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THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 3


4 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013


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themusic 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

#014

“I DON’T LIKE TO READ THE REVIEWS AT ALL, JUST TO AVOID READING THOSE SNIDEY ONES.”

INSIDE FEATURES Soundwave Spiderbait

tour diary

Oh Land Black Rebel Motorcycle Club Michael McIntyre Gossling The Good Ship Between The Buried & Me

- BRITISH FUNNYMAN MICHAEL MCINTYRE (P23)

“SPEEDING WHEN LISTENING TO METAL AT NIGHT ON A FREEWAY IS INEVITABLE. BUT I SURVIVED.” - KRAM WRITES US SOME SPIDERBAIT STUDIO STORIES FROM LA (P20)

Alex Lloyd Jeremy Neale Saoirse Ronan 4Senses Michael Beach Mr Grevis Women In Docs

“WATCHING THESE TWO LEGENDS HAVE SO MUCH FUN PLAYING THESE AMAZING SONGS REMAINS AN ABSOLUTE PLEASURE.” - STEVE BELL REVIEWS NEIL FINN & PAUL KELLY GOIN’ YOUR WAY. (P44)

THEMUSIC.COM.AU ARE ON THE GROUND AT MELBOURNE’S FACE THE MUSIC INDUSTRY CONFERENCE, UNEARTHING GOSSIP AND KNOWHOW FROM THE BEST IN THE BIZ.

Joshua Oppenheimer

REVIEWS Album: Mick Turner

Live: Boy & Bear Arts: 20 Feet From Stardom

THE GUIDE

Cover: Cub Sport Eat: Bagels Drink: Frozen Drinks Local News Gig Guide The End: Ultimate Fantasies

SOME OF THE PLANET’S MOST EXCITING MUSICIANS HAVE BEEN ADDED TO THE WOMADELAIDE BILL.

READ ALL ABOUT IT FROM THURSDAY ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

feature “I WAS REALLY INTIMIDATED BY THE PROCESS OF MAKING A FULL ALBUM.” - GOSSLING CALLS IN FROM NEW YORK CITY (P24)

web 6 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

HEAR A BRAND NEW TRACK, WAKING UP DEAD, FROM DEATH FROM ABOVE 1979’S SEBASTIEN GRAINGER. EXCLUSIVELY AT THEMUSIC.COM.AU


THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 7


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Steve Bell

ASSISTANT EDITOR Benny Doyle

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE EDITOR Justine Lynch gigs@themusic.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS Adam Curley, Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Ben Preece, Benny Doyle, Bradley Armstrong, Brendan Telford, Carley Hall, Chris Yates, Cyclone, Dan Condon, Daniel Johnson, Dave Drayton, Grace Wilson, Guy Davis, Helen Stringer, Jake Sun, Jazmine O’Sullivan, Lochlan Watt, Madeleine Laing, Mandy McAlister, Matt O’Neill, Mitch Knox, Sam Hobson, Sky Kirkham, Tessa Fox, Tom Hersey, Tony McMahon, Tyler McLoughlan, Tristan Birrell

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 13 NOVEMBER - 19 NOVEMBER 2013

PHOTOGRAPHERS Freya Lamont, John Stubbs, John Taylor, Kane Hibberd, Rick Clifford, Sky Kirkham, Stephen Booth, Tessa Fox, Terry Soo

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NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Brett Dayman

QLD SALES Zac Gould sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Nicholas Hopkins

ART DEPT Brendon Wellwood, Eamon Stewart, Julian DeBono

ADMIN AND ACCOUNTS Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson, Loretta Zoppolone, Shelley Neergaard

This week marks the opening of the prestigious Brisbane International Film Festival, which brings us the best in film from all over the globe. Whether your thing is movies, documentaries, animation or if you’re into mainstream, experimental, short or world film then BIFF has something for you! It runs between 13-14 November all around our fair city, so head over to biff. com.au and find out what they have that’s up your alley – guaranteed to have something for everybody!

The third installment of the excellent 4Senses initiative takes place this Friday night at SLQ (from 7pm), where local bands perform multi-sensory live gigs utilising sight and touch as much as the usual hearing. Past bands to have participated include Giants Of Science, pictured, SixFtHick and We All Want To but this week it’s The Gin Club, The Jakarta Criers and The Stress Of Leisure’s turn. It’s not only immense fun but it raises much needed funds for the Deaf Australia organisation – what more motivation do you need?

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CONTACT US Phone: (07) 3252 9666 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au Street: Suite 11/354 Brunswick Street Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Postal: Locked Bag 4300 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

BRISBANE

Everyone likes going back to their childhood, and there aren’t many more iconic productions for young ‘uns than the one and only Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. The morality tale between good and evil has it all – great songs, flying cars, scary-as-all-hell bad guys – and the book was written by Ian Fleming, the scribe behind the James Bond franchise! Revisit those golden days of yore when the stage production hits QPAC from 19 Nov to 22 Dec, just in time for school holidays. Watch out for the Child Catcher though!

relive


watch

Most grandpas are pretty decent old blokes – you can count on them for rambling stories, afternoon naps and lollies. Irving Zisman is not most grandpas. Based on the Jackass skit of the same name, Johnny Knoxville is bringing his crude character to life in this fulllength feature that sees Zisman and his eight-year-old grandson Billy (a perfectly cast Jackson Nicoll) travelling across the States, pranking the hell out of their unsuspecting countrymen and women. Cringe-worthy hilarity at its finest, Bad Grandpa hits cinemas this Thursday.

tunes lol

Auto-Tuned wannabe pop stars are apparently still a thing. After the “success” of Chinese Food, the adorkable Alison Gold has released ABCDEFG. Not only does the song and accompanying video clip seem to miss the last third of the alphabet (no QRSTUVWXYZ in sight), but also ends with Gold eating her love interest who has inexplicably turned into a spring roll. Also producer Patrice Wilson has a miniature train set or something and is controlling her every action like some kind of creepy god figure. This will either make you laugh or give you nightmares, we’re not sure which.

hear It looks like the hipsters have won. There’s now an entire TV show dedicated to the indie bands you’ve never even heard of competing in the band comp to end all band comps. Why? Because they’re being judged by Tim Rogers, Julia Zemiro and Clare Bowditch. Exhumed, hosted by James Valentine, starts tomorrow night at 8pm on ABC1. We maybe spoke too soon about the end of reality TV season. But this at least has Tim Rogers in it.

Northern Lights, the new track from DZ Deathrays. Once again, the Brisbane boys have given us an absolute cracker, but this time they’ve side-stepped the facepeeling for something a bit more moody and atmospheric – it plays out like a garage rock mantra. This track marks the first taste of a second record which should drop early 2014, but before that you can hear the song live on stage when they perform at the Big Day Out festival right around the country. Tickets start from $185 and can be purchased via bigdayout.com.

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au

SUNNYBOYS

ALONE WITH YOU TONIGHT

A DAY TO REMEMBER

LARGER AND LOUDER

That’s what this second list of acts makes next year’s Soundwave festival, with another supersized serving of heavy international acts, as well as some choice Aussie product that will fly our flag high. Heading up the announcement are recent visitors to our shores and festival favourites A Day To Remember, the Floridian metalcore party boys eager to share their brand new album Common Courtesy, and hairy Atlanta quartet Mastodon, with HIM, Pennywise, Jimmy Eat World, Glassjaw, Panic! At The Disco, Eagles Of Death Metal, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Less Than Jake, Mayday Parade, Sevendust, Crosses, Suicide Silence, The Porkers, Gojira, Black Veil Brides, Zebrahead, Satyricon, Dream On Dreamer, Mutemath, Desaparecidos, Stiff Little Fingers, Thy Art Is Murder, Graveyard, Dir En Grey, Deez Nuts, In Hearts Wake, Breathe Carolina, Defiler, I Call Fives, Hacktivist, The Devil You Know, Soil, Boss Hoss, Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats, Nostalghia and Upon A Burning Body also lapping the country in 2014. Catch these bands as well as the likes of Green Day, Alice In Chains and Avenged Sevenfold when Soundwave shakes RNA Showgrounds, Brisbane, 22 Feb; Sydney Olympic Park, 23 Feb; Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne, 1 Mar; and Claremont Showgrounds, Perth, 4 Mar.

SAVE OUR SOULS

Being a part-time James Brown impersonator living on the streets of Brooklyn was arguably rock-bottom for Charles Bradley, but the 65-year-old musician never bottomed out. Since those humbling days he’s gone on to assert himself as a prolific soul artist in his own right, his latest release, Victim of Love, moving beyond the heartache and pain of his first LP, No Time For Dreaming, to find a resolute sense of hope. Along with his allstar band His Extraordinaires – featuring members of The Dap Kings, The Menahan St Band, Budos Band and others – Bradley will show off these stunning new tracks when he performs at The Basement, Sydney, 2 Mar; The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, 4 Mar; and Corner Hotel, Melbourne, 6 Mar.

TWIN BEASTS

Two huge names in Australian metal combine forces in what will be a tornado of riffs and a flurry of double kick when Melbourne’s Be’Lakor and Perth’s Claim The Throne co-headline a series of dates across the Nullarbor. With Be’Lakor currently working on a follow-up to 2012’s brutal Breath and Bone and Claim The Throne showing off their latest Forged In Flame, there’s going to be plenty of new shit to bang heads to when the bands play the following shows (although if you see this ** it means that Be’Lakor aren’t performing, sorry): Miami Tavern Shark Bar, Gold Coast, Jan 23**; Crowbar, Brisbane, 24 Jan; Under The Southern Cross 6 Festival, Bald Faced Stag, 25 Jan; Bendigo Hotel, Melbourne, 26 Jan; Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 30 Jan**; and 7 Feb, Amplifier Bar, Perth.

“IS THE MORAL OF HOMELAND THAT TEENAGERS ARE MORE ANNOYING THAN TERRORISTS?” IF IT IS @MORGAN_MURPHY THEN IT’S WORKING. 10 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

They were never forgotten, but some thought they were definitely gone. However, Sunnyboys continue to defy the sands of time, now announcing a brand new best of collection that features fan favourites and previously unreleased material, also housing a 14-page booklet featuring stories, insights, song meanings and more. Now, after some transcending comeback shows over the last couple of years, Sunnyboys have announced east coast dates for early next year. The band kick things off with two special nights at The Northern, Byron Bay, 14 and 15 Mar; they then play Forum Theatre, Melbourne, 21 Mar; The Tivoli, Brisbane, 28 Mar; and Enmore Theatre, 29 Mar, with supports across the tour including the likes of Ron S. Peno & The Superstitions, The Frowning Clouds, The Stems and more. For full event details for your city, check out The Guide at theMusic.com.au.

MIKHAEL PASKALEV

SOON TO BE SUPERSTAR

After developing tendonitis during his formative years trying to match the shredding of guitar gods like Jimmy Page and Hendrix, Mikhael Paskalev quickly learned to approach music in a different way. Since then the 26-year-old Norwegian has been earning a reputation as a daring pop auteur, one who can make you feel bloody brilliant while still stretching the boundaries of creativity. Paskalev makes his maiden voyage to our parts next year and will perform 4 Mar, Alhambra Lounge, Brisbane; 5 Mar, Oxford Art Factory, Sydney; and 7 Mar, Howler, Melbourne. The tour is proudly presented by The Music.


national news news@themusic.com.au WIRE

PUBLIC ENEMY

MICROPHONE FIENDS

Rap music as you know it wouldn’t be where it is without Public Enemy. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees were ranked by Rolling Stone as the 44th most influential act of all time, and even after 30 years Chuck D, Flavor Flav and the crew can still bring the fury like few others. Get a history lesson when Public Enemy bring the noise on the following dates: 4 Mar, Corner Hotel, Melbourne; 5 Mar, Metro Theatre, Sydney; 6 Mar, Panthers, Newcastle (all ages); and 7 Mar, The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, in addition to their 8 Mar appearance at Golden Plains Festival and 28 Feb appearance at Perth Festival.

REIGN OF BLOOD

In a little over a decade, powerhouse Canadian quartet 3 Inches Of Blood have earned the kind of reputation that few hold. Their ferocious metal style – harking back to British golden era of the ‘80s – combines vicious pitting anthems with killer hooks and old school soloing, and with a swag of epic tunes the Canucks arrive to bring the hammer down on Aussie audiences. Hear them 10 Apr, Crowbar, Brisbane; 11 Apr, Manning Bar, Sydney; 12 Apr, Evelyn Hotel, Melbourne; and 16 Apr, Rosemount Hotel, Perth.

BRINGING SPACE TOGETHER

When a band has been around as long as Wire, it’s rare that they’re still pushing fresh agendas. But yes, the British post-punks are still creating music as vital as they always have, and even though they’re 14 albums and almost 40 years into their career they still show no signs of slowing down. The quartet will return for their first Australian shows in three years, playing the following dates in 2014 off the back of this year’s release, Change Becomes Us: 19 Feb, The Zoo, Brisbane; 20 Feb, Oxford Art Factory, Sydney; and 21 Feb, Corner Hotel, Melbourne. This tour is proudly presented by The Music.

WHAM BAM THANK YOU... WAM

WAM hosted the WA Music Awards last week, and alongside incredible Western Australian product such as Abbe May (Solo Artist Of The Year), Karnivool (Heavy Artist Of The Year) and Tame Impala (Single Of The Year, Group Of The Year, Album Of The Year), theMusic.com.au also managed to receive a gong, being awarded Music Website Of The Year. Everyone here at The Music is humbled by the honour, and it’s a privilege to be in such fine company in 2013; thank you WAM and thank you, fine reader, for your continued support of our support of Aussie music – we’re forever grateful.

BEN CAPLAN

CACOPHONY OF ELEGANCE

Adding to his appearances at the Woodford Folk Festival and Sydney Festival, Ben Caplan will now also lead his band The Casual Smokers at a selection of east coast headline dates. The roaring Canadian has proven himself as a new blues voice worth listening to, and combines his wistful tales of love, hurt and triumph with an invigorated onstage presence – the result being a night that’s truly unforgettable. Change your attitude with Ben Caplan when he plays 2 Jan, Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane; 3 Jan, Northcote Social Club, Melbourne; 4 Jan, Caravan Club, Melbourne; and 7 Jan, Lizottes, Newcastle.

TRUE WORDS SPOKEN

Author of much loved books such as Down Under, The Lost Continent and A Walk In The Woods, Bill Bryson has long been established as one of the most engaging and humorous travel writers in the world. Now, he visits Australia once more, this time to take us on an engrossing journey through his life, discussing his published works, travel, science, history and more. In conversation with the man with that hair, Ray Martin, Bryson will offer unprecedented insight into his mind on the following dates: 14 Mar, State Theatre, Sydney; 15 Mar, QPAC, Brisbane; 19 Mar, Perth Convention & Exhibition Centre; 21 Mar, Royal Theatre, Canberra; and 22 Mar, The Plenary, Melbourne.

“THE DAYS THAT COFFEE CAN’T FIX ARE THE MOST DANGEROUS” TRUE DAT @KELLYOXFORD. THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 11


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au HEATSICK

TO0 HOT TO HANDLE

MOSES GUNN COLLECTIVE

SHABBY CHIC

Back by popular demand, Psych Night is delivering another dose of psychedelic and progressive rock to in-the-know partygoers. The event is BYO alcohol and merges the best parts of a house party with live music and projection art. It’s set to go down 30 Nov at the She Bangs Coffee warehouse in Albion, and this time Moses Gunn Collective will take punters to new realms of blissed-out, alongside Lopaka, Magenta Voyeur, The Unofficials, The Rider and Praxis Axis. Tickets are limited so jump on it now – purchase yours through GreenTix.

SEXY TIMES

COMING BACK HOME

HOOK UP THE CARAVAN

FIFTY YEARS OF THE RIGHT STUFF

Honouring the pact that the band members made a few years ago, Mi-Sex are getting together annually to blow off the cobwebs and run through classics like Computer Games and Blue Day. In May the band ripped through some dates down south that put the warning out – the boys are back! Now, fans in Queensland get to see for themselves when the band play 9 Jan, Woombye Pub, Sunshine Coast; 10 Jan, Eatons Hill Hotel; and 11 Jan, Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast. Tickets through the venues direct.

Entitled Music for Lovers, Villains and Fools, this double-headline tour will feature the musical tapestries of theatrical folk pop group The Tiger And Me, while the effortlessly talented Bearded Gypsy Band will also do their bit to turn these evenings into one sexy speakeasy of cheer. Twirl and stomp when the two groups play Beach Hotel, Byron Bay, 12 Dec; The Joynt, 13 Dec; Solbar, Maroochydore, 14 Dec.

After a huge 12 months that have seen the band play almost 40 shows across Europe in clubs, bars, barns, boats and lounge rooms, Laneway return to their natural habitat, Brisbane, to cap off a huge year with a show at Shady Palms, 15 Dec. The duo have even put together a special festive bootleg to fill your stockings with So... THIS Is Xmas, so grab a copy at the show. Also on the bill is the engrossing Seavera.

You Lost That Loving Feeling is the most played song in American radio history; The Righteous Brothers are the men responsible for the tune. One half of the soulful duo, Bill Medley, will now visit us to celebrate five decades of the good stuff, performing all the hits across two nights: 21 Mar, Events Centre, Caloundra and 22 Mar, Twin Towns, Tweed Heads. You might be into the jams, you might want to take your mum along; whatever the case, you can purchase tickets now through the venue websites direct.

“IT IS INTERESTING THAT THE BLACK BMW IS THE PREFERRED CAR OF SO MANY ASSHOLES” SO WHO CUT @DEMETRIMARTIN OFF? 12 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

4ZZZ’s Bastard Theatre are excited to be bringing you Heatsick this week, the UK-viaBerlin multi-instrumentalist who delivers his grooves as a sole man with a single Casio. Get your freak on to his playful and inventive analogue sounds at Fox Hotel’s Arcadia Room this Thursday from 7pm. Tickets are a tenner on the door, with the full bill also featuring M*A*S*H, Enderie Nuatal, Club Sound Witches and DJ White Pimpernell.

GIDDY UP

Charlie Horse have received some serious praise for their second album Strange Passengers, riding on from the success of their previous release I Hope I Am Not A Monster. They’ll be showing off this swag of dark and brooding tunes when they visit Queensland for the fourth time next month. They play The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba, 13 Dec, and closer to home, Ric’s Bar, 14 Dec, supported by The Slow Push.

MICHELLE XEN

THE SEAMSTRESS OF SOUND

Michelle Xen embarked on more than just a music project in 2012. Her distinctive electropop pushes the boundaries of art and sound, extending into cross-disciplinary projects such as clothes and graphic design. Her On For You EP is a sensorial collaboration that is export-worthy, airplay-ready and synth-heavy. It is due to be officially released in Sydney this Friday with another launch at Brisbane’s Black Bear Lodge, 8 Dec, before she appears at Woodford Folk Festival, Woodfordia, 29 Dec. A spectacle worth shouting about.


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BAND OF FREQUENCIES SAT 23 NOV

THE FUMES SUN 24 NOV

STONEFIELD FRI 29 NOV

THE BADLANDS SAT 30 NOV

A LITTLE PROVINCE THU 5 DEC

THE NERVE MON 9 DEC

HELMET & THE MELVINS SUN 15 DEC

AFENDS XMAS W/ POND WED 18 DEC

BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 13


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au IMMIGRANT UNION

THE KITE STRING TANGLE

CATCH THE DRIFT

Falls Festival is venturing north to our parts for the very first time, with the inaugural New South Wales event taking place at North Byron Parklands (the same locale as Splendour In The Grass) over the new year period, and now, triple j Unearthed has filled one of the event’s last remaining performance slots, calling on the medicinal electronic sounds of The Kite String Tangle, who ties up an already memorable line-up quite nicely indeed. Pulling comparisons from a broad range of artists, including everyone from Vance Joy to Flume, Danny Harley will transport you to another world entirely so check him out at the event, which happens 31 Dec to 3 Jan.

EROS NOT IN OUR FAVOUR

Unviable due to technical reasons (?), the scheduled Eros Ramazzotti show that was due to take place at Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, 17 Nov has been cancelled. If you had planned on getting your Italian stallion on you’ll have to source a refund: credit card purchases will be refunded automatically, for all other purchases please contact Ticketek.

YOUNG LIONS

HITCHING A RIDE

Soulful, soothing and decidedly welcoming, Immigrant Union make for the perfect addition to the upcoming Black Rebel Motorcycle Club gig, happening 17 Nov, The Hi-Fi. Featuring Brent DeBoer of The Dandy Warhols, the band are currently working on a sophomore release so get in early and hear the latest alt-country buzz from the six-piece. Tickets are still on sale through Oztix.

“REALLY NEED TO WORK ON NOT SOUNDING INSANE WHEN I LEAVE SOMEONE A VOICEMAIL”

THAT’S HALF THE FUN THOUGH @BRETTRYLAND.

SKETCHING OUT PRIDE OF THE CITY

Giving you a decent stint to get over your Christmas/New Year’s Eve hangover, Young Lions then demand that you get back on the saddle at Thriller, Coniston Lane, 11 Jan. The melodic post-hardcore quartet, featuring members of Dream On Dreamer and The Dream The Chase, will showcase songs off latest release, Burn, a record that since it’s October release has proven impossible to ignore. Tickets to the 18+ event will be available on the night. 14 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

In addition to two slots at the Mullum Music Festival on 21 and 22 Nov, The Ray Mann Three have just announced a couple of headline shows for next month. Hear Mr Mann and his cohorts work through a selection of soulful indie jams at The Joynt, 14 Dec and The Brewery, Byron Bay, 15 Dec.

BRING THE BEAT BACK

Some of the most formidable names in hard dance music are teaming up for a night of pure fury at Coniston Lane, 22 Nov. Featuring Darren Styles from the UK, Belgium’s Da Tweekaz and Adrenalize from Denmark, you can make a meal of things with hectic BPMs all night long. Tickets can be purchased from Oztix, with prices starting from $23.50.

FLAMIN’ HELL

Bullhorn are a bucket of awesome – we already know that. But when you throw Fyah Walk into the mix also, you know things are going to get cray-zee on the dancefloor. The double bill is taking place on the Gold Coast at SoundLounge, 29 Nov, so whether you like your roots with some brass in its arse or simply want to get on down to some vibing reggae sounds then this night is just waiting for you. Tickets can be purchased through the venue website now for $15+BF, with PureVelour also on the bill.


MONDAY 18 NOVEMBER

MIC’S TRIVIA 7PM

TUESDAY 19 NOVEMBER

DEEP STACK POKER 6PM

WEDNESDAY 13 NOVEMBER JORDAN AND BRYAN

SHOWCASE NIGHT 7PM

O’MALLEYS OPEN MIC NIGHT THURSDAY 14 NOVEMBER JORDAN & BRYAN

OPEN MIC NIGHT 7PM

O’MALLEYS OPEN MIC NIGHT

PLAY AT OPEN MIC NIGHT TO SCORE A PAID GIG AT OUR SHOWCASE NIGHT O’MALLEY’S OPEN MIC NIGHT

FRIDAY 15 NOVEMBER

LOCKY 5PM

STRINGS FOR AMMO 9PM

DJ BRIAN MENKENS 12AM

SATURDAY 16 NOVEMBER

GER FENNELLY 3PM

MURPHY’S PIGS 4PM

OFF THE LEASH 9:30PM

SUNDAY 17 NOVEMBER

GER FENNELLY 3PM

STRINGS FOR AMMO 7PM

Basement Level - Wintergarden Centre Queen Street Mall - Brisbane City PH 07 3211 9881 FAX 07 3211 9890 Email admin@mickomalleys.com.au

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 15


‘Mad About You’, ‘I Get Weak’, ‘Leave A Light On’, ‘In Too Deep’, and ‘Heaven Is A Place On Earth’.

BOOK NOW

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16 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013


music

RIDING THE WAVE OF SUCC SU CCESS ESS

Words Daniel Cribb. Cover pic Kane Hibberd. Feature pics Terry Soo and Jay Hynes.

BRING ME THE HORIZON, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: JAY HYNES


It took the organisers of Soundwave bankruptcy, queuing in porta potty lines and some “fucking insane” kids to perfect a formula that transformed it into Australia’s biggest festival. Daniel Cribb tracks down founder AJ Maddah, fans, crew and previous artists AFI and The Amity Affliction to get an insight into the festival’s success.

T

he year’s 2004, pop punk is in its prime and Good Charlotte have just released their third record, The Chronicles Of Life And Death. Twins Benji and Joel Madden haven’t quite made the transition from pop punkers to gossip magazine cover stars and KFC mascots yet, and instead are actively touring, where they find themselves in a small riverside park in Perth headlining a two-night festival that accompanies water-based and action sports event Gravity Games. After a successful debut, promoter AJ Maddah brings Gravity Soundwave back in 2005. Unfortunately, like with any other trend, pop punk isn’t as fashionable anymore and he loses everything on the festival, forcing him to

punter Monty Kanungo is one of those shouting their opinion via the message board and social media. “The use of social media has been the biggest growth for the festival scene. Not only in terms of advertising and promotion but bringing people together as a community,” Kanungo says. “I was an avid member of the Soundwave forum in its first few years and made some great friends. Many of us travelled from city to city and crashed on each other’s couches.” Maddah places emphasis numerous times throughout our conversation on the importance of those relationships, citing a

the bands and the fans... Other festivals feel like a competition, Soundwave feels like an open house party with friends you haven’t met yet,” Steele says. And it doesn’t end with the punters; backstage, artists experience the same sort of thing. After playing the festival in 2010 and having such a great time, AFI are returning next year. “It’s a great experience; I had such a fun time touring with Soundwave,” vocalist Davey Havok says. “At the final show, Perry of Jane’s Addiction invited me on stage to sing a song with them, which was a moment I’ll never forget; it was one of the greatest moments of my life.” It’s clear a strong sense of community was key in Soundwave’s development, but there was another factor that has aided its success. Bands such as The Amity Affliction, Parkway Drive and Dream On, Dreamer, who have toured Soundwave in past years, seem to have experienced a rise to success in the same timeframe the festival has. “Parkway Drive and The Amity Affliction and bands like that have made it big because, first of all, they’re great bands,” Maddah explains. “Secondly and thirdly, it’s because they’ve shown a lot of integrity and they’ve done the hard work. I mean, the number of times those bands have been around the country playing shows to however

“SOUNDWAVE FEELS LIKE AN OPEN HOUSE PARTY WITH FRIENDS YOU HAVEN’T MET YET.”

recede into the shadows until 2007 when he returns with a more diverse line-up, this time touring Perth, Sydney and Brisbane, before launching the full national Soundwave tour in 2008, setting the wheels in motion for the festival we know today. Working on Soundwave 2014’s second artist announcement, things are “fucking mental” when Maddah answers the phone. “I went to bed at 4am, got up at 8am, that’s how it goes,” Maddah begins. It’s his work ethic that’s been imperative in the festival’s success, but he also learnt something from the first few years of Soundwave that he still utilises today. “Soundwave is maybe fifty per cent me booking it and fifty per cent kids on Twitter booking it, in terms of the feedback we get and discovering new music.” Listening to and responding to feedback via Twitter can only get you so far, which is why he tends to get a little more hands-on come festival time. “What I try to do in Adelaide every year is actually attend the show with a ticket. I go through the gates with everybody else and try to spend the whole day out in the public area, using the public amenities, eating at the public catering, just to have the fan experience. It’s my way of making sure that we’re providing adequate quality and working out what needs to be improved.” Attending every year since 2004 and flying interstate most years to attend multiple shows, Perth-based 18 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

fan-organised picnic around the time of the first Soundwave that consisted of fans that met on the message board. “At first I thought, ‘Wow, my kids are completely fucking insane,’ and then I was just really, really proud,” Maddah admits. “There’s just an amazing sense of community, amongst the fans, and between the bands and the fans, if you ever go to our signed tent.” National signing tent supervisor Ben Steele sees those connections firsthand each year and will be touring with Soundwave for the fifth time in 2014. “I think the most important aspect in Soundwave’s success has been the community feeling built between the staff,

many people they could pull, until they got to that tipping point, is an amazing amount of hard work. And look, the kids recognise the honesty and integrity.” The Amity Affliction played Brisbane’s local stage in 2008, toured with the festival in 2011 and this year headlined a stage on the tour, and bassist Ahren Stringer has noticed a shift in the way the heavier genres are perceived. “I think it’s kind of become acceptable to have heavy music in the top 40 and played on the radio, and with Soundwave as well, it’s just more acceptable to get with heavy music and support it.” It’s more acceptable, but, Maddah stresses, it isn’t necessarily more popular or fashionable. “The best thing going for Soundwave is that it’s never been fashionable; it’s never been cool. We never want it to be fashionable; we never want it to be cool. I guess part of the problem for some other festivals is they live and die by fashion, whereas, people who come to Soundwave aren’t there as a rite of passage, they are not there to pose in their clothes or be part of a scene, or take fifty photos to put on their Facebook page – people come to Soundwave for the music, and that’s constant. The real music fans, they come to the festival for the music and therefore they’ll be back the next year and the following year as long as the lineup is good. Fashion is temporary, music is permanent.” WHEN & WHERE: 22 Feb, RNA Showgrounds


SOUNDWAVE HIGHLIGHTS

ANTHRAX, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: JAY HYNES

Soundwave has always been a raucous festival, so there’s plenty of highlights for us to choose from:

TWO TICKETS TO IRON MAIDEN It’s not something we had considered would ever happen, but in 2011 the mighty Iron Maiden sat atop the bill of an Australian rock festival, proving the power of true metal despite many promoters in the past being a little shy of embracing it on their festival bills.

FUCKED UP GET FUCKED UP

FUCKED UP, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: TERRY SOO

SLAYER, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: JAY HYNES

During the final throes of the 2011 Soundwave in Brisbane, most metalheads had descended upon the main arena for the Iron Maiden spectacle, but a couple of hundred punters stayed over on Stage 4 after The Bronx finished to see closers Canadian punks Fucked Up strut their stuff. They ended up slaying all before them with frontman Damien Abraham spending the entire set in the crowd amongst the enthralled punters while the band smashed it from the stage. After it finished we wandered back past Stage 5 just in time to witness Third Eye Blind doing Semi Charmed Life, one of the strangest musical dichotomies of all time and delightfully absurd…

CANCER BATS, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: TERRY SOO

PATTON ROCKS OUT WITH HIS COCK OUT In 2010, an incredible Faith No More set in Brisbane ended with Mike Patton showing his dick to the whole crowd. It was a really special moment.

THE BLACKOUT, SOUNDWAVE 2013. PIC: JAY HYNES

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 19


music

TO LIVE AND KRAM IN LA Spiderbait are just about to release their first album in nine years. Here, drummer Kram from the band wrote us his reflections on recording the new album in LA and provided us with a few happy snaps.

J

ust got back from LA where we were recording our new album. It was nuts. It was awesome. It was fun. It was weird.

Spent a lot of time in cars and pools with beers. A good way to describe Los Angeles – cars, pools and beers. Over there they don’t have .05 or anything technical regarding how much you’ve had to drink when driving. They just get you to walk the line. That means you get out of the car and walk along an imaginary line while the police watch you. If you seem okay they let you go. If you don’t seem okay you go straight to jail. Like Monopoly – do not pass Go, do not collect $200... An incident happened one night outside the studio. The owner had been drinking a bit too much and decided to drive his SUV. He crashed straight into a Porsche parked 50 yards down the street. Then the cops got him. I’m not sure what happened after they took him away. I hope he’s okay – he was a nice guy.

“I WOULD DRIVE HOME LATE MOST NIGHTS.”

I would drive home late most nights on the ten after drinking six beers, and listen to the same heavy metal song (Reach For The Sky) we had just recorded turned up excruciatingly loud five times in a row. I was staying at my director friend’s house out in Westlake and timed my trip to exactly five plays. We did some of the soundtrack to his film, Ghostrider. He has a nice pool. He is a true brother. Oh btw, speeding when listening to metal at night on a freeway is inevitable. But I survived. LA has that effect on you, which is very rock’n’roll. I LOVED those drives. I LOVED that pool. I LOVED those beers. Cigars too... It was great to finish the album there. And it was nice to hang in pools. I can’t wait to go back. Kx WHAT: Spiderbait (Universal) 20 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013


HEALING BONES

music

On her new album, Wish Bone, Oh Land moves away from fairytales and tackles real world issues. She chats to Cyclone about music as therapy and ‘dressing weird’. Pic by Jeremy Williams.

O

h Land (aka Nanna Øland Fabricius) has surmounted personal tragedy to become Scandinavia’s coolest electro-pop star, her third album, Wish Bone, generating global buzz. However, the eccentric singer-songwriter, now aligned with Dave Sitek’s fledgling Federal Prism Records, is just content to have it released in Australia. She lately visited for the first time, staging her theatrical show at the Vogue Fashion’s Night Out in Sydney. “I had so much fun,” Fabricius enthuses. “It’s really lovely and friendly [there] – I’m into it.” The Dane’s success has been incremental – or, as she puts it, “very organic and natural” – with listeners discovering cult songs like Sun Of A Gun between albums. Fabricius was born into a family of classical musicians, her mother an opera singer and father an organist, but she didn’t consider following them. Instead Fabricius was preparing to be a prima ballerina in Sweden when disaster struck – she suffered a grave spinal injury. Unable to dance, she turned to music, composing “therapeutic”. Ironically, that catastrophe was liberating. “I started dancing when I was only ten and immediately got admitted to the Royal Ballet School,” Fabricius explains. “Once you get into that environment, it’s very professional, very ambitious. So I never really questioned that I was supposed to do anything other than dance the rest of my life, because I was just a kid. When I got an injury, when I was 18, and I realised that it was not a passing one but something more serious, it was very shocking, of course – because, when you’re young, you think that you’re immortal and you’ll never get old and you’ll never die. The way I dealt with it the most, and the best, was by writing about it – and the way I wrote about it was in melody. ” In 2008 Fabricius, teaming with DJ/producer Kasper Bjørke, presented her debut, Fauna. She’d lay down choral vocals for Danish electronic wunderkind Trentemøller – “a very sweet guy” – on Into The Great Wide Yonder. Nevertheless, Fabricius left Copenhagen for New York nearly five years ago. While her music is largely influenced by experiences and people, Fabricius has found stimulus in her new US

surrounds. “Being there has definitely confronted me with a lot of things that I’m not used to,” she says, Denmark comparatively “isolated” and “safe”. Fabricius collaborated on Wish Bone with Sitek, who, outside of TV On The Radio, has produced everyone from Yeah Yeah Yeahs to

Land’s Wolf & I) as Fabricius explores modern romance. She asks “questions”. “I grew up in the ballet – like [with] Swan Lake and all of that – so I was used to big, epic tales, and that was the way you expressed simple stories,” Fabricius suggests. “Then I also grew up in the Land of Fairytales with Hans Christian Andersen – so that form of storytelling is very natural for me. But I think within the past few years I’ve become more and more interested in what’s going on in the world around me and things that I can’t figure out – like political issues, feminist issues... – whereas on the first album it was more very personal, about my injuries and my story and stuff.”

“WHEN YOU’RE YOUNG, YOU THINK THAT YOU’RE IMMORTAL AND YOU’LL NEVER GET OLD AND YOU’LL NEVER DIE.” Santigold to Beady Eye. (He’s likewise rebooting Kelis’ career.) Their Los Angeles sessions were spontaneous. Sitek encouraged Fabricius to discount any expectations. “It was just very intuitive and very real, the way we worked.” Consequently, Wish Bone has a tougher, brassier sound – Fabricius touts it as “astronaut-ballerinapop”. The material is grounded, too, in urban realism with less of the old magic variety (cue Oh

Fabricius’ feminist consciousness emerges on Renaissance Girls, Wish Bone’s warehousey lead single, and the minimally harmonic My Boxer – although she remains more exemplary Odette than evil Odile. The Renaissance Girls video centres on singing, dancing and performing, Fabricius eschewing gimmickry. As it happens, Fabricius has dabbled in acting for “fun”. She’ll appear in Danish director Kristian Levring’s western The Salvation as part of an international cast. And, to her astonishment, Fabricius has been embraced by the fashion industry. “I was like, ‘Oh, wow, that’s crazy’ – because I always was told that I dressed so weird,” she laughs. “But I guess the fashion world like when people dress differently – that’s what keeps the fashion world going.” WHAT: Wish Bone (Federal Prism/ADA) THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 21


music

BACK IN BLACK Since inception, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club have been dividing audiences. As they prepare to return to Australia for the Harvest Festival, founding member Robert Been speaks to Matt O’Neill about staying the course.

I

t’s weird to think of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club as veterans. From the outset, they’ve been discussed (and debated) as representatives of some new vanguard or other. Originally thrown in with the neopsychedelia of acts like The Dandy Warhols and Brian Jonestown Massacre (co-founder Peter Hayes a former member of the latter), they would later be sold as garagerock revivalists alongside The Strokes and The Vines. Throughout, they’ve consistently borne the brunt of accusations levelled at any band with a nostalgic outlook. Their authenticity has been an ongoing subject of debate. Their relative youth has seen them frequently derided as derivative. Astonishingly, they’ve managed to stick it out amongst it all. Formed in 1998, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s career is currently enjoying its 15th year. Their recent album, Specter At The Feast, is their seventh. “There’s kind of a philosophy of learning from the greats, the classics, the bands that we still think are the best bands,” co-founder, bassist and vocalist Robert Been says. “We don’t totally buy into whatever the new fad or sound at the time is... We’re still trying to keep our roots. Still learning from those bands who still did it the best. The best so far, anyway. We’re not really convinced that the latest thing is the best thing. So, in some way, we’re still just trying to get better from those groups – and I would hope that’s the good side of ‘derivative’. Of course, then there’s the bad side of derivative – but I’ve never thought of us as stuck in any way. This record, in particular, was really important that we knew, in ourselves and for ourselves, that we were making something of worth. That happened before we even went into the studio.” There’s always been more to Black Rebel Motorcycle Club than such debates, of course. They’ve showcased surprising mobility throughout their catalogue. In addition to their celebrated garage-rock roots, their work has encompassed strands of shoegaze, country, gospel, psychedelia and countless other genres. 2008’s The Effects Of 333 was an entirely instrumental ambient release, for example. “I don’t know if I’m surprised we’re still a band. I’m surprised that we’re a band that’s made a good amount of music that I am in no way embarrassed of,” Been says with a laugh. “I’m surprised that each record we’ve made, we’ve

22 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

somehow survived it. You know, we’ve never had an easy album. I kind of worry about the day that we’ll have an easy one, because it could effect how it comes out. “When I think back about each album, it was kind of putting everything we had into it. There was always things we

Rebel Motorcycle Club are, more than most bands, determined to make good albums. They listen to reviews, evaluate their mistakes from album to album and typically approach each release in their catalogue with a blueprint of what they hope to accomplsh. “Well, we learn things every album. [With] certain things, we want to make a point to better from the last. You know, there were certain things on [2010’s] Beat The Devil’s Tattoo that we wanted to make sure we didn’t do again. There was a kind of garagey-ness to recording the drum sounds that we tried to get. We wanted that record to feel lo-fi and, hopefully, bring a lot of feeling out of that rough, almost-punk, garage element. But, there

“THERE WAS ALWAYS THINGS WE WERE DEALING WITH THAT MADE IT FEEL ... LIKE IT WAS LIFE-IT-DEATH” were dealing with at the time that made it all feel – every single fucking time – like it was lifeor-death, all-or-nothing. Like, everything felt like that. Maybe when you get that deep into a process – get really obsessive with something – that’s how it’s always going to turn out.” They’re a remarkably professional band. Not in the sense of corporate polish or branding, but in the implementation of strategic policy. Black

were a lot of dynamics that Leah [Shapiro, drums] played with that weren’t captured with that kind of recording. There are a lot of subtleties in what she does dynamically for the songs that, on this album, we wanted to make sure to address and remedy. There’s usually something quite particular to each album that we like to work on or fix-up for the next.” Ironically, the band threw out that approach for Specter At The Feast. The band simply followed their songs. As a result, Specter... runs the entire gamut of the band’s eclectic discography. WHAT: Specter At The Feast ([PIAS] Australia) WHEN & WHERE: 17 Nov, The Hi Fi


THE KING OF COMEDY Britain’s heavyweight champion of comedy Michael McIntyre has sold out ten O2 Arena gigs, but the odd snide review still stings he tells Baz McAlister.

L

ast year, Michael McIntyre was said to have been the highest-grossing comedian in the world, an impressive achievement. Not only is he the king of comedy, he’s a kingmaker, having given a lot of other great comics exposure on his Saturday night television Comedy Roadshow in 2009-10. There followed a judging spot on Britain’s Got Talent, though McIntyre seemed ill at ease sitting in judgment, quitting after one series to return to stand-up with a tour of the UK in which he was gigging every other night, culminating in 2012

with a ten-night sold out stand at London’s O2 Arena, with roughly 20,000 fans pacing into the venue each night. As you can imagine, the Hampstead-based comedian took it a bit easier this year, but he’s rounding it off with his first foray to Australia, playing huge major city venues. “It’s a life experience,” he says, “an incredible thing to do. And I’m not that stressed about it because I know the show, I know what I’m doing. I’ve not worked very much this year, so it’s more exciting for me to tell the jokes because I’m not bored with them.” McIntyre pauses for a moment, then

lets loose with that infectious laugh, which punctuates this interview. “I’m being very honest with you!”

comedy

McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow did get a run on the ABC and he’s hoping Australians will come to the party, not just British expats. “I don’t want the [big drunk expat crowds], I only want the locals who’ve picked up The Music to come! Lonely people who pick up magazines in pubs and record shops; maybe they’re waiting for someone, or between relationships. It’s a bit of a niche target audience but if they could come that would help me.” McIntyre’s broad appeal and relatable material have brought him huge success, but his relatively rapid rise has meant there’s no shortage of people wanting to tear him down a peg. “I was on a plane once and everyone was taking the free fucking paper, and I had a bad review in it. I was just sat there in my seat watching people get to page eight, which was a full-page assassination of me, and you could see them reading it and looking over their shoulders all sympathetic – ‘Oh dear, there he is, poor thing’. By the end of it the whole flight knew that it wasn’t a good show - but it was a good show. It was just a bastard review. I don’t like to read the reviews at all, just to avoid reading those snidey ones.” McIntyre has gained the love of his fellow countrymen – perhaps by getting out and doing those 170 gigs last year, and striking while the iron is hot? “That’s the problem, I don’t know how hot the iron is,” he laughs. “The fact that I’m talking to you in the middle of the night doesn’t bode well. But apparently there is an iron; it is working. I think it’s one of those old irons you have to leave in the fire for a bit...” WHEN & WHERE: 20 Nov, Brisbane Entertainment Centre

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 23


music

HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS Helen Croome ventured to Tasmania to write the first Gossling record, but after getting nothing done it was back to Melbourne to finally realise her Harvest Of Gold, writes Benny Doyle.

“I

went to Tassie just by myself to purposefully get lonely and depressed to write some new material, so I went down there and got lonely and depressed but didn’t write anything,” Croome sniggers. “It was just a learning experience; now I know that I can’t be by myself for that long. I just missed friends, and I didn’t have the internet – I missed the internet. It took me until when I got back to Melbourne to write the bulk of the material.” Of course, those creative hurdles are well and truly behind the emotive songstress. Calling in from New York City in the middle of the CMJ Music Marathon, Croome says it’s now all about sharing the songs, and although recent crowds have been eerily silent, it’s been in a good way. “Playing a venue with 100 people and they’re dead quiet is a lot more intense than playing a festival stage,” she says, reflecting on her initial two performances at the showcase. “You’ve got to stop those thoughts of, ‘Wow, these people are really listening to everything I’m singing,’ and then the, ‘Don’t stuff up the lyrics’, ‘What’s the next chorus coming?’ – that type of thing. It definitely adds another level of intensity to the gig, but that’s the biggest buzz I get in life. “I’ve been waiting a long time to play some new material live, so I’ve kinda been gagging for it, just to put these new songs in,” she adds. “Not only because it’s a different sound but now there’s more songs to choose from. [It means] we can have a different set depending on the gig, like a festival show compared to a more intimate show.”

After her false start in the Apple Isle, Croome put Harvest Of Gold together in her Melbourne hometown, working autonomously with the exception of a few co-writes that “helped things get moving in [her] brain again for other things to start flowing”. None of these tracks are more striking than Songs Of Summer, which features the unmistakable vocal tone of Sparkadia’s Alex Burnett. “I wrote that song for the album and it really needed a baritone, low male voice – it was quite a low part,” she 24 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

tells. “But, yeah! We sent the track to Alex, he liked it and he was in London, so I’d actually never met [him] until last week when he came to one of our [UK] gigs and said, ‘Hi, I’m Alex’. It was all just via email. It was a pretty different experience, but that song is one of my

a whole album,” says Croome. “Also, I wanted to take my time. I was really intimidated by the process of making a full album – I felt like I was more in control just trying to get five or six tracks down and make them fit together nicely on a record.” Since those first forays, however, it’s clear Croome has found the knack. The album showcases her as a fully formed artist, one who isn’t afraid to move away from the expected. But although there’s some more pop hooks – and a little bit of abrasion thrown in – the songs that are closest to her heart are still the

“I’VE KINDA BEEN GAGGING FOR IT, JUST TO PUT THESE NEW SONGS IN.” favourites on the album – I’m really happy with how that turned out.” Following a trio of EPs in the years leading up to Harvest Of Gold, Croome admits that she was more than prepared to make her full-length debut. But never in the past did she find herself in a rush, revealing that since 2009’s If You Can’t Whistle she’s been happy biding her time, and saving her pennies, for this moment. “It was a combination of being an independent artist and not being able to afford to make

ballads, like closing number A Lover’s Spat. “I hope people listen to those tracks as well as the poppier stuff like Harvest Of Gold and Never Expire and [are] able to experience both worlds,” she muses. And far from being a moniker, Gossling now stands comfortably as a four-piece band, allowing all the intricacies of Harvest Of Gold to be brought to life on stage. “It’s been a challenge working out how to play the album material live because I’m playing a lot more synth, so it’s been a fun challenge,” Croome explains. “I knew when we were making the record that it was going to be hard, but I didn’t want that to stop me from keeping on going and making the record that we ended up making.” WHAT: Harvest Of Gold (Dew Process/Universal) WHEN & WHERE: 15 Nov, Alhambra Lounge


SEAS OF CHANGE As a member of The Good Ship, John Meyer has embarked on many a voyage. But as Benny Doyle discovers, none have been as grand as this.

H

aving done a two-night stretch earlier this year in the Brisbane Powerhouse’s Visy Theatre, grand folk rockers The Good Ship return to the venue’s main theatre for the official launch of their third long-player, The Seven Seas. A fluid piece of music broken up into ten songs, the record leaves linear ideals behind to offer a rounded story that talks of bravado, persuasion and the inner demons we all face, and with Sandro Colarelli onboard as the narrator, Andrew Meadows looking after lighting and Kat Henry directing,

the music becomes a fully fledged theatrical piece where the mood ebbs and flows through each respective section. “It’s very different to a normal gig, which we can do with our eyes closed having toured so much,” admits John Meyer. “It’s so [strange] doing a show where you’ve got to play quietly sometimes and take it easy. The album is a concept in the traditional sense and it works with the show – the album is the show.” An extension of the song Seven Seas from their second record O Exquisite Corpse, Meyer – who sings, plays guitar and adds percussion in The Good Ship – says the band used a couple

of older tracks to anchor the music’s storyline and then built it up from there. “But it’s not like an actual musical in the old Hollywood sense,” he clarifies, “it’s just a cycle of songs that were tied together with the story. And so we thought, ‘Well, we’ve already got a couple of songs that seem to tell a bit of that story, let’s write some more songs that flesh out different parts.”

music

Once the basic plot was realised, it was just a case of deciding which parts would be acted out and which would be expressed through song. Meyer puts any thoughts of artistic crossover to bed. “No, we’re fucking useless!” he remarks on The Good Ship’s acting capabilities. “That’s why we have an amazing actor, Sandro, that we’ve got involved to be the narrator; he really drives that [side]. And we’ve got a fantastic director in Kat, who has kinda drawn out some acting chops from us. But we wrote the story so we wouldn’t have to pretend to be actors – we’re not, we’re musicians. But there’s little elements that accentuate parts and help to tell the story. “One of the most interesting things though is combining our rough and tumble rock’n’roll gigging vibe with the actors. It’s a completely different world; they don’t really get us and we don’t really get them. Secretly I think that they want to be in the band and secretly we want to be actors as well – you always want what you don’t have. I think Kat in particular, she’s desperate to be in the band; she’s desperate to explore the rock’n’roll lifestyle now that she’s had a taste. She wants groupies… little do they know it’s just hours sitting in the touring van.”

WHAT: The Seven Seas (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 15 Nov, Brisbane Powerhouse (all ages); 13 Dec, Festival Of The Sun, Port Macquarie

1000s OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

THE GUIDE AT THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 25


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END TO END

the record into the live setting has been difficult for the guys. But it’s something they set out to do when writing The Parallax II: Future Sequence, and Between The Buried & Me are a band that achieves what it sets out to.

When Between The Buried & Me wrote The Parallax II, they knew they wanted to play the whole thing start to finish. Drummer Blake Richardson catches his breath long enough to talk with Tom Hersey.

“T

he first shows were pretty rough,” admits Blake Richardson, talking about the challenges of playing an album as dense and complex as The Parallax II live. “I’m not a big ‘cardio’ guy, but playing drums for [90 minutes] every night has taken care of my exercise! “[There have] been a couple other things I’ve had to personally overcome as well... One obstacle in particular

is that since we have reoccurring musical themes it’s hard to decipher where you are at some points in the set. For example, in Telos, there’s a marching band drum break toward the beginning of the track. We bring the percussive theme of this section back in the song Silent Flight Parliament. The challenge is that I moved around a few notes during the writing process to give a ‘hint’ of sorts that references the original theme. So remembering which one is which during a long set can sometimes get confusing.” According to Richardson, the whole process of transposing the entirety of

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“We knew that while we were writing, if the album was going to be one long cohesive piece, that we should at least attempt to play the entire thing live. We had done the same thing when we recorded Colors. We just said, ‘Hey, it’d be cool if we just played this whole record straight through… for a whole tour!’ And that’s what we did for Parallax II.” Revisiting the album’s narrative night after night has also been rewarding for Between The Buried & Me. Richardson reckons touring the Parallax material has even inspired the band to think about where else they could possibly take the story. “Playing this material live has definitely sparked some inspiration as far as the story is concerned. It’s way down the road at this point, but we’ve been toying with the idea of continuing the story somehow, or maybe even doing some kind of a prequel. “We’ve already started getting riffs together. We have one more tour for the Parallax cycle planned. Then after that, we are going to start writing again… But I honestly have no clue what the record will be like as far as material is concerned. I personally would like to have a little bit more fun with this next record, similar to what we did with The Great Misdirect. When we wrote that record we had just gotten done touring off of Colors. So we just wanted to have no rules. So I am thinking that’s the direction we are going to go in.” Then Richardson adds, “as if we wouldn’t do that anyways!” WHEN & WHERE: 15 Nov, The Zoo

SUPRISE SIXTH With the release of his sixth record, Urban Wilderness, Alex Lloyd tells Tyler McLoughlan how he’s managed expectations and reconnected with his fan base as an independent artist.

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hough he seemingly dropped off the radar in recent years, Alex Lloyd has been in London raising a family and exploring creativity outside of his role as the singer/songwriter come unlikely pop star responsible for Amazing. “We’ve got four kids now and we needed some help from our family so we moved very close to them,” says Lloyd of returning to the New South Wales Central Coast late last year. “I was creative over there but in different ways. I worked on the Mad Bastards soundtrack and did a few other documentaries and things like that.” Lloyd didn’t realise it at the time, but he was also writing his sixth record, Urban Wilderness, a title that summarises the feeling of not knowing what direction to take. “The weird thing about this new record is that it was written over such a long period of time – five or six years – so I never really sat down and said, ‘I’m gonna make a record’. I had about fifteen/sixteen songs and I played them to Shane Nicholson and said: ‘What do you think? Do you think we can make this into a record?’ And he said, ‘Yeah for sure’, and that was basically how it happened,” he laughs. “It’s quite eclectic; it’s definitely more positive than previous records...”

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Even so, Urban Wilderness is Lloyd through-andthrough, the work of a fine craftsman who has a habit of hitting the emotional sweet spot. Raising around $20,000 via crowdfunding site Pledge Music, Lloyd continued down the independent path started with 2008’s Good In The Face Of A Stranger, as much because of a need to maintain creative control as to find out who his fans were. “For me, I just didn’t want to be trapped in a deal anymore, and I also wanted to try and connect with my fan base as my social media skills have been lacking over the years,” he levels. “I think more

and more today it comes down to timing – it’s not always perfect – and maybe perseverance.” Lloyd’s focus now is on getting back on the road with a full band in tow, something he’s missed in recent years. “This album is a band record, it’s not an acoustic one at all, I’m really looking forward to it. Even with my last record, Good In The Face Of A Stranger, which I never really toured in Australia, I’m looking forward to playing a couple of tracks off that as well with a band,” he says, conceding a feeling of slight anxiety as with any new release. “I don’t think it’s gonna be a chart topper or anything like that but I hope it does well and I can continue playing. If it does well enough that I can do another one then that would be great.” WHAT: Urban Wilderness (MGM) WHEN & WHERE: 16 Nov, Springwood Hotel


POP WITHOUT BOUNDARIES

music

Jeremy Neale’s got an EP out, a tour on the go and the kind of momentum X-Men’s Juggernaut could only dream of. He talks to Madeleine Laing about blank slates, soul revival and his dreams for the year 3000.

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owards the end of this interview, Jeremy Neale says that he’s worried he’s rambled too much. And sure, there was a lot of talk about ‘90s movies, but Neale also answers questions thoughtfully and generously. He’s an optimistic dude, and why shouldn’t he be, with new single Swing Left his third in a row to become a serious radio hit, but it’s optimism tinged with anxiety; there’s pressure in this momentum, pushing Neale to keep trying harder to reach more people. Swing Left, he says, was a conscious decision to do just that; “It was a big decision for what was gonna be a final single for the EP. I personally was leaning towards Lone Tiger because the production was so vastly different on Swing Left. In a way it was the logical conclusion of the style – to take it to a high production level and give it a quality that’s not seen on the rest of the EP. I wanted to see if I could do something else in that genre that might interest a different type of person who wasn’t caught by the other ones.” His first proper EP, In Stranger Times, just came out, but Neale’s already got future release plans that are causing some angst and excitement.“The problem I’ve got now is that if people enjoy the EP, I wanna release like a super deluxe version of the EP. There were a lot of songs that could have been on there but I didn’t want to deal with the stigma of releasing an album so early. “However, I can’t really put them on the album when it eventually comes out, because since I sent the EP away it’s been like an amazing blank slate where I can start in a different style, so I’ve been writing a lot of different stuff. It’s still Jeremy Neale, but I’ve been listening to a lot of Mayer Hawthorne and a lot of upbeat, soul revivalist stuff. So some of the darker songs I’ve got now don’t seem as appropriate [for the album] as they might have been. So I’m hoping enough people like the EP and they’re like, ‘Hey Jeremy, can you maybe give us another EP of that stuff in like a bonus context so the world doesn’t judge you for not progressing?’ And then, ‘Jeremy, when you release your next thing perhaps then you can show us what you’re ready to show the

world in the context of a new direction, while still comfortably in your own realm?’”

is actually like, astronomical. Melbourne’s live music population is incredible, the amount of bands and the amount of people who go see music is just incredible, so it allows a lot of different things to flourish.”

This EP tour is the longest one yet for Neale, and yeah, tickets are selling well, but that doesn’t negate the fact that Brisbane tends to be a much friendlier town to pop music, so the

On a practical level, Neale says that heading out on this tour he’s trying to keep in mind the harsh lessons he’s learned from years of unhinged antics at Velociraptor shows. “You gotta go home a certain time if you wanna keep your voice. And it seems like it’s gonna be easy, but then you’re out until early hours of the morning thinking, ‘Aww... I can just drink my voice back tomorrow’, and that’s feasible for the

“WE’LL START SHAMELESSLY PANDERING TO THE ROBOT POPULATION.” band might have to work a little harder in other states. Neale isn’t too worried, though. “I tried to explain it recently to someone in Melbourne, and they’d acknowledge the sound of Brisbane and that the sound may not be received so well in other cities. Because [in Brisbane] the music population is small, pop music works to bring people in who are outside of the music scene. Whereas in other cities, the population based in music in the other cities

next night, but not the night after that. I don’t think I’ve gotten better yet but I’m gonna really try.” And speaking of Velociraptor, with several members now living overseas, Neale says not to believe any whispers that Brisbane’s biggest portable party is drawing to a close; “I would really like Velociraptor to live on as a Brisbane institution, to be a band that never stops. Maybe I’ll just write a stash of tracks to have on the backburner that can keep getting released until the year 3000. We’ll start shamelessly pandering to the robot population. It’s very important to me that the band continues. And it will keep going as far as I’m concerned, and hopefully the people who like the music feel the same way!” WHAT: In Stranger Times (Create/Control) WHEN/WHERE: 15 Nov, Solbar, Maroochydore; 16 Nov, The Zoo THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 27


film

LIVING IN THE NOW Saoirse Ronan talks to Anthony Carew about running through post-apocalyptic countrysides and working with Wes Anderson.

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o often I’m the youngest one on a set, it was nice to feel like a veteran,” smiles Saoirse Ronan. The 19-year-old Irish actress has long been the kid crashing the adult-table – from the moment she scored an Oscar nomination at just 13 for her brilliant turn in Joe Wright’s Atonement – but that wasn’t the case with Kevin Macdonald’s How I Live Now. “It was just all kids we were workin’ with. We were all of a pretty similar age, but I was one of the older ones. It was a really great experience, personally.” How I Live Now is a high drama about the end of the world and fucking your cousin. Based on a young adult novel by Meg Rosoff, it’s set in the English countryside – cue Nick Drake and Fairport Convention on the soundtrack (although meticulous electro nerd Jon Hopkins did the score) – in the wake of an apocalyptic attack by unseen terrorists; but it’s really a heaving-heart soap opera about “the loss-of-innocence” and the tortured romance between Ronan and bothon-and-off-screen boyfriend George MacKay. “For younger people, the end of the world makes sense,” Ronan says. “If you’re going through your first-ever love affair, it’s so intense, you have to have something truly massive to contrast with it. For adolescents, it already feels like the world is ending every single day.” Literature and cinema come filled with tales of kids who must learn to survive without parents – from The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe to Spirited Away, with countless iterations in between – and, so, it’s a film about siblings and cousins becoming their own kind of family. But there’s an interesting new-millennial wrinkle: as important as it is to separate children from adults, dramatically speaking, it’s just as important to separate the children from technology – true adventure lurking offline. “That’s most important for my character, Daisy, who’s this real modern girl, one who feels the need to be connected to the world at all times, and has to learn to let go of that,” says Ronan. Ronan sees this character as the one, more than any she’s played before, closest to herself – “Normally I like to play roles that’re the complete opposite of me; you’re really actin’ that way” – but isn’t quite the same deviceslave. “I try to be conscious of not getting too obsessed with my phone, endlessly staring at these things that aren’t actually really going on in the world right now.” Her turn in How I Live Now comes on the heels of The Host, in which Ronan played the lead in a future-world whose alien-centric mythology was penned by Twilight author Stephenie Meyer. The cumulative effect is that, on screens, Ronan has spent most of 2013 running across the post-apocalyptic countryside, desperately hoping to

be reunited with loved ones. Ronan sees the similarities from the outside, but feels the experience of making them wasn’t comparable: The Host a “huge logistical undertaking” filled with crane shots and Hollywood money; How I Live Now, a smallbudget picture shot on handheld cameras in the English countryside by the dude who made Touching The Void. Come 2014, Ronan will be appearing in a fardifferent pair of films. She’s spent 2013 filming two works of eccentric auteurdom: in Germany, playing a key role in Wes Anderson’s latest movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel; and then in Detroit, starring in Ryan Gosling’s ‘fantasy-neonoir’ directorial debut, How To Catch A Monster. “Everything is very tactile on Wes’ films: all the sets are made, they’re all built; everything that you see on screen is really there,” says Ronan. “And the acting style in Wes’ films is so different. The performances he gets from people – like Tilda Swinton or Owen Wilson or someone – is so different to how you see them in any other film; this quirky, theatrical style that he likes his actors to bring.” The amazing cast of The Grand Budapest Hotel features familiar Anderson totems (Wilson, Swinton,

Murray, Jason Schwartzman, Adrien Brody, Bob Balaban, Harvey Keitel, Jeff Goldblum) as well as Ralph Fiennes, Jude Law and Tom Wilkinson. In making the transition to Anderson’s theatrical style, Ronan sought advice from Swinton. “I was talking to Tilda before I started working and she said, ‘You’ll notice that he wants you to deliver a line almost like music; every line has a beat to it, a rhythm’,” Ronan recounts. “At first I wasn’t sure I’d be able to get it quite right – I’d never done anything like that before. Once you get into the swing of it, and you get in tune with what Wes wants, then everything just flows.” From there, she went to Detroit – “it’s almost an eerie place, no one lives there any more” – to work with Gosling (and Christina Hendricks, Eva Mendes, Ben Mendelsohn and Matt Smith) on How To Catch A Monster, which found another different take on acting: extensive improvisation. “Every single day we

“FOR YOUNGER PEOPLE, THE END OF THE WORLD MAKES SENSE.”

would improvise; everything was a surprise every day,” Ronan says. “Ryan cast us because he knew what we were like as people, and [he encouraged us], as we improvised, to bring more of ourselves to the roles. We dealt with dreams a lot. We rehearsed with a dream analyst, who had worked with Ryan before, and for a few days all we spoke about were dreams we’d had the night before, and how that subconsciously fed into the character. It was a complete different experience to anything I’d ever had – it was amazing.” After The Grand Budapest Hotel and How To Catch A Monster in 2014, Ronan is lined up to play the titular historical figure in Susanne Bier’s take on Mary, Queen Of Scots. And after that, well, she’s just auditioned for Star Wars: Episode VII, for an unspecified role that she’s sworn to secrecy over. She’s “already said too much” about her possible jaunt to a galaxy far, far away; for now, she’s here to talk How I Live Now. WHAT: How I Live Now In cinemas 28 Nov


MORE THAN WORDS 4Senses is back in 2013, and as co-creator Tony Browne teaches Benny Doyle, sound is only a part of the encompassing live music experience.

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he brainchild of local music lover Tony Browne, 4Senses is an evening of song designed to delight those in the deaf community who normally don’t have the ability to totally absorb live performances. Gearing up for a third instalment of the event, Browne has pulled together the formidable talents of The Gin Club, The Stress Of Leisure and Jakarta Criers – the varied acts looking to attract a wider demographic of punters – for a night out that you don’t have to hear to feel. “We’re just always looking for solid performers,” he says, “people that can convey more than just sound to the audience.”

To allow the music to transcend, 4Senses calls on the speedy skills of Auslan interpreters Mikey Webb and Maree Madden who sign lyrics live on stage, essentially learning three sets of songs in a mere six weeks. “[And] it takes quite an effort from the bands,” Browne adds, “‘cause they’ve got to put the setlist together in advance and [plan] how they’re going to play, [and] get across all the music and the lyrics because the interpreters need to learn the tempos. That stuff then has to go across to the visual artists as well so they’ve got six weeks to compile the filmtrack to the soundtrack.”

Adding to the sensorial experience further are subwoofer chairs, the number of which is being stepped up this time around from two to ten, thanks to a venue upgrade that will see 4Senses held in the SLQ Gallery: “They’re going to be shaking the place,” Browne laughs. Four projectors will also be used throughout the room, lighting up and mapping the State Library itself and the Knowledge Walk as you lead into the entry. And then there’s the balloons.

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“I never realised it until I came up with this concept but if you stand in front of a band at a gig you can really feel the different frequencies,” explains Browne, “and once you pick up a balloon you can feel the vocals, you can feel the different guitars and the different frequencies coming through your fingertips. “I’ve never seen sound as one dimensional,” he continues. “I saw The Drones the other week and there’s times when they just send you into another space in what they can create in a room. And I’ve always believed that is such an amazing feeling and why people go out and see bands, to get that feeling of energy in the room, and it’s not just about the sound.” Still currently a single evening showcase, Browne is ideally looking to source a government grant to expand 4Senses interstate, no surprise considering the amount of effort that goes into organising the event. He’s also hoping that along with funding, 4Senses can raise awareness. “I find it quite ironic because you’ve got people from the deaf community there and then you’ve got a whole lot of people from the general community who are probably on their way to going deaf, so there’s probably something there about looking after your ears as well.” WHEN & WHERE: 15 Nov, 4Senses, SLQ Gallery

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 29


music

STRADDLING THE POND Michael Beach has a band in Melbourne and a band in San Francisco, but he’s out here at the moment promoting his awesome second solo album, Golden Theft. Steve Bell struggles to keep tabs on this super talented musical chameleon.

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ichael Beach calls both San Francisco and Melbourne home, although he’s legally only allowed to abide in the northernmost of those two cities. His previous Melbourne band Electric Jellyfish recently morphed into new outfit Shovels, so on this current trip Down Under he’s both promoting his eclectic and accomplished new solo record Golden Theft, and also rocking out with his mates. “I went to my last year of uni in Melbourne on an exchange in about 2002, and I went home to LA for two years after uni and then came back [to Australia]

for about five years on a bunch of different visas, and wasn’t able to keep renewing them so I had to go,” he explains of his dual-country background. “I would have stayed if I was able to, but when my last visa ran out there was nothing else I could do. At that point I’d played with Electric Jellyfish long enough that it was like seeing old friends when you get back together – you immediately pick back up where you left off. “It’s great being part of two scenes, and honestly the Michael Beach [solo] stuff wouldn’t have happened if I didn’t have to move back to the States – I guess it had

music

started a little bit before, but once I knew that I wouldn’t be able to do the Electric Jellyfish stuff full-time I didn’t want to wait a year to be able to write, record and play music so I got that going as a way to keep myself busy. Now on this tour I have a full band – the Shovels guys are playing the solo stuff with me – so it’s the same three guys playing two different bands, it’s great.” Obviously this cross-continental pollination gives Beach an opportunity to compare the underground rock scenes in Australia and America. “Both places have great music scenes, but in America there’s definitely a group of people who are just totally Aussie-philes – anything that comes out of Australia they’re just immediately onto. And Australian bands generally do pretty well over there in the underground scene, there’s been heaps of bands tour there regularly and do great. I personally prefer the more underground, less publicised stuff and in the United States things are either completely off the radar or once it catches on it’s gigantic and omnipresent wherever you go, so that adds a different element. “Both scenes are great, but I enjoy being in Australia – this is where I started playing music so I identify a little more with this process than the really American process of struggling for a long time and then if you’re lucky blowing up. I love the underground community here that doesn’t give a shit if it gets huge or whatever.” WHAT: Golden Theft (Twin Lakes) WHEN & WHERE: 14 Nov, Beetle Bar (solo); 15 Nov, Brisbane Bowls Club and 17 Nov, Rock’N’Roll BBQ, 633 Ann (Shovels)

LIVING THE DREAM After working on his debut album for most of his adult life, Perth-based MC Mr Grevis has turned his follow up My Escape around in less than a year. He tells Chris Yates why he wanted to keep the momentum rolling.

“P

eople seem to forget you pretty quickly!” Mr Grevis (born Gary McPhee) states when asked why he wanted to keep rolling after his well received debut The Sampler. He also confirms he’s very happy with how it turned out and is glad he decided to try this approach. “Yeah 100 per cent,” he confirms. “There are so many little things I’d like to change but as soon as I listened to the master – I literally listened to my final master in my car on the way to press it – I knew it was the right decision. I didn’t expect the first one to get the response that it did. I knew I had to get to work and strike quickly. Hopefully this one is strong enough that I can take two years off and work on my next one, my masterpiece.” He laughs after this but you can tell he really wants to spend some more time on the follow-up. While the desire to return to a much more slowly crafted process must be appealing, the spontaneity and more offthe-cuff nature of My Escape really shines through. “I would have liked to have put some more breaks and bridges in there as well but then maybe people would have thought I was trying to be a bit too musical with it,” he explains. “I definitely focused on

30 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

having something for everybody...I wanted the songs to sound really different and be different with subjects and topics. Drapht is a big influence of mine and a good friend, and I find that with his stuff it sounds so different, and he’s so on point with his topics. A lot of rappers try to stay on topic but before long they start to stray and just do random bars.” He also wanted to show some other sides of himself as a rapper that he didn’t get into on the debut record. “After my first record when I had that track The Youth, I seemed

to get a lot of comments from people who were at least 40 years old on my Facebook and I felt like I sort of still needed to cater a bit more to them. The only complaints I got last time were that I wasn’t doing any fast raps. I can rap fast but I just find most of the time when dudes are doing that double-time shit, generally 90 per cent of them aren’t saying anything. So I did that on the intro, and I don’t even really say anything,” he laughs. “It’s just a bunch of bars, but I really wanted to show cats that I could do that sort of stuff.” WHAT: My Escape (Obese) WHEN & WHERE: 15 Nov, Beetle Bar; 16 Nov, Solbar, Maroochydore


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WHAT’S UP, DOC After a couple of years on the down-low, Women In Docs are gearing up for the February release of their third album Carousel. Co-leading lady Chanel Lucas tells Tyler McLoughlan about how the friends in folk have changed over the years.

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hanel Lucas and Roz Pappalardo built Women In Docs the old-fashioned way – on the road, one town at a time.

“When we formed Women In Docs we both had full time jobs and when we decided to play music together the conversation went: ‘I’m gonna quit my job and travel around Australia and play music – do you wanna come with me and do that?’ And we both went, ‘Yeah, okay’,” “We bought a van and we packed all of our shit into the van… We had a beanbag, an ironing board and a

kettle and we got in the car and drove to Brisbane and decided to become famous,” she giggles, recalling that they went straight to Woodford Folk Festival. With two albums and five EPs to their name, next year’s eighth release marks some interesting changes in the Women In Docs dynamic. “Until about three or four years ago, we had been working constantly as an independent act just to stay afloat – to earn money, get a reputation and build an audience, and that was all around Australia and internationally,

and we just didn’t stop,” Lucas says. “We’ve just had a couple of years off touring and I think it’s given us perspective; it’s made us slow down a bit and work more on our craft instead of just gigging, gigging, gigging… This is the first album where we’ve consciously sat down and written songs together.”

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Carousel is the title track from the forthcoming album, and a notable country flavour permeates the song’s harmonies and instrumentation. “We’ve always dabbled in country because we’ve grown up in regional Queensland listening to Graeme Connors and those kind of bands, but we’re not really a country band. And then listening back [to the entire record] we kind of went, ‘Woah, sounds like we’ve gone a bit country on this one!’” Sharing the new songs with audiences nationally throughout November, Lucas jokes that she might not be tour fit, judging by a trial run to a Mackay festival recently. “I went up with no jumpers or jeans, and I got there and it was freezing ‘cause we were up in the mountains. One of the other bands was going into town, so I gave them five bucks to buy a flanno at the shop, and they didn’t have any flannos so they bought me this ‘90s jumper that Chandler in Friends would wear!,,, We’re not ready! The music will be great – the band will be a shambles. Hopefully we get it together by November.” WHAT: Carousel (Plus One Records/MGM) WHEN & WHERE: 1 Nov, Joe’s Waterhole; 2 Nov, Grottofest, Marburg; 16 Nov, Brisbane Powerhouse

FACING THE TRUTH

film

A new documentary unmasks the fiction behind Indonesia’s Communist “cleansing” of the mid-‘60s. Anthony Carew talks to filmmaker, Joshua Oppenheimer.

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n 1965-66, in the wake of a failed coup, the Indonesian army, paramilitary groups and local vigilantes conducted what was essentially genocide: anyone perceived a ‘communist’ was rounded up and executed. Anywhere between 500,000 and two million people died; the outcome was Suharto’s corrupt 30-year reign. “The rest of the world cheered on these killings while they happened,” says Joshua Oppenheimer. “The killers won, they’ve been in power ever since, and they’ve told stories to justify it.” American-born Danish-based documentarian Oppenheimer enters this minefield with The Act Of Killing, a film not just about the gangsters who killed countless communists a half-century ago, but also those self-justifying stories. “We use storytelling to escape from our most bitter and indigestible truths. One of the constants in all the stories we tell, across all cultures, is this Star Wars morality: a division of the world into good and evil.” The Act Of Killing began when Oppenheimer was working on another film (now being revisited as forthcoming companion-piece The Look Of Silence) about survivors in Sumatra. “Every time we filmed even the most simple testimonies from survivors’ families, the police would come and arrest us. Yet, at the same time, the neighbours of these survivors were the people who’d

perpetrated these crimes, and they were free to not only talk about what they did, but boast about [it]. Everybody in the broader human rights community was adamant that we had to make the film; we had to expose the corruption, the impunity, the use of gangsters, and the fact that it all goes back to the celebration of genocide. Then one of the survivors said to me, ‘You know how the gangsters boast about their killings? Show that to your audience.’” Oppenheimer began interviewing “every killer [he] could find”, coming across people who weren’t haunted by their histories, but glorified by them, the cultural cachet of ‘gangsters’ in

modern-day Indonesia giving them political clout. “All of them were virtually falling over themselves to tell me what they did, to show off what they did. I realised there were two stories: what happened in 1965, but also what’s still happening now.” It wasn’t until interviewing his 41st killer, Anwar, that he found his central subject: a doting grandfather and class clown who took to Oppenheimer’s brief: dramatically stage re-enactments of his crimes. “He spent five years with me trying to run away from what he’s done by fictionalising it. He was trying to build this cinematic, psychic scar-tissue around his wounds, desperately trying to convince himself that what he experienced wasn’t real. Eventually, he’s forced to confront the fact that it is real, and no amount of acting can ever help him escape his reality.” WHAT: The Act Of Killing WHEN & WHERE: 1 Nov, BIFF, Palace Barracks THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 39


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reviews

ALBUM OF THE WEEK

Explore the careers and personal lives of the incredibly talented back-up vocal artists for popular performers such as Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and more in 20 Feet From Stardom; with the calibre of musicians in their line-up The Nerve unsurprisingly deliver a solid offering; and Spiderbait are back after nine years.

MICK TURNER

Don’t Tell The Driver King Crab/Remote Control Mick Turner is an inimitable force, a man whose creative legacy continues to defy and mystify. His work with Dirty Three, his artwork, his collaborative projects – all have an extraordinarily strong voice emanating from within, accentuated by that stuttering, chugging, interminable guitar.

★★★★½

TRACK LISTING 1. All Gone

7. The Navigator

2. Sometimes

8. Over Waves

3. Long Way Home

9. The Birdcatcher

4. Don’t Tell The Driver

10. We’re Not Going Home

5. Gone Dreaming

11. The Last Song

6. Here’s A Way

On Don’t Tell The Driver, Turner gathers a menagerie of talent to gather round his iconic world vision, a delicate yet intense experience into the gossamer sheen of one of his watercolours, and it’s an album of understated grace and overblown awe. The most notable addition here is the prominence of vocals – Deadstar’s Caroline Kennedy-McCracken and Oliver Mann (Over Waves) accentuating perfectly the ephemeral moments of a tumultuous love affair – whether it be with a lover, a substance, with life, or with music itself. The vague nature of the lyrics is never a sore point though – the intricate interplay of Turner’s guitar with the tempered yet no less schizophrenic drums (played alternately by Kishore Ryan, Jeff Wegener and Ian Wadley), bass (Art Of Fighting’s Peggy Frew) and horns is a kaleidoscopic aural journey into multiple realms, their make-up determined by the listener. Therefore the epic title track could easily be a song of hope as a song of weary defeat; Gone Dreaming feels like dour rumination but could be merely meditative (the horns shift with colour and light, never alighting on a particular emotion); The Last Song has a cathartic expulsion, yet still lingers, burbling away. Don’t Tell The Driver is a masterpiece of immersion, and like the greatest artworks, is made to get lost in. Brendan Telford THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 41


album reviews

BLOOD ORANGE

JAKE BUGG

Cupid Deluxe

Universal

Domino/EMI

Nottingham’s Jake Bugg is turning into quite the prolific singer-songwriter. Barely a year on from his Mercury Prizenominated debut, the 19-yearold returns with Shangri-La.

Devonte Hynes is known under many guises. There was his first band, Test Icicles, his singersongwriter moniker Lightspeed Champion, and now Blood Orange, purveyor of dance funk. Not to mention, as a producer he’s worked with Solange, Sky Ferreira and Sugababes recently, stamping all of their work with a unique chill dance vibe. Cupid Deluxe takes the downtempo element of dance music and marries it to unashamedly ‘80s slap bass, falsetto and beautifully fleshed out female vocals courtesy of newcomer Samantha Urbani. Disco rears its head more than once, cleverly mixed into percussion and elaborate vocal harmonies on songs like On The Line. Lyrically, Hynes is entering bolder territory. He’s seemingly reconciled his transformation from UK indie kid to NY R&B genius, reminiscing on

Shangri-La

★★★★ council estate life over a heavy bass on High Street. On past records he’s seemed unsure, downtrodden – honest to the point of exhaustion. There’s an assuredness in It Is What It Is, as Urbani and Hynes sing, “Time will tell if you can figure this and work it out/No one’s waiting for you anyway”. Whether it’s meant to be taken as antagonistic or self-aware is up for interpretation. Hynes is no longer broken-hearted; sometimes he’s brutally honest. Cupid Deluxe is contemplative music with a summertime beat made for dancing with a sway in your step. Sevana Ohandjanian

Despite this album having been recorded in Malibu with super producer Rick Rubin, Bugg’s colours remain unchanged. There’s a fuller production sound, Messed Up Kids filled out with electric guitars and strong percussion to match Bugg’s braying “It’s a washed out Saturday” as he paints a story of lower-class struggle characterised by drug-dealing buddies and girls out on the streets. The songs are endlessly catchy: opener, There’s A Beast And We All Feed It, is classic country, all lilting guitar and snare undertone. Slumville Sunrise will be familiar to anyone who saw Bugg on tour recently, he’s been pulling it out in live shows and it slots easily into his repertoire, with a chugging riff and tongue-twister lyrics

THE NERVE

SPIDERBAIT

Bird’s Robe

Universal

There has never been anything subtle about the bands Ezekiel Ox has fronted in the past, from Full Scale to Mammal, and there is certainly no restraint on the debut album from his new project, The Nerve.

Australian alt-rockers Spiderbait haven’t released a studio album in nine years. That’s nine years that drummer Mark Maher, aka Kram, bassist Janet English and guitarist Damian Whitty have had to really perfect their art. They’ve returned with their seventh album, a self-titled hark back to their Tonight Alright days that fails to really pull together the best parts of the rock band that was, and instead seems a bit jumbled, without the manic energy or catchy pop choruses of their back catalogue.

Audiodacity starts brazenly and brashly with Again. The signature Ox snarl is replaced by a violent scream, complete with the same massive guitar solo which is evident on almost all of the album’s tracks. Highlights include Witness, Down There and The Insight, which are a 42 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

that speed up exponentially as Bugg’s energy grows. The slow tempo songs are hit and miss – A Song About Love teeters on saccharine but saves itself with wide-eyed innocence; All Your Reasons, meanwhile, screams Neil Young tribute. Bugg sings of what he knows – childhood council housing life, wheeling and dealing friends, the girls he’s convinced to love and then left. He has an admitted tendency to lean on cliché; one of the best songs, What Doesn’t Kill You, is the epitome of underdog anthem. Yet Jake Bugg possesses the talent of singing with a natural conviction and not coming off precocious. Sevana Ohandjanian

Spiderbait

Audiodacity

The title track from Audiodacity gives a pretty clear insight into the motivations of the band, also featuring Cog’s Lucius Borich, Pre-Shrunk’s Davarj Thomas and the European-based “guitar virtuoso” Glenn Proudfoot. It includes the lyric, “As you spruik your Jesus, tell him I’m coming for his mantel”. Ox has certainly never been backward in coming forward and neither is this album.

★★★★

★★★ classic Ox funk and heavy rock combination, allowing him to spit out his political views in a fast-paced antagonistic style. Audiodacity will be an easy listen for fans of Mammal and Pre-Shrunk but Cog fans may find the aggression confronting, unless they’re won over by Ox’s political persuasion. The album is solid and with the calibre of musician on offer you would expect nothing less. Time will tell if this is yet another short-lived project for the charismatic frontman or whether the line-up boasts the Holy Grail of combinations he seems to be eternally searching for. Monique Cowper

Opener Straight Through The Sun proves that Kram’s gritty vocal register is back in full force. In It’s Beautiful they’re already back to combining rock chords with electro pop keys and Janet English‘s voice. Miss The Boat is an obvious highlight, with a wailing guitar solo and a classic rock tinge, but Supersonic falls flat, with a pervading electro pop bend that wastes all the energy amassed. The album pulsates,

★★★ from fast to slow, between early ‘90s- and early ‘00s-style Spiderbait, with a sexy bassline (care of I’m Not Your Slave) and a Lou Reed-esque drawl on Get Bent thrown in for good measure. Crazy Pants (Rockstar For A Night) brings back a certain bassdriven swagger, but softer tunes at the latter half of the album and a lack of killer hooks, keeps this album from really impressing (although The Sun Will Come Shining is a sweet pop song). In the end it all feels like it’s been done by the band before, and that they could’ve pushed some sonic boundaries or just crafted another truly great rock or pop tune. Hannah Story


album reviews

★★★★

★★★ ½

★★★★

★★★★

FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH

MEZZANINE

JOSHUA JAMES

ROBBIE WILLIAMS

Strange Paradise

Swing Both Ways

The Wrong Side Of Heaven And The Righteous Side Of Hell Volume 2

Gun Fever Records/Green

From The Top Of Willamette Mountain

A constant knife-edge balance between straight-up metal and more easily digestible hard rock, Five Finger Death Punch make it work for the majority of this album. The only real low points are Battle Born, Cold and My Heart Lied, so watered down you might find that dirty word ‘Nickelback’ coming to mind. Otherwise, it’s balls out all the way. Singer Ivan Moody, along with the constantly shredding guitar of Jason Hook, manages to find actual melodies within the aggression… So much aggression.

Scary thought: Frances Bean Cobain is now old enough to own a firearm. Perth quartet Mezzanine seem happy to revel in records made just prior to Nirvana’s paroxysm without ever seeming a modernised update of the genre (singer Cory Ryst certainly sounds a lot less self-loathing in his introversion). Strange Paradise is gritty, yet somewhat polished making the likes of Mary and the marvellously twee King Of The Ring instant contenders. Veteran producer Dave Parkin’s (Snowman, Jebediah) work takes decent enough grinding riffs and knocks them over the fence, making the whole album worth a shot.

Pete Laurie

Mac McNaughton

Sony

★★★

Cooking Vinyl Joshua James’ third album, the first to have a direct Australian release, features a hell of a lead single in Queen Of The City; charming in its sense of immediacy, a grungy, pastoral feel is lent to warm, heart-tugging melodies. James simply lets his easy folk vocal and arrangement style speak with the likes of Willamette Mtn, though there’s never a dull moment as layered melodies, darker tones and beautifully constructed lyricism draw the listener along for an atmospheric ride with this craftsman of intelligent folk. Tyler McLoughlan

IAN BALL

Resonate/Desperate

Unfold Yourself

No Sleep/Shock

Stop Start/Inertia

With opening track Meteor, Resonate/Desperate is already going faster than full speed. State Faults aren’t trying to ease the listener in. The blistering guitars, explosive drumming and throatobliterating screams are the perfect start, letting you know exactly what you’re about to be assaulted by for the next 38 minutes. Whether “assaulted” is a positive or negative is totally up to the listener. Sometimes repetitive, but always relentless, aggressive and unflinching, Resonate/Desperate makes sure you’ll be feeling the effects for a while after listening.

The second solo album from Gomez’s Ian Ball (not the one with the raspy voice) seems somewhat unnecessary as many tracks here appear a tad Gomez-lite. The whole shebang is based around Ball’s fine ear for a melody, which remains as strong as ever, but these lines are often merely filtered into breezy little pop tracks that are content to merely coast along. When Ball adds a little grunt, as he does on Open Sesame and the propulsive Memory Test, things get way more interesting, while the African-flavoured Changer is another highlight in a nice, but not especially essential release.

Pete Laurie

Paul Barbieri

Swing Both Ways goes the full musical double entendre. The title track (a duet/co-write with Rufus Wainwright) is big band jazz hands and rainbow acceptance. Mock send-ups of Williams’ past lives are also gold; Swing Supreme (Williams as Sinatra covering Williams as Love Supreme), while No One Likes A Fat Pop Star is Williams’ autobiographical ode to his love/hate relationship with a good curry. Irony-free originals and jazz standards are also here: Dream A Little Dream with Lily Allen (pure, sweet), Minnie The Moocher (Williams solo) and new tunes Shine My Shoes and Go Gentle. Liz Giuffre

★★★

STATE FAULTS

Island/Universal

★★★★

MAJOR TOM & THE ATOMS Heroes, Villains, Boom Boom Boom! Independent If you felt you’ve been missing out on a beefy dose of rhythm and blues lately, wrap them around this debut record by Melbourne lads Major Tom & The Atoms. It’ll ruffle your hair, tip you upside down and shake the coins from your pockets, and you’ll buy it a drink for the privilege. Tom Hartney (ex- Little Red) fronts this six-piece, but if you’re after the innocent Coca Cola or pop-tastic Rock It, you’ll be disappointed. Major Tom & The Atoms have lost the training wheels. This is fun, it’s tight and it’ll make you go Boom Boom Boom. Dylan Stewart

★★★★

NIGEL WESTLAKE, LIOR & THE SYDNEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Compassion Universal The collaboration of composer Nigel Westlake, Israeli-Australian singer-songwriter Lior and the powerhouse Sydney Symphony Orchestra is unlike anything released this year. Translating philosophies of love and kindness through ancient Hebrew and Arabic texts, Compassion flows seamlessly between the delicate, the adventurous and the percussive. Lior’s rich and warm voice reaches spine-tingling heights on Avinu Malkeinu, a moment to truly rejoice in Australia’s vibrant culture. Mat Lee THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 43


albums/singles/eps

★★★½

★★★★

★★★★½

FLYYING COLOURS

MICK MEDEW

THE MORNING NIGHT

Northern Lights

Mascot

Citadel/Fuse

Walking Horse/MGM

I Oh You

Keep Warm

These guys know their way around a distortion pedal, epitomising the shoegaze genre as it stands today. From the outset, Flyying Colours craft a hazy and dream-like soundscape that transitions seamlessly from track to track, dominated by breathy vocals and guitars drenched in reverb. It’s undoubtedly a psychedelic journey, but one that’s understated and smothered in a thick, tonal fog. Debut single Wavygravy builds into static frenzy and sounds like the musical love child of Tame Impala/early Dandy Warhols. Bugs, however, is arguably their most melodic contribution, and a fitting finale that will leave listeners inadvertently swaying.

Brisbane legend Mick Medew’s new album started off as a solo affair but he quickly assembled a new band to mine this entirely different milieu to the powerhouse melodic garage rock we’re used to from The Screaming Tribesmen and The Rumours. He does bluesy swagger (Broken Hearted Blues), stripped back and contemplative (The Sin (You Should Have Told Me)), ballads (Falling Down Again, Bloodsucking A Small Town) and ballsout rock (Dream On The Slide) yet it all sits together seamlessly. A fascinating new front from a great talent.

WA’s The Morning Night’s second album is a breath of fresh air, harking back to many a golden age, arguably thanks to a second producing stint by Brian Jonestown Massacre guitarist Ricky Maymi. Amberola kicks off with the lush, reverb-heavy drone of Everything I See, followed by the sparse but jangly Valentine. It’s become difficult to stand out from the Tame Impalas and Deep Sea Arcades with this sort of sound, but The Morning Night does so with Adrian Hoffman at the helm, who insightfully pieces together fresh but reflective sounds to make one engaging album.

Spunk

Grace Wilson

Shane Savage

Carley Hall

DZ DEATHRAYS

DZs are still partying, but this one sounds much more influenced by the fuzzy swelling of ecstasy than shots of Jagermeister. Great development while still keeping their trademark sounds in check.

NEIL FINN

Divebomber EMI Neil takes a pretty severe left turn getting Dave Fridmann to help out, which turns Divebomber into a Flaming Lips song.

SHINING BIRD

Flyying Colours

The Mesmerisers

Amberola

This band is from Wollongong and their single Keep Warm is fantastic, and will help you do exactly that heading into summer.

ABBE MAY

★★★½

Perth Girls Independent

★★★½

★★★★½

LURCH & CHIEF

YOUNG LIONS

Independent

Shock

Goin’ Your Way

Brisbane’s melodic rock/metal scene is growing healthier by the day, and the glossy vocalskewed Young Lions tip their hats to the scene with debut Burn. The five-piece formed late last year but they’ve already managed to own their sound, confidently leaping from upbeat, punchy rockers like Sleepless Rest to tight, weaving riffing in The Runner And The Fighter. Single Grave Digger showcases all these extremes, singer Zachary Britt working his chops between spitting verses and a soaring chorus. It’s a neat production effort but a bit more dark to counteract the light would make it a watertight debut.

EMI

The third single from Gloamer is a pop song about driving to gigs and is drenched in MGMT style fuzzy electronics while the lyrics circle around.

Lurch & Chief ’s second EP is a bold step in the right direction, made up of equal parts grit, angst and cathartic choral refrains. Their ‘90s grunge aesthetic lends itself to more traditional rock syncopation, but at the same time channels a newer and more progressive sound. From the loose electric guitar riffs in We Are The Same, to the brazen intro of Mother/Father, there’s a sense of overall versatility. The ongoing vocal repartee between Hayden Somerville and Lili Hall delivers emotional magnitude and adds depth to crashing percussion. These six tracks command attention.

Chris Yates

Grace Wilson

Carley Hall

Steve Bell

The video for this rips off Robert Palmer’s Simply Irresistible which is a great idea, but not as great as putting a cover of Total Control by The Motels as a B-side.

THIRD D3GREE

Different Kind Of Love Sony X Factor ‘hopefuls’ who have used the Will.I.Am app to embarrass themselves in such a way to ensure the shame will last forever.

LOON LAKE City Lights Caroline

44 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

Wiped Out

Burn

NEIL FINN & PAUL KELLY

A brilliant aural and visual memento of the incredible tour undertaken earlier this year by two of Australasia’s biggest talents. The entire two hours is priceless, best summed up by Kelly’s rendition of Crowded House’s Into Temptation, and Finn returning fire with (You Can Put Your) Shoes Under My Bed (plus Paul’s happy dance during One Step Ahead). The charming between-song banter has been excised from the DVD, but watching these two legends have so much fun playing these amazing songs remains an absolute pleasure.


THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 45


live reviews

BOY & BEAR, BATTLESHIPS, DUSTIN TEBBUTT Coolangatta Hotel 8 Nov A polite bunch of punters (doubts ensue that the politeness won’t last long in this place) give New England, New South Welshman Dustin Tebbutt their undivided attention, and rightly so; this slight dude with a voice that echoes nuances of Justin Vernon and Josh Tillman hits the nail on the head in terms of openers. He’s assured, engaging, slightly awkward in his attempts at stage banter, and wow, what beautifully crafted songs. Ably backing himself with nothing but

THE BREAK @ QAG. PIC BY TERRY SOO

his trusty guitar and MacBook, he loops his way through most of his The Breach EP. The title track and The Wolves showcase his commanding warble; if only the musical output wasn’t hampered by a swift sound setup. By the time Sydney indie rock quartet Battleships arrive, the place is looking fuller than usual at this point in the night. By the sound of all the cheering they’ve got some eager ears present. Spec-sporting Jordan Sturdee’s vocals really are the centrepiece of this tight outfit; he manages to lilt from articulate and snappy in the cracking beat of Coming Back To You to the more sparse and brooding energy behind new single, Take Your Rest. It’s a pretty flawless set and when they close with 46 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

the sense-rocking In Retrospect, it’s clear they’ve satisfied fans and made new ones.

Line, leaving the many happy faces and a fine flagbearer for Australian music in their wake.

At last check tonight’s show was close to sold out status. There’s little surprise then if indeed it has as there’s very little breathing space in the Cooly’s supremely awkward-shaped room. In a way, that let’s-makefriends-with-strangers kind of communal vibe is almost a social script that sits well alongside Sydney’s folk/indie rock powerhouse five-piece Boy & Bear. Singer Dave Hosking has maintained his trademark mo’ (and, admittedly it has been a warm day, but really, a wifebeater?), and his easy smile that has not once disappeared in their near-constant gigging over these past three years. It’s not

Carley Hall

THE BREAK

Queensland Art Galley 8 Nov The Queensland Art Gallery is an amazing place to spend a Friday night. What better way to forget about the week of drudgery that’s just passed than to take in some art, have a cocktail or two, sit and chat in the lush gardens and generally feel like a more civilised person than you probably are? The California Design exhibition presently showing lends itself to

THE BREAK @ QAG. PIC BY TERRY SOO

a long time between debut and award-winning, single-rotating, headlining, chart-breaking status, but there’s something timeless about their retrospective sound that intensifies alongside their warmly comforting everyman lyrics. The title track off this year’s Harlequin Dream kicks things off, with guitar standing in for that bitching sax solo, sadly. They dip back to their early EP with Rabbit Song and Mexican Mavis, and from there it’s a near two-hour set of classics from 2011’s Moonfire (Lordy May, Milk And Sticks, Part Time Believer) and a fair sample of new stuff (Three-Headed Woman, Real Estate, Southern Sun). Their strict policy on no encores materialises when they wind things up with Golden Jubilee and Feeding

a solid program of contemporary music, much of which has been programmed for this series of UpLate performances inspired somewhat by the music of California from the 1960s. A specially programmed soundtrack has us all jovial as we await the (mainly) Aussie rock legends who make up (mainly) instrumental surf rock band The Break. The band come onstage to the chanting of the Gyuto Monks of Tibet – who contributed to their latest LP, Space Farm – and bassist Brian Ritchie, who you perhaps know as a member of the Violent Femmes, gets us started with an atmospheric solo on the Japanese shakuhachi, which is kinda haunting but is great at building anticipation for the explosion of jagged surf rock to come.

The band sound a little looser than usual for the first couple of tracks tonight and the sound in the packed gallery space booms a little too much for the guitar interplay between Midnight Oil axe slingers Jim Moginie and Martin Rotsey to be distinguished clearly. By the time the Oils’ classic Wedding Cake Island comes around though, it seems as if the band are locked right back in where they belong and things start to sound a little more like they should. The visuals that accompany the performance are perfect: surfing footage, sci-fi oddities and, at one point, some frighteningly fucked-up footage of Englebert Humperdinck all contributing a refreshing visual accompaniment to the driving tunes.

THE BREAK @ QAG. PIC BY TERRY SOO

A set highlight comes almost immediately after when they kick into Face The Music, a driving rocker that draws just about everyone’s undivided attention. It doesn’t hurt that the raw power of Rob Hirst’s drum solo is absolutely life-affirming. The opener from their Church Of The Open Sky debut, Cylinders, remains one of the great surf rock songs of any era and any place and it sounds as good tonight as it always does before Ritchie brings in Space Farm – a heavy hitting spaghetti western-inspired rollicker that closes the set proper. They’re convinced to stay for a couple more songs, treating us to a very different rendition of Kraftwerk’s The Model and a very faithful version of Dick Dale’s Miserlou – such


live reviews a fittingly Californian way to close up this particular show. Dan Condon

SCOTT KELLY AND THE ROAD HOME, NOAH LANDIS, GREG DALE The Zoo 9 Nov The last minute cancellation of Jarboe left this bill a little lighter in weight, yet if there is any solace to be had in this unfortunate turn of events, it is that those in attendance are now privileged to a couple of rare solo

that is more characteristic of this evening. And what a sight it is to witness him beat out the guitar with an urgency not too unlike his infamous performances on the keys. It was only last year that Scott Kelly played this same stage, but tonight he’s complimented by the backing band that his music deserves, and the results make for a rather momentous, albeit subdued, occasion. Though tonight he’s reserved in performance, Kelly still commands quite a presence. The mighty Neurosis frontman stands firm at centre-stage with an Oakland Raiders cap obscuring the eyes in his downturned head. From this near-still stance, he delivers reserved outpourings of signature vocals

SCOTT KELLY @ THE ZOO. PIC BY FREYA LAMONT

performances by those in Scott Kelly’s backing band. Greg Dale is the first of the two and does well to start things off on the right foot. Through half a dozen dry-folk cuts, a confident voice is exhibited over some inspired acoustic guitar work that is coloured with touches of delay. Seeing that Noah Landis’ infamous keyboard work has contributed so much to the menacing undertones of Neurosis and Tribes Of Neurot, it seemed likely that he’d perform some kind of tortured set of ambient synths. Landis, however, throws a curve ball. He straps on an electric guitar and confronts the mic with a collection of songs that see his punk, rock and doom roots melded together and cast in a folk-like furnace

and slow irregular guitars. The accompaniment of Dale’s guitar work lends Kelly’s irregular strumming rhythms an added sense of force and momentum. And Landis’ keys and sample textures project a spatial dynamism and thickness through which the core of each song is better able to swim – the greater example of this comes late in the set, when Blood and Time’s Silver Ocean Storm is rendered majestically over subtle soundscapes of thunder. After being mostly muted between songs, Kelly drops his guard and gives a deeply heartfelt monologue expressing both his appreciation towards the respectful crowd and his personal sentiments behind the “last” song. While

it all looks to finish up with The Forgiven Ghost In Me, closer, We Burn Through The Night, and the album’s opener, A Spirit Redeemed To The Sun creep onto the end. Another moving performance – now, fingers crossed for the big N! Jake Sun

THE KITE STRING TANGLE, ELROY 4.0 Black Bear Lodge 7 Nov It seems like an obvious choice for Trinkets collaborator Elroy 4.0 to be in support for The Kite String Tangle’s first

aka Danny Harley of Pigeon. The enthusiastic punters have packed in and are simply stoked to get an earful of his infectious productions. The music really penetrates from the get-go and when he glides his tranquil voice over the smooth and sophisticated concoction of electronic music the results are simply astounding. It is possibly some of the most exciting and tasteful electronic music to come out of Brisbane of late and it’s gratifying to find that in the live setting it hits home hard, bringing a wonderful kind of subdued power to the fore. He makes the most of the moment, positively exploiting Lorde’s rapid-fever success by serving up a joyous cover of Tennis Court. The crowd laps it up straight away, and when

NANCY VANDAL @ THE ZOO. PIC BY MARKUS RAVIK

headlining tour, and tonight the Byron Bay producer’s set sure does go down a treat. While the room is only at half capacity at best for the performance, his hypnotic electronic offerings help to create a heavy mood in this intimate environment. Like many in this age of the producer, there’s not much in the way of expressive movement to be seen, but the silky smooth atmospheres and forceful beats deliver enough aural delights to satisfy. If not only for the high rotation on triple j of late and the recent announcement of his NYE opening set on the Byron leg of Falls Festival, the fact that tonight’s gig sold out weeks prior is enough to suggest that the time is steadily arriving for local lad The Kite String Tangle,

each time the song demands, a collective baritone “yeah” is volunteered, heightening the selection’s success with a joyous little incarnation of call and response. While The Kite String Tangle does seem just a little bit shy of enough material to make up a fulfilling complete and expansive set, he serves each minute well, and there certainly seems like a good amount of engagement throughout. He wisely saves the heavy artillery for last, and goes out on a high by topping it off with the one everybody seems to have been waiting for – Given The Chance. All in all a pleasing set that goes that little bit further toward promoting a promising future. Jake Sun THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 47


live reviews

NANCY VANDAL/1.1.1/ SPIKE CITY The Zoo 8 Nov “Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the smooth sounds of Spike City,” frontman and Brisbane punk institution Rollo says as the seven-piece takes to the stage. The band features an assortment of other familiar faces from the Brisbane punk scene, including guitarist Ben Jones. They play a set that ranges from lounge-ska to frenetic punk. The band also display a healthy anti-establishment streak, with

Piss In My Weet-Bix and When I Squeeze My Nose I Sound Like Axl Rose, proving that while they might have grown a little older, they thankfully haven’t matured in the traditional sense. The band air a couple of new songs next, including Nurofen For My Euro Friend, before delving into their back catalogue for Sucker For Your Spit and Egg Sandwich. Demolition Derby Date, She Left Me For A Game Show Host Blues and Ray Martin Has A Shed Full Of Giant Robotic Killer Wasps are all as infectious and gloriously ridiculous as ever, and Death Metal Song – which features lead vocals from ever-youthful saxophonist Gilli Pepper – gets a predictably raucous reaction. We’re Not Getting Any Nuder

NANCY VANDAL @ THE ZOO. PIC BY MARKUS RAVIK

between-song banter including “Queensland: Beautiful one day, fascist the next”, and a setlist that includes an “ode” to Lisa Newman, Stonehenge, and an energetic rendition of Blowhard classic, I’m Broke. Next up are fellow Brisbane band 1.1.1, who also feature a couple of ex-Blowhard members but play a more straightforward brand of punk rock than their horned brethren. Nevertheless, they manage to keep the crowd dancing with a mix of old and new tracks, including Love Song and Rock Da Nation, finishing up with a boisterous rendition of Dead Kennedys’ Too Drunk To Fuck. Nancy Vandal open their set with a couple of classics in the form of 48 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

gets the crowd moving before vocalist Fox Trotsky tells the crowd they have one more “proper song”, reiterating that the band needs to play songs to “keep Satan happy”, before launching into fan favourite Move Over Satan. The band then leave the stage briefly, returning to chants of “Nancy, Nancy” with J.J. Speedball in tow for a spirited rendition of Turbonegro’s Erection, before finishing up with Frenzal Rhomb Were Better When Ben Was In The Band. The band’s next scheduled Brisbane gig is next year’s Soundwave festival, but if tonight’s turnout is any indication, they’ll be welcomed with open arms for their next headline show. Daniel Johnson

THE OTTOMANS, TSUN, GAZAR STRIPS The Hideaway 8 Nov It’s encouraging to see more than a few punters have made it out early to hear the sounds of local trio Gazar Strips tonight, because they’re a group who are involved with (arguably) one of the more exciting musical movements in Brisbane at the moment – the resurgence of goth! Their haunting, echoing bass lines evoke memories of early pioneers of the genre like The Cure, yet they have a much

to the retro edge of keys and frontman Karl S Williams’ earthy vocal tone. It’s easy to get lost in the joyous energy of this set, particularly because of the lengthy, tripped-out instrumental jams that feature. Upping the ante fashionably, The Ottomans take the stage donned in some seriously suave blue suits, with the exception of frontman Mitchell Dave-Lewis, who dons shorts instead of trousers. Their style is more boppy and danceable in comparison to the previous acts, resulting in a group of eager fangirls rushing to the front of the crowd to boogie down for the entirety of the set, which The Ottomans seem pretty pleased about. Lewis has an almost dirty and gravelly tone

THE OTTOMANS @ THE HIDEAWAY. PIC BY FREYA LAMONT

bolder and dirtier edge, thanks in part to their hard-hitting riffs, but more as a result of the stunning vocal range of frontman Atlas Harwood. This is demonstrated particularly well in the set’s highlight, Spookies, which starts out with a low, deep rumble from Harwood before the build-up to a forceful yell for the chorus: broody, grungy and seductive stuff. Tsun lighten the mood almost immediately with their warm psychedelic tunes. Taking the stage in stylish splendour – suits, ‘60s haircuts, spotty socks, flowers all around – it’s not long before they have the area around the stage packed out with swaying and dancing fans. They too, have a sound that sparks memories of yesteryear, this time thanks

of voice, which adds a perfect amount of edge to their surfy, jangly style of psych-pop. As Lewis charms the crowd, their guitarist wanders sporadically into the audience, which is always exciting and energising in these smaller venues. The reason they’re here tonight is to launch their latest single, She Was, which is saved for the back end of the set, and is met with roars of glee (particularly from the fangirls) as soon as the opening riff is knocked out. It’s not hard to understand the excitement here; the melodies are tight, the vibe is exciting and there’s room within the track for each band member to shine. While this tune has been a long time coming, it’s definitely proven worth the wait. Jasmine O’Sullivan


THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 49


50 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013


the guide Member answering/role: Tim – vocals/keys How long have you been together? We started out at the end of 2011 when we released our debut single Evie. How did you all meet? Andy, Sam, Zoe and I went to the same school and we all knew Dan through other school friends.

CUB SPORT

You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? Beyoncé. Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? Ball Park Music are an inspiring Brisbane band. Our first proper tour was supporting them at the start of 2012, I think we all learnt a lot from them. What part do you think Brisbane plays in the music you make? I don’t know, maybe the sunny weather has subconsciously helped us make summery-sounding songs.

If your band had to play a team sport instead of being musicians which sport would it be and why would you be triumphant? Tennis ‘cause my old neighbours have a court we could practice on and the outfits are very fashion-forward. What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? We’ve got an Australian tour in support of our Paradise EP, then some festival appearances over New Years and then we’ll be doing some more recording! Cub Sport play California Design Up Late, QAG on 15 Nov, Valley Fiesta on 24 Nov and Falls Festival, Byron Bay 31 Dec-3 Jan. Photo by TERRY SOO.

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eat

BEHOLD, THE BAGEL There was a time when the onlyy dough h mattered d to D D that Dave Drayton was misspelled and inedible. And while that ‘d’oh!’ holds a special place in his heart, a challenger has emerged: the bagel.

I

have to admit to some trepidation before writing this article. Bagels are dear to me and, as a recent trip to the US confirmed, criminally underrepresented here at home. Bagels are so commonplace in the States that they’re practically another bread option for sandwiches – rye, multigrain, wholemeal, plain, and then all these options again but as bagels. The proliferation of the boiled delight in its adopted homeland is such that even at an airport McDonald’s – the lowest of the low – there is a choice of bagels to be had at breakfast. Now, considering my obvious infatuation, it would seem like a desirable opportunity that I had been presented with – to proclaim in print the glory of this boiled and baked good. Not so. Why? Because I don’t want the bagel to be the next kale, the next goji berry, the next quinoa – foods relegated to the category of ‘exotic’ because our parents thought Chinese food at the Bowlo was ‘pretty bloody different enough, mate’. Foods that now arrive not our plates but on a culinary ‘scene’, the edible equivalent of dubstep, overpriced and still underrepresented but with more buzz than a free range honey-providing bee fuelling an undiscerning public who feel as special as the time they ordered Crust instead of Dominos when they eat even the most underwhelming bagel. But even the most underwhelming bagel is a start – as long as we take care that it does not become the next quinoa. I guess what I’m proposing – admittedly somewhat ambitiously – is a complete overhaul of how we, as a nation, think about breakfast and sandwiches. What I am going to then is present you with the facts, plain and simple. I’m not going to harp on about the fact that the bagel is organically yielded from the beards of artisanal foodie and delivered to select bakeries stacked on the horns of free range argyle unicorns... No. As I stated, this is a matter of national importance. We exist in a world where Stanmore 52 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBERV 2013

OUR BAGEL PICKS THE BAGEL BOYS You can buy the Boys’ traditional kettle-boiled bagels from various cafes, grocery stores and markets. They have 11 different kinds of sweet and savoury, as well as a gluten-free option.

LA VOSH PATISSERIE 154 Musgrave Rd, Red Hill With everything baked or made on the premises daily, La Vosh sells fresh New York bagels, Jewish Challah bread on Fridays, French pastries, petits fours, cakes, brioche and pies.

McDonald’s can give me a croissandwhich and yet I can’t find a bagel within five blocks of it. Where even the shitty soulless Bagel House bagels in major supermarket chains remain unstocked on shelves for days at a time. The Bagel – A Brief Primer • Bagels began in Poland during the 18th century, where they were called bajgiels, which is both difficult and fun to pronounce. • Bagels are both boiled and baked. This twice cooked method means they are superior to bread. The boiling provides a chewy, deliciously doughy interior, and the baking ensures a crunch crust encasing. This balance also makes bagels perfectly equipped to support other foodstuffs – the interior is forgiving, waiting to be smothered with sauces and flavours; while the crust ensures the structural support you would want from any hand food. • The first batch of bagels to enter outer space were taken by Canadian astronaut Gregory Chamitoff. He took 18 sesame seed bagels to the International Space Station on his 2008 Space Shuttle mission. I cannot clarify whether he also took schmear aboard the rocket. I’m also a little concerned by the sesame seed option; we all know what happens when potato chips are taken into zero gravity – surely rogue sesame seeds pose as much of a danger. Your Instructions Your local supermarket, your local bakery, your local café, your local restaurants – at all of these locations ask where you can ‘find the bagels’. Don’t ask if they ‘stock bagels’, if you do that you’ll increase their buzz-food currency and ensure their elusiveness in this land. Just ask where they are. Or better yet, just order a couple confidently. Soon enough, weary of turning all of these bagelless customers away, the providers of food in this country will deliver what we’re so sorely missing.

BAGEL NOOK 2/100 Creek St, Brisbane As well all the regular varieties of bagels available for purchase, the Nook is serving up breakfast and lunch bagel combos.

FLUX ON ANN 750 Ann St, Fortitude Valley Their specialties are coffee, tea, doughnuts and bagels. If that’s not a winning combination, what is?


eat/drink

FOOD TRIPPIN’ EATING AROUND THE USA WITH SOFIE MUCENIEKAS AND LLOYD HONEYBROOK

PHILLY

What drinks are you serving? Do you have a specialty? Enjoy local beer, wine and bubbles as well as refreshing frozen daiquiris and spirits at prices that won’t blow the budget.

Briefly describe the crowd that frequents your bar? Popular among males in their 20s, Empire Hotel attracts those who have a passion for sport. They love a good match and love to watch it live and loud on the big screens. Empire Hotel also attracts groups of young revellers who enjoy a good dance to some of the best and greatest dance beats of now!

Does the bar offer food? If so what style and what’s your specialty? Empire Hotel serves delicious pizzas all day. Treat yourself or share with friends accompanied with an icy cold beer or a frozen daiquiri. Pizza and beverage specials available Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays.

Who’s cooking and pouring and what makes them special? Krystal, Tamara, Charlie and Hannah rock it out over the Empire Hotel bar every Friday and Saturday night. This all-girl bar team are supported by our floor staffer, Emanuel. The girls get in there and rock out hard making sure service is key.

BAR PROFILE EMPIRE HOTEL Answered by: Mel Froude Address: 339 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley Briefly describe the design/atmosphere of the bar? Built in the late 1880s, Empire Hotel has managed to maintain its original charm, lively atmosphere and genuine hospitality. Catch all of the best live sport action on one of the three big screens and get good food and great prices. Does the bar have a music component? A mix of live music and dance beats, Empire Hotel transforms from an afternoon of relaxing

After an awesome day wandering around the Reading Terminal Market (most impressive market we’ve ever been to!) and staring at the weird’n’wonderful at The Mütter Museum, @lloydhoneybrook and I decided it was about time we got our first real Philly cheesesteak! So we did our research and headed over to Joe’s Steak & Soda Shop for two cheesesteaks (one steak, provolone cheese, onion, mushroom, and one steak, onion, Cheez Whiz), one fries with blue cheese dipper, and two cookies’n’cream malt shakes. Trashy food made with quality ingredients and love! We’re all about it! #cheezwhizrulez #whywecamehere — with Lloyd James Honeybrook.

live entertainment to upbeat tunes guaranteed to get you dancing!

Anything out of the ordinary on the horizon? Empire Hotel offers a little something for everyone. Test your smarts at trivia or win fabulous prizes at Tranny

“COOKING IS LIKE LOVE; IT SHOULD BE ENTERED INTO WITH ABANDON OR NOT AT ALL” HARRIET VAN HORNE

Bingo. Why not even challenge your friends to a game of table tennis? Live music and great DJs to suit everyone! Website: katarzyna.com. au/venues/empire-hotel mon-wed 6.30am-3pm thurs-fri 6.30am-6pm sat 7am-6pm sun 9am-6pm

café good food & coffee Mon-Sat 7am–3.30pm Sun 7am–2.30pm

breakfast, lunch & afternoon tippler

xf!hpu///

dsbgu!cffs///txffu!txffu!xjof! ///bmm!ebz!csfblz///dpdlubjmt ///qmbuft!up!tibsf///xbjufst!uibu!dbsf! ///boe!dppm!bqspot/ 693 Brunswick St, New Farm e asa@ponycat.com.au p 3254 2883

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THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 53


drink

FRO-COHOL Hannah Storyy decides to run headfirst iinto summer, slightly li h l intoxicated i i d from f all of the following frozen alcoholic drinks below. She shares the best.

SUMMER FOODS WATERMELON

Frozen cocktails need to be paired with summer foods, like, for instance, watermelon. We could’ve picked many fruits but we chose watermelon, because there’s nothing like having a sticky chin after biting into a quarter-melon.

PRAWNS

I

cy poles are a kid’s summer staple. Icy poles, sprinklers, and the fan you used to sit really close to. Those were the days, those sticky, heady days. But we’re all adults now, so how can we enjoy summer as if we’re still 12 and lying on the only cold patch of tile we can find? Here’s how: frozen alcoholic drinks.

MAKE IT A SLUSHIE Take any drink. Make it a slushie by pouring delicious things into a blender. If you’re too lazy to make one yourself, you can always head to a 7/11 and buy a ready-made one, then add your poison. Tried and true is of course vodka with coke, but raspberry would work too. Try the fancy flavours if you want to use liqueurs; we’re pretty sure that pavlova slushies would be perfect with just about anything if they still existed. Just add lychee-flavoured booze to whatever fancy type they’ve got this month. It’s the perfect way to get a brain-freeze, in more ways than one.

MAKE IT AN ICY POLE There’s this thing the internet showed me called Blueberry Peach Tequila Pops where you add a few teaspoons of tequila in with a regular recipe. So you puree blueberries and peaches and add tequila or gin and throw it in the freezer, then magic, you have fruity alcoholic ice pops. Or you could just throw it all in a cocktail shaker, shake and then put them in molds. This works with most fruits, so try whatever is on hand and in season. Mango would have to be my favourite.

JUST ADD BOOZE TO A REGULAR DESSERT You know how your genius friends used to find ways to infuse watermelon with vodka? You could infuse a chocolate cheesecake with booze, or an old school from-the-packet ice-cream cake. I think it involves simmering your booze of choice, let’s say rum, over medium-low heat for a few minutes. You’re cooking the alcohol out so that it’ll freeze easy. It 54 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

wont get you drunk, but it will taste like rum. Or alternately, take your frozen treat out of the freezer and douse it in the liquor of your choice. You will no doubt end up with a mouthful of pure alcohol, and you wont regret it at all for at least ten seconds.

USE ICE-CREAM, YOU FOOL! Put ice-cream in a blender with your preferred poison. Let’s say vodka. This is probably the fastest and most cost effective method, and also the one most likely to get you belted. Use vanilla ice-cream unless you’re using fancy liqueurs. Try rum or vodka or something that you think would taste good in smoothie format. Have a girls’ night in, paint your toenails, have so many you leave the ice-cream out so in the morning you pour the melted ice-cream into a bowl with some tequila and have it for breakfast (hair of the dog).

GOOGLE FROZEN ALCOHOLIC DRINKS RECIPES Just follow the instructions. Just do exactly what they tell you and it will be delicious and you will not be disappointed because you will be both cool and somewhat inebriated. Here are some things to whet your appetite quicksmart: frozen lime margarita, frozen gin fizz, frozen coconut drink (with frangelico), Kahlua frozen mudslide, frozen peach daiquiri, frozen mojito, melon slush, frozen coffee cooler, frozen green tea and moonshine cocktail… The moral to this story is that you can freeze all of the things.

THINGS NOT TO DO 1) Freeze your beer. It will explode in your freezer and you’ll be left eating beer-battered peas for the rest of the year. 2) Try and make spirit ice cubes. Pure alcohol will not freeze in your home freezer. It’s just not cold enough. Stop trying. I don’t know what you were planning on doing with pure alcohol ice cubes, but I’m sure it would’ve ended up with you on the floor passed out while your friends drew dicks on your face.

Of all the seafoods prawns probably taste the best, and offer the greatest return on investment. There’s something about the ritual of shelling your own prawn before eating it that makes you feel like you’ve accomplished something.

ICY POLES

Icy poles aren’t just for children. Track down the Home Ice-Cream man and get yourself some delivered. Almost as satisfying is stuff like sorbet and gelato, just avoid the frozen yoghurt.

CHRISTMAS HAM

Christmas ham is the highlight of our year. Those two weeks where you eat only butcher-fresh Christmas ham are the best. No one can argue otherwise.


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

TOURING THIS WEEK

BRIGHTER THAN EVER

Welcome back to the New Globe Theatre, in a move that’s bound to strengthen the local scene. There’s more cool news soon in this regard too, so watch this space…

DOUBLE THE FUN It’s not too late to head down to Melbourne for next week’s Chapterfest, which features a collaborative set between Dick Diver and Twerps. How could that not be amazing?

IT’S ONLY NATURAL

ADAPT OR DIET

That a performer making music as gorgeous as Gossling would call on some sounds equally as delightful. Little Scout, pictured, and Whitaker will both join the bill for Gossling’s Harvest Of Gold launch show at Alhambra Lounge this Friday.

BAD MOON RISING

UNITED BY FATE

Thriller at Coniston Lane is hosting a Full Moon Party this Saturday with American hardcore dudes Hundredth, who’ll be supported by Vices, Sierra and Bayharbour. Get your tropical on with jungle juice cocktails and surf machine contests, too!

Skinwalkers play a slew of shows in support of new EP, Fateless. Catch them Thursday, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden; Friday, Ric’s Bar; 21 Nov, Tatts Hotel, Lismore; 30 Nov, Commercial Hotel, Sunshine Coast; and 5 Dec, X&Y Bar.

How strange is the pretentious culinary rubbish the Poms are insisting for the cricketers in the Ashes cookbook leaked last week. We could win this, they’re clearly freaks if that’s what they eat…

NEW GLOBE THEATRE

BACKLASH POLICE STATE?

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… KICK IT OFF

LET THERE BE ROCK

After being postponed a few weeks ago, it’s take two for the official opening of the New Globe Theatre, with Bertie Page Clinic, pictured, The Sugar Shakers, The Phoncurves and Cleveland Blues set to shake the venue in style this Thursday.

Plenty of heads will be happy to hear that the former Route 66 bar under Alliance Hotel is hosting bands once more, with Big Bongin’ Baby, Wild Colonial Savage, The Barmaids and Midwife Crisis, pictured, all stopping by on Friday.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

JAKE BUGG Shangri La Universal MICK TURNER Don’t Tell The Driver Remote Control THE NERVE Audiodacity Bird’s Robe/MGM SPIDERBAIT Spiderbait Universal

Now because the bikies have been stirred up the police in Queensland want high power semi-automatic weapons and the right to not wear name tags. It gets scarier every day…

SEARCH UNWARRANTED? Another alarming trend seems to be the amount of Queenslanders – mainly those with long hair and band shirts – being body searched in the street for no apparent reason. Déjà vu much?

BIG BOTHER To the ‘winner’ of the latest Big Brother who recently proclaimed, “I could be the next Kyle Sandilands” – fuck off in advance. What an aspiration in life…

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 55


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

ALBUM FOCUS

BRISANE BOUND

PRIMITIVE MOTION

TRUE VIBENATION

Answered by: Leighton Craig

Name: Bheki (Native Wit) Mkwananzi

Album title: Worlds Floating By

Home ground: Sydney

Where did the title of your new album come from? It’s a lyric from the song The Hill. The concept of parallel worlds, time-out-ofjoint, universes within and without, and inner voids in orbit. Moon day, sun night. How many releases do you have now? Five releases. This is our third album, but the first to be released on vinyl. How long did it take to write/record? The album was mostly recorded in two afternoons by Joel Stern in his lounge. We took forever putting finishing touches on it, including several overdubs at home. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? The motivation to capture songs we’d been playing live was strong. Marking that point in time helps when you want to move on with new material. What’s your favourite song on it? Colours, a mix of the ‘studio’ version with one we’d made ourselves in the gallery space where we practice. Will you do anything differently next time? Perhaps finish the project more quickly. And record a double album; we have enough new songs to record three albums! Primitive Motion play Coorparoo Bowls Club on 16 Nov (4pm-10pm with Cured Pink, Scraps, Screaming Match and more).

56 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

Describe your live music/ performance style as succinctly as possible: Big horns, hip hop, live beats and a selfmade instrument that uses wiring to turn the audience into human drum machines!

TOURING THIS WEEK

MAGIC MO-MENTS Get in the spirit this Friday and help support men’s health issues at The Hideaway’s Hey Ho, Let’s Mo! night featuring Jack Flash, pictured, and West Texas Crude. Prizes for best lip caterpillar and beard on the night – fiver entry on the door.

Is this your first foray to Brisbane? If not how many times have you performed in our midst? No, this is our fifth or sixth time in Brissy. We love it here! Please relate your impressions of performing in our fair city: We’ve always had high energy, fun shows, and you guys really know how to party! Not so great when we have early flights home but lots of fun. What can we expect different this time around? New tunes and possibly new but poorly choreographed dance moves. Has anything exciting been happening in your world of late? We’re working on our second album and will be launching the first single Dressed To Chill.

IMAGINARY DRIFT

LIVE IT UP

San Francisco-based expat Michael Beach will join loud and proud slackers Tape/Off, pictured, Tiny Migrants and Soda Eaves for one hell of a well-rounded bill at Beetle Bar this Thursday. Tenner on the door gets you a taste.

You know what you’ve got to do when Mental As Anything bring their deep, deep swag of party anthems to SoundLounge at Currumbin RSL on the Gold Coast. Friday night fun, perhaps with the folks? Go on, earn some brownie points.

YOU ASKED THE QUESTION

POPPING CHERRIES

And here are The Answers. The trio – featuring Custard legend Glenn Thompson – will visit from Marrickville this Saturday to play Southside Tea Room alongside Dale Peachey. Welcome the headliners as they return to Brisvegas!

Performing in Brisbane for the very first time, GC alt. rock trio GGGhost will headline at The Tempo Hotel, this Thursday, playing with After Gryce, Penny Rides Shotgun, The Kinetics and Dennis Jaculli. Get some new riffs in your life!

What will you be taking home as a souvenir? Good memories and hopefully a bit of good Qld weather! True Vibenation play The Joynt on 15 Nov.

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CAFÉ - BAR

321 BRUNSWICK STREET MALL, FORTITUDE VALLEY 13TH OF NOVEMBER

LE PARTI SOUL W/ DJ REDBEARD (8:00PM - LATE) + KIGO (10:00PM) + PERFUME KITCHEN (9:00PM)

BAY STREET BYRON BAY (02) 6685 6402

14TH OF NOVEMBER

www.beachhotel.com.au

MARTHA MARLOW (10:30PM) + MASH (9:30PM) + DJ VALDIS (8:00PM - LATE)

THIS WEEK:

15TH OF NOVEMBER

SKINWALKERS (9:00PM) + THE KEEPAWAYS (8:00PM) + DJ VALDIS (8:00PM - LATE) 16TH OF NOVEMBER

THE DELTA LIONS (9:00PM) + COLUMBIA BUFFET (8:00PM) + DJ VALDIS (9:00PM - LATE) 17TH OF NOVEMBER

THE MCQUEENS (9:30PM) + GUESTS (8:30PM) 18TH OF NOVEMBER

CIDER STREET (9:30PM) + GUESTS (8:30PM) 19TH OF NOVEMBER

ZEKE FOSTER (9:30PM) + BACKSEAT KILLERS (8:30PM)

FREE LIVE MUSIC AND INDIE DJS WANT TO PLAY? EMAIL BOOKINGS@RICSBAR.COM.AU

WWW.RICSBAR.COM.AU

THUR 14TH FROM 9PM

GARRETT KATO FRI 15TH FROM 5PM

GREG KEW CARAVANA SUN 9:30PM SAT 16TH FROM 9PM

DJ DISCROW

SUN 17TH FROM 4:30PM

LISA HUNT DJ TAYA 8PM

MON 18TH FROM 8PM

‘HIT THAT HIT’ MUSICAL BINGO (FREE ENTRY, GREAT PRIZES) TUES 19TH FROM 5PM

‘LOVE YOUR SISTER’ BREAST CANCER FUNDRAISER OPEN MIC NIGHT 8PM WED 20TH FROM 9PM

DJ SPACIE

COMING UP: THUR 21ST

DJ LONGTIME FRI 22ND

JON J BRADLEY/ KID MAC SAT 23RD

STEREOSONIC LAUNCH PARTY SUN 24TH

RHYS BYNON / SUNDAY SAFARI MON 25TH

PEKING DUK TUE 26TH

NINA LAS VEGAS WED 27TH

FEENIXPAWL DEC 31ST

NYE PARTY

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 57


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

EP FOCUS

FUTURE SOUNDS

PERSONAL BEST RECORDS

FLYYING COLOURS Name: Brodie J Brümmer EP Title? Flyying Colours EP How many releases do you have now? This is our first release, which includes our debut single Wavygravy. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? The recording session itself was particularly eventful – Gemma rejoined the band which was fantastic. It was tumultuous time for us all which I feel is reflected in the music. What’s your favourite song on it? Bugs the final track is my personal favourite. It was the first track written for Flyying Colours. We’ll like this EP if we like... Anything loud, fuzzy, dreamy, trippy, poppy, noisy... ‘90s guitar bands – it’s hard to say. I think you will like it. When and where is your launch/next gig? We will be in Queensland playing three shows with Soviet X-Ray Record Club next weekend! Flyying Colours play Black Bear Lodge on 14 Nov, Studio 188, Ipswich on 15 Nov and The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba on 16 Nov.

MITJA HARVILAHTI FROM MOONSORROW Artist/Band: Moonsorrow Name: Mitja Harvilahti Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? The Kinks – The Kinks. First record you bought? Thin Lizzy – Dedication. I wanted a Thin Lizzy album so I bought a collection album that they put out when I was around eight or nine years old. Record you put on when you’re really miserable? Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood´s album together called Nancy And Lee. Or some Tom Waits. Usually not metal for the blue moments. Record you put on when you bring someone home? Ulver – Blood Inside. Most surprising record in your collection? I don´t find anything surprising really, since I have lots of different stuff. Last thing you bought/ downloaded? I bought the latest MGLA album.

LONG WEEKEND Work on Fridays? Don’t worry about it. Your boss will be cool when you them ‘em you’re taking Friday off after partying with Louis London, pictured, Foxsmith and Five Mile Town at Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel, 21 Nov.

HONK IF YOU’RE HORNY

URINE FOR A TREAT

Black Bear Lodge’s Jazz Party is being taken over by Barksdale Brass Band on 3 Dec as they celebrate the release of their debut EP and the impending festive season. Special guests include Kristin Berardi, Hannah Macklin and The Melotonins.

Kiwi art-punk quartet Girls Pissing On Girls Pissing are making the trip over to tour our fair country this month. Get a squiz of them at the Waiting Room, 29 Nov; Real Bad, Moorooka, 30 Nov; or the Time Machine, Nambour, 1 Dec.

THE LOUDER THE BETTER

BEAT THE BARBE-QUEUES

Young post-hardcore crew The Sweet Apes will show off brand spankin’ new single Flight when they visit Tall Poppy Studios for an all ages gig, 13 Dec, or Thriller, Coniston Lane, for the 18+ crowd, 14 Dec.

Get down to 633 Ann early on 24 Nov to catch a ripping bill of miscreants: the ever-dangerous SixFtHick, pictured, along with Hightimes, Bad Vision and The Chooky. Unite through your passion for no-bullshit punk rock and char grilled rissoles!

Moonsorrow play The Hi-Fi on 20 Nov.

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the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

FUTURE SOUNDS

EP FOCUS

AURAL WINDOW

BACKYARD BLITZ Nova & The Experience are doing some special backyard shows 13 Dec, Byron Bay; 14 Dec, Gold Coast; and 15 Dec, Brisbane. Locations for these secret tea parties will be announced on the band’s Facebook page the day of the show – stay tuned!

Name: Glen Nicholls

VICTORIANA GAYE

EP Title? Candlelight

Name: Vicki Philipp

How many releases do you have now? Two!Cocoon And Epitropos and now our new one Candlelight.

Album title? Holy Roll

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? I was inspired by the thought of creating something new, fun and trying to break down walls between genres to create something amazing that we are so proud of. Mission accomplished! What’s your favourite song on it? My favourite track has to be Mirrors Of You. I’m a sucker for a good power-ballad!

WINNING THE RACE

GUIDED BY VOICES

It ain’t just a name! Slow Riots have been chipping away at a second EP for a few years now and finally we get to hear it live when they launch at 3unker, 22 Nov with Seahorse Divorce, Columbia Buffet and Skin+Bones.

Two of Brisbane’s most stunning young indigenous voices, Sue Ray and Emily Foster, pictured, will partner up for one unmissable evening at the Queensland Multicultural Centre, 23 Nov from 7pm. Engulfing stories sung by two incredible women.

ALBUM FOCUS

We’ll like this EP if we like... Saosin, Paramore, Bring Me The Horizon and Chuck Norris having some kind of super baby! Aural Window play Snitch at X&Y Bar on 14 Nov.

Where did the title of your new album come from? It’s our self-inflicted pep talk song. It’s about being gracious with your chosen roll. So, here we are on tour feeling really holy, like groovy Dali Lamas. How many releases do you have now? Three releases. An EP 5 Songs and two albums – Our Pleasure released in 2010 and Holy Roll is our current release. How long did it take to write/record? Around a year to write and a year to record. Some tunes had been bubbling away for a while, a few were straight from the page. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? The diversity of human behaviour inspires our lyrics and the coastal environment where we live influences our sound. It’s all that nitty gritty day to day livin’ while we dream away that gets us going. What’s your favourite song on it? Wishing Well – it’s beautiful, moody and long with really delicious trombone accompanying the trumpet lines.

CAN’T RESIST THE KINK

GOES DOWN SMOOTH

Before they bunker down to record their new record over the summer, Desert Blues Cartel will get behind Texan visitor Kinky Friedman at Black Bear Lodge show on 24 Nov. Tickets on sale through Oztix for $45+BF.

Let the bluesy vocal stylings of Sarah Frank entertain you at Shady Palms Café on 13 Dec, supported by Aquila Young. With a voice like bourbon, it could well be the perfect soundtrack for those hot and sticky summer nights.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Will you do anything differently next time? We are writing new songs and talking about just that. We’re planning to record a series of EPs in different places with different people. Victoriana Gaye play The End on 14 Nov, Queen St Mall on 15 Nov (5-8pm) and Mullum Music Festival on 23-24 Nov.

THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 59


opinion

OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

URBAN AND R’N’B NEWS BY CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

Eminem gets his Loki on with The Marshall Mathers LP 2. But do fans give a shit? Or is Big Sean now the Detroit rapper? Nah. Mathers just won Artist Of The Year at the inaugural YouTube Music Awards... However, Slim Shady’s latest blockbuster doesn’t reveal any major surprises. It’s not outré like Kanye West’s Lou Reedpraised Yeezus. Mathers is recontextualising his life and career, MMLP2 a nostalgic yet vigourous ‘sequel’ to 2000’s The Marshall Mathers LP. On DJ Khalil’s rock anthem Survival, Mathers brags, “I’m not a rapper – I’m an adapter.” Curiously, he brokers peace with mom on the darkly emotive, Headlights. Mind, elsewhere he’s as venomous – and politically-incorrect – as ever. Mathers has artistic integrity and, while he’s never privileged progressive beats, he ventures out more here. Rick Rubin executive-produces MMLP2 with Dr Dre (who chips in... zero tracks), bringing his dirty rock vibe to songs such as Rhyme Or Reason and masterminding symbolic lead single Berzerk – a mash-up of vintage rap samples from the likes of Beastie Boys. Aussie beatmaker M-Phazes is also on board, for the twopart Stan-inspired epic Bad Guy, which opens MMLP2. Dude can be formulaic. Many players in Shady’s universe return, including Love The Way You Lie’s Rihanna. There’s one rap guest: Kendrick Lamar on Love Game. He’ll join Mathers for February’s Rapture stadium tour of Oz. ogflavas@themusic.com.au

THY ART IS MURDER

Our world is shrinking… in terms of resources, polar ice caps, natural diversity, and it’s all our fault and we should feel bad about it… nah, just kidding. I meant in terms of technology bringing everyone together. We’re no longer a novelty on the worldwide stage, so let’s take a look at all the excellent groups that have been representing on an international scale in 2013. By the way, I was being dead fucking serious. Thy Art Is Murder headlined their second ever European tour in February, and returned in June/July for a run throughout the festival season. They went on to win themselves a slot on the renowned Summer Slaughter tour – headlined by Dillinger Escape Plan – all across the USA and Canada. Before the month’s end they’ll be back in there on their first headlining run. Circles released their acclaimed debut album on the UK label Basick Records, and became the second local group to tour with Dillinger Escape Plan this year, heading out across Europe only last month. The Amity Affliction put their stamp on Warped Tour over in the States, and smashed a headlining run in Europe whilst taking In Hearts Wake under their wings. Kromosom released pretty much their entire discography through legendary US label Southern Lord, then took their crust punk mayhem all across Japan and the USA, even appearing at the annual Chaos In Tejas fest back in May.

EMINEM 60 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

4Arm kicked off their year with a US tour in support of

Testament, and just returned for another run in support of fuckin’ SLAYER. King Parrot took their insanity to the DIY Indonesian touring circuit in April, as well as picking up an international release for Bite Your Head Off through the renowned Candlelight Records. Northlane smashed Canada for the second time back in July. They’re about to embark on their first-ever US run, and just picked up a US release for Singularity. They also got to enjoy their first-ever European adventure in recent months with a place on the Never Say Die tour, which also featured multiple fellow Aussies in… Hand Of Mercy, who had returned to follow up on their run of European shows earlier in the year in support of Bleeding Through, and are currently recording a new album in the USA, as well as… I Killed The Prom Queen, who have been hard at work rebuilding their momentum. The band also hit up the USA with some pretty high profile acts earlier in the year, and put album number three in the bag whilst in Sweden. Deez Nuts just can’t stay away from Europe, and 2013 was no exception, even taking Relentless out for a spin one time. Psycroptic successfully pulled off a large headlining tour of Europe in September. They’re currently enjoying their first blast across Japan, joining the ranks of fellow Aussies such as Ne Obliviscaris, Eternal Rest, As Silence Breaks and Blunt Force Trauma, all whom visited the land of the rising sun this year.

QMUSIC PPCA-AUSTRALIA COUNCIL RECORDING ARTIST INITIATIVE PPCA and the Australia Council are pleased to partner in the delivery of the PPCA – Australia Council Recording Artist Grant. The initiative supports Australian artists creating new sound recordings; artists may apply for any costs primarily associated with the creation of a sound recording, which may also involve some costs associated with promotion. This category is open to individuals only. If you are collaborating with others, you may nominate one of the collaborators to apply on behalf of the group. For more info, and to apply, head to australiacouncil.gov.au.

VOTING NOW OPEN FOR THE AGE MUSIC VICTORIA AWARDS We’re proud to be sponsoring The Age Music Victoria Awards Best Emerging Artist category, in conjunction with BIGSOUND’s official travel partner, Travel Beyond. Voting is now open to music fans across the country. The awards will be presented at Billboard on Wed 20 Nov with an allstar lineup. Tickets are now on sale for the event. The Age/ Music Victoria Awards will celebrate the best music and most significant achievements of the year by recognising and amplifying achievements across all genres. Vote now at theage.com.au/entertainment/ agemusicvictoriaawards.

WANT TO KNOW MORE OR BECOME A QMUSIC MEMBER? For these stories, memberships and more, go to qmusic.com.au.


opinion

CULTURAL CRINGE A LOOK AT THE FINER THINGS WITH MANDY MCALISTER So, who wants to join my gang? We’re called Big and Dangerous Motorcycles of Funtime Outfit, or BaDMoFO, for short. Our uniform is a practical and stylish pink jumpsuit that zips apart at the waist so members don’t have to fully undress to pee. Considerate, no? Our team motto is Veni, Vidi, Vici because our members are smart sorts, but even the ones with pending membership to Mensa couldn’t figure out the Latin translation for “We came, we saw, we had a cup of tea and rode back down the mountain harming no one.” We’re still trying to decide on a club song. The frontrunners are Jerry Harrison’s forgotten ‘90s classic, Rev It Up, and and Cycle Sluts From Hell’s I Wish You Were A Beer. We’re at a deadlock on this issue but are hoping it can be resolved once and for all with an influx of new members. While we’re having issues deciding on a club song, BaDMoFOs agree on the most important things. For instance, we

believe in freedom of association. If we didn’t we’d have to kick Bob out. Bob’s a BaDMoFO but he’s also a bit of a dick. You see Bob has a beautiful family, including a loving wife, yet, when Bob was away on a ride with the club he had a fling with a motorcycle mechanic. Luckily, God also believes in freedom of association, otherwise the whole club would be smitten for adultery. We can’t prove that we weren’t aware of Bob’s infidelity or that we didn’t cover for him while he played love rat, but luckily, due to freedom of association, not all members had their belongings thrown off a balcony, and not all members had to move out of their familial homes and in with their sister and brother-in-law. This system of running things seems to be going well. After all, if we started arresting people who belonged to the the same group as a person who was a little dodgy, every police officer in Queensland would be under arrest. Not only would this look

THE LOOKING GLASS A JOURNEY THROUGH ARTS WITH HELEN STRINGER Judging by the quantity of smug memes proliferating across newsfeeds there are real people out there genuinely moved by Hallmark quotes and baby animals inadvertently doing human-like things. There are some of us, however, who don’t feel remotely close to emoting when a picture of a rat tucked into a tiny bed hugging a tiny teddy bear turns up on our newsfeed. That said, there are many non-vermin-related ways to cheer yourself up to be found on the internet. Most involve Ryan Gosling. ‘Ryan Gosling

Won’t Eat His Cereal,’ for instance, works a treat. However, it pales in comparison to ‘Ryan Gosling Breaks Up Fight,’ a short YouTube video in which an onlooker rightfully loses her shit when Baby Goose steps in to end some fisticuffs between two guys fighting over a painting. Despite the preternatural awesomeness of Baby Goose, my favourite happymaker is ‘Finding Franco’ . It’s a drinking game I’ve made up where you spend a full 12 hours tracking James Franco and take a drink for any mention of the man in the previous 24.

bad, the state would have to sub-contract the job of arresting police officers to a private security firm, and there’d be no one left for the important task of harassing jaywalking pedestrians. Yep, if we start arresting people for being in the same association or group as a criminal, pretty much every member of every professional body in Queensland will be in the clanger. Last week a doctor was charged with Medicare fraud. Better lock up the Australian Medical Association. Many a Catholic priest has been accused of paedophillia. Better lock up everyone associated with Catholicism; yes even Thelma, the 75-year-old

It’s a feel-good game: Franco’s appeal stems from the fact he does a lot of things, sucks at most of them but does them anyway. Combined with shots of whiskey, ‘Finding Franco’ works as an antidepressant for many reasons. The very fact he’s shit at most of the alternative career choices he makes is reassuring; Franco’s mediocrity proves that despite being filthy rich and shamefully over-privileged, celebs are just as incompetent as we are. Reviewers of his prolific output unanimously agree with this interpretation, repeatedly asserting that his writing/art/directing/poetry is brilliant provided you can overcome the fact it’s completely awful. There’s further consensus that if Franco wasn’t a famous movie star there’s absolutely no way a publisher would so much as poke his output with a stick. Franco tries and fails at more things a person living according to the linear passage of time could possibly have hours in the day to do. Luckily, he doesn’t give a fuck what we think and instead likes to write his own glowing reviews, giving an unbiased opinion on the quality and

volunteer organist. Sure it’s unlikely that she was involved in systematic abuse of children but she can tell it to the judge. Sign up now for the Queensland chapter of BaDMoFO. We’re sure you’ll find our HQ, located in a well armed secret bunker: quite luxurious. We are contactable by homing pigeon any time of the night or day. Previously we’ve accepted members from many walks of life with the only pre-requisite being a love of motorcycles. However, this model of operation is increasingly unsustainable. We’re currently looking for recruits with skills in espionage, cyber warfare and evading the police. Undercover cops need not apply.

relevance of his poly-hyphenated artistic forays. Recently he wrote an opus for Vice on the social relevance of his character ‘Alien’ in Spring Breakers. Being grounded in the real world Franco makes down-to-earth claims like “there will never be a… character more important for this age.” He then pulls out the all-time under-grad favourite of explaining convolution by calling it “a mist of meta-commentary.” It’s great when Franco does these things because really, the only way to appreciate his art is for James Franco to explain to you that you should be appreciating Franco’s art, and then give you 1250 words to clarify just how you should go about doing so. If alcohol-based hand sanitiser wasn’t the closest I could get to actual alcohol, at this point of titration I’d likely be drunk enough to watch Oz The Great And Powerful and Your Highness back to back. I’d likely be feeling much more hopeful about my creative output, inspired by the knowledge I too could be successful at many things just by being bad at them all. THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 61


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby 21-24 Nov Patrick James: Black Bear Lodge 27 Nov The John Steel Singers: The Spotted Cow 28 Nov, The Zoo 29 Nov, Solbar 30 Nov Philadelphia Grand Jury vs Feelings: The Rev 5 Dec Festival Of The Sun: Port Macquarie 13-14 Dec Pond: The Zoo 14 Dec Bonjah: Solbar 28 Dec, The Northern 29 Dec Woodford Folk Festival: Woodfordia 27 Dec – 1 Jan

Wire: The Zoo 19 Feb Future Music Festival: RNA Showgrounds 1 Mar Mikhael Paskalev: Alhambra 4 Mar A Festival Called Panama: Tasmania 8-9 Mar Billy Bragg: The Tivoli 20 Mar Steve Earle & The Dukes: The Tivoli 15 Apr Allen Stone: The Zoo 16 Apr Byron Bay Bluesfest 2014: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm 27-21 Apr

Half Moon Run: Solbar 2 Jan, Old Museum 3 Jan, The Northern 4 Jan

WED 13 His Merry Men + Stormchasers + Astrid & The Asteroids: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Fabulous Sounds of the Sixties Show feat. Darren J Ray: Caloundra RSL, Caloundra Jam Night feat. various: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane The Casuarinas: Junk Bar, Ashgrove The Members: Prince of Wales Hotel, Nundah Mark Sheils: Royal George, Fortitude Valley Terry Clark: The Elephant Arms, Fortitude Valley Wafia + Andrew Markwell + Fossils: The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley Luna Junction + guests: The Joynt, South Brisbane Natalie de Jager: The Lido Cafe & Restaurant, Ascot Open Mic Night feat. various: The Loft, Chevron Island Nathan Pursey: The Plough Inn, Southbank Tempo Acoustic Sessions with Jesse Mann + Al Buchan + Graham Moses: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Lesyah: The Vault, Southport DJ Daniel De Niro + Brent Dee: Vanity Nightclub, Surfers Paradise

THU 14 Hey Geronimo: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley

GIG OF THE WEEK KEEP ON DANCIN’S: 15 NOV, BLACK BEAR LODGE

KC & The Sunshine Band: The Tivoli 19 Apr Heatsick + M A S H + Enderie Nuatal + Club Sound Witches + DJ White Pimpernell: The Fox Hotel, South Brisbane Big Sean + special guests: Arena, Fortitude Valley Sonic Masala feat. Michael Beach + Tiny Migrants + Tape/Off + Soda Eaves: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Flyying Colours + Soviet X-Ray Record Club: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Olly Murs: Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, South Bank The Cope Street Parade: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Dog Trumpet: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm Liam Gerner + Andrea Kirwin + Boi & Eskae: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa Smokie + guests: Empire Theatre, Toowoomba Ragdoll + Jabba: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Pete Hunt Quartet: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Ballad Boy: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt Open Mic Night feat. various: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane Bertie Page Clinic + The Sugar Shakers + The Phoncurves + Cleveland Blues: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley Tourism: Oh Hello!, Fortitude Valley Benjalu: Paddy’s Shenanigans Irish Pub, Airlie Beach TAFE Music Showcase feat. various: Solbar, Maroochydore Skinwalkers: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden, Surfers Paradise Victoriana Gaye: The End, West End

Nile + The Faceless + Rome: The Hi-Fi, West End Memory Waste: The Joynt, South Brisbane Zealardor + Odin’s Ravens + Sam King + Ruby McKean: The Loft, Chevron Island Ty Fader: The Plough Inn, Southbank Music Kitchen feat. GGGhost + After Gryce + Penny Rides Shotgun + The Kinetics + Dennis Jaculli: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Frazer Goodman + Friends: The Vault, Southport Ages Of Earth + Kick The Butterfly + The Halls: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Stevie Z + DJ Daniel De Niro + Jake Carmody: Vanity Nightclub, Surfers Paradise Snitch feat. Aural Window + Awaken I Am: X&Y Bar, Fortitude Valley

FRI 15

The Good Ship: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm

Nick & Greg: Gazebo Restaurant, Hotel Urban, Brisbane

Mia Wray + DJ Pipeline Pedro: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa

The Delta Lions + Leadfinger: Irish McGann’s Hotel, Roma

Guilt Retreat feat. Tyvek + Shovels + The Real Numbers + Hydromedusa + Gerald Keaney & The Gerald Keaneys + Eggvein + Dag + Blank Realm + The Adults: Club Greenslopes, Greenslopes

B-Rad + Ramjet: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Cheated Hearts with DJ Jane Doe + DJ Frankie Trouble + The Gatling Gun + Cvlt Teens + Virtual Illusion: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley

Strings For Ammo + Locky: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane

Hits & Pits 2.o feat. Black Flag + Boysetsfire + Bad Astronaut + The Ataris + Snuff + No Fun At All + Good For You + Off With Their Heads + Jughead’s Revenge + more: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta

The View From Madeleine’s Couch: Post Office Square (12pm), Brisbane

Paul Van Den Hoom: Coorparoo Bowls Club, Coorparoo Useless ID + The Decline + Driven Fear + No Trust: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

DJ Turhan: Love Nightlife, Broadbeach

Soul Train feat. various: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley

Cub Sport: QAGOMA (QLD Art Gallery), South Bank Green Jam Sessions with Laura Mulcahy: QPAC, Southbank Smokie + guests: QPAC Concert Hall, South Bank Victoriana Gaye: Queen Street Mall, Brisbane

The Aston Shuffle (DJ Set): Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise

Skinwalkers: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

Charley Pride: Empire Theatre, Toowoomba

John Malcolm: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

Friends feat. Gossling + Little Scout + Whitaker: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Big Bongin Baby + Wild Colonial Savage + The Barmaids + Midwife Crisis: Alliance Hotel, Spring Hill Diva Demolition: Andergrove Tavern, Andergrove Mr Grevis + Mr Hill + Chase + Boi Blue: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Keep On Dancin’s: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Steve Barry Trio: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

DOG TRUMPET: 14 NOV, BRISBANE POWERHOUSE

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 62 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

Le Breeze: Lambert’s Restaurant, Kangaroo Point


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au Jason Kufoa: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Berst + Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

John Butler Trio + Dom Miller: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Little Planes Land + Denville: Shady Palms, Stones Corner

Ladi Abundance: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Jeremy Neale + Major Leagues + Wolver: Solbar, Maroochydore

DJ Turhan + DJ Luke Peters: Love Nightlife, Broadbeach

Brent Dee + DJ Daniel De Niro + Jake Carmody: Vanity Nightclub, Surfers Paradise

Mental As Anything: SoundLounge, Currumbin

Off The Leash + Murphy’s Pigs + Ger Fennelly: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane

The Gin Club + The Stress Of Leisure + Jakarta Criers: State Library of Queensland (SLQ Gallery, Level 2), South Bank Rohan + Sean Anthony + Jaynie Wong + Ray Saito: The Crosstown Eating House, Woolloongabba Hey Ho Let’s Mo feat. West Texas Crude + Jack Flash: The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley

Adrian Lux: Platinum Nightclub, Broadbeach

The Answers + Dale Peachey: Southside Tea Room, Morningside

Soula + In2nation + Street 66 + Evan Manttari: The Loft, Chevron Island

Alex Lloyd + The Young Lions: Springwood Hotel, Springwood

Best of Escalate feat. Matt Duke + Upsize + Archetypes + Double Lined Minority + We Become Ghosts + White Elephant: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Bob La Castra + Groove Assembly: The Vault, Southport Wideacre + Makeout Creek + The Carolines: The Waiting Room, West End Between The Buried & Me + The Contortionist + Ne Obliviscaris: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Brent Dee + Jake Carmody: Vanity Nightclub, Surfers Paradise

SAT 16 Cookie Jar+Various: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley Remi + Fishing: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Screamfeeder + Hits + The Slow Push: Beetle Bar, Brisbane The Merrys: Bon Amici Wine Bar, Toowoomba The Soundscapes Trio: Brisbane Powerhouse (Turbine Platform/5pm), New Farm Women In Docs: Brisbane Powerhouse (Visy Theatre), New Farm

Rockaoke feat. various: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

DJ Jazzy Jay: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Ingrid James Duo: The Lido Cafe & Restaurant, Ascot

Allday: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley

Charley Pride: The Arts Centre Gold Coast, Surfers Paradise

West Texas Crude + Truckstop! + The Hi-Boys: Royal Mail Hotel (12.30pm), Goodna

Mr Grevis + Mr Hill + Chase + Boi Blue: Solbar, Maroochydore

Screamfeeder + The Slow Push: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba

Saviour + For All Eternity + Anchored: Tall Poppy Studios, Brisbane

The Delta Lions + Leadfinger + Columbia Buffet: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

True Vibenation + School Fight: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Blue Steel: The Plough Inn, Southbank

MON 18 Rob Hackwood Duo: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Yellowood Music Festival feat. The Delta Riggs + The Headland Peddler + Jimmy The Saint & The Sinners + The Money Smokers + Jackson Dunn + Electrik Lemonade + Ashleigh Mannix: The Gem Hotel, Alberton Hits & Pits 2.o feat. Black Flag + Boysetsfire + Bad Astronaut + The Ataris + Snuff + No Fun At All + Off With Their Heads + Jughead’s Revenge + Good For You + more: The Hi-Fi, West End

FISHING: 16 NOV, ALHAMBRA LOUNGE

SUN 17 Rock n Roll BBQ feat. Wayne Keys + Hydromedusa + King Kongo + Shandy: 633 Ann (2pm), Fortitude Valley Dethrone The King + Bodies In Barrels + The Grills + System Trashed + On Your Feet: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Kate Martin: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Strings For Ammo + Ger Fennelly: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane Shifting Sands + Bree De Rome: Shady Palms, Stones Corner Shifting Sands: Shucked Lane, Newstead The Brodie Graham Band: Solbar, Maroochydore Hakan Henry: Stoke Bar (2pm), Southbank

Azur + DJ Jahzen: Cafe Le Monde (3.15pm), Noosa

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club + Immigrant Union: The Hi-Fi, West End

Tigers & Emperors: Coorparoo Bowls Club, Coorparoo

The Hipshooters: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Cheap Fakes: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Wayward Smith + Belltalk: Dowse Bar (Iceworks), Paddington

Retro Room: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank

Wayward Smith + Bree De Rome + Fettler + Martha Marlow: The Loft, Chevron Island

Wasabi + Mick McHugh + Ragdoll: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Lucy Street: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Step It Up: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Franz Ferdinand + guests: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley

Big Boyz: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank

TUE 19 Behind The Velvet Curtain – Songwriters Collective feat. Harmony James + Gian Famularo + Tommy Sheehan + Connie Choo: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Jessica Mauboy + Nathaniel: Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, South Bank Woody Lives Here: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Lauren Grace Duo: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End The Bug feat. The Bumsteaders + Sunas: New Farm Bowls Club, New Farm Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Valley The Ten Tenors: The Arts Centre Gold Coast, Surfers Paradise Escalate Showcase feat. Mars Attacks + thebeforeparty + By Eleanor: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Lesyah: The Vault, Southport

Soul2You: The Plough Inn, Southbank Flyying Colours: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba Belltalk + In2nation + Say Do Now + Soula + Zoophonic Blonde: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Residents feat. various DJs: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley Starq: The Vault, Southport Jeremy Neale + Major Leagues + Rolls Bayce + Eves: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Victoriana Gaye: Upfront Club Maleny, Maleny Stevie Z + Jake Carmody: Vanity Nightclub, Surfers Paradise

DJ Manie Shika: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa I Know Leopard + guests: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane

JOHN BUTLER TRIO: 17 NOV, THE ZOO

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 63


tour guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

INTERNATIONAL

Harrison Craig: Star Court Theatre Nov 19

Pond: The Zoo Dec 14, The Northern Dec 15

Smokie: Empire Theatre Nov 14, QPAC Nov 15

Seabellies: Alhambra Lounge Nov 21

Clairy Browne: The Hi-Fi Dec 19

Nile: The Hi-Fi Nov 14

Sal Kimber & The Rollin’ Wheel: The Joynt Nov 21

Big Sean: Arena Nov 14

Holy Holy: Black Bear Lodge Nov 21

Heatsick: Fox Hotel Nov 14 The Real Numbers, Tyvek: Greenslopes Bowls Club Nov 15

Miami Horror: Oh Hello! Dec 21 Bonjah: Solbar Dec 28, The Northern Dec 29, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden Dec 30 Mi-Sex: Woombye Pub Jan 9, Eatons Hill Hotel Jan 10, Coolangatta Hotel Jan 11

Useless ID: Crowbar Nov 15

Stonefield: Alhambra Lounge Nov 22, Villa Hotel Noosa Nov 23, The Northern Nov 24

Between The Buried And Me: The Zoo Nov 15

Bodyjar: The Hi-Fi Nov 22, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 23

Karnivool, Dead Letter Circus: Marquee Jan 11, Coolangatta Hotel Jan 12

British India: The Zoo Nov 22, 23

Hunters & Collectors: Sirromet Wines Feb 2

The Living End: Eatons Hill Hotel Nov 23

Josh Pyke: Old Museum Feb 15

Martha Davis And The Motels: Twin Towns Nov 15

HELMET: 8 DEC, THE HI-FI

Olly Murs: BCEC Nov 16 Adrian Lux: Platinum Nov 16 Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: The Hi-Fi Nov 17 Franz Ferdinand: The Tivoli Nov 17 Moonsorrow: The Hi-Fi Nov 20 Jill Scott: The Tivoli Nov 21 Neck Deep: Snitch Nov 21, Trinity Hall Nov 22 (AA) Mikal Cronin: Alfred’s Apartment Nov 21, Black Bear Lodge Nov 22, The Northern Nov 23 Carl Craig: Bowler Bar Nov 22 Sonny and the Sunsets: QAG Nov 22 Justin Bieber: BEC Nov 26, 27 (AA) Dale Watson & His Lonestars: Black Bear Lodge Nov 28, Morningside Services Club Nov 29 City and Colour, Twin Forks: Brisbane Riverstage Nov 30

Jack Johnson: QPAC Dec 14

Neko Case: The Hi-Fi Mar 5

Chic featuring Nile Rodgers: The Tivoli Dec 15

Bruno Mars: BEC Mar 7

Todd Terry: Cloudland Dec 15

Public Enemy: The Hi-Fi Mar 7 Yo La Tengo: The Zoo Mar 11

The Brian Jonestown Massacre: The Hi-Fi Dec 15, The Northern Dec 18

Iced Earth: The Hi-Fi Mar 14

Bon Jovi, Kid Rock: Suncorp Stadium Dec 17

Queens of the Stone Age, Nine Inch Nails: BEC Mar 17

Mac DeMarco: The Zoo Dec 18

Sebadoh: The Zoo Mar 23

David Dallas: Alhambra Lounge Dec 19

Thirty Seconds To Mars: Brisbane Riverstage Mar 30 (AA)

Waka Flocka Flame: The Hi-Fi Dec 21

3 Inches Of Blood: Crowbar Apr 10

Ben Caplan: Black Bear Lodge Jan 2

Steve Earle & The Dukes: The Tivoli Apr 15

Half Moon Run: Solbar Jan 2, Old Museum Jan 3, The Northern Jan 4

Allen Stone: The Zoo Apr 16

Babylon Circus: Solbar Jan 3, The Brewery Jan 4, Alhambra Lounge Jan 5

Toby Keith: BEC Mar 14

KC & The Sunshine Band: The Tivoli Apr 19 KT Tunstall: The Zoo Apr 30 Jason Derulo: BEC May 5

Earthless: Crowbar Jan 3

Michael Buble: BEC May 12

Leonard Cohen: BEC Nov 30

Deafhaven: Crowbar Jan 8

Kataklysm: Crowbar Dec 4

Paramore, You Me At Six: BEC Jan 9

Fleshgod Apocalypse: The Hi-Fi May 14

Cave: The Zoo Dec 4 Insane Clown Posse: The Hi-Fi Dec 5 Steel Panther: Riverstage Dec 6 Guitar Wolf: Beetle Bar Dec 6 Passenger: The Tivoli Dec 6, Dec 7 (AA) Taylor Swift: Suncorp Stadium Dec 7

Daughters: Crowbar Jan 9 The Crimson Projekct: The Hi-Fi Jan 11 Mayhem: The Hi-Fi Jan 12 Misfits: The Zoo Jan 16 We Are Scientists: The Zoo Jan 22 The Locust: Crowbar Feb 5

James Blunt: BCEC Jun 2 Dragon: Kedron Wavell Services Club Jun 20, Twin Towns Jun 21

NATIONAL Gossling: Alhambra Lounge Nov 15 The Aston Shuffle: Elsewhere Nov 15

Joey Bada$$: The Hi-Fi Dec 7

Dash Berlin: Riverstage Feb 9

Allday: Bowler Bar Nov 15

Melvins, Helmet: The Hi-Fi Dec 8, The Northern Dec 9

The National: Riverstage Feb 11

Jeremy Neale: Solbar Nov 15, The Zoo Nov 16

Deerhunter: The Zoo Dec 9 Muse: BEC Dec 10 (AA)

Ed Kowalczyk: The Tivoli Feb 12 Wire: The Zoo Feb 19

Screamfeeder: The Spotted Cow Nov 15, Beetle Bar Nov 16

Peter Murphy: The Hi-Fi Dec 10

Eminem: Suncorp Stadium Feb 20

Metric: The Tivoli Dec 11

Dolly Parton: BEC Feb 21

Alex Lloyd: Springwood Hotel Nov 16, Lismore Workers Club Nov 17

Sage Francis: The Hi-Fi Dec 12

Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band: BEC Feb 26

Fishing: Alhambra Lounge Nov 16

The Wonder Stuff: The Zoo Feb 27

John Butler Trio: The Zoo Nov 17

Brian McKnight: QPAC Mar 2

Jessica Mauboy: BCEC Nov 19, Jupiters Casino Nov 20, Caloundra Events Centre Nov 22, Empire Theatre Jan 8; Lismore Workers Club Jan 10

Alicia Keys, John Legend: BEC Dec 13 Kylesa: The Hi-Fi Dec 13 Hopsin: The Tempo Hotel Dec 13, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden Dec 16 Chris Lake: Family Dec 13, Platinum Dec 20

64 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013

Charles Bradley: The Hi-Fi Mar 4 Mikhael Paskalev: Alhambra Lounge Mar 4

The Hello Morning: Eumundi Amphitheatre Nov 24 Patrick James: Black Bear Lodge Nov 27 Air Supply: Jupiters Casino Nov 27 The John Steel Singers: The Spotted Cow Nov 28, The Zoo Nov 29, Solbar Nov 30 Whitley: Alhambra Lounge Nov 28, Woombye Pub Nov 29, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 30 Circles: Transcontinental Hotel Nov 29 Machine Translations: The Hi-Fi Nov 30 Closure In Moscow: The Spotted Cow Dec 5, Alhambra Lounge Dec 6 Tumbleweed: The Tempo Hotel Dec 5 Colin Hay: The Tivoli Dec 5 Philadelphia Grand Jury, Feelings: The Rev Dec 5 The Nerve: The Northern Dec 5, The Tempo Hotel Dec 6, Kings Beach Tavern Dec 7 King Parrot, Gay Paris: Commercial Hotel Dec 6, Thriller Dec 7 Courtney Barnett: QAG Dec 6 I Exist: Sun Distortion Dec 6 (AA) The Screaming Jets: Eatons Hill Hotel Dec 6, Coolangatta Hotel Dec 7 Birds Of Tokyo: Coolangatta Hotel Dec 11 Guineafowl: Alhambra Lounge Dec 12, Beach Hotel Dec 13 The Tiger & Me: Beach Hotel Dec 12, The Joynt Dec 13, Solbar Dec 14

Pete Murray: The Tivoli Feb 22 Kerser: The Hi-Fi Feb 22 (AA and 18+) Caravãna Sun: Beach Hotel Feb 28, Solbar Mar 1, Brunswick Heads Hotel Mar 2 Sunnyboys: The Northern Mar 14, 15, The Tivoli Mar 28 Kate Miller-Heidke: The Tivoli Apr 5

FESTIVALS Hits & Pits 2.0: Coolangatta Hotel Nov 15, The Hi-Fi Nov 16 Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby Nov 21-24 Valley Fiesta: Fortitude Valley Entertainment Precinct Nov 22-24 The Other Side: South Stradbroke Island Nov 23 OzManouche: Brisbane Jazz Club Nov 28-Dec 1 Warped Tour: RNA Showgrounds Nov 29, Coffs Harbour Showground Nov 30 Stereosonic: RNA Showgrounds Dec 7-8 Festival Of The Sun: Sundowner Breakwall Tourist Park Dec 13-14 Woodford Folk Festival: Woodfordia Dec 27-Jan 1 Falls Festival: Byron Bay Dec 31-Jan 3 Beachlife: Surfers Paradise Beach Jan 4-5 Boys Of Summer: The Rev Jan 8, Eagleby South School Hall Jan 9 (AA) Big Day Out: Metricon Stadium and Carrara Parklands Jan 19 Laneway Festival: RNA Showgrounds Jan 31

The Gin Club: Cafe Le Monde Dec 12, Black Bear Lodge Dec 13, The Spotted Cow Dec 14

Soundwave: RNA Showgrounds Feb 22

Gareth Liddiard: QAG Dec 13

Good Life: RNA Showgrounds Feb 28

Charlie Horse: The Spotted Cow Dec 13, Ric’s Bar Dec 14 Battleships: Solbar Dec 13, The Hideaway Dec 14 Katie Noonan, Abby Dobson: Old Museum Dec 14

Bluesfest: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm Apr 17-21 Groovin’ The Moo: Townsville Cricket Grounds May 4


music. thursday 14/11.

Claire Walters 8pm.

saturday 16/11.

AMA

ZING

CITY VIEW C S COOPOCKTAIL S ERS ON T Dele AP ctab le d ishe s

Mojo Webb 8pm.

café & wine bar breakfast. lunch. dinner. drinks ‘til late. open 7am weekdays. Lower Burnett Ln. Brisbane CBD. 07 3211 4242.

WED DECEMBER 4 THE ZOO, BRISBANE tickets on sale now from lifeisnoise.com, oztix and the venue

Live

Jazz

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THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013 • 65


the end

ULTIMATE FANTASIES FANTASY SPORTS WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF

Sports tipping where you control your destiny – to a degree.

FANTASY FOLLOWERS Middle aged men living vicariously through the glories of young bloods.

ATTRACTIONS Makes even the worst of matchups interesting. Ultimate procrastination activity.

DRAWBACKS Can swallow your life whole.

LEVEL OF LUCIDITY Real professionals, real sports, coaching fantasy. Direct the players you once dreamt of being like.

FAN(TASY) FICTION WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF

Anything is possible with this style of writing, and oh how it can get weird.

FANTASY FOLLOWERS Those that lurk in the recesses of dimly lit bedrooms.

ATTRACTIONS Create the plotlines you wish Hollywood would serve up.

DRAWBACKS Can incite heated debate online, or worse still, at pop culture conventions.

LEVEL OF LUCIDITY Frightening levels of madness.

FANTASY ISLAND WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF

TV show where guests visit undisclosed Pacific island to live out wildest fantasies. Nothing suss.

FANTASY FOLLOWERS

Fans all over the world. Proved to be a popular daytime TV rerun choice in the ‘90s.

ATTRACTIONS

Anything was possible on Fantasy Island, for the right price. White suits were impeccable.

DRAWBACKS

They got rid of iconic little man Tattoo in 1983. Unsurprisingly, the show disappeared soon after.

LEVEL OF LUCIDITY

Yes, some fantasies got intense, but don’t sweat it, Mr Roarke always gave a disclaimer. 66 • THE MUSIC • 13TH NOVEMBER 2013


BE PART OF THE

FUTURE OF MUSIC 21-24 NOV SOUTH BANK BRISBANE QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIA

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Picnic Under The stars Music Bazaar Katie Noonan Lisa Gasteen Topology DeepBlue

The Music (Brisbane) Issue #14  

The Music is a free, weekly gloss magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, li...

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