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2 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014


THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 3


themusic 11TH JUNE 2014

“PLANTING TREES, IT MAY BE A CORNY THING TO SOME, BUT WHAT A TREE REPRESENTS TO ME IS LIFE.”

#042

INSIDE FEATURED In Hearts Wake Earth

HARDCORE HIPPIES IN HEARTS WAKE (P12)

The Bronx Bastille

feature

The Paper Kites Emma Russack Carcass Twin Beasts Vale Doc Neeson Mia Dyson The Last Impresario Director Gracie Otto

“WHEN WE GO TO ANY PART OF AUSTRALIA AND PLAY SHOWS, IT’S SOMETHING THAT’S REALLY IMPORTANT AND GRATIFYING TO US. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN WORTH OUR WHILE.” MATT CAUGHTHRAN OF LA HOMBRES THE BRONX (P15)

WE BREAKDOWN WHO’S IN LINE TO MAKE MOVES IN THIS WEEK’S ARIA CHARTS.

GET UP TO DATE ONLY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

My Friend The Chocolate Cake Graveyard Train

REVIEWS Album: The Orwells

Live: Propagandhi Arts: Edge Of Tomorrow

THE GUIDE

WANNA KNOW WHAT NEW MUSIC YOU SHOULD SPEND YOUR MONEY ON THIS WEEK?

CHECK OUT OUR RELEASE WRAP-UP ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Cover: Barge With An Antenna On It Food/Drink Frontlash/Backlash Indie News This Week’s Releases Indy Features Gig Guide

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE RECENT HAPPENINGS IN THE AUS INDIE SCENE. ONLY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

review “THE SONGS CONJURE THE SAME RESTRAINED MENACE AS MURDER CITY DEVILS MARRIED WITH THE RAMSHACKLE CATCHINESS OF BLACK LIPS. STEVE BELL TELLS US WHY WE’VE GOT TO HEAR THE ORWELLS’ NEW RECORD (P24)

“HE PROBABLY LET ME START MAKING THE FILM BECAUSE I WAS YOUNG AND BLONDE.” GRACIE OTTO TALKS ABOUT HER DIRECTORIAL DEBUT, THE LAST IMPRESARIO (P22)

arts 4 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014


www.thenorthern.com.au

JONSON STREET BYRON BAY WED 11 JUNE GRAVEYARD TRAIN

FRI 13 JUNE THE PAPER KITES PHOEBE STARR AIRLING

SAT 14 JUNE WAXHEAD ELEGANT SHIVA BLACK TONGUE

THURS 19 JUNE THE HARD ONS

FRI 20 JUNE FAIT ACCOMPLI THE RUMOURS

SAT 21 JUNE TRANSVAAL DIAMOND SYNDICATE

FRI 27 JUNE THE BADLANDS

SAT 28 JUNE TIJUANA CARTEL

THURS 3 JULY THE CAIROS NOVA HEART

SUN 6 JULY THE BEARDS

TUE 8 JULY DAN SULTAN

FRI 19 JULY SLEEPMAKESWAVES

SUN 20 JULY DAVE GRANEY TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 5


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Steve Bell

ASSISTANT EDITOR Benny Doyle

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE EDITOR Justine Lynch gigs@themusic.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS Alice Bopf, Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Ben Marnane, Ben Preece, Benny Doyle, Bradley Armstrong, Brendan Telford, Brie Jorgensen, Carley Hall, Chris Yates, Cyclone, Dan Condon, Daniel Johnson, Dave Drayton, Guy Davis, Helen Stringer, Jake Sun, Jazmine O’Sullivan, Lochlan Watt, Madeleine Laing, Mandy McAlister, Mitch Knox, Roshan Clerkea, Sam Hobson, Sky Kirkham, Tessa Fox, Tom Hersey, Tony McMahon, Tyler McLoughlan

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 11 JUNE - 17 JUNE 2014

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PHOTOGRAPHERS Freya Lamont, John Stubbs, John Taylor, Kane Hibberd, Markus Ravik, Rick Clifford, Sky Kirkham, Stephen Booth, Terry Soo, Tessa Fox

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QLD SALES Juliet Brooks, Madeleine Budd sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Brendon Wellwood

ART DEPT David Di Cristoforo, Eamon Stewart, Julian De Bono

ADMIN AND ACCOUNTS Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson, Loretta Zoppos, Niall McCabe

The vinyl resurgence shows no signs of abating, which is why the West End Record Fair (held second Saturday of each month) is going such great guns. This Saturday all attention is on the Rumpus Room where vaunted sellers from Sydney are showing their wares for the first time in Queensland, and then on Sunday you can catch them (plus locals) at the Sunshine Coast Record Fair at Sands Tavern, Maroochydore. Happy hunting!

This weekend QPAC brings four performances (two each on Friday and Saturday) of Horrible Histories – Awful Egyptians, a stage adaptation of the best-selling kids’ book which brings to life Egypt’s illustrious ancient past in all its lurid, gory detail. Featuring awesome Bogglevision 3D effects you can discover a long forgotten world of pharaohs, mummies, asps, the afterlife and so much more! History has never been so fun!

accounts@themusic.com.au

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CONTACT US Phone: (07) 3252 9666 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au Street: Suite 11/354 Brunswick Street Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Postal: Locked Bag 4300 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

BRISBANE

You probably know Queensland songstress Roz Pappalardo best from acclaimed duo Women In Docs, but this Saturday evening she branches out and brings love story Rosa to Brisbane Powerhouse as part of the Queensland Cabaret Festival. Through both song and storytelling Roz brings to life the tale of her maternal grandmother’s amazing journey from Sicily to FNQ, and you’ll laugh and cry as you see this great performer in a whole new light.

enjoy


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STATE OF ORIGIN ON THE BIG SCREEN COMING SOON: THU 19TH JUNE

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DJ LONGTIME THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 7


national news news@themusic.com.au COURTNEY LOVE

RED BULL FLYING BACH

HOLEY SMOKES

No matter what you think of her antics away from the stage, you can’t deny that Courtney Love knows how to own it once she slings a guitar over her shoulder and leans into the mic. From stints with Faith No More and Babes In Toyland to her defining rock’n’roll venture Hole, Love continues to antagonise, elate and surprise, like all good icons should. Hear the Californian work through her solo output and pick at the classics when she brings the You Know My Name tour to Metro City, Perth, 13 Aug; Festival Hall, Melbourne, 16 Aug; Eatons Hill Hotel, Brisbane, 20 Aug; Newcastle Panthers, 22 Aug; UC Refectory, Canberra, 23 Aug; and Enmore Theatre, Sydney, 24 Aug.

“PRINCE WAS AT THE FRENCH OPEN RECRUITING FIGHTERS FOR A MARTIALARTS TOURNAMENT ON HIS ISLAND.” AND MICHAEL BROWN [@MCB3000] IS PRETTY SURE THE WINNER GETS HIS SCEPTRE. SPIDERBAIT

THY ART IS MURDER

BEEN TOO LONG

Can you comprehend that it’s been a decade since Spiderbait embarked on a national tour? Even off the map, they’ve still felt like a part of our lives thanks to their huge swag of killer rock nuggets, but it’s exciting to know they’re going to get well-familiar once more, touring off the back of their self-titled release of last year and their Splendour In The Grass return. Hear Janet, Whitt and Kram 8 Aug, Metro Theatre, Sydney; 9 Aug, The Hi-Fi, Brisbane; 15 Aug, Astor Theatre, Perth; and 29 Aug, Corner Hotel, Melbourne.

8 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

THE MIGHTY DON’T FALL

After they’ve finished crisscrossing the planet and destroying stages on a global scale, Australia’s most frightening heavy music mongers Thy Art Is Murder will stomp on the remains of 2014 with a huge summer tour. A tour de force in the world of extreme music, you’re unlikely to find a heavier local tour this year, so celebrate the success of the Sydneysiders and see if they can agitate a few more promoters once more when they perform 13 Dec, The Hi-Fi, Melbourne; 14 Dec, Community Centre, Melbourne (all ages); 17 Dec, Capitol, Perth; 18 Dec, HQ, Perth (all ages); 19 Dec, Manning Bar, Sydney; and 20 Dec (18+) and 21 Dec (under-18), Crowbar, Brisbane. Tickets are on sale this Thursday, with the tour proudly presented by The Music.

BREAKING BACH

Following a two-city sell out last year, the preconception defying Red Bull Flying Bach is returning Down Under for a full national tour. Pitting classical music and interpretive urban dance moves against each other, the 18th century masterpieces of Bach are given street cred thanks to world champion breakdance crew Flying Steps. Let chief choreographer Vartan Bassil inspire you at State Theatre, Sydney, 9 – 12 Sep; Crown Theatre, Perth, 17 – 20 Sep; QPAC, Brisbane, 24 – 26 Sep; and Arts Centre, Melbourne, 1 – 4 Oct.

DREAMS COME TRUE

After the crazy success of Alison Wonderland’s recent Warehouse Project tour, she will be taking her slick skills and stomping beats to some locations off the beaten track. In amongst OS jaunts to New Zealand, Taiwan and Indonesia, Wonderland will bring her Rural Juror Touror (just try and pronounce that after a few beers!) to some smaller settings, playing 20 Jun, Academy, Canberra; 26 Jun, UniBar, Wollongong; 28 Jun, Argyle House, Newcastle; 3 Jul, Southern Cross Uni, Lismore; 4 Jul, Fitzgeralds Irish Bar, Bunbury; 5 Jul, Toucan, Mandurah; and 16 Aug, Karova, Ballarat. This tour also ties in with Wonderland’s brand new EP, Calm Down, which will be available 27 Jun.

ARE YOU HEARING THIS?

After a successful introduction last spring, Australia’s leading boutique dance festival Listen Out will be back in 2014. With a starring cast last year that included Disclosure, Azealia Banks, Rüfüs and AlunaGeorge, the event is damn well on the pulse, and you can be certain they’ll be looking to top the efforts of 2013 in more ways than one. Dance like you mean it 27 Sep, Centennial Park, Sydney; 28 Sep, Ozone Reserve, Perth; 4 Oct, Observatory Precinct, Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne; and 5 Oct, Brisbane Showgrounds. Stay tuned for first artist announcements and ticket info soon.


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LUKE KELLY FRIDAY 25TH

ANDREW STRONG AUGUST SATURDAY 2ND

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THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 9


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au MONIQUE BRUMBY

BENI

WE WANT BANGERS, NOT ANTHEMS

BACK IN THE SADDLE

Get along to The Treehouse, Byron Bay, 26 Jul or Dowse Bar, 27 Jul (all ages) and check out ARIA-winning songstress Monique Brumby. The Melbourne songwriter has been tirelessly crafting her latest offering during the last three years, the self-titled record touching on themes of love, equality, acceptance and more. Get excited to see one of our most passionate performers back on stage again and hear her new classics for the very first time.

ENDLESS AMAZING

With the evergreen Iva Davies earning yet another platinum disc off the back of White Heat: 30 Hits, it all but makes sense that he get Icehouse out on the road again to rip through the classics that we love so dearly. Great Southern Land, Electric Blue, We Can Get Together – where do you even begin? Make sure your voice is full and limbs are loose when Davies leads his troops out on 20 Sep for a special outdoor concert at an as-yet unannounced location in SEQ, before he heads to the border for a set at Twin Towns, Tweed Heads, 21 Sep.

GET READY FOR TAKEOFF WARM RECEPTION After getting Paramore’s party started right during their arena tour early this year, explosive pop-rock-hop duo Twenty One Pilots are returning with more fuel and plenty more fire. They play east coast club shows later this winter, and will run rings around their fans at The Zoo, 10 Aug. Tickets for this one are on sale Friday.

H-Town massive Katchafire will be rolling out their full eight-piece reggae rhythms with a chilled out show at Miami Marketta on the Gold Coast, 22 Jun. Staples of the Pacific and Californian roots scene, these worldbeating Kiwis are a class unto themselves, and will work through a choice selection from their four full-length studio albums.

FIXED BY FUSION

SECOND CHANCE DRAW

By creating a theatre company that combines elements of Australian form and content with Asian sensibilities and integrity, Frank Theatre have been able to put on unique cross-cultured performances that involve movement, dance, text, foreign language, music and multimedia. Come along to one of their workshops in West End, Friday – Sunday. More info at ozfrank.com.

If you’re gutted you missed out on Splendour In The Grass tickets last month, then you might get a reprieve, with the festival announcing that they’ll be releasing an additional 2500 tickets Thursday (12 Jun) – a mixture of three-day passes, single day stubs and camping tickets. So, what have we learnt from last time? Get in quick! Head to Moshtix at 9am and hope your trigger finger is itchy. If you miss out again though, you’ve still got a further safety net with the fairly reliable resale facility kicking into gear via Moshtix, 9am, 16 Jun.

“LAVA IS BASICALLY EARTH JIZZ.”

WELL GREG EDWARDS [@ GREGTHEGROUCH], THAT’S DISGUSTING. 10 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

You can’t escape the lure of dancefloor don Beni, with the Riot In Belgium alum bouncing around the east coast to promote his new extended-play Protect / Can’t Hide. Showing off the producer’s electronic finesse, it’s a classy collection of electro-fuelled house that you need to hear. Get moving at Capulet this Saturday and Elsewhere, Gold Coast, 18 Jul.

STORIED SUPPORTS

US post-hardcore outfit Story Of The Year are set to take us ten years back in time when they visit to celebrate their muchloved debut Page Avenue, and the night will be sure to kick off right with Take Us To Vegas and Dollarosa both announced as supports. Limited tickets are still on sale for the gig, happening 26 Jun, The Hi-Fi.

RETURNING GRACE

After a self-stated period of exile, Jackie ‘The Peppercorn Queen’ Marshall is getting back to her musical muse, with motherhood failing to remove the creative shine from her swag of songs. Get a taste of PQ’s new alt-country tunes when Marshall exorcises some more demons, launching The Good People EP 4 Jul, The Joynt and 6 Jul, Bohemian Bungalow, Eumundi.

COOLIO

CHASING PARADISE

Multi-platinum, multi-faceted, Grammy Award-winning rapper Coolio will breathe life into the ‘90s once more with a nostalgialaden set of classics from his party-ready back-catalogue. Expect a hit-heavy set and one massive ol’ singalong for Gangsta’s Paradise. Hell, he might even share some of his Cooking With Coolio secrets onstage too. Whatever he does though, you can be sure it’ll be entertaining, so be at East 88, 7 Aug and Coniston Lane, 12 Aug.


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au THELMA PLUM

THE SMITHS

THIS CHARMING MAN

Dance to those unmistakable Johnny Marr guitar lines and let the lyrical foreplay of Morrissey touch you all over when Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro hosts The Smiths Video Night, an evening playing tribute to one of the great bands of the ‘80s. There’ll be music videos, docos, concert footage and more from 7pm, 18 Jun, with $5 tickets on the door.

I FEEL FINE

Accompanied by a 17-piece orchestra, You Am I legend Tim Rogers, The Living End’s Chris Cheney, Grinspoon frontman Phil Jamieson and singer-songwriter Josh Pyke are set to unite once more for The White Album Concert series, and they’ve just added a second show at QPAC, a matinee performance taking place at 3pm, 13 Jul. Relive Beatlemania all over again – tickets for the new date are on sale now.

MAKE A WISH

After supporting the likes of A$AP Rocky, Childish Gambino and Tyga, hyped Sydney artist Miracle is excited to announce his debut headline tour. Experience the MC when he brings his out-of-the-box rhyming and production to GPO, 12 Jul and East, Gold Coast, 29 Aug.

RIPE FOR THE PICKING

She may be based down south these days, but we still consider Thelma Plum one of our own up Queensland way. Her debut EP Rosie was a beguiling listen that wrapped around your heart whole, but with new EP Monster Plum is looking to explore more progressive sounds, with the help of studio wizards such as Eric J Dobowsky (Chet Faker, Flight Facilities) and the ever-formidable M-Phazes. Watch this ridiculously talented teen command the stage when Plum plays with MTNS at Old Museum, 10 Jul. Venue website for tickets, with under-18s welcome if accompanied by a parent or guardian.

“I’M DRIPPING IN KRUNK.” IT’S @NICKJFROST. WHAT?! YEEAH! WHAT?!

LAST LOOK ON THE BRIGHT SIDE

JEN CLOHER

STARING RIGHT AT YOU

Don’t miss your only chance to see Jen Cloher headline in 2014, when the Melbourne songwriter plays some select capital city dates in suitably intimate surroundings. The tour coincides with Cloher releasing her full-band take on The Loved Ones’ Sad Dark Eyes, but you can be sure the setlist will still be full of all her catalogue classics, including plenty of tracks from last year’s raw and triumphant In Blood Memory. Cloher finishes her fourdate tour with a show at Junk Bar, 25 Jul.

It’s been 40 years since the cast of Monty Python came together for a live show, but they’re set to end the wait with a run of dates at The O2, London this July. You don’t have to fly around the world to share the magic though – just head to Dendy Cinemas Portside, 6 Aug, where they’ll be screening the last Monty Python Live (Mostly) show, the comedy dons’ final ever gig. Tickets are on sale now for $20.

WORTH A SHOT

One of Australia’s leading independent music festivals, UBERfest, is expanding this winter, and will take place in Queensland, 30 Aug. Get along to Jubilee Hotel to catch the likes of Super Monkey Zero, Daylight Army, Super Asleep, Dr. Parallax, Spook Hill, Jade Haven, Wax Wings, Windrest, Don’t Waste The Paint, Amodus, King Jester, Buried With The Rest, Kombi Killers, Junkyard Express, Meredith and Lachy Lyne, with more to be confirmed in the coming months.

TINY TERROR

Small in stature but huge in heart, wise crackin’ rock’n’roller Mojo Juju is releasing her demons on stage one last time before creeping back into the studio to cut her second record. Get sexy with the pocket rocket when she settles into the Joynt for two nights, 27 & 28 Jun. Tickets available on the door, with support from Frank Sultana.

BACK TO GET BLOODIED

Corrosion Of Conformity fans can let out a sigh of relief with the band finally confirming rescheduled dates after their cancellation earlier this year. The trio make for a crushing live proposition, so brace yourself for the annihilation when they purge 30 years of pain out on the Crowbar stage, 24 Jul.

THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 11


music

EVERYDAY HEROES As well as making an impact, In Hearts Wake want to make a difference. Frontman Jake Taylor talks to Benny Doyle about the environmental ideals behind the band’s new record and how they’re hoping to soundtrack a movement.

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t a time when the most celebrated word on the planet relates to taking a photo of one’s own face, it’s nice to see a band looking outwards rather than focusing inwards, especially a group so young. Almost two years on from their debut record Divination, a surprise success that found its way into the ARIA top 30, Byron Bay metalcore gang In Hearts Wake have returned to the soil with a far more organic hit of heavy – Earthwalker.

after,” Taylor reasons, “but you always have to go back and forth. The band then decamped to Michigan once more to work with ‘Metal Josh’ Schroeder, who also produced Divination. Here the unique messages of each song were woven seamlessly into one standout body of work. “It was just all about nailing the performances and bringing that epicness to life,” Taylor recalls. “And it has a lot more feel, this CD; there was a lot of extra emotion and energy [when recording], attitude when it was needed, but then [also] held off. It was such a big concept we were writing for – diversity is a big one – and it’s not always easy.”

are we sacrificing relationships, our financial situation, not doing all these things that our friends are doing like travelling the world? And I really realised [that] nothing’s changed – I’ve always been doing this for the message, and being a part of what I think is the bigger picture. And this was really, not taking a side, but really speaking out about it rather than being a person on the sideline. “After travelling and seeing a lot of the world with my family and band, I’ve grown to appreciate how lucky we are as Australians,” Taylor continues. “With that being said, I don’t want to see it turned to crap, and I feel that in the state of politics and just the way our economic structure is really heading, it’s worse than it’s ever been. That’s not saying that our dollar is bad, but if the government feels that we need to get our dollar stronger, boost our economy, they’re willing to turn back on every word; we’re talking hundreds of hectares here that they just want to give away because there’s ‘too much forest that’s been locked up’. “I feel that this is the turning point [to make a difference]. Just outside where we live in Byron Bay there’s a huge blockade in Bentley; people, protestors have been camping out there every night, and every morning the police show up trying to get through with all the bulldozers and fracking trucks, and the people are making a stand. It’s on

“WITH A LOT MORE PEOPLE REALLY RESPONDING TO THE MESSAGE AND BEING A PART OF THE EARTHWALKER MOVEMENT, IT DOES REALLY FEEL LIKE WE’RE DOING THE RIGHT THING.”

“It’s evolving,” vocalist Jake Taylor says of the band’s music. “I’m not sure if these songs feel faster or [more] energetic, but there’s a lot more going on. The light and dark has even more of its ups and downs it feels like, but it’s gelling really well. Getting our head around all new material though is challenging, it’s good, and it’s fun to be getting to play the new stuff.” Going against the grain of an apathetic era where too many people simply don’t give a shit, In Hearts Wake are using their position to creatively raise awareness on environmental issues that we face in our backyard, and all around the globe. But while Taylor is singing about logging, mining and our own modern behavioural patterns reacting to such industry – or “being hippies” as one intellectual giant on Facebook put it – the music surrounding his words remains punishing and crisp. As much as the lyrics and sounds are individually powerful though, the two elements of the band are only able to hit so hard because of their co-dependence and ability to feed off each other. The five friends live close to one another in Byron so communication throughout the creation of Earthwalker was constant. But rather than hand his lyric sheet to guitarist Ben Nairne – who took the lead writing the music – Taylor instead would share the vibe he envisaged for a song. This left interpretation open for Nairne and the rest of the band – Eaven Dall (guitar), Kyle Erich (bass) and Caleb Burton (drums). “It’s like a writing a script to a movie, and then the soundtrack comes 12 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

Earthwalker makes the band’s message crystalclear – if we carry on remaining passive and keep allowing terrible decisions to be made by governments, things are quickly going to head south. We need unity between ourselves, and the land we walk on. However, Taylor says when the band started working on this second full-length there was no modus operandi, no ‘what we need to do’ or ‘what we should do’. This album was simply a natural extension of the band members as people – in musical and thematic form. “I definitely felt a responsibility,” the frontman admits. “At the end of the day, why am I doing this? Why are we doing all of this? Why

our doorstep, all of this, and I don’t want to be 50 and say I didn’t try. I definitely want our kids to inherit this beautiful country that we so love now.” Growing up in Byron Bay and being immersed in the Northern Rivers area – easily one of the most stunning regions of our country – In Hearts Wake didn’t find it hard to get inspired about their mission of change, one which has seen them partner up with carbon solutions provider Carbon Neutral and plant biodiverse native trees tying in with ticket and album presales. “Loving these beaches, loving these waterfalls, loving everything this place has to offer – that’s where that importance comes from,” Taylor says. “What makes me happy is going to those places – it really changes my whole day. Even when I think it might not, and I’m just in a mood or whatever, it will seriously just transform everything. If people don’t have that catalyst to do that in their lives, then that’s an unfortunate thing.” Baring their beliefs so honestly and passionately has unsurprisingly led to keyboard warriors having a dig at In Hearts Wake online. But Earthwalker succeeds in informing without preaching, a fine line that the band walk with ease. “It’s more just an appreciation for what we don’t want to lose – that’s the biggest message,” Taylor explains. “I think for the most part people are on board with it because at the end of the day it is a part


of the bigger picture, and any neglect to see that to me is ignorance, not about our music, but to see it’s for the good. There are people that will be confronted by it because they like that Hollywood buffer where everything is good. People like to feel good, they like to be happy, and they don’t want to understand and be shown what’s really happening because it makes them feel uncomfortable. But it’s necessary, it really is.” Did In Hearts Wake question what they were about, not only as musicians but as people? Of course they did, we all do. And there have been plenty of times in the past few years where the band asked if what they were doing was worth it – the financial pressures and social anxiety related to FOMO, an all too real occurrence in a digital age when everyone is putting their best foot forward on the internet. But now, with music as their bonding solution, they are helping to inspire a new generation of socially conscious individuals. “There’s definitely that doubt, as there is with any creative outlet, it comes into your mind – ‘Am I

doing what I need to be doing?’” concedes Taylor. “And I guess now with a lot more people really responding to the message and being a part of the Earthwalker movement, it does really feel like we’re doing the right thing. Y’know, planting trees, it may be a corny thing to some, but what a tree represents to me is life, it changes the weather, it can provide food for families; like, the ‘tree of life’ in many religions is such a symbolic thing, and the earth, I think it’s powerful.”

WHAT: Earthwalker (UNFD) WHEN & WHERE: 15 Jun, The Brightside; 21 Jun, Live It Up, RNA Showgrounds; 29 Jun, The Sands Tavern, Maroochydore

ACORNY WAY TO INTERACT In amongst all this musical progression and conservation, In Hearts Wake also managed to concoct a pretty novel way to connect with their fanbase and concurrently promote their new record. Head to the UNFD webpage and you’ll find the Earth Invaders online video game, a cute little procrastination assister, devised by the band and their label, which sees the boys redesigned in squirrel form throwing acorns at Tony Abbott’s nasty bulldozer brigade. High scores bring with them unreleased tracks and prizes, but everyone gets some lolz. “We’re always trying to offer different ways to release things and get really creative with it, because that’s the best way to engage fans other than have good songs, to do things differently,” explains Taylor. “One thing we do want to implement, amongst all this seriousness and these bold statements, [is a sense of ] fun, because that’s what we are, we’re just fun dudes that do fun stuff. And in terms of the Earth Invaders game, [hilariously catchy faux hip pop jam] Brown Rice, Tuna And Salad, or dressing as hippies [on the cover of Blunt Magazine], we just want to keep it light and remember to be joyous in all of it. The frontman adds, “We’ll have a few fun surprises on the tour too. But the message needs to [remain] undiluted, it’s got to be strong.”


music

DOWN TO EARTH Seattle doom metal masters Earth may be everyone’s idea of brutal, but as Cam Findlay discovers exchanging Mighty Boosh quotes with Dylan Carlson, there’s a lot more heart than hate.

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he story of Dylan Carlson’s doom metal musical project is long and intricate. Since 1989 – albeit with a big gap between the late ‘90s and 2002-3 – Earth has been an ever-influential, all-powerful behemoth of post-metal energy. One of the bands responsible for kicking off Seattle’s glory days, as well as the progenitors of the post-metal, Earth seems unstoppable. Poetic it is, then, that the 46-year-old Carlson is softly spoken, warm and conversational, obviously happy to delve into the deep lore of Earth once again in the lead-up to their eighth studio album, the follow-up to 2012’s Angels Of Darkness, Demons Of Light II. Carlson is currently sitting in his hotel room in London. “It’s good to have some down time,” Carlson admits. “I went and saw one show; it was for Bad Omen Records. It was these bands Witchhazel, Azazel and Satan’s Satyrs I think they were called. I liked Witchhazel. They were my favourite band out of the bunch. They were a) Christian, and b) the openers, but they were really good, I thought,” he laughs. “Lately I’ve been going to a lot more,” Carlson explains when asked if his gig attendances are still moderate to high. “I’ve been seeing a lot of bands back home in Seattle lately, and I’ve seen a bunch while I’ve been over here. So I’ve been busy.” On top of touring Angels Of Darkness, Carlson has spent the last few years working on a few solo projects, including his debut solo album. Its birth was slightly unusual. Carlson became heavily interested in English folklore and pagan rituals, and used that as a basis for writing music that may have surprised Earth fans. It was English folk rock, and Carlson has been pretty successful with it. Meanwhile, he’s working on the upcoming Earth album. “It’s done, it’s been mastered, I’ve just approved the CD master. We’re waiting for the test pressing now. I mean, it’s gonna definitely be more of a heavy metalleaning record, I’d say. There’s three songs with vocals, two with Mark Lanegan singing and one with Maria Cosi from Rose Windows. So I guess it kinda hearkens back to [1996’s] Pentastar in some ways. I think it’s a little heavier than Pentastar was, but it definitely has 14 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

that feel to it, whether that’s from the period we’re in or what. We’re back to touring as a power trio again as well, so I think it’s more of a loud rock, heavy thing going on with the band; we’re excited to do it. So in a way it feels like we’ve come full circle.” That statement in itself sounds like a big deal for

in it all. “I mean, I kind of started doing the solo stuff because I was right into the whole English folk rock thing. I really didn’t want to sort of saddle Earth with that again. I want Earth to do what Earth’s going to do, and if I want to keep doing something different I can kind of do that on the side. Not that the solo side is exclusively that either, because I’ve got other elements that I’ve been playing with, like some free-jazz parts and stuff. I don’t know why I started doing all that, maybe I was going through a mid-life crisis or something. But I’ve also started listening to the metal bands I loved back in those days a lot more. I don’t think I ever stopped liking that type of music. I think I just forgot about it for a while.

“I WAS LUCKY TO COME OUT OF THAT TIME, YOU KNOW?” Carlson. Having spent a fair chunk of time sober, connecting back to his days of heroin abuse and a much-publicised friendship with Kurt Cobain cannot be easy. But, as fans and interviewers have learned in recent years, he has no plans to run away from the dark days between the incarnations of Earth. “Yeah, in some ways,” Carlson admits a certain cathartic retrospection

“I often joke with people that I only ever have had one idea, and that I’ve been running with it this whole time,” Carlson laughs heartily. “I was lucky to come out of that time, you know? I was lucky that I could start writing again. With all the changes, I’m still trying to pursue the same idea that I had all those years ago – the idea of the perfect riff.” He exclaims suddenly when this scribe jokes about the old cliché of ‘the New Sound’. “Whoa, I actually just watched that episode! The one with the New Sound!” This then leads us on to a slight detour as we compare Might Boosh notes. “Maybe I’m just waiting for the door to appear in my head,” he laughs once again. WHEN & WHERE: 17 Jun, Crowbar


THE NEXT NUMBER

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No matter the season, Matt Caughthran, lead singer of The Bronx and Mariachi El Bronx, is a busy dude, but finds a moment to chat to Dylan Stewart.

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att Caughthran is yakking down the line from Wilmington, North Carolina, where El Bronx have just wrapped up the final show of a five-week tour supporting reggae-punk rockers Slightly Stoopid. “It’s been great man,” he enthuses. “We haven’t really done too much reggae stuff, you know, in our world, but it’s cool. Being out with a bunch of bands, smoking pot and making music, it’s not the worst thing in the world.” After The Bronx’s upcoming whirlwind Australian tour and a month in Europe, there’s a third El Bronx album to release and an under-wraps Bronx project. “I wouldn’t call it Bronx V” – for newcomers, every Bronx album is called The Bronx, but the first album is colloquially known as I, the second II, etc. Their latest, IV, dropped last year – “I will tell you this: it’s just going to be an EP. It will be a new collection of music that we’re putting together for a project, and it’s probably going to come out and exist outside of that project on its own. So, umm, that’s it. That’s all I can say.”

stages they’ll be ready to unleash the whole album on punters. “We made a point on this record when we started touring with it. We have lots of songs from II and, particularly, III that are cool but we don’t play, so we were like ‘Let’s not do that with this record. Let’s

having been in a band for a while, it’s so awesome that we can go out and play a different set of tunes every night. We’re stoked, because we’re not going out and doing the same thing every night and the crowd’s stoked because the setlist is fucking cool.” It’s humbling – and, frankly, exciting – to hear Caughthran talk frankly about The Bronx’s shows and the search for improvement on stage. “I think we got a little lethargic in a couple of ways and started playing the same set a lot, but this time we’re going to come down to Australia with a new sense of pride and a new sense of energy.

“NOW THERE’S A CERTAIN WEIGHT THAT EACH BAND CARRIES.”

Which begs a question: with both The Bronx and Mariachi El Bronx successful in their own right, is it easy to switch from one to the other? “It’s not easy, y’know, but it’s rewarding so it’s really exciting,” Caughthran admits. “It was a lot easier when we first started the band, mentally, to switch over. But now there’s a certain weight that each band carries so it’s harder to go back and forth. You can’t just switch anymore; you’ve got to allow some time for a headspace to be created. “Logistically it’s a fucking nightmare. When we have a tour with both bands we’ve got like 90 pieces of gear; we go to airports and it’s insane. But it’s all good. Even when we do Bronx tours now, it’s a bitch because there’s less gear but you’ve got to load in and out fucking heavy gear, so when we do mariachi stuff it’s like ‘Oh, it’s super easy going, there’s no heavy gear.’” The Bronx released IV last year to satisfy fans’ growing hunger for the Californian five-piece’s brand of punk/ hardcore songs. It had been five years since III, with Mariachi El Bronx I and Mariachi El Bronx II dropping in between. The album is a return to the highs the band is known for, and when The Bronx hit Australian

make sure that when we go out we play these songs. Let’s know them.’ “There are certain songs off II and III, that, if someone in the audience shouted them out, we would be like ‘Yo, umm, sorry.’ We might be able to fumble our way through them but that would be a bummer. We don’t want to be that type of band. We want to be able to play anything any time. “For this new record, we just wanted to get out and fucking play all these songs because,

“We’re going to play some different tunes and some different sets each night and really have some motherfucking fun and get the place cranking like we always do.” While The Bronx aren’t getting out west this time around – “You know I’m a west coast guy, I love the west coast. Hopefully they’ll forgive us” – they are taking their high octane show to Tasmania for the first time. And though his choice of a tattoo of the Tasmanian Devil might not be particularly original, the opportunity to throw down a Bronx set on a whole new landmass is something that Caughthran is excited about. “When we go to any part of Australia and play shows, it’s something that’s really important and gratifying to us. It’s always been worth our while. It’s a beautiful thing, man. I seriously really, really love Australia.”

WHEN & WHERE: 15 & 16 Jun, Crowbar THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 15


music

TAKING OVER Having gone three times platinum in Australia and having sold over two million units worldwide, standout single Pompeii is just another highlight in the success story that is Bastille. Tyler McLoughlan finds out from Kyle Simmons why the band still can’t quite believe their luck.

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s they make their way around the world on sold out tours, Britain’s apocalyptic popsters Bastille are still coming to grips with the dizzying levels of success they’ve achieved this year. As Bad Blood took top spot in the UK charts and became the highest selling digital album of the year, they looked to Australia to dip their toe in the water with two intimate shows far smaller than the stadium crowds they’ll return for in June. “In a band context and also just personally it was the first time I’ve got over there and it was just incredible; the response we got just shocked us all, we just totally weren’t expecting it…” says keyboardist Kyle Simmons of Bastille’s quick August visit. With genuine disbelief he attempts to sum up the events of last year. “It’s pretty weird,” he continues. “Quite early on we sort of exceeded our expectations. We’re quite a pessimistic band as it is and now to have a chance to come back [to Australia] and with our album having done what it did and the response that came from the album and the singles and stuff, we’re just blown away and we’re so happy to come back and hopefully be playing some new songs as well… It’s so weird because none of us sort of saw this ever happening and now it has none of us can have an opinion because it’s the weirdest thing to us, but obviously we’re so chuffed that it’s turned out like this.” Currently enjoying continued chart success with Of The Night, the lead single from a deluxe double album release of their debut titled All This Bad Blood, the four lads were barely out of nappies when the ‘90s hits they mashed together – Corona’s The Rhythm Of The Night and Snap!’s Rhythm Is A Dancer – originally did the rounds. “I s’pose we were all pretty young when they came out and so it was one of those songs that you were never really sort of old enough to form an opinion about, it was just somethin’ that was on all the time… [The Rhythm Of The Night] was one of them songs that you’d hear somewhere and you’d be singin’ all the words going, ‘Why

do I know all the words?’ You just can’t explain it; it was just one of them. Basically Dan [Smith – frontman and songwriter] thought that they were the same song… In his mind growing up they just mashed together…

“We are so excited about that because obviously when you release an album, there’s a lot of songs that you’d love that don’t make the cut; there’s only so many songs that can go on the first release. We were happy with the release but it was just a shame, but now we’ve been given a chance to release it with all the songs that we’ve done so far and even a couple of new songs…” he says, expanding on the significance of the fresh tracks. “… It was sort of to give people a hint towards the different sounds we might be working with next. We’ve just started using guitar; on the first album, the first release, there was no guitar at all, so we’re using guitar now. One song’s really quite heavy and rocky but then the other song’s almost a bit garagey so yeah, it’s just to give people an idea of where things could go on the next album.” Considering the diversity of Bastille’s style and their position as one of 2013’s biggest success stories, once their touring commitments wind down in 2014 the writing for their second record really could take them anywhere.

“PEOPLE SEEMED TO REALLY LIKE IT AND THEN IT JUST KIND OF TOOK OFF.” And then we were like ‘Hey, what a great idea – let’s mash them together’… People seemed to really like it and then it just kind of took off,” Simmons notes. Renowned for their mixtapes and covers of other artists as diverse as Miley Cyrus, TLC and Cutting Crew, the deluxe edition also offers two previously unreleased tracks which hint at what the future may hold for Bastille.

“…The whole thing about us not picking one genre, it’s not like a conscious thing: ‘Oh, they’re tryin’ to be different’ – it’s just that we don’t feel the need to write in one style…” Simmons admits. “Each song might lend itself better to a different sound so that’s why we can go completely electro, or we can go bandy, we can go really hip hop or we can go into sort of stripped back acoustic-y stuff – and definitely on the next album I think we’re gonna try and stretch it even further and experiment with where we can go ‘cause I think that’s the fun really.”

WHAT: All This Bad Blood (EMI) WHEN & WHERE: 13 Jun, Brisbane Convention And Exhibition Centre


THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 17


music

FLYING HIGH Closing 2013 with a top 20 ARIA debut for their first long-player, States, and an American tour with one of Australia’s favourite Canadians, The Paper Kites are continuing the momentum with a new set and a national tour. Frontman Sam Bentley talks to Tyler McLoughlan.

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t’s feeling good!” exclaims The Paper Kites’ co-founder Sam Bentley of his band’s triumphs of late. “It was really good to get around the country and get to a bit of North America and just spread the word and play and get feedback… Prior to having a full-length album out, it all felt a bit like we were a band but not a grown-up band, whereas now we’ve got a full-length on the shelf it all feels a bit more real.”

Though prepared for the worst in terms of audience sizes when hitting the US for the first time late last year, a warm-up lap alongside Dallas Green made all the difference for the folk outfit. “We started off for the first few weeks from the south in Florida across to California supporting City & Colour, and that was really special – just massive venues, such a huge, professional tour, very eye-opening and a real privilege. I know I’m sounding cheesy now but it was a real privilege to be on a tour like that for a few weeks,” he chuckles. “We were obviously just the support band but

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everyone was very receptive over there and seemed to warm to us, and then we spent the next month or so doing our own headline tour. That was amazing as well. We kind of expected – and management all but told us – that we’d be playing to pretty much empty rooms every night. All the venues were 300-400 capacity and we were preparing ourselves… [We thought] if we can get 50 people along to a show, it won’t be embarrassing – that was our benchmark. But we actually ended up selling out almost every show, which was just amazing.” This was in no small part due to the effort spent translating their ethereallylayered debut album to fit the stage. “We had to work really hard on that. The rehearsals leading into the album release tour, early on it was kind of concerning… I remember fumbling through the first few songs and then we just stopped and started laughing; we’re about to go out on the road and we’re playing the Forum Theatre in Melbourne, The Hi-Fi in Brisbane and the Metro in Sydney and we sound horrendous! People would walk past our rehearsal room and go, ‘Oh that’s cute, a bunch of kids have started a band,’” Bentley laughs. “After doing 55 shows or whatever it was in the last few months of last year, we decided it was well and truly time to completely rip apart the set and reassemble it. It’s gonna be different in that we aren’t playing quite as many songs from the new album as we did on the album tour, and we’ve actually pulled out a lot of old songs… I can’t wait to get on the road.” WHEN & WHERE: 13 Jun, The Northern, Byron Bay; 14 Jun, The Hi-Fi

OPENING UP Emma Russack reflects on the growth and inspiration behind her new album and tells Tyler McLoughlan how vulnerability can be a positive.

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aving caught the attention of Spunk Records when her teenage covers of Neil Young and Joy Division made waves just as YouTube was becoming a platform for bedroom music-makers, Emma Russack is a long way from those days, yet the soulful, blues-tinged folk songstress is still suitably chuffed to be working with the label on her recent second album, You Changed Me.

“I’m glad it’s out there and it seems to be getting a rather positive response so far and that’s always good. And it’s just nice to have the continued support from Spunk. It feels great; I feel really excited – a lot of people don’t get that opportunity and I’m lucky enough to have it. I think the first record I bought as a teenager with my own money was a Spunk album. I think it was Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s I See A Darkness and Spunk put that out and at the time I was like, ‘Wow, Spunk must be really cool,’ and then I got signed to them when I was 22, so that’s pretty cool,” she admits with a laugh. Armed with an intensely personal new record written over two years of personal growth, Russack reflects on what the title has come to mean. “Well I’ve been thinking about that a lot lately and it really should be I Changed Me, but “ You changed me” was obviously a lyric in one of the songs [Woman]. I think I’ve undergone the biggest change of my life in the last 18 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

two years; I’ve become a much happier person, a much more upbeat kind of person. And also on a smaller scale, I started seeing someone a couple of years ago and he was a lot older than I was, but he completely changed my life for a while and he inspired the song that has the lyric “ You changed me”, so I guess it’s got two little parts to it. “I think I’m getting to know myself a lot better, and just having a better attitude towards life; I used to be very sensitive to criticism and now I’m a lot more content and just a lot more upbeat and fun to be around. I’ve never had so many friends in my life as I do now;

it’s great – I feel like I’m finally living a normal existence and that’s really, really good.” Embarking on her first truly national jaunt for this album, Russack admits she loves the idea of being vulnerable in a live setting while sharing such personally intimate stories. “I find it absolutely liberating – maybe it’s even a form of therapy. Some people hate it – some people can’t stand my music, which is fine, and some people love it and get a lot out of it. I can understand how it is polarising but that part of it doesn’t concern me one bit, absolutely not! I enjoy being exposed, I absolutely thrive off it.” WHAT: You Changed Me (Spunk) WHEN & WHERE: 18 Jun, Black Bear Lodge


THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 19


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SYMPOSIA OF SICKNESS With their latest album, death metal titans Carcass achieved the impossible: a credible and exciting comeback. Mark Hebblewhite asked guitarist Bill Steer how the legendary Scousers pulled it off.

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o many reunions, so many disappointments. We won’t name the culprits but it’s undeniable the metal landscape is littered with once great bands who reunited in a blaze of glory and then disappointed with sloppy shows and new material that besmirched their legacy. With Carcass, nothing could be further from the truth. Since reforming in 2007 their shows have been masterclasses in perfection and the new LP, Surgical Steel, is an absolute behemoth. In fact it could be described as the long-lost bridge between Necroticism... and Heartwork. The Music wondered whether this was

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by design – a belated step that should have been taken back in the early 1990s. “We can’t really be that calculated – it’s not that kind of group,” reveals Steer, nonchalantly adding that Carcass “just goes with what feels right… In hindsight though it does sit comfortably with the music we did in the band’s middle period. It’s hard to analyse why it happened that way although I was listening to a lot of the same types of music I did back then. Maybe that’s also why the album doesn’t sound very modern – except for the production, which is very contemporary”.

On the issue of influences Steer is at pains to note that Carcass has never been derivative. “Although we love bands like Obituary we were never part of the whole Morrisound thing, which to our minds got very boring very quickly when all the ‘clone’ bands came on the scene. A lot of them were very proficient players but their music didn’t have the impact on me that say the first two Death records had. As a band we actually didn’t listen to a lot of extreme metal – except when we were just starting out. We realised early that just listening to your contemporaries doesn’t help you innovate – instead we all gravitated towards music that excited us and gave us inspiration. As far as metal was concerned that was the older stuff – Death, Possessed and classic metal bands. We didn’t just sit around listening to Cannibal Corpse all day – which is what some people think. [laughs]” Steer and his bandmates seem genuinely humbled by the ecstatic reception Surgical Steel and the band’s reformation has had. In fact he sees their return to our shores as symbolic of their good fortune. “This will be our third visit to Australia. We played way back in 1993 and then as part of the reunion thing a couple of years ago. It’s the kind of place people from the UK would love to get to but can’t – so for us it’s always an amazing experience.” As for recording plans, Steer pleads, “We’re booked up touring for so long that we really can’t think past that right now. I think we have to wait until at least the end of winter. I will say though that among the three of us – Dan, Jeff and myself – we are very keen to write new material and push the whole thing forward. That said we’re in no rush to do it at the moment.” WHEN & WHERE: 13 Jun, The Hi-Fi

TOOTIN’ A NEW TUNE With his group undergoing a bit of a makeover last year, Steve Gavan of Twin Beasts, formerly The Toot Toot Toots, tells Jazmine O’Sullivan why they needed to change things up.

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n 2010 Melbourne-based quintet The Toot Toot Toots released their debut album Outlaws, which was well received across the nation and put the band on the map. Fast-forward to 2014, the band return with their sophomore album, Badlove – however, you’d be forgiven for not immediately realising it was the same group, as last year the group changed their name to Twin Beasts. “We were working with a new producer for the album [Badlove], Burke Reid [The Drones] from America, and he was working at putting a lot of things into place for us to eventually travel over there, and we were getting a lot of negative feedback to the name The Toot Toot Toots,” says bass player Steve Gavan. “We originally came up with the name as a joke when we first started and we were never that fond of it anyway, so we decided that maybe with this new album and new sound it would be a good idea for a change. “After going through probably about 200 suggestions of names, Twin Beasts was the one we all kind of landed on, essentially because our group is basically just five men just feeding off each other.” With the new name in place, the boys set to work reinventing some of their previous material in order to create a cohesive style. “We felt we just wanted to try and modernise our music a bit I guess,” Gavan offers. “[In the

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past] we were listening to a lot of older musicians and trying to replicate that a bit too much, so in the process of reinventing our work we still wanted to use those influences, but to kind of bring out more of a modern sound while doing so.” This fusion of old school storytelling with a modern twist is best realised on their album Badlove, a work which explores the many different facets of love the boys have experienced over the years: the good, the bad and the ugly. “We’re very proud of [the album]. We feel like we’ve worked a lot harder to get the result this time around and we’ve had help from

heaps of new people, so we feel like it’s a dramatic stepup. My personal favourite track is probably Wicked Boys, which is about a bunch of young guys who have done something wrong and taken off on the run together. A lot of our old stuff is based on stories like that, and that’s the kind of songwriting that I enjoy and relate to more.” With the group currently on the road for their national tour promoting the album, Gavan reveals they’re hoping to bring out even more new material. “We’re hoping to put out a small EP after the tour, and do it ourselves to try have a go at recording something just on our own. We’ve already started working on some new material, but it really all depends on whether we will be able to afford to do it.” WHAT: Badlove (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 12 Jun, The Loft, Gold Coast; 13 Jun, Solbar; 14 Jun, Beetle Bar


but still trying to be a jugband. [Producer] Peter Dawkins flew over from Sydney, came and saw the jugband play and offered us a deal – a dream come true! But we turned it down because we’d made the decision to form a rock band.”

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With Neeson on bass, John and Rick Brewster on rhythm and lead guitar respectively, and Charlie King on drums, The Keystone Angels started to learn how to play rock’n’roll. “They eventually had enough original material for us to come to Sydney,” manager John Woodruff remembers, “and I took them into EMI’s studio to do Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again … The Angels took a long, long time to break and radio took a long time to start playing the band. The first single to do anything meaningful was Take A Long Line [August 1978]. It was a long uphill fight. Part of why it took so long was down to getting some idea of ‘cool’, which none of us had.”

VALE BERNARD ‘DOC’ NEESON 1947-2014 With the recent passing of Doc Neeson, Michael Smith looks back at the career of The Angels’ frontman, drawing on interviews conducted with and about Neeson over the years.

“I

t suddenly became international in its own way,” Bernard “Doc” Neeson happily admitted in an episode of ABC TV’s Australian Story that aired in April this year. Neeson was referring to the crowd “response” to a question posed in the title of one of The Angels’, the band he fronted for three decades, most well known songs. With Neeson singing, “Am I ever gonna see your face again,” the crowd would respond with, “No way, get fucked, fuck off” – never lyrics in the song. “It now gets sung in pubs in England,” he continued. “In a way I’m really delighted to hear that because it’s Australian audiences making a song their own. And from the point of view of when the band first started, we were trying to write songs for Australian audiences; they’ve made it their own in a way I’d never have thought possible.” Neeson lost his 17-month battle with a recurring cancerous brain tumour 7.15am, Wednesday 4 Jun. Born in Northern Ireland’s capital, Belfast, 4 Jan, 1947, Neeson arrived with his parents, aged 13, in Adelaide in 1960. His original career choice was primary school teacher, and he was in his final year of study when he was conscripted. On finishing his two years’ service, he took advantage of a Federal Government retraining scheme, enrolling at Flinders University and gaining an honours degree in Drama. In 1971, at the suggestion of his flatmate John Woodruff, who was involved in their management, Neeson joined a band called the Moonshine Jug & String Band, which included brothers John and Rick Brewster.

“The Jugband recorded a song that I wrote called Keep On The Move,” Neeson recalled, “and, really, it was a rock song. We recorded it as a jugband but we got a couple of players in and we had a bit of a hit with it. It went to #4 in the charts in Adelaide. The jugband pulled lots and lots of people and it gave us a bit of a taste of success. We realised we could actually write a song, record it, put it out there and have a hit! “We tried to do it again, and it was getting silly. Instruments started creeping in like a proper bass drum, and a bass guitar instead of a tub bass. I got an electric guitar and suddenly there was an amp on stage and we were getting more and more like a rock band,

The iconic Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again, released in May 1976, only reached #58 in the charts at the time. Take A Long Line only managed #29. It was live in concert where The Angels won their spurs, and it was the character Neeson created out front that made the band. Touring their eponymous 1977 debut album, The Angels were still wearing their hair long and John Brewster was playing long harmonica solos, the songs betraying a forgettable countryrock element. Something had to change. “Probably where I drew on my drama more was in creating a ‘Doc’ persona,” Neeson explained, “and in that respect I drew a lot on stuff I’d studied in German Expressionism, and particularly German Expressionist cinema. One of the things about the Expressionists that I really got into was that they looked, in performing, on using a process of distorting the persona, the character, even the environment, to show the inner self, to define the inner soul, and I guess one of the things I got onto was we’ve all got a dark side which many of us try and stay away from.” By the time second album Face To Face was released in August 1978, the long hair was gone, as were the harmonica solos and Neeson was careening around the stage, arms outstretched, eyes bulging. The album sold more than 280,000 copies, peaking at #16. Their next, 1979’s No Exit, did even better. In March 1980, Face To Face was released in America. Over the next two decades, The Angels released ten more studio albums, including one #1, 1990’s Beyond Salvation, toured America, mounted record-breaking tours of Australia, became for a time the highest-paid band in the land, and were inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 1998. A horrific car accident the week before flying out to East Timor capital, Dili, to entertain the troops in December 1999, left him with severe whiplash and serious nerve damage to his neck and spine. He managed to get through the Dili gigs, gigs that he had organised, but over the next three years, he experienced extensive periods of pain, illness, hospital and rehabilitation, effectively spelling the end of his association with The Angels, though they reunited briefly in 2007. Neeson restarted his own career fronting, first, Doc Neeson’s Angels, then Red Phoenix and finally, in rehearsal at the time he was felled by the brain tumour, The Angels 100%. THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 21


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HIT LIST Tyler McLoughlan discovers that a more rock-oriented approach suits Mia Dyson’s spirited new record, as does her newfound awareness that being out of control is not such a bad thing.

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ia Dyson has always done things her own way with an admirable confidence that comes when one intimately understands the capability of her own voice and guitar. As she drops her fifth independently released album, the Torquay girl turned LA native describes how her sound has progressed on Idyllwild. “I’ve been kind of – fairly or unfairly, I’m not sure – put into the sort of bluesier category,” Dyson, a regular contender for the Best Blues & Roots Album ARIA, begins. “I think it’s definitely a part of my sound but it’s certainly not all of it, but [on] this record there was

definitely some of the influences from my ‘80s childhood – Elvis Costello, Talking Heads and bands like that, and more of a reckless rock‘n’roll sound that I really love but has not necessarily come into play for me before.” Starting off with the romping good times title track, written in celebration of Dyson’s recent nuptials, and progressing onto the warm familiarity of lead single When We’re Older, there’s a lot of joy to be found across Idyllwild; a greater range of musical experimentation too. “I think it’s a crab shoot!” Dyson exclaims of compiling a consistent tracklisting. “I was

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worried with this record – can all these songs sit together? But then I go and listen to some of my favourites, like Tom Waits’ Mule Variations, and he has these wild songs that are things being smashed together and sung through a PVC pipe, and then he has right next to it the most heartbreakingly sweet, aching ballad that has no sort of odd sounds – just pure piano and a slide guitar or whatever. And he’s got those songs right next to each other and I didn’t bat an eyelid at that. So I kind of just have to hope that it makes sense, that in some strange way the songs fall together because they were written in a certain period and they’ll hopefully fall together and be songs that can live together. “There seems to have been a theme that emerged with the record that I didn’t intend. It’s of either growing up or growth in general and looking towards old age as an idea of what it would be like to have experienced all of that life and have that life behind you instead of in front of you, and hoping for love to last, and hoping that you become more open-hearted rather than less.” Dyson admits to feeling a lot of resistance in the lead-up to its release, though she’s learnt a liberating lesson with Idyllwild. “When I sit down to write, I want to be able to create something; it’s so fulfilling, it feels so good to create that I want to force it – I want to have control over it happening. And it refuses to comply with that; the very nature of creativity is that I can’t make it happen, I can only be there and put in the time. I’m aware of it at least now, but I still have to remember it and learn it every day.” WHAT: Idyllwild (Independent/MGM)

ALMOST FAMOUS After meeting Michael White at Cannes Film Festival, director Gracie Otto had the idea for her first feature-length film: The Last Impresario. She talks to Hannah Story.

“O

bviously he probably let me start making the film because I was young and blonde,” 27-year-old director/actress Gracie Otto admits to The Music. She’s talking about her debut feature film, The Last Impresario, which premieres in Australia at the Sydney Film Festival this week. The film charts the life of acclaimed Scottish film producer Michael White, whose list of credits needs to be read to be believed – from the original British stage production of The Rocky Horror Show to Monty Python And The Holy Grail to Yoko Ono’s first London exhibition. By speaking to White and to his son, lovers, friends and admirers, people from Ono to John Cleese to Anna Wintour, The Last Impresario paints a picture of a man described as an “impresario”, a “playboy”, a “gambler”, and “the most famous person you’ve never heard of ”. Otto met White in Cannes in 2010: “He was kind of this enigma because he had all these exchanges with people and he’d keep on taking me out all night until five in the morning to these parties, but also he looked, like, 80 years old.” Otto says she saw him as a “high roller” and had no idea about his rich professional and personal history. Then after discovering that White was selling his huge collection of personal effects and memorabilia at Sotheby’s, Otto knew there was a story here. To make 22 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

the film she travelled between Europe, America and Australia to interview White and his friends, initially as a one-woman crew. Then she gathered archival footage and was given access to White’s personal collection including hundreds of candid photographs of White with his famous friends, as taken by White himself. Last July Otto showed White an unfinished cut of the film. “I wanted to make sure that he liked the film. Even though there’s good things in it and bad things, at the end of the day I would hate to have made a film that he hated or didn’t want anything to do with after all this time.

LEONARDO DICAPRIO AND KATE MOSS. PIC: MICHAEL WHITE

It was always intended to be a positive film about him, not ripping him to shreds… All he really cared about was that he didn’t want a shot of him with walking sticks, because he was saying to me on the phone, ‘I feel pathetic with these walking sticks’… They’re still in there because I said to him, ‘You’ve got walking sticks, they have to stay, you can’t cut them out.’” Beyond the thrill of finding herself face to face with the likes of Jack Nicholson, who declined to be interviewed, and Kate Moss, Otto says she learned a lot from the film, and from White as a person. “I think I learnt a lot from Michael mainly and his story because he’s such an inspiration. All the health challenges and everything, y’know, he was really on his last legs. A couple of months ago I was in the hospital with him in LA, he got sick again, and now he’s in a wheelchair, and he still bounced back. He still doesn’t give up on life.” WHAT: The Last Impresario In cinemas 26 Jun


BEST CONSUMED LIVE An enduring presence in Australia’s musical landscape, My Friend The Chocolate Cake celebrate their 25th anniversary with a live-performance career retrospective collection. Cellist Helen Mountfort shares her highlights with Tyler McLoughlan.

O

ne can hear the joy in Helen Mountfort’s voice as she describes the underlying ethos of My Friend The Chocolate Cake, a band she co-founded with fellow Not Drowning, Waving collaborator David Bridie. “We’ve had so much fun over the years! When David and I put Chocolate Cake together right in the early days, a very important part was who we chose [to play with] – he and I started working on these songs and then

every week we added another friend to the band ‘til the room was full. So they all had to be people we really liked because we’d played in bands before that hadn’t been formed like that, and that makes it tricky… We’re very proud of the fact that we’ve never had a My Friend The Chocolate Cake band meeting and we’re never going to,” she chuckles. Amassing a large international collection of performance recordings over the years, Mountfort recently sat down to trawl through them. The result is Best (Cake) In Show. “As you collect lots of albums and you’re an old band, people don’t

necessarily want to buy five albums, so we curated Parade (in 2004) as a kind of ‘best of ’ that we were very happy with – we really liked that album – but there were lots of songs that we couldn’t put on it. We always thought we’d do a Parade #2 at some point, and then we started listening to a whole lot of live stuff we’ve done over the years and thought, ‘Why don’t we do it as a live record?’ Then it’s a celebration of two things: it’s a celebration of all the great songs we’ve had over the years that didn’t make it onto the Parade compilation, but also a celebration of Cake live. A lot of the versions of songs that are on this new record we actually like much better than the recorded version because of course once you’ve been playing something for four or five years it sounds so much better than when you recorded it all those years ago. We’ve been really blessed to have some amazing live mixes over the years, so we were blown away.”

music

They’ve won ARIAs and soundtracked countless film and television projects over their career, but their connection to an audience they’ve celebrated life’s large and small moments alongside remains among Mountfort’s highlights of the My Friend The Chocolate Cake experience. “We always come out after the show to talk to people and you meet people who are not only coming saying, ‘I’ve been coming to see you for the last twenty years,’ but they bring their kids as well. One thing that’s great about Chocolate Cake is that it is music that parents and kids can agree they both like… A lot of kids grew up listening to Chocolate Cake and now they’re in their twenties and going to shows. We get quite a lot of cute family groups, which is really nice.” WHAT: Best (Cake) In Show (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 14 Jun, New Globe Theatre

BACK ON TRACK

music

Hard living nearly landed Graveyard Train in one of the cemeteries that they’re so fond of singing about, but as Nick Finch tells Steve Bell, distance and a newfound maturity knocked any conflict on the head.

J

ust a couple of years ago Melbourne chain-wielding horror merchants Graveyard Train seemed to have the world at their feet, with their warmly received third album Hollow ushering in a bout of touring that saw them playing relentlessly both home and abroad – a workload which nearly tore the band completely asunder. “It was weird, we managed to keep it together whenever we were onstage – whenever we’re playing we always put 100 per cent in – but in all that time offstage we were just drinking too much and bickering,” reflects frontman Nick Finch. “When we started the band none of us really expected to be working hard – it was always just a weird side-project – so it took us all by surprise when it became a heavy touring schedule, and I guess we just lost our shit a bit. But it’s okay now – we had a year off and everyone seems a bit more chilled and a bit happier. “The music was always fine. We were always a bunch of drunks anyway, but there was some really heavy drinking with guys going on benders and missing gigs. People were paying good money to come and see us, and a band member wouldn’t be onstage because we didn’t know where the fuck he was – just stuff like that. It’s sort of like a weird, awful Contiki tour being on tour – there’s too much booze and too much free time, and none of us have the skill set to deal with it and stay sober.”

Fortunately after a year apart all was forgiven by the time they regrouped to record new collection Takes One To Know One. “This one was really fun – we were all really sober, and we got along really well,” Finch recalls. “It was a really positive experience. Hollow was done in a proper studio and was a bit slicker than I was used to – with this one we wanted to make it more organic, so we recorded in this old warehouse in Melbourne with vintage gear and it’s all a bit more lo-fi. We’d all been writing in the year off so it’s basically just a bunch of songs – just some stuff we recorded. I think we might have possibly even matured a little bit.”

There’s certainly less lyrical reliance on things that go bump in the night. “There’s only so many fucking monsters you can write about,” Finch laughs. “Hollow went on this real ‘death bent’ – my songs were all pretty death-related – but for this one we’re a bit looser. It’s all still pretty dark lyrically, but there’s definitely less overt horror. You have to develop as a band or you’d go insane – and we were going insane anyway. I don’t think we’re ever going to sing nice songs about love and things like that, but maybe less with the vampires and oogedy-boogedy.”

WHAT: Takes One To Know One (Black Hat Rackets/MGM) WHEN & WHERE: 11 Jun, The Northern, Byron Bay; 12 Jun, Solbar, Maroochydore; 13 Jun, The Zoo THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 23


ALBUM OF THE WEEK

★★★★

album reviews

THE ORWELLS

KASABIAN

Warner

Sony

Chicagoan five-piece The Orwells are barely out of high school but are already onto their second album of ragged doowop garage-rock, and from the opening bars of bouncy opener, Southern Comfort, it’s clear that they’ve progressed far beyond the snotty punk of 2012 debut, Remember When. Frontman Mario Cuomo’s louche vocal delivery retains some grit, while the songs conjure the same restrained menace as Murder City Devils married with the ramshackle catchiness of Black Lips (and even The Strokes in parts).

Kasabian’s 2009 endeavour West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum took the concept album route and nailed it. By contrast, 2011’s Velociraptor! was too many ideas with no direction. So here we are, album five, and 48:13 is somewhere in the middle. It’s not quite thematically cohesive, but neither is it as choppy as the preceding record. When 48:13 hits its stride, it is truly fantastic rock music: the anthemic, shout it at the top of your lungs, slow motion bodies jumping in a crowd type of rock music that is being consistently watered down on radio right now by the dreary likes of Coldplay.

Disgraceland

Whether brash and up-tempo (the contagious Dirty Sheets, nagging highlight, Let It Burn, or the politically infused Who Needs You) or sedate and cruisy (the chugging sway of Bathroom Tile Blues, slowburning death lament, Blood Bubbles) understated guitar lines abound, hooks are abundant and catchy melodies effortless. Despite using a trio of producers (relatively big indie names Dave

48:13

Sitek, Chris Coady and Jim Abbiss) it sounds cohesive, far more polished than in the past but never super-slick. The lyrics are all pretty juvenile (in the best rock’n’roll tradition of lust, drugs and violence plus swathes of selfdisgust and suburban alienation) but this quest for teenage kicks is perfectly legitimate given their actual youth. The Orwells may not have captured the ferocity of their live show on this occasion but they still possess the swagger of true rock’n’roll believers and this conviction is infectious. Not the direction some early fans were hoping for but a cool album in its own right. Steve Bell

TIËSTO

Teaming up with a host of guests from vocalists Icona Pop and Ladyhawke to producers like Hardwell, few of the 18 tracks on the deluxe version of A Town Called Paradise are designed for 24 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

48:13 isn’t the start of a musical revolution the way Kasabian dream it to be, but it’s still going to make you want to move. Sevana Ohandjanian

Utopia Forthwrite/EMI

Universal

He runs his own radio channel (take that Bob Dylan), his own headphone brand and watch brand (take that Dr Dre), is in the middle of two Las Vegas residencies (take that Celine Dion) and is one of the biggest drawcards at festivals and nightclubs the world over. It’s little surprise, therefore that the refrain on one of the biggest tracks on A Town Called Paradise is, “Leaving footprints all over the world” (Footprints).

Keats, you’ve taken a wrong turn, and it’s a cold-hearted soul who doesn’t join in on the bridge of “Gonna keep you up all night”. It’s all about melody here, be it via the insistent pulse of guitar on Stevie – lyrical content eerily reminiscent of New Order’s 1963 – or the spaghetti western synth lines on Doomsday. Bow, meanwhile, is Serge Pizzorno’s finest hour, with little electronic twinges and simple bass keeping him company as he crows, “Take a bow and say goodbye”.

360

A Town Called Paradise A quick scroll of Tiësto’s resume would suggest that, despite his ascendency to the pinnacle of the dance genre and his general superstardom, the Dutch producer is still one of the hardest working guys going round.

The band have stripped back the excess for a happy balance between ballads and fist-pumping adrenaline. Tom Meighan is loaded with braggadocio on Bumblebee, and lead single Eez-Eh is pure dance rock amusement. The lyrics are mostly nonsensical, but if you’re coming to Kasabian’s music looking for

★★★

★★★½ the club; instead, anthems like Light Years Away are built for stadiums full of euphoric ravers. Singalong choruses like the title track’s “Let us wash away into a neon sea of light” are pop-tastic in their simplicity, but unexpected drops like that in Echoes blow away any notion that Tiësto has traded his credibility for the big bucks. A Town Called Paradise is probably not going to silence those who see house music as anything but fuel for pill-popping teens, but it is an expertly-produced dance record filled with three-to-fiveminute tracks begging to be remixed and rained down upon dancefloors the world over. Dylan Stewart

It’s difficult to divorce a 360 release from its creator. Each record is an opportunity to answer the question: how is this guy the biggest rapper to come out of this country’s rap scene? It’s like trying to crack a code. So let’s start at the start. Our host’s biggest assets as a rapper are those he shows off in his a cappella battles: his sense of humour and his boundless charisma. There’s a reason he gets millions of YouTube views. Strangely, he rarely deploys either of these traits on this record. Here, he prefers a slightly clumsy treatise on religion with It’s All About To End. Or, alternatively, By All Means, a candid and gripping dive into 360’s recovery from drug addiction. Even as he throws “ninja stars in a titty bar” on Sixavelli, the fun is not in the jokes, but in guessing how long Six can ride the same rhyme scheme. Eddie Jones, a woozy, swinging, swaggering brag track, is the record’s highlight.

★★★ Uncle Six’s flow has developed since his early days but he still rides a similar bar structure for the entire album. Over 17 tracks on the deluxe edition, it’s a little exhausting. So why (ignoring the Iggy Azalea-shaped elephant in the room) is 360 comfortably the most successful rapper we have? Perhaps the secret is we don’t know. The mystery remains unsolved. So we have to listen to some more of his music to find out. James d’Apice


albums/singles/eps

★★★★

★★★½

★★★½

TAPE/OFF

THE FELICE BROTHERS

FREAK WAVE

Hey Biscay

Sonic Masala

Spunk

Poison City

Swashbuckling Hobo

Brisbane four-piece Tape/Off have finally dropped their debut long-player after years of EPs and singles, and Chipper proves the wait’s been worthwhile. They’re still in thrall to ‘90s underground bands like Pavement, Sandpit and Archers Of Loaf but their palette has expanded to include different elements, such as tints of shoegaze, to great effect. They veer from majestic to discordant with ease – sometimes within the parameter of a single song – while the production is dry yet serves their ramshackle aesthetic perfectly, with beautiful mid-fi flourishes abounding. A great introduction.

The Felice Brothers’ new album further distances them from the pastoral folk label they sought to escape on previous album Celebration, Florida. Favorite Waitress finds the band in the middle of the urban sprawl, as they stumble through city streets, past empty cafes and lonely liquor stores. A large storytelling element left with the departure of Simone a few albums ago, but Saturday Night and Chinatown showcase Ian’s rambling brand of songwriting. The band explores meandering song structures, as melodies seldom wander through the same bar doors twice. The result is an unassuming addition to Americana.

Melbourne’s Freak Wave are not afraid to wear their ‘90s guitarrock influences bloodily pinned to their sleeve. Debut album Don’t Let Me Down begins with The Sleepers Must Awaken (an Archers Of Loaf title if there ever was one) and Tyre Kicker (a Dinosaur Jr squall that bleeds out into an impassioned roll). Adrian Lombardi’s ardent vocals do push the emotional envelope at times, such as on A Period of Juvenile Prosperity, but when the rock locks in like on Threat? What Threat? the urgency is warranted.

HAPPY TIMES More submarine-themed, denim-inspired garage-rock from Brisbane’s Happy Times with three new tracks on vinyl from local label Swashbuckling Hobo, who are cranking out 7-inches. Full marks for Croatian Drunk.

SPARTAK

Five Points Feral Media New EP by group split between Canberra and Sydney sees clanking beats cut up with the tricky production guiding the songwriting and the vocals holding it together.

KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD

Chipper

Favorite Waitress

Steve Bell

Don’t Let Me Down

Brendan Telford

Roshan Clerke

How Wax

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/album

Flightless/Remote Control Despite these guys not taking themselves at all seriously, plenty of folks are with NME premiering this new single. A ‘60s garage oddity filtered through a completely modern crispy production.

MKO

Daffodils Independent In this deeply touching tribute to her late father, Brisbane’s MKO takes a glitchy beat and merges it with some daisy age production touches and drenches it in rich layers of R&B vocals. Fantastic stuff.

CHARMING LIARS We Won’t Give Up Haulix The sound of the Sunset Strip never left, in fact, most of the Charming Liars left their homeland of England to have a crack at the hard rock sound, even enlisting recording royalty Bob Rock to help out on this debut EP. Chris Yates

★★★

★★★

MIND OVER MATTER

SCOTT SPARK

Permanent/Shock

MGM

Straight Arrows – Rising

We’ve had eight years to get to know Mind Over Matter. It’s surprising, then, that so little progress has been made. While contemporaries Horrorshow and Spit Syndicate have looked outside themselves for inspiration, our hosts have turned inward. They’ve found a formula and perfected it. The result is far from unpleasant: tight beats, consistent rhyme schemes, and accessible, melodic hooks. Real Life and What They Say are cases in point. Refining the same structure for three albums means this record is crisp and professional, but it also means that it can be a little exhausting.

Muscle Memory is Sydney-viaBrisbane singer-songwriter Scott’s Spark’s second record, after 2010’s Fail Like You Mean It, and it’s familiar cleverly earnest piano-pop music. Recorded way back in 2012, it’s obvious why it’s been such a long time coming: the production is beautiful, the songwriting dense and the orchestration intricate and thoughtful. The stories are endlessly relatable and told with clarity and confidence in Spark’s sweet and likeable voice. It’s not the edgiest record in the world; you could probably happily give it to your mum for Christmas, but accessibility in pop music is never a bad thing.

Bob Mould – Beauty And Pain

This Way To Elsewhere

James d’Apice

Muscle Memory

Say Anything – Hebrews Lower – Seek Warmer Climes Mia Dyson – Idyllwild Alexis Taylor – Await Barbarians Tom Vek – Luck Klaxons – Love Frequency

Madeleine Laing THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 25


live reviews

SCHOOLBOY Q, ISAIAH RASHAD The Hi-Fi 7 Jun It’s good to see the majority of punters from this sold out show have turned up to catch opening act Isaiah Rashad, as the man from Tennessee delivers a fierce and engaging performance from the moment he opens proceedings with Ronnie Drake. He says it perfectly in one of his standout tracks Soliloquy when he states, “I ain’t your every day normal brother,” as tonight, he is definitely much more than that – he’s got the bold, swag-laden energy to get this young crowd hyped when he needs to, which is balanced with a degree of humility

body. Like Rashad before him, Schoolboy is incredibly good at working the crowd and utilising the stage. He ventures to talk to the audience a little more; at one stage asking all the ladies to shout out, then asking all the ladies who came with their boyfriends to shout out, before finally asking, “What the fuck did you bring your boyfriend to my show for?!” Tonight is all about his latest album Oxymoron, and as such almost all tracks are featured. While most of this crowd are probably too hyped up to notice, the set is masterfully balanced – we get some slower moments where the beats really shine and become transporting, as heard in the likes of Prescription/Oxymoron, countered with tracks that are more in the moment and energetic, such as Collard Greens, Man Of The Year

SCHOOLBOY Q @ THE HI-FI. PIC: MARKUS RAVIK

and a complete generosity of spirit. Rashad has a remarkable ability to make everyone in the room feel like a part of the show, resulting in dancing and hands being thrown in the air on command. At one stage he even asks for the lights to be directed on the audience so he can take a look at his fans. Shot You Down is another highlight of the night, as well as an incredibly well received rendition of RIP Kevin Miller. In a move which could be argued to be almost antigangster, Schoolboy Q takes the stage pretty much on time, which is surprising, but also impressive and appreciated. You can tell this guy means business because the bass level is immediately cranked right up – the frequency is so loud and low that it feels like a tremendous thunder pulsing through your 26 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

support gig of 2014. It’s fair to say they’ve paid their dues by now though, and as bassist Lucas Moore utters a quick “good evening”, the band launches straight into Guns ‘N’ Moses. Whether it’s a case of more regular band practices or the confidence of playing bigger stages, the band are at their cohesive best tonight, with Geordie Stafford and John Mercer’s dual-vocal delivery sounding particularly potent. The band manage to fit a decent number of songs into their short set tonight, including Birth, School, Amity Affliction, Death; A New Hope In The Age Of Couches (Tilt Ya Head Fuckwit); and set closer Van Damme Them All To Hell. Adelaide four-piece Crisis Alert play a frenetic blend of hardcore and thrash that harks back to the

PROPAGHANDI @ THE HI-FI. PIC: TERRY SOO

and Fuck LA which have every person in the crowd bouncing and rapping along. Once the set finally wraps up, Schoolboy returns for an incredibly brief encore before calling it a night. By the end of it, there is probably more THC in the air than oxygen, with Schoolboy himself doing his bit throughout the night to contribute, and not many are complaining. Jazmine O’Sullivan

PROPAGANDHI, CRISIS ALERT, DICK NASTY The Hi-Fi 8 Jun After a couple of years of inactivity, Brisbane punk stalwarts Dick Nasty have snared their third high profile

‘80s DC scene. Frontman Matt Horvath is particularly energetic, shouting his lyrics with a venomous fury and jumping around the stage and swinging the microphone in between. Highlights include Urban Decay, Thought Control and a cover of Bad Brains’ Attitude, and although at times it’s difficult to ascertain where one song finishes and another begins, their energy and fervour is undeniable. Propagandhi waste no time with formalities, launching straight into a frenzied rendition of Dear Coaches Corner from 2009’s Supporting Caste, before singer/guitarist Chris Hannah greets the crowd with, “What the fuck’s up, Brisbane?” before bassist Todd Kowalski takes over vocal duties for Fuck The Border. Hannah then launches into a diatribe about the Queen’s Birthday public holiday,

thanking the crowd for choosing to come and “puke on the dance floor” at The Hi-Fi tonight instead of somewhere else, before the band rips into A Speculative Fiction. Next up it’s Note To Self, the opening salvo from the band’s most recent album, Failed States – which Hannah says is about “getting older and making sure you don’t become a miserable shit” – followed by that album’s eponymous track, which is even more frenetic live than its studio counterpart. Hannah stays fairly stationary throughout tonight’s show, with the exception of his left leg, which taps uncontrollably, and fellow guitarist David “Beaver” Guillas is similarly restrained, but Kowalski’s livewire energy is a sight to behold. Jord Samolesky’s frenzied drumming holds it all together and the

KRISTEN HERSH @ BLACK BEAR LODGE. PIC: STEPHEN BOOTH

band has never sounded so tight. Newer songs such as Lotus Gait and Cognitive Suicide get a decent response, but the real fervour is reserved for older tracks such as And We Thought That Nation States Were A Bad Idea; Today’s Empires, Tomorrow’s Ashes; and Fuck Religion. After closing their set proper with a blistering delivery of Duplicate Keys Icaro, the band return for a three-song encore consisting of Back To The Motor League; Stick The Fucking Flag Up Your Goddam Ass, You Sonofabitch; and Anti-Manifesto. At one point this evening, Hannah thanks the crowd and says, “After all these years, some of you still come out.” If the band continues to deliver performances like tonight’s show, the punters are sure to keep coming. Daniel Johnson


live reviews

KRISTIN HERSH, O’ LITTLE SISTER

boyfriend (for some reason) who’s just like Tintin. The intimate Kentucky Star shines brightly, and a short but entertaining set concludes with an acoustic deconstruction of Miley Cyrus’s Wrecking Ball.

8 Jun

After a brief sojourn former Throwing Muses mainstay Kristin Hersh rushes on stage and takes a seat – also clutching an acoustic – and kicks off with Your Dirty Answer, the diminutive singer’s voice so expressive as if she’s witnessed far more than one lifetime would allow. This is the Words & Music tour, so following the sparse and harrowing Sno Cat she picks up a copy of her memoirs and offers, “This is based on my teenage diary. I’m so sorry,” before reciting a funny and self-effacing passage in her absolutely gorgeous spoken voice. This is how the night proceeds from hereon in; a couple of songs – mainly from Hersh’s

Black Bear Lodge The usual narrow channel of Black Bear Lodge has been filled with chairs tonight and transformed into an intimate theatre environment, and most of the sitting room is accounted for by the time O’ Little Sister – the musical nom de plume of Brisbane songstress Lucinda Johnson – takes the stage armed with just an acoustic guitar and begins to regale the crowd with breathy tales of affairs of the heart. Her quiet fingerpicking leaves plenty of space for her voice to show its impressive range, but it’s the lyrics which drive most of these relationship narratives, covering subjects such as feeling safe in a loved one’s arms and wanting a

long-spanning solo career, plus tracks from Throwing Muses’ epic 2013 return Purgatory/Paradise – and then a reading of prose, often material released with the song she’s about to unveil. Hersh proves to be a wonderful guitarist, coaxing strange textures and tones to accompany the surreal worldview that emanates from her lyrics. Songs like the ominous Slippershell and the downcast Poor Wayfaring Stranger work perfectly in this stripped-back environment, allowing her voice to come to the fore in all its ragged glory, while Detox proves malleable amidst its meandering and Static is upbeat and abrasive. The spoken interludes provide a fascinating insight into Hersh’s mindset and also make proceedings feel impossibly intimate, but it’s the gorgeous songs like the impossibly moving Your Ghost which dominate proceedings and affect both physically and cerebrally.

Mississippi Kite has an REM-esque feel, Flooding is confused and aching and the set concludes with Krait, a soaring and acerbic number rife with mordant imagery. The obligatory encore starts with the urgent discord of Sunray Venus and ends all too abruptly with early Muses track Your Cage and it’s over – two guitars, two voices and one brilliant night of music. Steve Bell

MORE REVIEWS themusic.com.au/reviews/live

arts reviews carries gravity, soon his every grisly demise comes with a brutal cut, and little reverence; each reset not beginning the narrative over, but continuing it apace.

EDGE OF TOMORROW

EDGE OF TOMORROW Film

In cinemas Ever wanted to watch Tom Cruise die? Then Edge Of Tomorrow is your film. Doug Liman’s exoskeletal explosion-movie has a simple, wildly-entertaining premise: Cruise is humancollateral in an unwinnable war against invading aliens, who gets stuck in a time-loop. Every time he dies, the day restarts anew. It’s less Groundhog Day,

more video-game conceit turned narrative hook, Cruise using each ‘life’ to train up, advance further, inch towards the end game. His lives are limitless, but, in a neat narrative wrinkle, only if he dies every day. Which means, as viewer, you see ol’ couch-jumper killed again and again. In often – intentionally! – hilarious fashion. The first time Cruise dies – face melting in an explosion like a Lost Ark Nazi – it’s shocking to see the ageless King of Dianetics the Summer Blockbuster dispatched so swiftly, with so little dignity. But after the first death is dramatic, and his ‘reawakening’

Liman, to his credit, knows that ‘downtime’ is inertia to the blockbuster, and keeps the pace rattling. Edge Of Tomorrow begins with opening credits that condense a whole saga’s exposition into the space of a pop song, and its endless hard edits can compress entire arcs into the blink of an eye. In a few key, clever moments, the smartlypenned script leaps ahead, with Cruise going through something he’s evidently experienced before, but the audience hasn’t. In these moments, our hero seems all-seeing oracle, a mystic who knows everything that’s about to happen (which is, surely, how TC sees himself IRL). But, mostly, he’s the butt of jokes; endless micro-scenes ending with an exasperated Emily Blunt executing Cruise with a roll of her eyes. In an unexpected piece of genuine gender-inversion from the Hollywood Industrial Complex, Blunt is the traditional actionstar of the piece – the perfectly-

sculpted, muscle-rippled killingmachine given a hero’s entrance, a flair for automatic weapons and an ability to effortlessly escape capture. Cruise, on the other hand, is in his element as a smarmy military-PR shill, an ex-ad-exec weasel whose sweet ride ends when he’s stripped of his rank and anonymously dumped in a Full Metal Jacket bootcamp presided over by a sneering Bill Paxton. Over the course of several hundred lives, Cruise, of course, morphs from cowardly neophyte to world-saving super-hero. But that journey – and the climax – has no heavy-handed moments of drama, just endless sleight-of-hand edits. This playful approach is what separates Edge Of Tomorrow from the endless ranks of superhero brand-builders. It’s not without its grandeur – an early ‘frontlines of the war’ beach-landing is reminiscent of both Saving Private Ryan and Gravity, with a money shot of soldiers swinging from droplines attached to a burning helicopter caught in a death spiral – but the smart-arse tone makes it feel more like a caper-comedy. Anthony Carew THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 27


28 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014


the guide

Member/roles: Sneven (guitar/vocals) and Dylan (drums) How long have you been together? Three years of radness with less than half of that put to any good musical use. How did you all meet? Sneven: I was in a band with a guy that Dylan went to TAFE with and we met that way. I think we bonded drunkenly over Tool or something, then I told him about Isis and now here we are BFFs. You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? Probably some classic Neil Young or some Melvins, because if it’s not one of them, one of us will just play some experimental wanker garbage that the other will most likely jump out the window into some kind of salmon farm over. Would you rather be a busted broke-but-revered Hank Williams figure or some kind of Metallica monster? Dylan: We are already busted and broke, but revered sounds lovely. Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? Not From There – that self-titled EP and that Sand On Seven album were life changers.

BARGE WITH AN ANTENNA ON IT

What part do you think Brisbane plays in the music you make? Brisbane is an amazing place for music with great diversity, we go out almost every week to catch local Brisbane bands and we always come back inspired from what we see. Is your band responsible for more make-outs or break-ups? Why? Who doesn’t make out at a Barge show? Now that’s the real question. We’re sure many children have also been conceived just due to someone opening up our Soundcloud page on their web browser. What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? More shows, more songs, a split-LP on Sonic Masala and also an album in the near future. Barge With An Antenna On It play Sonic Masala Festival at Greenslopes Bowls Club on Saturday 21 June.

Pic: Terry Soo THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 29


eat/drink

CHOCK FULL O’ HOT CHOC Everyone’s favourite liquefied brown confectionery. Some options if you want to stray from the traditional. Illustration Brendon Wellwood.

MEXICAN CINNAMON HOT CHOCOLATE M ME

they pronounce “mee-loh”) sweetened with evaporated or condensed milk. A simple but genius combination. Low GI, high in sugar... so it evens out?

Sem Semi-sweet chocolate, cinnamon, sugar, vanilla with hot water, milk or cream. Add a van pinch of chilli powder for the chilli version, pin for those who like their hot chocolate to than one kind of hot. Best served be more m on a two-thirds-full stomach alongside churros or pan dulce (sweet pastries). chu

ITALIAN HOT CHOCOLATE Or cioccolata calda. It’s much thicker than the milky, watery stuff we’re used to. It does use milk, cocoa powder and sugar, but the secret’s in the extra ingredient – a little bit of potato starch or corn starch to make that rich texture.

FLAVOURED HOT CHOCOLATE FLA Ap Apparently just plain chocolate isn’t exciting enough for some people. Flavoured syrup eno suggestions: caramel for sweet tooths, hazelnut sug for those who want a ‘more mature’ hot chocolate, mint for those who don’t mind cho when they accidentally swallow mouthwash. whe

WHITE HOT CHOCOLATE One for the FREAKS. Just kidding. More like one for those who don’t appreciate REAL chocolate. Heat up some milk on the stove and melt grated white chocolate in it. Drink it while thinking about how you can look in the mirror every day and think you’re an alright person.

HOT MILO HO Th Malaysian/Indonesian version The hot chocolate is just Milo (which of h

COLA 36-48mg 375mL cup GREEN TEA 30-50mg 250mL cup

MILK CHOCOLATE 20mg 100g bar

CAFE COFFEE 113-282mg 250mL cup

INSTANT COFFEE 60-80mg 250mL cup

ENERGY DRINK 80mg 250mL can

HOW MUCH CAFFEINE? Source: australianbeverages.org

BLACK TEA 25-110mg 250mL cup ESPRESSO/SHORT BLACK 107mg (25-214mg) 1 shot

ICED COFFEE 30-200mg 500mL bottle

30 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014


eat/drink DRINK UP

Answered by: Chris Fairon

vintage with street art and local art pieces.

What’s your bar’s specialty drink? Craft beers, unique cocktails, boutique wines.

Who is pouring at your bar and what makes them special? Barney – mixologist wizard; Kitty – will make you laugh and smile; Kellie – friendly and passionate for the drinks and music.

What drink turns you off? Decaf coffee. What makes your bar different? Combination of local/national live music, obscure entertainment, crazy decor with a homely feel.

THE BEARDED LADY

Best hangover cure? Double drop Berocca, coffee, orange juice and fried food of some description. Or a caesar.

Who will I meet at your bar? All types of people from all walks of life. 138 Boundary St, West End thebeardedlady.com.au

What’s the design/ atmosphere of your bar? Homely Queenslander

BREAD & MEAT CO – SHOP 15, TCB, 315 BRUNSWICK ST, FORTITUDE VALLEY

What’s your most popular item? The Original Acai Bowl: a smooth, frozen blend of acai, banana, strawberries and a dash of apple juice. It’s topped off with crunchy granola, fresh fruits and chia seeds.

A chain, yeah, but they serve their indulgent hot chocs of many kinds in cute, convenient mugs called ‘hug mugs’. Come on.

Why are you better than Maccas? We use a whole range of nourishing ingredients. We complement our organic and fair-trade acai with fresh fruits, premium juices and top of the line superfoods and supplements. Each item on our menu is dairy-free, sugar-free, with the option of glutenfree. All our packaging is biodegradable and recycled. We aim to

Okay, another chain but you can’t go past their Spanish hot chocolate with a side of churros. John Mills Himself – Brisbane These guys are famous for their hot chocolate, made with real chocolate and optional, rotating flavours like rose, peanut, chai, basil, sesame, lavendar and pepita.

Pic by Ren Scurville

From the same people as JMH. You can choose what ratio of dark chocolate to milk chocolate you want in your hot choc! Plus they have rotating hot choc special flavours like lime & sea salt and jaffa.

KISS THE BERRY Answered by: Sarah Miller and Keziah Bossley

Max Brenner

This trend of naming establishments after the exact products they provide ain’t bad. Bread & Meat Co’s menu consists of three sandwiches, three salads and three sides. At the moment sandwich-wise: BBQ pulled pork, corned beef, beef brisket dip (36 hour-roasted (!), jus on the side for dipping). Salads: chicken caesar, fattoush, strawberry. Sides: chilli cheese fries, Canadian poutine, sweet potato parm fries. The bread and sauces/dressings are made in-house and the chips are all cooked to order. Plus, they have rotating specials and deliver in the CBD/Valley! Your gourmet sandwich prayers have been answered.

TAKE ME AWAY

kisstheberry.com

Where to get ‘em.

San Churro

HOT SPOT

Shop 1, 99 Creek St, Brisbane

HOT CHOC STOP

encourage customers to treat their body as best as they can.

includes acai, banana, raw almond butter, cacao, raspberries and more.

What would you suggest on your menu? We always recommend the Original Bowl, so that they can experience the full flavour of acai. However, our personal fave is our Snickers Delight bowl, which

What is an ingredient you couldn’t live without? Acai, obviously. Acai is a purple berry that originated in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil. It fills your body full of essential antioxidants, fatty acids, minerals and vitamins.

Bunker – Milton

THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 31


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

INDIE NEWS

RIP DOC NEESON

The Oz rock scene is reeling at the loss of The Angels’ iconic frontman Doc Neeson who passed away last week following a long battle with brain cancer. RIP.

CHEERS LUKE Sad news in sport too with 28yo Queensland Bulls’ batsman Luke Pomersbach retiring from cricket to concentrate on his ongoing battle with depression. So long mate, and thanks for all the sixes…

BALI BOGANS We can’t work out who’s worse – the freaks featured on TV rubbish What Really Happens In Bali or the fools who watch and allow the dross to flourish.

JUNGLE FEVER

RECOGNISED RISE

DOUBLE HEADER DOUBLED

A high-octane night just reached new levels with Apes announced as the east coast support for Band Of Skulls forthcoming dates. The Melbourne quartet help out our Southampton visitors when they play 21 Jun, The Hi-Fi.

Continuing with their steady rise, Byron quartet The Familiars are jumping in the tour van to share their new single with the east coast. They launch Stranger Faces 26 Jun, Black Bear Lodge with Jakarta Criers and Waax.

The co-headline tour featuring The Used and Taking Back Sunday just started bulging, with raucous Sydney duo Corpus, pictured, set to open the evening at Eatons Hill Hotel, 22 Aug. Tickets for the all ages show are on sale now.

DARK & DIRTY

DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER

SKY IS FALLING

Midnight Son & The Crime Scene have no issue injecting darker and more energised tones into country music. Inspired by the landscape of Arizona, the evolution of the band will soon culminate in a debut EP. Hear them at Padre Bar, Saturday.

The multifaceted Diamond City are gearing up for their debut gig on 12 Jul, as a part of The Zoo’s Indie Rock Party, before taking part in Brisbane French Festival, Southbank, 13 Jul and a Ric’s Bar session, 3 Aug.

Prog rockers Mass Sky Raid have been quiet recently recording their second EP, but they’re set to change the pace come Friday when they meet with Caligula’s Horse, Burning Brooklyn and Opus Of A Machine at Coolangatta Hotel, GC.

REMEMBER THE TREMORS

FAR FROM ACTING

FEAR THE BEARD

We’re pretty excited that Little Earthquake are staying in Brisbane a little longer, playing Ric’s Bar, 19 & 21 Jun. Marvel at the siblings Hyland as they stir a variety of styles together with their unique melodies.

After getting comfortable last year in Liverpool’s Royal Court Theatre as George Harrison in the hit show Lennon, prodigious young Brit Matt Breen is now focusing on leaving his own musical legacy. Catch him at Imperial Hotel, Eumundi, 21 Jun.

Where do we begin? The Bearded Lady is hosting Scul Hazzards, Frown and Occults, 19 Jun; Boss Moxi, 20 Jun; the soulful Leah Flanagan, pictured, 22 Jun; Danny Widdicombe, 25 & 27 Jun; and Hannah Rosa, 26 Jun. Get on down.

FOR ALL SEASONS

COME AND COLLECT

SORTING OUT THE MESS

After receiving a healthy dose of airplay on triple j, the electronic duo Autumn are excitedly putting together their debut EP, dropping later this year. See them in action when they play Dowse Bar, Sunday with The Mercy Project and Saskia Van Imperen.

Get down to The Sands Tavern, Maroochydore this Sunday at 9am sharp – the Sunshine Coast Record Fair is serving up a smorgasbord of vinyl, with more than 20,000 records available, as well as CDs, memorabilia, antiques and more.

With The Ninjas pulling out from their scheduled headline date at The Loft, Gold Coast this Saturday, White Summer have stepped up to the plate, and will now lead a bill that also includes Underwood Mayne, Luke Houselander and Liam Ward.

BACKLASH LOOSEN YR BELT

Cool news for gastronomes with food festival Good Food Month coming to Brisbane after a long stint in Sydney and a recent expansion to Melbourne. For eleven nights in mid-July South bank turns into one massive restaurant – eating ain’t cheating!

SPIN THAT WEB After what seems like an eternity away Oz rock party starters Spiderbait are returning to the road and bringing their venerated live show back this way in August. No doubt they’ll play some old gold, get amongst it!

DARN TOOTIN’! Slightly late, but we just caught new TV series Fargo, and it’s fucking awesomely surreal (just like the eponymous film). Look for Key & Peele playing bumbling FBI agents amidst a massacre, and then please explain to us what’s happening.

32 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

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the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

INDIE NEWS

NON-STOP ROCK

STAND FOR THE SEATS

NOTHING BETTER

If you’re up the Sunny Coast way and looking for shits and giggles this weekend, then The John Steel Singers, pictured, (Saturday) and Bearfoot (Sunday) are both clocking into Solbar. Don’t even think about Monday.

Recent triple j Unearthed chart toppers Sunday Chairs are bringing their honest rock north. The Sydney visitors play Ric’s Bar, 27 Jun with Centre & The South, before the two bands back up with Scott Teelow at The Loft, Gold Coast, 28 Jun.

Brisbane newcomer cln has his debut EP ready for release, which delves into a world full of downtempo beats and ornate synths. He plays Moustache Magazine’s Alter Ego Launch, 20 Jun and Alhambra Lounge, 16 Aug.

EVERYBODY GET HAPPY

PUT IT ON ICE

GET LOUD, GET LIVE

Be at The Underdog this Saturday when Happy Times launch new 7” Hey Biscay, the track pulled from a debut set to land late-’14. Supporting riffs come from BMX-RAY, Big Bongin’ Baby and young bloods Concrete Lips.

Combine two of your loves at New Globe Theatre, 29 Jun when the first Cider House Blues Festival takes place. More than 20 delicious cider varieties will be available from 1pm, with Badlands and DJ Gosper taking care of the tunes.

As well as the Mindsnare and In Hearts Wake shows this weekend, The Brightside are also hosting a Simpsons House Party, Thursday with Deadlights, We Set Signals and more, while Nerdlinger, Revellers and a host of locals play Friday.

BUNKER DOWN

GOTTA HAVE FAITH

CHEW ON THIS

Raw dance is again on the menu with Red Mecca 002 set to combust at The Underdog, 20 Jun. $10 doors gets you sets from Tralala Blip, pictured, Abstract Mutation, Soft Power, Afrikan Braidz and Multiple Man DJs.

Following the sold out success of his Melbourne date, Anthony Callea will bring his show, Ladies & Gentlemen: The Songs Of George Michael, to Queensland. Grab your mum and get along to Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, 27 Sep.

The supports for Teeth & Tongue’s Brisbane show have been confirmed, with intelligent indie quintet Denmark, pictured, and the unheralded Bent both warming the stage at Beetle Bar, 21 Jun. $15 via Oztix.

HOLD ON EVERYONE

DANCE WITH FLAVOURS

NO END TO THE PAIN

Supports have been announced for I, A Man’s Gravity Wins Again Brisbane launch date, with Mosman Alder, Love Signs and Little Scout (DJ set) joining the band 21 Jun, at Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel. 9pm, free entry.

Food and drink aren’t the only things to spoil yourself with when you go to Eat Street Markets, with La Mont adding to their first full Queensland tour by announcing a performance at the outdoor markets on 21 Jun.

The Psycroptic, Aborted and The Schoenberg Automaton tour just got more blood-thirsty, with Kyzer Soze also playing at The Brightside, 21 Jun, while Widow The Sea and I Shall Devour have been added at The Lab, 22 Jun (all ages).

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… KASABIAN 48:13 Sony THE FELICE BROTHERS Favorite Waitress Spunk BOB MOULD Beauty And Ruin Merge/Inertia STRAIGHT ARROWS Rising Rice Is Nice THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 33


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

BRISBANE BOUND

SINGLE FOCUS is a chance it will be included on an upcoming release. At the moment I’m just concentrating on one track at a time.

THE HOLIDAYS

newcomers at our shows. We always feel welcome.

Member’s name: Andrew Kerridge Home ground: Sydney Describe your music/ performance style: Groove-based pop aesthetic with a mix of live percussion, washy guitars and kooky electronic soundscapes. How many times have you performed in our midst? Brisbane is pretty much a second home for us. We’ve taken the stage at least 20-plus times over our career. Please relate your impressions of performing in our fair city: There has always been a great mix of enthusiastic fans and

What can we expect different this time around? More onstage dance moves and better haircuts. Has anything exciting been happening in your world of late? Releasing our album Real Feel has kept us nice and busy with all sorts of excitement. Playing shows mostly. What will you be taking home as a souvenir? I’m always happy to make a trade after a show. Find me after our show and make me an offer! The Holidays play Alhambra Lounge on Friday 20 June.

What was inspiring you during the songs writing and recording? I had a very specific mood in mind that I wanted the song to evoke. It was never a song for me – it’s for Dad. I didn’t want it to be angsty or depressing.

MKO Member’s name: Hannah Macklin Single title: Daffodils What’s the song about? It’s a tribute to the eternal peace of my beloved father Tony, who passed away in January of this year. How long did it take to write/ record? About two months. I’d been playing with daffodils as a metaphor for Dad’s memory. The lyric content was mostly written when my drummer Myka sent me a beat which suited it perfectly. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? It’s currently just a single but there

GETTING’ COMFY

We’ll like this song if we like... Little Dragon, Hiatus Kaiyote, James Blake; beats, soul, poetry, daffodils, beauty, peace, love, life. Do you play it differently live? We use samples and triggers so the musical elements are covered live, however, I sing it a bit differently. I try and really feel it in the particular moment. When and where is your launch/ next gig? The Motor Room on Friday, supporting Laneous & The Family Yah. It’s the last show one their annual Pink Dove tour. MKO play The Motor Room on Friday 13 June.

SINGLE FOCUS

of Aussie rock‘n’roll. This mix is a recipe for a good time

SHANDY Member’s name: Viktor Biermischgetrank What is it about the venue that makes you want to a run of shows there? The Underdog is Brisbane’s cult venue with Bon Scott’s mural channelling rock’n’roll inspiration. The Sex Pistols had the 100 Club residency, the Ramones had CBGBs and Shandy wants The Underdog Pub. Same set every week or mixing it up? A good Shandy is all about the mix. There’s ‘70s bootboy glam, ‘77 punk, a dash of sugar oi plus loads 34 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

Any special guests going to make an appearance during your tenure? Spiritually we will be channelling Harvey Lembeck, Stiv Bators, Bon Scott and Tor Johnson. It’s too early to confirm or deny any guest appearances, but our set and security can certainly accommodate it. Favourite position at the venue when you’re not on stage? We’re usually at the back of the Billy Thorpe room enjoying a 60/40 beer and lemonade mix while punishing the pinball machine on a collision course to a new high score. Shandy play The Underdog every Friday night in June after midnight.

HAPPY TIMES Member’s name: Turbo Nicko Single title: Hey Biscay What’s the song about? Submariners’ lament. How long did it take to write/ record? Twice half the time. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Yes. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? The Kermadec Trench and Otto Kretschmer. We’ll like this song if we like... Happy Times Do you play it differently live? Only when we are not well oiled.

Happy Times play The Underdog on Saturday 14 June.


THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 35


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THE MUSIC PRESENTS The Bronx: Crowbar 15 & 16 Jun In Hearts Wake: The Brightside 15 Jun, The Sands Tavern 29 Jun Hard-Ons: Coolangatta Hotel 20 Jun, Prince Of Wales 21 Jun The Audreys: The Byron Theatre 19 Jun, Soundlounge 20 Jun, The Zoo 21 Jun, Solbar 22 Jun Frente!: Star Court Theatre 27 Jun, Brisbane Powerhouse 28 Jun Yeo: Alhambra Lounge 27 Jun, Solbar 28 Jun Dune Rats: The Zoo 28 Jun, Alhambra Lounge 29 Jun (U18) The Beards: The Spotted Cow 2 Jul, Soundlounge 3 Jul, The Tivoli 4 Jul, Solbar 5 Jul, The Northern 6 Jul Little Bastard: Black Bear Lodge 10 Jul, Solbar 11 Jul

WED 11

Josh Rennie-Hynes + Phil Smith + Bree De Rome: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Something For Kate: The Tivoli 11 Jul Violent Soho: The Hi-Fi 12, 13, 19 Jul The White Album Concert: QPAC 13 Jul (matinee and evening) Remi: Solbar 17 Jul, Bowler Bar 18 Jul Melody Pool & Marlon Williams: Black Bear Lodge 7 Aug, St Martin’s Parish Hall 8 Aug BIGSOUND 2014: Fortitude Valley 10-12 Sep Bonjah: The Zoo 10 Oct, Racecourse Hotel 11 Oct, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden 12 Oct Gorguts: Crowbar 16 Nov

Karaoke: Royal Exchange Hotel (Public Bar), Toowong Josh Rennie-Hynes + Graveyard Train: Solbar, Maroochydore

Darren J Ray: Caloundra RSL, Caloundra

Urban Chiefs: Taps Australia, Mooloolaba

Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Chick Corea + Gary Burton: QPAC (Concert Hall), Southbank

Simpsons House Party with Deadlights + We Set Signals + Arrivals + Hometown Heroes: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley

Jeff Carter: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong

Little Lightning: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Luna Junction: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Twin Beasts + Rattlehand + Bree De Rome: The Loft, Chevron Island

Open Mic Night feat. various artists: The Loft, Chevron Island Ronnie Walker: The Plough Inn, Southbank

THU 12

Lambda DJs: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Bottlecock + Karl’s Dog + Ape Farm: Beetle Bar, Brisbane The Love Junkies: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Songwriters Session feat. Phil Smith: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa Russ Walker + DJ J-Mixx: Chalk Hotel, Woolloongabba Tuffy: Hamilton Hotel (Public Bar), Hamilton Plagiarhythm: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Daryle Kiernan: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Des Reid: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt

The Con & The Liar + The Buzzbees + Faux Bandit: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley Jeff Carter: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong

GIG OF THE WEEK SASKWATCH: 14 JUN, THE ZOO

Thy Art Is Murder: Crowbar 20 Dec, 21 Dec (U18)

Ty Fader: The Plough Inn, Southbank Open Mic Night feat. various artists: The Underdog Pub Co, Fortitude Valley Worlds Away + Reichelt + Monii: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

FRI 13

The Cherry Dolls + White Summer + Claws & Organs: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Night of the Dead! feat. Lizzard Wizzard + Deadweight Express + Dead Wolves + Black Deity + Dead Zephyr: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Bloods + Major Leagues + special guests: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Bastille + Foxes + Alison Wonderland: Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, South Bank Metal of Honor feat. Universe + Demodocus + Tensions Arise + Messiam + Vice + Wornaway: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley

Caligula’s Horse + Mass Sky Raid + Burning Brooklyn + Opus Of A Machine: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta Various artists: Coolangatta Sands Hotel (Sand Bar), Coolangatta Lancelot: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise InExcess: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton The Copy Cats: Hamilton Hotel (Public Bar), Hamilton Electric Samurai + Nick Tango: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Upstairs At Murphy’s feat. various DJs: Irish Murphy’s (Upstairs), Brisbane Various DJs: Limes Hotel, Fortitude Valley Quinn Band: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Family Affair: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Phil Smith + guests: Mandala Organic Arts Cafe, Mermaid Beach The Voodoo Crypt feat. Captain Reckless & The Lost Souls + Little Mac & The Monster Men + Midnight Creepers + The Undeadnecks + more: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley Jessie Andrews: Oh Hello!, Fortitude Valley Gentleman Sir: Padre Bar, Woolloongabba

Shifting Sands + DJ Jon: The Bearded Lady, West End Nerdlinger + Release The Hounds + Columbus + The Playbook: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley Elbury + Steve Dorrington: The Crosstown Eating House, Woolloongabba Carcass + special guests: The Hi-Fi, West End Chocolate Strings: The Joynt, South Brisbane Songwriters Circle with Kate Leopold + David Taylor + Felicity Lawless + Mattie Barker: The Loft, Chevron Island Laneous & The Family Yah + MKO + Vulture St Tape Gang + The Melotonins: The Motor Room, West End John Wilkinson: The Plough Inn, Southbank Adriatic + End Us + Planet Fiction + The Black Catapult: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley The Voodoo Crypt feat. The Flangipanis + Whiskey & Speed + D Rouser + more: The Underdog Pub Co (Downstairs), Fortitude Valley

Brian Fraser: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

Shandy: The Underdog Pub Co (midnight), Fortitude Valley

Twin Beasts + Rattlehand + Some Jerks: Solbar, Maroochydore

Diamond Dave: The Underdog Pub Co (Public Bar), Fortitude Valley

Saskwatch + special guests: Soundlounge, Currumbin

Graveyard Train + special guests: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

DJ Ritchie: Story Bridge Hotel (Shelter Bar / 10pm), Kangaroo Point Dubarray: Taps Australia, Mooloolaba

Darren J Ray: Twin Towns (Breezes), Tweed Heads Nerdlinger + Guests: X&Y Bar, Fortitude Valley

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 36 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

SAT 14

Keith Urban + Sheppard: 1300 Smiles Stadium, Kirwan

Cookie Jar + various DJs: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley Karaoke: Acacia Ridge Hotel, Acacia Ridge DJ Indy Andy: Albany Creek Tavern (Creek Bar), Albany Creek Alhambra Doof Committee: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Twin Beasts + Rattlehand + Some Jerks: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Barksdale Brass Band + DJ Soul Train: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley ROSA + Roz Pappalardo: Brisbane Powerhouse (Visy Theatre / 9pm), New Farm Beni: Capulet, Fortitude Valley Honey + various DJs: Chalk Hotel, Woolloongabba Various artists: Coolangatta Sands Hotel (Sand Bar), Coolangatta Freak Wave + The Gift Horse + more: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Nerdlinger + guests: Fat Louie’s, Brisbane Trainspotters feat. Per Purpose + The Sulphur Lights + The Wrong Man + The Maryettas + Moonshine: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Pat Capocci + The Hi-Boys + The Inferno’s: Hamilton Hotel (H Lounge), Hamilton Tyson & Shake: Hamilton Hotel (Public Bar), Hamilton Wasabi + Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Upstairs At Murphy’s + various DJs: Irish Murphy’s (Upstairs), Brisbane


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au Autumn + The Mercy Project + Saskia Van Imperen: Dowse Bar (Iceworks), Paddington Spike: Hamilton Hotel (Public Bar / 2pm), Hamilton

Kiara Jack & The Jills + Felicity Lawless: The Joynt (4pm), South Brisbane

Various artists: Limes Hotel, Fortitude Valley The People Feel Good Band: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro (3pm), West End

Tape/Off + Freak Wave: Tym Guitars (all ages / 2pm), Fortitude Valley

The Bronx + Army Of Champions: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

DJ Ritchie: Story Bridge Hotel (Shelter Bar / 3pm), Kangaroo Point

Rob Hackwood Duo: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Jackson McLaren & The Triple Threat + Meredith: The Bearded Lady, West End In Hearts Wake + Dream On Dreamer + Being As An Ocean + Endless Heights + Sierra: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley

Astro Travellers: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Majestiq: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Songwriters In The Round feat. Lisa Richards + Nadia Sunde + Michael Fix: New Farm Bowls Club, New Farm My Friend The Chocolate Cake: New Globe Theatre (3pm / 7pm), Fortitude Valley Lancelot: Oh Hello!, Fortitude Valley Midnight Son & The Crime Scene: Padre Bar, Woolloongabba Bounce Sessions with J-Trick: Platinum Nightclub, Broadbeach Brooksy & Co: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong Brian Fraser: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

Amaya Laucirica + J Francis: The Bearded Lady, West End Mindsnare + Manhunt + Shackles + Idylls: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley The Paper Kites + Phebe Starr + Airling: The Hi-Fi, West End Eagle Junction + Dead Zephyr + Backseat Killers + The Missing: The Hive, Fortitude Valley Cheap Fakes + The Mouldy Lovers: The Joynt, South Brisbane White Summer + Underwood Mayne + Liam Ward: The Loft, Chevron Island Simon Meola + Blue Steel: The Plough Inn, Southbank We All Want To: The Scratch, Milton The Bootleg Beatles: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley

Bearded Gypsy Band: Royal Mail Hotel (6pm), Goodna

Happy Times + BMXRAY + Big Bongin Baby + Concrete Lips: The Underdog Pub Co, Fortitude Valley

The John Steel Singers + The Dawn Chorus + Ayla: Solbar, Maroochydore

Saskwatch + Little Odessa + Grizzly Jim Lawrie: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Abba & The Bee Gees Show: Souths Sports Club, Acacia Ridge The Very: Story Bridge Hotel (The Corner Bar), Kangaroo Point DJ Ritchie: Story Bridge Hotel (Shelter Bar / 10pm), Kangaroo Point Lauren Valentine Duo: Taps Australia, Mooloolaba

SUN 15

Bluesville Station: Bearded Dragon Tavern, Tamborine Various artists: Coolangatta Sands Hotel (Sand Bar), Coolangatta

The Bug feat. Peter Miller + Two Crows: New Farm Bowls Club, New Farm Trivia: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Valley Finntroll + special guests: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Nerdlinger + Release The Hounds + Columbus + The Playbook: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley

TUE 17

Keith Urban + Sheppard: Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Boondall

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AMAYA LAUCIRICA: 14 JUN, THE BEARDED LADY

Various DJs: Limes Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Tuesday Night Jazz with Charlotte McLean: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

MON 16

Bear Foot: Solbar (6pm), Maroochydore

Blake Saban: Taps Australia, Mooloolaba

Woody Lives Here: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Kitty Hawk: The Plough Inn, Southbank Rock n Roll BBQ feat. Hell Crab City + more: The Underdog Pub Co (12pm), Fortitude Valley

Tyson Faulkner + Venus Envy: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong

Earth + Dreamtime + A Savage God: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

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tour guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

INTERNATIONAL Bastille: BCEC 13 Jun (AA)

Eatons Hill Hotel 22 Aug

Jen Cloher: Junk Bar 25 Jul

Knapsack: Crowbar 23 Aug

Monique Brumby: The Treehouse 26 Jul, Dowse Bar 27 Jul

Carcass: The Hi-Fi 13 Jun

King Buzzo: Black Bear Lodge 24 Aug

The Bronx: Crowbar 15, 16 Jun

Bob Dylan: BCEC 25 Aug

Earth: Crowbar 17 Jun

Lady Gaga: BEC 26 Aug

Caitlin Park: The Hive 2 Aug (AA)

Finntroll: The Zoo 18 Jun

The Dandy Warhols: The Tivoli 30 Aug

Bodyjar: The Hi-Fi 7 Aug

Supersuckers: The Zoo 19 Jun La Dispute, Balance & Composure: Trinity Hall 19 Jun (AA), The Hi-Fi 20 Jun

Kids In Glass Houses: The Brightside 30 Aug, The Lab 31 Aug (AA)

Dragon: Kedron Wavell Services Club 20 Jun, Twin Towns 21 Jun

Biffy Clyro: The Tivoli 4 Sep

Aborted: Miami Shark Bar 20 Jun, The Brightside 21 Jun, The Lab 22 Jun (AA) Band Of Skulls: The Hi-Fi 21 Jun Katchafire: Miami Marketta 22 Jun

Protest The Hero: The Hi-Fi 4 Sep Anberlin: The Hi-Fi 6 Sep Cannibal Corpse: The Hi-Fi 13 Sep Kanye West: BEC 15 Sep

Joan As Police Woman: The Hi-Fi 24 Jun

The High Kings: Eatons Hill Hotel 19 Sep, Maroochy RSL 20 Sep, Empire Theatre 21 Sep, Southport Sharks 23 Sep

Story Of The Year: The Hi-Fi 26 Jun

Ingrid Michaelson: New Globe Theatre 21 Sep

Tinie Tempah: The Met 27 Jun

Robbie Williams: BEC 22 Sep

The Upbeats: Ellements Lounge 28 Jun

Veruca Salt: The Zoo 24 Sep

The Vibrators: Prince Of Wales 28 Jun The Crimson ProjeKCt: The Hi-Fi 28 Jun Tiny Ruins: Black Bear Lodge 1 Jul Bell X1: The Zoo 4 Jul Caféïne: The Bearded Lady 4 Jul, The Loft 5 Jul Lloyd Cole: Brisbane Powerhouse 10 Jul, Soundlounge 11 Jul, Star Theatre 12 Jul Henry Fong: The Brightside 11 Jul, Platinum 19 Jul Gareth Emery: Platinum 17 Jul, The Met 18 Jul Lorde: Riverstage 20 Jul Pelican: The Zoo 24 Jul Corrosion Of Conformity: Crowbar 24 Jul Andrew Strong: The Commitments: The Tivoli 25 Jul, Twin Towns 26 Jul A Great Big World: The Tivoli 2 Aug Neurosis: The Hi-Fi 4 Aug Hanson: The Tivoli 5 Aug, Coolangatta Hotel 6 Aug I Am Giant: The Rev 6 Aug Coolio: East 88 7 Aug, Coniston Lane 12 Aug Twenty One Pilots: The Zoo 10 Aug Vincent Cross: New Farm Bowls Club 19 Aug, Dowse Bar 20 Aug, The Treehouse 22 Aug

Justin Timberlake: BEC 26, 27 Sep Sepultura: The Hi-Fi 4 Oct Rick Springfield: Eatons Hill Hotel 9 Oct, Twin Towns 10 Oct More Than Life: Snitch 6 Nov, Tall Poppy Studios 7 Nov (AA) Gorguts: Crowbar 16 Nov Accept: The Hi-Fi 16 Nov The Rolling Stones: Brisbane Entertainment Centre 18 Nov

Hugo Race: Junk Bar 26 Jul, Brisbane Powerhouse 27 Jul

THE DANDY WARHOLS: 30 AUG, THE TIVOLI 13 Jun, The Bearded Lady 14 Jun

Jun, Brisbane Powerhouse 28 Jun

Lancelot: Elsewhere 13 Jun, Oh Hello! 14 Jun

Hands Like Houses: The Brightside 28 Jun

Mindsnare: The Brightside 14 Jun

Dune Rats: The Zoo 28 Jun, Alhambra Lounge 29 Jun (U18)

The John Steel Singers: Solbar 14 Jun My Friend The Chocolate Cake: New Globe Theatre 14 Jun (3pm matinee/7pm evening) Freak Wave: Crowbar 14 Jun, Tym Guitars 15 Jun Beni: Capulet 14 Jun, Elsewhere 18 Jul

James Reyne plays Australian Crawl: Eatons Hill Hotel 8 Aug, The Tivoli 9 Aug Spiderbait: The Hi-Fi 9 Aug Seekae, Jonti: The Zoo 12 Aug

Alison Wonderland: Southern Cross Unibar 3 Jul

Tina Arena: Jupiters 23 Aug, BCEC 24 Aug

Loose Change: Alhambra Lounge 19 Jun, Solbar 20 Jun

Northeast Party House: Alhambra Lounge 3 Jul, Solbar 4 Jul, The Spotted Cow 5 Jul

The Aston Shuffle: The Zoo 29 Aug

Hard-Ons: The Northern 19 Jun, Coolangatta Hotel 20 Jun, Prince Of Wales 21 Jun The Sinking Teeth: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden 19 Jun, Tatts Hotel 20 Jun, Crowbar 21 Jun The Holidays: Alhambra Lounge 20 Jun

Nine Sons Of Dan: Snitch 3 Jul, Racehorse Tavern 5 Jul, Swingin’ Safari 6 Jul The Cairos: The Northern 3 Jul, Alhambra Lounge 4 Jul, The Spotted Cow 5 Jul, Broadbeach Tavern 6 Jul, Solbar 12 Jul

Freedman Does Nilsson: Soundlounge 15 Aug, Old Museum 16 Aug

Busby Marou: Soundlounge 29 Aug, Eatons Hill Hotel 30 Aug (AA) Dead Letter Circus: New Globe Theatre 4 Sep 360: Arena 6 Sep (U18 matinee/18 + evening)

Holy Holy: Black Bear Lodge 4 Jul

Boy & Bear: The Arts Centre Gold Coast 12 Sep, The Tivoli 13 Sep

Wagons: The Zoo 20 Jun

Little Bastard: Black Bear Lodge 10 Jul, Solbar 11 Jul, The Rails 12 Jul

Icehouse: SEQ Outdoor Concert 20 Sep, Twin Towns 21 Sep

Agnes Obel: Old Museum 25 Nov

Mondo Rock: Eatons Hill Hotel 20 Jun

Jesse Davidson: Alhambra Lounge 10 Jul

Katy Perry: BEC 27, 28, 30 Nov, 1, 15 Dec

Bonjah: The Zoo 10 Oct, Racehorse Hotel 11 Oct, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden 12 Oct

Straight Arrows: The Brightside 20 Jun

Thelma Plum: Old Museum 10 Jul

Björn Again: QPAC 28 Nov

Passenger: Riverstage 25 Jan

Josh Pyke: Empire Theatre 20 Jun (AA), Majestic Theatre 21 Jun (AA), Byron Cultural & Community Centre 22 Jun (AA)

Voyager: The Brightside 11 Jul

Thy Art Is Murder: Crowbar 20 Dec, 21 Dec (U18)

Psycroptic: Miami Shark Bar 20 Jun, The Brightside 21 Jun, The Lab 22 Jun (AA)

Jeff Lang: Mullumbimby Town Hall 11 Jul, Brisbane Powerhouse 12 Jul

Allday: Coniston Lane 20 Jun

Miracle: GPO 12 Jul, East 29 Aug

The Audreys: The Byron Theatre 19 Jun, Soundlounge 20 Jun, The Zoo 21 Jun, Solbar 22 Jun

Sonic Masala Fest: Greenslopes Bowls Club 21 Jun

Violent Soho, The Smith Street Band: The Hi-Fi 12, 13 Jul

Vulvapalooza: New Globe Theatre 27 Jun

The White Album Concert ft Tim Rogers, Chris Cheney, Phil Jamieson and Josh Pyke: QPAC 13 Jul (matinee & evening)

Jam’n’Beats: Club Greenslopes 28 Jun

Toxic Holocaust: The Northern 19 Nov, Crowbar 20 Nov Rick Astley: The Tivoli 21 Nov, Twin Towns 22 Nov

Roxette: BEC 10 Feb One Direction: Suncorp Stadium 11 Feb Eagles: BEC 10 Mar

NATIONAL Graveyard Train: The Northern 11 Jun, Solbar 12 Jun, The Zoo 13 Jun The Love Junkies: Black Bear Lodge 12 Jun Twin Beasts: The Loft 12 Jun, Solbar 13 Jun, Beetle Bar 14 Jun Saskwatch: Soundlounge 13 Jun, The Zoo 14 Jun

The Creases: Black Bear Lodge 20 Jun

Deez Nuts, Confession: Crowbar 20 Jun Teeth & Tongue: Beetle Bar 21 Jun I, A Man: Grand Central Hotel 21 Jun

Anathema: The Hi-Fi 21 Aug

Captain Reckless & The Lost Souls: New Globe Theatre 13 Jun

Yeo: Alhambra Lounge 27 Jun, Solbar 28 Jun

The Paper Kites: The Northern 13 Jun, The Hi-Fi 14 Jun

Ben Salter: Junk Bar 27 Jun

Amaya Laucirica: The Treehouse

Something For Kate: The Tivoli 11 Jul

Remi: Solbar 17 Jul, Coniston Lane 18 Jul, The Brewery 19 Jul Buried In Verona: The Brightside 17 Jul, The Lab 18 Jul (AA) Dave Graney: Beetle Bar 18 Jul, Solbar 19 Jul, The Northern 20 Jul

FESTIVALS Live It Up: RNA Showgrounds 21 Jun

WinterSun Festival: Eumundi Amphitheatre 29 Jun Splendour In The Grass: North Byron Parklands 25-27 Jul Gympie Music Muster: Gympie 28-31 Aug UBERfest: Jubilee Hotel 30 Aug

sleepmakeswaves: The Northern 18 Jul, The Zoo 19 Jul

BIGSOUND: Fortitude Valley Entertainment Precinct 10-12 Sep

Mojo Juju: The Joynt 27 & 28 Jun

Crooked Colours: Alhambra Lounge 19 Jul, Beach Hotel 24 Jul

Listen Out: Brisbane Showgrounds 5 Oct

Frente!: Star Court Theatre 27

Perfect Tripod: QPAC 25 Jul

Soulfest: Riverstage 25 Oct

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 38 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

The Angels: Queensland Lions Club 8 Aug, North Leagues & Services Club 9 Aug

Emma Russack: Black Bear Lodge 18 Jun

Chet Faker: The Tivoli 21 Jun, Lake Kawana Community Centre 22 Jun

Taking Back Sunday, The Used:

Clare Bowditch, Adalita: Powerhouse Theatre 8 Aug

Keith Urban, Sheppard: BEC 17, 18 Jun

Bloods, Major Leagues: Black Bear Lodge 13 Jun

Kid Ink: The Hi-Fi 22 Aug

The Beards: The Spotted Cow 2 Jul, Soundlounge 3 Jul, The Tivoli 4 Jul, Solbar 5 Jul, The Northern 6 Jul

Melody Pool & Marlon Williams: Black Bear Lodge 7 Aug, St Martin’s Parish Hall 8 Aug

Dan Sultan: Solbar 2 Jul, The Spotted Cow 3 Jul, Soundlounge 4 Jul, Eatons Hill Hotel 5 Jul, The Northern 8 Jul

Courtney Love: Eatons Hill Hotel 20 Aug

Forever Came Calling: Snitch 21 Aug, The Lab 22 Aug (AA)

In Hearts Wake, Dream On Dreamer: The Brightside 15 Jun, The Sands Tavern 29 Jun

Kate Miller-Heidke: Empire Church Theatre 7 Aug, QPAC 8 Aug


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VULTURESBANDOFFICIAL THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014 • 39


40 • THE MUSIC • 11TH JUNE 2014

The Music (Brisbane) Issue #42  

The Music is a free, weekly gloss magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, li...