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2 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014


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themusic 29TH JANUARY 2014

“OBVIOUSLY I AM 17, I’M GOING TO FUCK SOME STUFF UP AT SOME POINT.”

#023

INSIDE FEATURES Lorde

Periphery

feature

In Hearts Wake Robert Trujillo

- COVER STAR AND GENERAL WORLDBEATER LORDE (P17)

Desaparecidos Drenge Tour Diary Frightened Rabbit Stiff Little Fingers DJ Shadow Groundation

REVIEWS Album: The Jezabels Live: Avicii Laneway Map & Times

THE GUIDE Cover: StormChasers

“IT WAS A VERY DANGEROUS STAGE, SO YOU’RE NEVER 100 PER CENT SAFE; THERE’S ALWAYS UNEASINESS AND RISK FOR US AS PLAYERS.”

- ROBERT TRUJILLO TALKS ABOUT THE EXPLOSIVE NEW METALLICA MOVIE, THROUGH THE NEVER (P22)

CHECK OUT A SPECIAL LANEWAY FESTIVAL-THEMED EDITION OF SICK TUNES ON FRIDAY. HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Readers Poll Food/Drink Frontlash/Backlash Indie News Opinion Gig Guide The End: Kiwis We Stole

WE REVEAL THIS YEAR’S GROOVIN’ THE MOO LINE-UP THIS WEDNESDAY.

ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

tour diary “THE BACKSTAGE HAS ONE TOILET WHICH AMPLIFIES THE SOUND OF PASSING URINE AND STOOLS, WHICH FURTHER AMPLIFIES AWKWARD SILENCES AND RAISED EYEBROWS.” - READ ABOUT DRENGE’S ADVENTURES FROM THEIR RECENT EUROPEAN TOUR (P24)

review 6 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

“TOO TRUE IS BRASH AND CONFIDENT AND WILL NO DOUBT FIND PLENTY OF ADMIRERS, BUT IT’S ULTIMATELY ONE-DIMENSIONAL AND FORMULAIC.”

- STEVE BELL REVIEWS THE NEW FULL-LENGTH FROM DUM DUM GIRLS (P30)


THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Steve Bell

ASSISTANT EDITOR Benny Doyle

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE EDITOR Justine Lynch gigs@themusic.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Ben Preece, Benny Doyle, Bradley Armstrong, Brendan Telford, Carley Hall, Chris Yates, Cyclone, Dan Condon, Daniel Johnson, Dave Drayton, Grace Wilson, Guy Davis, Helen Stringer, Jake Sun, Jazmine O’Sullivan, Lochlan Watt, Madeleine Laing, Mandy McAlister, Matt O’Neill, Mitch Knox, Sam Hobson, Sky Kirkham, Tessa Fox, Tom Hersey, Tony McMahon, Tyler McLoughlan

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 29 JANUARY - 4 FEBRUARY 2014

indulge

PHOTOGRAPHERS Dave Kan, Freya Lamont, John Stubbs, John Taylor, Kane Hibberd, Markus Ravik, Rick Clifford, Sky Kirkham, Stephen Booth, Tessa Fox, Terry Soo

listen

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Brett Dayman

QLD SALES Madeleine Budd, Zac Gould sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Nicholas Hopkins

ART DEPT Brendon Wellwood, David Di Cristoforo, Eamon Stewart, Julian De Bono

ADMIN AND ACCOUNTS

Experience the best of both worlds as A Day On The Green brings the cream of Aussie rock’n’roll to Sirromet Wines, Mount Cotton. They don’t come much bigger or better than Oz rock legends Hunters & Collectors, playing their first shows in this area for over a decade, supported by the equally awesome You Am I, Something For Kate and British India. A great line-up in a gorgeous amphitheatre – what a combo!

You probably know Ezekiel Ox from his time fronting rock bands such as Full Scale, Mammal, The Nerve and Over-Reactor, but did you know that he’s also branched out into the world of spoken-word, dance and cabaretstyle entertainment? Well you do now! Catch the man this Friday and Saturday at emerging art space Bird Studios. Ox is intelligent and captivating – find out just how far he’s willing to go to engage with his crowd!

Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson, Loretta Zoppos, Shelley Neergaard accounts@themusic.com.au

DISTRO Anita D’Angelo distro@themusic.com.au

SUBSCRIPTIONS store.themusic.com.au

CONTACT US Phone: (07) 3252 9666 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au Street: Suite 11/354 Brunswick Street Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Postal: Locked Bag 4300 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

BRISBANE

There aren’t many musical pieces more unique than Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells, the Celtic-folk-rock opus which was released in 1973 and not only stayed on the British charts for an incredible 279 weeks but also launched and bankrolled Richard Branson’s Virgin Empire. It originally took 25 people to bring it to life, but this weekend you can witness a two-man orchestra achieve the same feat – good luck with that! Tubular Bells For Two runs Friday and Saturday night at Brisbane Powerhouse, with a Saturday matinee performance.

chime


record

One of our country’s top studios, The Grove, situated in rural Central Coast just west of The Entrance, has just been purchased by Scott Horscroft – a man who’s played a hand in the success of some of our most popular acts, including Silverchair, The Presets and Empire Of The Sun. The property – which features four studios, spacious villa-style living, an outdoor pool and more – is the ultimate creative hub for musicians looking to disappear into their work. Check it out at thegrovestudios.com.

listen

To The Jezabels’ second album The Brink. After ARIA success with Prisoner, the Sydney group had a lot of work to do to maintain the momentum, including between 180 and 200 shows in 2012. Last year they devoted their time to crafting the record, which was described by The Music’s Hannah Story as “a new chance for The Jezabels to bring their strengths to the synth-pop table: namely, frontman Hayley Mary”.

go

Laneway Festival kicks off on Friday in Queensland, before heading to Melbourne and then Sydney over the weekend (and Perth next weekend!). It’ll be a day of sun-drenched hipsters in clothing that is inappropriate for the weather, thick eyeliner, twee songwriters, floral headdresses and plenty of grog. It’s genuinely a really fun festival though if you’re into the tunes, and you’re sure to find something to catch your eye with Earl Sweatshirt, Dick Diver, Lorde and Haim all on the line-up, plus loads more.

watch

With nine nominations at the upcoming Academy Awards, a recent joint win for best picture at the Producers Guild Awards (with Gravity) and plaudits being showered upon it from critics around the globe, it’s clear that Steve McQueen’s new masterpiece 12 Years A Slave is something worth your time. Based on the memoirs of violin player Solomon Northup – the individual all but absorbed by actor Chiwetel Ejiofor – it shines an unforgiving light on the American slave trade of the 19th century. See it in cinemas from tomorrow (30 Jan). THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au PHARRELL WILLIAMS

DAVE CHAPPELLE

HE’S GOT THE MEDICINE

HAPPY SURPRISE

And here we were thinking the gates were well and truly shut on Future Music Festival for 2014. Not quite, as the event has just announced pop music superstar Pharrell Williams will join the likes of Phoenix, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and Deadmau5 at the Sydney (Royal Randwick Racecourse, 8 Mar) and Melbourne (Flemington Racecourse, 9 Mar) legs of the tour, while performing two special headline dates in Brisbane (The Marquee, RNA Showgrounds, 12 Mar) and Perth (Challenge Stadium, 14 Mar). Whether it’s been through his solo work, during his time in N.E.R.D or guesting on mega hits from the likes of Daft Punk, Williams has always played a class game – and you can expect all the hits and tricks soon. Future tickets are on sale now; solo dates on sale this Monday.

BUILT FROM STONE

Three decades of unstoppable power has led to Germany’s Kreator being hailed by thrash metal fans worldwide, and later this year they’ll flex their musical muscle for us with the help Bay Area titans Death Angel, here to show off last year’s record The Dream Calls For Blood. Let your face get rearranged by heading to 170 Russell, Melbourne, 16 Apr; Manning Bar, Sydney, 18 Apr; The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, 19 Apr; and Amplifier, Perth, 20 Apr.

GETTIN’ DIRTY

Following the success of his Down Under adventure last year, Adrian Edmondson – the celebrated actor and comedian who’s starred in cult British series The Young Ones and Bottom – is leading his folk punk outfit The Bad Shepherds back to our parts on 11 Apr, Gum Ball Festival, Belford; 12 Apr, Factory Theatre, Sydney; 13 Apr, Clarendon Guesthouse, Katoomba; 14 Apr, Brass Monkey, Sydney; 16 Apr, Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane; 18 Apr, Thornbury Theatre, Melbourne; 19 Apr, The Bridge Hotel, Ballarat; 20 Apr, Caravan Music Club, Melbourne; 24 Apr, The Odd Fellow, Fremantle; 25 Apr, Fairbridge Folk Festival and 26 Apr, Rosemount Hotel, Perth.

RETURNING FROM BATTLE MOUNTAIN

After a crazy career that’s careened through plenty of sharp corners, it seems like Jonny Craig has found some solace in Australia, with the former Dance Gavin Dance vocalist coming back Down Under once more, this time for some solo shows with a full band. Catch him 8 May, Crowbar, Brisbane; 9 May, Tall Poppy Studios, Brisbane (all ages); 10 May, The Hi-Fi, Sydney (all ages); 11 May, The Small Ballroom, Newcastle; 14 May, Amplifier, Perth; 15 May, HQ, Perth (all ages); 17 May, Corner Hotel, Melbourne; and 18 May, Wrangler Studios, Melbourne (all ages). Californian acoustic duo This Wild Life, Georgia-based MC Kyle Lucas and Aussies Red Beard will support.

“CHILL IT WITH THE SHITTY METAPHORS” LILY ALLEN’S TONGUE IS SHARPER THAN OUR HEAPS SHARP SCISSORS. 10 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

You don’t have much time to prepare your sides to absolutely be split by legendary US funny man Dave Chappelle, who’ll be performing his first ever stand-up shows outside of America right here in our backyard. Well, not literally – you’ll actually have to go to a proper venue to hear his sharp jokes and witness all those send ups that you motherfuckers love. Catch Chappelle 20 Feb, QPAC, Brisbane; 25 Feb, Riverside Theatre, Perth; 28 Feb – 1 Mar, Palais Theatre, Melbourne; 4 Mar, Sydney Opera House; and 5 – 6 Mar, State Theatre, Sydney.

VIVA LAS VEGAS

Nina Las Vegas gets the nation moving week in and week out as host of triple j’s House Party program, but high-fidelity can only give you so much. Now you can experience Nina outside of your radio and let her get your party started – in real life no less – she plays Corner Hotel, Melbourne, 13 Feb; 170 Russell, Melbourne, 14 Feb; Metropolis, Fremantle, 28 Feb; 6 and 7 Mar, Goodgod Small Club, Sydney; Bowler Bar, Brisbane, 8 Mar; and Trinity Bar, Canberra, 9 Mar. There’s a whole bunch of cool supports along on each date too – head to The Guide at theMusic. com.au for the full line-up in your city.

SONS OF ANARCHY

ASK THE ANARCHISTS ANYTHING

Tig (Kim Coates), Juice (Theo Rossi) and Bobby (Mark Boone Junior), wild riders from hit US TV series Sons Of Anarchy, will be conducting a moderated panel conversation for fans of the show, including an audience Q&A, as well as clips and tunes from the show. If you’ve watched the bad boys of California then you’ll want to be at Palace Theatre, Melbourne, 27 Mar; Eatons Hill Hotel, Brisbane, 28 Mar; UNSW Roundhouse, Sydney, 29 Mar; and Metropolis, Perth, 30 Mar. VIP meet and greet packages are also available!


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THE BABE RAINBOW, THE FURRS, SALVADARLINGS, THE MOUNTAINS

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JON CLEARY & THE MONSTER MEN 14 & 15 MAR

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THE TEMPO HOTEL 388 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley. 18+ ID Required. Management reserve the right to refuse entry.

THURS 21 MAR

BILLY BRAGG SUN 30 MAR

DUB FX & OPIOU

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 11


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au BORN LION

THE GIN CLUB

JOIN THE CLUB HEAR THEM ROAR

The music of Born Lion is hard, fast, spicy and trimmed of all the fat, and it needs to be experienced in a venue with beer, sweat and full voices. The Sydney boys have fast earned a name for themselves by delivering some of the best punk coming out of this country right now, so party with your new favourite band when they launch their latest single Good Times Jimmy 27 Feb, SCU Unibar, Lismore and 1 Mar, Ric’s Bar.

SET YOURSELF UP FOR THE STAGE

Available to anyone over 15 with an interest in theatre and the arts, the InsideOutside Theatre Company is running workshops teaching new skills, helping to expand confidence, improving communication and having plenty of fun in the process. Classes are going to kick off again weekly at The Space North Lakes, and will happen on Saturdays, 10am – 12pm from 1 Feb and Thursdays, 1pm – 3pm. Each class costs $15 and can be booked by emailing angela@insideoutsidetheatre.com.

I AM GIANT POSTPONE TOUR

If you were planning on catching I Am Giant at The Rev, 6 Feb, then you’re going to have to change your plans as the melodic UK-via-NZ alt-rockers have just announced the tour’s postponement. At this stage new shows will be announced for May, but we’ll confirm that closer to the date. Until then, hold on to your tickets or hold tight on buying them.

CRACKED GENIUS

If the legends are to be believed, Finntroll was birthed on a drunken night back in ’97 when original axeman Somnium became convinced that loud guitars and humppa styled Finnish polka needed to be brought together. Since then, the swinging metal Nords have helped popularise a completely new strain of heavy metal, and they bring six albums worth of raucous revelry to Brisbane on 18 Jun, playing The Zoo. Tickets are $59+BF through Metropolis Touring.

THE JAGGED EDGE

Get to Dowse Bar early on 23 Feb because US vocalist Singer Mali – back in the country after visiting us as the special guest of Amanda Palmer – will be settling in for a 4.30pm performance. Enjoy her sultry brand of avantjazz, before hanging around for the theatrical pop of Emma Dean – back home after a year spent in New York City – and Kiwi avant-garde duo April Fish. It’s $15 with under-18s permitted accompanied an adult.

QUICK FOR THE KILL

With barely a word of warning, Melbourne five-piece blast beat lords King Parrot have just dropped a few shows upon us, hitting The Northern, Byron Bay this Sunday and The Hi-Fi, 5 Feb with US thrashers Havok and Aussie young guns Desecrator. The boys are using these dates as a warm-up before they torch the US as part of SXSW, so no doubt they’ll be at their unforgiving best. Brace yourself for the punch.

RECORD FAIR

DUST OFF THE SKINNY JEANS

Time to get your stylish hipster on with the Cheated Hearts gang – they’re putting on an indie dance party, with the tastiest tracks from the likes of Bloc Party, Grimes, Friendly Fires, Two Door Cinema Club, Foals, and plenty more. Dimestore Diamonds, Pony Club DJs, The Gatling Gun and Cvlt Teens DJ the shebang, happening at Coniston Lane, 7 Feb. Tickets can be purchased on the door for $10.

“SNAIL PORRIDGE AND CHEESE ON TOAST ICE CREAM... FUCK OFF HESTON” HEAR, HEAR @FIONAOLOUGHLIN. 12 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

Hard at work mixing their new album, The Gin Club are looking to shake off the cabin fever, step out of the studio and show off a few of these new cuts for the very first time. They’re also taking suggestion for the album title, so be sure to yell out something weird when they headline The Underdog, 14 Mar. Ola Karlsson will support on the night.

TIME TO DIG THE CRATES!

Embark on a vinyl treasure hunt and get ready to scour the crates when the West End Record Fair takes over Boundary Hotel, The Hi-Fi and Rumpus Room on 8 Feb. Revolve Records from Erskineville is bringing up a big collection to unleash, while other interstate and local dealers will be selling stacks of wax from across every genre. It’s free entry, but if you can’t make it don’t fret; it will be happening on the Sunny Coast the following day too, at The Sands Tavern, Maroochydore where there’ll be $5 early-bird entry available from 8.15am.


MONDAY 3 FEBRUARY

MIC’S TRIVIA 7PM

TUESDAY 4 FEBRUARY

DEEP STACK POKER 6.30PM

WEDNESDAY 29 JANUARY

OPEN MIC SHOWCASE 7.30PM

THURSDAY 30 JANUARY JORDAN & BRYAN

OPEN MIC NIGHT 7PM

O’MALLEYS OPEN MIC NIGHT

PLAY AT OPEN MIC NIGHT TO SCORE A PAID GIG AT OUR SHOWCASE NIGHT O’MALLEY’S OPEN MIC NIGHT

FRIDAY 31 JANUARY

STRINGS FOR AMMO 5PM - 9PM

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SATURDAY 1 FEBRUARY

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RAMJET 9PM

SUNDAY 2 FEBRUARY

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Basement Level - Wintergarden Centre Queen Street Mall - Brisbane City PH 07 3211 9881 FAX 07 3211 9890 Email admin@mickomalleys.com.au

THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 13


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au WIL WAGNER

BLACK BEAR LODGE

BLACK BEAR LODGE TOPS READERS POLL

Beating out plenty of stiff competition throughout the Valley, the CBD, south of the river and across all parts of Brisbane, Black Bear Lodge has topped our 2013 Readers Poll as the best venue in Brisbane. Since returning as a live music hub after the close of The Troubadour, the room continues to be a warm sanctuary amongst the hectic Brunswick St Mall scene, with lush cocktails and craft beers the choice to enjoy while watching yet another killer performance. Much love to all the Black Bear crew!

BLANK REALM

FREE WIL

Charismatic frontman for The Smith Street Band Wil Wagner has gotten a little restless, as he’s known to do, and is going to fill in a few weeks of down time with a run of solo shows around the country. Joined on his travels by American Max Stern and banjo shredder Pinch Hitter, Wagner will do four shows while he’s in the Sunshine State, playing The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba, 27 Feb; Crowbar, 28 Feb; Sun Distortion, 1 Mar (all ages); and The Time Machine, Nambour, 2 Mar (all ages).

“YOUNG BUT MY MINDSET COMPLEX”

DOMO FUCKING GENESIS [@ DAMIERGENESIS] SUMS UP OFWGKTA.

POINT BLANK

Their brand new record Grassed Inn is all kinds of rad, so why not let Blank Realm know what you think of them by getting in the crowd for their Brissie launch show at The Underdog on 8 Feb. The bill will also feature a whole host of other local and interstate legends including Sydney’s Four Door, Lucy Cliche from fellow southerners Naked On The Vague, and Brisvegas crews Sewers and Thigh Master.

FLYING HIGH

Proving his popularity, Danny Harley, aka The Kite String Tangle, has just announced a second Brisbane date on his upcoming national tour, catering for the demand which has already seen him sell out his original show at The Zoo, 22 Feb. If you missed out on the first night don’t make the same mistake again – he plays the same venue the following evening, 23 Feb, with tickets available for purchase through Oztix. 14 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

DEATH COMES TO PARTY

When you’re talking about one of the most radical rock groups of the past 30 years, you need to call on a support band equally as bad arse to support. So we’re happy that Gang Of Four have chosen New Zealand powerhouse trio Die! Die! Die! to hit the road with them in a couple of months. You can get this action on 22 Mar at The Hi-Fi, with tickets via Oztix.

LEMURIA CHANGE OF PLANS

If you’re heading along to the Lemuria show tomorrow night (Thursday), then let it be known that Snitch is now being held at Coniston Lane, not X&Y Bar, but the bill is the same with Kissing Booth, Columbus and Inside The Whale supporting. And we’ll give you a tip – say ‘Lemuria’ on the door to save a bit of coin on entry. You’re welcome!

GET WHAT YOU GIVE

Making every second count, Frank Sultana & The Sinister Kids have just announced additional dates to their upcoming tour, to go with shows announced a few weeks ago at The Joynt, 15 Feb and Mojo Burning Festival, New Globe Theatre, 15 Mar. The stomping blues rockers will now also play The Rails, Byron Bay, 14 Feb and Taps Australia, Mooloolaba, 13 Mar.

ALWAYS SAY NEVER

If you’re a fan of Shire five-piece The Never Ever, then you’re probably already in the know that their latest single In Or Out is about to drop, the track pulled from their latest EP Ghosts & Ghouls. What you probably didn’t know, however, is that they’re going to hold a premiere screening of the short, and combine the launch with an intimate acoustic set, an exclusive behind-the-seens doco (never to be screened again) and a Q&A session, all at Event Cinemas Myer Centre, 21 Feb – not bad, eh? Tickets for the all ages event are on sale now through the band’s official website.


BAY STREET BYRON BAY (02) 6685 6402 www.beachhotel.com.au

THIS WEEK: THUR 30TH FROM 9PM

LIONHEIR FRI 31ST FROM 5PM

2 IN A GROOVE THE FERAMONES 9PM SAT FEB 1ST FROM 8:30PM

DJ DISCROW SUN FEB 2ND FROM 4:30PM

LISA HUNT CAPTAIN KAINE 8PM MON FEB 3RD FROM 8PM

‘HIT THAT HIT’ MUSICAL BINGO

(FREE ENTRY, GREAT PRIZES) TUES FEB 4TH FROM 7:30PM

OPEN MIC NIGHT WED FEB 5TH FROM 8:30PM

SQUEAK LEMAIRE COMING UP: THUR FEB 6TH

VELSHUR FRI FEB 7TH

THE FAMILIARS THE VANNS LUNATICS ON POGO STICKS SAT FEB 8TH

BYRON HOUSE MAFIA SUN FEB 9TH

THE HOMBRES SUNDAY SAFARI THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 15


Tap into Live Music on The Sunshine Coast

Taps @ Mooloolaba: The only venue in Australia where you pour your own beer Thurs 30 JAN

Ryan Delaney & Jack Blanford Fri 31 Jan

Dan Hannaford Sat 1 feb

Zac Gunthorpe & Shannon Carroll Sun 2 Feb

Asher Chapman Mon 3 Feb

Superbowl Monday Thurs 6 Feb

Sue-Anne Stewart Fri 7 Feb

Blackwood Jack & The Alamo Sat 8 Feb

Asa Broomhall Sun 9 Feb

John Malcolm Taps top pick: Blackwood Jack & The Alamo hit Taps as part of their East Coast Tour. These two high energy Victorian blues rock bands can be seen at: www.tapsaustralia.com.au performing live on Friday 7 Feb. Free Entry. Gig guide, events & venue information: www.tapsaustralia.com.au

Follow us @tapsaustralia ph: (07) 54 777 222 Cnr The Esplanade & Brisbane Road, Mooloolaba.

16 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014


music

WE CAN BE HEROES

Words Dan Condon. Photos Cybele Malinowski. THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 17


She’s just about conquered the pop world as Lorde, having just won a Grammy, and Ella Yaulich-O’Connor is quickly becoming a spokesperson for the youth. She tells Dan Condon how she’s dealing with it all.

E

lla Yaulich-O’Connor, better known to the world as Lorde, is enjoying mainstream pop success at its most immense. She’s broken all manner of records with regards to her age, her gender and her country of origin in terms of sales and chart positioning, but nine weeks atop the US singles chart with her track Royals – which has now almost sold five million copies in that country alone – is the ultimate proof that what has happened here is mammoth. When we speak, she’s preparing to fly to LA for the Grammy Awards, where she’ll be performing and is nominated for four awards, enjoying some rare time in her own Auckland bedroom. “It’s super messy,” the now-Grammy winner giggles. “I fly out tomorrow, so there’s stuff all over the floor.” There aren’t many 17-year-olds who could command a headlining slot on the St Jerome’s Laneway Festival,

it now’. But I was 15 when I wrote it and I’m 17 now, so I think you grow a lot in that period. It definitely feels like a bit of a relic now.” Reading certain reports about Lorde’s persona, you’d expect an overtly headstrong diva who’ll pounce on any chance to belittle you; but the truth is, she’s just a very switched on and very polite teenage girl. Hearing her speak about the moment she realised she was going to be allowed to take time away from school to write her album is enough to fill anyone with youthful glee. “I was so for it, I was kind of freaked out, but I really wanted to do it,” she says of following up her early

“I feel like most pop stars have this plan written in stone years before anything happens but the song started taking off and I was like ‘Oh, okay…’ and then we had to plan for what was gonna come next. “Before I put The Love Club EP out I was just planning on releasing EPs and messing around and putting stuff on the internet until I finished high school and then I would kind of look at it more seriously. But obviously things went kind of crazy and, what happened to the music once it left my hands was, like, just this insane thing. So I had to rethink and decide when I wanted to write the record; it was important to me that I followed up this big song with material that I felt was relevant to me right now and which felt kinda fresh and did come at the same time as that song, I guess. It wasn’t a plan that was thought out well in advance.” Due to Yaulich-O’Connor’s own personal relationship with music, she couldn’t particularly envisage her material resonating with a wide, popular audience. It’s not that she didn’t have faith in it, it’s just that it’s her music, largely written by, about and for her. “For me, I know a record is important to me if I can hear my life in it. If you write super personally, like I do, the worry for me is that if it means so much to me then it’s not gonna mean too much to other people because it’s going to be too specific or whatever,” she explains.

“WHAT HAPPENED TO THE MUSIC ONCE IT LEFT MY HANDS WAS, LIKE, JUST THIS INSANE THING.”

but comparatively such an engagement appears almost insignificant. Lorde’s signed a publishing deal reportedly worth around four million dollars, appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone in the US and will be a huge fixture on the US and European festival circuit through 2014. But how do you deal with going from being a nobody to the most in-demand artist on the planet? “I think when it’s happening to you it’s less weird,” she says. “For example, being on the cover of Rolling Stone, you’re like ‘that never happens to people like me’, but then you’re among the people who have been on the cover of Rolling Stone and it’s not so weird. I’ve adjusted to things, I think.” It has been Royals that has resonated with audiences around the world so much. That’s the song that’s topped the charts and has been flogged to death on almost every format of radio with a vaguely youthful orientation, the song that’s been lauded and derided (both are very important) ad infinitum and it’s simply the song that everyone knows. It’s interesting then to hear Yaulich-O’Connor’s take on the song. Is it her best? “No!” she exclaims. “I definitely don’t think Royals is my best song. I understand why it worked and why it was kind of a hit, I can see those qualities in it, but at the same time there’s part of me that’s like…” she groans, “‘these melodies are just not as good as something I could have written now’, or like ‘I definitely wouldn’t have written this lyric this way if I had’ve written 18 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

success with her debut album Pure Heroine. “It was pretty much down to my parents, because obviously I had to take three months out of school. They came home from this meeting with my manager and said ‘we’re gonna let you make the record’ and I was like ‘YEEEEAHHH this is gonna be awesome!!!’” This was not the plan. Royals – and The Love Club EP it came from – were not meant to become this massive. Lorde was not supposed to have an album out yet. Yaulich-O’Connor didn’t just want to capitalise on the success of the single, she wanted what people heard from her after Royals to be something from the same woman at a similar time in her life.

“I feel like a lot of people my age really reacted to it which is so cool for me and is kind of the dream. I was lucky. I feel like teens are a tough audience and I feel like a lot of the art and that a lot of the material aimed at teens is usually super corny and feels patronising or whatever, and I am aware of that. But people I guess didn’t feel that about Pure Heroine which is super cool.” She’s a relatable voice for the not-so-disenfranchised teen market who aren’t necessarily interested in the ersatz world of Bieber, Taylor and Miley. Her brand of cool is certainly defined, but it’s accessible. Whether Lorde likes it or not, she has become a role model, and if her success continues then she’ll be one for a long time to come. “That’s a crazy one because, obviously I am 17, I’m going to fuck some stuff up at some point, because I think that’s a natural part of becoming an adult,” she says when asked if she’s comfortable with such exemplar status. “But as long as people are willing to accept me as an imperfect role model, then I guess I’m honoured.” Yaulich-O’Connor’s unwavering commitment to ensuring her creative vision is fulfilled is beyond admirable, particularly given the scale of the success or failure she holds in her hands. As far as how such a young woman gets such a strong say when dealing with multinational record labels and powerful managers goes, she says she just started early.


AND THE CRITICS… People love to talk about Lorde. Even moreso, writers have loved to write about Lorde since her ascent into the realms of pop stardom. Famously, American feminist blogger Verónica Bayetti Flores accused Royals of being “deeply racist”. “Because we all know who she’s thinking when we’re talking gold teeth, Cristal and Maybachs. So why shit on black folks?” Flores’ blog read. The piece prompted a minor media storm. For someone who appreciates a large degree of control over her image and creative output, you’d understand if YelichO’Connor feared distortion of her character or music in the press, but she’s dealing with the critics in a typically mature manner.

“Basically from when I was 12 or 13 I’ve been calling the shots in regard to my own career and my management and label have been super open to that, which is weird because lots of adults who’ve been doing what they do for a long time don’t really want to take direction from someone who is just starting high school,” she says. “But I’ve always known what was best for my art and what I was doing and people have kind of respected that. I guess I’ve just been saying how things should be for long enough that people don’t really question it anymore.” That doesn’t mean the 17-year-old doesn’t stress about the weight of these decisions. When it comes to the Lorde brand, there are quite literally millions of dollars at stake and the wrong move could see the artist and all those around her lose out immensely. But simple wisdom has helped her get through thus far. “Some of the stuff I have to decide about isn’t creative, it’s to do with my brand in a way, which is definitely something which can be hard and something I’m often up all night thinking about,” she admits. “At the end of the day – and it sounds so cliché – I just go with my gut. Even if I ask a bunch of people for advice and they say ‘do this’ or ‘don’t do this’ I usually go with the thing that I first thought.” WHEN & WHERE: 31 Jan, Laneway Festival, RNA Showgrounds

“I feel like people have really loved to write about me this year, which is cool, I’m lucky people want to start a dialogue about what I’m doing,” she says. “But also when so many people are coming to the table there’s stuff you read that’s like ‘This is so bullshit, I feel so misrepresented by this’.” Yelich-O’Connor has her theories, though it should be noted that she did not pinpoint any critic’s portrayal in particular. “Often these people are like old, old journalists who don’t really know anything about teen culture… I don’t know, it can be a little bit misguided sometimes, but I’ve definitely learned to not read what people think I’m not doing or whatever. I try not to take it too seriously.” THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 19


music

METAL’S MAD SCIENTISTS

was there just to assist. And as much as they might be able to suggest things, like I said a few things and they weren’t the way that we ended up going, but I didn’t get butthurt because all I’m trying to do is help the person get to their vision of the song. So actually I think there would have been a lot more argument if it was something that Periphery were doing as a whole band. Because when you’re representing a person, you can just try and assist them and no one would take it personally if they didn’t like your ideas or whatever.

A crazy notion led to American djent bigwigs Periphery writing and recording an EP that functions like a KISS solo record, where each member wrote their own song. Guitarist Misha Mansoor tells Tom Hersey about the impetus for what would become Clear.

“I

t was just kind of a fun experiment really. The idea was just, ‘Go all out and make any song that you want’,” says guitar wizard Misha Mansoor of Clear; a release that isn’t the band’s next full-length album – work on that’s planned for March/ April – nor is it an EP – the band didn’t want to repeat themselves having done Icarus back in 2011. Mansoor doesn’t refer to Clear as anything but an ‘experiment’ because the seven-track release is just that. There’s an introductory song that the band did together, and then every other song saw the individual members of the six-piece write whatever they wanted. Mansoor breaks down how it all came to be: “Stef [Stephen Carpenter] from the Deftones, I guess he’s a pretty big fan of our music, and we’d hang out with those guys a lot, but with him especially, and one day when we were on tour together he suggested ‘Y’know, you’ve got a band full of producers, I’d like to hear if you had an idea, how everybody would interpret that one idea’. And that stuck with us. It was a good point, and we started to wonder what that would be like. Then we had a little over a month between the Summer Slaughter tour and a headliner last year, and we realised that not only are we a band full of producers, but that a lot of us have the ability to record at home. So we could put together an idea like this fairly quickly when everybody was just responsible for one song.” Where that idea diverged from the efforts of bands like KISS and The Melvins was that the person in charge of the song could do whatever they wanted to realise their vision. Where KISS had strict rules that they would not play on each other’s records, Periphery decided any member could get whatever musicians they wanted to help them along with the thing, whether they were in the band or not.

“Everybody was like the ‘director’ of their own song. So they could get anybody’s help on their song, whether they were in the band or not. It

“It raises a lot more potential for problems than one might think. It brings up all these different issues about the dynamics in the band and communication and stuff like that. But everyone in the band had a similar vision of what this should be in terms of respect, and letting every other member do their own thing. Say I had ended up hating somebody’s song, so be it. That’s part of the risk going into it, and that has to be okay that it might end up like that. And I was expecting there to be that kind of reaction somewhere along the line, and I was mentally preparing for that, to be like ‘There’s probably

“SAY I HAD ENDED UP HATING SOMEBODY’S SONG, SO BE IT.” was about whatever they wanted to do to help fulfil their vision. In a regular Periphery song we’d all have our opinions and we’d have a discussion about stuff; here, if you were helping out somebody on their song it was just do what you’re told.” Despite the member overlap, the songs totally represent the individual visions of the writer. “Anybody who was helping anyone else with their song

going to be a couple of songs where I’m like this really shouldn’t be on a Periphery release’. But I’m grateful to say I don’t feel like that about any of the songs.” With Clear just released, Periphery are now turning their sights towards an Australian run with Animals As Leaders, and Mansoor is undeniably stoked to get down here, if only to escape America’s unusual and entirely inhospitable winter. “It’s pretty miserably cold in the US at the moment, so it’s kind of good to get out of here. Though as I understand, you guys are in the middle of a heatwave? So we might just be going from one end of misery to the other.” WHAT: Clear (Roadrunner/Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 31 Jan, The Hi-Fi


PLAYIN’ FAVES

instrumental beats putatively inspired the term ‘trip hop’. On his freewheeling third album, The Outsider, this original Diplo actually dipped into Bay Area hyphy with 3 Freaks. Davis also teamed with Lavelle for UNKLE’s Psyence Fiction, a B-boy’s post-rock opus, with Thom Yorke a guest.

Always understated, DJ Shadow nonetheless states his case to Cyclone.

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alifornian innovator DJ Shadow (aka Joshua Davis) is making a statement by not making a statement with his All Bases Covered tour. The Godfather of Alternative Hip Hop will play his favourite new music in a pared-back format geared to diehard fans. “It all took shape really organically,” Davis explains. “I was asked by some friends of mine to DJ. It was an opportunity for me to do something I hadn’t done in a really long time, which was to put together a set of

contemporary music that I’m into – because for most of the last 15 years I’ve either been out doing a Shadow-centric live show or I’ve done a concept DJ set, like, with DJ Chemist, for example, where we use old 45s or something.” Davis drops anything from Chicago’s footwork and juke to trap, keeping it ultra-fresh. “Half of my set is built off producers who might only have a hundred Twitter followers,” he laughs. Davis is taken, too, by “harder-edged rap producers”, such as Mike WiLL Made It. The San Fran turntablist will always be known for 1996’s sample-based debut, Endtroducing....., on James Lavelle’s UK label Mo’ Wax. Davis’ experimental

music

Davis agrees his later LPs, including 2011’s The Less You Know, The Better, have often been overlooked. The Less… thematised Davis’ ambivalence towards digital technology. Ironically, he resides in Silicon Valley – and spends up to 12 hours a day online (he uses a laptop when DJing). “You’re just bombarded with this message every day that your life is incomplete without [the] latest gadget or app. It seemed like there was absolutely no other voice saying, ‘Well, what are we losing? What have we lost by just sort of blindly embracing technology to the extent that we have? And who’s benefitted from it? I mean, is it the average person or is it a select few? Trust me, where I live there’s a lot of rich dotcomers walking around. I think a lot of what we’re buying into is just another con game.” Davis’ influence is pervasive, his production techniques (and aesthetic) evident even in The Weeknd’s illwave R&B. “There’s certain sounds that I feel are Shadowesque or whatever, but it’s not like I could really sit back and be like, ‘Oh, they obviously were influenced by my stuff ’. I really don’t think about music that way. I definitely can tell when somebody’s just trying to straight rip-off something I’ve done – and I’ve heard that a few times, especially back in the ‘90s! But I guess I just hear things that I like and I don’t really think about where I fit into it. It’s just like, I hear it and I like it – and that’s good enough.” WHEN & WHERE: 7 Feb, Family Nightclub

THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 21


music

SECOND TERM

and you can love the country and still call it out for its shortcomings’. I think everything about that album seemed like the right time and the right place, even the writing and recording and everything.”

Nebraskan punks Desaparecidos made a big racket during their first stint together, and now they’re back to fan the flames of discontent. Guitarist Denver Dalley takes Steve Bell through their unanticipated resurrection.

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maha-bred political punk outfit Desaparecidos burnt brightly but briefly during their initial tenure in the early 2000s, releasing just one acclaimed long-player Read Music/Speak Spanish in 2002 before calling it quits later that year, with frontman Conor Oberst returning to the fold of his then main project, Bright Eyes. Their music was rough-edged and visceral and their lyrics mainly socio-political treatises on the state of the nation, tackling everything from urban sprawl and materialism to the evils of corporatisation and America’s gung-ho approach to foreign policy – no injustice seemed too small, no cow too sacred. After their split all five members moved onto other projects and it seemed that Desaparecidos (perhaps presciently translated as “disappeared ones” in Spanish) would be consigned to the footnotes of musical history, until in 2010 Oberst asked the band to reform for the Concert For Equality festival in their native Nebraska. What was meant to be a oneoff performance ran so smoothly that it’s prompted a more permanent return to the fray, the band releasing some typically confronting seven-inch singles as they reintroduce themselves to the world at large. “Originally it was the keyboard player Ian [McElroy], the drummer Matt [Baum] and I, and we formed the band – I don’t know if we had very much direction at that [early stage],” recalls guitarist and co-songwriter Denver Dalley. “Conor and Ian are cousins and we all grew up together, and Conor caught wind that we were making noise in the band room and he wanted to be involved. I think we were planning on being a full-time band when schedules allowed, but then everything got kinda hectic and we were all involved in other projects and the timing didn’t feel right, until now. In a lot of ways a lot of the time I was disappointed because I wanted to just keep playing, but I think it’s turned out now the best way that it could – we’re better musicians and better players now, and I think we sound live better than we ever have. I think it worked out the way that it was supposed to.” The band’s original timing was problematic in some ways; in post-9/11 USA a lot of people weren’t too

keen to hear criticism of their homeland, even – perhaps especially – from among their own ranks. “It was funny, we were recording the album and actually in the studio when 9/11 happened and were going back and forth between tracking in the studio and watching

Dalley believes that Desaparecidos would have been a political concern irrespective of the era it was birthed in, due to the members’ inherent tastes and convictions. “We have a pretty wide array of bands that have inspired each one of us,” he offers, “but we have a lot in common – we all love Fugazi and Weezer and Cursive, there’s a ton of bands that we all definitely like – but we’ve all said from the beginning that the coolest thing, the dream that we’ve always had with music, is the idea that you can have a song that people enjoy the music and then listen to the lyrics and it either sparks a conversation or makes them go research something or go look something up online. Even just to start a conversation is the biggest thing, so that it’s not just singing, ‘Baby, oh baby’ or something like that. We’ve always wanted to ruffle feathers and get people to think – that’s the ultimate dream.”

“EVEN JUST TO START A CONVERSATION [WITH OUR MUSIC] IS THE BIGGEST THING” the news in the rec room and trying to take it all in,” Dalley remembers. “I think in the wake of all that everyone was really tiptoeing around and walking on eggshells, and really afraid to say anything that could be taken as anti-American. It was an interesting time, and then we came out with this album in 2002 and I think for a lot of people it was a relief, almost saying, ‘It’s okay, you can voice your opinion

And although Read Music/Speak Spanish’s songs – and the subsequent singles since their return – are clearly tackling US-based issues, the themes are universal enough to achieve more widespread resonance. “Definitely,” Dalley agrees. “I remember after Read Music/ Speak Spanish I was on tour with another band over in France and England and people would come up to me and talk to me about that album, and they’d say, ‘I know you guys wrote it from the perspective of Americans, but it’s just like that over here too – it’s the same urban sprawl’. They could relate so closely to the themes, and I think that’s because we’re singing about the bigger issues but just from the perspective of our own backyard.”

WHEN & WHERE: 22 Feb, Soundwave, RNA Showgrounds


THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 23


music

BORDEAUX

English grunge duo Drenge have been touring and touring and touring but they’re not spent yet; they’ve still got Laneway and Australia to look forward to. We got brothers Eoin and Rory Loveless to write us a diary about the ups and downs and butchered soundchecks of life on European tour.

NANTES French venues make you think that everyone else should just give up. It’s almost like they are perfectly designed to the point of irritation. It’s annoying when there is nothing to vex or frustrate you. Everyone is lovely. You get a home-cooked and nutritious meal. The stage and PA are top spec. However, tonight was the first time anyone has ever fucked-up on spelling our band’s name.

Outside the venue is an old-school London bus, which has been converted into a kitchen and dining room. Another lovely meal. This taps into mine and Rory’s secondhand/second generation Catholic guilt complex, almost like we don’t deserve to be this well looked after. A small boy in the front row in a Drenge tee looks worryingly bored.

“I GO TO THE AFTER-PARTY IN A POSH BAR AND BUY TWO BOTTLES OF BEER FOR €16. IT’S CARLSBERG AND EACH BOTTLE WOULD COST 75P FROM AN OFFY IN THE UK.”

WHEN & WHERE: 31 Jan,

ZURICH We get taken for fondue just before the show, which is really lovely and tasty, but results in me feeling like Elvis Presley in his final years, staggering around the stage trying to conceal my bloated gut. After us is LIVE BAND ROCK KARAOKE where any old bank manager or office employee can get up onstage and sing their favourite RHCP/Offspring/Metallica song with a bassist, guitarist and drummer. The support band’s entourage totally trash the dressing room and when questioned about it, I feel so guilty that ‘It wasn’t me’ just doesn’t cut it as an excuse and I leave.

EINDHOVEN I love the stuff you find in European service stops. I’m not in the mood for Bum Bum, but maybe next time? The guy at the venue gives our FOH warning glances throughout soundcheck and interrupts us asking me where I want my audience to stand. I generally don’t care and I don’t like his attitude so I point vaguely to the middle of the room. Apparently we are so loud that “everyone will stand in the corner, cowering from the sound”. Later, the crowd stand exactly where I pointed. Drenge 1 Holland 0.

Laneway Festival, RNA Showgrounds

ARHUS

COPENHAGEN We go to the zoo. Apparently it’s the tenth best in the world, but apart from the OTT polar bear enclosure, there’s not much going on. Our band name is a Danish word and despite us having no strong links to the country or its people, bar a slight fascination with its cinema history, the Danes take us to heart in a big way. We do an encore, which means dropping the song we’d normally play at the end, only to play it a bit later after going off stage and saying, ‘This is a bit daft’. 24 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

I go off in search of sushi, nothing special, but I just wanted to find some sushi and end up having THE BEST SUSHI OF MY ENTIRE LIFE so far. We are not as warmly received in Aarhus as we were in Copenhagen. It’s a Sunday night and songs finish with some awkward clapping and then absolute silence. On the plus side, I get to drive the van out of the car park, feeling as chuffed as a 5-year-old would if put in the same situation.

PARIS The backstage has one toilet which amplifies the sound of passing urine and stools, which further amplifies awkward silences and raised eyebrows. We both go on a whimsical walk up to Sacré-Cœur and pretend we’re tourists. The sun sets and Paris looks like it does in the movies. My voice has been flagging for the past three shows and tonight I just scrape through. My onstage frustrations are lost on the monitor engineer who refuses to shake my hand at the end of the night. I go to the after-party in a posh bar and buy two bottles of beer for €16. It’s Carlsberg and each bottle would cost 75p from an offy in the UK.


RABBIT SEASON

off, it’s always directed at the other one. Because we’re brothers, you know, that’s the way it goes. We haven’t physically come to blows – yet,” Hutchison laughs. Ultimately, the collaboration was successful, yielding track after track of anthemic rock, including epic singles like The Woodpile, State Hospital and the sweeping Backyard Skulls. The songs still aren’t cool, but they are cannon shots of heart-on-sleeve sincerity. They have helped Frightened Rabbit reach a whole new audience.

Frightened Rabbit’s drummer Grant Hutchison believes his band’s long-time fans are “good at smelling bullshit”. Simone Ubaldi inhales deeply.

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ore often than not, a rock band’s success depends on the right intersection of songwriting and style. Rock is supposed to be cool. Rockstars are supposed to be disaffected hipsters and if they fail at it, they will struggle to cut through. Honesty, vulnerability and earnestness are anathema to the artifice and fashion that keeps Pitchfork churning. But honesty is what Frightened Rabbit do best. Formed in Selkirk, Scotland in 2003, the band began as a bedroom project for the once chronically shy songwriter Scott Hutchison; a vehicle through which the he could exorcise the ghosts of past relationships. A year later, Grant Hutchison joined his older brother on drums, then Billy Kenny was added as a guitarist. They released a debut album, Sing The Greys, in 2006. Their follow-up, 2008’s The Midnight Organ Fight was a breakthrough, a critically acclaimed work of rough bombast. Keyboardist Andy Monaghan was then added to the line-up and their sound expanded even further, captured on the 2010 album The Winter Of Mixed Drinks. Again, the record was critically acclaimed, but the not-so-cool Frightened Rabbit somehow missed the fast train to indie-rock stardom. Their literate songs of heartache and alienation never made headlines. Still, the band ploughed on. They toured mercilessly and delivered chest-rattling live performances, slowly amassing a sizeable throng of seriously devoted fans. Their rise was a slow-burn triumph of substance over style. This year, Frightened Rabbit released their fourth longplayer, Pedestrian Verse. At long last they seem to have broken through to a mass audience, with the album debuting in the UK Top 10. “We feel like the sound of this album and the songs on this album are definitely what we’ve been striving to achieve for years,” Grant Hutchison says. “It’s a bigger, fuller sound without taking away what is at the heart of Frightened Rabbit.” Pedestrian Verse was three years in the making, with much of it conceived and rehearsed while the band were on tour. It represents a new era for the now five-piece band (former Make Model guitarist Gordon Skene signed on in 2009), beyond their new-found commercial success. Stifled by his own attempts at songwriting, Scott Hutchison threw open the door and asked his bandmates to help him write the record. “I think he

found that he was almost repeating himself,” Grant Hutchison explains. “He’d kind of maybe even subconsciously created a pattern and a routine to write a Frightened Rabbit song, and that is something that I think every band should try and avoid – rehashing old techniques and old

The move from indie label Fat Cat to Atlantic Records in 2010 has also had a significant impact on the band’s trajectory. “Probably the major difference with this album is that we went from a small indie label to a major. We had the usual concerns about how much input they would want, would they try and remould us into what they wanted or something that could sell records… it never happened. The word ‘single’ was never bandied about before we wrote and recorded the album, which is a good thing,” Hutchison says. “I think [labels] have just had to change their game plan. It’s good, because I think they probably got a little bit

“I THINK [LABELS] HAVE JUST HAD TO CHANGE THEIR GAME PLAN. IT’S GOOD, BECAUSE I THINK THEY PROBABLY GOT A LITTLE BIT LAZY…” methods to simply churn out the same old crap.” The new process was challenging for the band, requiring everyone to step up while their leader let go the reins. For the Hutchison brothers particularly, it meant keeping their sibling rivalry in check. “We’ve still got that little side of us that likes to show the other one up. It’s funny, you know, on tour we’re fine, we get along well, but creatively it can be a frustrating melting pot of emotions and, whenever one of us flies

lazy when all they had to do was throw a cheque at a band and they would become the next big thing, but even if they didn’t it didn’t matter because there was always more money in the bank. Now, you have to be more careful. They’ve given us incredible support.” So long as they have social media, the band that built its reputation on immediacy and integrity can have the best of both worlds. “We control our Twitter and there are no label posts turning up on there, we can stay in direct contact with our fans. We were very conscious of not losing that. Our fans, who have been around for a few years, are good at smelling bullshit,” Hutchison smiles, “And if we started shovelling bullshit they would quickly disappear.”

WHEN & WHERE: 31 Jan, Laneway Festival, RNA Showgrounds

music


music

NOBODY’S HEROES

At the outset Stiff Little Fingers copped an inordinate amount of criticism for writing about the Troubles – especially with early singles Suspect Device and Alternative Ulster and their subsequent 1979 debut album Inflammable Material.

The original era of UK punk may have seemed a time of upheaval, but for Stiff Little Fingers it was a walk in the park compared to their actual lives in Northern Ireland. Frontman Jake Burns tells Steve Bell about striving for objectivity amid mayhem.

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t’s almost impossible now to imagine what life would have been like in Northern Ireland during the Troubles, the decades of complex political upheaval and violence which terrified the region from the late ‘60s, but you can at least get some feel for the terror and confusion in the early music from Belfast punks Stiff Little Fingers. They’d existed briefly as a bog-standard rock covers band, but when the maelstrom of punk hit hard in 1977 they were swept up in the excitement, changing not only their name (taking Stiff Little Fingers from the title of a track by The Vibrators) but also their entire approach to rock’n’roll. “Realistically the previous band [Highway Star] was just for fun – we were just a bunch of school kids having fun,” recalls frontman Jake Burns. “I think by the time that punk happened I’d already reached the stage where I was disillusioned with the music I was hearing – I’d long since got fed up with bands like Yes and Genesis and these overblown ‘King Arthur On Ice’ things that these guys were doing. Also I’d become more and more enamoured of songwriters rather than instrumentalists – every teenage boy in my generation went through a Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath phase, wanting to be the ten-minute guitar solo hero, but eventually your focus turns onto the actual song. So by the time that punk came around I was listening to people like Graham Parker and Dr Feelgood and Bob Marley; people who were actually writing their own songs, or in Dr Feelgood’s case playing what were original rock’n’roll songs but beefed up for the ‘70s market. “So when punk rock came along I was an easy convert for it, because I loved the excitement, I loved the immediacy and I loved the fact that it was being played by people who were roughly the same age as I was. I didn’t really see a huge future in it, to be honest – I really thought that it was going to be a short, sharp shock to the music business which was long overdue, but I didn’t really see any longevity in it. I didn’t see anybody who were writing songs that meant anything, until I heard The Clash – once I heard The Clash that changed my perspective

on everything, because I realised, ‘Hang on, these guys are writing about their own lives, they’re writing about everyday problems like the lack of job opportunities and they’re writing about where they grew up’ –

“Every band gets an amount of criticism throughout their career – particularly at the start people are either instant converts or wary of them – and I think that doing what we did we had a lot more people who were slightly wary of us,” Burns ponders. “But I couldn’t see what else we were supposed to write about – this is what we knew. We tried very hard not to actually take sides – it’s a principle that we’ve tried to adhere to until this very day, that we’ll comment on what’s happening around us and effectively leave it up to the listener to make up their own mind. But that did get us a lot of criticism which at the time I didn’t think was particularly justified, but I was a young kid and it was hard because we got a lot of attention very quickly.” In recent times Stiff Little Fingers infiltrated popular culture during a scene in High Fidelity

“I THOUGHT [PUNK] WAS GOING TO BE A SHORT, SHARP SHOCK TO THE MUSIC BUSINESS… BUT I DIDN’T REALLY SEE ANY LONGEVITY IN IT.” they weren’t writing songs about bowling down Californian highways, because at the time I hadn’t been further west than Galway so those songs just didn’t mean anything to me. Plus as our drummer Brian [Faloon] pointed out at the time it was raw music and as musicians we were very raw – the whole thing was tailor-made for us. Plus it was a lot of fun to play – it was a genuinely exciting time.”

where the dorky record store clerk tries to impress a customer by explaining how Stiff Little Fingers (along with The Clash) were precursors to Green Day; it must amaze the band how their music has continued to resonate through time. “It’s very, very flattering when somebody pays you a compliment by saying that they’re a fan or that we influenced them,” Burns agrees with a laugh, “even if in a lot of cases I either can’t hear the influence in their music, or in some cases – and I’m much too much of a gentlemen to mention names – when the band is so bloody awful that I wish we hadn’t influenced them!”

WHEN & WHERE: 22 Feb, Soundwave, RNA Showgrounds


SONIC SUMMIT

aesthetic that fits neatly into a genre we like or what the rest of the music world is up to.”

Shrouded in mystery, Beijing-via-LA duo Alpine Decline arrive on Australian shores armed with their fifth album in four years. Jonathan Zeitlin sits down with Brendan Telford to dispel the myth.

T

o Australian audiences – and indeed globally – Alpine Decline are a mystery band, having carved four immaculate albums seemingly out of the ether, slowly changing from the Doug Martsch-sounding self-titled album to the marred contemplation of Night Of The Long Knives and the haunted Visualisations. Jonathan Zeitlin says that the duo (Zeitlin on guitar/ vox, Pauline Mu on drums) find their circumstances ultimately colour the direction and mood of each album.

“We try to think of the albums outside of the artist-evolution narrative and imagine them as episodes in a genre series or something – the way you can dive into the noir detective world in a Raymond Chandler novel without needing any story continuity,” Zeitlin explains. “Someone finding out about us, now or in 20 years, can then totally explore each record like a trip into some far flung destination within our universe. The albums (change) because our reality, like most people, is a constantly flickering, twitching thing, and we’re trying to explore that rather than just execute a particular

music

With that swirling amalgam of different influences making Alpine Decline somewhat difficult to define, Zeitlin maintains that definition isn’t necessary when music should be experienced, preferably as loud as possible. “In a Venn diagram, hopefully we fall within songwriting and sonic chaos,” he laughs. “Trying to have new experiences and continue developing the narrative – that’s how we feel we should be living our lives. We don’t think our music should be some separate thing we’re doing; the albums are artefacts and the means by which we hope to share these experiences and connect with people on a humanist level. Our new album Go Big Shadow City is to me the most maximum, expansive, panoramic album yet – both in sound and songwriting – and I feel its role in the series of records is to push the rocketship into supersonic, solar-shielding peeling off, into-the-white saturation. I hope at the end you pull off the headphones, pupils dilated, sweat beading on your upper lip, wondering where you are and what the fuck that was.” Such a huge sound coming from two people is hard to fathom, yet Zeitlin insists nothing is compromised. “With just two of us on stage, the thrill is in connecting with each other and trying to build up this massive storm of sound. The risk of it collapsing and our natural tendencies to let it rip on guitar and drums makes the live sound a lot more aggressive and raucous.”

WHAT: Go Big Shadow City (Tenzenmen) WHEN & WHERE: 1 Feb, Grand Central Hotel; 2 Feb, Tym Guitars (all ages, instore)

FROM THE GROUND UP

music

Reggae legends Groundation are headed to Australia following a headline spot at New Zealand’s Raggamuffin Festival. Tyler McLoughlan catches up with band leader Harrison Stafford to learn the secret to their success.

O

n a steamy Jamaican evening ahead of Groundation’s three-date Australian stopover, vocalist and guitarist Harrison Stafford recalls the outfit’s first two visits with a lovely rhythmic lilt one could listen to all day. “It was great!” he exclaims. “The first time was kind of no-holds-barred, just go and play the shows, and the crowds came out and the energy was there; you realise that people knew Groundation’s music. And then the next time we came back for the WOMAdelaide shows. That was really a great experience to be part of this eclectic, worldwide event from Africa to India to Iran to Portugal… The first two experiences were wonderful so I’m sure the third will be even better!” As festival favourites who have played in 38 countries across six continents since their debut release in 1999, Stafford explains why a Groundation headline show is a real treat for the eight-piece band and fans alike. “We all met at university and we were all the time playing and performing and studying jazz music together, so it’s nice to have your own show; there’s no timeframe problems… A lot of the time even though you might not be playing to 10,000 people like the festivals, you’re playing to people who really know and appreciate the

music and they want that once-in-a-lifetime, this-is-the-moment, this-is-the-night Groundation – all this improvising is never gonna be repeated again at a show. That’s what is great about having our [headline] shows.” Groundation are a part of a roots/reggae elite that barely register on the mainstream radar despite building large and fiercely loyal audiences through working the international tour circuit year after year. “I think what comes with reggae music and what comes with Groundation is commitment to the sound and to the evolution of the

music and not so much to pop culture and trying to be something that is gonna [make you] a millionaire,” Stafford says. “Reggae music has proven to be a part of social change, to be a part of the underground consciousness. That’s why reggae music is always gonna be underground, that’s why you’ll never be calling me and sayin’, ‘Wow, I saw you all over MTV, or a reality TV show and you have millions of records sold!’ We’re never gonna have this conversation, and that’s because what our main focus is, is trying to uplift people, to breaking down these barriers that really separate us. The barriers are within our culture, within our races, within our classes, and the barriers in our education system. So as long as we, [creators of ] reggae music – conscious music – stick to these themes, there will always be a strong following for it.” WHEN & WHERE: 4 Feb, The Hi Fi THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 27


28 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014


reviews

ALBUM OF THE WEEK

This week: French psychological drama The Past offers both tension and tenderness; Sky Ferreira offers darkness and fun; and Dolly Parton offers wit and Kenny Rogers.

THE JEZABELS The Brink MGM 2014 is off to a strong start in terms of lady-led releases: Warpaint, Dum Dum Girls, and now The Jezabels have each brought out impressive albums that show off these women’s serious rock chops. On The Brink our very own Jezabels bring a new sound into their production, with Heather Shannon on keys riding the indie-synth wave, along with the rest of today’s indie-poppers. This new album serves as a new chance for The Jezabels to bring their strengths to the synth-pop table: namely, frontman Hayley Mary and her broad vocal range, and their ability to create a growing sense of tension (case in point: the brooding Psychotherapy).

★★★★

TRACK LISTING 1. The Brink

7. The End

2. Time To Dance

8. Got Velvet

3. Look Of Love

9. Psychotherapy

4. Beat To Beat

10. All You Need

5. Angels Of Fire

11. Marianne

Like Mary’s vocals, each song, and the album as whole, swells and dives between soft and loud, up- and down-tempo, light and dark. The opener and title track is moody and atmospheric, and one of the early highlights of an album tinged by rock chords and big choruses. Time To Dance adds a melodic edge to winsome lyrics, while lead single The End has managed to worm its way into our collective ears since its October release. It’s got the most light and shadow about it in the slow-building verses, before the smack of energy and warmth in the chorus. Piano-based bonus track Marianne is slow-burning and caps off an album that proves that The Jezabels remain one of our biggest indie-pop exports. Hannah Story

6. No Country THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 29


album reviews

YOU ME AT SIX

DUM DUM GIRLS

Cooking Vinyl

Sub Pop/Inertia

Behind the scenes, the completion of Cavalier Youth forced You Me At Six (YMAS) to operate differently – and perhaps a little harder – than in their previous records, but their more productive work ethic doesn’t necessarily translate through a large portion of the songwriting in their latest, fourth album Cavalier Youth. While opening track Too Young To Feel This Old provokes a glimmer of promise for the record’s remaining contents (reaffirmed all the more in the more structurally impressive Lived A Lie), Cavalier Youth progresses with a disappointing lack of variety. Save for the big, optimistic, atypically YMAS poppunk anthem Fresh Start Fever, the album operates at a mostly unwavering pace, differentiated only by mere subtleties in timing – and barely at all in structure or lyrical content (which, to no one’s

It’s only been four years since Dum Dum Girls – initially the moniker for NYC-via-LA chanteuse Dee Dee Penny’s solo recordings – landed on the scene with a splash, but already the stylistic change that the nowfull band has undergone in that time is bordering on seismic.

Too True

Cavalier Youth

★★★ surprise, predominately focuses on the subject of romance). For the most part, Cavalier Youth is catchy and easily digestible, but YMAS have played things a little too safe with this one, and, as a result, it isn’t quite the stand-out record we were hoping for from the outfit, and nor is it an entirely memorable one on the whole. Evidence of the band’s growth since their inception is certainly there, but given the success of their third album Sinners Never Sleep (released in 2011), it comes as quite a let-down that the British three-piece didn’t attempt to be any bolder this time around. Justine Keating

Their 2010 debut I Will Be was punchy and laden with fuzzedout guitars, while second album Only In Dreams (2011) proved to be the perfect bridge to their current aesthetic; namely superslick production with an ‘80s pop sheen, the sub-three-minute songs all seemingly tailor-made for radio with their predictable structures and commercial-oriented hooks and melodies. Despite the trademark reverb it’s not miles removed from what acts like The Divinyls, The Pretenders and even Pat Benatar were doing 30 years ago – songs like Evil Blooms, Rimbaud Eyes, In The Wake Of You

SKY FERREIRA

DOLLY PARTON

EMI

Sony

At 15 Ferreira was Capitol Records’ big bet to be the next Britney. Cut to five years later and it’s all glowing Pitchfork reviews and serious indie hype.

There’s something innately soothing about the voice of Dolly Parton beyond the fact that she has pipes few can rival: superior production, relatable story-telling, self-deprecation, wit, turmoil and empathy are part of the charm, on top of the fond childhood memories she stirs for many Australians who grew up with Parton-loving parents. It’s almost unfathomable that at the age of 68 – on her 42nd album – she still sounds this damn fine, and she’s repaying Australasia for an almost three-decade touring drought broken by her 2011 visit by dropping Blue Smoke several months before the US and Europe to coincide with her February world tour shows.

Like any good pop record, Night Time, My Time’s also got at least one serious club hit in 24 Hours, with a chorus ready-made for girls in too-high heels to 30 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

and Little Minx would slot into current ‘classic hits’ radio formats seamlessly. There’s more texture and dynamics underpinning tracks such as Cult Of Love, Too True To Be Good and first single Lost Boys & Girls, but not enough to lift the album from its overall malaise. Too True is brash and confident and will no doubt find plenty of admirers, but it’s ultimately one-dimensional and formulaic – one can only assume that the conceptual stylistic jump from ‘60s girl groups to ‘80s rock divas and the corresponding sonic shift from lo-fi to multitracking seemed better on paper than it proves in practice. Steve Bell

Blue Smoke

Night Time, My Time

There’s plenty of pop tropes here, but done with a twist; Boys is an empowerment anthem (“All the little things that you do/Always getting in my way”) turned love song (“You put my faith back in boys”) with Ferreira’s breathy voice floating sweetly on top of aggressive distorted guitar and synth. In I Blame Myself Ferreira analyses the pressures that her “reputation” has brought from the industry, taking responsibility and owning her mistakes in a way that’s fierce and powerful.

★★★

★★★ be screaming along to at two in the morning: “I wish these 24 hours would never end...”. The second half of the album gets a bit more unconventional; Omanko buzzes and whines with incessant distorted cymbals, and in Heavy Metal Heart we (aptly) get the first really good guitar riff, and a taste of those grunge influences that supposedly set Ferreira apart from real commercial pop stars. Night Time, My Time is a long record, and starts to drag towards the end, especially on the clunky title track, but it’s also dark, sultry and sometimes even fun. Madeleine Laing

The title track lead single sets a shuffling rhythm as fiddles and slide guitar soundtrack a rather upbeat tale of lyin’ and cheatin’ mixed with train metaphors and straight-up “clickity clack”s, “choo choo”’s and “woo woo”’s from Parton that would feel

★★★★ overcooked for anyone else, but not for the country queen of heartbreak. It’s overwhelmingly cute to hear Parton team up with her old Islands In The Stream buddy Kenny Rogers for You Can’t Make Old Friends; it’s easy to imagine them singing this one to each other in the round too as the songstress trades: “’Cause we both know” to Rogers’ huskily spoken “We’ll still be old friends”. Willie Nelson also guests on the beautifully solemn ode to love, From Here To The Moon And Back. Parton shows no signs of slowing down with Blue Smoke; rather quite the opposite – and why the hell should she, she’s fabulous! Tyler McLoughlan


albums/singles/eps

★★★

★★★★½

★★★½

A$AP MOB

THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM

ANGELIQUE KIDJO

MAJOR LEAGUES

Eve

Weird Season

Trillmattic

B-Sides

429/Universal

Chugg/MGM

RCA/Sony

Shock/SideOneDummy

This track is helped out with a memorable verse by Method Man, but it didn’t need it with that Golden Age beat.

Angelique Kidjo’s latest album Eve (named after her mother) really has it all – a balanced blend of traditional tribal and modern electronic beats, stirring string contributions, heart-warming harmonies from several African women’s choirs, more than three Beninese dialects, as well as cameos from Vampire Weekend’s Rostam Batmanglij and Nigerian singer Asa. Eve celebrates African womanhood, all the while brimming with Kidjo’s trademark warmth, positivity and funk, which never fails to instigate dancing. Hello and Ebile are but a few highlights, as well as the three interludes which break up the album with almost ritualistic chanting.

Local misfits Major Leagues have come a long way since the easy jangle of Teen Mums hit the airwaves some 12 months ago. Their debut release is five tracks that perfectly encapsulate the creative arc the quartet have travelled on. Opening with Silver Tides, a sun-bleached midtempo number coloured with bent distortion that Slowdive acolytes could get behind, Weird Season settles into a comfortable amble – Feel is a seductive grind (and the best track here), Endless Drain remains a hookladen pop overdose, while closer Creeper is a throwaway gem.

Fay Ray/(She’s Got) My Name And My Number

It’s not quite new Gaslight, but this LP is a welcomed addition for fans of the band. It features one fresh tune (She Loves You) and choice covers from the likes of Pearl Jam and The Rolling Stones, but the best tracks here are all pulled from acoustic sessions. What’s great about these cuts is that they’re some of the most swinging rockers from Gaslight’s catalogue (Great Expectations, Boxer), yet stripped and presented raw, you can really soak in Brian Fallon’s lyrics, one of the band’s biggest strengths. Because of that, when you go back to the original records, the tunes hold a lot more poignancy.

Spiral Scratch

Benny Doyle

Jazmine O’Sullivan

BECK Blue Moon EMI Sounds like Pet Sounds-era Beach Boys only less edgy. It’s easy listening mainstream ‘70s radio, but lacking in any real pop.

THE EXILE CO/THE CITY LIGHTS

Brendan Telford

Two Sydney rock acts team up for a split 7” on a new Sydney label and it’s all good news – The City Lights are as bright as ever.

SALLY SELTMAN Billy Caroline

★★★★

★★★

★★★½

Predictably great Seltmann track that has production edge and an incredible pop hook, echoing the catchy vibe of 1234.

DAMIEN JURADO

ELIZABETH ROSE

PIGEON

Brothers And Sisters Of The Eternal Son

Elizabeth Rose

Settle In

QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE

Inertia Access

Create/Control

Secretly Canadian/Inertia

When the vocals are cut up and the bassline bounces this works best. The classic house beat is clearly looking backwards, not necessarily a bad thing.

Quietly going about his business as a cult indie troubadour, Damien Jurado has again teamed up with producer Richard Swift to create a textured, dynamic, sprawling eleventh album that offers a complexity in atmosphere far beyond the heartbreak of 2012’s Maraqopa. With psych frameworks, moody synths, vocal shadowing often in falsetto and the influence of dub, Jurado’s folk experimentations are brought to a percussive high in Silver Donna while Return To Maraqopa makes one wonder if he has been mentoring Cloud Control. Take some time to absorb this one.

This bright spark of a release from national house favourite Elizabeth Rose is an ethereal dreamscape of sound. Coming from someone who rarely frequents the electro-pop scene, it’s a fun and accessible record, never growing old on the ears, while not being too starved for attention. Stand-outs include Is It Love? a feminine, delicate track that packs an impressive punch with interwoven synths that offer more than your average electronic score, while Only Me breaks free from expectation, with the talents of VCS offering strong male vocals to match Rose’s strength and self-confidence.

On first listens, this release boasts all the most obvious signs of a dance release; elegant vocal distortions, punchy beats and strobing keys – a playful overall sound, perfect for, well… dancing. Yet the actual lyrics are further developed than your regular tracks intended for emphatic dance moves as opposed to sedentary reflection. This means that this release from Brisbane’s own Pigeon might reach a wider audience – the raver and the thinker, the party and the morning after. This makes it a special record in itself. Plus its level of catchiness is a sin.

Chris Yates

Tyler McLoughlan

Alice Bopf

If I Had A Tail Remote Control Just can’t get my head around QOTSA these days. A lot of different ideas (disco beat, atonal chorus), but it doesn’t gel at all.

STORM QUEEN Look Right Through (MK Remix) Ministry Of Sound

Alice Bopf

THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 31


live reviews

AVICII, NEW WORLD SOUND Riverstage 24 Jan Arriving at the Riverstage the funky electro house of New World Sound has the crowd in a frenzy, the venue full to the brim. Joel Fletcher and New World Sound have the crowd warmed up, the mosh pit going nuts. A quick trip to the merchandise takes us through a crowd of mixed ages, from young teens to parents keeping a watchful eye over said excited teens. New World Sound finish with an appreciative roar from the crowd for what has been an energetic set. Anticipation prompts chanting for Avicii, who takes to the

(Calvin Harris’), This Is What It Feels Like, Don’t You Worry Child, Liar Liar intermingled with Silhouettes, and New World Sound’s track, Flute, intermixed with more intense, harder tracks like Fall Into The Sky (Zedd) – but it feels disjointed at times. With 45 minutes to go and a tease of Levels, we are given Fade Into Darkness once again, filling the venue with a sing-along atmosphere. Having teased the intro to Levels throughout the show he finally delivers the much anticipated track with 15 minutes to go, the crowd jumping, hands in the air with renewed energy, only to be brought back down to earth with a thud and an abrupt mood change. The chants for an encore are responded to as Hey Brother breaks the silence, plumes of smoke shoot from the stage and

AVICII @ RIVERSTAGE. PIC: TERRY SOO

turntables in a T-shirt instead of his signature plaid shirt, his cap backwards, to start the show with his current hit, Hey Brother. The crowd goes mental – the track clearly a favourite – singing along with the lyrics and exploding at the remixed chorus, which come with a heavy beat. Smashing out his own hits one after the other, Long Road To Hell, followed by ID (I Wish I Could Turn Back Time), then Wake Me Up, Avicii has the crowd belting out the lyrics. Impressive visuals easily keep our attention on the massive screens on both sides of the stage, behind and in front of the turntables, showing trippy abstract colours, an epic 3D night skyline along with a 3D robot head. Avicii covers a number of genres throughout the show, the crowd particularly enjoying Smile (Galantis), Free (Ivan Gough & Jebu), The Tracks Of My Tears, Sweet Nothing 32 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

comedy to lighten the mood. McDermott’s previous Paul Sings tour was entertaining, but the songs were beginning to veer dangerously close to lounge music and there was a sense that he was skating by on his charisma and voice. Tonight, with the band stripped back to guitar and piano, the compositions are closer to jazz and his voice, never weak, is stronger than before, particularly as the night goes on. The songs are thematically bleak, inspired by school shootings, tsunamis and loss, and there’s a rawness to the singing that suggests a grief still fresh, but the lyrics tend to end up pointing to hope – to the beauty and love in the world rather than the despair. Not every song works, but Her Agoraphobic Hands and Needle & Thread are particular stand-outs and this is easily the strongest collection of music that he has performed.

PAUL MCDERMOTT @ POWERHOUSE. PIC: MARKUS RAVIK

with a bang from behind us a shower of white confetti coats the audience and fills the sky, ending the night on a high. Nicole Brumby

PAUL MCDERMOTT

Brisbane Powerhouse 25 Jan Under a thin spotlight, and in front of back-lit artwork from the exhibition that sparked this show, Paul McDermott presents The Dark Garden, his darkest and most personal performance to date. Structured around the five stages of grief (anger, denial, bargaining, cross-dressing and acceptance, in this particular version), the show centres on a collection of songs inspired by the death of a close friend, interspersed with stories and

show presented straight, a more honest and reflective construction of the same base material. It seems, judging from tonight, that it would be within McDermott’s range, but for now both audience and performer seem content to engage at a safe distance. Sky Kirkham

HOUSE OF GIANTS, MIDWEST, HARLEQUIN

The Waiting Room 25 Jan Only a few shows on since introducing their new vocalist Stephen Nolan and Harlequin are already looking and sounding like a band on the cusp of

HOUSE OF GIANTS @ THE WAITING ROOM. PIC: DAVE KAN

The stories between the songs are sometimes interesting, sometimes enlightening and occasionally suggest the performance is more layered, or perhaps less honest, than it initially appears. Many of them stretch on too long though, and McDermott seems almost too aware of his own public persona. Half-serious jokes about his ego, and vulgar anecdotes about Annie Sprinkle (a former porn star, now sex educator) and, separately, a vaudeville goose, are strained and stand in stark contrast to the brief insights into the songs and the tragedy that spawned them.

creating something revelatory. Nolan’s voice is humbling to say the least, and it naturally soars over the quintet’s experimental brand of rock. Untitled and Loop benefit from a number of tempo changes and the boys’ smart grasp of dynamics means that the music is always working towards something climactic – if the journey hasn’t taken you there already. When bassist Jack Hudson cuts an excited glance over to guitarist Michal Mihow before launching into the finale of Rachunek, you just know the group are enjoying things as much as we are.

This leads to a tonal disconnect in the material tonight. The songs are largely good, the comedy a mixed bag, but the links between the two are awkward at best. McDermott is a captivating performer and quite capable of making an audience laugh, but it would be interesting to see this

Midwest are the most straightup band on this bill, playing a passionate brand of post-hardcore that recalls the fantastic punk currently coming from east coast America. It suits the house party gigging vibe that you get from The Waiting Room perfectly. Miles and Lewis Wilson trade


live reviews in these really solid riffs that are propelled forward with rhythms by the ever-smiling Hobey Bennett. The guitarists thrash about when it’s called for, and concentrate on the upper register of their fretboards when they want to get provocative. This all goes down while Timothy Corke chokes out his bass guitar and emotions, the frontman’s vocal tone making sure you feel every guttural roar. As Far As The Eye Can See is a highlight. The evening then gets a real freeform lean as headliners House Of Giants plug in. The instrumental group move in and out of various styles with frightening ease, and when they really lock in on a certain section – be it prog, jazz or funk – it’s impossible not to be completely knocked over by the collective experience. Zac Rainsford is the focal point of the group – moving his fingers across his guitar neck like a spider crawling over a web, while smashing additional percussion when it’s called for. But you get the sense that

it’s only that way because he’s positioned at the front of the group – someone has to be. This is the great thing about House Of Giants: no one is the hero, it’s the music that is the star. And you get the feeling that’s exactly how the five-piece – and everyone else in the room tonight – like it. Benny Doyle

AFRICAN BRAIDZ, ENDERIE NUATAL, SECOND INTERVIEW, DOMESTIC SPHERE Brunswick Hotel 26 Jan For Australia Day ‘14, in an odd combo, Australian flags coupled with Keno and televised tru-blu sporting events line the walls of the classic Brunswick Hotel for a night of experimental electronica

that also marks a return of shows to the pseudo karaoke bar.Things kick off with Domestic Sphere, who also serves as the house DJ tonight, offering up a few sets of more traditional ‘tracks’ mixed with house beats and jam electronica and it’s consistently a good mix. Second Interview, led by Multiple Man’s Sean Campion, bring an oddball trance sound equal parts aggressive and meditative. The set though is far too short and despite the room already being quite full a number of people arrive during the latter portion, which is a shame for a polished performance and outfit. His day job may be knocking out the insatiable noisy improv with Cured Pink but at night Enderie Nuatal turns into a souped-up skyline with the registration plate set to RED DEMON as he brings the beats to satisfy the ravers, delivering a non-stop set identifiable by its notable peaks comprising natural-sounding percussion and drums mixed with sped-up and heavily effected synth lines. By the end, the man,

who tonight kind of looks like a starring member of the 1986 Australian cricket team, has the crowd eating out of his hands. And the headlining event comes in the form of African Braidz, the pairing of Chris Campion (Multiple Man) and Damon Black (Secret Birds) in a delightful and in-line-withproceedings electronic form. The start is a bit rough, courtesy of an all-cancelling sound problem killing the group’s sound entirely as they begin. As their set progresses they mix sounds of trance with live synths and triggered manipulation and the results are a bangin’ hit with the already lubricated crowd, lapping up every minute amongst an excellent VHS mix of Jamaican dancehall and digital glitch as a backdrop. At times the synch drops out and the odd sound drops up but damn, these distant Chemical Brothers lookalikes have a solid future in bringing the lads and ladies the beats should they leave the guitars at home. Bradley Armstrong

arts reviews

Dead Inside S3, E4 This Week On Girls: “Just because it’s fake doesn’t mean I don’t feel it,” whimpers Laird, turtle corpse at hand, so attuned to death even Crystal Fairy Caroline’s made-up tale of Adam’s dystrophied cousin causes snot to drip from his nose. Co-writing Judd Apatow leans on Freaks & Geeks’ classic ‘Tests & Breasts’ climax: nothing soliciting pity – and leverage – like a well-rehearsed tearjerker. Stories create “the

illusion of continuity” amidst chaos; making sense from the senseless. One day John Cameron Mitchell’s on Grindr, the next he’s facedown in the Hudson River; not even his non-disclosed toxicology report inspiring grief in Hannah. “It’s my first death,” she shrugs; existential angst reserved for her e-book’s in-flux status. Death is sudden absence turned into a story, like the one about Jessa’s ‘dead’ friend Season, who’s not only alive, but Melonie Diaz; no longer in Jessa-enabled shambles but all Baby, Brownstone and CoolLooking Husband. Season’s death was as pantomimed as Hannah’s crocodile tears, which are but a mask for her real relationship insecurities.

THE PAST Film

In cinemas 6 Feb In psychological French drama The Past, director Asghar Farhadi offers equal parts tension and tenderness in a story full of unraveling knots, which teeters on the edge of melodrama but never succumbs – thanks to a nuanced portrayal of the complexities of relationships and restrained performances from the main cast. The film begins with Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa) returning to France after four years in Tehran to finalise his divorce with estranged wife Marie (The Artist’s Bérénice Bejo). He then discovers Marie’s plans to marry her new partner

Hannah Nudity Watch: Dressing for a Ray’s shift, with even less grief than clothing. Shosh Amaze Meter: Burbling with Bandana Collection pride. The Tao Of Adam: “When you die, how would you feel if a bunch of judgemental creeps snarkily reported on every fucking detail of your body decomposing?”

THE PAST

Samir (Tahar Rahim), which Marie’s teenage daughter Lucie (Pauline Burlet) vehemently opposes. In his attempt to patch things up between Marie and Lucie, Ahmad digs up more and more secrets until you can almost smell the stench of guilt that threatens to suffocate the main characters. Dreary, wet weather, soft focus and muted grey tones throughout the film amplify its bleak atmosphere and sense of foreboding. These tumultuous revelations, while able to evoke shock, merely act as a diving board for what’s really the focus: the exploration of the relationship between significant others, ex-spouses, and children and adults. Some of the film’s most moving moments come from the situation being viewed through children’s eyes, their innocent bluntness about heavy topics hitting like a silent blow to the stomach. The Past questions humankind’s capacity for selfishness and forgiveness, our need to absolve, justify and take/shirk responsibility for our actions, and how the choices we make always have a consequence. Stephanie Liew THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 33


34 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014


the guide

Member answering/role: Paddy – bass How long have you been together? About three years with more than a few members coming and going since we started. You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? Erykah Badu never disappoints, The Beatles are a pretty safe bet and we’ve spent many a cloudy car ride with Desmond Cheese pumping in Beau’s old Merc. Would you rather be a busted broke-but-revered Hank Williams figure or some kind of Metallica monster? I think the dream is to just break even and have all the touring, recording, releasing, photographing, publicising, film clipping and wax cutting pay for itself so that we could afford to do it all to the highest standard without dipping into our own pockets. Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? We’ve always looked up to other bands from Brisbane, particularly LeSuits, who were like our big brother band when we started gigging. We’ve also spent a lot of time listening to Laneous & The Family Yah and Yeo (who doesn’t live in Brisbane anymore, but that doesn’t matter). What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? We’re really just looking forward to getting this release out and having it toured so we can relax and get back to songwriting and focusing on our live show. We’ve got a few festival gigs around the place on the other side of the vinyl release, and beyond that I think we’ll just be taking our time banking up some cash and musical material to do it all over again in a year or so. StormChasers play New Globe Theatre on Saturday 1 Feb, Solbar, Sunshine Coast on Sunday 7 Feb and Queen St Mall on Saturday 8 Feb (free, afternoon). Photo by TERRY SOO.

STORMCHASERS THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 35


readers poll

2013 READERS POLL RESULTS After a huge year of class music heard from the stereo and stage, you, the muchloved readers of The Music, have come back to us with your top picks from 2013, and it seems like we’re pretty much on the same page – great minds thinking alike and all that. Your number one record was created by four likely lads from Sheffield, while a New Zealand teenager captured your hearts, as well as the rest of the world’s. The Boss inspired you all, cinema took many to places unknown and plenty of horns were raised to the altar of metal. Readers, this is your yearly wrap-up.

MOVIE OF THE YEAR 1. Gravity 2. Django Unchained 3. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire 4. The Great Gatsby

1. Royals LORDE

5. Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues

2. Get Lucky DAFT PUNK FT PHARRELL 3. Do I Wanna Know? ARCTIC MONKEYS

ALBUM OF THE YEAR 1. AM ARCTIC MONKEYS 2. Pure Heroine LORDE 3. Reflektor ARCADE FIRE 4. ...Like Clockwork QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE 5. Hungry Ghost VIOLENT SOHO

4. Covered In Chrome VIOLENT SOHO

6. Modern Vampires Of The City VAMPIRE WEEKEND 7. Days Are Gone HAIM 8. Random Access Memories DAFT PUNK

5. Avant Gardener COURTNEY BARNETT

SONG OF THE YEAR

6. Riptide VANCE JOY 7. Retrograde JAMES BLAKE 8. Is This How You Feel? THE PREATURES

9. Push The Sky Away NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS

9. Reflektor ARCADE FIRE

10. Trouble Will Find Me THE NATIONAL

10. The Wire HAIM

LIVE PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR

36 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

1. Soundwave 2. Splendour In The Grass 3. St Jerome’s Laneway Festival 4. Big Day Out 5. Groovin’ The Moo

QLD. Black Bear Lodge NSW. Enmore Theatre

2. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds

VIC. Corner Hotel

3. Neutral Milk Hotel 4. Haim

FESTIVAL OF THE YEAR

VENUE OF THE YEAR

1. Bruce Springsteen

PIC: KANE HIBBERD

PIC: JOSH GROOM

5. Foals

ARTIST OF THE YEAR

6. Tame Impala

1. Lorde

6. Tame Impala

7. Muse

2. Arctic Monkeys

7. Vampire Weekend

8. The Drones

3. Flume

8. Remi

9. Beyoncé

4. Haim

9. Violent Soho

10. Blink-182

5. Daft Punk

10. Arcade Fire

SA. The Gov WA. Rosemount Hotel ALL READERS POLL PRIZE WINNERS WILL BE CONTACTED VIA EMAIL. FOR THE FULL LIST OF WINNERS, HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU.


eat/drink

THE GREAT OUTDOOR(CINEMA)S It’s well and truly outdoor cinema season. Here are our suggestions for the best things to munch and sip on while your eyes are more preoccupied with the big screen. Illustration Sophie Blackhall-Cain.

CHEESE AND CRACKERS

DIP Have it with crackers, bread, carrots and celery... it really is a versatile, wonderful thing.

If you wanna get really fancy, bring some sliced cabana and olives and have a mini antipasto plate!

SANDWICHES AND ROLLS

CRISPS

Pre-bought or homemade, it’s hearty enough for dinner and it doesn’t need to be kept warm. No chance of poking yourself in the face with utensils, either.

These noisy snacks (plastic packaging ruffles, loud crunches) can only be eaten in the time between bagging a good position and waiting for the sun to finally go away so the movie can start. Or the really loud bits of action scenes.

FRUIT Ah, nature’s dessert. Stick to non-messy kinds like grapes, berries, apples and bananas. Stay away from oranges, watermelon and mangoes, unless pre-chopped into convenient forkable bits.

BOTTLED SOFT DRINK OR JUICE Something you can pop the cap back onto when you’re not drinking it, to minimise spills. The sugar will provide you with a burst of energy to keep you from falling asleep during the film.

COOKIES As long as they’re not too crumbly, you can go for any type and any texture. Their round form feels good and comforting in your hand; that’s a fact.

café good food & coffee Mon-Sun 7am–3pm

ALL D

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THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 37


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FRONTLASH

TOURING THIS WEEK

CREDIT WHERE DUE

Campbell Newman should be congratulated for his approach to the issue of curbing trading hours to halt alcohol-related violence. Common sense and politicians don’t often mix, but in this case ‘Can Do’ is right on the money.

HE’S RICH, BEEYOTCH!

BEWARE OF THE BITE

HEY GIRL...

Unbelievable news that US comedian Dave Chappelle is not only emerging from his selfimposed cultural exile but also coming to Australia for a run of shows in February! Check him out, on his day one of the funniest men on the planet!

One of Brisbane’s bright altcountry lights Rattlehand will slide in to New Globe Theatre tonight (29 Jan) as part of their Campfire Test sessions. It’s $5 entry with other sets from Soldiers Of The Sun and Colin Lillie.

We just wanted to tell you about StormChasers new EP, Hey Girl. You don’t need Ryan Gosling anymore. Hear the bubbly new tracks Saturday, New Globe Theatre; 7 Feb, Solbar, Maroochydore; and 8 Feb, Queen Street Mall.

RICH AND SMOOTH

FULLY FORMED

Her voice has been described as “melting chocolate”, and now you can enjoy the delicious sounds of Nadia Sunde when she waltzes into the Brisbane Jazz Club this Friday, promoting her new album Stoking The Fire.

From sole bedroom project to fully operational four-piece, Brisbane rockers Taken By Wolves are launching You Belong To Me at Beetle Bar, Saturday, with support from Young Griffo, Junkyard Diamonds and The Before Party.

HOMELY TASTES

SWEET SOUNDS

Sonic Masala is back at The Waiting Room this Friday, presenting a brace of songwriting nuance just left of centre. Curlew will be supported by St Augustus and The Steady As She Goes. Doors at 8pm, $10, BYO.

Rough and tumble bluesman Sugarcane Collins is back on the road again, playing this Friday and 8 Feb, Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna; Sunday, Nimbin Hotel; and 9 Feb, The Rails, Byron Bay. He’s showing off his new LP, Downunder The Blues.

THANKS KIWIS! The NZ ODI team did us a solid by beating India so that our boys leap back to the top of the world rankings. One format down, two to go. Number one! Number one!

DAVE CHAPPELLE

BACKLASH NOT GOOD ENOUGH

Memo to anti-Oz Day protestors who vandalised Captain Cook’s cottage last week – being a complete cunt is not the right way to get your message across.

TIME TO STOP Speaking of the ‘C word’, the Japanese have to stop the annual dolphin slaughter which was once again carried out last week. It’s a disgrace and unjustifiable by tradition or cultural grounds.

GROW UP BEEBS Poor Bieber, he’s going off the rails Britney-style. Anecdotal evidence suggests that his pampered existence has resulted in him being an utter twat 24/7, here’s hoping he realises before it’s too late. Or not.

38 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… THE JEZABELS The Brink MGM SKY FERREIRA Night Time, My Time EMI DUM DUM GIRLS Too True Sub Pop/Inertia WITHIN TEMPTATION Hydra Roadrunner/Warner

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

FUTURE SOUNDS

IN THE FAST LANE

BONE CRUSHERS

Street 66 – theirs is a blend of hip hop, reggae, soul and funk; an exotic, overwhelming sound that’s been birthed in our own backyard. The fourpiece headline at The Loft, 14 Feb, with support from Astro Travellers and Anika Mantell.

Although they’ve only been together a short while, the focus of WA metal slayers To Hell With Honour has been clear from the outset – to destroy on stage. Hold on tight when they play Ric’s Bar, 27 Mar.

PERSONAL BEST RECORDS

TAPE/OFF CURLEW

Member’s Name: Nathan Pickels

Member’s name: Mark Zian

Single title: Pedestal Fan

Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? Between Dad’s Backstreet Boys and Abba CD’s the best I could scrounge was Michael Jackson – Off The Wall. First record you bought? The Offspring – Americana. Record you put on when you’re really miserable? It depends on what kind of miserable. If I want to wallow then Jason Molina – Pyramid Electric Co. If I want cheering up then anything by Lambchop or Grandaddy.

THREE SCOOPS, PLEASE

WESTERN FRONT

The Triple Treat tour has a habit of breaking some pretty hot acts, and this year will be no different with young songstress Eves, pictured, prodigious teen Jesse Davidson and Jordan Léser. Get amongst it at Black Bear Lodge, 6 Mar.

See the world through different coloured lenses when Perth electronic darlings Crooked Colours make their welcomed return to our parts for the first time since supporting Rüfüs last year. Catch them at Alhambra Lounge, 13 Feb.

Record you put on when you bring someone home? My girlfriend and I can’t remember, recently I got her obsessed with Max Ryan & Where Were You At Lunch. Most surprising record in your collection? Boys II Men – Cooleyhighharmony or maybe their other albums. Last thing you bought/ downloaded? Machine Translations – The Bright Door. Curlew play The Waiting Room on Friday 31 Jan.

KEEPING IT REAL

KNIFE WATCHMEN

Maintaining the popularity which saw him take out second place on the inaugural Australia Idol many moons ago, Shannon Noll will head for the Darling Downs to play a special show at City Golf Club, Toowoomba, 14 Feb.

Watch the rock chaos unfold as garage lads Horror My Friend play two dates while they’re visiting from the ‘Laide. Catch the trio at Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel, 27 Feb and The Loft, Gold Coast, 1 Mar.

SINGLE FOCUS

What’s the song about? Being the partner of someone who worries about things and can’t sleep because of it. How long did it take to write/record? Considering it’s comprised of only four actual chords, a long time actually. Is this track from a forthcoming release/ existing release? It is off our forthcoming album Chipper which is set for release around April this year through excellent new Brisbane label Sonic Masala. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Mainly lack of sleep. It does give you a lot of think to think things through. Probably too much, really. We’ll like this song if we like... ...And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead and free jazz (shout out to the legendary Ben Thompson). Do you play it differently live? Live we can’t do the horns freak out so it gets replaced with as much feedback noise as possible. Tape/Off play Trainspotters at Grand Central Hotel on Saturday 1 Feb.

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ON THE MUSIC STEREO

FUTURE SOUNDS

PERSONAL BEST RECORDS

FUEL THE FIRE

PAYS TO BE FRANC

Record you play when you’re miserable? Toxicity – SOAD.

It’s pedal to the metal with Central Coast rockers Smokin’ Mirrors gearing up to launch new EP Set To Ignite with a free show at Ric’s Bar, 6 Mar. Soaring vocals, unapologetic riffs – get it in ya.

Teenage production sensation Young Franco will be dropping his brand of Futurefunk with shows at Komune on the Gold Coast, 15 Feb, as well as Bowler Bar, 15 Mar. Tickets for the latter show are $10 on the door.

Beneath The Sun TOM E. LEWIS

Record you play when you bring someone home? Museum – Ball Park Music.

ONLY LIVING THINGS

A MOVING TRIBUTE

The B-Sides THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM

Most surprising record? The Singles – No Doubt.

So Long, See You Tomorrow BOMBAY BICYCLE CLUB

Maids play Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel, Saturday and Swingin’ Safari, Gold Coast on Sunday 2 Feb.

A Sydney Vegan Festival sideshow has just been announced with Vegan Black Metal Chef, Terry Hope Romero and Isa Chandra Moskowitz from Post Punk Kitchen. Check it out at Crowbar, 30 Mar.

Written with the convicted women of Australia’s history in mind, Love-Song-Circus is the latest endeavour from Katie Noonan, working together with circus group Circa. Cremorne Theatre, QPAC, 4 – 8 Mar.

Grassed Inn BLANK REALM No Depression UNCLE TUPELO Alien Lanes GUIDED BY VOICES Pure Heroine LORDE

MAIDS Member’s Name: Matt James First record you bought? I hate this one. Savage Garden.

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CAFÉ - BAR

321 BRUNSWICK STREET MALL, FORTITUDE VALLEY

Wednesday 29th January

Yarn Story Telling Night - Back To School Thursday 30th January

Ken Stringfellow & Chris Stamey Friday 31st January

Little Odessa Free entry Late: Black Bear Vinyl Club Saturday 1nd February

DJ James Wright Discomentuary Sunday 2rd February

GUNK Tempura Nights & Doom Mountain

29TH OF JAN

LE PARTI SOUL W/ DJ REDBEARD (8:00PM - LATE) CARRIAGE (10:00PM) + SPECIAL GUESTS (9:00PM) 30TH OF JAN

STUDENT NIGHT: WHITE SUMMER (10:30PM) + LONDON BUREAU (9:30PM) 31ST OF JAN

PLATINUM PEN (9:00PM) + SNEEKY PICNIC (8:00PM) 1ST OF FEB

LIONHEIR (9:00PM) + GUESTS 2ND OF FEB

RIC’S EXPOSED #6 HEAT 1. THE BUMBACLUTS (7:00PM) + YOUTH ALLOWANCE (7:45PM) + DREAM GIRL (8:30PM) + LOVE LOST (9:15PM) + BRUTET BEN (9:45PM) 3RD OF FEB

HOSPO NIGHT FEAT: ANDY MCCABE (8:30PM) & (9:30PM) 4TH OF FEB

DOM COLE (8:30PM) & (9:30PM)

FREE LIVE MUSIC AND INDIE DJS WANT TO PLAY? EMAIL BOOKINGS@RICSBAR.COM.AU

WWW.RICSBAR.COM.AU

THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 41


opinion ROOTS DOWN

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

OG FLAVAS

BLUES ‘N’ ROOTS WITH DAN CONDON

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

I’m not at all familiar with the past work of Tom E Lewis, which I’m embarrassed to admit after hearing Beneath The Sun, the 55-year-old South Eastern Arnhem Land man’s new album. While Lewis has probably been somewhat more renowned as an actor over the past few decades, music has been a big part of his life as well and he’s toured the world playing jazz in the past. There’s not much jazz on Beneath The Sun; it’s a record of stories that has that feeling of authenticity that can’t be faked – no matter how good an actor he may be. “I survived the dark side,” he says in his bio. You can tell. The record is out through Skinnyfish Music/MGM on 14 Feb. If you get a chance, jump online and search for the discography of Bobby Keys. The past 44 years has seen him as a part of The Rolling Stones, but he’s truly done so much more than that – performing with everyone from Joe Cocker (on Mad Dogs & Englishmen, no less) to Lynyrd Skynyrd over the years. He will be in Australia with the Stones in March and has a band of shit-hot musicians, which he calls The Suffering Bastards, joining him for dates along the east coast of the country. The shows will see him take a journey through the myriad classic tracks he’s had a hand in and sound like they’re going to be a real hoot. Check The Guide for details.

TOM E LEWIS

42 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

DEAD KELLY

If you’re a fan of Australian metal – and I mean really true blue Aussie metal – make sure you head to deadkelly.net and grab a free download of Sons Of The Southern Cross, the fully brutal debut album from Dead Kelly that was just released on Australia Day. These blokes hail from the Sunshine Coast, Yandina to be precise, and were born from the arse end of vocalist Pine Cone Throat’s ten-year stretch trying to make it in the world of alternative rock. After sinking tens of thousands of dollars into professional studios, publicists, video clips and all that jazz to walk away with nothing but debt and bad experiences at the end of it, he got serious in a totally different way. Dressed in balaclavas, blue singlets, footy shorts and pluggers, the band’s sound is kind of like Damaged meets Meshuggah with an occasional dose of rabbit-hole prog, and they’ve done everything without playing a single show or spending a cent. They’re funny as fuck, playing up the Aussie metal bogan thing to its full potential, while still tackling some deeply serious issues – you’ve got track titles like Yeah Nah, It’s All Good and then In The Shame Of God. January is probably far too early to call the Australian metal album of the year, but I’m calling it. Last week Swedish melodic death metal pioneers At The Gates posted a 13-second video on Facebook. It contains some blurry imagery of what looks to be a sheet of lyrics, an ominous tone for the soundtrack, and the characters ‘2014’. The immediate conclusion drawn by almost everyone is that At The Gates are working on a new album. If this is the case, it’d be the band’s first studio record since 1995’s genre-

defining and retroactively massive and influential Slaughter Of The Soul. The band broke up in 1996, before reforming for a tour in 2007, and then permanently reforming and remaining on the circuit since 2010. In various interviews, vocalist Tomas Lindberg didn’t rule out the possibility of recording again, even suggesting that they might do an EP of covers at one stage. Last year guitarist Anders Bjorler also left his subsequent band The Haunted. If we don’t see a new record from At The Gates this year they’ve played a very mean trick on their legions of fans. The third album from Adelaide/ Melbourne metalcore group I Killed The Prom Queen is just around the corner. Entitled Beloved, it’s the band’s first full-length since 2006. They’ve released two singles from it thus far, but I’ve gotten my hands on a promo copy that has barely stopped being played since. In keeping with having a different vocalist on each album, in addition to frontman Jamie Hope (ex-The Red Shore), it also marks the recorded debut of drummer Shane O’Brien (Jack The Stripper, ex-Confession) and bassist Benjamin Coyte (In Trenches, Day Of Contempt). The band’s sound is the same but different – there’s more intense drumming, more sing/ scream vocal interplay, more atmospheric synths, significantly more technical shredding embedded into the songs, and even some guest vocals from the dudes out of Soilwork and The Ghost Inside. Longtime fans of the group will find it pretty hard to be disappointed in the effort… it’s looking to be a very close runner up for Australian metal album of the year for me.

Angel Haze’s Dirty Gold has received a limited digital release only in Australia – a shame. The femcee’s decision to leak it obviously backfired. Though her Grimes collab hasn’t materialised, Haze has a song with intriguing Canadian EDM types A Tribe Called Red and, in Battle Cry, Sia. Meanwhile, Haze’s rival Azealia Banks will supposedly drop Broke With Expensive Taste in March. But Universal’s focus is Aussie twerker Iggy Azalea, her The New Classic due in April. Mind, today’s hippest MC is surely Chicago’s Chance The Rapper. who’s working with bud James Blake in LA. Other buzz ‘newcomers’? Sam Smith, who’s sung on hits by Disclosure and Naughty Boy, won both the BRIT Critics’ Choice Award and The BBC’s Sound of 2014. He’ll premiere with May’s LP In The Lonely Hour. Also listen for Rudimental divette Ella Eyre. An ongoing trend is postdubstep soul (or illwave) singersongwriters, like California’s Banks. Jhené Aiko will present Souled Out in May via No ID’s Artium imprint following her crossover Sail Out EP. Tagged ‘the female Frank Ocean’, she used to be down with Chris Stokes’ tween urban-pop empire – and B2K! Kelela, who aired slinky mixtape Cut 4 Me, is recording for LA DJ/producer Kingdom’s Fade To Mind. South London’s Sampha should capitalise on his surprise involvement in Drake’s Nothing Was The Same. Even Australia has a nightbus ticket with Sydney trio Movement on Modular. Into poppier R&B? Check out Tinashe – an altsoul Cassie. Oddly, she’s starred in Two And A Half Men… @therealcyclone

ANGEL HAZE


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Halfway: Old Museum 8 Feb Wire: The Zoo 19 Feb Future Music Festival: RNA Showgrounds 1 Mar Mikhael Paskalev: Alhambra 4 Mar The Growlers: Black Bear Lodge 5 Mar, Coolangatta Hotel 6 Mar Bleach* Festival: Gold Coast 7-23 Mar A Festival Called Panama: Tasmania 8-9 Mar

Suzanne Vega: Brisbane Powerhouse 15 Apr Allen Stone: the Zoo 16 Apr The Wailers: The Tivoli 16 Apr Byron Bay Bluesfest 2014: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm 27-21 Apr KC & The Sunshine Band: The Tivoli 19 Apr India.Arie & Joss Stone: the Tivoli 20 Apr Jake Bugg: The Hi-Fi 23 Apr

Billy Bragg: The Tivoli 20 Mar

Ozomatli: The Zoo 23 Apr

Caspian: Tempo Hotel 20 Mar

Arctic Monkeys: BEC 7 May

GIG OF THE WEEK HUNTERS & COLLECTORS: 2 FEB, SIRROMET WINES

Steve Earle & The Dukes: The Tivoli 15 Apr

WED 29

THU 30

Back To School + Various: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

DiveTheThird + Various: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley

Quennel Mott: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Junior Danger + The Bear Hunt + The Con & The Liar: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

Open Mic Night + Various: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane Campfire. Test feat. Rattlehand + Soldiers Of The Sun + Colin Lillie: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley London Klezmer Quartet: Queensland Multicultural Centre, Kangaroo Point

Ken Stringfellow & Chris Stamey: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Road Plant: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Carl Wockner: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa

Carriage + Guests: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

Snitch feat. Lemuria: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley

Jabba: Royal Exchange Hotel, Toowong

Trainspotters feat. Waax! + Busy Kingdom + Settling: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane

Open Mic Night + Various: The Loft, Chevron Island Acoustic Session with Josh Lovegrove + Friends: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Lecia & Lani: The Vault, Southport One More Ben + Greg Eales + Reuben Aptroot + Sean Fitzgerald: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Jabba: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Jam Session + Various: JMI Live, Bowen Hills Neil Duddy: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Ballad Boy: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt Open Mic Night + Various: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane

London Klezmer Quartet: Queensland Multicultural Centre, Kangaroo Point White Summer + London Bureau: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley Barry Charles & The Deeper Beat: Solbar, Maroochydore Kim Sheehy + New Age Notion + Ella Fence + Shannon Beaumont: The Loft, Chevron Island Renae Suttie + OJ Newcomb: The Piano Bar, Maroochydore The Music Kitchen feat. Ella Fence + Dream Girls + Jack Seven + more: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Frazer Goodman + Friends: The Vault, Southport Superkaleida + Binary Circus + Mars Attacks: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Snitch feat. +Lemuria + Kissing Booth + Columbus + Inside The Whale: X&Y Bar, Fortitude Valley

FRI 31

Latin Cave+Various: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley Zoophonic Blonde: Albany Creek Tavern, Albany Creek Buella Blue & The Raven + The Androgyny + Rollo The Punk Poet + Miss B B LeBuff: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Little Odessa: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Nadia Sunde: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Tubular Bells For Two + Aidan Roberts + Daniel Holdsworth: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm DJ Pipeline Pedro + DJ Jasti: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa Sound Saber + One Man Down + Le Murd + Maybe Logic: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley Wild For The Night feat. Jack This!: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley

KURT VILE: 31 JAN, LANEWAY FESTIVAL

Helena: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill Mojo Webb: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane

Jabba + B-Rad: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Various DJs: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley

Seductive Soul: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central

Gentlemen + Occults + Multiple Man: The Underdog, Fortitude Valley

Strings For Ammo: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane Platinum Pen + Sneeky Picnic: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley Laneway Festival 2014 feat. Adalita + Autre Ne Veut + Cashmere Cat + Cass McCombs + Chvrches + Cloud Control + Danny Brown + Daughter + Dick Diver + Drenge + Earl Sweatshirt + Four Tet + Frightened Rabbit + Haim + Jagwar Ma + Jamie xx + King Krule + Kirin J Callinan + Kurt Vile + Lorde + Mount Kimbie + Mt Warning + Parquet Courts + Run The Jewels + Savages + Scenic + The Growl + The Jezabels + Unknown Mortal Orchestra + Vance Joy + Warpaint + XXYYXX + Youth Lagoon + The Creases + Laneway Festival: RNA Showgrounds, Bowen Hills The Lazy Valentines: Royal Exchange Hotel (8.30pm), Toowong Jeff Carter: Royal Exchange Hotel (4pm), Toowong Rory Ellis + Sugarcane Collins: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna Mykel: Saltbar, South Kingscliff The Velvets + The Ninjas + White Summer: Solbar, Maroochydore Ann Vriend + Andrew Veivers: Soundlounge, Currumbin The Piano Man: Southern Cross Tavern, Coolangatta Steve Blaik: Story Bridge Hotel (The Corner Bar), Kangaroo Point DJ Ritchie: Story Bridge Hotel (Shelter Bar), Kangaroo Point Periphery + Animals As Leaders: The Hi-Fi, West End The Veal: Late Night Comedy + Various: The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley The Mistaeks + Nowhere Else + Pirates of the Tempest: The Loft, Chevron Island Indie Showcase with +Josh Lovegrove + Chrome Recliner + The Unofficials: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Jazz & Shriaz + Various: The Vault, Southport Curlew + St Augustus + Steady As She Goes: The Waiting Room, West End Heavy Roller + Dr Bombay + The Buzzrays + Buttermilk: Transcontinental Hotel, Brisbane

SAT 01

Cookie Jar + Various: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley Taken By Wolves + Kolorsol + thebeforeparty + Young Griffo: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Various DJs: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Remi Harris: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Tubular Bells For Two + Aiden Roberts + Daniel Holdsworth: Brisbane Powerhouse (2pm), New Farm Tubular Bells For Two + Aiden Roberts + Daniel Holdsworth: Brisbane Powerhouse (7.30pm), New Farm Joel Fletcher + Ember: Gilligans, Cairns Trainspotters feat. Tape/Off + Alpine Decline + Maids: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane 1st Annual Rat Rods & Rockabilly Festival+Various: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton Jabba + Quennel Mott: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Lachlan Bryan & The Wildes: Lefty’s Old Time Music Hall (Free entry), Brisbane Musique: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Ramjet + Tullamore Tree + Ger Fennelly: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane Gogarty + HRBRT + Stormchasers: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley Helena: Platinum Nightclub, Broadbeach

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 43


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MON 03

Lionheir + more: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley Bertie Page Clinic + The Real Gone Hick-Ups + Buffalo Gals Dance Co.: Royal Mail Hotel (1pm), Goodna

Rob Hackwood Duo: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Andy McCabe: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

DJ Josh: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Rockaoke + Various: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Hayden Hack Infusion: Solbar, Maroochydore The Associates: Story Bridge Hotel (The Corner Bar), Kangaroo Point

TUE 04

Nick Tango: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

DJ Ritchie: Story Bridge Hotel (Shelter Bar), Kangaroo Point Lij Gilmour: The Hive (All Ages), Fortitude Valley Platinum Pen + Sneeky Picnic + Lane-Harry x Ike Campbell + Chang Po Ching: The Loft, Chevron Island James Zabiela + Pedestrian + Drew Hill: The Met, Fortitude Valley Dance For The Dead feat. Airforce Kid + Jericho13 + Baltimore Gun Club + Triplickit: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Various DJs: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley The Sulphur Lights + Chinese Burns + Gentlemen + Unpeople: The Underdog, Fortitude Valley Bec Whitehead: The Vault, Southport

Dom Cole: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

LEMURIA: 30 JAN, CONISTON LANE

The Australian Queen Tribute Show: The Venue, Townsville

My Fiction + Matthew Turner-Daunc: Dowse Bar (Iceworks), Paddington

Amateur Drunks + Cannon + Mennace2Society + Overrun: The Waiting Room, West End

CC Jerome Jetsetters: Harrigan’s Drift Inn, Jacobs Well

Dead Wolves + BMXRAY + Minus Nine + Seismic Toss: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

SUN 02

Joe ‘Papa’ Roberts Quartet: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Valley Groundation + Tom Frager + Guests: The Hi-Fi, West End

Those Old Soles: Solbar (2pm), Maroochydore Big Kitty: Story Bridge Hotel (Outback Bar), Kangaroo Point

Ragdoll + Mick McHugh: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Maids: Swingin’ Safari, Surfers Paradise

Rockin Bodgies: Logan Diggers Club (3pm), Logan Central

The Furrs + Guests: The Bearded Lady, West End

Exposed #6: Heat 1 + Various: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

Yank Tank: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

A Day On The Green with Hunters & Collectors + You Am I + Something For Kate + British India: Sirromet Winery, Mount Cotton

Frazer Goodman + Friends: The Vault, Southport

Milk Crate Comedy Night + Various: The Loft, Chevron Island Escalate + Various: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Alpine Decline: Tym Guitars (In-Store / 2pm), Fortitude Valley

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tour guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

INTERNATIONAL

Greenthief: The Northern 11 Apr, Norville Hotel 12 Apr, Crowbar 18 Apr, Kings Beach Tavern 19 Apr

Lemuria: Snitch 30 Jan Ken Stringfellow, Chris Stamey: Black Bear Lodge 30 Jan

Boy & Bear: Sunshine Coast Function Centre 26 Apr, Empire Theatre 27 Apr, Lismore Workers Club 14 May

Periphery: The Hi-Fi 31 Jan Groundation: The Hi-Fi 4 Feb The Locust: Crowbar 5 Feb

The Presets, Australian Chamber Orchestra: QPAC 26 May

Selena Gomez: BCEC 6 Feb

Keith Urban: BEC 17 Jun

DJ Shadow: Family 7 Feb Hannah Wants, Doorly: Bowler Bar 7 Feb

FESTIVALS

3 INCHES OF BLOOD: 10 APR, CROWBAR

Dash Berlin: Family 9 Feb

Laneway Festival: RNA Showgrounds 31 Jan

Jeff Martin: Black Bear Lodge 9 Feb The National: Riverstage 11 Feb

Billy Bragg: The Tivoli 20 Mar, The Northern 21 Mar

The English Beat: The Zoo 18 May

Ed Kowalczyk: The Tivoli 12 Feb

Gang Of Four: The Hi-Fi 22 Mar

Devin The Dude: Coniston Lane 12 Feb

Jurassic 5: Eatons Hill Hotel 22 Mar

We Are Scientists: The Zoo 29 May

Ben Pearce: Bowler Bar 15 Feb

Sebadoh: The Zoo 23 Mar

Armin van Buuren: BEC 4 Jun

Wire: The Zoo 19 Feb

Absu: Crowbar 23 Mar

Eminem: Suncorp Stadium 20 Feb

Thirty Seconds To Mars, White Lies: Brisbane Riverstage 30 Mar (AA)

Ellie Goulding: BCEC 5 Jun (AA)

Clutch: The Zoo 21 Feb Skream: Bowler Bar 21 Feb Dolly Parton: BEC 21, 22 Feb Mother’s Cake: Beetle Bar 22 Feb

Kodaline: The Hi-Fi 1 Apr Bobby Keys & The Suffering Bastards: Eatons Hill Hotel 1 Apr

Eddie Vedder: QPAC 22, 23 Feb

The Rolling Stones: Brisbane Entertainment Centre 2 Apr

Singer Mali: Dowse Bar 23 Feb

Kylesa: The Hi-Fi 2 Apr

Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band: BEC 26 Feb

A$AP Ferg: The Hi-Fi 3 Apr

The Wonder Stuff: The Zoo 27 Feb Madeleine Peyroux: The Tivoli 28 Feb Mango Groove: Eatons Hill Hotel 1 Mar

3 Inches Of Blood: Crowbar 10 Apr Suzanne Vega, Seth Lakeman: Brisbane Powerhouse 15 Apr Steve Earle & The Dukes: The Tivoli 15 Apr Allen Stone: The Zoo 16 Apr

Brian McKnight: QPAC 2 Mar

The Wailers: The Tivoli 16 Apr

Six60: The Hi-Fi 2 Mar

Kris Kristofferson: Lismore Workers Club 16 Apr, Empire Theatre 17 Apr, QPAC 18 Apr, Jupiters Theatre 19 Apr

Charles Bradley: The Hi-Fi 4 Mar Mikhael Paskalev: Alhambra Lounge 4 Mar Neko Case: The Hi-Fi 5 Mar

Adrian Edmondson & The Bad Shepherds: Black Bear Lodge 16 Apr

Neil Finn: Nambour Civic Centre 6 Mar, QPAC 7 Mar

Kreator, Death Angel: The Hi-Fi 19 Apr

Bruno Mars: BEC 7 Mar

KC & The Sunshine Band: The Tivoli 19 Apr

Public Enemy: The Hi-Fi 7 Mar Lionel Ritchie: BEC 10 Mar

India Arie, Joss Stone: The Tivoli 20 Apr

Yo La Tengo: The Zoo 11 Mar

Ozomatli: The Zoo 23 Apr

Pharrell Williams: The Marquee 12 Mar (AA)

Jake Bugg: The Hi-Fi 23 Apr

Gretchen Wilson: Eatons Hill Hotel 13 Mar

Toxic Holocaust, Skeletonwitch: The Hi-Fi 24 Apr

Iced Earth: The Hi-Fi 14 Mar

Skid Row, Ugly Kid Joe: Eatons Hill Hotel 26 Apr

Toby Keith: BEC 14 Mar

KT Tunstall: The Zoo 30 Apr

Queens of the Stone Age, Nine Inch Nails: BEC 17 Mar

Jason Derulo: BEC 5 May

Martha Davis & The Motels: New Globe Theatre 19 Mar

Jonny Craig: Crowbar 8 May, Tall Poppy Studios 9 May (AA)

Baths: Alhambra Lounge 20 Mar

Michael Buble: BEC 12 May

Caspian: The Tempo Hotel 20 Mar

Fleshgod Apocalypse: The Hi-Fi 14 May

Arctic Monkeys: BEC 7 May

James Blunt: BCEC 2 Jun

Bastille: BCEC 13 Jun (AA) Finntroll: The Zoo 18 Jun Dragon: Kedron Wavell Services Club 20 Jun, Twin Towns 21 Jun The Crimson Projekct: The Hi-Fi 28 Jun Andrew Strong: The Commitments: The Tivoli 25 Jul

NATIONAL Lachlan Bryan & The Wildes: Lefty’s Music Hall 1 Feb Hunters & Collectors: Sirromet Wines 2 Feb King Parrot: The Northern 2 Feb, The Hi-Fi 5 Feb Miami Horror: Oh Hello! 7 Feb

Pete Murray: Villa Noosa 20 Feb, Twin Towns 21 Feb, The Tivoli 22 Feb, Redland Bay Hotel 23 Feb The John Steel Singers, Jeremy Neale: Black Bear Lodge 20, 21 Feb The SideTracked Fiasco: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden 20 Feb, Beetle Bar 21 Feb Kerser: The Hi-Fi 22 Feb (AA and 18+) The Kite String Tangle: The Zoo 22, 23 Feb

The Bennies: The Spotted Cow 14 Feb, Crowbar 15 Feb, The Time Machine 16 Feb Josh Pyke: Old Museum 15 Feb Young Franco: Komune 15 Feb, Bowler Bar 15 Mar The Angels: Harrigan’s Drift Inn 15 Feb, Caloundra RSL 28 Mar, Coolangatta Hotel 29 Mar

Hits & Pits Round 3: The Hi-Fi 9 May, The Northern 10 May

The Holidays: Elsewhere 6 Mar, The Zoo 7 Mar, The Spotted Cow 8 Mar

Elizabeth Rose: Alhambra Lounge 8 Mar

Rick Price: Brisbane Jazz Club 14 Feb, Gold Coast Arts Centre 15 Feb

Groovin’ The Moo: Townsville Cricket Grounds 4 May

Lior: Old Museum 6 Mar

Oliver Tank: The Zoo 8 Feb

Shannon Noll: City Golf Club 14 Feb

Easterfest: Queens Park 18-20 Apr

Caravãna Sun: Beach Hotel 28 Feb, Solbar 1 Mar, Brunswick Heads Hotel 2 Mar

Frenzal Rhomb: Coolangatta Hotel 7 Mar, The Hi-Fi 8 Mar

World’s End Press: Black Bear Lodge 14 Feb

Bluesfest: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm 17-21 Apr

Wil Wagner: The Spotted Cow 27 Feb, Crowbar 28 Feb, Sun Distortion 1 Mar (AA), The Time Machine 2 Mar (AA)

Christine Anu: Southport RSL 7 Mar, Old Museum 8 Mar

The Aston Shuffle: Oh Hello! 13 Feb, Elsewhere 14 Feb, Solbar 15 Feb, Byron Bay Brewery 16 Feb

Good Life: RNA Showgrounds 28 Feb

D At Sea: Solbar 27 Feb, The Loft 28 Feb, Crowbar 1 Mar

The Necks: Byron Bay Community Centre 7 Feb, Brisbane Powerhouse 8 Feb

Sarah McLeod: Black Bear Lodge 9 Feb

Soundwave: RNA Showgrounds 22 Feb

Born Lion: SCU Unibar 27 Feb, Ric’s Bar 1 Mar

REMi: Coniston Lane 7 Feb

Pigeon: Alhambra Lounge 8 Feb

Daydream Festival: Acland Lane 15 Feb

Dan Sultan: The Zoo 8 Mar Nina Las Vegas: Bowler Bar 8 Mar John Farnham: BEC 10 Mar The Smith Street Band: The Zoo 14 Mar The Gin Club: The Underdog 14 Mar Sunnyboys: The Northern 14, 15 Mar, The Tivoli 28 Mar Baby Animals: Eatons Hill Hotel 14 Mar, Coolangatta Hotel 15 Mar, Racehorse Hotel 4 Apr, Alexandra Hills Hotel 5 Apr Illy: The Zoo 15 Mar Luca Brasi, Postblue: Crowbar 22 Mar, The Lab 23 Mar (AA) Jimmy Barnes: Sirromet Wines 30 Mar Kate Miller-Heidke: The Tivoli 5 Apr

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 45


the end

KIWIS WE STOLE RUSSELL CROWE WHY WE’D STEAL THEM

Films like Romper Stomper, LA Confidential, Gladiator and a heap more; maybe not so much for 30 Odd Foot Of Grunts.

WHY DIDN’T AMERICA CLAIM THEM? We’d have to say because Rusty is just too “okka” to be a Yank.

OFFICIAL NODS A bunch of Oscars; Centenary Medal in 2001 for being a top film bloke.

THE OZ FACTOR Moved over here when he was four, immediately adopted Ausiness (including all the punching)

SEE ALSO The Finns; Spencer P Jones (probs famed for music more than Russell)

KIMBRA

WHY WE’D STEAL THEM Have you seen her perform live? It’s bloody amazing. Also, those dresses giver her a slight Bjork-but-less-crazy edge.

WHY DIDN’T AMERICA CLAIM THEM? Probably because she doesn’t get nude in clips all the time. Oh, wait...

OFFICIAL NODS

Platinum for 2011’s Vows; legendary status because of a certain collab...

THE OZ FACTOR Has pretty much made Melbourne her own since moving in ‘08.

SEE ALSO Ladyhawke; Lorde; TrueBliss (you know, that band that won the first Popstars? No?)

PHAR LAP WHY WE’D STEAL THEM Because he was a horse. Also, he was the horse that became the icon for Australian racing.

WHY DIDN’T AMERICA CLAIM THEM? Do you know how much it costs to ship a 900-pound equine to the US?

OFFICIAL NODS 37 wins from 51 starts. Not too shabby.

THE OZ FACTOR Almost all of his success was on Aussie soil, and his hide and heart are both in the Museum Of Victoria. Ew.

SEE ALSO Sonny Bill Williams; Sika Manu; hell, half of the NFL-playing population of Australia. 46 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014


THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014 • 47


48 • THE MUSIC • 29TH JANUARY 2014

The Music (Brisbane) Issue #23  

The Music is a free, weekly gloss magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, li...