, brutally honest, and side-splitting. Hannah Story

Guy Davis

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 41


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THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 43


Comedy / G The Guide

Wed 30

Busy Kingdom

Aeroplane + Kato + Tash + Viberia + DJ Bobby Gray: Beach Road Hotel, Bondi Beach

Boleyn + Fripps & Fripps + Riley J: Brass Monkey, Cronulla

The Blind Boys Of Alabama: 2 Apr Factory Theatre

Oliver Goss: Brighton Up Bar, Darlinghurst Vishtèn: Camelot Lounge (Django Bar), Marrickville

The Music Presents Allen Stone: Mar 30 Factory Theatre Nahko & Medicine For The People: 30 Mar Metro Theatre Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats: 31 Mar Metro Theatre The Blind Boys Of Alabama: 2 Apr Factory Theatre Caligula’s Horse: 15 Apr Oxford Art Factory; 16 Apr The Basement Canberra; 17 Apr Small Ballroom Newcastle Deradoorian: 16 Apr Newtown Social Club The Gum Ball: 22 – 24 Apr Dashville Ratatat: 27 Apr Enmore Theatre William Crighton: 29 Apr The Vanguard; 30 Apr Stag & Hunter Newcastle Henry Wagons: 13 May Newtown Social Club The Cat Empire: 20 & 21 May Enmore Theatre, 22 May Canberra Theatre DMA’S: 10 Jun, Metro Theatre The Rubens: 24 Jun Hordern Pavilion

Traumer + Deeper Than House + more: Chinese Laundry, Sydney Mitch Anderson & His Organic Orchestra: Coopers Hotel, Newtown Allen Stone + Iluka: Factory Theatre, Marrickville Rackett + Heavy Daze + Smitty B Goode: Frankie’s Pizza By The Slice, Sydney Dana Hassall + Amber Rae Slade: Gasoline Pony, Marrickville Borgore: Great Northern Hotel, Newcastle Danny Bhoy: Illawarra Performing Arts Centre, Wollongong Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band: Lizottes Newcastle, Lambton

Busy As Busy Kingdom are living up to their name, touring their latest single Temptation. You can see them at Marlborough Hotel Thurday, Captain Cook Hotel Saturday, or bust over to World Bar to see them with Alex Lahey Friday.

Coast & Ocean + Sean Emmett + Lachlan Campion: Rad Bar, Wollongong

Cool-Tide feat. High Tide DJs: Valve Bar, Ultimo

Joseph Calderazzo + Simon Meli + Jak Housden: Rock Lily, Pyrmont

Thu 31

Don Hopkins: Low 302, Darlinghurst Nahko & Medicine For The People + Mike Love: Metro Theatre, Sydney

Musos Club Jam Night: Ruby L’Otel, Rozelle The Squeezebox Trio: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe Comedy Night with Sean Woodland + Christina Van Look + more: Oatley Hotel, Oatley

The Decemberists: Sydney Opera House (Concert Hall), Sydney William Crighton: The Stag & Hunter Hotel, Mayfield

Mark Travers: Orient Hotel, The Rocks Bogota 07: Play Bar, Surry Hills

Strung Out performing Exile in Oblivion + Pears + Topnovil: Uni Bar, Wollongong

Anthony Charlton: Australian Arms Hotel, Penrith We May Fall + Liberties: Bald Faced Stag, Leichhardt Fox & The Hound + The Scat Sundays + Kodiak + Solid Esteem: Brass Monkey, Cronulla

Elizabeth Rose: 24 Jun Oxford Art Factory, 25 Jun Argyle House Newcastle Oliver Goss Band

Daniel Champagne

Popping Corks

Face The Goss Oliver Goss Band are releasing their EP, Kill It Or Face It, and they’re having a launch party Wednesday at Brighton Up Bar with psychrockers Rufflefeather and Sabrina Soares. Get down there and get your hands on a copy.

44 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

True Troubadour Daniel Champagne is set to tour Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Belgium, American and Canada with his new album The Heartland Hurricanes. See while you can at Rad Bar Thursday and Newtown Social Club Sunday.


Gigs / Live The Guide

Bootleg Rascal

The Runaway Houses + Easy Street + Dream Cities: Slyfox, Enmore

Brian Wilson Performing ‘Pet Sounds’ & His Greatest Hits: Sydney Opera House (Concert Hall), Sydney Shakey Graves + Jerry Joseph: The Basement, Sydney

Sleepy Rascals Hip hop infused jam slingers Bootleg Rascal’s debut album Asleep In The Machine is out now and the band is currently mid-tour to show it off. Head down to The Northern on Saturday to get a geeze.

Evie Dean: Dural Country Club, Dural

Ed Kuepper: Street Theatre, Canberra

Taj Mahal + Victor Martinez: Factory Theatre, Marrickville

The Last Waltz Revisited feat. Richard Clapton + Tim Rogers + Paul Dempsey + Kevin Borich + Olympia + Vika & Linda Bull + The Rockwiz Orkestra + Brian Nankervis + The Last Waltz Revisited: Sydney Opera House, Sydney

Original Sin - INXS Show + Swingshift - Cold Chisel Show: Heathcote Hotel, Heathcote

Gingers Jam: The Oxford Hotel, Darlinghurst

Hierophant + Tim & The Boys + The Rangoons: Hotel Steyne (Moonshine Rum & Cider Bar), Manly

The Pretty Bones + Capes + Undermine: The Phoenix, Canberra

Big Daddy Wilson + Fletcher Pillon: Lizottes Newcastle, Lambton

Steve Poltz: The Vanguard, Newtown

DJ Sam Wall: Manly Wharf Hotel, Manly

The Basement Blues Society presents Harry Brus + The Lachy Doley Group + The PJ O’Brien Band + Just Us: The Basement, Sydney Mi-Sex: The Bridge Hotel, Rozelle

Gordie Tentrees: Tintenbar Up Front, Tintenbar Max Fricker + Canvas + more: Valve Bar (Basement), Ultimo

Fri 01 The Gentle Enemies: Bald Faced Stag, Leichhardt Belvie: Beach Road Hotel, Bondi Beach

Andrew Winton: Camelot Lounge (Django Bar), Marrickville Big Daddy Wilson: Camelot Lounge, Marrickville Musos Club Jam Night: Carousel Inn, Rooty Hill

Friday On My Mind - Tribute To Vanda & Young: Brass Monkey, Cronulla Vaudevillia by Mic Conway’s National Junk Band: Camelot Lounge, Marrickville Columbia Buffet: Captain Cook Hotel, Paddington

Aeroplane

Danny Bhoy: Civic Theatre, Newcastle Diesel: Centro CBD, Wollongong The World Famous Comedy Store Showcase: Comedy Store, Moore Park Vintage Trouble + DJ Stephen Ferris: Factory Theatre, Marrickville

Hydraulix + Blackjack + Stalker + more: Chinese Laundry, Sydney Rebecca Johnson Band: Colonial Hotel, Werrington

Leftover Crack + Choke + Obat Batuk + Coffin: Factory Theatre (Factory Floor), Marrickville

World Famous Comedy Store Showcase 2016: Comedy Store, Moore Park

Jacinta Laws: Fitzroy Hotel, Windsor

Flamin’ Beauties: Crown Hotel, Sydney

Mabel: Frankie’s Pizza By The Slice, Sydney

Open Mic Night with Champagne Jam: Dundas Sports Club, Dundas

Coasea + Matt Raczkowski + Brodie + Morghana + Daniel Biviano + more: LazyBones Lounge, Marrickville Taj Mahal + Taj Ralph: Lizottes Newcastle, Lambton

Tigertown

Reckless: Orient Hotel, The Rocks Stephanie Lea: Oriental Hotel, Springwood City Calm Down + Airling + Problems: Oxford Art Factory, Darlinghurst

Tiger Tracks

Kirsty Bolton: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe

Daniel Champagne + Alex Johnson: Rad Bar, Wollongong

ArtBar: Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), The Rocks Tigertown + Phebe Starr + Jack Crooks: Newtown Social Club, Newtown

Live & Originals feat. Men with Day Jobs + Dominique Morgan + Invona Budys: Mercantile Hotel, The Rocks

City Calm Down: Oxford Art Factory, Darlinghurst

Brown Sugar: Marble Bar, Sydney

Oliver Thorpe: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe

Busy Kingdom: Marlborough Hotel, Newtown

The Beatvilles: Orient Hotel, The Rocks

The final March Sosueme, Wednesday at the Beach Road Hotel is huge. Aeroplane is in all the way from Belgium and Kato, Tash and Viberia & Bobby Gray will all be there to help you party through hump day.

Stiff Little Fingers: Metro Theatre, Sydney

Larger Than Lions: Marble Bar, Sydney

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats + All Our Exes Live In Texas: Metro Theatre, Sydney

The Hump Day Bump

Tigertown are back on home turf celebrating the release of their Lonely Cities EP with a national tour. It’s their first time back in Australia for 12 months and they’ll be at Newtown Social Club Friday.

Downtown Funk feat. Phil Toke + Meem + DJ Benny Hinn: Play Bar, Surry Hills Australia + Miners + Yeevs: Rad Bar, Wollongong Jellybean Jam: Revesby Workers (Infinity Lounge), Revesby Kirsty Lee Akers: Rooty Hill RSL (Waratah Room), Rooty Hill Anh Do: Saraton Theatre, Grafton

Lucky Luke & His Shooting Stars: The Merton Hotel, Rozelle Riley Pearce: The Newsagency, Marrickville Whitney Houston’s Crypt + Twinrova + California Girls + Harrow: The Phoenix, Canberra Tijuana Cartel + Black Rabbit George: The Rhythm Hut, Gosford Steve Poltz: The Vanguard, Newtown 031 Rock Show: Towradgi Beach Hotel (Sports Bar), Towradgi The New Christs + Hoss: Uni Bar, Wollongong Kang + 51 Percent + Possibility of Two + Hack The Mainframe: Valve Bar (Basement), Ultimo Fool’s Gold: Inna Riddim with Various DJs: Valve Bar (Level One), Ultimo Mescalero feat. Steve Edmonds: Warilla Bowls & Recreation Club, Barrack Heights Soul Tattoo: Winmalee Tavern, Winmalee

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 45


Comedy / G The Guide

Vishtèn: Wollongong Town Hall, Wollongong

Carmada

Banquet feat. Alex Lahey + Busy Kingdom: World Bar, Potts Point

Matty O: Rooty Hill RSL (Fred Chubb Lounge), Rooty Hill

Cath & Him: St Georges Basin Country Club, Sanctuary Point

The Last Waltz Revisited feat. Richard Clapton + Tim Rogers + Paul Dempsey + Kevin Borich + Olympia + Vika & Linda Bull + The Rockwiz Orkestra + Brian Nankervis: Sydney Opera House, Sydney

Sat 02 Hilltop Hoods + Sydney Symphony Orchestra + Sydney Chamber Choir + Maverick Sabre: Allphones Arena, Sydney Olympic Park

Rick Dangerous & the Silkie Bantams + Hammers: Tatts Hotel, Lismore

Diesel: Asquith Leagues, Waitara The Ruckus + Bones Atlas + Salvador Dali Llama + Balko: The Annandale Hotel, Annandale

Fenrir: Bald Faced Stag, Leichhardt Strange Talk: Beach Road Hotel, Bondi Beach

Madre Monte + Nativo Soul: The Basement, Sydney

Franky Valentyn: Blacktown Workers Club (Jack McNamara Lounge), Blacktown Raise The Crazy + Eightball Junkies + Release The Hounds: Botany View Hotel, Newtown Big Daddy Wilson: Brass Monkey, Cronulla Soul Tattoo: Brighton RSL, Brighton-Le-Sands

Kyro + A-Tonez: The Grand Hotel, Wollongong

Long Drive

DJ Suketu: The Ivy, Sydney

Carmada are coming to the pointy end of their Land Down Under tour with travel buddies Elk Road. Before anyone calls it quits though, you can catch the two at Towradgi Beach Hotel with a whole heap of special guests.

Aubrey & Purton: The Merton Hotel, Rozelle

Cinemusica with Australian Chamber Orchestra: City Recital Hall, Sydney

Greg Poppleton & The Bakelite Broadcasters: Penrith RSL, Penrith

Tuka + Soul Benefits: The Small Ballroom, Islington

Next Best Thing: Club On East, Sutherland

Urban Stone: Penrith RSL (Castle Lounge), Penrith

Stormcellar + Hairpin Culvert: Town Hall Hotel, Newtown

The World Famous Comedy Store Showcase: Comedy Store, Moore Park

Mark Travers: Plough & Harrow, Camden

Steve Edmonds: Diggers @ The Entrance, The Entrance

Kill Dirty Youth + Propeller + Blaand: Rad Bar, Wollongong

Access feat. Carmada + Elk Road + Nemo + Various DJs: Towradgi Beach Hotel (Waves), Towradgi

Stephanie Lea: Dural Country Club, Dural

She Cries Wolf: Red Rattler, Marrickville

Ian Moss: Enmore Theatre, Newtown

Lets Groove Tonight: Revesby Workers (Infinity Lounge), Revesby

Abbalanche - The Australian ABBA Tribute Show: Burwood RSL (Auditorium), Burwood

The New Christs

Keep It Disco feat. Ben Fester + Preacha: The Oxford Hotel, Darlinghurst Orlando Furious + Shit Narnia + Narks: The Phoenix, Canberra

Venom Clubnight: Valve Bar (Basement/Level One), Ultimo

Blind Boys Of Alabama + Eagle & The Wolf: Factory Theatre, Marrickville

Second Coming The New Christs have called in their mates Hoss and the two bands are set to tear sonic holes in the walls at Uni Bar Friday and Factory Theatre Saturday – where they’ll also be joined by The Undermines.

The New Christs + Hoss + The Undermines: Factory Theatre, Marrickville Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band + Chris Henry: Hotel Gearin, Katoomba

Hilltop Hoods

Wendy Matthews: Hydro Majestic Hotel, Leura The Beatnix: Lizottes Newcastle, Lambton DJ Tim Boffa + DJ Ketami: Manly Wharf Hotel, Manly Jonathan Lee Jones: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe

Wafia: Cake Wines Cellar Door, Redfern

The Goon Sax + Flowertruck + Solid Effort: Newtown Social Club, Newtown

Johnny G & The E-Types: Camelot Lounge, Marrickville

Groovology: Oatley Hotel, Oatley

The Weeping Willows + Katie Brianna: Camelot Lounge (Django Bar), Marrickville Busy Kingdom: Captain Cook Hotel, Paddington Dom Dolla + Baytek + Jesabel + more: Chinese Laundry, Sydney

46 • THE MUSIC • 30TH MARCH 2016

The Chosen Few + Ryan Enright: Orient Hotel, The Rocks Mo Kolours: Oxford Art Factory (Gallery Bar), Darlinghurst Father Sydney Vol. VII feat. Jackal + Yookie: Oxford Art Factory, Darlinghurst

High Class Hood Get involved in the huge night the Hilltop Hoods are throwing at Allphones Arena Saturday night with Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Sydney Chamber Choir and Maverick Sabre. The night kicks off their Restrung tour.


Gigs / Live The Guide

HAZMAT: Woy Woy Leagues, Woy Woy

Manning Bar (10am), Camperdown

Sun 03

Mr Falcon’s Presents Burlesque: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe

Luen: Beach Road Hotel, Bondi Beach

Daniel Champagne + Nikita Rolleston + Rebecca Bastoli : Newtown Social Club, Newtown

Big Daddy Wilson: Beaches Hotel, Thirroul

Red Runners Duo: Oatley Hotel, Oatley

Fox Holmes: Brass Monkey, Cronulla

Cover Note + Lonesome Train: Orient Hotel, The Rocks

Babyroll: Bald Faced Stag, Leichhardt

Horse & Wood: Camelot Lounge (Django Bar), Marrickville The Tracks + Brother Be: Coalcliff Surf Club (Bombie Bar), Coalcliff Bella Fiorentino + Dawn Laird + Rox Sea: Corridor Bar, Newtown She Cries Wolf: Drone (All Ages), Newcastle Jason Isbell + Eilen Jewell: Enmore Theatre, Newtown One Day Sunday feat. Joyride + Raph + Nick Lupi + Nacho Pop +

She Cries Wolf

Clive Hay: Penrith Panthers (Squires Terrace Bar), Penrith Cinemusica with Australian Chamber Orchestra: Sydney Opera House, Sydney Janet Levey + Nathen Welsh: The Annandale Hotel, Annandale Dougie DeKroo’s Kentucky Moon: The Merton Hotel, Rozelle Magnus + Shady Nasty + Delphine Geoff: The Record Crate, Glebe Ben Abraham: The Vanguard, Newtown

The Weeping Willows

Wolf-Packed Gold Coast-based hardcore crew She Cries Wolf will play Doublebassment Friday on their national tour for their recently released single and clip We’re All Arsonists befor heading to Red Rattler Saturday and Drone Sunday.

Frankie’s World Famous House Band: Frankie’s Pizza By The Slice, Sydney The Weeping Willows: Janes Wollongong, North Wollongong John Maddox Duo: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe Greg Byrne: Orient Hotel, The Rocks The Monday Jam: The Basement, Sydney

The Bootleg Sessions feat. Propeller + Room 15 + New Savages + Joe Conroy: The Phoenix, Canberra

Tue 05 Cinemusica with Australian Chamber Orchestra: City Recital Hall, Sydney Open Mic Night with Champagne Jam: Dundas Sports Club, Dundas City & Colour: Enmore Theatre, Newtown

Steve Edmonds

Rock n Roll Karaoke: Frankie’s Pizza By The Slice, Sydney Live & Originals feat. Dan O’Connel + Elaine Crombie + Lance Aligannis + Jon Cage: Mr Falcon’s, Glebe

Willows Come A-Callin’

Co-Pilot: Orient Hotel, The Rocks

The Weeping Willows are taking their gothic brand of bluegrass and Americana around Australia to give people a taste of their recent album Darkness Comes A-Callin’. You can see it yourself at Camelot Lounge Saturday and Jane’s Wollongong Monday.

Original Guitar Wizard Hau + Shantan Wantan Ichiban: Factory Theatre, Marrickville

Steve Edmonds: Towradgi Beach Hotel (Sports Bar), Towradgi

Rick Dangerous & the Silkie Bantams + Daggerz + Red Gazelle + Kill Dirty Youth: Frankie’s Pizza By The Slice, Sydney

Kill Your Heroes + more: Valve Bar (Basement), Ultimo

Revolution Incorporated: Hotel Steyne (Moonshine Rum & Cider Bar), Manly

Mon 04

Jed Zarb: Jamison Hotel, Penrith

Doggin It + Deano Angeletta + more: Camelia Grove Hotel, Alexandria

DJ Graham M + DJ Husky: Manly Wharf Hotel, Manly

Peter Miller Robinson + Dominique Morgan + Lucas Hendriks: Corridor Bar, Newtown

Rock n Roll & Alternative Market feat. The Satellites + West Texas Crude + Cruisin? Deuces + The Drey Rollan Band + more:

City & Colour + Little May: Enmore Theatre, Newtown

One of Australia’s slickest bluesrock outfits, Steve Edmonds Band, will be smashing out ‘70s blues and pub-rock vibes at Diggers @ The Entrance on Saturday and Towradgi Beach Hotel Sunday.

THE MUSIC 30TH MARCH 2016 • 47


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The Music (Sydney) Issue #132  

The Music is a free, weekly magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, lifestyl...

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