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THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 3


4 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013


australian tour 2013

with special guests husky & twin forks

saturday 30 november riverstage ticketmaster.com.au or 136 100 | all ages

tickets selling fast! new album ‘the hurry and the harm’ available now cityandcolour.com chuggentertainment.com

THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 5


themusic 9TH OCTOBER 2013

#009

“THE FIRST BULL PACK PASSES ME BY SO CLOSE I COULD HAVE TOUCHED THEM, BUT I’M TOO BUSY SCREAMING.”

INSIDE FEATURES Cartoons Of The Now Grouplove

- SARAH REID RISKS A MINOR GORING TO RUN WITH THE BULLS (P58)

Freestyle Flowers Tommy Tiernan Rolo Tomassi

feature

World’s End Press Mantra Sebadoh Regurgitator Bullhorn The Immortal Rob Schneider Icona Pop

“THE JERKIER WE CAN MAKE THE MUSICAL CHANGES THE MORE WE JERK AROUND THE AUDIENCE.” - QUAN YEOMANS OF REGURGITATOR (P32)

STREAM: MELBOURNE PSYCHEDELIC SHOEGAZE BAND FLYYING COLOURS’ NEW EP. LISTEN AT THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Tumbleweed Pikelet Bertie Page Clinic The Handsome Family Amorphis Cosmo Jarvis

REVIEWS

Album: Scott & Charlene’s Wedding Live: Listen Out Arts: Gravity Games: Volgarr The Viking Muso

THE GUIDE Cover: Marcus Blacke

Food: Peanut Butter Drink: Summer Coffee

CHECK OUT: ALL THE NEWS AND RESULTS FROM THIS WEEK’S CARLTON DRY INDEPENDENT MUSIC AWARDS. HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU

THE LOWDOWN: FIVE REASONS WHY DANCING WITH THE STARS WILL MAKE YOU SAD. ONLY AT THEMUSIC.COM.AU

comedy “IT’S NOT LIKE I’M NOT PROUD OF THE MOVIES I MADE – I JUST WOULDN’T DO IT AGAIN.” - FUNNY MAN ROB SCHNEIDER (P34)

Travel: Running With The Bulls

“EVEN THE CLAMMY FACE-CHEWERS TO OUR RIGHT ARE REACHING OUT TO SHOW THE DOMESTIC PRODUCT SOME LOVE.”

Art: Temporary Design Fashion: Flowers Local News Gig Guide The End: Sinead O’Connor Beefs

review 6 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

- BENNY DOYLE GETS HIS DANCE ON AT LISTEN OUT (P45)


CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Steve Bell

ASSISTANT EDITOR Benny Doyle

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE EDITOR Justine Lynch gigs@themusic.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS Adam Curley, Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Ben Preece, Benny Doyle, Bradley Armstrong, Brendan Telford, Carley Hall, Chris Yates, Cyclone, Dan Condon, Daniel Johnson, Dave Drayton, Guy Davis, Helen Stringer, Jake Sun, Jann Angara, Jazmine O’Sullivan, Lochlan Watt, Madeleine Laing, Mandy McAlister, Matt O’Neill, Mitch Knox, Sam Hobson, Sky Kirkham, Tom Hersey, Tony McMahon, Tyler McLoughlan

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 9 OCTOBER - 15 OCTOBER 2013

drink

PHOTOGRAPHERS Freya Lamont, John Stubbs, John Taylor, Kane Hibberd, Rick Clifford, Sky Kirkham, Stephen Booth, Terry Soo

rummage

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Brett Dayman

QLD SALES Alex Iveson, Zac Gould sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Nicholas Hopkins

ART DEPT Eamon Stewart, Brendon Wellwood, Julian De Bono qld.art@themusic.com.au

ADMIN AND ACCOUNTS Loretta Zoppolone, Shelley Neergaard, Jarrod Kendall, Leanne Simpson

Say what you like about the Germans, but boy do they know how to drink beer! And, of course, every October they drink that beer as if it’s their last month on earth, as part of the awesome Oktoberfest celebration! Brisbane has adopted the event with a vengeance, and last year we were named one of the Top 10 Oktoberfests in the world (outside of Germany), so grab your drinking boots and hit RNA Showgrounds over two weekends (11-13 and 18-20 October) – schnell!

With vinyl having made a massive resurgence in recent time everyone wants to get amongst the bargains by rummaging through crates of records in search of that elusive wax treasure – this Saturday you can scavenge for music to your heart’s content at Brisbane North Collectors Fair. It’s held at Windsor Table Tennis Assoc (86 Green Tce, Windsor) with early bird entry kicking off at 8am. You know what they say about early birds and worms, right? That goes for records too, so set those alarms!

accounts@themusic.com.au

DISTRO Anita D’Angelo distro@themusic.com.au

SUBSCRIPTIONS store.themusic.com.au

CONTACT US Phone: (07) 3252 9666 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au Street: Suite 11/354 Brunswick Street Fortitude Valley QLD 4006 Postal: Locked Bag 4300 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

Once a year we get to discover things about the history and architecture of Brisbane during Brisbane Open House, which for one weekend per annum allows people to enter places that are usually kept under lock and key. Take guided tours of a myriad of iconic buildings (71 in total) such as Brisbane Town Hall, The Old Museum, Windmill Tower and Tattersall’s Club – it happens between 10am-5pm this Saturday and Sunday, check out brisbaneopenhouse.com.au to see what’s available.

learn BRISBANE


lol

Watch Tina Fey parody Girls. It’s a memorable Saturday Night Live promo; the cast nail the voices of Hannah, Jessa, Marnie and Shoshanna, and it’s really impressive. Girls is one of those TV shows that has been so heavily lauded and criticised in equal measures that it’s ripe for parody. It’s almost like stealing from an unattended servo, it’s so easy. Fey’s hilarious take is to introduce a new cast member, Berta from Albania, to give the girls some much-needed perspective.

toy

sting

And here we were thinking that jellyfish didn’t bring much to the table. They’re regular environmental activists! Tonnes of the wobbly critters managed to shut down the Oskarshamn Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden after becoming clogged in the pipes, and excitedly, marine biologists reckon the occurrence could happen more frequently in the future. Mother nature taking the power back.

Ever wondered what Aussie hip hop stars like Seth Sentry and Drapht would look like as fiveinch tall bobble heads? Well, now you can totally find out thanks to Hip Hop Heads, who are shrinking down some of our country’s finest lyrical gymnasts so that they can ride in our cars and watch over our work desks. Nod your head, yo! $29.95 plus postage from hiphopheads.com.au.

watch

For your daily dose of lady-inspiration, watch Julia Gillard killing it in conversation with Anne Summers. The woman packed out the Sydney Opera House and wore a sparkly cardigan the whole time. You can check out the entire forty minutes on the ABC website. She speaks candidly about being a female prime minister and about how it kinda hurts to be dumped by your party. It’s a good time for it – she’s not yet irrelevant, and you’re still feeling nostalgic about her and not adjusting well to seeing Tony’s mug on the evening news. THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 9


national news news@themusic.com.au

IGGY STARS IN THE QUICK AND THE CANCELLED

As quick as it was announced last week it was pulled from our clutches. The Iggy Azalea sideshows that were meant to happen around her Beyonce dates on 25 Oct, Trak Live Lounge, Melbourne; 27 Oct, Arena, Brisbane; and 2 Nov, Metro Theatre, Sydney have all been cancelled. A statement on the matter reads: “Iggy’s management apologise for confusion caused relating to the Australian sideshows and take full responsibility for the miscommunications.” Shall we put this on the growing pile of hip hop show stuff-ups? Hmmm.

PUNCH DRUNK LOVE NEUTRAL MILK HOTEL

LAY OUT THE WELCOME MAT

It’s with great joy and plenty of relief that we can tell you Harvest casualties Neutral Milk Hotel (pictured) will still be performing Down Under for the very first time. But it gets better! The US cult indie group will be joined by the forever smooth M. Ward and fuzz-rock kings Superchunk. With the two supports both releasing cracking records this year and the headline act keen to make up for lost time, this tour will surely be remembered long after the final riffs have rung out. The American triple threat will happen at The Tivoli, Brisbane, 12 Nov; Enmore Theatre, Sydney, 14 Nov; and Forum Theatre, Melbourne, 15 Nov. Tickets on sale this Friday.

Eager young indie types Lime Cordiale have put the finishing touches on their stumbling fun EP, Falling Up The Stairs, and will bring their quirky lyrics and brass flourishes to The Toff In Town, Melbourne, 2 Nov; Alhambra Lounge, Brisbane, 7 Nov; Solbar, Maroochydore, 8 Nov; The Northern, Byron Bay, 9 Nov; Transit Bar, Canberra, 14 Nov; Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, 15 Nov; and Cambridge Hotel Front Bar, Newcastle, 16 Nov.

CHEMICAL IMBALANCE

When We Are Scientists plug in, it’s hard to work out just what you’re supposed to do. The trio lock into grooves that are designed for dancing, but the volume that weighs down on you is more typical of a full throttle metal concert. It’s bouncy, loud and impossibly fun and if you haven’t seen the New York-based group do their thing on stage then don’t miss your chance. Touring their latest Business Casual EP, you can see We Are Scientists on one of the following dates: The Zoo, Brisbane, 22 Jan; Factory Theatre, 24 Jan; Corner Hotel, Melbourne, 25 Jan; and Amplifier, Perth, 26 Jan.

THE GREAT SCOT

Sickest Cunt Out There – that’s what Kerser is proclaiming himself to be. But behind all the hilarity of that statement is plenty of belief and some serious freestyle chops to boot. The MC’s new album S.C.O.T. will be hitting shelves on 25 Oct, so you’ll have plenty of time to get well versed in the verses before Kerser performs in 2014. Dates are as follows: Cambridge Hotel, Newcastle, 1 Feb (two shows: all ages/18+); The Hi-Fi, Sydney, 8 Feb (all ages); The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, 15 Feb (two shows: under 18/18+); The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, 22 Feb (two shows: under 18/18+); and Metro City, Perth, 1 Mar.

PUT THE FAYGO ON ICE

If you understand that headline, then you probably already know what we’re about to tell you; Insane Clown Posse’s horror circus is coming to town. The infamous American hip hop act will be looking to recruit more Aussies into their juggalo family, so don the face paint and unleash your inner hatchet man when Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope rock the mike with special international guests Boondox and Big Hoodoo. The tour hits The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, 5 Dec; The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, 6 Dec; The Hi-Fi, Sydney, 7 Dec; and Metropolis, Fremantle, 8 Dec.

“JUST READ A BUNCH OF SUICIDE NOTES (NICKELBACK SHEET MUSIC)” PADDLE POP LION INTO SELF HARM? [@MEGANAMRAM] THINKS SO. 10 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

KATE MILLER-HEIDKE

RIGHT BEHIND HER

Proving her unwavering popularity in Australia, Kate Miller-Heidke has just smashed records with the crowdfunding campaign for her fourth record (and first as an independent artist), O Vertigo!. Achieving the funding target in a mere three days, the quirky Queensland songwriter will be sure to repay fans’ faith in her artistic pursuits with a series of colourful and captivating live shows happening next year. She will play York Theatre, Seymour Centre, Sydney, 12 Mar; Athenaeum Theatre, Melbourne, 18 Mar; Quarry Amphitheatre, Perth, 21 and 22 Mar; and The Tivoli, Brisbane, 5 Apr. Tickets for all dates go on sale this Thursday.


national news news@themusic.com.au JIMMY CARR

SNEAKER AUCTION

STEP TO IT

Warner Music Australia is back to reinforce the goodwill generated last October by running charity auction In Their Shoes again during Cancer Awareness Month. The project sees musicians penning their own designs for a pair of plain white Chuck Taylors using nothing more than a few coloured fabric markers, with artists submitting creative kicks including The Black Keys, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Skrillex and Bon Iver. After the initiative raised more than $120,000 for the National Breast Cancer Foundation last year, the auction will be hosted on eBay again in 2013, going live on 24 Oct at 6pm before bidding closes on 29 Oct. You can get a sneaker peek of the designs at intheirshoes.com.au, or head along to The Standard, Sydney on 27 Oct from 7pm where all 70 designs will be exhibited.

BLEEDING THROUGH

Celebrating thirty years of black metal power, seminal Scandinavian overlords Mayhem will swoop down on the Aussie east coast early next year. Church burnings, murder, prison sentences – any of these scandals would’ve been enough to derail a weaker band. But Mayhem continue to stand tall, and will treat the fans to a viewing in the flesh, playing The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, 10 Jan; Factory Theatre, Sydney, 11 Jan; and The Hi-Fi, Brisbane, 12 Jan.

CAVE

JOKE TECHNICIAN

Landing in Australia for the very first time, celebrated British comic Jimmy Carr will showcase his champagne wit and slick wordplay with a few nights of capital city hilarity early next year. During the last decade Carr has become a regular personality on English stage, screen and radio, and with his new show Gagging Order he takes things to places both welcome and vulgar, but always with his unmistakable charm. Smash your moral compass and catch ol’ James at Hamer Hall, Melbourne, 15 Jan; Concert Hall, Perth, 19 Jan; City Hall, Brisbane, 22 Jan; and Sydney Opera House, 28 Jan. Tickets are on sale this Thursday.

THE BEST OF THE BUNCH

The nominees in the running for the Channel [V] Oz Artist 2013 have just been announced, with the final 50 consisting of a great mix of old and young, loud and soft, lads and ladies. Just a few of the artists up for the annual award include, Parkway Drive, The Preatures, RÜFÜS, Flume, Alison Wonderland and Tame Impala, with voting open now at vmusic.com.au. Tune in to The Riff on 23 Nov at 10.30am to find out who made the final four, with the winner announced 7 Dec.

“GOOD THING I HAVE AN INFINITE AMOUNT OF PAIN TO TAP INTO” MORRISSEY IS CALLING [@WOLFPUPY], HE WANTS HIS VIBE BACK.

GOT AN INKLING FOR THIS? TRANCE ROCK

For the very first time, you’ll be able to witness the wide-reaching psych style of Cave live on Australian stages, with the Chicagoans making a summer stop in our parts. Expect your mind to be twisted when the quartet perform at The Zoo, Brisbane, 4 Dec; Annandale Hotel, Sydney, 5 Dec; Kelvin Club, Melbourne, 6 Dec; and as part of Slanted and Enchanted, Astor Theatre, Perth, 7 Dec.

American R&B superstar Jason Derulo has made his intentions clear, saying last week that he wants to permanently relocate to Australia and start his family. And what better way to make some new pals than take his shows to arena stages across the country? The Tattoos album tour will touch down at Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, 26 Apr; Royal Theatre, Canberra, 29 Apr; Newcastle Entertainment Centre, 1 May; Brisbane Entertainment Centre, 3 May; Sydney Entertainment Centre, 5 May; and Perth Arena, 10 May. Get your tickets this Friday.

FIRST ARIAS UP FOR GRABS

Just a week out from the official ARIA nominations event, the nominees for the ARIA Fine Arts and Artisan Awards have been announced. These include best jazz, world, classical and soundtrack release, as well as producer and engineer of the year and best cover art, with some of the individuals in the running including Harley Flume Streten, Kevin Parker [Tame Impala], Luke Steele and Nick Littlemore [Empire Of The Sun], David Bridie, Nick Cave and Warren Ellis and Renee Geyer. These awards will be presented at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 15 Oct, along with the announcement of the full list of artist nominees for 2013. THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 11


local news qld.news@themusic.com.au FUTURE OF THE LEFT

BIFF

BIFF FOR ALL AGES

PORT POWER

Learn How To Stop Your Brain In An Accident during Future Of The Left’s upcoming tour, where the uncensored rockers will rip into new tracks and old favourites with volcanic intensity. Continuing to push the boundaries, the quartet have never compromised on their quest for the ultimate riff, and with crowdfunding for their latest full-length reaching target in a mere five hours it’s clear that the band are hitting people in all the right places. Make sure you’re ready for some face-melting fun when the Welsh rockers visit us for their standard Aussie summer stand, playing at The Zoo, 5 Jan. Tickets can be purchased now through Handsome Tours.

ON THE HIGH SEAS

Thriller is going all nautical on us, with a high seas party featuring Sudanese-viaMelbourne rapper Ur Boy Bangs, as well as local metal types Shorelines, Knights Like These and Graves from Wollongong. Happening 18 Oct at Coniston Lane, get on down to get an eyepatch, slam back some spiced rum cocktails and watch a bit of Titanic – why the hell not?

NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT

With the dust barely settled on their 2012 ARIA-nominated record Behind The Stars, Paul Greene & The Other Colours are back to it, plugging new tune Beautiful Delusion and showing off their slick songwriting that slides between genres with ease. Get hooked on the group’s melody 28 Nov, Solbar Maroochydore; 29 Nov, Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna; and 30 Nov, The Loft, Gold Coast.

CHIC CHANGES

Don’t go freaking out, Chic ft Nile Rodgers and Todd Terry are still coming to Brisbane – that you can be sure of. It’s just that the make of the gig has changed slightly. Chic and Mr Rodgers will now spread the disco fever at The Tivoli on 15 Dec with a long list of local supports including Mitzi, Graham Don, Mr Sparkles, Cool Hand Luke, Chantal and Gavin Boyd, while former Chic support Terry will still play at Cloudland that night as originally scheduled, but will do so with Eric Powell, Chris Wilson, Cosmo Cater and Kieron C. Tickets for both dates are still available now.

MO’ POND

In addition to their already announced show at The Zoo, 14 Dec, scrappy wunderkinds Pond will fire off their Hobo Rocket south of the border also, with a new show announced for The Northern, 15 Dec. Doctopus will back up as support at this show as well.

THE DELTA RIGGS

SORRY KIDS

Sadly, Spit Syndicate’s under-18s show at Alhambra Lounge, 12 Oct has been cancelled, with refunds available from point of purchase. The hip hop pair will still play The Loft, Gold Coast, 10 Oct and Woody’s Surf Shack, Byron Bay, 11 Oct.

“STILL NOT SURE WHY THE CEILING CAN’T HOLD US.” RAP MUSIC DOESN’T HAVE TO MAKE SENSE [@SOFIFII] – DUH. 12 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

In addition to the upcoming Brisbane International Film Festival happening at various city venues from 13 Nov to 24 Nov, the event is proud to announce BIFF GenNext. Curated with young people in mind, the complementary event happens from 14 Oct to 20 Oct and features a whole range of entertaining and challenging films geared towards under 18s, with everything from animated favourite Who Framed Roger Rabbit to French classic The King and the Mockingbird. In addition, youngsters are encouraged to learn, with free study guides and workshops at the State Library for students 12 to 16 years of age. It’s all free but you should probably book your spot online, so head to biff.com.au.

KICK UP THE SAND

Although it’s been birthed from the Pacific, the Byron Bay Surf Festival is all about the music in 2013. In between film screenings, art and photography exhibitions, markets and a whole heap of beach-based activities on the shores of beautiful Byron, Wolf & Cub bring out their double drum attack on 25 Oct for the launch party, Byron House Mafia let their hair down on 26 Oct, while Waxhead perform at the closing ceremony before The Delta Riggs cap things off in fine style on 27 Oct. All this music can be heard at the Beach Hotel, and incredibly, all free of charge.


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local news qld.news@themusic.com.au

KINKY BUSINESS

TRANSVAAL DIAMOND SYNDICATE

Tussle is the first full-length from Sydney upstarts Day Ravies, and they’re going to launch the record at Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel on 30 Nov. They play with Naked Maja, Nite Fields and Barbiturates.

FRUIT FINGERS

Jazz sounds from The Big Apple can be heard in full glory along the bank of Brisbane River this Thursday, with Benny Lackner Trio arriving from the bustle of New York City.

OLD FACE, FRESH VEHICLE

The legendary Mick Medew is leading The Mesmerisers out on the Transcontinental Hotel stage to launch their debut record. The bill also features 52 Pickups and Heroine Chic. Come along early, the rock will be waiting...

NOISE POLLUTION

Celebrate the days of bent cops, questionable drugs and depraved punk rock with Public Execution at 633 Ann this Sunday. The Rock’n’Roll BBQ bill also includes White Devil, Goldstool and Dugong and the Riotards, with things getting hairy from 2pm.

NOCTURNAL CREATURE

Based out of Berlin, Andre Crom is bringing his deep and dirty house to the other side of the world for one sweaty night in Brisbane, playing Coco Lounge, 1 Nov.

JORDIE LANE & ROSE COUSINS

FREEWHEELING RIFFS

Get your rock’n’roll fix with no impact on your wallet by heading to Irish Murphy’s, 19 Oct for Rocktoberfest, a full volume celebration that features some local favourites and a few newcomers, all with plenty of skill on the axe. Transvaal Diamond Syndicate head up a bill which also includes Ghost Audio, Jumper, Penny Rides Shotgun, DieVsCity and Dennis Jaculli. The free event happens from midday, so you can boogie down early!

“WHY DOES ANYONE GIVE A FUCK ABOUT THE FUCKING MERCURY... APHEX NEVER NOMINATED, M PEOPLE WON IT. FUCK OFF.” YOU GUESSED IT: [@FOURTET] DIDN’T GET A NOD IN 2013.

COMPUTERS AND BLUES

Machine Translations will make a welcome return to Brisbane, playing a special show at The Hi-Fi, 30 Nov, with support from Halfway and Bandito Folk. Hear tracks from J Waler’s brand new full-length The Bright Door, which is getting a release this Friday.

BUDDY UP

The Festival of Small Halls is a gorgeous concept from our friends at Woodford Folk Festival and Mullum Music Festival that will see an Aussie artist and a visiting international perform a month-long run of regional shows, bookended by performances at Mullum (23 Nov) and Woodford (28 Dec). In its inaugural year, Jordie Lane will partner with Canada’s Rose Cousins at Forest Hill School of Arts, 27 Nov; Sandgate Town Hall, 29 Nov; Eudlo Hall, 1 Dec; Mt Mee Public Hall, 22 Dec, and a whole bunch of other venues. For full dates and tickets head to festivalofsmallhalls.com. 14 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

ENGINES REVVED

Eatons Hill Hotel are welcoming our country’s finest motocross riders and a clutch of our best rock and hip hop acts for a ripping day in the suburbs at Red Bull FMX. The stunts will be soundtracked by The Living End, Pez, Violent Soho, Yacht Club DJs, Dune Rats and more. Tickets are available now for $45+BF through Oztix, with the action happening from 12.30pm, 23 Nov.

THROW THEM A BONE

Head along to Brisbane Powerhouse, 14 Nov or Byron Bay Community Theatre, 15

Nov and check out Dog Trumpet, featuring the formidable talents of Reg Mombassa and Peter O’Doherty. The guys will be touring as a four-piece, playing tracks off their latest double record, Medicated Spirits.

BEASTLY GROOVES

Multi-headed Melbourne soul collective Saskwatch will show off their new tune Hands with two shows, 8 Nov, Black Bear Lodge and 9 Nov, The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba. Get your tickets from Oztix now.

KYOTO CALLING

Japanese sound scientist Marihiko Hara is set to visit Oz for the very first time, presenting his electronic and acoustic soundscapes at Black Bear Lodge, 29 Oct. Blending progressive sounds with more traditional instrumentation, this will be anything but your typical night out. This is a great thing.


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16 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013


tv

NEW AGE OF ANIMATED ANARCHY Words Steve Bell.


It’s not news that cartoons aren’t just for kids anymore, but animated TV shows aimed at adults are pushing the boundaries more than ever, writes Steve Bell.

“WHAT’S FASCINATING ABOUT THE SHOW IS ITS COMPLETE LACK OF MORALS.”

O

nce upon a time animated cartoons were considered the domain of children or the young at heart, the pervading recollections of most being older family-friendly fare such as The Flintstones and The Jetsons, or more ubiquitous and mildly subversive recent series such as The Simpsons, South Park and Futurama. But boy, how things have changed in recent times. New animated series Brickleberry began airing recently in Australia on cable for the first time, and one only had to survey the opening scene of the first episode to see how much things had changed: it began scanning a vast vista of an arc-load of wild animals having kinky sex, culminating with a blood-spattered park ranger beating a bear to death with a shovel. The jury may be out on whether Brickleberry is actually any good – many pundits bemoan its puerility and similarity to Family Guy – but what’s fascinating about the show is its complete lack of morals (it’s awesomely disgusting), which makes one realise just how much the boundaries of taste have shifted in the animation world in the last couple of decades. 18 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Of course, controversy in animation is nothing new (we should note at this juncture that we’re focusing primarily on US titles, even though 90 per cent of all animation is from Japan). It’s hard to believe in hindsight that The Simpsons was initially deemed to be cutting-edge because of Bart’s mildly rebellious streak – Bart T-shirts were banned at schools, because his penchant for back-chatting his folks and espousing the values of underachievement made him a bad role model – and that South Park once seemed thrilling due to its willingness to tackle taboos such as racism and sexuality (although to be fair they’ve continued ramping it up, and their depiction of Muhammad a few years ago earned the writers credible death threats). Even Beavis & Butthead were considered a threat by many moralists in their day, and while Family Guy has a hack at just about every line there is to cross, its scattergun nature means that they rarely push any one thing too far. Obviously a lot of early animation now seems crass by today’s standards – episodes of old faithfuls such as Betty Boop (Making Stars (1935)), Popeye (You’re A Sap Mr Jap (1942)) and about a dozen Bugs Bunny featurettes all

seem completely racist in hindsight, although that’s more a reflection of the prevailing morality of yesteryear rather than any overt intention to push society’s buttons. You could continue ad infinitum in this regard; the whole premise of Speedy Gonzalez, for instance, was the racial stereotyping of Mexicans as drunk and lazy, to the point that it was taken off the air altogether in the ‘90s, and has recently returned with a disclaimer: “The cartoons that you are about to see are products of their time. They may depict some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that were commonplace in American society. These depictions were wrong then and they are wrong now.” Yet while the old faves such as The Simpsons are far from redundant, it’s the new breed of animation which has really started to push the envelope, perhaps fuelled by a perceived lack of enforcement of decency standards in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission, which has allowed competing TV networks to run rampant with their programming. Here’s just a handful of the main offenders (if you take offence at such things):


ARCHER

THE BOONDOCKS

METALOCALYPSE

FX (2010-present)

Adult Swim (2005-present)

Adult Swim (2006-present)

Possibly the raunchiest of the animated shows, based upon the oedipal issues of the titular suave and self-centred spy, and his cohorts at the spy agency ISIS which is run by his mother. Surprisingly highbrow – contains references to Tolkien, Melville and Chekhov – but also groin-grabbingly lowbrow.

Razor sharp race relations satire involving the African-American Freeman family moving to a whitebread suburb of Chicago. Features Uncle Ruckus – the incredibly racist, black, white supremacist – and won a Peabody for a particularly daring episode about Martin Luther King Jr. Uses the N-word more than Django Unchained.

Follows death metal band Dethklok, incredibly popular (the planet’s seventh largest economy) despite their somewhat naff music (which features prominently) and proclivity for killing their fans. Everything they touch turns to shit, and the humour is indelibly black. Beloved by metal fans for obvious reasons.

AXE COP

ADVENTURE TIME

SUPERJAIL!

Fox (2013-present)

Cartoon Network (2010-present)

Adult Swim (2008-present)

A vengeful cop wields an axe to mete out his peculiar form of justice. Incredibly surreal and random – possibly because co-created by a 5-year-old – as evinced by episodes such as Zombie Island... In Space in which Hitler forces a captive scientist to create a zombie army. Absurd and illogical, wears thin after a while.

A weird, surreal romp ostensibly aimed at kids but far more popular amongst adults (Matt Groening is an avowed fan, and Tyler The Creator namechecked it in Yonkers). Beyond trippy – one episode features bears holding a rave in a giant’s stomach – and Henry Rollins voices a rainbowcoloured unicorn. Pretty much enough said...

Based in a psychedelic prison located in a volcano, which is itself housed in an even larger volcano. Abstract characters and plots, and graphic violence is the order of the day, often showed in horrific detail with massive body counts par for the course. Definitely not for the faint of heart.

BOB’S BURGERS

HIGH SCHOOL USA!

UGLY AMERICANS

Fox (2011-present)

Fox (2013-present)

Comedy Central (2010-2012)

The Belchers run a restaurant, and their escapades contain plenty of toilet humour, smut and innuendo, tied together by a strange sense of familial ethics. Dry and deadpan, although critics have decried it as “vulgar” and “crass”– perhaps because its subject matters include child molestation, jock itch and transsexual hookers.

Purposely drawn like the comic books of yore, these kids’ behaviour is more akin to Porky’s than the gang from Riverdale High. Quite literate, with the anodyne characters grounded in reality – eating disorders, bullying, neurosis, sex hang-ups, sexting – with a bleak undertone which verges on depressing.

Revolves around Mark Lilly, a social worker in an alternate reality NYC inhabited by humans and all manners of monsters. Mark’s roommate became a zombie to pick up a chick with an undead fetish, and his girlfriend/boss is a succubus. Visually spectacular with droll, offbeat humour. THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 19


music

DISCOVERING TRUST Grouplove aren’t ready to be beautiful just yet. Frontman Christian Zucconi tells Ben Preece that the party anthems are just too much fun.

L

A-based Grouplove’s 2011 debut Never Trust A Happy Song was an exercise with results that simply could not have been predicted by the five friends, with singles Colours, Tongue Tied and Itchin’ On A Photograph all going nuts and helping the band forge a path onto the international touring circuit. And they haven’t stopped. In fact, no time was taken between finishing touring plans for their debut and actually leaping right into the studio to record their anticipated follow-up Spreading Rumours. Singer Christian Zucconi says he insisted on the quick turnaround as to not lose the band’s momentum. “We became such a strong live act with all the touring for so long, we didn’t want to leave that fire that we’d built up over the last couple of years touring,” he explains. “So we got off the road, took a week off around Christmas and then moved into this house – the studio – in the Hollywood Hills and began setting up and just went for it. We wanted to capture that energy from our shows, record everything live which was pretty great – it’s the best way to capture it.” The spontaneous vibe Zucconi describes is certainly present across the album’s 13 songs. From the wackedout, Nirvana-esque pop of Borderlines And Aliens to the infectious first single Ways To Go, the band’s dynamic has shifted a lot since they came together to record their first full-length. “Before the first record, we had played like ten shows as a band and did everything piece by piece. We weren’t that familiar with each other yet because things moved so fast in the beginning when we met. This record is different – we trusted each other and knew where each of us was coming from musically, and we were just so much closer as friends and musicians that it’s much more collaborative. You can hear the difference, I think, for sure.” The spontaneity continued while the five-piece toured, with the band penning most of Spreading Rumours on the road. “We wrote [it over] like two years and then maybe 30 or 40 per cent of the record was written in the studio. Some of the songs just came, as they do, when we were just hanging out at the house. Like Sit Still – me and Hannah [Hooper – vocals/keys] wrote that at the house just hanging out and Ways To Go was me, Ryan [Rabin –

20 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

drums] and Hannah, we came up with that one night at the studio; it just came when Ryan started playing a riff. It was like, here’s a song that didn’t exist five minutes ago and now has a place in the world. A lot of it was also written on the road, not really performed as a band though – we’d be

it’d be real spontaneous and it’d be like, ‘Yo we got it now let’s put it down to tape’. It was really fun and on the fly.” The focus for the band is on maintaining the wackedout party aesthetic already created. But there was no such mission statement going into the studio; Spreading Rumours truly runs the gamut and somehow all falls together. “We recorded like 24 songs, but when we were choosing which ones to go on the record, we went with the strong, up-kind of songs because that’s the stuff we want to play live for the next three to four years. We had a lot of beautiful, slow stuff but we want to keep the bangers going and bring that

“HERE’S A SONG THAT DIDN’T EXIST FIVE MINUTES AGO AND NOW HAS A PLACE IN THE WORLD.” familiar with the song and play it at soundcheck but never played them in front of an audience. A song like Raspberry, we actually wrote that in Australia last time we were there. School Boy was written in Sydney right by the Opera House where we were filming some TV show there, and it was two riffs like they already existed and knew the scope of the song. When we got into the studio, we’d just rehearse them with the band for like an hour or two and

energy that we’re known for right now. We don’t want to divert too far from that bombastic energy.” Already on tour in the States, all roads will eventually lead to Australia, a country that has welcomed Grouplove with open arms since the beginning. “We’re so excited to be playing Big Day Out, can’t believe it,” Zucconi exclaims. “We’re excited to be coming back to Australia, there’s lots of cool bands on that bill. You guys have been there since the beginning, our EP came out over there first before it did [in America] – there’s definitely a soft spot for you guys, we’re lucky to have you in our corner.” WHAT: Spreading Rumours (Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 19 Jan, Big Day Out, Metricon Stadium & Carrara Parklands, Gold Coast


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culture

URBAN ORCHARD

46 • THE MUSIC • 28TH AUGUST 2013

Inspired by her surroundings, Sydneybased contemporary floral artist Setsuko Yanagisawa composes freestyle designs that work harmoniously within their environment. Pics Cole Bennetts.


culture

THE MUSIC • 28TH AUGUST 2013 • 47


comedy

CRAIC DEALER

Irish comedian Tommy Tiernan talks to Baz McAlister about taking time out from his ‘world tours’ of the Emerald Isle to whip Down Under for some craic.

T

ommy Tiernan is one of those rare comedians, more philosopher than funnyman. Sure, the jokes come thick and fast, but they’re woven from experience and plumb deep notions: death, love, sex, religion, identity. One of the Galway-based 44-year-old’s favourite subjects is what it means to be Irish, especially since the Celtic Tiger lost its roar and the economic boom of the ‘90s in Ireland collapsed. Tiernan’s Australian tour is titled Stray Sod, recalling a mythological Irish concept. “A stray sod is something that you stand on in a field, that makes you disoriented,

music

so my notion is, could Ireland be the stray sod of the world? Could there be something so totally not in tune with the rest of the planet about our country that encourages that? People here no longer know one end of an economy from the other, so this is a lamentation about that – a desire for strangeness, a refusal to see the world in purely economical terms. Money is ugly. I think it’s left a really bad taste in people’s mouths here that we’re suffering economically. I think what’s going on in Ireland now is that a lot of people are thinking, ‘Hang on, this isn’t right. This [capitalist] system can’t

be working given what it’s doing to us’. Now, there isn’t a viable other system to hand at the minute but I think people are struggling with the idea that we’ve ended up in a situation where banks own everybody’s houses. How did we end up like that?” Tiernan gets out to all the usual international comedy festivals, but has a slavish devotion to his countrymen. That’s why he fills the time between with his ‘World Tours’ of the counties of Ireland, playing small venues, driving from town to town, off the beaten track. “It’s a great way for me to work,” he says, on the eve of his ‘World Tour of Leitrim’. “When I’m doing press for these shows, it’s local papers like the Leitrim Observer or the Meath Chronicle. This Australian tour, I’m doing national press and it’s almost like there’s a degree of importance to it. But doing regional stuff, it’s wonderful and normal and ordinary and gentle. But it’s challenging in terms of stand-up – you’re going to places where the audience are delighted you’ve come because nobody else comes to their town. Maybe a C&W singer passes through every now and again but not a comedian. So they bring that energy to the show, of being excited that you’re there. But you’re definitely in their country and they let you know really quickly if you’re not up to scratch. It’s very good, creatively, for my stand-up.” One of the more memorable spots Tiernan recently played is a pub in Waterford called Henry Downes – a cavernous old place with, seemingly unwisely, its own rifle range. “I don’t know under what vision giving people guns when they’re drunk is a good idea. They make their own whiskey in that pub as well, which they’re very happy to let you buy. What could possibly go wrong?” WHEN & WHERE: 27 Oct, The Tivoli

ROLLING WITH IT The upcoming run of shows for UK jazz/ grind/art/core/punk act Rolo Tomassi will the band’s best ever according to James Spence. He gets a little cheesy for Tom Hersey.

“I

t’s just a shame it’s taken us so long to get back,” Rolo Tomassi’s James Spence admits. After a well-received run on the Soundwave festival and a spot supporting Architects, the band are now finally coming back to headline their own shows, and according to keyboardist/vocalist, everyone in the band is stoked. “The Soundwave experience was wild but certainly outside of what we’re used to usually so to do things in our comfort zone is ideal. I’d like to think we can translate on a large stage as well as a small one but in terms of intimacy and energy, club shows are usually where it works best.” The band’s also looking forward to introducing Aussie fans to their third full-length record, last year’s Astraea. But, with the album being as complex, fast and challenging as it is, how does it translate live? “The most obvious difference is how much faster everything ends up being played. It’s fairly natural when you’re playing things nightly that it ends up being faster and as a result more energetic and intense. [Also], the word ‘fun’ isn’t something you’d usually associate with music like ours but we have a really, really, good time playing and I think that definitely comes across live.” 24 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Spence is also looking forward to introducing Australian fans to guitarist Chris Cayford and bassist Nathan Fairweather, who both joined the band last year and marked Rolo Tomassi’s first line-up change since 2005. “I can barely remember what it was like without them. I’ve never felt as comfortable onstage as I do with them playing with us. The initial transition was a bit weird but that’s probably only because we’ve never had to change members before and we were playing mainly older material but now we’re playing

a set of songs that the five of us wrote together, it’s the best it’s been as far as I’m concerned. Before they joined they’d played in a few different bands together which certainly helped in terms of onstage chemistry. Without wanting to be too cheesy with it, I definitely feel there’s a lot more unity with our performance as a five-piece and that’s largely down to those guys. Everyone is pulling in the same direction.” It’s because of that unity in the band that Rolo Tomassi are looking to get back into the studio. “We get home from this tour and it’s all stations go on album number four. Hoping to have it early in the second quarter of next year but we won’t be rushing. We’ve come this far and we need to make sure it’s something we feel is worth releasing that’s better than the previous record and builds on what we’re doing.” WHEN & WHERE: 10 Oct, Crowbar; 11 Oct, Sun Distortion (all ages)


THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 25


music

THE WORLD BEGINS As World’s End Press prepare to unleash their self-titled debut album to the world, frontman John Parkinson tells Jazmine O’Sullivan how the recording process was like a dream come true.

Y

ou could say the boys from World’s End Press were sitting under some pretty lucky stars when they were sending out the demos for their self-titled debut album to potential producers, as they got a call-back almost immediately from one of the hottest names in the business. “We teed up a session with Tim Goldsworthy (Unkle, DFA Records), locked in a time and packed up and left, and this was directly after our tour for Second Day Uptown,” Parkinson reflects. “We’d just been touring, we had practiced all the songs, and by the time we were set to head off to Wales we were ready to record. We arrived in Heathrow and got picked up by a guy we didn’t know who just whisked us off to Wales straight away – it was pretty surreal after the 24-hour flight to be heading into the unknown with this stranger, it was really cool.” And into the unknown it was, as the group were transported out of the city and into the lush Welsh countryside. “On the way there we passed all these castle ruins and cows, and sheep and what not,” Parkinson laughs. “We didn’t know where the hell we were going, but it was beautiful. The name of the studio [we recorded in] is Rockfield, which has essentially been converted from stables. A family lived there; Kingsley [Ward], the guy who owns it, set it up in the late ‘60s and it’s been going ever since. All kinds of British rock heritage have passed through over the years, so it was a pretty cool place to do it.” In what could be considered a stark contrast to this recording environment, the WEP crew then made their way over to the city of Bristol to finish up production work. This leg of the journey held a particular poignancy with the group, as Parkinson relays. “The postproduction was done at Massive Attack’s studios, and they were a major influence on my music appreciation. Bristol is inspiring, but being in the actual HQ of where all the music I loved growing up was made was amazing.” While WEP’s music can broadly be classed as dance, their debut is laden with sonic experimentation and

26 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

long, instrumental freakout moments, to which Parkinson admits some of Bristol’s characteristic melancholia has crept in. He and the group felt moments like these were important to include in the record. “I think with any record we make we want to

what can be heard on the record, with extended versions of those instrumental moments. “We’ve kind of got this idea that one day we’re going to play a show where we can play our fourteen minute closer [from the album, Out]; we want to indulge and play that in front of an audience, because it’s just a nice textural sort of thing.” Having recently covered Tame Impala’s instant classic Elephant for triple j’s Like A Version, Parkinson says the song could possibly find its way into their forthcoming setlists. “We were totally setting ourselves up for a big backlash from psychedelic rock fans [by picking that song]” muses Parkinson, “we expected them to be

“IT WAS PRETTY SURREAL AFTER THE 24-HOUR FLIGHT TO BE HEADING INTO THE UNKNOWN WITH THIS STRANGER, IT WAS REALLY COOL.” have those [instrumental moments], because that’s what you buy albums for, or it’s what I buy albums for. I mean, singles you can hear on the radio, they sort of stand alone, but it’s those moments that are maybe not suitable for radio that I almost enjoy more.” With plenty of new ammunition to fire at audiences, Parkinson says he and the group are excited to bring a more lively performance to

like, ‘You murdered this brilliant song!’ Fortunately I don’t think we got too much of a sting from it. “We kind of realised it was an ambitious choice when we sat round listening to it and thought, ‘Oh, most of this is just a soaring guitar solo’ and we play our instruments totally differently to the way Kevin Parker does, so we had no choice but to kind of do it in a completely different way. We actually only had a week to do it, because we got a late call from triple j. It was pretty hectic, but it was a fun process to take apart a song and see what we could do with it.” WHAT: World’s End Press (Liberation) WHEN & WHERE: 23 Nov, Valley Fiesta, Fortitude Valley


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music

REPEAT AFTER ME Mantra’s Telling Scenes found Rob Tremlett digging deeper than ever. And, as the Melbourne MC tells Matt O’Neill, getting piano lessons.

“T

o be honest, it wasn’t really a conscious decision. In terms of my own musical knowledge and stuff. I actually made the decision to start learning to sing a couple of years ago. It was after the release of my last album [2011’s Speaking Volumes],” says Tremlett, explaining what led him to get piano lessons. “There was stuff I’d never tried before on that album.” “It was just about strengthening up my vocal performance as a rapper... But, while I was doing it, my teacher started teaching me piano. So, I was learning chords, melodies and the actual structure of music. Which is not something I’d looked at since I was a kid,” he impresses. “Learning about that stuff in the context of what I’m doing now was a big help.” Telling Scenes isn’t just another album for Rob Tremlett. His third solo outing as Mantra, Telling Scenes finds the respected rapper getting ambitious. It’s taken him nearly two years to really tease it out. As a musician, he’s taken a more hands-on role in writing and production. As a lyricist, he’s digging deeper than ever. “Lyrically, I did a few things that I’d never really done before. I address a lot of personal issues on this album that I’ve never touched on in a song before. I don’t want to use the term ‘soul searching’ – but I guess I just did,” he quips. “I think I personally became a bit more reflective over the time I worked on this album.” It’s gone through a couple of incarnations. Initially, Tremlett was reaching for something far more obscure. In discussing the album’s initial direction, he talks of minimalism and cathedrals. Mantra’s third studio album was intended to be a vast, cavernous recording. The eventual product didn’t turn out like that. “It was way darker than the final album ended up being. I wanted it to be really dark, I wanted it to be really minimal. I was working with a few vocalists and we were writing these almost choirstyle vocals and basing a lot of the songs around that. Basically, I saw a big, Gregorian church. “And that’s where I was spitting my raps. I was taking it back to the abbey. I was the fucking monk, y’know what I mean,” Tremlett jokes. “A lot of those early ideas managed to get onto the album in some way, but I think 28 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

I just wasn’t in that dark, brooding place. There’s a few lighter tracks, there’s a few hardcore banging tracks. There’s both sides.” Tremlett’s work as Mantra has always had a pronounced difference from that of his peers. For one thing, there’s genuine darkness and struggle to Mantra’s narrative. One of his closest friends was murdered at the outset

abstract. A little bit cryptic. But, that was just the starting point. But it’s gotten me to the point where I’m at now – which is much more of a complete artist. I feel like I’ve honed it. I’m a much better songwriter now. Those early records hold a very special place in my heart but I think I’ve been able to take their strengths and really build on them with this album.” Most poignantly, Mantra’s work has always been shot through with a sense of spirituality. Tremlett’s chosen alias alone is a hint of the greater depths at play within some of his work. He still maintains that nationalistic sense of larrikinism (see: recent single Loudmouth) but there’s always something going on beneath the surface.

“I WAS TAKING IT BACK TO THE ABBEY. I WAS THE FUCKING MONK, Y’KNOW WHAT I MEAN.” of Tremlett’s career. More pragmatically, his early albums have a far broader stylistic palette than found on those of his contemporaries. “I’m still really proud of everything I did on those first two albums. When I listen to my first solo album, I kind of go, ‘Wow, I don’t write like that anymore’. Sometimes, I look back and go, ‘Wow, I wish I could think like that again’,” he reflects. “It was much more dreamy, much more

“I’m certainly not a religious person. In fact, I’m quite adamantly not a religious person... But I’m totally accepting of all forms of spirituality and I really value the sense of spirit. The idea of the spirit and spirituality. I feel like I definitely consider myself a spiritual person in that I know what my soul needs to be happy and content. “Can’t always get it, but I know what it is,” the MC says with a laugh. “It’s certainly not a thing I rigidly stick to or whatever, though. I think the spiritual connotations of the albums are often simply a product of me thinking about the world and my place within it.” WHAT: Telling Scenes (Ten To Two Records) WHEN & WHERE: 17 Oct, The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley; 19 Oct, Solbar, Maroochydore


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music

DROWNING OUT THE BUZZ Forget second album syndrome. Instead, the teeth-gnashing and self-doubt hit Loon Lake early. Sam Nolan tells Simone Ubaldi about the challenges of their debut album.

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oo much success, too soon, and the songwriting process goes off the rails, says frontman Sam Nolan. “I got to a stage where I was feeling really messed up because I’d put myself under way too much pressure. I had writer’s block and the songs just weren’t coming out. I knew that there were heaps of people who had invested time and money into it and it was just getting to a point where it was too much.” Loon Lake rocketed into the spotlight on the strength of their 2011 EP, Not Just Friends. Barely a year old, the band went into high rotation on triple j, RRR and FBi with the infectious garage pop tunes Easy Chairs and In The Summer. There was a flash of brilliance there, a rough and ready exuberance. From nowhere, they were suddenly everywhere. In 12 short months, Loon Lake had released a follow up EP, Thirty Three, spawned the indie hit Cherry Lips and toured mercilessly, quickly escalating through support slots and headline club shows to appearances at major festivals. For this band of brothers (Sam, his biological siblings Simon and Nick, and honorary siblings Tim Lowe and Dan Bull), it was a breathless, intoxicating climb. “I remember the first time we were played on triple j, it was a real buzz,” Nolan says. “[And] I guess the more things that happen, the more you want it. People were taking us seriously so we had to too, so we kept raising the bar for ourselves.” By the time they came to record a full-length, Loon Lake had already started to evolve away from their signature sound. There was a feeling amongst the band members that the sugary insta-pop that had paved their way to success wasn’t substantial enough; the boys wanted to sink their teeth into something more challenging. As chief songwriter, Nolan struggled initially to meet their expectations. “We went to Bali on a surf trip in April and I wrote some stuff there. I took MIDI keyboards and a laptop and wrote loads of stuff, but the boys just weren’t taking it. It was probably too shiny and catchy, loads of stuff in the vein of Cherry Lips, but it wasn’t what they wanted.” Nolan was crippled by the stress, but his brothers told him to lighten up. Move faster, they advised, don’t labour 30 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

on things. He responded by putting his guitar down altogether. Instead of writing, Nolan listened, drowning himself in pop music: Florence & The Machine, Frank Ocean, Rudimental, Rihanna. He also watched BBC songwriting lectures by Mark Ronson and Calvin Harris. Somewhere in the process, he found his voice again.

got rid of heaps of crap and we realised that we had some great ideas.” The ten-day working vacation was a huge restorative for the guys, who had reached the point where the thought of hitting a rehearsal room in Melbourne was nothing but a drag. “We surfed, we ate well and played all night... We had to find a way to get the buzz again and it worked, we just had a ball. Everything just fell in place.” Three months later and Loon Lake’s debut album is ready to hit the shelves. Called Gloamer, it is both a first step and a mature step forward for the band: dynamic, reflective and surprisingly textured. This is still a garage pop band, but the boys have stretched their wings a little, adding synth keys and the odd electro inflection to their sound.

“WE SURFED, WE ATE WELL AND PLAYED ALL NIGHT… WE HAD TO FIND A WAY TO GET THE BUZZ AGAIN AND IT WORKED.” In late May, the band rented a house in the Victorian coastal town of Johanna to see what kind of album was taking shape. “We decided that it was time to get away from everyone and take every single idea that we had in our computers and work through them,” Nolan explains. “Every idea that was good went up onto this blackboard, then we nutted out the tracks and improved them. It was great because we

“We just want to be like everyone else,” Nolan jokes. “I think it’s tastefully done. We didn’t want to end up sounding like those triple j bands with the mad synth lines and everything, but instead of thinking that we couldn’t use synth because we’re a guitar band, we just forgot about the rules. Even if we wanted to program beats, if it sounded good it, it was going in. Honestly, I was worried about losing fans at the start. I thought it was arrogant to completely change, but the guys were like, ‘it’s good stuff, believe in it’. And they were right.” WHAT: Gloamer (Caroline) WHEN & WHERE: 10 Oct, Black Bear Lodge; 19 Jan, Big Day Out, Metricon Stadium & Carrara Parklands


music

POP PURGE Eight albums on and Regurgitator continue to fascinate and perplex in equal measure. Quan Yeomans explains to Brendan Telford how predicability is a dirty word.

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uan Yeomans and Ben Ely have, against all odds, become one of the most loved songwriting duos Australia has ever produced. Kick-starting their career with hard, acerbic rock mixed with hip hop diatribes and vitriolic delight, the band continue to be an amorphous entity of hookladen invention and sustained glee. In fact there’s only been the one constant – unpredictability. Yeomans happily admits that the intention has always been to do whatever the fuck he wants, and on eighth album, Dirty Pop Fantasy, this idea has been magnified. “For this record the only directive that we had was to really throw people around, really jerk them from one genre to the next, and I think we’ve been pretty successful on that front,” Yeomans explains. “We have done that in the past but we really wanted to push it to ridiculous ends. That was the only aesthetic decision we made about the record. Ben actually came over and stayed with me for a while (Yeomans now lives in Hong Kong) in this nine-storey Chinese walk-up in Sai Kung, stuck in this yoga studio together, which was like share house living in one giant room with only a curtain between us. That went on for four weeks, writing and jamming together, then we recorded a few songs, then we moved to Melbourne and did some guitar tracks at Ben’s house, vocal tracks at my house, and went on like that.” Yeomans admits the chemistry between Ely and himself is unique, making the process seem easy at least to them. “When we are looking for balance in our records it’s more about ‘do we have enough of this genre there?’ Our consistency is our inconsistency – the more inconsistent we can be the more fun it can be for us; the jerkier we can make the musical changes the more we jerk around the audience. For this, I did write a few straight-up guitar pop songs – Fuck You Sweetness was one of the first that I came up with – and when we went into the studio it was We Love You! and Fucking Up, very standard rock songs, very down-the-line kind of tunes. The thing is, I can look at that and think I’ve gotten that out of the system and move elsewhere. It’s more of, like, a checklist for us, playing until we have our fill then looking for something else to play with.” This propensity for eschewing favoured genres for others rather than tightening what’s been working is something that’s been creeping into a lot of bands’ modus operandi of late, but unlike Regurgitator, it all seems disingenuous. On Dirty Pop Fantasy the band never sit still, never play safe, never pander to past or future fans – each song is a fleeting glimpse of something tangible and relatable before being whisked off to another sound at odds with the last. Yeomans admits they tread a fine line between authenticity and novelty, but again it comes down to one thing. “Not giving a fuck. It does feel like that, that a song is like a view into another dimension. We have been around for a lot of the eras that these genres have either started or reignited. We grew up listening to all this stuff, and now it’s about picking the best things out of what we grew up with and continue to hear. We want to emulate every genre and have fun with it at the same time.” The album title, Dirty Pop Fantasy, lends itself further to this idea that Regurgitator has crafted a bizarre playlist of their favourite pop songs that never existed. The band

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have always crafted music by inverting it. One song in particular, Home Alone Stoned, stands out. Its touchstone? Being stoned listening to hair rock. “I mean, [the band] Asia was a big influence for Home Alone Stoned, which is at odds with everything else on the album. Ben and I love that movie The Forty Year Old Virgin, we pretty much watched it back to back multiple times a few years ago. It’s been a pretty big influence. Ben bonded with this guy when he came to Hong Kong; they would get stoned in the studio and make these hour-long YouTube playlists of the sappiest ‘80s ballads as they could, and there was a lot of Journey on there. I think it’s seeped into the band – you might see more of those in future.” At the end of the day, though, despite the constant skewering of popular music conventions, Yeomans openly loves the form. “I have always loved pop music; I pore over it, it’s a hobby of mine. The best songs are irresistible, even if they are quite clinical when broken down into their parts. Pop music is superficial in a lot of ways of course, but there is a shift where the lyrical content can be quite strong, whether it is cleverly jarring or confrontational, confessional in a real way. Stimulation is key with pop music – my goal is to use its everyday clicheness to draw people in then twist their minds a little with a different form of content inside. There is this explosive litany that’s repetitive and addictive, it’s short, it’s kind of simple yet easy to digest, and can have this really emotional impact. As I get older

“OUR CONSISTENCY IS OUR INCONSISTENCY – THE MORE INCONSISTENT WE CAN BE THE MORE FUN IT CAN BE FOR US.” I’m a little less addicted to it as I used to be, and there is this pressure to produce something more drawn out and quieter, like a graphic novel or a suite of music, but pop is so intrinsic and ingrained and easy – I think I’ll be doing this for a long time to come.” WHAT: Dirty Pop Fantasy (Valve/Consume) WHEN & WHERE: 10 Oct, Kings Beach Tavern, Sunshine Coast; 11 Oct, The Hi-Fi; 12 Oct, Coolangatta Hotel; 13 Oct, The Northern, Byron Bay


COMING TO BLOWS There’s far too many euphemisms at one’s disposal in a brass band – horny, windy, blow it. Stevie Buchanan from urban nine-piece Bullhorn takes them all in stride on his mission to get crowds up and dancing, Carley Hall disovers.

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risbane horn blowers Bullhorn could clobber you to death with a range of heavy shit: trombones, trumpets, bari saxes. But the one you’d really have to look out for is Stevie Buchanan and his sousaphone, although it’s an effort just for him to keep his beautiful old instrument in the air. “It gets really heavy – it’s about twelve-thirteen kilos,” Buchanan informs. “And it takes a lot of air to play. I actually used to smoke [but] realised that it wasn’t working with the limited lung capacity!”

The nine-piece have been drenching crowds with soulful reggaecum-jazz-cum-hip hop since mid-2011, forming out of shared love of all things horny and windy. Buchanan stresses that his brainchild was the product of this penchant for a brass band that reflected the urban vibe of his and his fellow blowers’ inner-city/ outer-suburb surrounds. “We all played around the Brisbane scene for a while, and the younger guys are all fresh from the Con. The main thing was just to put together a brass band but not playing the old-school New Orleans jazz stuff

or east European. We’re generally modern, upbeat, we do a lot of hip hop and drum’n’bass – the stuff that’s relevant now that will get the party happening.”

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The pedigree Buchanan managed to wrangle together is impressive, with band members coming from Brisbane’s finest jazz and urban outfits, including Dubmarine, The Upsteppers and Miguel. But the brass band isn’t strongly represented in these parts, which means finding a starved audience is easy. “There’s no one in Brisbane, and no one I really know of in Australia, that’s doing the sort of stuff we do,” Buchanan reasons. “It’s definitely a unique sound and line-up. It can be really interesting, especially with new crowds when we set up. We’ve seen a few people stand there quietly and treat it like a concert but we usually open our sets with pretty hardhitting tunes [to get] people up on the dancefloor fast. One novel aspect of Bullhorn’s schtick is their “reimaginings” of tracks generally not expected for a horn makeover, such as Radiohead’s Exit Music (For A Film) and Groove Armada’s At The River. With album number two in the works, the boys are tuning up for their Roll Off The Top/Beach Party double single release and staging it as a double-billed show at The Zoo with up-and-coming soul sister Bec Laughton. “She’s got an awesome neo-soul roots voice,” Buchanan enthuses. “She’s a small girl but she’s got a big voice. There’s definitely going to be some more collaboration with her in the future and we’re definitely going to jump on stage with her at The Zoo for a track or two.” WHAT: Roll Off The Top (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 11 Oct, The Zoo; 12 Oct, Solbar, Maroochydore

OPENING PANDORA’S BOX

film

Nuclear energy as the way of the future? What? Anthony Carew speaks to director Robert Stone about enviro activism and the limits of renewables.

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o, wait, Robert Stone, the guy who made the landmark anti-nuclear documentary Radio Bikini in 1988, has just made a pro-nuclear documentary called Pandora’s Promise? Is the veteran documentarian – who also made the awesome Guerrilla: The Taking Of Patty Hearst – recanting on what he once stood for? “I still have the same abhorrence of nuclear weapons now as I did then,” Stone assures me. “I had to come to accept the limitations of renewables: we really can’t power the world with wind and solar,” Stone explains. “Before making this film, I had no idea how vast a problem energy is, just how much energy the world is using, and how much more we’ll be using in the near future. The sad fact about it is that if you’re anti-nuclear, you’re pro-fossil fuels.” Stone’s previous doco Earth Days was about the birth of environmental activism. And when showed at Sundance Film Festival in 2009, its subject Stewart Brand, “a legend in the environmental movement”, gave his pro-nuclear power views. “And the place just went crazy,” Stone recounts. “In a good way! No one had ever heard an environmental icon say anything positive about nuclear energy, and that’s all they wanted to discuss.” So, Stone set about making Pandora’s Promise, which posits nuclear power as a possible ally to

the environmental movement and an energy source to fight climate change. “But I knew it couldn’t just be dry facts,” Stone offers. “If I was going to make a story about it, it had to be about people.” The resulting picture is a portrait of various environmentalists who’ve “changed their minds” about “why they now advocate for this technology, and the personal toll it’s taken on their lives.” Stone doesn’t see his finished film as being a piece of propaganda. “Most people who come and see it identify wholly as being nuclear sceptics, but they’re interested in hearing both sides of the

debate. Even people picketing the film seem interested in discussing the ideas.” How would the Stone of 25 years ago feel about his own change of mind? “The seed of this does actually go back to Radio Bikini,” he answers. “After making that film, I was the golden boy of the anti-nuclear movement for a while, and I was embraced by these activists. And I really didn’t like a lot of them; I found them to be very dogmatic, set in their ways and not interested in truth. And truth, as a documentary filmmaker, is your highest calling; you follow truth wherever it leads you. I’m a documentary filmmaker, not an activist.” But hasn’t Pandora’s Promise turned him into a pronuclear campaigner? “Yeah,” Stone says, a little sheepishly. “I’ve definitely been made an activist, which I’m a little weary of. I don’t want to be a spokesperson, I just want to spark discussion and, hopefully, change.” WHAT: Pandora’s Promise WHEN & WHERE: 14 Oct, Bemac Cinema, Kangaroo Point THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 33


comedy

DEUCE IS LOOSE Best known as Deuce Bigalow, comedian Rob Schneider tells Baz McAlister he couldn’t play the character now even if he wanted to as he has discovered the joys of ‘mature’ stand-up.

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e’s best known, perhaps, for yelling his catchcry “You can do it!” in Adam Sandler’s movies and for his two-time turn as the world’s most famous man-whore, Deuce Bigalow – but comic actor Rob Schneider, like most comedians, did start out doing stand-up. That all changed around 1988 when Schneider scored a gig on Saturday Night Live, and TV fame beckoned, then Hollywood called. Stand-up fell by the wayside for Schneider – but now, after around 20 years off the stage, he’s learning to re-embrace the joys of the microphone and spotlight. For Schneider, who turns 50

next month, it’s all about challenging himself. “There’s no shortcuts in stand-up,” he says. “You can’t hide behind whatever you’ve achieved in your life, whatever movies you’ve made... You’ve got two minutes to be funny and that’s it. You’ve got to prove your worth. And it’s all about creativity – if you can get an audience to tune in to your point of view and subvert them with some weird idea, it’s a fun night.” Schneider says his return to stand-up sees him as a very different kind of comedian to the 20-something starting

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out in the ‘80s. He no longer does his impressions: “I don’t do any of those any more. That’s easy – the toughest thing you can do is talk about yourself, to be vulnerable,” he says. “I’m kind of talking about what happens in life – the change from being in your 20s to being in your late 40s when you start to realise that some things are no longer a possibility for you, and some things no longer work as well as they used to. Everyone can relate to that. I look at 20-year-olds who come and see me and I go, ‘You can’t relate to any of this, can you?’ but they still laugh at it. It’s still funny.” Schneider married two years ago and his daughter is about to turn one, but despite his busy family life he’s still ticking career boxes. He put out his first stand-up comedy album (“I wanted to wait until there was no money left in the music business,” he quips), recorded a song, made a TV stand-up special, and recently starred in his CBS sitcom, Rob. Returning to the stage is just a logical progression. “In a way I feel like stand-up is a chance for me to start over, to reinvent myself,” he says. “From that, I want to do another TV sitcom about what’s happening in my life and in my career. I want to do a few more movies, too, but the movies I want to make now are different. I wouldn’t make the kind of movies I made before; I couldn’t, because I’m not the same person. It’s not like I’m not proud of the movies I made – I just wouldn’t do it again. I’m going to be 50. I’m not as interested in the same things I was back then.” WHAT: Rob Schneider WHEN & WHERE: 24 Oct, The Tivoli

THEY LOVE IT

Caroline Hjelt, one half of Swedish sensation Icona Pop, tells Anthony Carew that releasing their debut album is “like letting the world read your diary”.

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his past year’s just been crazy, I can hardly believe half the things we’ve gone through,” says Caroline Hjelt. The 25-year-old is one half of Swedish pop duo Icona Pop, whose past year has pretty much centred entirely around their bona fide hit single I Love It. It went multi-platinum in Australia, Canada and the US. When it wasn’t on sale in the UK, a bunch of covers dented the lower rungs of the UK charts, and it spawned 15 official remixes. It’s soundtracked countless commercials, been publicly loved by everyone from Taylor Swift to Nicole Kidman, been performed in Glee and parodied on Sesame Street, and danced to by a coked-out Lena Dunham in Girls. First released in May 2012, yet only hitting number one in the UK in July 2013, it’s been everywhere for a year-and-a-half: if you bought a pair of jeans or went to a house party, you heard it. “We noticed it when we first started playing it live,” recounts Hjelt – who splits the duo with Aino Jawo. “After it came out, anytime we’d perform it we’d see how crazy the crowd would go. Then it started ending up on all these blogs, and we knew that something was going on with it. It’s so crazy that it’s still going. We put out the song in Sweden almost a year-and-a-half ago, and yet people are still playing it on the radio, it’s still everywhere on television, it’s still being played at parties.” 34 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Now, finally, comes the release of Icona Pop’s debut album, This Is... Icona Pop. Hjelt sees it as the culmination of her existence (“all I ever wanted to do was make music; it’s been my whole life”), the destination from a journey that began when, at eight years old, a neighbour invited her into a basement studio and helped record the first song she ever wrote (“in Swedish, the lyrics translated as Leave Me Alone; those were basically all the lyrics”). Hjelt and Aino first met at a party in February of 2009, bonding over mutual heartbreak and musical obsession. They started recording the next day, taking their first steps

toward global domination with no such ambition. “We’ve always just wanted to make good pop music,” Hjelt offers. “We want it to be smart, and thoughtful, and to make people feel; and to put our own feelings into it. We weren’t just in the studio for four months, setting out to pursue just one idea. We’ve been, essentially, working on this album for five years, since we first met each other. The album is like a lot snapshots of thoughts and feelings that we’ve had, situations that we’ve been through. We’ve been writing on it from self-experience: going to different parts of the world, ups-and-downs, being heartbroken and breaking hearts. Writing on the road has been like writing a diary: we haven’t been in the studio, being like, ‘Let’s write a party song!’ or, ‘Let’s try and make something like blah-blahblah...’ We’ve written when we’ve really needed to, when there’s been something in our bodies aching to come out. “If you think of an album as like a diary, then when you release it it’s like letting the world read your diary. But as much as it’s scary, it’s also exciting and gratifying.”

WHAT: This Is… Icona Pop (Warner)


THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 35


music

ALL KILLER, NO FILLER It may have taken three years to complete, but Adelaide rockers Wolf & Cub wanted to write a record that would hold up from start to finish. Frontman Joel Byrne talks to Tom Hersey about what it took.

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here’s an energy in the band that I’ve never felt before,” Joel Byrne enthuses when he sits down with The Music. “Maybe that’s because there’s some new members, but I think it’s mostly due to the record. And that can only be a good thing.” The record the Wolf & Cub frontman is so stoked about is the band’s third full-length, Heavy Weight. According to Byrne, it was by far the band’s most arduous record to complete. On top of member changes that introduced ex-The Scare players Brock Fitzgerald and Wade Keighran into Wolf & Cub, Byrne and drummer Joel Carrey set out to hold this record to a higher standard than anything they’d done previously. “We wanted something that sounded classic in the sense that you listen to those classic records and every song sounds great. I think that was our aim, and in trying to achieve that it meant we had to cut bits that maybe were overstaying their welcome. We were very conscious about having everything on the record feel essential. “I think on the first couple of records I was maybe a little bit naïve in thinking that those long-winded parts were a little bit more essential than they were. We wanted to make things more concise this time... Every song was like a child, and we were raising them.” Guiding those tracks to their potential saw Wolf & Cub retaining the dark, psychedelic lashings and retro rock grooviness of 2006’s Vessels and 2009’s Science And Sorcery while introducing a greatly beneficial sense of economy. That pop sensibility lends Heavy Weight a taut and powerful playability. “I think in the back of your mind when you’re making a record, you know there are going to be some tracks that people are going to skip over. You just know that sometimes you feel like you’re just indulging yourselves. But on this one, I feel like, more than I have with anything else we’ve done, this is a record that you don’t need to skip any songs. As a whole it’s a heavyweight record. Which was the point.” Byrne feels that they needed to offer up something pretty damn special to make sure parts of the album weren’t 36 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

getting passed over. “The nature of the industry these days, it’s so easy to just download single tracks... you don’t have to digest the whole album... But we wanted something where every track was that one track that you were going to download.

was shaped by the somewhat unusual approach. “It would be awesome to be able to go away for a month and make a record, but I’ve never really had that opportunity so I’d don’t really know what that would be like. It’s always been this kind of fractured process. “I think being in a room and knowing it’s costing us money and we’ve only got a certain amount of time to do it… I think that’s an important part of our process. I think if we are given too much time and there aren’t those constraints I think we could probably get a bit

“BUT WE WANTED SOMETHING WHERE EVERY TRACK WAS THAT ONE TRACK THAT YOU WERE GOING TO DOWNLOAD. WE WANTED THIS ALBUM TO BE YOUR PLAYLIST.” We wanted this album to be your playlist. We’ve done it for you. This is it.”

lazy. I know, personally, that I need that pressure, because otherwise I will find something else to do. I think for us, those constraints actually help to make the band.”

Achieving that proved to be a long and hard task given the band was split between cities. Members worked on material by themselves and needed to be smart with the time they spent together. Then there were the recording sessions for the album – small blocks spanning two years. Byrne believes the album

Preparing to tour Heavy Weight, Byrne says Wolf & Cub are now faced with a problem they’ve never really experienced before. “On the other records, there have been tracks that I’ve known we’re never going to play live. But on this one, I can’t fathom not playing every one of these tracks. And that’s actually a pretty good feeling.” WHAT: Heavy Weight (MGM) WHEN & WHERE: 12 Oct, The Zoo; 25 Oct, Byron Bay Surf Festival, Beach Hotel


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BREAKING BARRIERS

Evelyn Morris describes to Brendan Telford the creative complexities and liberations of performing as Pikelet.

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velyn Morris is a revered musical idealist, crafting intrinsically “difficult” pop amalgams that are as much about the individual as they are about creatively altering musical forms. Calluses is Morris’ third record under the Pikelet moniker, and although those individualistic flourishes are still present, it’s clear that Pikelet has become a band concern. “Initially one of the main reasons of getting a band involved was because of the difficulties I was having with the loop pedal,” she explains. “I found that my ideas were dictated by the knowledge that I’d have to

use that technology somehow, and it became very limiting. I didn’t like the idea of writing the songs then handing the pieces over to session people who didn’t really have a direct relation to what I was trying to do.” Calluses represents a difficult creation process, something that Morris and the band had to work at diligently. Morris maintains that the arduous nature of the writing and recording process is a natural obstacle to true creativity. “I don’t think that anything creative truly comes easy, nor should it,” she asserts. “I like to think that going through the process of being creative means you’re touching on

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things that you’ve never encountered or attempted before, therefore you don’t really know what you’re doing; you’re reaching around in the dark, trying to figure things out. If you’re going to have any critical engagement with creative practice, you have to challenge things you believe; I don’t agree that rolling with your first idea is the best option. “We were also trying to be more collaborative. It was figuring out how to get everyone’s opinions and ideas involved… Democracy makes things take a little longer than usual.” Calluses is the most intricate release of Morris’ oeuvre, something that was both unexpected and sometimes confronting. “It became a situation whereby we struggled to find any space on these tracks, just layer upon layer,” Morris admits. “I find it really full and cluttered. It baffles me when people say there is space. It feels like there’s a little too much going on.” Morris makes it clear that there isn’t much in the way of mainstream accessibility in what she does with Pikelet, although that’s hardly the point. “Most people I know that are really testing their creative capabilities just aren’t interested in “making it” like they used to. There’s a point of recognition for every Australian musician that (Australia) is a very difficult place to sustain a music practice, which at first makes you feel sad, like, ‘Oh shit, what am I doing with my life then?’ But then you realise that you want, need to do it anyway, so you work it around your job and let it be something else, something for you and you alone.” WHAT: Calluses (Chapter) WHEN & WHERE: 11 Oct, Black Bear Lodge

CREATIVE CONTROL

Canada’s musical mad scientist Devin Townsend formerly channelled his seething rage into some of extreme metal’s most deranged fare. Nowadays, he enjoys trip hop, sips coffee and aims for a decent night’s sleep before indulging creative whims, Brendan Crabb learns.

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ude, I’m such a train-wreck for the most part, as an artist. As a person I think I’m pretty good, but as an artist, I’m so all over the place that it takes a pretty casual culture to be able to stomach it,” vocalist/guitarist/ keyboardist/producer Devin Townsend says.

Stagnation certainly isn’t part of his ethos. During a two-decade career trajectory begun via Steve Vai’s Sex & Religion LP, the rubber-faced Canadian has rarely remained on one musical path for too long. Even after now-defunct extreme metal project Strapping Young Lad’s sonic maelstrom became more successful, Townsend issued regular solo releases. They were zany, heavy, progressive and deeply melodic; oftentimes all of the above. He’s since expanded further – Devin Townsend Project’s recent quadrilogy (in addition to latest effort Epicloud) particularly exhibiting a songwriter seeking to explore the breadth of his capabilities. Taking into account his ongoing prolific output, Townsend must be somewhat accustomed to existing in a sleep-deprived state. “Yeah, it’s not for lack of trying. I fall asleep at ten o’clock at night, wake up 37 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

at two in the morning and I’m fucked. I used to be able to combat it years ago by just drinking a bottle of wine before bed, but because that’s not really happening anymore, you just end up twiddling your thumbs and thinking about your world falling apart until 5am. Then you get up, have a cup of coffee and things are okay.” Having so many ideas rattling about upstairs ought to be a burden, though, Townsend manages to find ways to compartmentalise artistic things. “A great deal of me being able to control them now is

just that I’m not on any substances,” he reveals. “I take melatonin every now and then to try and get some sleep, but other than that, it’s pretty clean living. And a by-product of this healthier work-life balance is acknowledging the unhinged brutality which once helped define him isn’t a wholly accurate representation anymore. Folding SYL after believing it had descended into self-parody was a major indicator. “Not on my radar anymore,” he emphasises when asked whether extreme metal factors into his listening habits. “When I play with bands, for example, I see Meshuggah, and I’m like, ‘Oh, they’re the best’. We toured with Gojira and I’m like, ‘They’re fucking amazing’. But I don’t listen to it, I’ve got no interest. Maybe I’ll listen to it once or twice just to be reminded… The new Jon Hopkins record is just brilliant. I like trip hop. But in terms of actively seeking out the newest and the heaviest, it just gives me a headache, man.” WHERE: 10 Oct, The Auditorium


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ANIMAL MAGNETISM The Handsome Family are heading back down to Australia to share their affinity with critters of all shapes and sizes. Chief lyricist Rennie Sparks tells Steve Bell about her ongoing obsession with the animal kingdom.

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he gothic-tinged folk and country of Albuquerque, New Mexico-based husband-and-wife duo The Handsome Family has long been based around the vivid imagination of lyricist/bassist Rennie Sparks – she crafts the words while husband Brett (guitar/keys) offers the baroque music and his emotive baritone – and on the pair’s tenth album, Wilderness, she’s cut loose with a collection of songs based upon various members of the animal realm. The collection relates the travails of frogs in streams, octopi in caves, spiders in nooks and crannies and wildebeests on the plains, but the common thread is that all of the songs find nature intertwining with humanity; sometimes overtly and sometimes covertly, each offering contains an inter-special convergence of some description. “We can never really know what it feels like to be any other creature; we can only imagine from a human perspective what it would be like,” Sparks smiles. “No matter what, we’re always going to be subjective so why pretend otherwise? I think there’s a language that we can talk to ourselves with that’s sort of like a dream language full of animals, and it seems like we all speak this language even though we don’t really know that we speak it until we encounter it. It’s odd, we’re all born with these ideas about certain animals – things that are scary and things that are beautiful. It’s a good thing.” This penchant for mining inspiration from the dream state is prevalent not just in Wilderness but also throughout much of The Handsome Family’s oeuvre to date. “Yeah, I guess I don’t want to write about things that we can just talk about. What’s the point? If we’re able to talk about it then we’ll be done with it, so I want our songs to be about something that can’t easily be talked about but which seems to live inside a song. I want reality to be a little different, so when you hear a song it can change the world you live in while you’re listening to the song. It should be like an altered state, so the rules are different.” Sparks is a prolific wordsmith, having made many forays into other disciplines involving the written word – poetry and prose in particular. How does songwriting compare to these counterparts? “I think writing lyrics is a different 38 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

kind of writing, because lyrics are meant to be sung and words on a page are meant to be silent,” she muses. “When I’m writing lyrics I’m always conscious that it needs to be words than can be sung, and words that will sound good aloud. Like I really wanted to write a song about

I should sing this one’, but he’s got the bigger voice – he can sing higher than me and lower than me; he can sing circles around me – and his voice has a certain authority, which makes it easy for me. I believe it more than I believe my own voice. And I really like to sing harmonies with him. I think that singing harmonies is just a beautiful experience so I’m really happy that I get to join in and then go away and then join in again. I always say that when you sing harmonies with someone you love it’s a very special thing – it’s a nice gift to have. If you love somebody you should try to sing in harmony with them at least once, you won’t regret it.”

“IF YOU LOVE SOMEBODY YOU SHOULD TRY TO SING IN HARMONY WITH THEM AT LEAST ONCE” jellyfish, but it’s just not a word that sounds good sung, so I had to pass on that – I wrote an essay on them instead. There’s something about jellyfish that just doesn’t resonate when you say it out loud – we need a better name for that creature.” Does she imagine Brett’s deep voice specifically singing the words during this part of the creative process? “Yeah, I do,” Sparks admits. “Every once in a while there’s one where I say, ‘I think

The Handsome Family’s now been an ongoing creative concern for over two decades, apparently due to their eschewing the usual clichés of rock’n’roll excess. “We’re mystified; this is a hard business to stay in for a long period of time, and we have some really wonderful, faithful fans who stick with us and seem to be continually interested in what we’re doing and I’m really thankful for that,” Sparks gushes. “It’s great to get up every day and do what you love, so we’re really fortunate. It’s certainly not a great time for musicians, they’re all struggling, but we keep our overheads low – we don’t spend a lot of money on cocaine or prostitutes, so that really helps keep the budget in line.” WHAT: Wilderness (Carrot Top/Spunk) WHEN & WHERE: 14 Oct, Black Bear Lodge


MARGINAL SUCCESS A chart topping progressive death metal band might sound like an oxymoron, but Finland’s Amorphis are anything but ordinary. Vocalist Tomi Joutsen speaks to Lochlan Watt.

A

morphis is a curious beast, having evolved from more brutal death metal roots to their hyper melodic progressive sound showcased on this year’s 11th studio album, Circle. Tomi Joutsen was a fan of Amorphis long before he became their frontman in 2005, and recalls his first exposure to the group through the radio. “The first song I heard was Signs Of The North Side,” a track from their 1992 debut The Karelian Isthmus. “They played the song [on a] radio show, and I got

really interested about Amorphis. At that time I was into death metal a lot, and was in all kinds of death metal bands, and Amorphis… I think it was something special. After a year I went to see them in Helsinki. I think [it] was Tales From A Thousand Lakes [1994], when that came out they were something new and fresh in metal scene. I was a fan of the band before I joined the band, so I am still living in my dream in a way. It’s incredible.” For a metal band to have had even one number one album on their nation’s charts, let alone four, as well as five other top ten releases, is unheard of in most parts of the world.

Joutsen, however, doesn’t think it’s “so strange”, and explains how strong the metal scene in Finland really is.

music

“We are not the only metal band from Finland that’s huge – Children Of Bodom, Nightwish, HIM, Sonata Arctica – I think when they release their albums they also go really on top of the charts. For us as a band it’s great that we are quite big in Finland. We can play lots of shows in Finland in festivals and in clubs also. It helps a lot in our career that we are in Finland. I think that lots of people think that Finland is a heavy metal country, and that’s true in a way. We have lots of heavy metal music here, and when you are listening [to] radio station they play some of really heavy metal bands also. It’s great to be in a metal band of course in Finland.” While the massively dreadlocked man believes that “the heavy metal scene in Finland is big, and I think it’s getting bigger everywhere,” he also thinks that, “It will always be marginal in a way. It has to be kind of underground music, but of course I’m happy that it’s getting bigger all the time. “I’ve been waiting [for] this moment for many years,” he says of the band’s debut Australian run. “There has been some plans before… two years ago there was some plans to go there in New Year’s Eve. I don’t know what happened. It’s business every time. Now it seems that it will happen, and I’m really, really happy about that. It’s going to be crazy. I’ve heard some really good stories about Australia from other Finnish bands that played there. It’s gonna be great, I’m really happy.” WHAT: Circle (Nuclear Blast/Riot) WHEN & WHERE: 12 Oct, The Hi-Fi

THE PERPETUAL ARTIST

music

Cosmo Jarvis is a man of many talents, who likes to do what he wants, when he wants. Ahead of his Australian tour supporting his latest EP, Jarvis gives Jazmine O’Sullivan a bit of insight into his busy lifestyle. We catch Cosmo Jarvis on a bit of a bad day over in South England. He’s been having a rough time trying to get some recording done for his forthcoming album. “I can’t really record vocals in my house because the walls are so thin. I bumped into my neighbour on a bus the other day and he said he could hear me sometimes!” He chuckles. “So now I go up to my mother’s house during the day; it’s only a short walk, but it’s all uphill, and I’ve injured my ankle recently so it was pretty difficult to get there. I take all my bits with me because it’s all pretty portable, but as I’m sitting in the room I realise that I’ve forgotten my headphone jack converter, so I can’t listen to the audio! And my mum is coming home soon and I can’t record while she’s here, so it’s been a bit of a nightmare.” Jarvis does however have his latest EP, They Don’t Build Hearts, recorded, produced and for release the end of September. Reflecting on the title track, Jarvis explains, “It’s just about love and how some people are really dependent on it, but then it also looks into how these emotional attachments can lead to a person’s demise. The chorus also refers to how it was really different back in

the ‘30s. I mean, I don’t know for sure because I wasn’t there, but from watching movies it seems like men and women spoke a lot differently to each other than they do today.” Following track, 9999, has more of an aggressive tone to it. “I hate it when you’re in the supermarket and they round up the price to make it look prettier, so it becomes 9999. They must just assume everyone’s really stupid. So the song’s about that.” With his previous songs Gay Pirates and Love This reaching great heights with Australian

audiences, Jarvis admits he is keen to head back to Australia for another tour. “I do OK in London, but it’s always difficult touring. It’s usually just the guest list that makes it look like a great show; in general the turnout in Australia is better and the shows are more lively.” With tours, record releases and various short films not enough to keep Jarvis busy, he reveals he’s now trying to break into the acting industry, whilst also working on his second feature film as director and producer. “[The film I’m working on] is about these bands who are trying to be acoustic songwriters. They’re really trendy, writing songs that have already been written, and they really care about the fashion and the hair and all that; then there’s the other side, these metal bands who bust their arse, but their scene is a lot harder to break into. Ultimately, it’s about learning what’s important to you.” WHAT: They Don’t Build Hearts (iTunes) WHEN & WHERE: 13 Oct, Beetle Bar THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 39


You know when you hear a song that’s the perfect soundtrack for whatever you’re doing? I love when that happens. It makes an ordinary moment feel so...extraordinary. That’s why wherever we go,

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goes with us.

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reviews

ALBUM OF THE WEEK

This week: Hold your breath through Gravity, spend a lot of time dying in Volgarr The Viking and Pearl Jam show no signs of slowing down with their new album.

TRACK LISTING

SCOTT & CHARLENE’S WEDDING Any Port In A Storm Bedroom Suck Scott & Charlene’s Wedding is the brainchild of frontman and songwriter Craig Dermody, who recently upped stumps from Melbourne for the mean streets of New York. His second album Any Port In A Storm continues the form of 2010 debut Para Vista Social Club, in that the slightly shambolic music has oodles of charm (slightly more polished but still defiantly lo-fi), but what really brings home the bacon is Dermody’s Jonathan Richman-like lyrical innocence, which manifests in this stream of emotionally direct, life-analysing vignettes.

★★★★½

Ruminations on the vicissitudes of life abound, Dermody seemingly intent on making sense of the curveballs that modern society sometimes throws up. There’s a number of unlucky in love songs (Wild Heart, Spring St, Clock Out And Leave) and some fish out of water tales about his new life in the Big Apple (Fakin NYC, Lesbian Wife), and we get a temporal hint about Dermody’s inspiration in 1993 (“I ain’t done much changing in what I love since 1993”) given that the album’s slacker vibe is totally in sync with laidback early ‘90s fare such as Pavement or The Lemonheads.

1. Junk Shop

7. Downtown

2. Lesbian Wife

8. Spring St

Yet despite all of these melancholy-tinged ruminations there’s a wry sense of humour and acceptance pervading everything, and when Dermody sings, “When you’ve got nothing left you’ve still got rock’n’roll” (Jackie Boy) you just know that everything’s going to work out just fine. Top-notch indie rock.

3. 1993

9. Gammy Leg

Steve Bell

4. Fakin’ NYC

10. Charlie’s In The Gutter

5. Clock Out And Leave

11. Wild Heart

6. Jackie Boy THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 41


album reviews

LOON LAKE

STONEFIELD

Caroline

Wunderkind/Illusive

It’s about time Loon Lake released their debut LP. After bouncing around the indie music scene for nearly three years and releasing two stellar EPs, they’ve finally put together enough electric riffs and catchy break-up songs for a long-player. Produced by Steven Schram (San Cisco, Little Red) and drummer Nick Nolan, Gloamer has its fair share of accessible pop tunes, such as City Lights and On Fire. Yet the record successfully manages to do more than catch the eye of those interested in glitter-tinted choruses and other such shiny things.

The Macedon Ranges outside of Melbourne isn’t meant to be like this. It’s meant to be about relaxing towns full of hipsters, day spas and gourmet produce markets. Instead, it’s proved the unlikely birthplace for one serious rock’n’roll act in Stonefield. Cynics may roll their eyes at a family act emerging Kings Of Leon-style out of a small Victorian country town to play Glastonbury. But there’s no denying these four Findlay sisters have some quality rock chops and some serious momentum behind them, their self-titled debut coming in the wake of a Foo Fighters support and news they are touring with Fleetwood Mac later this year.

Gloamer

The boys from rural Victoria will be the first to admit that tracks like 2012 hit Cherry Lips don’t take a lot of mental strain to write. But then there are songs like middle track Bones, which draws out a sense of melancholic hopelessness, and Love Gets Done, which will invigorate eardrums with its epic guitar solo. It Was Only

Stonef ield

★★★½ Love, a revamp of one of the band’s first songs, Good Times, adds synthesisers and decent production values to a great break-up song. Finale Goodbye Forever is unlike anything we’ve previously heard from the Nolan brothers and co., as lead singer Sam Nolan gives his best Stephen Malkmus impersonation on a lo-fi track filled with longing and regret. Interspersed with guitar solos and synth-heavy backings, Gloamer demonstrates an inclination towards something beyond the blend of garage-pop Loon Lake are accustomed to brewing, and the results are sweet. Ash Goldberg

Produced by Ian Davenport (Radiohead, Band Of Skulls), the sound quality on this release is light years better than most debut efforts. Powered by Amy’s snarling voice and

PEARL JAM

YUCK

Universal

Caroline

As one of modern rock’s most robust and indefatigable bands, Pearl Jam has time and again produced quality music through more than their share of adversity. With a sound and style that seems to divide most people right down the middle, either loving or hating them, they’ve managed over 20 years of live performances with a mostly original lineup, and what is soon to be 11 studio albums (Lost Dogs totally counts) – the latest of which is the über-cool Lightning Bolt.

Following the recent departure of frontman Daniel Blumberg, this trio leave little time in asserting a fresh approach on their sophomore album. This release is a far cry from the grinding, garage aesthetic of their debut. Instead, from instrumental opener Sunrise In Maple Shade, this album predominantly evokes a bright, sunny and textured sound. Less reliant on dynamics and instead favouring gradual builds, they even experiment with instruments such as bells and horns to fully embrace their janglier shoegaze sound.

Lightning Bolt

This latest release is one of substance, variation and, most importantly, huge noise. Those with their ears to the ground will have heard the singles Mind Your Manners and Sirens, both of which are great; the former, a return to form, the latter, a brilliantly crafted ballad with the insight and wisdom that frontman Eddie Vedder seems to have always had. Further listening will reveal more gems – brilliant opener Getaway, a full-band rendition of Sleeping By Myself – which fans will recognise 42 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

★★★½ Hannah’s big riffs, the band tear through openers C’mon and Love You Deserve before adding a gospel choir to ripping first single Put Your Curse On Me. These girls certainly know their way around a distortion pedal, but they have to be careful of their straight rockers being a little formulaic as tracks like To The Mountains and House Of The Lonely amble along and only really take off when the band gets creative in the bridges. It’s when they are creative from the start in the slower Diggin’ My Way Out and the rocking album highlight Baby Blue that we see just how good Stonefield can be. Paul Barbieri

Glow & Behold

★★★★½ from Vedder’s solo work, giving them a whole new concept to sink their teeth into – and the tasty styling of Infallible provides an anthemic quality to the album. From the aforementioned track’s unexpected and classic chord progression, to the epic reverb-ridden soundtrack of Pendulum, to the mournful, heartfelt and lachrymose Future Days, Lightning Bolt covers all bases, maintaining a singular voice, yet exploring a multitude of sounds simultaneously. While their albums are starting to look formulaic, the band manages to find new ways to impress and inspire. True to their nature, Pearl Jam just aren’t slowing down. Lukas Murphy

The wavering tremolo of Rebirth is especially reminiscent of My Bloody Valentine, its chords sliding in and out to create a sense of uneasy cohesion. However the melody-driven, energetic single Middle Sea is undoubtedly the gem of this collection, in which the band strike a delicate balance between the lo-fi punk of their earlier work and the heavy, shoegaze haziness that this album strives

★★★½ towards. Moments of peacefulness and serenity are also achieved at times, as in Somewhere, a twinkling example of melancholic, meandering headphones music. Mirroring the opener, Twilight In Maple Shade (Chinese Cymbals) is a pulsating instrumental track, which perhaps should have closed the album in place of the syrupy Glow & Behold – a rather soft, inoffensive song that sounds more like a B-side tacked on the end at the last minute. Though this album is a noticeable regression in terms of edge, Yuck again display real potential to create waves in the alt.rock scene, with hopefully a true breakout album still on the cards. Stephanie Tell


album reviews

★★★½

★★★★

DAN LE SAC VS SCROOBIUS PIP

CLOWNS

CULTS

Poison City

Sony

Excuse me sir, but I think your face has melted to the speaker. You’ve been listening to Clowns again, haven’t you? Fast, frenetic and fun, I’m Not Right is the debut album from these Melbourne lads, and it brings you all the hellfire attitude and lyrical accuracy of The Bronx at their best. With song titles like Grave Junkie, Eat A Gun, Jesus on Acid and Oh Fuck, My Face, you get a pretty good idea that this is not an album to listen to with your mum. Best enjoyed at ear-splitting level – or live, if you have the chance.

The dichotomy of Manhattan duo Cults really comes to the fore in this second LP, with delicate vocalist Madeline Follin surrounded by waves of ominous dream and indie pop from cohort axeman Brian Oblivion. Their offering is fascinatingly atmospheric and, at times, unsettling. So Far has bite, the sweet vocal from the frontwoman seems almost sadistic and leads its roaring synth. Similarly, the brash rock of I Can Hardly Make You Mine is effectively contrasted with Follin’s innocence. If you’re expecting extreme diversity from track to track, you’ll be disappointed. Cults have a formula, and this time it’s infectious.

Dylan Stewart

Mat Lee

I’m Not Right

Static

★★★½

Sunday Best/[PIAS] Australia This duo continue to astound. dan le sac can claim to be one of the better beatmakers ever. He delivers stadium sized crunch but still finds majesty in the miniscule. Scroobius Pip’s whole style, on the other hand, is a rejection of any aesthetic. He’s bad. In his better moments he’s so-bad-he’s-notquite-so-bad. Repent Replenish Repeat is the pair’s apogee. On Stunner, le sac creates a monster only for Pip’s delivery to be overslow and repetitive. Gold Teeth is a lecture on consumerism from a man with a sleeve tattoo. Come for the beats. If you stay? Well, you’ll be staying for the beats, too.

Warp/Inertia

Roadrunner/Warner

Vengeance Falls

SLEIGH BELLS Bitter Rivals Liberator A combination of bratty rap, sweet melodies and grrrrl aggression, the vocals of Alexis Krauss are disarmingly cute, with an almost siren quality. You’re being lured in for the kill, but it’s worth it. Derek Edward Miller’s guitars still offer plenty of fuzzed out, speaker-killing crunch, with a new edge of polished pop that works. The opening, title track is a standout with its poppy guitar jangle before launching into that familiar, overblown Sleigh Bells sound. While Sing Like A Wire is a glorious mess of bubble gum vocals, ‘80s house synth and Marshall stack guitars that somehow never crumbles under its own weight. Pete Laurie

★★★½

★★★½

TRIVIUM

Ilp

Repent Replenish Repeat

James d’Apice

KWES

★★★★

★★½

MACHINE TRANSLATIONS

The Bright Door

Kwes has largely existed behind the scenes producing material for artists as diverse as Speech Debelle, Micachu and The xx. Now he steps into the spotlight with a debut album that rolls out the blueprint for his unique sound. As it turns out Kwes is a crooning romantic and his icy cool and clear vocals sensitively deal heartfelt lyrics with plenty of emotion. Under the vocals are darkly experimental electronic textures and that brutal UK bass which gives this record plenty of bottom end. A pop record that comes completely out of left-field, Kwes gives us a complete original.

Trivium’s last album In Waves was a sprawling, highly ambitious effort. It was a lot to take in, yet it lost its way – which is where Vengeance Falls takes a different path. With only ten tracks of unending and brutal rifferama, this is the band’s most cohesive work. Gone are the ‘80s metal clichés of soaring melodic choruses, with frontman Matt Heafy and co. bringing a rhythmic post-hardcore sound with less guitar gymnastics and a refocused energy on keeping things dirty and heavy. With this release, Trivium have further cemented their position in metal’s monarchy.

Spunk

Guido Farnell

James Dawson

Matt MacMaster

J Walker’s Machine Translations has been quiet for some time. His eighth album, The Bright Door, is a restless one reflecting distraction, and the stubborn effort to record it regardless bears rich melancholic fruit. Walker’s natural inclination toward blushing folk rock pushes against subtle metallic instrumentation and atonal shapes that haunt the edges. Dissatisfaction hovers over the record like a pregnant storm cloud. Repeated sounds using different versions of the same instrument litter the record, and many of the songs involve long loops. Walker’s drive to find something results in a hypnotic and fascinating listen.

★★

NYPC

NYPC Cooking Vinyl This London outfit used to go by New Young Pony Club, but like everything else in pop culture these days (in which they’re firmly entrenched, artistically) brevity has taken priority. As well as losing members (they’re a duo now) and most of their name, they’ve lost their edge. Shouty, angular dance punk has given way to sugary synth pop arrangements, and there’s not much demanding your attention. Terrible metaphors clog up their lyrics and the production is flat and uninspired. By track four, Now I’m Your Gun, patience runs thin and a tough slog remains. Weaksauce. Matt MacMaster THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 43


albums/singles/eps

★★★

BEEF JERK Schooners

Independent If all the members of Beef Jerk disappeared, there would be no bands left in Sydney. Schooners is a messy jangle fest, and a sign of our times.

SALLY SELTMANN Needle In The Hay Caroline A candy-licious video accompanies the equally sweet track from Sally Seltmann, the first taste from her impending second album.

JACKIE ONASSIS Juliette Sony Taking a cue from smooth hook-based modern sounds, Sydney’s Jackie Onassis release a very now track which pays no mind to typical throwbacks and stands apart as a consequence.

HOLY GHOST!

HELM

Halfcut/Shock

DFA/[PIAS] Australia

Summerland

What is happening? That’s the question you’ll keep asking yourself listening to Crossfaith’s third record Apocalyze. Though they’re the biggest Japanese export since Godzilla, Crossfaith’s music makes zero sense. It’s like nu-dub metalcore and it sometimes feels as ridiculous as such descriptors. It’s like standing in the middle of a Pachinko slot hall in some out of the way Osakan prefecture at three in the morning. There’s a lot of weird noises, you’re completely overstimulated and you cannot begin to comprehend everything going on around you. But it’s still kind of awesome.

More like holy shit! As in how could these two write a tune as good as Dumb Disco Ideas – probably DFA Records’ finest moment since James Murphy signed off LCD with the incredible Home – and then turn out an album as pedestrian as Dynamics? No matter how much time you give this faux disco yacht rock, it never touches you. We get it – you’re from New York City, you’ve got BrooklynVegan looking over your shoulder making sure things are cool and pouty enough. Just understand your beige loft party soundtrack doesn’t matter to anyone outside the borough.

Gold Coast progressive chuggers Helm have smoothed out their rough-around-the-edges sound over the past five years, resulting in their multi-faceted and wellconstructed third opus, Vol 3... Panthalassa. The polished vocals and garish growls are still there for an equally emotive and sonic assault, only this time there’s a keenly felt consideration given to the cinematic. Bermuda and Endless Storm offer this in spades, the latter instantly addictive with its arcing motif. The Taxidermist again throws up something different, with a more subdued acoustic introduction that soon rips into blistering guitar chops. Another bit of rebellion from the glitter strip.

Tom Hersey

Benny Doyle

Carley Hall

Apocalyze

SASKWATCH

Dynamics

★★★★

Voices

The cover of the new AIC album has a triceratops on it, the coolest dinosaur. Are AIC the coolest band then? No, this song sounds like Live.

THE CROOKED FIDDLE BAND

Moving Pieces Of The Sea Bird’s Robe

THE STILLSONS

Never Go Your Way Mountain Man Music

Another instantly memorable indie pop singalong from Melbourne’s The Stevens.

Sydney’s The Crooked Fiddle Band are an instrumental act that melds any number of genres and stylings into a frenetic, eerie suite of songs that could be metal for a world without electronic technology. At times archaically abrasive, obtuse, barbed, soothing, folkloric and pastoral, the troupe tell tales from across an imaginary static sea – a sense of hopeful balladry, undertaking an epic from a scorched steampunk fantasy paradigm. Moving Pieces Of The Sea encapsulates bizarre, square peg/round hole territory – yet is undeniably breathtaking.

Chris Yates

Brendan Telford

Carley Hall

Northside Records There are so many people in Melbourne band Saskwatch, if you got them to do a support you wouldn’t have to sell tickets. A soul band via The Jam with an ace female singer.

THE STEVENS Hindsight

Chapter Music

44 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Vol 3... Panthalassa

★★★½

The Stillsons revel in the country-folk realm on third album Never Go Your Way, framed with a playfully atmospheric indie bent. Cat Canteri’s everreliable vocals simply stand out here, a number of tracks getting her soulful treatment (Another Lover) while she runs riot with the melancholic subject matter of others (Feel So Young). The latter half of the album is largely confined to Canteri’s harmonising with Justin Bernasconi’s Neil Finn-ish storytelling, Go Home the duo’s highlight. It won’t be everybody’s cup of tea, but it’s worth taking a sip.

Hands

★★★★

CROSSFAITH

ALICE IN CHAINS EMI

★★

★★★

ED KOWALCZYK The Flood And The Mercy Sony Ed Kowalczyk’s second solo effort is difficult to separate from his work as the hugely popular frontman of Live, and a cover shot recalling The Dolphin’s Cry video clip imagery does him no favours. The Flood And The Mercy is solid enough – rock-heavy, melodic, musically dynamic, intensely lyrical and even epic in the alternately banging and gentle twists of album highlight Take Me Back and the guitar work of R.E.M.’s Peter Buck throughout – though there’s not a great deal of new ground broken. If it ain’t broke… Tyler McLoughlan


live reviews

FOALS, ALPINE The Tivoli 2 Oct Alpine, acting as the sole support tonight, sound bigger and bolder than ever. Phoebe Baker is headbanging, Lou James is dipping and twisting, the sextet’s rhythm section is firing stage right while refrained textures are being created to the left of the central vocals. As usual, the Melbourne gang find the intricacies of songs like Softsides hard to contain, but for every slight miscue there’s a moment of brilliance that you can’t deny. Later, Villages sees the band beautifully lost in their own dance, before Gasoline concludes a joyous set. An epileptic light show then heralds the arrival of British conquerors Foals. The five-piece

to grooves that are lean and animated. The transcending journey that is Spanish Sahara is given full exposure, while the intro to Red Sock Pugie is twisted out before hands and voices fill the room during Late Night, which starts off sluggish but comes full-circle amazing by song’s end. Foals then round things out with Electric Bloom, which is instantly jolted with Philippakis thickening out Jack Bevan’s drumming with some stick work of his own before taking to The Tivoli’s top level to get some air off the mezzanine. The frontman jumps, waiting arms catch, and once again he is swiftly back to the stage barely missing a beat. Lights shoot towards the roof like futuristic pillars and, with the crazy snake backdrop looking all kinds of 3D, it’s overwhelming in the best possible way.

FOALS @ THE TIVOLI. PIC BY FREYA LAMONT

a concert but rather like a ‘happening’. It seems like the kind of shit that went down in the ‘60s, or at least in a 24-yearold’s approximation of what the ‘60s might have been like. And when Steven Wilson and his five-piece backing band take the stage – which they do half an hour after doors; there’s apparently no time for support bands tonight – their set does feel like something much bigger than the usual international band you’d go out to see on a Saturday night. First of all, there’s the sheer breadth of sound in the solo material from Wilson. Though his day job band Porcupine Tree have never let themselves fall into a genre trap from which they haven’t been able to escape, Wilson is positively all over the shop across records like The Raven That Refused To Sing

FOALS @ THE TIVOLI. PIC BY FREYA LAMONT

clop onto the stage one by one, soaking up the adulation, before making their loud and lucid intentions for the evening clear with Holy Fire’s Prelude melting into Total Life Forever, the latter which electrifies mid-song with a wild guitar break. There’s a nip pourer to the left of keyboardist Edwin Congreave featuring an undisclosed clear substance, but the Oxford five don’t require any additional kick. My Number builds and bursts with way more impact than you hear on record, while Providence sounds volatile and marks Yannis Philippakis’ first venture into the pit, the furry frontman crowdsurfing the first few rows before landing on stage for the massive breakdown as nonchalantly as can be.

Foals dip back in the encore, opening with the Skins-approved Hummer, before Philippakis teases the heaving room, “Are we going to blow this place away? Wednesday night style?” And fair play to the lads, with the sonic boom of Inhaler they almost do, before usual setstopper Two Steps, Twice smashes the night to its conclusion, but not before a second mezzanine jump – with guitar – from Philippakis. Because indie rock can be this daring and dangerous.

The band’s playing is super versatile, going from bone crushing sections of ripping chords and pounding rhythms

With tonight’s show advertised as being presented in “quadraphonic surround sound”, it feels like it’s trying not so much to be

Benny Doyle

STEVEN WILSON The Tivoli 5 Oct

of doing justice to every twist and turn in the frontman’s songbook. Then there’s the atmosphere in The Tivoli. If the promise of a quadraphonic PA hasn’t already convinced you that this is something special, Wilson is pulling out all the stops to give the fans value for money. There are the visualizations tied into Wilson’s Raven record that play behind the band as they work through the newer stuff, ranging from mildly unsettling to rather creepy – a close-up of an old man’s weathered face while the sound of a clock ticking pensively plays through the customrigged P.A. takes the cake in the creepiness stakes. Even if you walk across The Tivoli’s floor and can’t actually pick up what the quadraphonic surround sound system is doing that a regular P.A. wouldn’t do, Wilson’s charm

FOALS @ THE TIVOLI. PIC BY FREYA LAMONT

(And Other Stories) and Grace For Drowning. From thrashy, balls-out jams where Wilson and his guitar compatriots hesh out to the out and out King Crimson-worshipping prog rock, to the disarmingly affecting ballads that Wilson can pen when sitting behind an acoustic guitar, the band feel like a sonic spaceship for the crowd assembled tonight. During engrossing numbers like The Watchmaker and Harmony Korine, which Wilson rightly introduces with a recommendation for Spring Breakers, the six-piece ensemble make us feel like we’re orbiting the earth. As the ethereal flute parts float over the audience, the spacey ambience is impossible not to get taken by. As they switch and swap instruments, Wilson’s crew all prove themselves as consummate musicians. Working as an ensemble, the group are capable

– the frontman has the crowd eating out of his hand – and the strength of his solo material makes tonight feel like so much more than your average show. Tom Hersey

THE APE, BITTER SWEET KICKS Transcontinental Hotel 5 Oct It’s a hot and humid evening at the Transcontinental Hotel tonight – the perfect climate to enjoy the swampy, blues-rock stylings of Melbourne-based outfit Bitter Sweet Kicks. An immediate explosion of thunderous bass lines, manic screams and roaring riffs attacks the senses; you have to take a step back to realise that each THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 45


live reviews element contributes to the larger picture, which is actually quite fascinating. While each band member is captivating, it’s difficult to take your eyes off the beautiful mess that is Jack Davies. He spends more time amongst the audience than on the stage, alternating between yelling into his mic, crouching into the foetal position, dancing, swaying and doing acrobatics. The shame here is that his mic cord is so short, which prevents punters from discovering the full spectrum of the mayhem he could create. When the time comes to return to the stage, instead of taking a simple step up, Davies – ever the showman – chooses to perform a backwards somersault, propelling his legs onto the stage while leaving the top half of his body dangling to the floor. In the midst of such antics the

into the set with Crawl Back, before a run through of tracks including Don’t Need Nothing, Sno Fun, Can’t Feel A Thing and the instrumental ditty Monkey In The Kitchen, which is completely hypnotic with its repetitive riffs. It’s clear the guys are loving it; it just feels like four mates jamming together and the good vibes are undeniable. This is confirmed when the band hug each other after their encore, which breezes by all too quickly, leaving the insatiable audience still wanting more. They leave the stage finally with a bow, where instead of facing the audience they face the back of the stage, waving and blowing kisses to the drum kit. Any indication their album may have given as to what kind of band The Ape are has been exceeded in this live setting. Jazmine O’Sullivan

THE CULT @ EATONS HILL HOTEL. PIC BY STEPHEN BOOTH

band keep the performance grounded, knocking out some stellar tunes along the way – notably I Am and King Of The Scrum, where the harmonica makes an appearance. By the end of it all Bitter Sweet Kicks leave many wondering how this performance can possibly be topped. It’s not long before The Ape respond to the challenge. They open proceedings with the first track on their self-titled debut, Man On A Mission, before a rowdy audience member asks frontman Tex Perkins what he’s drinking out of his mysterious carry-mug. “My own urine,” Perkins responds without missing a beat, “it really perks me up!” It’s this quick wit and dry sense of humour that we’ve come to love about Perkins and he is definitely in fine form tonight. They swing back 46 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

to the ripe old age of two (or a tender 14 in dog years). A fresh-faced band with familiar faces – also a band name to clearly up the word count of any article written about them – Landing in the Presence of the Enemy Jaguars Advanced open the night and for the group’s first gig they already exhibit a polished sound, building on postrock walls of noise with splinters of punk, electro and a tad funk. Adelaide’s Big Richard Insect follow and they’re in town to launch their rather decent 7”. However, the group don’t translate as well live as on record, with their sound coming off as more generic punk than the more defined dirty sound with hints of jangle thrown in on wax. The set’s mid-point is definitely its weakest, with attention spans waning, but

THE CULT @ EATONS HILL HOTEL. PIC BY STEPHEN BOOTH

THE SPINNING ROOMS, TURNPIKE, BIG RICHARD INSECT, LANDING IN THE PRESENCE OF THE ENEMY JAGUARS ADVANCED

after Turnpike meant at times there’s a bit of a double-take as the groups sound similar in parts. However, the Rooms take it one step further in creating a captivating atmosphere with each passing track. The addition of sax to this style of music at times helps accelerate the group’s tracks into more drone-based soundscapes underneath the wailing guitars and the masterful drumming of Noah Wilson, which is bewildering to watch all night. Apart from the odd sound problem mainly due to the variety on offer, the set is a joy and makes the prospect of this group playing at the illustrious ATP all the more understandable and welcoming. Hear, hear, The Waiting Room! Thanks for the last two years and bring on many more. Bradley Armstrong

DUKE DUMONT @ LISTEN OUT. PIC BY TERRY SOO

the band bring it together in the end, which is really what saved the performance.

THE CULT 1 Oct

4 Oct

As lame as it is to open with something like this – “What can you say about Turnpike that hasn’t been said before?” – they are simply timeless and still pretty badarse! There are simply no flaws in the set and the band are purely tight; even as an audience member there is a sense of the whole experience being really organic and natural. The interplay between the band during the tracks is a marvel and the crowd lap up every moment. A perfect enlistment for this gig and a true highlight of the night.

With festivals crumbling around us in the post-apocalyptic digital age of music, there is still hope as Brisbane’s little venue that could, has. Tonight sees part one of the celebrations as The Waiting Room comes

Closing the evening are the band that some knew as, “Oh, that band that got announced for ATP” but by the end everyone knows their name as The Spinning Rooms, and they nailed their set. Playing

The Waiting Room

Eatons Hill Hotel The majestic interior of Eatons Hill Hotel is absolutely packed for a Tuesday night, seeming not just like a weekend but rather a weekend at the tail-end of the ‘80s. There are just as many tattoos on display as you’d spy at any half-decent hardcore show, only instead of fresh colours and crisp lines this body art is all faded and lived in, obviously relics of an era before such displays were so ubiquitous. Anticipation hits fever pitch as the lights drop and an ominous video begins – perhaps Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now, it’s hard to tell as everyone jostles to see their heroes enter the fray – and soon The Cult are amongst us once more, kicking into Wild


live reviews Flower – the opening track of 1987’s classic opus, Electric, which they’re here to play in full tonight –with hellbound intent. Frontman Ian Astbury is the star, clad in sunnies, slicked-back hair and a fur-collared jacket (despite the oppressive heat) and looking the epitome of the Wolf Child, yet when he hits the mic there’s no vocals, just the choppy guitars. They recover and move onto the slightly turgid Peace Dog, before powering into Lil’ Devil – the sound pristine now – Astbury offering a fey intro at its conclusion before decimating the rousing Aphrodisiac Jacket, the venue’s PA sounding incredible in full flight. Veteran guitarist Bill Duffy unleashes the night’s first major solo during Bad Fun, which descends into a massive drum solo finale – this was the era of excess after all – before

passion and conviction. They close with a fiery triumvirate of older fare – Nirvana, their first single Spiritwalker, and Sun King – before Astbury introduces the band almost like an afterthought, before doffing his sunglasses to us like we’re special and disappearing into the backstage darkness. Tonight’s show is hit and miss, but the massive throng are all smiles as they head into the equally massive carpark which is most likely all that matters. Cam Shenton

LISTEN OUT

South Bank Cultural Forecourt 6 Oct Brisbane is all sunny and buff for Listen Out today, and on the main Atari Stage Rüfüs

AZEALIA BANKS @ LISTEN OUT. PIC BY TERRY SOO

Astbury yelps his way through King Contrary Man, after which they almost raise the venue with an incendiary rendition of Love Removal Machine which has the place in raptures. So far so good, but then at this juncture – for reasons which we’re never privy to – they leave Electric behind, omitting its final three songs entirely, and veer off into “career highlight” territory; they begin this phase with recent single Embers, which is bemusingly terrible. From here the night oscillates wildly, veering between relatively uncooked recent material (Honey From A Knife, Lucifer, Rise) and bygone brimstone anthems (Sweet Soul Sister, Phoenix, and the incendiary She Sells Sanctuary which closes the main set): they sometimes flicker and sometimes flame, although to be fair everything is delivered with

levels. Smoke billows out of various stage corners to remind you of the city life surrounding, before Campbell gets a little futurist with some Daft Punkesque vocoder-led jams. After a brief dance to the nice atmospheric synth sounds of LA’s Classixx, we follow the garden path and find the lush alcove housing the 909 Stage, greeting AlunaGeorge in live quartet mode. Aluna Francis is in full vixen mode, prowling the stage like it’s her own personal catwalk. A cover of Montell Jordan’s This Is How We Do It is class, especially for the older contingent (represent!), while Attracting Flies does everything it needs to do, with the awkward intro seeing the crowd propel forward on cue for a sway and a smile. The Brits then offer up their spin on Disclosure’s White Noise that still

DISCLOSURE @ LISTEN OUT. PIC BY TERRY SOO

are relishing their current hot property status, running through the majority of their recent chart-topper, Atlas. Modest Life, Sundream and Rendezvous make the banks of the Brisbane river seem like the beachside sand of Café del Mar, and Tonight leaps from the speakers before a pixie-haired vocalist appears for late banger Unforgiven. Closing out with Desert Night, even the clammy face-chewers to our right are reaching out to show the domestic product some love. OP Thomas Prime and Charlie Hustle are in party starter mode on the Red Bull Crate Diggers Stage, but more people are digging what Miguel Campbell is throwing out. The Leeds-based producer starts off funky and deep but soon has found his groove with some French-styled electro that’s a welcomed spike in the intensity

by throwing out her version of Harlem Shake, complete with Born Slippy intro. Luxury then kicks over into the incredible beat of Liquorice before Young Rapunxel a cappelas into 212 and the Brisbane skyline shakes violently. “What’s up guys, I’m Duke Dumont, let’s go.” And he does. Briefly. Because after he opens with big jam Need U (100%) his mixer packs it in. Such drama would floor a lesser man, but the Duke is cool, calm and collected, and after some flurrying he’s back to his versatile best. Things get progressively deeper and deeper, with many heads nodding in approval, before Street Walker absolutely floors the assembled mass. Two podiums of Disclosure tech soon stand before us, machines ready to do we don’t know what.

DISCLOSURE @ LISTEN OUT. PIC BY TERRY SOO

feels individual though it doesn’t stray too much from the formula, before Your Drums, Your Love concludes a premium display. Then it’s Azealia Banks, and we wonder: where will the drama come from? Because there’s going to be drama, right? Nah, just the highlight set of the day, with a minimal amount of bullshit. Banks cuts between a male and female dancer in matching outfits and is ferocious on the microphone. Fierce from the Fantasea mixtape lands hot and hard, as does 1991, the set playing out as a rapid-fire collection of short, sharp dance/ rap barbs that claw at your ears and eyes. Jumanji is a sonic rampage with verbal crossfire, and the response sees Banks showing Brisbane plenty of love after the “rough arse time” she’s had this tour. She twirls her untamed hair as fucks the consequences

A strobe freakout then paints a black and white backdrop for the brothers Lawrence to arrive and get down on it. F For You is just the vibe we’re wanting, before When A Fire Starts To Burn turns the night upside down. The boys are doing things proudly live these days, singing many of the vocal hooks, playing bass lines on a four-string, adding the percussion on electronic pads, all the while triggering the myriad of beats and sounds. They run through You & Me, Stimulation and White Noise, which features the forever sassy Aluna Francis, then, as the nowiconic Disclosure sketched faces start shaking, Confess To Me is drawn out into a barnstorming version of instant classic, Latch. The guys have killed it, and after extending the track out they sign off an absolute belter of a day. Benny Doyle, Ali Fraser THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 47


arts reviews – an overwhelmingly exact and staggeringly complex choreography of terrible, majestic destruction.

GRAVITY

GRAVITY Film

In cinemas Gravity is more a technical marvel than it is any other aspect of it being a film. Director Alfonso Cuaron, known for his love and aptitude for long, elegant, impossible takes, ramps that up to infinity here, crafting some of the most balletic and beautiful action sequences ever put to screen. Your stomach drops, watching this stuff. You ripple with adrenaline and excitement in your seat. You hold your breath, again and again. It’s such a unique and powerful film because it’s such a precise visual achievement

48 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

That its marooned astronauts are just stuck above the earth’s atmosphere – exquisitely milked here for all its singular, astounding beauty – adds a kind of profound and smothering loneliness to their situation. Just outside of human existence, we’re reminded, there is a swallowing, impartial blackness. Gravity resubmits to the cinematic discourse the sheer immensity of space, and also its terrible inhospitality. There’s just so much to gush about in this film. Its score, for one, is terrific. Because there’s no sound in space, the music has to be the looming groans of giant, expensive shapes hitting each other; of vast things catapulting off into space; of the recurring, dead-eyed threat of a fastorbiting debris field. Go see it already. Gravity is too immense to do justice with words. Samuel Hobson

RUNNER RUNNER Film

In cinemas A good thriller does certain things. It tenses the audience’s muscle, it creates a sense of dread in the pit of their stomach, it twists their expectations and it throttles their nerves. Bad thrillers don’t do much. They keep the audience at a distance; they are empty films. Runner Runner is not a good thriller, and not surprisingly, as gambling thrillers usually fail to impress.

RUNNER RUNNER

The concept is always the same. The house always wins until a clever kid comes along and the house loses. Richie Furst ( Justin Timberlake) is a college kid who had a short-lived career in Wall Street. Trying to pay his tuition fees, he gambles all his savings on an online poker site and loses. Richie is convinced that he has been cheated and takes a plane to Costa Rica to tell online gambling mogul Ivan Block (Ben Affleck) that there is cheating on his site. Block is so impressed he offers Richie a job just as the FBI is moving in on the operations and as Costa Rica is becoming a bad host. Despite a good cast, it is hard to ever care about the characters or be engaged in their actions. The filmmakers seem indifferent as well. The actors, the style and the plotting all suggest that the characters aren’t overly motivated or worried themselves. They are just empty shells. Sam Hilton


games

★★

GIANA SISTERS: TWISTED DREAMS – RISE OF THE OWLVERLORD Black Forest Games PC All trace of this game vanished from my brain overnight. Hell, I’ve already forgotten the game’s full title. Giana Sisters whatever whatever is a functional 2D

platformer, betrayed by a vacuum of creativity. The key culprit is the game’s art direction. Most of the levels fail to capture an engaging theme, and paralyze the eyeballs with oversaturation. Coupled with the least personable pickups in gaming history – literally, thousands of coloured gems – the game’s art style amounts to one big self-Shoryuken. The mechanics, while not broken, borrow heavily from existing contenders. Giana can twirl her hair to slow her descent, like Dixie in Donkey Kong Country 2. She can dash through the air, a la Sonic the Hedgehog. And she has the power to phase between two dimensions, like in Guacamelee. Except instead of that game’s toyful shift between the worlds of living and dead, we get a palette swap and different obstacles. Recent platformers like Rayman: Legends and Guacamelee have run wild with art direction, music and gameplay variety, creating gripping and hilarious micro-universes. Giana Sisters never had such a thematic game plan, and was dead long before production began. Michael Pendlebury

however is unfortunately the fundamental that should never be neglected: gameplay.

★★ ½

LEGEND OF DUNGEON

Robot Loves Kitty PC/Mac This game is like bubblegum. It starts off amazing, but before long, it’s a flavourless glob of grey matter. Legend Of Dungeon is a very charming dungeon crawler with that retro art style we all know and love. It’s pretty, the sound effects and music are awesome and you’ll get a decent number of hours out of it. The game’s downfall

My bovine troopers were soon reduced to seared spare ribs by strange cards like Doom Blade and Darksteel Colossus. Being too lazy to adapt, I gave up on Magic.

IRONCLAD: TACTICS

★★ ½

Zachtronics PC

While my friends had Magic card decks filled with masturbatory wizards like the ‘Elvish BranchBender’, I was the buffalo whisperer: I had this deck packed with bulked-out herbivores called Auruchs. My Buffalo Legion was undefeated – until my friends began researching the game beyond our measly starter decks and entry-level deck mechanics.

But I did keep a secret fever for more turn-based deckbuilding experiences (a common nerd opiate), and this drove my excitement for Ironclad: Tactics. The game’s story is set in a steampunk revision of the American Civil War, and tasks you with dismantling a range of armed Confederate tincans. Over time, new unit and ability cards are unlocked, and these can be be slotted (with a satisfying ‘shleck’) into custom decks. Appealing enough, but the game’s battle system seriously disappoints. Victory points are awarded not through mechanical violence, but by walking units off the enemy’s side of the screen. So long as your volume of exiting robos exceeds theirs, you win. This makes combat secondary to pumping droids into empty lanes. Very unsatisfying – indeed, what is steampunk without rivet shrapnel and steamboiled Mississippi manflesh? Michael Pendlebury

★★★

VOLGARR THE VIKING Crazy Viking Studios PC

Throw back to the time when you saved a summer’s worth of lawn mowing money to buy only one game, a game you would play religiously, taking turns, going life-for-life with your childhood BFF’s. Enter the fray Volgarr the Viking, an ode to the legendary era of 16-bit gaming in all its glory. It’s fun, but it’s an absolute bitch of a game if you

You swing/shoot your weapon with one button, and you charge it up by holding down that same button. That’s it. That’s a fully comprehensive summary of the combat system. Considering that the game is about fighting monsters in combat, it really is a terminal shortcoming. Eventually you’ll find that the best strategy is just summoning about 100 skeletons by mashing one button and slowly killing every monster you find with spam. So slowly, in fact, I found myself wandering into the kitchen and fixing myself a hard drink to pass the time. The atmosphere is awesome, but ruined by the immersion shattering inclusion of pop references like Dr Who and Plants vs Zombies. It could have some awesome puzzles too, but the way they’re put together is so understated and uninteresting you don’t even notice/care they exist. The game isn’t awful, it’s just not that good. Lachlan Petersen fall remotely on the OCD-Game Completionist scale. Firstly – it’s hard as sun-aged shit. The pixelated Volgarr powers through side-scrolling levels slaying all manner of beasties, jumping around and dying. Predominantly dying. The no saved-gameness of Alex Kidd in Miracle World, the lack of physics of Altered Beast and the raw difficulty of Chakan mesh together in a rageinducing blend that has gamers the world over holding their breath while they jump. Volgarrstyle gaming is much harder than you remember: now you suck worse than the little sister you used to begrudgingly watch take her parent-mandated turn with agonizing caution and unexpected success. Hit a button and Volgarr launches off with a surprising lack of regard for his own safety, generally resulting in a one-way ticket to Valhalla; but of course, herein lies the beauty. The gaming experience of Volgarr instils a sort of stubbornness that hasn’t been felt in decades and eventually the same level of Stockholm Syndrome-style love/madness you used to feel. Simon Holland THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 49


muso

STUDIO CREDITS

ISLAND SONGS Taking time out after years of album/tour/ album/tour, Travis took to the task of writing and recording their seventh album as if it was their first. Andy Dunlop talks to Michael Smith about it.

PRODUCERS: Fran Healy & Michael Ilbert

STUDIOS: Ocean Sound Recordings, Gilke, Norway; Hansa Tonstudio, Berlin

MIXING ENGINEER: Michael Ilbert

MASTERING: Tom Coyne @ Sterling Sound, New York City

ARTWORK: Fran Healy

I

t’s five years since Glasgow four-piece Travis – singerguitarist Fran Healy, bassist Dougie Payne, guitarist (and now pianist) Andy Dunlop and drummer Neil Primrose – released their last album, 2008’s Ode To J Smith, in which time they amicably parted company with their label, Independiente, and relaunched their own Red Telephone Box label via Kobalt Label Services. Healy and Dunlop released a live acoustic album and, in 2010, Healy released his first solo album, Wreckorder. Reconvening in 2011, Travis got stuck into some international touring but also started work on a new album, Where You Stand, released in August, coproduced by Healy with audio and mixing engineer Michael Ilbert (The Hives, Taylor Swift, The Cardigans). “It was one of those things,” Dunlop suggests when asked about the choice of Ilbert. “I think any producer’s always a risk really ‘cause it’s one extra person in the studio. We’ve known each other so long it’s always gonna be a risk getting anyone in that won’t upset the personalities in that way. We were very lucky with Michael – it worked brilliantly. Fran knew him beforehand obviously, but I think it wasn’t until the first day we settled… ‘cause we were on an island in Norway as well – it’s not as if we can change anything,” he chuckles. “Everything was set in stone once you were there really. We tried to record the album in sequence as much as possible, so the first day we set to and started Mother and it just all fell into place.”

TRAVIS CO PRODUCER MICHAEL ILBERT

50 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

The studio, Ocean Sound Recordings, is situated in Giske, on Norway’s northern coast,

which features an excellent acoustically treated 70 square metre live room and a Neve VR60 Legend Console in the control room. “Finding the studio was kind of a weird thing. Fran had played the year before at this little free festival they have on the island every year and they’d told him there was a studio there, and usually when people tell you that you imagine a shed with a microphone in it! So they took him to the studio, but the deal-breaker was the desk in the studio – they said it was the desk that [Radiohead’s] OK Computer was recorded on – they’d bought it from a studio in London. Well, if OK Computer was recorded there, then so was [Travis’ second album] The Man Who, ‘cause it was the same desk and [producer] Nigel [Godrich] used to like working on that desk [in RAK Studios] in Mayfair in London. So we were reunited with the desk we recorded The Man Who on.

“I THINK ANY PRODUCER’S ALWAYS A RISK REALLY ‘CAUSE IT’S ONE EXTRA PERSON IN THE STUDIO.” “Michael was really good in the sense that he comes from a slightly different angle, pretty much from the pop world, and we wanted to see if we could meet somewhere in the middle.” The Norway sessions took two weeks, and then the action all moved to the infamous Hansa Tonstudio, at Köthener Straße, behind Potsdamer Platz in Berlin, where David Bowie recorded his ‘Berlin Trilogy’ of albums – Low, Heroes and Lodger – and Nick Cave and Iggy Pop have also recorded. The former Hansa mixing room is now Ilbert’s headquarters and houses his collection of vintage gear, which includes pairs of Spectrasonics 610 and Decca limiters, and custom-built copies of the classic EMI limiter. “Originally we were only going in to do some B-side for iTunes and things, and we just went in with a bunch of songs we had kicking about left over from the sessions and, luckily, two of them came out brilliant and we thought, ‘Oh well, they’re good enough to be on the record.’ I mean, Hansa, for musicians, is somewhere between a museum and a toy shop really. You’re aware of the incredible history of this place, and then Michael would pull out an amp and say, ‘This is the guitar amp from [Iggy Pop’s] Lust For Life,’ or, ‘This is the keyboard from Low,’ so we were like kids in a sweet shop!” Where You Stand by Travis is out now.


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BANDS THE INDUSTRY THE LOCALS THE BLOG RES THE DJS THE GIGS THE PRODUCERS THE REMIXES THE ARTISTS THE FESTIVALS THE GRO LBUMS THE TOURS THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE FA THE INDUSTRY THE LOCALS THE BLOGS THE E S THE GIGS THE PRODUCERS THE CLUBS THE TISTS THE FESTIVALS THE GROUPIES THE ALBU THE FANS THE BANDS THE INDUSTRY THE LOC S THE ENCORES THE DJS THE GIGS THE PROD LUBS THE REMIXES THE ARTISTS THE FESTIVA PIES THE ALBUMS THE TOURS THE FANS THE NDUSTRY THE LOCALS THE BLOGS THE ENCOR HE GIGS THE PRODUCERS THE CLUBS THE R BANDS THE INDUSTRY THE LOCALS THE BLOG RES THE DJS THE GIGS THE PRODUCERS THE REMIXES THE ARTISTS THE FESTIVALS THE GRO THE INDUSTRY THE LOCALS THE BLOGS THE S THE GIGS THE PRODUCERS THE CLUBS THE TISTS THE FESTIVALS THE GROUPIES THE ALB THE FANS THE BANDS THE INDUSTRY THE LO S THE ENCORES THE DJS THE GIGS THE PROD 52 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013


the guide eat

drink

travel

Name/instrument played: Marcus Blacke – guitar. I wish I played others well enough to mention them, but sadly I’m a one-trick pony. I sing a little as well. You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep you happy if we throw them on the stereo? The Dirty Three. I think they’re without a doubt the best Australian band to ever exist. Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? James Grehan, Karl S. Williams, Steve Grady, O Little Sister would have to be my favourite though, she is one heck of a songwriter. If you had to play a sport instead of being a musician which sport would it be and why would you be triumphant? Ping pong. I have always had this strange ability to play ping pong, the weird thing is I’ve never owned a table. The downside is chasing a ping pong ball around always makes me feel like an absolute twat. What’s in the pipeline for you musically in the short term? I might be going on tour in Europe but that’s still in the works so fingers crossed. Also a new album, I’m working really diligently on some new songs that I’m thinking are pretty cool. I can’t wait to have them all figured out recorded and ready to perform hopefully by early next year. Marcus Blacke launches Butterfly Black (Independent) at The Hideaway on 18 Oct and The Loft, Gold Coast on 19 Oct. Photo by TERRY SOO.

MARCUS BLACKE

culture

fashion


eat

WARNING: MAY CONTAIN NUTS With a full set of pearly whites and an EpiPen handy, Dylan Stewart discovers the versatility of peanut butter.

I

t was the 1890s, and the people of St. Louis, Missouri, loved their peanuts. The problem was that, thanks to poor dental hygiene, many of St. Louis’ fine residents found themselves without teeth and unable to enjoy the taste of those fine, bitesized morsels without the pain of a toothache. According to the non-profit Southern Peanut Growers Association of America – and their great website peanutbutterlovers.com – the story goes that a local physician saw a way around this problem. He ground peanuts into a paste and packaged it for his tooth-deprived patients to rub on their exposed gums in the comfort of their own homes. Now, while the concept of peanut-based spread stretches back millennia – it’s thought the Incas combined peanut paste with cocoa some 3,000 years ago – it took the savvy mind of John Kellogg (yep, the Corn Flakes guy) to patent it for the masses in 1895. Throughout the 20th century, peanut butter became a staple on breakfast tables worldwide, hugely popular not only in Australia and the USA, but also throughout Europe and Asia. Smooth or crunchy (usually depending on what your mum used to buy), by the time you got to grade three, chances are you knew how great peanut butter was; spread onto piping hot toast or into the groove of a crispy celery stalk. But the times, they are a-changing, and the domain of peanut butter is shifting, too. On one hand, peanut allergies have become far more widespread (no pun intended), meaning that teachers, gym workers and first-aid attendants are trained to use the EpiPen to prevent anaphylactic shock, and well intentioned parents have to think twice before sending their kids off to school with that PB sandwich or Picnic. On the other hand, though, peanut butter is seeing a renaissance of sorts. In restaurants around Australia, peanut butter – house-made or storebought – is inching into the menu, adding both variety and indulgence into a diner’s experience.

54 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

STRANGE SPREADS SQUEEZE BACON

Why waste time preparing bacon when all you want is its sizzling flavour? Jump straight to tubey liquid bacon to avoid conventional hassles.

MARSHMALLOW FLUFF

This American spread is a more convenient way to exacerbate tooth decay and achieve sugar highs. Comes in flavours like vanilla, raspberry and strawberry.

BEER SPREAD

With Australia’s multicultural population bringing with it competing cuisines, over the past few decades the prevalence of South-east Asian restaurants has expanded from capital cities, through regional centres and into rural towns. The obvious item is the humble satay sauce, which blends peanut butter (preferably crunchy) with fresh red chili, lemon juice, garlic and a touch of brown sugar. Whether as a coating for mouthful-sized pieces of skewered meat or simply as a dipping sauce, there’s no chance of any fingers remaining dry when satay sauce is around. And from the other side of the world, come the American-inspired peanut butter-based desserts. A recent phenomenon is the decadent – and potentially life span-shortening – peanut butter cheesecake. Black Toro, the Mexican restaurant in Glen Waverley in Melbourne’s south-east, has inspired reviews from bloggers and journalists alike about its deconstructed peanut butter cheesecake, and the Elvis-inspired banana and peanut butter cheesecake at the new Betty’s Espresso in South Brisbane seems almost too good to be true. The salty flavour of peanut butter finding its way into dessert is not strictly reserved to cheesecake, though. Soft peanut butter biscuits and hard peanut brittle have been hiding away in Tupperware containers in grandmas’ pantries for decades, always on a shelf that’s just discoverable by intrepid young hands. And peanut butter ice cream, from Ben & Jerry’s Clusterfluff flavour to the scoop you’d find in the Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich at The Dip, works in summertime and winter alike. Milkshakes, brownies, cookies, caramel – the list goes on. After further investigation, though most PB recipes are relatively easy to whip up at home. And goddamn it’s delicious. On the surface it doesn’t really stand out, but with a hint of creativity it can become the ultimate spread – whether you’ve got teeth or not.

In Italy, a chocolatier and a brewery got together to make spreadable beer, Birra Spalmabile, available in two flavours: Omid dark ale and Greta blonde ale.

CLAM SPREAD

There’s something about northern North America that breeds a need for the salty taste of the sea to be infused in everything. Yuk

DURIAN JAM

The durian is world-renowned for its awful stench; in some areas it is illegal to carry the open fruit on public transport. Yet some people can’t get enough of it, and apparently you can purchase it in jam form.


eat/drink

FOOD IS ART

FOOD TRIPPIN’ EATING AROUND THE USA WITH SOFIE MUCENIEKAS AND LLOYD HONEYBROOK

BAR PROFILE

BLACK BEAR LODGE Answered by: Tim Carroll Address: Level 1, 322 Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley Mall Briefly describe the design/atmosphere of the bar? A stylish candlelit hideaway, the Black Bear Lodge is the perfect place to enjoy a drink and catch up with friends in the early evening or dance the night away at one of our weekend vinyl soul nights.

CHICAGO TO CLEVELAND.

Before heading out on the road to Cleveland we made a stop at ¡Bang! Bang Pie Company for some pick-me-up pie action. We sure had our work cut out for us with this spread - the freshest OJ, coffee, biscuit with various delicious butters’n’jams, biscuit and gravy (so dense!) and two slices of absurdly good pie (the most intense chocolate pie ever, I literally only had two bites and @lloydhoneybrook struggled through the rest, and a slice of strawberryrhubarb honey fig pie). #brutal #biscuitsarescones

What drinks are you serving? Do you have a specialty? In terms of beer we serve mostly Australian craft beers. We have Four Pines and Stone & Wood on tap (both delicious) and then we have The Hills Cider on tap and a selection of brews by the bottle too. We serve a selection of cocktails with

our Old Fashioned and Espresso Martinis being some of our favourites.

“I WILL NOT EAT OYSTERS. I WANT MY FOOD DEAD. NOT SICK. NOT WOUNDED. DEAD.” WOODY ALLEN

Who’s cooking and pouring and what makes them special? We’re a pretty mixed crew all working on a bunch of projects. There’s a bunch of musicians from local bands like Dreamtime, Texas Tea, Holy Holy and Raptors. We also have a few filmmakers, photographers and writers in the team. The Black Bear crew love hanging together in the Black Bear Gun Club and we love karaoke. Anything out of the ordinary on the horizon? The Preatures will be cool, The Handsome Family from the States, Jordie Lane and our rad ‘90s party called No Diggity. Website: blackbearlodge.com.au mon-wed 6.30am-3pm thurs-fri 6.30am-6pm sat 7am-6pm sun 9am-6pm

café good food & coffee Mon-Sat 7am–3.30pm Sun 7am–2.30pm

breakfast, lunch & afternoon tippler

xf!hpu///

dsbgu!cffs///txffu!txffu!xjof! ///bmm!ebz!csfblz///dpdlubjmt ///qmbuft!up!tibsf///xbjufst!uibu!dbsf! ///boe!dppm!bqspot/ 326!hjwfo!ufssbdf!qbeejohupo!447:4889

693 Brunswick St, New Farm e asa@ponycat.com.au p 3254 2883

THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 55


drink

FROM THE FRIDGE

ICE COLD, BABY

Sometimes when you’re in a rush and the café lines are too long, you just have to make do and dash into a 7-Eleven for your iced coffee. Here is our pick of the best five cold coffeeflavoured, milkbased beverages.

FARMER’S UNION

The idea of downingg hot milk on a scorchin scorching summer’s day seems b bl but b for f many off us coffee ff is i a necessity. Luckily, our baristas unbearable, are providing suitable cold options. Simon Eales susses it out.

H

uddling on a polished wood bench, wrapped in a scarf, while listening to the comforting hiss of a steaming wand while sipping a mocha, macchiato, or short black would make any crèma connoisseur purr. If, that is, the weather’s chill, right? Surely this August hermit skips down the road for a slurpee once the thermostat’s up? Nup. Caffeine, the most benevolent of addictives, is a comely mistress and entirely irresistible. Forty degrees? Don’t care! Triple-shot flat white stat, mate. But, is an iced coffee any real alternative? To find an answer, I took a little pilgrimage ‘round a couple of Melbourne’s top coffee spots and spoke to those who know. Iced coffee, until recently, has been mostly served in a tall glass with lots of milk, sugar and ice-cream. Now as we, like, grow up and seek to take our caffeine hits sans sugar coma, top cafes are pouring focus into perfectly extracted beans served chilled without the frills. For Mark Jacobson, former owner of Collective in Melbourne suburb Camberwell and current barista of Fitzroy’s Doomsday, the move towards no bullshit cold coffee is a welcome one. “A lot of people now are doing iced lattes, which are just two shots of espresso, cold milk and ice. And that’s what people actually want. They don’t want the sugar and most of the time they don’t want the ice-cream, not once they’re past 16 years old!” Up at St Ali North in Carlton North, they serve three types of iced coffee. One, a little old school, the Cappuccino Con Fredo, is a double espresso with milk, blended with ice. They also have an iced latte and then – the piece I’m after – their Chilled Daily Brew: filter coffee from their Fetco batch brewer, chilled and served for $5 a glass. It looks like sewage water but tastes delicious, and comes without distractions: no ice, cream or straws. With a pep in my step I head city-side to chic suit hotspot Patricia, where co-owner Pip Heath tells me

56 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

about the difference between cold drip, cold brew and cold filter. Cold drip is brewed slowly (over 4-12 hours) using special scientific-looking equipment that drips cold water through the coffee. With cold brew, the coffee is extracted sitting in cold water, and is then filtered out. Cold filter, the preferred method at Patricia, is “basically pour-over coffee, which we’re hot extracting the same way as all of our other filtered coffee,” Heath says. “Then we chill it in an airtight container, serve it in a hip flask, and you pour it yourself over a big cube of ice.” It’s their big cold coffee seller. Because coffee for filters has been lighter roasted than coffee for espresso, chilling it “changes the way the filter coffee tastes,” Heath says. “[Filter coffee’s] got a fair bit more acidity. But when you chill it, it mellows out that acidity and becomes a little more on the spectrum of those classic coffee flavours: nutty, chocolatey, also a bit of scotchy booziness.” He reckons that in summer cold coffee sales can make up 40% of orders. In response, they’re throwing up a few extra options. “We’re thinking of giving ‘Clouds Mountains’ a bit more of a push.” This bizarre drink, Heath tells me, was “invented as a joke and now people actually order it. We get a scoop of ice-cream and put it in a cup. We then get a canelé [a small, delicious, French baked treat], put it on top and extract the double espresso over that.’ I now have the choice between sweet ice-creamy fun and smooth, scotchy finesse. Strap me up to the colddrip drip and pour me over a croissant, I’m a cold coffee convert. Until I remember something Jacobson told me back at Doomsday. “Even in hot weather, people want hot coffee. In India, they drink hot tea as one of the best ways to keep cool. When you ingest a hot drink it makes your skin feel like it’s colder outside. It’s a really old way of keeping cool.” Confliction swamps my caffeine-drowned brain… But, for now, I just chock it up as a win-win and have a little lie down.

Trusted, reliable and Australian-made – in South Australia, to be precise. Can’t go wrong with that white and teal packaging.

BIG M

Will take you back to the days of writing lunch orders on brown paper bags and feeling older than your 11 years sipping the ‘grown up drink’ through a straw.

THE TERRITORY’S OWN PAUL’S ICED COFFEE

Basically a dressedup variant of Paul’s milk, so images of Pat Rafter spring to mind, as do other ad campaigns with him in his underwear.

OAK

For when you’re neither particularly hungry nor thirsty but a weird combination of both and you want to kill that feeling dead. Obviously.

DARE

According to the ads, this is one for commitmentphobes. Proper coffee too serious? Opt for some that comes in a plastic bottle.


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ORDER FROM STORE.THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 57


travel

BY THE HORNS Sarah Reid triple knots triple-knots her sandshoes for a different kind of summer festival – one that involves bulls.

EUROPEAN FESTIVALS CHEESE ROLLING Cooper’s Hill, Gloucestershire, UK, (May)

The simple pleasure of rolling down a hill. Rolling down a hill with a giant wheel of cheese.

KATTENSTOET

Ypres, Belgium, (May) A festival celebrating cats enough said.

LA TOMATINA

Valencia, Spain, (August) Throw mushy fruit at strangers in this redder than red fiesta.

I

’ve done a lot of stupid shit overseas. But running with the bulls really takes the cake. I hadn’t given it much thought until a mate suggested we get involved this summer, and by the time the bastard had chickened out I’d already booked my flight. Direct from Ibiza, no less. When in Spain, and all that.

The first bull pack passes me by so close I could have touched them, but I’m too busy screaming. The second group are upon me in seconds, and I flatten myself against a wall of bodies as they fly by. Everyone around me stops for a moment in stunned silence. Then I remember it’s not over yet and force my jelly legs to run.

Immortalised in Ernest Hemingway’s classic 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises, Pamplona’s San Fermin festival draws over one million punters each year. Dating back to the 14th century, the highlight of the event is the bull runs, which kick off at 8am each day from 7-14 July.

Jogging through the stadium gates will go down as one of the biggest adrenalin rushes of my life. But that was still just the beginning. For the next half hour, six angry young bulls would be released into the arena one by one. And if you climb out of the arena before the end, you’re considered a coward. I was lucky, but plenty of others weren’t. With more than 200 injuries every year, most travel insurers won’t cover you for running with the bulls. The event has claimed 15 lives since 1924, with the most recent death that of a 27-year-old Spaniard, in 2009. This year, a 23-year-old Aussie was gored so badly she was lucky to escape with her life.

I bunk down in the nearby city of San Sebastian, as Pamplona is an apocalyptic mess at this time of the year. Dressed in traditional whites and a red bandana, I rise at dawn on the fourth day of the festival to join a bus-load of shit-scared backpackers bound for Pamps. Or maybe that’s just me, as it turns out less than half of them had mustered the balls to run. Stepping off the bus, the smell of piss and sangriastained vomit chunks assault my nostrils. Pamplona parties hard during San Fermin, and the bars are only just beginning to close. Walking the length of the cobbled course to orientate myself, I’m interested to find it’s less than a kilometre long. But it only takes the bulls around three minutes to charge through to the stadium, so if you want to keep up with them (and secure ultimate bragging rights), you have to start running from Dead Man’s Corner, about midway on the course. It’s a delicate science – starting too far towards the end of the course and beating the bulls into the ring is a massive faux pas. At 6.30am event staff begin to erect the wooden barricades that corridor the course. Ninety minutes later and the starting rocket goes off, signalling the release of the first six bulls. I turn to run, but it’s more a process of stumbling through a sea of human carnage than anything resembling a sprint. This is the catalyst of most injuries – people keep their eyes on the bulls rather than what’s in front of them, trip up and get trampled. 58 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

The bulls have it worse. Every night of the festival six beasts from the morning’s run are killed during a series of bullfights. If you haven’t had the misfortune of witnessing the brutal sport, it’s a pretty awful way to die. In light of these animal rights issues along with the continuing dangers of the event to festival-goers, there’s more talk every year about whether Pamplona’s bull run has had its day. While I can’t see the festival breaking tradition anytime soon, there’s no doubt that the face of it is changing. The day following my run, I returned to Pamplona to watch the spectacle from the arena. Taking my seat amid a group of local teens, all coked to their eyeballs, I was surprised to learn that they had no intention of ever doing the run as their forefathers have for centuries. “It’s so dangerous,” one girl shrugs. “We just want to party.” While I don’t know if I’d run again, I’m proud of myself for getting ‘er done. It’s fun to spend a day watching from the sidelines, but nothing beats the thrill of being in the thick of it.

IL PALIO DI SIENA Siena, Italy ( July 2 and August 16)

An epic horse race between the districts of the city. Held inside Siena’s central square, Piazza del Campo.


THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 59


culture

BOTTLE IT UP Giuliano Ferla gets a lesson on theatrical design at the Foxtel Melbourne Festival Hub Launch, courtesy of Bluebottle director Ben Cobham.

I

am on my way to the Foxtel Melbourne Festival Hub Launch at Federation Square. I am heading there to interview Ben Cobham, the director of Bluebottle, which is the company hired to build this year’s festival hub. I arrive at the door and I see a bunch of corporate performance artists standing around trying to look goofy. I get a complimentary coffee and keep myself occupied. I watch the performers. I hate them. You know, once upon a time I did something like this. I did it and then I stopped, because it was just too embarrassing. One of the performers comes up to me on his hands and knees with a ball in his mouth. Playing at being a dog, he wants me to play fetch. He, like the others, is dressed in purple and yellow complementary colours, emphasising wackiness. They all have straps around their heads that peg metal hooks into the corner of their mouths, forcing their lips back into a smile. The guy with the ball in his mouth is now rubbing his head against my leg, but I do not want to play fetch. I bend down so I can get close to his ear. “Fuck off,” I whisper to him. I don’t really do that – I just think about it. I’m annoyed at the unpleasantness of this whole thing and how degrading it is for them. But I’m not a jerk. So I listen to the speeches being made, I drink some lemonade, and then it’s my turn to interview Ben Cobham. And Ben, dressed like a boho Marcel Marceau, turns this morning around for me. It’s only occasionally that you get to talk to someone who is passionate about their craft, who knows what they serve, and who is very articulate in expressing it. He speaks about his philosophy: “I do have a very strong belief that theatres, the foyers and the auditorium are so amazing that it makes it really hard for performers… We know that at the end of the day it is our job to 60 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

make the people standing onstage look good, and they’re why people come. We don’t want to upstage them. Our work is about trying to hold a fairly tight line, and always allowing there to be more.” For the Hub, he and the team at Bluebottle have come up with a space and building that is informed by theatrical design. “We’re theatre people. Bluebottle is made up of theatre people, and we’ve been working for about ten years on the idea of using theatrical sensibilities and moving them into other contexts.” The Hub will be a structure based on pragmatism, simplicity and manoeuvrability. He talks about getting inspiration from one of his previous projects, The Impossible House, which was a house designed and engineered upon the concept of the theatrical bump in. He, his partner and his newborn child rented a block of land in South Melbourne and built it. “[The different parts of the building] fitted together, we rented the land and put the house on it and when the lease ended we packed it up and took it away. That’s how it started.” Bluebottle are applying the same principles in the design of the Melbourne Festival Hub. “In a way, this is the moment we’re up to, using the same premise, using that same pre-engineered kit of parts that we can carry and put up. But this one’s kind of like on steroids. It’s a very big venue.” Talking to Cobham is inspiring, especially considering my shirtiness at the performers. He has a real little gem about approaching work: “You can try to be the boss of something, or you can let it be the boss and listen to what it’s asking for, and if you are listening the right things will happen. It might sound a little bit hippie but we’re not. We’re actually really pragmatic, but we like that process.” I like him.

AROUND BRISSY BRISBANE AIRPORT LIGHT GARDEN

This beautiful new light installation at the Cultural Forecourt, South Bank is designed by Tony Assness, and will shine each night of the Brisbane Festival. Building on the success of the 2012 lantern installation, prepare to be dazzled by the latest LED technology in a display of light that is sure to set your Instagram feeds alight.

SWELL SCULPTURE FESTIVAL

Having just wrapped up its 11th edition, the annual festival sees local, national and international artists providing over 50 sculptures for display along Currumbin Beach. The free exhibition goes for ten days and includes informative artist talks, the Swell Smalls Gallery, artist master classes and childrens’ workshops.

GREAT BRISBANE DUCK RACE

In PA Research Foundation’s signature FUNdraising event for Cancer Research, 40,000 rubber ducks are tipped into the Brisbane River at Riverside Drive and race between barriers over a 100m course. By purchasing tickets, you’re helping to raise money for research into deadly and debilitating diseases at the home of the discovery to the world’s first cancer vaccine.


fashion

STRAYA’S FLORA

FLOWERING THROUGH

Australian flowers keep really well as they are used to our climate. Invest in a bunch or pick some off the side of the road for long-lasting floral enjoyment.

Decorations, symbols, gifts, garnishes... Flowers are multipurpose things. William Miller ponders their many uses.

GOLDEN WATTLE (ALL OVER)

WARATAH (NSW)

A

STURT’S DESERT ROSE (NT)

nd so the winter thaws and we emerge from the cold, rolling around in the grass, soaking the sun with our skin and flowers – like the girls whose heads they adorn – come out to play. The ultimate symbol of spring, flowers work in tandem with the sun to remind us that there is in fact life at the end of cold, cloud-filled winter. Jasmine fills the air of suburban streets, and magnolias, whose lineage goes back to that of before the bee, cover front yards with a light purple hue. But aside from being the symbol of spring, flowers have another role as an emblem that accompanies us in every stage of life. We gift them for anything: from celebrations and grievances to ‘I’m sorry I said the wrong thing, baby’. My girlfriend’s bedroom is filled with flowers. It’s a bittersweet irony; we pull this living thing out of the earth and then temporarily keep it alive, tormenting it in water-filled prison.

COOKTOWN ORCHID (QLD)

PINK HEATH (VIC)

RED AND GREEN KANGAROO PAW (WA)

It kind of makes sense, though. Beauty is a thing of symbolic nature, so if it’s in the ground and ready to be plucked out, why not? The whole killing flowers and then using them as symbols thing started way back when robes were the garment of choice. Back then they were used to appease the gods. Now they are used to appease significant others. Over the next few hundred years flowers came into their own and by the Renaissance they were seen as emblems of beauty taking on their role as decoration. But they haven’t always been only revered for their beauty. The 1600s saw a period of time where tulips were seen as one of the most valuable commodities the Netherlands had to offer. The brief period aptly named ‘tulip mania’ is thought to have been the first economic bubble. At the time, a single bulb of the Semper Augustus, a white tulip with blood red flares across its petals, could fetch a price in equivalence to four acres of land. Considering the rate at which I’m buying flowers to fix my wrongdoings in the eyes of my better half, I feel considerably lucky that we are currently not in 17th century Holland. Nice pants they wore, though.

The times have certainly changed. Today you can’t walk into any café without the hefty scent of spring joining you at the table or a native arrangement headed by a banksia finding its place somewhere around you. It makes sense. Who isn’t happy with a little bit of colour joining them for lunch? Some flowers are even finding their way into the meals, with cafes adding floral edibles into the mix, like alyssum – a tasty little thing that wouldn’t look out of place in a spring posy, but instead finds itself as the key ingredient to a couple of dishes, tasting like mustard and making for an interesting looking meal. Giving flowers, while simple in theory, can end up as difficult as a hayfever-ridden day. Roses, tulips and orchids are the safe bet, but to hell with safe bets. You need something that says, ‘my emotions are different; look how well I can pick out plants’. Australian natives fit the bill: subdued greens, highlighted with magenta and yellow. Natives are a nice way to say, ‘I care about you, my choice in flowers is a little quirky and I care about Australian plants’. That said, florists are confusing places. Full of unfamiliar smells, new colours and what for some (most of us) is overpriced greenery. Fear not, there is another option – the garden down the street. Yeah, you know the one. The one where pomegranates hang just over the fence line, teasing you with their swollen fruit. Flowers you didn’t even know existed line the path. The kind of garden you wish you grew up in, where grandma would sit on the porch in summer pouring never-ending cordial and the sprinkler was for dancing under, not watering. As tempting as that garden filled with flowers sounds, don’t go down there trying to steal flowers. We aren’t supposed to condone that. But if there is one hanging just over the fence and there is a person you think should have a flower, well then, who are we to stop you? Careful though, an old lady might see you from the porch and her cordial sounds like yelling at you for desecrating her beautiful garden. Heathen. THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 61


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

FRONTLASH

LOCAL SOUNDS

WHERE THERE’S SMOKE

Nothing confirmed yet, but great news with both Nine Inch Nails and QOTSA hinting at a joint Aussie trek soon. Who will headline? First world problems indeed…

UNCAGE THE CHICKEN We’re always quick to smash corporations, so kudos to Woolworths for phasing out the sale of caged eggs over the next couple of years. Hopefully others will follow their lead.

LATE CROPS Thank God the people behind the canned Harvest festival have just announced a tour featuring Neutral Milk Hotel, M Ward and our heroes Superchunk. Line-ups don’t come much more solid!

NOT KIDDING

RIOT GRRRLS

Some of Brisbane’s best young talent will join forces against child abuse on 23 Oct at The Zoo’s charity event, For The Kids, By The Kids. Dave’s Pawn Shop, pictured, Minus Nine, Dameena and Dead Zephyr will all rock for a good cause.

The Waiting Room in West End will host Gunk’s album cassette launch on 18 Oct. The BYO event will also feature an eclectic array of art and bands. Seriously, the novelty of a cassette tape should be all the incentive you need to attend.

GLASS HALF FULL

LOVE NOTES

Forever the Optimist will tour their new single Revolutions later this year, treating local fans to two dates, happening at Coolangatta’s Southern Cross Tavern, 29 Nov and then The Zoo, 30 Nov. What’s not to be happy about?

Alt-country mainstays Orphan Ann will launch brand new single Dear Darlin’ at The Hideaway on 24 Oct, with support from folkies Malo Zima and exciting newbs Cowbird, who offer up their country with an experimental lean. Fiver on the door.

WANDERING GENES

LOOKING SKYWARD

There’s going to be Gypsy Blood all over the stage when Sue-Anne Stewart launches her brand new collection of beautiful songs at Solbar, Maroochydore, 31 Oct; Dowse Bar, 7 Nov; and The Treehouse, Byron Bay, 9 Nov.

Not adverse to spending time on the road, creative others and lovers The Firetree are releasing new single Star Dreamer with shows 25 Oct, Ric’s Bar; 26 Oct, Palmwoods Hotel, Sunshine Coast; and 27 Oct, The Rails, Byron Bay.

FULL FRONTAL ASSAULT

LAND HO!

Nothing will be left standing after The Schoenberg Automaton, A Million Dead Birds Laughing and Aeon Of Horus partner up for some obliterating nights of metal. 1 Nov, Upstairs 199 (all ages) and 2 Nov, Crowbar.

Much loved local institution The Good Ship will launch their swinging third LP, The Seven Seas, at the Brisbane Powerhouse, 15 Nov with a special all ages show. Hear the octet bring their tales of treachery to life and feel the musical storm.

SUPERCHUNK

BACKLASH STOP THE ROT

So now the new State Govt is proposing fucking increased lockouts and more restrictive opening hours, clearly not heeding the lessons of their predecessors and still treating us like children. Let’s fight the power once again!

YELLOW PERIL They’re going to kill off a Simpsons character, but won’t tell us who! Please let it be someone expendable like Comic Book Guy, though even that would still be saddest… day… ever…

BUDDY HELL How in God’s name do Sydney Swans get to nab Buddy Franklin, a year after they snared Kurt Tippett having just won the premiership. Their extra salary cap allowance is a rort. 62 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

THIS WEEK’S RELEASES… STONEFIELD Stonefield Illusive SCOTT & CHARLENE’S WEDDING Any Port In A Storm Bedroom Suck JONATHAN WILSON Fanfare Bella Union/[PIAS] Australia CULTS Static Sony

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

LOCAL SOUNDS

MAP YOUR PLANS

TASTE THE RAINBOW

And make sure you get to Southside Tea Room this Saturday night as Wolf & Napoleon – Kahl Wallis from The Medics in solo mode – and Neighbour will perform together. Fiver for entry, with specials across the board.

There’s loads of colour on the triple bill at The Zoo, 17 Oct, with The Cassingles, pictured, Old Lion and Flavour Factory bringing smart arse punk, quirky reverb crunch and psych weirdness together as one. $6 through Oztix.

SINGLE FOCUS

THE HOLIDAYS

PUBLIC EXECUTION

Answered by: Simon Jones

Name: Steve Playford

Single title: Voices Drifting

Album title? Public Execution

What’s the song about? Well, I guess it’s about eloping with someone who is pretty great. How long did it take to write/ record? About a year-anda-half to get it right. It was written reasonably quickly but it took a while before the pieces all fell into place. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Yes, forthcoming second album.

HOME GROWN

DO YOUR PART

Producer and MC Calski has some stories that need to be told, so check him out when he and running mate Rainman support Mantra on the early shift, 17 Oct, The Tempo Hotel and play a headline date 9 Nov, The Transcontinental Hotel.

Help raise funds for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation by getting along to Black Bear Lodge, 20 Oct, where Twin Haus, pictured, Hushka and Baskervillain will showcase their diverse sounds to support Australians like you and we.

What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Lots of stuff, but I took a mid-album break in Japan and absorbed a lot of that strange wonder and isolation of being a westerner in Tokyo. We’ll like this song if we like... Fuzz pedals, choral pads, spring reverb, subwoofers, not giving a damn. Do you play it differently live? Slow and low, baby. The Holidays play Alhambra Lounge on Saturday 12 Oct.

ON THE MUSIC STEREO Any Port In A Storm SCOTT AND CHARLENE’S WEDDING Value Of Nothing EDDIE SPAGHETTI Purple Skies, Toxic River TV COLOURS Silver Jews SILVER JEWS INVSN INVSN

Fanfare JONATHAN WILSON Role Model BODYJAR Antidotes FOALS Settle DISCLOSURE Death Beat HIGH TENSION

ALBUM FOCUS

Where did the title of your new album come from? Rumpole Of The Bailey – an old TV show. Terry our singer came up with that. How many releases do you have now? A vinyl single and a couple of cassettes. Rod McLeod, who produced our single, is now our bass player. How long did it take to write/record? It’s a compilation of all our recorded stuff but remixed. It’s been released by Clinton Chapman from Short Fuse Records. The material dates back to the early ‘80s. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Yes... drinking beer. Abusing each other and probably not thinking it would be thirty years down the track ‘til we played together again. Having Freddy as our drummer was inspiring. What’s your favourite song on it? I think they all have their moments, but personally, Left Wing Refuse is my favourite. Will you do anything differently next time? Who knows if there will be a next time? No plans at this time. Just playing here and there is okay for now. Public Execution launch Public Execution (Short Fuse) at Rock’n’Roll BBQ, 633 Ann on Sunday 13 Oct (free).

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 63


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

SINGLE FOCUS

GUARDS OF MAY

CROWN JEWELS

Answered by: Damien Salomon

New Nowhere is the latest track from Sydney garage creeps Royal Chant. They are heading up a free show at Ric’s Bar, 20 Oct alongside Moonshine Sally, so get along, make some noise and neck some ales while you’re at it.

Single title: Numbers What’s the song about? It’s about addiction, but in a broad sense; it’s not about one sort of particular addiction to something specific. How long did it take to write/record? Took a few months to pull it together and write it. We had all the parts but the structure took some time to get right. And about four days to record in the studio. Is this track from a forthcoming release/ existing release? No, just a stand-alone single. We recorded two new singles this year and this is the first one to come out, with the second to follow it soon. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Everything, really. Just the world in general, but musically we are inspired by so many different artists and I think you hear that in the track – it’s quite versatile. We’ll like this song if we like... Your E string dropped down to B, and if you’re into decent grooves and heavy riffs. Do you play it differently live? Not really, no. At the moment we’ve just been sticking to the recorded version, but I’m sure it will evolve in the live setting over time. Guards Of May play The Tempo Hotel on Saturday 12 Oct and The Zoo on Saturday 30 Nov.

INTERSTATE ARRIVALS

SINGLE FOCUS

MIND OVER MATTER Answered by: MC Willow Single title: Somebody’s Love What’s the song about? It is about the many attempts we go through trying to find love and a deep connection. How long did it take to write/ record? We worked on it over a period of six months, while working on other songs at the same time. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? It will be on Mind Over Matter’s upcoming album, This Way To Elsewhere. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? We have been through experiences ourselves as the ones described in the song, and can really relate to that search for a deep connection with somebody. We’ll like this song if we like... Hip hop music with some tempo and a chorus that is sure to get you singing along.

SLEEP IS FOR SUCKERS

CRASHING DOWN

Melbourne rock juggernaut The Deep End are in the midst of their No Time To Rest tour, and will dive into these dates: 8 Nov, Shark Bar, GC; 9 Nov, The Tempo Hotel; and 10 Nov, Prince Of Wales, Nundah.

Splintering their creativity on Split, The Ocean Party write and sing their own songs, under the shared banner of course, and will show off the new tracks at Beetle Bar, 22 Nov with Thigh Master, Dag and Nathan Roche.

FLYING HIGH

STRAIGHT UP

Still riding high after shows supporting US visitors Anberlin, Melbourne pop punk rascals Masketta Fall will do their own Brissie headline show, playing an all ages show at The Old Museum, 3 Nov to launch latest single, Parachutes.

Lachlan Bryan takes his coffee hot and black, and simple, quality ingredients are the same things that have gone into his new LP, Black Coffee. Catch him and The Wildes at Eatons Hill Hotel, 31 Oct and Burleigh Underground Drummers, GC, 1 Nov.

Do you play it differently live? We play it live with Ernst Carter Jr as back up, DJ Ntaprize performing cuts/ percussion and beat mixes and Reichardt on guitar/keys. Mind Over Matter play Beetle Bar on Saturday 12 Oct.

BUDDY SYSTEM There’s going to be a song off! Interstate pals Sam Buckingham and Wes ‘Buffalo Tales’ Carr will be co-headlining at Dowse Bar on 24 Oct. Both artists have new music to be heard, so this one’s primed for perfection.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 64 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013


the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

TOURING THIS WEEK

SINGLE FOCUS

PERSONAL BEST RECORDS

GET DREAMING If you get your arse down to The Hideaway this Saturday you’ll be rewarded with a set from superb experimental pop group Naked Maja, who’ve got a floating new track, #59, ready for consumption, pulled from a forthcoming sophomore EP.

SIX APPEAL

SPILLING OVER

The varied musical influences of six-piece Bris-band Western Front combine jazz drums, metal guitar and classical piano for a unique rock experience. Get along and immerse your ears when they play Glass Bar on Thursday.

The Off The Rails parties continue at Grand Central Hotel with Roku Music, pictured, set to rock-you, Death Legs making you work for it and Police Force, well, let’s hope it doesn’t come to that. Be there Thursday night!

JUST ADD BEER

THIS IS TECHNO

Keen for some cheap bevvies and cheaper tunes? Then be at Grand Central Hotel on Saturday, where interstate slackers Beef Jerk launch new 7”, Schooners. Thigh Master, BARGE With An Antenna On It and Bent support.

That’s the name of the night that’s happening at Elsewhere on the GC this Friday. Motorik Vibe Council will venture up from Sydney with phat sounds in mind, while CSMNT61 and Audun will also front up. $10 on the door.

OWL EYES Name: Brooke Addamo

BEEF JERK

Single title? Hurricane

Name: Jack Lee

What’s the song about? Hurricane is kind of a rebellion against pressures I felt at the beginning of my album process.

Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? Wild & Sexy Dance Party cassette.

How long did it take to write/ record? The actual lyrics and beat of the song didn’t take long at all, but getting the mix right probably took the longest out of all the songs on the album. Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Hurricane is the third single from my debut album Nightswim. What was inspiring you during the songs writing and recording? Throughout all the songs on this album my main inspiration was really just trying to keep my writing style simple and honest to myself and how I was feeling. We’ll like this song if we like... Moody pop music. Do you play it differently live? I’ve kept the form of the song the same but used a few different sounds and samples.

First record you bought? The Offspring – Americana. Record you put on when you’re really miserable? Eno & Cale – Wrong Way Up. Record you put on when you bring someone home? Television Personalities – And Don’t the Kids Just Love It. Most surprising record in your collection? Encrypted Hard Drive – Heavy Petting Zoo. Last thing you bought/ downloaded? The Fall – Grotesque. Beef Jerk play Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel on Saturday 12 Oct.

Owl Eyes plays Alhambra Lounge on Friday 11 Oct and Woombye Pub, Sunshine Coast on Saturday 12 Oct.

RIFF REVERSAL The Butterfly Effect have called on duo Sleep Parade for support on their Brisbane return this Thursday at The Zoo. The pair will play tracks from newie Inside/Out so get down early – tickets through Oztix.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 65


opinion

OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

ROOTS DOWN

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

BLUES ‘N’ ROOTS WITH DAN CONDON

It’s tough being an eccentric artiste in urban music, especially as a female. Janelle Monáe, a singer/rapper/musician/producer, has held on, but what of her British counterpart V V Brown? Last month she dropped Samson & Delilah, the follow-up to 2009’s neo-rockabilly Travelling Like The Light, but, despite strong reviews, it’s floundered. Back to Monáe: The Electric Lady is among the season’s ‘event’ albums. It’s been forever coming: Monáe, mentored by OutKast’s Big Boi yet signed to Diddy’s Bad Boy Records, presented her psy-fi debut The ArchAndroid in 2010. The tuxedo buff has since shamelessly maintained her profile with corporate branding – she’s even a CoverGirl “spokeswoman”. For The Electric Lady, Monáe continues to foster her Afrofuturistic android alter ego Cindi Mayweather, but any narrative is convoluted and the concept undeveloped and distracting. The interludes and ‘suites’ are unnecessary. However, Monáe has refined her dazzling musical eclecticism. On the album’s first half, she commits to retro funk, as exemplified by the Erykah Badu-graced single QUEEN. Monáe then indulges her love of old musicals. Still, there are bursts of rock guitar throughout. And Dorothy Dandridge Eyes is ‘80s reggae. Monáe’s also joined by elite guests, including R&B rebel Solange (the title track). Givin’ Em What They Love with Prince is predictably showy – imagine Alicia Keys channelling Nona Hendryx. Way cooler is the smooth duet Primetime with Miguel. ogflavas@themusic.com.au

JANELLE MONAE 66 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

The St Jerome’s Laneway Festival has not traditionally been a blues/roots/soul-friendly event, but this year they have managed to program a bill that’s diverse and brilliantly complementary.

PALM MEET A LOCAL

This week’s Adamantium Wolf is coming from a modest rental homestead in Tarragindi, south Brisbane, affectionately known as Valhalla House. It has a garage that’s been built in with makeshift soundproofing, is kitted out with a basic backline and PA, and it has played host to dozens of hardcore, punk and metal shows over the last year. This place is the essence of DIY, and tonight Palm from Japan and A Secret Death will play here with locals Marathon and Shortlife (who live here and run things). This is the third diary entry about a tour I’ve handled for the first two mentioned bands. We’ve visited every state and territory over the last few weeks, and it’s all finally coming to an end. We’ve seen just as many sights as we have venues, and while everyone is ready to die of exhaustion, it’s been quite positive. Samuel Bufalino, drummer of A Secret Death, last night compared the tour to “the hottest and most amazing and fun girl you’ve ever met – totally fucked and insane”. I’m happy with that. Following on from where we left off in Mildura, we headed to Bendigo for the sleepiest show of the tour so far. I guess metal and hardcore aren’t exactly raging in said town, but after a total of six hours we got the hell out and made our way to Melbourne for a much larger festival show. This was a great night – both rooms at The Reverence were packed out by 8pm, with all the bands delivering killer sets. You can almost always rely on Melbourne for good shows, and that statement rang true when we returned

the week after for another massive Tuesday night show. The morning after the first Melbourne show was rough. I fumbled around and the Palm tour party missed our 10am flight to Hobart; $150 and six hours later we were finally on our way. The ticket sales weren’t massive, so I was kind of concerned. We had the same Melbourne line-up from the night before – Rolo Tomassi (UK), Palm, A Secret Death and Totally Unicorn – a few less local acts, and ticket prices $5 cheaper than Melbourne. People still complained about the $35 ticket, and many punters turned away at the door. Four bands crossing the Tasman Sea isn’t cheap, but sustainable touring doesn’t seem to be a concept many Tasmanians understand. There was still enough people partying hard for things to be insanely fun, but I don’t Tasmanians should ever complain about tours skipping over them again. What’s interesting is the response to the show we organised for Palm the next day. With five local bands, all playing for free and a $5 cover charge/note donation, we nearly cracked 80 payers with just 24 hours of organisation, 18 hours of promotion and a last minute Facebook push. What does that really say about promotion and show organisation in the modern age, or Tasmania for that matter? The audience is there, but for whatever reason they aren’t prepared to pay similar prices to the rest of the country… After tonight we have Rockhampton and Cairns to bring it all to a close. Grab next week’s issue to see how it goes!

But if you’re reading this, you probably don’t care much about the hip hop, indie rock and electro brilliance on offer. You should be interested in a few acts, however. The blunted psychedelic soul of Portland via Auckland trio Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s second LP II is one of 2013’s truly great records (it has suffered a little from being released in the first week of the year). The beguiling indie-folk of Daughter has captivated millions around the world over the past few months and their quick visit for Splendour a couple of months ago well and truly won over Australian audiences. Likewise, Melbourne lad Vance Joy seems to be winning scores of new fans each and every day with his restrained brand of luscious folk. Scotland’s Frightened Rabbit are a pretty great rollicking rootsrock band, King Krule is yet to prove himself to me, but the scarily young British troubadour has won over Billy Bragg, so he’s worth keeping an eye on as well. But the jewel in the crown is Kurt Vile. If you’re avoiding him because he’s cool, then wake up to yourself – he’s one of the great folk artists of our time with ridiculous songwriting chops and an expansive sonic palette that steers his songs into gloriously psychedelic territory a lot of the time. Don’t miss him. roots@themusic.com.au

KURT VILE


opinion

ARE YOU LOCAL? BRISBANE SINGLES AND EPS BY CHRIS YATES

CUTLOOSE

Check One (ft N’Fa Jones) Independent Brisbane producer and DJ Cutloose (aka Trent Wildman, also a pretty good DJ name I might add) enters the world of creation from the world of curation with his first single Check One. The beat is loose and fluid, slinking along on a very minimal instrumental line, leaving plenty of room for N’Fa’s repeated hook to get stuck in your head before the bass and clicking/handclap beat join in to bounce the whole thing along. N’Fa’s more recent work is considered and worldly, and this track is a fitting addition to his recent output. The electro tinges in the beat and the avoidance of a straight boom bap beat separate the track from so much Australian hip hop which relies on these tropes.

NAKED MAJA #59

Independent Experimental music is thriving in Brisbane at the moment as pockets of organised weirdos put on fantastic line-ups and really engage with their audience. To be fair, Brisbane has always been somewhat of a leader in this regard which is probably why it’s so healthy now, and bands like Naked Maja get the ability to hone what they’re doing until it sounds like this. All the elements of straight-up rock’n’roll are twisted into a warped pop song which gazes at the ground and lifts into the sky at the same time.

JEREMY NEALE Swing Left

Create/Control ‘Our Jeremy is quickly on his way to becoming everyone’s

THE LOOKING GLASS A JOURNEY THROUGH ARTS WITH HELEN STRINGER Australians have again proved that in most arenas we’re better than everybody else. Sure, we may not be doing so well in sports, and yes, our PM looks uncannily like an angry frog, but there is one thing we are unequivocally awesome at: illegal downloads. First we set records illegally downloading the fuck out Game Of Thrones, then we demonstrated our superior piracy skills by burglarising American cable TV on a scale never seen before to obtain the

final episode of Breaking Bad. We accounted for 18% of the 500,000 illegal downloads in the 12 hours immediately after the screening of the finale to take out the top prize for illegal downloading. Aussie Aussie Aussie, oi oi oi. One of the consequences of our download-happy fingers is that free-to-air will be killed by torrent. I’m a veritable expert on the subject because in the past month I have watched sixeight hours of television per day.

BREAKING BAD

Jeremy and there’s not a damn thing we can do except sit back and wonder how he keeps on getting it right. Swing Left has been produced by Australian producer extraordinaire Tony Buchen and his lush touches have really added something amazing to Neale’s already well honed songwriting and recording techniques. It turns out sounding like he took a brand new studio back in time and re-recorded The Zombies’ Odessey And Oracle and then came back to the present – which is what I think happened and explains why Jeremy has a hoverboard.

SAHARA BECK

I’m not talking quality illegally downloaded television. I’m talking old-fashioned free-to-air TV. And yes, free TV almost deserves to die. But in the interests of keeping housewives and sick people mildly to moderately entertained, there are small changes that could be made. It’ll never be the glory days but if everybody pools together it may just pay for another season of Offspring.

they’re objectively reporting on anything except stories about cats wearing clothes. When your anchors believe that ‘Asia’ is not a region but a country it’s time to admit that you’re just not very good at news. So throw caution to the wind and embrace your incompetency; instead of attempting to decipher politics, play celebrity look-alike with politicians. Tony Abbott’s trout pout = Lindsay Lohan. Julie Bishop’s hair = Princess Diana. Bill Shorten’s dreamy baby blues = pre-batshit Mel Gibson.

For instance, it should not be difficult for Channel Ten to air reruns of Charmed in the right order. How hard is it to work out that TV shows use numbers in ascending order to keep track of multiple episodes in multiple seasons? Do they not know that Prue gets killed off at the end of season three and is replaced with the infinitely inferior Paige and that some of us would appreciate just a modicum of continuity so we aren’t swapping between timelines, especially when in one of those timelines a main character is fucking dead? Jesus Christ, you could get this right by hiring a sixyear-old to count on his fingers. Network “journalists” should give up the pretence that

Bang Bang Bang Independent Sahara has a really big voice which despite occasionally resting on an American twang still seems to communicate a lot of her personality. The vocal delivery of the chorus makes it very engaging and the sheer ability to hit those notes is impressive, but there’s no unnecessary gymnastics – it all serves the song very well. The production is impressive and the instruments which eventually join the minimal mix manage not to overpower the simplicity of the voice and melody line which are what make the track really work.

Replace Slide Show with ‘Where in the World is Campbell Newman?’ – the first person to find where Campbell is wins a holiday touring all the countries with friendly tax laws he’s travelled to in the name of “trade missions”. Frankly I don’t think there’s a lot of difference between spending your days watching daytime TV and watching unlawfully procured American TV. You’ll quickly stop loving your MacBook Pro when you’re too sick to do anything else. If there’s one skill I wish I hadn’t developed it’s the capacity to give vacuous attention to a screen. THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 67


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au John Malcolm: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Wolf & Cub: The Zoo Oct 12 Katchafire: The Hi-Fi Oct 13 Andy Bull: Alhambra Lounge Oct 19

Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby Nov 21-24

Violent Soho: The Northern Oct 24, The Zoo Oct 26

Patrick James: Black Bear Lodge Nov 27

The Cribs: The Zoo Oct 25

The John Steel Singers: Spotted Cow Nov 28, The Zoo Nov 29, Solbar Nov 30

The Jungle Giants: Solbar Oct 25, The Hi-Fi Oct 26, Alhambra Lounge Oct 27 The Breeders: The Tivoli Oct 29 Dan Sultan: Old Museum Oct 31, Woombye Pub Nov 1 Jordie Lane: Spotted Cow Oct 31, Black Bear Lodge Nov 1 Horrorshow: Spotted Cow Oct 31, The Zoo Nov 1, Solbar Nov 2, Beach Hotel Nov 3 Grass Roots Festival 2013: Mt Cootha Nov 3 Boy & Bear: Beach Hotel Nov 7, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 8, The Tivoli Nov 9

Alex Gibson + guests: Hotel LA, Brisbane

Golden Days Festival: Coolum Sports Complex Nov 9

Le Breeze: Lambert’s Restaurant, Kangaroo Point The Seed Project feat. Josh Lovegrove + James Diamond + Opus Of A Machine: QPAC (Melbourne Street Green), Southbank 8 Ball Aitken: Redlands Sporting Club, Wellington Point

Festival Of The Sun: Port Macquarie Dec 13-14

Darren Marlow: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Pond: The Zoo Dec 14

Harley Breen + Damian Power + Aaron Gocs + Steve Allison: Sit Down Comedy Club, Brisbane

Bonjah: Solbar Dec 28, The Northern Dec 29 Woodford Folk Festival: Woodfordia Dec 27-Jan 1 Half Moon Run: Solbar Jan 2, Old Museum Jan 3, The Northern Jan 4 Future Music Festival: RNA Showgrounds March 1 Billy Bragg: The Tivoli Mar 20

GIG OF THE WEEK REGURGITATOR: 11 OCT, THE HI-FI Devin Townsend Project: The Auditorium, Bowen Hills Pat Tierney + The Lyrical + Meredith: The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley

Owl Eyes + Willow Beats + The Kite String Tangle: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley

Caravana Sun + La Mont: The Joynt, South Brisbane

New Jack Rubys + FAT + White Devil: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

Spit Syndicate + Joyride + Ozborn & Stalkz + Lane Harry + Ike Campbell: The Loft, Chevron Island

VIOLENT SOHO: 26 & 27 OCT, THE ZOO

WED 09

Knox + Jack Man Friday + Guests: Beetle Bar, Brisbane Flinter + Benjamin Forbes + Leigh Dallimore: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Harley Breen + Steve Allison: Jupiters (The PA), Broadbeach Mark Sheils: Royal George, Fortitude Valley Moski Jo + guests: The Joynt, South Brisbane Open Mic Night feat. various: The Loft, Chevron Island Candice: The Plough Inn, Southbank Acoustic Sessions with Jesse Mann + Graham Moses + Agghared Drake: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Lesyah: The Vault, Southport

THU 10

28 Days: Albany Creek Tavern, Albany Creek

Loon Lake: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Benny Lackner Trio: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

FRI 11

Pikelet + Primitive Motion + Per Purpose: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Ed Kuepper: SoundLounge, Currumbin Rolo Tomassi + Totally Unicorn + Stockades: Sun Distortion, Brisbane Regurgitator + Wampire + Seja: The Hi-Fi, West End Cherrywood + Paddy McHugh & The Goldminers: The Joynt, South Brisbane Ingrid James + Julian Jones: The Lido Cafe & Restaurant, Ascot

Will Day: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Seventh Avenue: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Lachy Doley + Miss Renee Simone + Brodie Graham: The Loft, Chevron Island

Open Mic Night feat. various: The Retro Bar, Kenmore

The Pigs: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta

Nathan Pursey: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Rolo Tomassi + Totally Unicorn + Stockades: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Non Cents with Six Shooter Cahill + Chris Miller: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise Western Front: Glass Bar & Restaurant, Fortitude Valley Roku Music + Death Legs + Police Force: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Galapagos Duck: Harrigan’s Drift Inn, Jacobs Well Regurgitator + Wampire + Seja: Kings Beach, Caloundra Kisschasy + guests: Red Room, Brisbane Devin Townsend Project + Special Guests : RNA Showgrounds (The Auditorium), Bowen Hills

KISSCHASY: 10 OCT, THE RED ROOM

Mandy Nolan: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Eleventh He Reaches London + Solkyri + Castles Sunk Below The Sea: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Harley Breen + Steve Allison + Damian Power + Aaron Gocs: Sit Down Comedy Club, Brisbane

Book Club feat. various DJs: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley

Songwriters Circle with Bec Laughton + Marisa Quigley + Josh Lovegrove: Solbar, Maroochydore

Frazer Goodman + Friends: The Vault, Southport

The Motoriks + Audun: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise

The Butterfly Effect + Sleep Parade + Teal: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Nick & Greg: Gazebo Restaurant, Hotel Urban, Brisbane

Open Mic Night with Kat Davidson: Stones Corner Hotel, Stones Corner

Open Mic Night with Liam Donnovan: Coorparoo Bowls Club, Coorparoo Adept + Bound For Ruin: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Bitter Lungs: Dolphins Hotel, Tweed Heads

Darren J Ray: GeebungZillmere RSL, Geebung

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 68 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Caravana Sun + Pat Tierney + La Monte: Solbar, Maroochydore

Jack Flash + Le Suits: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba Fallin Short + Upsize + The Evershow + Lucky 13: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley The Kush Club with Bambanou: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley Jazz & Shriaz feat. various: The Vault (4pm), Southport Wayne Foster: The Vault, Southport


BAY STREET BYRON BAY (02) 6685 6402 www.beachhotel.com.au

THIS WEEK: THURS 10TH FROM 9PM

LITTLE SCOUT W/ LITTLE CASINO FRI 11TH FROM 5PM

BEACHY FRIDAYS

DRINK SPECIALS AND ENTERTAINMENT W/ GREG KEW

BENJALU 9:30PM SAT 12TH FROM 9PM

DJ DISCROW

SUN 13TH FROM 4:30PM

LISA HUNT CAPTAIN KAINE 9:30PM MON 14TH FROM 8PM

'HIT THAT HIT' MUSICAL BINGO FREE ENTRY, GREAT PRIZES TUES 15TH FROM 7:30PM

OPEN MIC NIGHT

WED 16TH FROM 8:30PM

MICK MCHUGH DUO

COMING UP... THURS 17

CASH SAVAGE AND THE LAST DRINKS FRI 18

SCOTT DAY-VEE DUO & SHYBABY SAT 19

DJ LONGTIME

CAFÉ - BAR

321 BRUNSWICK STREET MALL, FORTITUDE VALLEY

9TH OF OCTOBER

MAKE MORE 10PM + J FRANCIS 9PM 10TH OF OCTOBER

THE IMPRINTS 10:30PM + GUESTS 9:30PM 11TH OF OCTOBER

WAXHEAD 9PM + GUESTS 8PM

SUN 20

12TH OF OCTOBER

FRI 25TH

KRISTY APPS AND THE SHOTGUN SHIRLEYS 9PM + JULIA ROSE 8PM

KING TIDE & SUNDAY SAFARI WOLF & CUB SUN 27TH

THE DELTA RIGGS SUN 3RD NOV

HORRORSHOW TUE 5TH NOV

MELBOURNE CUP @ THE BEACHY THURS 7TH NOV

BOY & BEAR TUES 31ST DEC

NYE PARTY

13TH OF OCTOBER

ILUKA 9:30PM + GUESTS 8:30PM 14TH OF OCTOBER

DOM COLE 9:30PM + GUESTS 8:30PM 15TH OF OCTOBER

‘LANI AND LECIA’. 8:30PM

FREE LIVE MUSIC AND INDIE DJS WANT TO PLAY? EMAIL BOOKINGS@RICSBAR.COM.AU

WWW.RICSBAR.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 69


the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au Bullhorn + Bec Laughton + Slip On Stereo: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Darkc3ll + Tensions Arise + more: Transcontinental Hotel, Brisbane Killer Queen: Twin Towns, Tweed Heads Bertie Page Clinic: Yandina Hotel, Yandina

SAT 12

Spit Syndicate + Joyride: Alhambra Lounge (under18s), Fortitude Valley

Harley Breen + Damian Power + Aaron Gocs + Steve Allison: Sit Down Comedy Club, Brisbane

Oceano + Aversions Crown + Feed Her To The Sharks + A Night In Texas + Emerald Vale: Tall Poppy Studios (all ages), Brisbane

Bullhorn + Slip On Stereo: Solbar, Maroochydore

Jazz On The Terrace+Various: The Greek Club (Odyssey Bar/12.30pm), South Brisbane

Wolf & Napoleon + Neighbour: Southside Tea Room, Morningside

Katchafire + Common Kings: The Hi-Fi, West End

Frank Lang + Anne FergusonHowe + Michael Bennett: The Calamvale Hotel, Calamvale

Eric Bogle: The Irish Club, Brisbane Karl S Williams: The Joynt, South Brisbane

Amorphis + The Eternal + Datura Curse: The Hi-Fi, West End

Pat Tierney + Tully Davidson: The Palmy Cafe, Palm Beach

The Holidays: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley

Naked Maja + Barbituates + Enderie Nuatal + Multiple Man (DJ Set): The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley

Mind Over Matter + Brokenword Crew + AWP: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

Morgan Bain + Cherrywood + Alisha Todd: The Loft, Chevron Island

The Cactus Channel: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Peking Duk: The Met, Fortitude Valley

Paul Williams + friends: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

3 Thieves: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank

The Handsome Family: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Thriller feat. Oceano + Aversions Crown + Feed Her To The Sharks + Still Water Claims: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley

Ty Fader: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Rockaoke feat. various: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Regurgitator + Wampire + Seja: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta Kick The Butterfly + Archetypes + Hill 60 + The Evershow: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill DJ Taya + Giv: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise Trainspotters feat. Beef Jerk + Barge + Thigh Master: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Bitter Lungs: Miami Tavern, Miami T.I. + Akon + guests: Riverstage, Brisbane Lachy Doley + The Swamp Stompers + Zac Gunthorpe: Royal Mail Hotel (afternoon), Goodna Vikki Grant: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Big Boyz: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank Doc Span + British Blues Invasion: The Tempo Hotel (5pm), Fortitude Valley

MON 14

Guards Of May + Opia + Soviet X-Ray Record Club + House Of Giants + Triplickit: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

TUE 15

Matt Corby + Bree Tranter + Bear’s Den: Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, South Bank

Emoh Instead: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley Lesyah: The Vault, Southport Wolf & Cub + Zeahorse + Little Odessa: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Owl Eyes + Willow Beats + The Kite String Tangle: Woombye Pub, Woombye

SUN 13

Cosmo Jarvis + Lime Cordiale: Beetle Bar, Brisbane LiveSpark feat. Roz Pappalardo: Brisbane Powerhouse (Turbine Platform/3.30pm), New Farm

LIME CORDIALE: 13 OCT, BEETLE BAR

NEW JACK RUBYS: 11 OCT, BEETLE BAR Blind Dog Donnie: Coorparoo Bowls Club, Coorparoo Sweet Formidables: Dowse Bar (Iceworks) (4pm), Paddington

One More Ben + Steele McMahon: Shucked Lane, Newstead

Royale Sunday with Snobs + Sessionkatz: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise

Sunday Sesh with Lindsay Webb + Jennifer Burke + Rhi Down: Sit Down Comedy Club, Brisbane

Steven Jaymes Band: Friday’s Riverside, Brisbane

The Hi-Boys: Solbar (2pm), Maroochydore

Ingrid James Quartet: Mr & Mrs G Riverbar (3pm), Brisbane

Adam Swain: Stoke Bar (4pm), Southbank

OCEANO: 12 OCT, CONISTON LANE

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 70 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Step It Up: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End The Bug feat. Brenna Logan + The Jar: New Farm Bowls Club, New Farm Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Valley Chris Pickering: The Scratch, Milton Rock Escalate with thebeforeparty + Harlequin + Mallory Vanetti: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Elvis Impersonator Competition feat. various: The Vault, Southport


music. thursday 10/10.

Lachlan Mitchell Trio 8pm.

saturday 12/10.

Mojo Webb 8pm.

café & wine bar breakfast. lunch. dinner. drinks ‘til late. open 7am weekdays. Lower Burnett Ln. Brisbane CBD. 07 3211 4242.

AMA

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CITY VIEW C S COOPOCKTAIL S E Dele RS ON T AP ctab le d ishe s

Live

Jazz

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THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 71


tour guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

INTERNATIONAL

The Bennies: Crowbar Oct 24 Violent Soho: The Northern Oct 24, The Zoo Oct 26

Rolo Tomassi: Crowbar Oct 10, Sun Distortion Oct 11 (AA)

The Jungle Giants: Coolangatta Hotel Oct 24, Solbar Oct 25, The Hi-Fi Oct 26, Alhambra Lounge Oct 27 (U18)

Devin Townsend Project: The Auditorium Oct 10 (AA) Oceano: Thriller Oct 12, Tall Poppy Studios Oct 13 (AA)

Busby Marou: SoundLounge Oct 24, The Hi-Fi Oct 25, The Spotted Cow Oct 26

Amorphis: The Hi-Fi Oct 12 T.I., Akon: Brisbane Riverstage Oct 12

LEONARD COHEN: 30 NOV, BEC

Cosmo Jarvis: Beetle Bar Oct 13 Katchafire: The Hi-Fi Oct 13, Parkwood Tavern Oct 20 The Handsome Family: Black Bear Lodge Oct 14 Lorde: The Zoo Oct 16 Kim Wilde, Nik Kershaw: The Tivoli Oct 16 Ricky Martin: BCEC Oct 16 Prince Rama: Alhambra Lounge Oct 16 Every Time I Die: The Hi-Fi Oct 18 Chelsea Grin: Brisbane Riverstage Oct 18 Imagine Dragons: The Hi-Fi Oct 19 One Direction: BEC Oct 19, 20, 21 Cody Chesnutt: The Hi-Fi Oct 20 Korpiklaani: The Zoo Oct 22 Mickey Avalon: The Hi-Fi Oct 24, Coolangatta Hotel Oct 25 Yellowcard: The Tivoli Oct 25 Limp Bizkit: Riverstage Oct 25 Behemoth: The Hi-Fi Oct 27 Fall Out Boy: BCEC Oct 27 The Cribs: The Zoo Oct 28 Beyonce: BEC Oct 28, 29 The Breeders: The Tivoli Oct 29 Pitbull, Kesha: BEC Oct 30 Wednesday 13: The Hi-Fi Oct 30 Lightning Bolt: The Zoo Oct 31 Gus G’s Firewind: The Hi-Fi Nov 1 Joey Cape: Crowbar Nov 1, The Loft Nov 2

Fleetwood Mac: BEC Nov 14, Dec 2

Paramore, You Me At Six: BEC Jan 9

Useless ID: Crowbar Nov 15

Daughters: Crowbar Jan 9

Between The Buried And Me: The Zoo Nov 15

Mayhem: The Hi-Fi Jan 12

Martha Davis And The Motels: Twin Towns Nov 15 Olly Murs: BCEC Nov 16 Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: The Hi-Fi Nov 17 Franz Ferdinand: The Tivoli Nov 17 Moonsorrow: The Hi-Fi Nov 20 Jill Scott: The Tivoli Nov 21 Sonny and the Sunsets: GoMA Nov 22 Dale Watson & His Lonestars: Black Bear Lodge Nov 28, Morningside Services Club Nov 29 City and Colour, Twin Forks: Brisbane Riverstage Nov 30

Misfits: The Zoo Jan 16 We Are Scientists: The Zoo Jan 22 The National: Riverstage Feb 11 Ed Kowalczyk: The Tivoli Feb 12 Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band: BEC Feb 26

NATIONAL

Adalita: The Zoo Oct 24, Kings Beach Tavern Oct 25, Coolangatta Hotel Oct 26 Dyson, Stringer, Cloher: The Spotted Cow Oct 24, SoundLounge Oct 25, Judith Wright Centre Oct 26, Woombye Pub Oct 27, Byron Bay Brewery Oct 31

Sticky Fingers: The Northern Oct 26 Eskimo Joe: The Hi-Fi Oct 31

Regurgitator: Kings Beach Tavern Oct 10, The Hi-Fi Oct 11, Coolangatta Hotel Oct 12, The Northern Oct 13

Dream On Dreamer: Price St Hall Oct 26, CWA Hall Oct 27, The Tempo Hotel Oct 31, Expressive Grounds Nov 1 (AA)

Little Scout: Beach Hotel Oct 10, Black Bear Lodge Oct 18, The Spotted Cow Oct 25, Solbar Oct 26

Horrorshow: The Spotted Cow Oct 31, The Zoo Nov 1, Solbar Nov 2, Beach Hotel Nov 3 Dan Sultan: Old Museum Oct 31, Woombye Pub Nov 1 Jordie Lane: The Spotted Cow Oct 31, Black Bear Lodge Nov 1

Cave: The Zoo Dec 4

The Butterfly Effect: The Zoo Oct 10

King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard: Alhambra Lounge Nov 1

Spit Syndicate: The Loft Oct 10, Woody’s Surf Shack Oct 11

Bernard Fanning: Sirromet Wines Nov 3

Pikelet: Black Bear Lodge Oct 11

Boy & Bear: Beach Hotel Nov 7, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 8, The Tivoli Nov 9

Joey Bada$$: The Hi-Fi Dec 7 Melvins, Helmet: The Hi-Fi Dec 8, The Northern Dec 9 Deerhunter: The Zoo Dec 9 Muse: BEC Dec 10 (AA)

Enslaved: The Hi-Fi Nov 3

Sage Francis: The Hi-Fi Dec 12

Dave Clarke: Beetle Bar Nov 3

Alicia Keys, John Legend: BEC Dec 13

Owl Eyes: Alhambra Lounge Oct 11, Woombye Pub Oct 12 The Holidays: Alhambra Lounge Oct 12 Wolf & Cub: The Zoo Oct 12, Beach Hotel Oct 25 Matt Corby: BCEC Oct 15 Mantra: The Tempo Hotel Oct 17, Solbar Oct 19 Damn Terran: Alhambra Lounge Oct 17, The Northern Oct 18

The Aston Shuffle: Elsewhere Nov 15 Screamfeeder: The Spotted Cow Nov 15, Beetle Bar Nov 16 British India: The Zoo Nov 22, 23 Patrick James: Black Bear Lodge Nov 27 Machine Translations: The Hi-Fi Nov 30

Courtney Barnett: GoMA Dec 6

Kisschasy: Red Room Oct 10

Taylor Swift: Suncorp Stadium Dec 7

Gossling: Alhambra Lounge Nov 15

New Empire: Brisbane Powerhouse Oct 25, Joe’s Waterhole Oct 26

Kataklysm: Crowbar Dec 4

Passenger: The Tivoli Dec 6, Dec 7 (AA)

Pond: The Zoo Dec 14

Closure In Moscow: The Spotted Cow Dec 5, Alhambra Lounge Dec 6

Loon Lake: Black Bear Lodge Oct 10

Steel Panther: Riverstage Dec 6

Colin Hay: The Tivoli Dec 5

Stonefield: UQ Oct 24, The Racehorse Hotel Oct 25, Alhambra Lounge Nov 22, Villa Hotel Noosa Nov 23, The Northern Nov 24

Leonard Cohen: BEC Nov 30

Insane Clown Posse: The Hi-Fi Dec 5

Whitley: Alhambra Lounge Nov 28, Woombye Pub Nov 29, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 30

Sarah McLeod: The Manhattan Club Nov 7, SoundLounge Nov 8, Coolum Hotel Nov 9, Bon Amici Cafe Nov 10 Lime Cordiale: Alhambra Lounge Nov 7, Solbar Nov 8, The Northern Nov 9 Saskwatch: Black Bear Lodge Nov 8, The Spotted Cow Nov 9 Nancy Vandal: The Zoo Nov 8, Miami Tavern Shark Bar Nov 9

Tumbleweed: The Tempo Hotel Dec 5

I Exist: Sun Distortion Dec 6 (AA) Birds Of Tokyo: Coolangatta Hotel Dec 11 Gareth Liddiard: GoMA Dec 13 Miami Horror: Oh Hello! Dec 21 Bonjah: Solbar Dec 28, The Northern Dec 29, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden Dec 30 Hunters & Collectors: Sirromet Wines Feb 2

FESTIVALS

Island Vibe: Home Beach Park Oct 25-27 Jim Beam Sand Jam: Surfers Paradise Beach Oct 26-27 Golden Days: Coolum Sports Complex Nov 9 Hits & Pits 2.0: Coolangatta Hotel Nov 15, The Hi-Fi Nov 16 Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby Nov 21-24 The Other Side: South Stradbroke Island Nov 23 Warped Tour: RNA Showgrounds Nov 29, Coffs Harbour Showground Nov 30 Stereosonic: RNA Showgrounds Dec 7-8 Festival Of The Sun: Sundowner Breakwall Tourist Park Dec 13-14

Jack Johnson: QPAC Dec 14

The Cairos: Black Bear Lodge Oct 17

Scott Kelly And The Road Home, Jarboe: The Zoo Nov 9

Chic featuring Nile Rodgers: The Tivoli Dec 15

Kate Ceberano: Twin Towns Oct 18, Brisbane Powerhouse Oct 20

Def FX: Beetle Bar Nov 9

One Republic: The Tivoli Nov 11

Todd Terry: Cloudland Dec 15

High Tension: Crowbar Nov 9

Big Day Out: Metricon Stadium and Carrara Parklands Jan 19

Salt-N-Pepa: Jupiters Hotel Nov 12

The Brian Jonestown Massacre: The Hi-Fi Dec 15, The Northern Dec 18

The Amity Affliction: Brisbane Riverstage Oct 18

Bodyjar: The Hi-Fi Nov 22, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 23

Laneway Festival: RNA Showgrounds Jan 31

The Living End: Eatons Hill Hotel Nov 23

Soundwave: RNA Showgrounds Feb 22

Air Supply: Jupiters Casino Nov 27

Bluesfest: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm Apr 17-21

The John Steel Singers: The Spotted Cow Nov 28, The Zoo Nov 29, Solbar Nov 30

Groovin’ The Moo: Townsville Cricket Grounds May 4

The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus: The Hi-Fi Nov 7

Neutral Milk Hotel, M. Ward, Superchunk: The Tivoli Nov 12 Smokie: Brolga Theatre Nov 12, Empire Theatre Nov 14, QPAC Nov 15 Nile: The Hi-Fi Nov 14 Big Sean: Arena Nov 14

Baby Animals: The Zoo Oct 18, 19

Bon Jovi, Kid Rock: Suncorp Stadium Dec 17

Jae Laffer: Alhambra Lounge Oct 18, The Loft Oct 19

Mac DeMarco: The Zoo Dec 18

Andy Bull: Alhambra Lounge Oct 19

Half Moon Run: Solbar Jan 2, Old Museum Jan 3, The Northern Jan 4

The Grand Rapids: Grand Central Hotel Oct 19

Don Walker: Old Museum Nov 9 Bluejuice: The Hi-Fi Nov 9

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 72 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013

Falls Festival: Byron Bay Dec 31-Jan 3


1000s OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

THE GUIDE AT THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013 • 73


the end

SINEAD O’CONNOR BEEFS CATHOLIC CHURCH THE BEEF

In 1992 O’Connor tore up a photo of (then) Pope John Paul II during a live broadcast of hit US show Saturday Night Live.

PROS It got everyone talking about O’Connor.

CONS It got everyone avoiding O’Connor.

WHO WON? JPII has long gone, O’Connor is still raging.

AND THEN… She invaded a live TV discussion about the Church in 1995 and recently described the role of the Pope as “anti-Christian”.

JOE PESCI THE BEEF

He appeared on SNL a week after O’Connor with a patchedup copy of the photo O’Connor had shredded on camera.

PROS Pesci proved adept at photo restoration.

CONS Pesci revealed his ugly side, saying: “If it was my show, I woulda gave her such a smack.”

WHO WON? Pesci was last seen in a Snickers commercial.

AND THEN… Madonna sided with Pesci and a Bob Dylan tribute concert audience booed, but Kris Kristofferson came to her defence.

MILEY CYRUS THE BEEF

Post-tween singer says her Wrecking Ball clip was inspired by O’Connor. O’Connor says Cyrus is pimping herself.

PROS

More like ‘prose’. O’Connor’s open letter to Cyrus was a thoughtful piece about modern pop culture.

CONS

Collective brain strain as everyone tries to remember the time O’Connor swung naked on a wrecking ball.

WHO WON?

Maybe O’Connor if she follows through her threat of suing Cyrus for her post-letter tweet attack.

AND THEN…

Amanda Palmer sided with Cyrus. Soundwave’s AJ Maddah sided with O’Connor. 74 • THE MUSIC • 9TH OCTOBER 2013


The Music (Brisbane) Issue #9  

The Music is a free, weekly gloss magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, li...