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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 3

BOOMERANG FESTIVAL

A NEW WORLD INDIGENOUS FESTIVAL FOR ALL AUSTRALIANS

ARCHIE ROACH

Photo Mick Richards

ERNIE DINGO

WITH LOU BENNETT, EMMA DONOVAN & DELINE BRISCOE AND A 10 PIECE ENSEMBLE

WANTOK: SING SING

GURRUMUL

THE CHOOKY DANCERS

THE MEDICS

AIRILEKE

QUIQUE NEIRA (CHILE)

1 3 3 P E R FO R M A N C E S A N D E X P E R I E N C E S FROM MUSIC TO WORKSHOPS FIRE GATHERINGS DANCE PARTICIPATIONS COMEDY SPEAKERS AND MORE!

LAUNCHING THE BOOMERANG INTERNATIONAL INDIGENOUS FILM FESTIVAL (BIIFF)

FRIDAY 4TH - SUNDAY 6TH OCTOBER T Y A G A R A H T E A T R E E FA R M B Y R O N B A Y FOR FULL FESTIVAL PROGRAM VISIT WWW.BOOMERANGFESTIVAL.COM.AU FESTIVAL & CAMPING TICKETS ON SALE NOW 02 6685 8310 / WWW.BOOMERANGFESTIVAL. PRINCIPAL MEDIA PARTNER:

4 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 5

TONIGHT, DON’T MISS OUT!

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TOMMY TIERNAN ADRIAN BOHM PRESENTS IRELAND’S NUMBER ONE COMEDIAN

“…BRIGHT, ORIGINAL & REFRESHINGLY FUNNY!” THE NEW YORK TIMES

STRAY SOD TOUR 2013

SUNDAY 27 OCTOBER THE TIVOLI

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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 7

themusic 21ST AUGUST 2013

#002

INSIDE FEATURES Foals

Chloë Grace Moretz

review

Franz Ferdinand Simon Reynolds Shane Carruth Crash Reef Dialectrix All Time Low Onesies Voyager

“HAIL TO THE KING MIGHT LEAVE YOU FEELING A LITTLE QUEASY AFTERWARDS, BUT WHEN YOU’RE THERE AND YOU’RE IN THE MOMENT, ITS DELIGHTS ARE UNDENIABLE.”

“LIFE CAN BE HARD IN SWAZILAND, BUT AS WOMEN WE ARE POWERFUL, AND WE KNOW THAT WE HAVE THE STRENGTH TO FACE THESE CHALLENGES.” - NOKUTHULA TALKS MUSIC FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT (P72)

- TOM HERSEY REVIEWS AVENGED SEVENFOLD’S SIXTH RECORD (P42)

Dave’s Pawn Shop Cosmic Psychos Alison Mosshart Obey The Brave

“WHEN YOU’RE RIDING THAT WAVE YOU DON’T REALLY WANT TO STOP; YOU DON’T WANT TO BREAK IT.” - BOB HARDY OF FRANZ FERDINAND (P24)

The Stiffys Holi Festival Ghost Notes Silver Screens The Smith Street Band

REVIEWS

Album: King Krule Live: Violent Soho Arts: Elysium Gear: Cole Clark Angel Guitar Muso

THE GUIDE Cover: Darkc3ll

STREAM: HEAR LOVE GRASS, THE BRAND NEW LP FROM COUNTRYFOLK DARLING SARA STORER, BEFORE ITS RELEASE ON FRIDAY. FIRST ON THEMUSIC. COM.AU

web EXCLUSIVE VIDEO:

HOT SYDNEY-BASED INDIE DUDES GLASS TOWERS PLAY A COUPLE OF SONGS FOR US, LIVE AND STRIPPED BACK. RIGHT NOW ON THEMUSIC.COM.AU

Local News Gig Guide Eat: Eastern European Cuisine Sport: Five Sports You Don’t Know Social Media: Seven Drones Travel: Volunteering In Swaziland Visual Art: Clutch The End: NonPerformance Enhancing Drugs

8 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

feature

“IT WAS KIND OF MIND-BOGGLING TO BE IN THIS BLOODIED PROM DRESS ONE DAY, BEATING UP PEOPLE IN THIS PURPLE SUPERHERO SUIT THE NEXT.” - CHLOË GRACE MORETZ, STAR OF KICK-ASS 2 (P22)

Be part of a bigger picture. Volunteer Overseas. Be part of the bigger picture and help create real change in the world. Australian Youth Ambassadors for Development (AYAD) volunteer their time and skills to help alleviate poverty and achieve sustainable development in developing countries across Asia, the Pacific and Africa. AYADs volunteer on 3 - 12 month assignments across a wide variety of sectors including health, education, marketing, communications, sport, law and everything in between. AYADs are fully supported with return flights, insurances, in country support, training and living/accommodation allowances. Learn more about the program, and hear from returned volunteers who have already become part of the bigger picture, at an Information Session in Brisbane.

Register to attend at www.ayad.com.au

6.30 - 8.00pm, Wednesday 4 September 2013 Rydges South Bank, 4 Glenelg Street, South Bank Refreshments provided.

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 9

CREDITS PUBLISHER

Street Press Australia Pty Ltd

GROUP MANAGING EDITOR Andrew Mast

EDITOR Steve Bell

ASSISTANT EDITOR Benny Doyle

ARTS AND CULTURE EDITOR Cassandra Fumi

MUSO EDITOR Michael Smith

GIG GUIDE Justine Lynch qld.gigs@themusic.com.au

CONTRIBUTORS Adam Curley, Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood, Anthony Carew, Baz McAlister, Ben Preece, Benny Doyle, Bradley Armstrong, Brendan Telford, Carley Hall, Chris Yates, Cyclone, Dan Condon, Daniel Johnson, Dave Drayton, Guy Davis, Helen Stringer, Jake Sun, Jann Angara, Jazmine O’Sullivan, Lochlan Watt, Madeleine Laing, Mandy McAlister, Matt O’Neill, Mitch Knox, Sam Hobson, Samantha Armatys, Sky Kirkham, Tom Hersey, Tony McMahon, Tyler McLoughlan

THIS WEEK THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK • 21 AUGUST - 27 AUGUST 2013

go

PHOTOGRAPHERS Freya Lamont, John Stubbs, John Taylor, Kane Hibberd, Rick Clifford, Sky Kirkham, Stephen Booth, Terry Soo

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER Brett Dayman

QLD SALES Alex Iveson, Zac Gould sales@themusic.com.au

ART DIRECTOR Matt Davis

ART DEPT Eamon Stewart, Nicholas Hopkins

hear Trumpet maestro Chet Baker was known as “the James Dean of Jazz”, and now his fascinating (and debaucherous) life is being revisited by actor/musician David Goldthorpe in the production Chet Baker: Like Someone In Love which is running at QUT Gardens Theatre on 22 Aug-23 Aug from 7.30pm. Revisit both the brilliant music and relentless selfdestruction which made Baker one of the most captivating and tragic figures in music’s rich tapestry.

qld.art@themusic.com.au

ADMIN&ACCOUNTS

Who doesn’t like noise? This Thursday a panel of experts – including the University of Queensland’s Amelia Barikin and Greg Hainge plus esteemed UK musician/composer, author and curator David Toop – discuss the premise that The Future Is Noise. The event also doubles as the release of Hainge’s new book, Noise Matters: Towards an Ontology of Noise. It all happens at 6pm on Thursday 22 Aug at Institute Of Modern Art, a joint project with Room40.

Loretta Zoppolone Shelly Neergaard Jarrod Kendall Leanne Simpson accounts@themusic.com.au

DISTRO Anita D’Angelo distro@themusic.com.au Subscriptions store.themusic.com.au

CONTACT US Phone: (07) 3252 9666 info@themusic.com.au www.themusic.com.au Suite 11/354 Brunswick St Fortitude Valley Locked Bag 4300 Fortitude Valley QLD 4006

BRISBANE

The 2013 instalment of the annual MercedesBenz Fashion Festival Brisbane kicks off this week, and this year it’s back being held in the iconic and newlyrefurbished City Hall, with free runway events being held at the Queen St Mall stage for the duration. The best Aussie labels strut their stuff alongside Queensland’s top designers and retailers, meaning that if you have any sartorial aspirations for this spring/summer then you best check out this event when it runs 25 Aug-31 Aug.

dress

win

On a list of ‘Things that really piss us off ’ here at theMusic, people who crash into you while checking their phone is pretty high up there. Finally, somebody has decided to bring an end to this assault on simple manners (or at least try), with Japan just erecting smartphone warning signs that read: “Walking while using a smartphone is dangerous... But those people probably didn’t see this announcement.”

watch

cringe

Howdy Miley Cyrus! Guess what? We get it! You’re a big old girl now and you want people to stop treating you like some dang Disney starlet! But, please stop. All this twerking shit at old mate Terry Richardson’s blindingly white studio is just… odd, uncomfortable and like watching your sister feel herself up. And no one wants to do that. Okay? Thanks.

We’ve all been that lonely soul trawling through their phone for some late-night extracurricular activities, and the video for Arctic Monkey’s new single, Why’d You Only Call Me When Your High? captures the desperation of the situation in full drug distorted glory. The song mightn’t be as good as Do I Wanna Know? (which they cross promote cheekily here), but the clip is an absolute corker. What’s Alex on? Anyone’s guess. But if he’s offering, then, well...

lol

“That’s not a campaign; this is a campaign.” The Daily Show with Jon Stewart knows how to break the ridiculousness of politics down, and in less than eight minutes they’ve managed to show the world what a bunch of jokers most of Australia’s candidates are. Peter ‘merlot cock’ Dowling, Stephanie “turbo-Palin” Banister, Jaymes Diaz; they’re all gloriously roasted by the great John Oliver on DOWN-UNDERcision 2013. Laugh at the gaffs while shaking your head at the frightening reality of it.

national news news@themusic.com.au THE CRIBS

SHINING STAR

He’s American by birth and a Brit by base, but Cosmo Jarvis recognises Australia as his adopted home. Embraced by our nation, songs like Love This quickly became summer singalong favourites and with a new record in the pipelines for early next year, the prolific 23-year-old will left spirits with material new and old. Along with rambunctious indie rockers Lime Cordiale, the devilish pop auteur will play Beetle Bar, Brisbane, 13 Oct; Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, 15 Oct; Workers Club, Melbourne, 16 Oct; Karova Lounge, Ballarat, 18 Oct; Bridge Hotel, Castlemaine, 19 Oct; Barwon Club, Geelong, 20 Oct (matinee); Annandale Hotel, Sydney, 24 Oct; Mona Vale Hotel, Sydney, 25 Oct; Fat As Butter, Newcastle, 26 Oct; and Yours and Owls, Wollongong, 27 Oct.

THE HUMAN JUKEBOX SIBLING SOUNDS

Help British brothers The Cribs celebrate ten years of chaotic rock goodness when they land on our shores for a full national tour later this year. Prepare to for a sweat-fest at one of these following dates: 23 Oct, The Small Ballroom, Newcastle; 24 Oct, Beresford Upstairs, Sydney; 25 Oct, The Zoo, Brisbane; 26 Oct, Ding Dong, Melbourne; and 29 Oct, Rosemount Hotel, Perth. All shows are proudly presented by The Music.

SOUTHERN BASS

There are few producers more revered and respected in the world of electronic music than Hernan Cattaneo. The Argentinean has spent the his career – spanning three decades – putting South American club culture on the map, all the while dictating the dance in some of the world’s biggest venues including Homelands, Bedrock, Pacha and Fabric. Cattaneo will be returning to Australia next month, bringing his deep, progressive house to select capital city venues. Check him out 20 Sep, Prince Bandroom, Melbourne; 21 Sep, The Ivy, Sydney (day) and The Met, Brisbane (night); and 22 Sep, The Court, Perth.

SURE TO BE A HOOT

Owl Eyes’ debut record Nightswim continues to give and give, with the Melbourne dream pop starlet ready to drop her fourth single off the longplayer. Along with Willow Beats and The Kite String Tangle, Brooke ‘Owl Eyes’ Addamo will tour Hurricane this spring, performing at Alhambra Lounge, Brisbane, 11 Oct; Woombye Pub, Sunshine Coast, 12 Oct; Northcote Social Club, Melbourne, 16 to 18 Oct; Oxford Art Factory, Sydney, 19 Oct; Wollongong UniBar, 24 Oct; ANU Bar, Canberra, 25 Oct; and Fat As Butter Festival, Newcastle, 26 Oct. And heads up, The Kite String Tangle doesn’t appear in Wollongong or Canberra – sorry folks.

SO THIS IS WHY THE LIBS HAVEN’T LET ABBOTT SAY ANYTHING FOR THE LAST THREE YEARS... EDDIE PERFECT [@EDDIEPERFECT] BOARDS THE POLITICAL ZIGGERS TRAIN.

12 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

Paul Dempsey can tell a story, no question. His work with Something For Kate has turned the songwriter into a musical icon of this country and his solo output has only solidified such a notion further. In amongst all this though, Dempsey has built a reputation as a formidable covers gun, tackling everything from The Clash’s Rock The Casbah to more modern fare like Active Child’s Hanging On, all in his own distinct style. Now, that side of his repertoire is going to be showcased, with the Shotgun Karaoke tour heading around the country: 5 Oct, The Zoo, Brisbane; 9 Oct, Lizotte’s, Dee Why; 10 Oct, Lizotte’s, Kincumber; 11 Oct, Lizotte’s, Newcastle; 12 Oct, Factory Theatre, Sydney; 20 Oct, Fly By Night, Fremantle; and 25 Oct, The Hi-Fi, Melbourne. Special guest at all dates is Melbourne up-and-comer Olympia.

DAN SULTAN

LONE RANGER

Local legend Dan Sultan will be showcasing his refined side with his Back To Basics tour, playing in stripped back solo mode before he releases his third record. Catch him 23 Oct, Lizotte’s, Newcastle; 24 Oct, The Basement, Sydney; 25 Oct, Heritage Hotel, Bulli; 26 Oct, The Abbey, Canberra; 31 Oct, Old Museum, Brisbane; 1 Nov, Woombye Pub, Sunshine Coast; 2 Nov, Thornbury Theatre, Melbourne; 8 Nov, The Wool Exchange, Geelong; 9 Nov, Theatre Royal, Castlemaine; 16 Nov, Fly By Night, Fremantle; and 17 Nov, Ellington Jazz Club, Perth. Proudly presented by The Music.

national news news@themusic.com.au ASTA

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN

TEEN SENSATIONS

Since taking out last year’s triple j Unearthed High competition, Asta has been steadily been solidifying her position as one of Australia’s most exciting young talents and now she’s excited to reach out to her ever-growing fanbase with the Synergy Tour. Swim with the Tasmanian’s gorgeous neu pop on 21 Sep, Goodgod, Sydney (afternoon/all ages; evening/18+); 28 Sep, Brisbane Powerhouse (afternoon/all ages) and Alhambra Lounge, Brisbane (evening/18+); 4 Oct, Northcote Social Club, Melbourne; and 5 Oct, Phoenix Youth Centre, Melbourne (afternoon/all ages). Proudly presented by The Music.

LORDE

BABY THEY WERE BORN TO RUN

Holy shitballs! Most Bruce Springsteen lovers thought they got it pretty sweet when The Boss ripped through some marathon sets earlier this year with his longstanding E Street Band. But we can guarantee you few – if any – of those fans would have guessed they’d get a second slice of the magic in less than 12 months. However, here we are, stoked to tell you that New Jersey’s favourite son and his cohorts will be touring Down Under in 2014. Here are the all ages dates: 7 Feb, Perth Arena; 15 Feb, AAMI Park, Melbourne; 19 Feb, Allphones Arena, Sydney; 22 Feb, Hope Estate, Hunter Valley; and 26 Feb, Brisbane Entertainment Centre, with supports at the various shows including a reformed Hunters & Collectors, Dan Sultan and The Rubens. Tickets go on sale this coming Monday, but we recommend getting on the pre-sale happening Wednesday because these shows are going to sell out, no question!

EVERYTHING I SAY SHOULD BE ACCOMPANIED BY SOMEONE PLAYING A THEREMIN

YASSIR LESTER [@YASSIR_LESTER] CAN ONLY DREAM.

RAISE ME UP

Emerging from nowhere to be topping the US alternative charts with her track Royals, New Zealand’s Lorde has had a monumental rise to the top in 2013 and now with the release of upcoming debut album Pure Heroine the 16-year-old will play an intimate run of dates along the east coast. The songstress performs 16 Oct, The Zoo, Brisbane; 17 Oct, Metro Theatre, Sydney; 19 Oct, Zierholz, Canberra; 21 Oct, Corner Hotel, Melbourne, with Oliver Tank supporting at all dates.

PURE LOONACY

The release of Loon Lake’s debut album is itching closer and closer and, as the band drop the second single from the forthcoming LP, Carolina. Dance all crazy like when the quartet play Spectrum, Sydney, 9 Oct; Black Bear Lodge, Brisbane, 10 Oct; Howler, Melbourne, 11 Oct; and Flyrite, Perth, 17 Oct.

PUNK ACROSS BORDERS

It may not be a recognised punk hotbed, but that arguably makes the dedication and success of Useless ID all the more magic. The Israeli noise makers have been causing the pit to heave for twenty years now and continue to fly the Middle East punk flag high, with their explosive, melodic strains. Catch them with Perth loudmouths The Decline at these dates: 8 Nov, Prince of Wales, Bunbury; 9 Nov, Blood Rock Fest, Rosemount Hotel, Perth; 12 Nov, Worker’s Club, Melbourne; 13 Nov, Great Northern, Newcastle; 14 Nov, Hot Damn, Sydney; and 15 Nov, Crowbar, Brisbane.

IMAGINING THEIR DESTINY

Their recent tour with A Day To Remember and The Devil Wears Prada proved that Dream On Dreamer have what it takes to operate alongside the big boys of metalcore and now the five-piece Melbourne outfit are excited to hit out on their own headline tour, giving their latest record Loveless the full treatment for fans. Dream On Dreamer will punish these venues into submission: The Tempo Hotel, Brisbane, 31 Oct; Expressive Grounds, Gold Coast (all ages), 1 Nov; Annandale Hotel, Sydney, 2 Nov (afternoon all ages and evening 18+); Racket Club, Newcastle, 3 Nov (licensed/all ages); Basement, Canberra, 6 Nov; The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, 7 Nov; Arrows On Swanston, Melbourne, 8 Nov (all ages); Amplifier, Perth, 10 Nov (18+); and HQ, Perth, 11 Nov (all ages). THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 13

local news qld.news@themusic.com.au YOU AM I

SUPPORT FOR THE NORTH

Making the jump from contenders to heavyweight fighters with their pounding record Singularity, Northlane are now seen as one of the brightest lights in Australian metal. The Sydney youngsters have just been announced on the massive Big Day Out bill, but before they get crazy with that circus they’ll be delivering some headline dates next month. Announcing supports for both local shows, you can catch the five-piece 19 Sep at Surfers Paradise Beer Garden with Saviour, Aversions Crown and In Ashes We Lie, while their 21 Sep show at Racehorse Hotel, Ipswich, will feature those first two mentioned, as well as Humality. Tickets for both dates can still be purchased through Oztix. Northlane will also perform 22 Sep at One Epic Event, Strathpine.

FRIENDLY FIRE

Easily one of the most fun regional music events on the calendar, it always calls for a road trip when Festival Of The Sun springs to life at the tail-end of the year. Positioned at the Sundowner Breakwall Tourist Park on the shimmering Port Macquarie coastline, the festival runs across two days, 13-14 Dec, and brings a line-up that will surely getting you moving and grooving. Here’s the first announcement in all its glory: You Am I, pictured, The Rubens, Ash Grunwald (ft Scott and Andy from The Living End), The Beards, Kingswood, Stonefield, Spit Syndicate, The Basics, Glass Towers, Tigertown, The Good Ship, Howlin Steam Train, Set Sail, Gang Of Brothers, Whores 4 Pinot, Mar Haze, D At Sea, Kaurna Cronin, Mustered Courage, Kita, James Bennet, DJ Healey. And it’s set to be a dark one with the theme for this year’s event ‘Black Friday’, so get out those freaky Halloween costumes, Day of the Dead fiesta corpse paint or any other outfit that screams for a good time. Tickets for the boutique BYO event are available through the event website Sep 3 for $160+BF, which includes two days of music and two nights camping – amazing, we know! Proudly presented by The Music.

FIND LOST

From recent reports Melbourne trio Damn Terran have almost been breaking venues in half with their unique brand of fuzzed out fire, and with comparisons to everyone from Pavement to At The Drive-In, it’s safe to expect the unexpected from the southerners. They’ve got a sweet new track out in the way of Lost and will be presenting it for masses at BIGSOUND, 12 Sep, before finishing up a headline tour in our parts, rounding it all out at Alhambra Lounge, 17 Oct and The Northern, Byron Bay, 18 Oct.

SOCIAL SUBMERSION

Moving from Wagga Wagga to Melbourne back in 2009 proved to be the catalyst that The Ocean Party needed to start doing great things, and since then their records have shown a group hell bent on creating perfect indie pop. They showcase new record Split as part of the Spunk showcase, happening at Black Bear Lodge 10 Sep, with Kieran Ryan, Mining Boom, Bored Nothing and Shining Bird also on the bill.

REALLY HOPING ELYSIUM KICKS OFF A TREND OF INDIAN DUDES BEING THE PRESIDENT IN MOVIES AZIZ ANSARI [@AZIZANSARI11] SHINING FOR A NEW ROLE.

14 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

PERFECT PORTRAIT

The music of husband and wife twosome The Handsome Family is full of the same beautiful chemistry that have keep the fires burning at home for two decades. Renowned for their intensely descriptive lyrics and genre-hopping delivery, the pair’s 2013 record Wilderness digs deep into the life of animals, interspersing the facts with true tales of historic events, death odes and more. Be a part of the rock and holler experience when the duo play Black Bear Lodge on 14 Oct, with tickets on sale now through Oztix.

TOTAL CONTROL

The LA Times call her “the most charismatic female performer in rock”, and now we can make the call for ourselves when Martha Davis brings her iconic group The Motels out our way to run through some bona fide ‘80s classics. The band will front up at Twin Towns, Tweed Heads, 15 Nov, with tickets on sale through Metropolis Touring for $49+BF.

LONDON CALLING

Vocal powerhouse Kate Ceberano will be returning to the road later this year, performing songs from her brand new record Kensal Road – her first full-length in a decade – for the very first time. Settling in with Ceberano’s heat and soul will be a voice of the new generation, Alison Ainsworth, who will act as support on all dates, in addition to providing backing harmonies and guitar alongside the headliner. Hear these fresh sounds at Twin Towns, Tweed Heads, 18 Oct, and Brisbane Powerhouse, 20 Oct, with tickets available through the respective venues direct.

DOCTOR’S ORDERS

That’s what’s keeping Diviney away from our parts in September, with health issues forcing him to cancel his two Queensland shows at BIGSOUND (12 Sep) and Studio 454 (13 Sep). It will be okay, we promise.

www.thenorthern.com.au WEDNESDAY 21 AUGUST

OPEN MIC SHOWCASE NIGHT 7.30PM–10.30PM

THURSDAY 22 AUGUST

OPEN MIC NIGHT 7.30PM–10.30PM

FRIDAY 23 AUGUST

JONSON STREET BYRON BAY Friday 23 August

GLASS TOWERS, WAXHEAD & JORDAN LESSER Saturday 24 August

LOCKY

BOOTLEG RASCAL

LATIN CONNECTION PRESENTS:

Thursday 29 August

5PM–9.30PM

LATIN CAVE BRISBANES HEART OF LATIN DANCE, MUSIC AND FOOD 10PM

SATURDAY 24 AUGUST

GER FENNELLY 2.30PM–6.30PM

ALTER EGOS 9.30PM–12AM

O’MALLEY’S EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT DJ MICHAEL SIDEWAYZ AFTER THE FEATURE BANDS TIL 3AM: COME DOWN AND MEET OUR RESIDENT DJ. SPINNING TOP 40’S, R&B, DANCE AND MUCH MORE TILL LATE

SUNDAY 25 AUGUST

GUTTERMOUTH Friday 30 August

WANDERING EYES Saturday 31 August

MIDNIGHT JUGGERNAUTS, KIRIN.J. CALLINAN, FASCINATOR Saturday 7 September

THE PAPER KITES Friday 13 September

GER FENNELLY

MT WARNING

STRINGS FOR AMMO

Saturday 14 September

2.30PM–6.30PM

7PM–11.30PM

MONDAY 26 AUGUST

MICKS TRIVIA 7PM–9PM

TUESDAY 27 AUGUST

DEEP STACK POKER 7PM

KINGSWOOD Saturday 21 September

SNAKADAKTAL Saturday 28 September

PIRATES ALIVE ALBUM LAUNCH Saturday 5 October

NGAIIRE Sunday 13 October

REGURGITATOR Basement Level - Wintergarden Centre Queen Street Mall - Brisbane City PH 07 3211 9881 FAX 07 3211 9890 Email admin@mickomalleys.com.au

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 15

local news qld.news@themusic.com.au I’M YOUR MAN

LITTLE SCOUT

WHO’S THE MAN?

Roslyn Oades is the creator of I’m Your Man a play based on audio interviews with Billy ‘The Kid’ Dib before he competed in the IBF featherweight championships. This play explores the brutality of matches and training, and the frame of mind that allows the bravery of putting your body at the disposal of each match. It’s on at the Brisbane Powerhouse from the 28 to 31 Aug.

TRAPPED IN TIME

The Ministry Of Sound crew enlisted the help of dancefloor dominators Spenda C and Leah Mencel to mix up their brand spanking Bass Trap double mix CD that’s dropping this Friday, and will be sending the pair out on the road to launch the record with some heady club nights around the country. The shows in our parts will go down at Villa Noosa, Sunshine Coast (Spenda C only) for their Trap City night, 14 Sep; Shuffle Nightclub, Gold Coast, 12 Oct; and Family, 25 Oct. ROME

EARNING THEIR BADGES

Returning to our lives are Little Scout, the sweet and serene local indie pop quartet who continue to dazzle with their startling harmonies and provoking instrumentation. The gang are on the road right now with their Brisbane brethren Hungry Kids Of Hungary (playing together at Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast, 30 Aug, and The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba, 31 Aug), but will be launching their forthcoming second record, Are You Life, with a headline show at Black Bear Lodge, 18 Oct. The LP’s second single March Over To Me is doing great things on the airways right now, and with the tracks mixed by Lars Stalfors, who has worked with Cold War Kids, Deap Vally and The Mars Volta, this album is sure to take Little Scout further than ever before.

I JUST HEARD THE TERM SWAGGAMUFFIN FOR THE FIRST TIME AND NOW I’M SAD SO ARE WE MARK RONSON [@ IAMMARKRONSON12], SO ARE WE.

EMPIRE RISING

The Gold Coast isn’t Gothenburg by any stretch, but there’s a few believers doing their very best to put the Glitter Strip on the map. ROME is such a band. Featuring members of Devolved and The Berzerker, the guys have just put together an unrelenting debut record, and will be showcasing it over the coming months. Catch them at Crowbar, 30 Aug and 6 Oct; Miami Tavern Shark Bar, Gold Coast, 31 Aug; and Sands Tavern, Sunshine Coast, 4 Oct. In other news for the band, a brutal night of metal just got a whole lot more intense with ROME also announced as the Brisbane support for the Nile/The Faceless double bill, going off at The Hi-Fi, 14 Nov. Get in early and feel the force. 16 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

CURIOUS YOUNG BUCK

Last week’s cover stars Midnight Juggernauts have called on the help of Fascinator for their two shows fast approaching in our parts. The musical psycho babble of reformed rock pig Johnny Mackay (Children Collide), Fascinator is a kaleidoscopic freefall into the great unknown. Set yourself up for the headliner by getting along to these shows early; the two acts play The Hi-Fi, 30 Aug and The Northern, Byron Bay, 31 Aug.

KEEP ON MOVIN’

He’ll make you laugh with his sharp wit, force you to reminisce with his storytelling and give you an all around top night out, no question, so head to The Tivoli, Dec 5 and be taken in with musical larrikin Colin Hay. After establishing himself as the frontman for Men At Work, Hay has gone on to produce plenty of great solo albums, his colourful lyrics perfectly suited for sole pursuits on the stage, and will be at his engaging best when he presents his latest show, Finding My Dance.

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music

CASSIUS IS OVER

Words Benny Doyle. Photo supplied by Warner.

Foals have learnt to write songs. They’ve also learnt to breathe. And as Walter Gervers informs Benny Doyle, the band’s lit a fire that’s not ready to go out.

“Y

ou don’t have my number,” Foals toyed on Holy Fire’s second single (unsurprisingly titled My Number), but as the Oxford five are fast finding out, more and more people are dialling in. Since the release of their third longplayer earlier this year, the band have swiftly – if somewhat nonchalantly – become a serious touring drawcard. Music that was once seen as complicated math rock has straightened out and simplified. Yes, the songwriting intelligence still prevails – that’s never going to change – but Foals have managed to chalk up a musical equation that anyone can solve. Holy Fire sees the five-piece stretching their sonic spectrum to the edges of their abilities. Digestible art pop, relentless rock force, stuttering angular riffs – undulation after undulation. It’s a record of extremes, a statement that their bass player Walter Gervers is quick to agree with.

you have that clean slate again – we really enjoyed writing it. We were back home in Oxford, and after all the touring it felt real refreshing to be writing new music again. There was no briefing, like, ‘This is what this record is going to be about, this is what it’s going to sound like.’ It really did naturally evolve, which means that for its strengths it has this big palate of songs which are wildly different. To get that spread and not be going over the same ground was something that when we started recording we were really conscious of.” Production issues on the group’s first two

for what was possible when Moulder provided the mix for Spanish Sahara, off Total Life Forever. Unsurprisingly, that majestic and at times lucid track acted as the centrepiece for that record and was recognised by NME as the best song of 2010. The grand ambition found on that tune is obvious throughout Holy Fire, and although ideas were “ping ponging” relentlessly during recordings at Assault & Battery Studios in London, communication was continual and rewarding. “They would come to Oxford for a bit of preproduction, and Yannis would send them loops and tapes and bad room recordings,” he remembers. “We had between nineteen and twenty tracks in very rough form, and then it was just a case of getting in there and chiselling away, which was really satisfying. They were great to work with to bounce ideas off, and there was a trust in them because of what they’ve worked on before.” And although their resumes are formidable, thankfully their personalities are not. “They’re just regular dudes, it’s great,” Gervers informs with a smile. “Alan’s a sort of sound doctor – he’s very considered and calm and he likes to have a laugh; and Flood is bustling with energy the whole time and he can’t really sit still and he wants to get his hands dirty, he wants to

“I THINK IT COULD BE THE DEATH OF THE BAND IF WE START TO COVER THE SAME GROUND.”

“I think there was definitely a feeling of not holding back,” he begins, speaking of the sessions. “If a certain song had an identity we weren’t about to rein it in too much and change it. In fact it was quite nice not making a song that was definitely heading in a different direction and sort of smothering it and making it more ‘Foals’. What we actually did do was not do that and not add too many layers and make it safe – [we] just let it go in the direction that it went. That leads to having songs, like Moon, which are very naked and soulful and quiet, and then something like Inhaler, which is obviously the product of five guys playing big riffs together and really enjoying it. It definitely lent itself to that.” Foals have just arrived at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa, Oklahoma, an iconic venue that has hosted everyone from Metallica and Bob Dylan to Kings Of Leon and Snoop Dogg. The guys are taking shelter from the brutal summer heat outside, enjoying their second stint touring the States since Holy Fire’s release, and the 29-year-old Gervers has broken away from his bandmates – Yannis Philippakis [vocals, guitar], Jimmy Smith [guitar], Edwin Congreave [keys] and Jack Bevan [drums] – to open up further about the group’s most successful record. “There wasn’t really a specific thing that we wanted to achieve [with Holy Fire], so that in itself is quite a pleasure, going into writing and recording because 20 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

albums have been well documented (Dave Sitek applying additional reverb on 2008’s Antidotes; Paul Epworth being replaced by Luke Smith on 2010’s Total Life Forever). This time around, Foals called in the serious big guns. Flood and Alan Moulder are two of the most commanding names in music production, having together worked on big budget records for the likes of Smashing Pumpkins and The Killers, and individually at the helm of releases from artists as diverse as PJ Harvey, Nine Inch Nails and My Bloody Valentine. Interestingly, the quintet got a taste

get into the guts of the songs. So between the two of them they’re quite different, but you put them together and they’re a pretty good calming combo for each other. They trust themselves because they know they’re good at what they do, but there were no egos flying around, which I think would have been a bit of a disaster for us to come face to face with.” Listening to Foals’ three records end to end, back to back, they all seem consistent to themselves, yet distinctly individual. They encapsulate a constant feeling – a vibe – and stand as capsules in time, reflecting band members growing up as songwriters, musicians and people. “We really do treat them like that,” Gervers agrees. “Sometimes we do go back and listen to the records themselves but not very often. We spend so much time on tour that these songs that we’re playing live still seem fresh to us, and some of them have come a long way from what they were originally, which is exciting. But we don’t get too sentimental or wistful about the old records; we just want to keep making different things and keep people on their toes, because I think it could be the death of the band if we start to cover the same ground.” Indeed, if you’re not looking forward you’re looking back, and then you might miss the turn coming up. However, Gervers is drawn to reflect, albeit briefly,

ITCHY FEET With main stage festival slots, a huge European tour, their biggest headline shows in the UK, not to mention these Australian dates, Foals will barely be catching their breath over the next six months. After all that you’d think a holiday somewhere like Miami would be on the cards. Right? Nah. It’s not like they don’t want to sit down afterwards, but when they do it’s going to be in a studio – again. “Basically, we don’t want to leave it too long to put out another record,” Gervers levels. “We’re already feeling like we could start on it now if we had the time.

citing the changes that have taken Foals from their university-centric hometown to the headlining act at the recent Latitude Festival in Suffolk, UK. “I suppose we learnt how to write songs as opposed to just jams and things that were the product of playing early live shows, like Antidotes. We’d written and played those songs a long time before we recorded them so they had a crisp frenetic nature to them. Then all of a sudden you make a record where you’re recording something in a studio that you’ve never played in front of an audience or no one’s ever heard it before, so obviously it takes on a completely different life. We’re always going to be neurotic and anxious about what’s getting released – like any band is – but we’ve learnt to relax a little bit more, and that goes back to songs having their own identity. If we’re into it and we like it we’re pretty sure other people will as well, so it’s just about being relaxed and letting things breathe a little bit more.” Foals can’t wait to return to Australia. After all, our country’s given the band their only number one record, an achievement that’s not lost on Gervers. “Mmmmm,” he says, enjoying the reminder as he takes

a sip of an undisclosed beverage. “That was a huge surprise for us – that was unreal.” Gervers is being rather gracious here. Obviously. Foals’ fanbase Down Under is rabid. But even if we Aussies in the know expected such a result, the band didn’t, making it all the more special. “It was really exciting and it hasn’t happened to us anywhere else before so good on ya,” he beams. “It was a

really good combination that week and there was a lot of luck in it, and it definitely doesn’t mean we’re a different band in Australia than we are anywhere else. I don’t know what else to say? It was cool, but we’re definitely not a chart-topping band – and we probably won’t be anywhere else in the future – but just to have that moment where we came in number one is pretty cool.”

WHAT: Holy Fire (Warner) WHEN & WHERE: 2 Oct, The Tivoli

And by the bass player’s admission plenty of ideas are accounted for, song sketches that even predate Holy Fire. “It’s quite weird, we’ve always had things that just keep kicking around that we keep going back to and listening to which are totally unfinished. “I’m not sure yet whether the next album we’ll be like magpies a little bit and pick through some old things or when we actually start writing it’ll just be all totally fresh, but I think a little combination of the two would be great. I’m one sucker in the band – I don’t like losing things – so when we write little bits and pieces which get left behind I get a little nostalgic, but we’ll see what happens.” THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 21

film

KILLING IT Chloë Grace Moretz tells Guy Davis she took her Hit Girl role in the Kick-Ass films on her mother’s advice - every mum dreams of hearing their child say: “Okay, you cunts, let’s see what you can do now.”

V

iewers of film and television are well-aware by now that you mess with Chloë Grace Moretz at your own risk. The 16-year-old actress of course has a fair few lighter roles on her alarmingly extensive resume – the precocious voice of reason in (500) Days Of Summer, an adventurous bookworm in Martin Scorsese’s Hugo, Alec Baldwin’s teenage nemesis on 30 Rock – but it’s with somewhat darker, edgier roles in movies like Let Me In, the US remake of the acclaimed Swedish vampire story Let The Right One In, that she’s made an even greater impression. And maybe the biggest impression she’s made on movie-goers to date is with her role as pint-sized badass vigilante Mindy Macready, aka the purple-clad Hit Girl, in Kick-Ass, the big-screen adaptation of Mark Millar’s nasty, ultraviolent comic book. Trained in martial arts and maximum intimidation by her father and fellow costumed crimefighter Damon ‘Big Daddy’ Macready (Nicolas Cage), pre-teen Mindy had no qualms about laying waste to any lowlife in her path with guns, blades and a choice array of well-deployed profanity. (Her opening line to a gang of thugs – “Okay, you cunts, let’s see what you can do now” – inspired more than a few shocked gasps and laughs.)

she was doing – she was kind of lost. She never really had a childhood, and now she’s still putting on this mask and this uniform, thinking that’s what she wants to do. But I do think she really knows if she’s a vigilante or a villain. If she’s killing people for a cause or whether she’s just having fun, you know? Her moral compass has gone a bit haywire.” No fear of that happening to Moretz, who has strong family backing to help guide her career choices. “My mom would never allow me to do something she felt would harm me as a person or my career as a business,”

Girl. “My mom read it and she fell in love with it. She told me it was one of the best characters she’d ever read, so I read it and I fell in love with it too, and I just chased after it until I got it. So I booked the film, knowing exactly what was in the script and exactly what they wanted to shoot, and we did it.” Reprising the role was subsequently a no-brainer, and Moretz says “it was like coming home – it was super-fun to be back in the uniform.” Especially since starting work on Kick-Ass 2 came a mere two day after wrapping her previous job, playing the title role in Boys Don’t Cry director Kimberley Peirce’s new adaptation of Stephen King’s classic horror novel, Carrie. Playing the victimised Carrie White, who eventually uses her latent telekinetic powers to wreak vengeance on her high school tormentors, was a marked contrast to portraying Hit Girl. “It was kind of mind-boggling to be in this bloodied prom dress one day, beating up people in this purple superhero suit the next,” laughs Moretz. “They are the most polar opposite characters you could ever imagine!” She’s extremely excited about Carrie, which co-stars Julianne Moore and is due for release later this year, but admits she had a few misgivings before meeting with the studio backing the film. “Brian DePalma’s version of Carrie is a beloved movie for me, so when it came up during this meeting how Kimberley was already attached and I was told about the work the screenwriter was doing on the script, I went ‘Oh, so you’re not making some gory, hacky cheesefest; you’re making a real film’,” she says. “When I got the script and read it, I fell in love with who Carrie is. This is the perfect depiction of Stephen King’s Carrie – she is here who she is in the book. It isn’t a remake of DePalma’s film; it’s an adaptation of Stephen King’s book. And I fought tooth and nail

“IT WAS KIND OF MIND-BOGGLING TO BE IN THIS BLOODIED PROM DRESS ONE DAY, BEATING UP PEOPLE IN THIS PURPLE SUPERHERO SUIT THE NEXT” Three years on, Moretz is reprising her role as Mindy/ Hit Girl in Kick-Ass 2, with her character facing a far more dangerous adversary than the city’s criminal element. Enrolled in high school, she finds herself frenemies with a clique of mean girls who play just as dirty as the street scum she used to dispatch with such glee. But using her lethal skill-set to sort the situation is out of the question... right? Well, let’s not spoil anything in that regard. But fans of Hit Girl’s homicidal antics in the first film, directed by Matthew Vaughn, will be pleased to know that a fair few wrongdoers meet a messy fate at the business end of Mindy’s impressive arsenal in Kick-Ass 2, which sees writer-director Jeff Wadlow taking the reins. Moretz points out, however, that the character is a little torn at times as to whether she’s creating carnage in the name of justice or simply because she gets a kick out of it. “At the end of the first Kick-Ass, Mindy was orphaned,” she says. “And without her dad, she didn’t know what 22 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

she says. However, when the 11-year-old Moretz saw the action movie Wanted, she admits she raced home and told her mother she simply had to find a role similar to Angelina Jolie’s hard-hitting, straightshooting assassin. “And I’m not kidding, a month later my agent came to us and said ‘I’ve got this script, it’s a very risky role,’ and they gave me the whole spiel, all the pros and cons.” The script was Kick-Ass, the role was Hit

for this movie; I took four different meetings, did two auditions, and they all went for hours. I know that no one else could be Carrie like I could be Carrie. And when I was able to step on set and be her, it was my most fruitful experience as an actor.” That certainty is a key aspect of Moretz’s selection of roles. “If I look at something and I don’t go ‘I am going to be the best actor for this and I’m so invested in this, I don’t think anyone else can do it’, I won’t do the film. I won’t do it if I don’t have that feeling, even if I think the script is amazing. You’re living in the shoes of characters like Mindy and Carrie, and you have to be able to portray her in such a way that the audience doesn’t feel like you’re lying to them.”

WHAT: Kick- Ass 2 In cinemas 22 Aug

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 23

as a band. And personally speaking, I listen to the lyrics and the melody first [in a song]; I need some content, decent lyrical content, something to engage with.” To flesh out the foundation themes from which to build their latest opus, Hardy, Kapranos and their bandmates, guitarist Nick McCarthy and drummer Paul Thomson, would simply talk. Conversations about general things, about bigger pictures, about ideas that would work well on record. One person would bring something into whichever studio they were working in at the time – London, Glasgow, Stockholm, Oslo – and then Kapranos would expand on it, taking the initial ideas away for the afternoon before returning with something more substantial. “Alex has this ability to take an idea and to condense it into lyrics; I don’t have that, my melody writing’s terrible,” Hardy shrugs. “He can assimilate ideas much better than I can, so on a lot of songs he’ll come from a much more general theme and then we’ll have a chat about that, then I’ll come back the next week and there’ll be a song written with those themes – it’s quite good.”

music

SHARP DRESSED MEN

Franz Ferdinand are back with leaner songs and snappier suits. Bob Hardy tells Benny Doyle about doing things the right way.

I

n 2004, Franz Ferdinand sung Take Me Out, which the world dutifully did, dancing along as the track charted globally. A year later they queried us: Do You Want To? And yes we did, we did want to. Now, they arrive with a statement: Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action. The title of Franz Ferdinand’s fourth album could very well be a summary of their career to now. The smashing success of their eponymous Mercury Prize-winning debut propelled the Glasgow four-piece to instant global acclaim, and over the following decade Franz Ferdinand have become synonymous with indie rock’n’roll in the UK: stylish, sharp-witted and constantly moving. Since their barnstorming sets at Coachella in April this year, the Glasgow quartet have been putting the ribbon around their brand new long-player, ten tracks of hip shaking jams that remind you just why the guitar is the sexiest instrument of all. And as bass player Bob Hardy explains, it’s a record ready to give. “I think the actual recordings, they’re quite dense, not in a bad sense, but there’s a lot going on that you can get rewarded [with] for repeat listening,” says the 32-year-old. “I also think [the songs] function immediately as well. [One thing] we were all conscious of in the studio is that they should be instantly arresting, but then it needs to have a little more depth that hopefully demands repeat listens. “Alex [Kapranos – vocalist/guitarist] has obviously been a producer in his own right. He’s working on three albums at the moment [from bands including The Cribs and Citizens], so he’s obviously very interested in production and sounds, as are the rest of the band,” he adds. “And I think that as we go further on in our recording career that becomes more a part of our process.” Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action is a guitar record first and foremost – Franz Ferdinand still refusing to go all experimental on us – but for once the staggering riffs were a secondary consideration. And although

24 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

Hardy doesn’t directly admit it, their fresh songwriting approach can be seen as a reaction to their at-times sluggish 2009 LP, Tonight: Franz Ferdinand. “On our third album a lot of the songs did come from a riff or a groove, but I don’t think we were all completely satisfied with [those] songs, so this time around we worked backwards and we started everything with an idea,” he reveals. “Not a concept but an idea of what the song would be about, and then we’d work on lyrics and a tune, and then we’d learn to play it and arrange it as a band, then all the production stuff would come last.” Working backwards? Surely this would result in a loss of momentum for most groups? Franz Ferdinand, however, thrived with the structuring shift. “I think it’s a much better way for us to work,” the bassist informs. “It’s how it was on the first album to a large extent, and the best of the next two albums I think worked in that way. It suits us

Again, Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action – it works on so many levels. This record has been an enjoyable one to make for Franz Ferdinand. They have afforded themselves another four-year break between full-lengths, and with hindsight now on hand can see the benefits that come from taking stock of your achievements. When they exploded out of the Scottish streets originally, this wasn’t so much the case: “It was such a massive, quick success we had, it kind of took us all by surprise,” recalls Hardy. “And when you’re riding that wave you don’t really want to stop; you don’t want to break it, y’know what I mean?”

“BEING ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WORLD, TO HAVE THAT REACTION... WAS ABSOLUTELY MENTAL.” Their debut was a monster hit, and one that Franz Ferdinand will be hard pressed to ever top. But rather than rushing to prove their place at the pinnacle, they currently hold a more considered outlook. However, it still seems suitable for the band to return with Harvest for some festival fun later this year, as according to Hardy it was here in Australia where the adventures of Franz Ferdinand first got rolling. “2004 we went to play Splendour In The Grass. It was our first time in Australia, not any of us had been, and it was just insane!” Hardy excitedly remembers. “We were in this tent and we played Take Me Out and the whole crowd was jumping and undulating. I can remember that vividly. Being on the other side of the world, to have that reaction – somewhere you’ve never been before – was absolutely mental.” WHO: Franz Ferdinand WHAT: Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action (Domino/EMI) WHEN & WHERE: 17 Nov, Harvest, Botanic Gardens

haven’t had much desire,” comes his honest response to why he’s yet to tackle a strictly non-musical book project (though 2011’s Retromania did see him delve into fashion, science fiction and the space race while investigating pop culture’s obsession with its own past), arguing that his approach to music writing hasn’t always been all about the music anyway.

author

“I always use music to write about other things – music as the prism through which I write about politics or the human condition or anything that was on my mind,” Reynolds explains. “Love, race, class, gender, you can always use music to write about them.” Good music writing, for him, is about “trying to make a sensibility, really”. “And then try to persuade people to adopt it,” he laughs. “That’s the kind of music writing I grew up on. People who weren’t just writing about good music to buy, it was about music as a way of explaining yourself or your identity or your life or whatever.”

THE NEVER-ENDING JOURNEY

If veteran music journo Simon Reynolds had a second shot at his 2011 book Retromania, he tells Kris Swales that Daft Punk and Random Access Memories would have their own chapter.

I

f you were ever assembling your own pub trivia team equivalent of The Avengers, Simon Reynolds would be your first round draft pick for the vital ‘music encyclopaedia’ role. Speaking from Los Angeles (“the vanity capital of the world”) about his current book project – a look at the evolution and legacy of the 1970s glam rock movement – Reynolds is reeling off random facts within seconds. That a club called English Disco was the preferred hangout of Iggy Pop and David Bowie at their most decadent, and Mötley Crüe had their genesis in a band called London are minutiae that few music writers could casually recall, but Reynolds is no ordinary music writer. The Brit, based in LA for three years now and “something like 18 years – it’s hard to say” in New York City before that, has written definitive tomes on some of the biggest musical revolutions of the post-rock’n’roll era – postpunk and hip hop amongst them. Perhaps his most important work is Energy Flash: A Journey Through Rave Music And Dance Culture, the 1998 journal something of a Star Wars of electronic dance music considering it’s been re-released in two special editions since. The 2013 addendum sees Reynolds apply his participantobserver style of music journalism to the USA’s ‘EDM’ explosion, specifically with a two-day sojourn to the HARD Summer outdoor festival in his adopted homeland. Though only just on the right side of 50 when he hit the dancefloor in front of modern superstars such as Skrillex, Reynolds says the frequent flyer points racked up in 1990s nightclubs are still valuable for assessing this latest twist in the evolution of club culture. “I’m not going out shoving pills down my throat,” Reynolds admits, also expressing a dislike for extended doses of an EDM sound he describes as “too digitised”, “The thing is, it isn’t that different from what it was in the ‘90s, just in certain respects. It’s a lot more sexual. It was a kind of carnival-esque aspect as well which interests me – this total Las Vegas slash fancy dress carnival basically, like Rio de Janeiro in Brazil.”

So how does the author, set to speak at a series of writers’ events down the east coast of Australia, go about stepping back into a scene where the majority of the protagonists are half his age or younger? “You just wander around,” says Reynolds. “People are friendly. I look a bit young for my age as well, so I don’t stand out as much as I should do. But also people when they’re off their faces are pretty indiscreet as well. I wasn’t really snooping; you hear things. People on the train home were talking about their adventures and I heard people swapping anecdotes about how fucked up they got.” Reynolds’ conversational prose and knack for being in the right place at the right time have seen his work featured in a lengthy roll call of music publications, from now-defunct UK rag Melody Maker to Rolling Stone and beyond. “I

Reynolds namechecks Forest Swords as a standout amidst the “weird dance stuff and underground blog world sort of stuff ” that’s currently ruling his playlist. His curiosity has also been piqued by the 2013 long-players from Disclosure and Daft Punk – records that both fan the flames of rapidly shortening musical trend cycles he lit in Retromania.

“PEOPLE WHEN THEY’RE OFF THEIR FACES ARE PRETTY INDISCREET AS WELL. I WASN’T REALLY SNOOPING; YOU HEAR THINGS.” “I was very suspicious,” he says of Disclosure, the duo breathing life into the turn-of-the-century UK garage and 2-step sound he was “obsessed” with first time around. “It seems too soon to revive it, but I must admit when I heard the album [Settle] that it was quite a well done version of it, and they’d added enough new ideas to it to make it pretty good. But it’s weird to think that this sound from 1999, the cusp of the millennium, is being recycled and rediscovered. “Daft Punk – if [Random Access Memories] had come out when I was writing Retromania it would’ve deserved a whole chapter on its own, really. In fact, it has so many things that feed into my theories, like the track from Giorgio Moroder all about making the music of the future – but that becomes a memory. There’s a story about when [Donna Summer’s Moroderproduced] I Feel Love came out, Brian Eno heard it and grabbed a copy and ran around to David Bowie’s house and went ‘David, David, I’ve heard the future!’ “It’s an amazing record, I Feel Love, and it was revolutionary and all that, but nobody is going to say of Giorgio By Moroder... nobody is going to rush around to anyone’s house and say ‘I’ve heard the future’. There’s something very poignant about the fact that Giorgio Moroder and Daft Punk collaborate but they don’t actually do anything mind-blowing. They just do this rather sweet pastiche of something from 1977.” WHAT: Brisbane Writers Festival WHEN&WHERE: 6 Sep, State Library THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 25

film

THE BIGGER PICTURE Shane Carruth wants his films to be subjective and open to interpretation, he tells Anthony Carew. His second feature Upstream Color has certainly got his audience scratching their heads.

“A

s an audience member, I want an experience that lasts longer than the running time of the film,” says Shane Carruth. The 41-yearold has just made a film that, he hopes, lives up to these expectations: Upstream Color. To call the film a labour of love, or even to bill Carruth as mere ‘auteur’, probably sells short how involved he was in every aspect. He wrote, directed, edited, photographed, scored and starred in the movie; and, in the US, he even self-distributed it. He’s probably more comparable to an indie musician than a

filmmaker; and, like the best of albums, there’s an elusive, interpretive quality to Upstream Color. “If you make a film and everyone walks out of it knowing exactly what it is, and their knowledge after seeing it is the full extent of what anyone will ever need to know about the story, I find it hard to believe that the experience would be compelling for people in any way,” says Carruth After showing at the recent Sydney and Melbourne film festivals, local audiences are getting in on the discussion. Which often begins with one question: WTF? Upstream Color

film

essentially follows Amy Seimetz (herself another actor/ filmmaker), who is drugged with a parasite harvested from an exotic orchard. From there, it’s a flowing, sight/sound, vaguely-plotted portrait of the life-cycle of organisms on Earth, cycles of abuse, the dangers of bio-engineering, and the mysticism of field-recordings. “I don’t think anything I can say in conversation is particularly useful to understanding the film,” Carruth warns, early in our first interview. Across two conversations – first on a sketchy phone-line from Casablanca, then a week later in Paris – Carruth can seem evasive, confessedly “abrasive”. He refutes the notion that either Upstream Color or its 2004 predecessor Primer (a micro-budget time-travel chin-scratcher) has a single genesis-story about their beginnings, or can be interpreted a single way. “There’s a lack of exposition,” he says, “[because] I didn’t want to get bogged down in the specific minutia of the details.” Carruth doesn’t believe that any ‘misinterpretation’ is a problem – “if you make something that’s veiled, you’re doing so operating under the understanding that it will, in the big picture, only be truly understand by a select few.” Just as Upstream Color is a film about the ‘big picture’, ecologically, the filmmaker takes a big picture approach to his work. “The thing I’m most passionate about in filmmaking is that there’s universal quality that can be relevant when seen in any era,” offers Carruth. “Hopefully you can make a film that touches on this shared understanding of what it feels like to be a human in the world.” WHAT: Upstream Color In cinemas 22 Aug

THE OTHER WOMAN Alison Mosshart has starred in and scored her first feature film without appearing on screen or singing a lyric. Anthony Carew finds out how.

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lison Mosshart has been half of The Kills for the past decade, and then in 2009 she joined ‘supergroup’ The Dead Weather; each band earning not just the interest of rock’n’roll fans, but, due to the celebrity wives and ex-wives of co-collaborators Jamie Hince and Jack White, the attention of gossip mags. “Constructive criticism is great, but sadly we don’t live in a world of that anymore,” Mosshart says. “I’d say 90 per cent of stuff written about us I don’t read, because 90 per cent is, to be honest, idiotic.” Yet, if seeing her reflection in print has long since become meaningless for Mosshart, the 34-year-old has suddenly seen a far more confronting reflection: someone evoking her on screen. “I may have become desensitised to have people write about me, but having Julianne Moore ‘play’ me in a performance, that’s something else entirely,” Mosshart laughs. In What Maisie Knew, Moore plays a flaky rock’n’roller going through a divorce with Steve Coogan’s blithe art dealer, with their eight-year-old daughter being passed back and forth between them. Though the character isn’t based, at all on Mosshart, Moore’s on-stage performances entirely are; and the film is filled with Kills songs that Moore has re-recorded the vocals for.

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“Julianne went through old Kills B-sides, leftover songs, vinyl bonuses, non-album tracks, things like that,” Mosshart explains. Moore took the impetus herself – seeing Mosshart as a figure of inspiration for her character, and approaching the singer to ask if it was okay. “I said, ‘Of course!’” Mosshart offers. “I love everything that she does. She’s just an incredible actress. But it was undeniably strange to listen to [the songs]. Hearing her sing with the exact same music – they’ve used the exact same tracks as we did on the originals; they’re still Jamie’s guitars and drums – that’s quite weird, for me.”

Mosshart wasn’t sure how the music would actually be represented in the film, which is a very loose adaptation of Henry James’ fin de siècle novel of the same name, and watching it for the first time at 2012’s Toronto International Film Festival, Mosshart went through a “whole gamut of emotions”, especially when Moore’s performance cut close to home. “It’s hard to watch if you’re in a band, but I think it’d be a hundred times harder if you were in a band and you had kids, and anyone had ever accused you of being a bad parent because you leave to go on tour,” Mosshart says. “The job is pretty crazy, you’re never home; so when that’s your job, it’s an uncomfortable thing to watch. I know what it’s like to be on a tour bus forever, but if I had a child [as well] and saw this film it would be almost too confronting.” WHAT: What Maisie Knew In cinemas 22 Aug

DON’T TOUCH THAT DIAL

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Sydney rapper Dialectrix challenges the status quo of Australian hip hop with his new record The Cold Light Of Day, and tells Chris Yates about the creative decisions that have guided the record.

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very artist presumably thinks what they are doing is new, different and exciting, and hopes to both appeal to fans as well as creating new audiences through their music. Brief descriptions of the new Dialectrix album having its roots in classic hip hop while incorporating new sounds and ideas really do not do the record justice at all, and the phrase sits within the category of what everyone always says about his work. However, from the opening bars of the record’s first track Shadow In The Light – a track designed to “punch people in the face stylistically” – it’s apparent this isn’t the usual promotional preamble. A very unconventional drumbeat bordering on jazz kicks in ferociously with Dialectrix (real name Ryan Leaf ) launching into his rhymes with a deadpan seriousness that really sets the tone for the record to take itself seriously in the best possible way. Once again Dialectrix has collaborated wholeheartedly with Sydney producer Plutonic Lab (real name Leigh Ryan) for the entire record, with DJ 2Buck supplying the scratches (except for Fire In The Blood which features DJ Morgs). Using one producer throughout the album is in itself a simple decision that few artists really make these days, preferring to pick and choose beats from a variety of sources to give their records a greater sense of variety, which does not always contribute to a cohesive record. Dialectrix says it was a no brainer to work with Pluto again and is confident this decision has helped yield such fruitful results. “I had this moment when we were working on the last record (Audio Projectile) where I thought it was going beyond what I had done before with other producers as far as really collaborating and getting along,” he explains. “I always say that working with him is like working with a band. We both used to play in bands in different capacities and different genres so working with him evoked that same feeling of like – I don’t feel like I’m just a rapper guy who’s rapping on beats. I feel like there’s someone here helping me and vice versa. It kind of grew from that and I just feel like I get a different and better result working with him than I do with anyone else. He’s also a really good friend of mine and it’s just a relationship that’s grown and grown to the point

where we are going to continuously do stuff together. Whether it’s always going to be as Dialectrix or whether we go off and do something else together, I don’t know, but I am always going to make music with that dude. I think we drive each other really well – there’s just too

working relationship between himself and Pluto. “We’re editing each other and helping each other while we write. We throw an idea out there, we entertain it and try and make it work and we both go ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Everything that is on the record we have both agreed on. It’s not like previous groups I’ve been in where if one person really likes a song and everyone else doesn’t – because one guy loves it so much it still gets on there. When it’s just the two of us we usually agree or disagree on the same things. We have this intuitive knowledge when we are working through ideas and coming up with concepts and these songs, we know straight away if we both feel

“WE KIND OF JUST LET IDEAS HAVE THEIR TIME TO EITHER SINK OR SWIM” many boxes ticked not to go with him again.” This collaborative approach has clearly contributed to the record’s genuinely unique sound. Either party has the privilege of vetoing anything they don’t think is working, and this constant bouncing of ideas and tracks off each other means that everything has gone under serious deliberation on the album. “We kind of just let ideas have their time to either sink or swim,” he says, continuing to explain the

the same way about it. That for me represents that band mentality – when you feed off each other and inspire and influence each other in real time, in the flesh.” Dialectrix says that the more they worked on the record together, the better the results were and the tighter the cohesion of the whole project. He says Plutonic Lab kept pushing him to really try and do something that no one has done before, which he fed off and pushed back that same philosophy to Plutonic Lab as well. No idea was too weird or too unconventional to at least give it a try, and Pluto’s extensive experience behind the controls meant that he had the resources and skills to implement even the most far out concepts. This constant experimentation has resulted in what is an incredibly accomplished record that succeeds in the pair’s efforts to try and create something new. WHAT: The Cold Light Of Day (Obese) THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 27

Instead, it appears old habits die hard, with the group relying on caves (which doubled as both influence and recording studio for Bliss Release) to help craft their sound. “Well, we didn’t do the whole band set-up in the cave,” Wright corrects. “We just took in some mics and some stuff that we had already recorded and played them back in the cave for reverb.” Lenffer adds: “We actually recorded it in a place called Bear Cave, and it was actually a quarry. Like, when you listen to the album you can hear water dripping. That’s all from the cavern.”

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The organic, unblemished musical mindset seems to have worked, with Dream Cave showcasing a more assured and mature sound than Cloud Control’s debut – the tracks more luscious and layered, with every quirk ironed out to produce a seamless albeit textured moodiness. “We stripped it back this time,” Lenffer reveals. “A lot of the demos were done on laptops, and we extract them from technology to a live setting – and making the songs strong in a live setting was really important to us.” The pair reveal that the foursome, which includes Lenffer’s brother Ulrich on drums and Jeremy Kelshaw on bass, have a remarkably democratic attitude towards their music. And, despite the aforementioned existence of egos, they tend to operate on a greater good philosophy.

CAVE DWELLERS They say album number two can make or break you as an artist, but indie rockers Cloud Control hardly seem worried. And, as Heidi Lenffer and Alister Wright gear up for the band’s second release, they tell Natasha Lee they’re just glad to be back home. Cover and feature pic by Carine Thevenau.

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fter the release of their critically acclaimed debut, Bliss Release, Cloud Control jumped ship from their hometown in the Blue Mountains and did what most Aussie 20-somethings do – packed up and headed over to the UK. Okay, this was a little different to your usual ex-pat adventure, with the foursome committed to one mission: recording album number two. The newie, Dream Cave, might not have that ‘London’ street sound stamped all over it, but lead vocalist Alister Wright and fellow band member Heidi Lenffer sure have embraced London’s alt.punk street fashion. The languid Wright, all arms and legs, is clad in a vintage Adidas pullover, ‘strategically’ ripped jeans (“they came like this,” he informs me when asked how he managed to rip them so badly) and a pair of black Doc Martens that he picked up at an op shop in London. Lenffer, on the other hand, credits her mum with helping her in the fashion stakes: “She likes to take me shopping and buy me things.” Despite their earlier success, Wright admits that he lost focus of the band’s popularity Down Under while recording the second album: “Well… yeah. I mean, I don’t sit around wondering how popular we are,” he adds awkwardly, “but it is something you think about, you know, having been overseas for so long.” He needn’t have, however, with the group commanding a sell-out performance at the Opera House as part of Sydney’s VIVID Festival – a one-off special that saw them debut, Dream Cave, in its entirety. “I think we did ourselves a service on this [album],” begins Lenffer. “This time around… we tried to write more feel good songs, like party songs.” Wright agrees, adding: “Yeah, we tried to write songs that we could play at a festival or at a concert and they would all be enjoyable. ‘Cause, definitely, there’s some that only work in certain situations; they’re not really good for everything. But these, you could play anywhere.”

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The album’s 11 tracks take you on a hypnotic romp through an alt. psychedelic rock universe, set somewhere between 1965 and ’68. Despite the overarching Mamas & Papas and Beach Boysesque sounds weaving their way through the album (specifically on the tambourine-happy Moonrabbit), Lenffer denies the band were reaching for any kind of hippie influences. “I know it sounds like it, but I wasn’t really listening to that kind of stuff at the time.” “You said you were influenced by Meditation Song? (from their debut, Bliss Release),” Wright interjects. “Oh yeah,” Lenffer continues, “that’s right. I was trying to write a song like one of our old songs. I was also into that Australian band, REM.”

“We bring different ideas to the table, don’t we?” Wright asks Lenffer. “You’re in the band,” she replies, “you tell me.” Wright continues: “Well, okay… sometimes we all work together, but a lot of the time it’s us bringing a whole bunch of stuff in and ruining it together.” Lenffer laughs, animatedly adding that “you can also form little alliances in the band. Like, if you think the song should sound ‘this way’, you can work with someone – almost like a proposal. You might do a drumming session with someone and then come up

“A LOT OF THE TIME IT’S US BRINGING A WHOLE BUNCH OF STUFF IN AND RUINING IT TOGETHER.” with a reason as to why the song should sound a certain way. It’s almost like negotiating,” she admits, before running her fingers through her hair and sighing, “it’s hard… But that said it’s as hard as it is easy. We share a similar philosophy rather than a certain sonic vision.” Wright, who’s been listening intently, widens his eyes and coos “Ooooooh!” while Lenffer continues, “Didn’t we a while ago… yeah, didn’t we try and come up with what we could say was like a foundational idea of the band, and it was ‘being excellent to each other.’” “Well…” begins Wright, “that was actually from Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure.” Undeterred, Lenffer continues: “Well, I think we inherited it,” adding (seriously) that, “we took it on as our own,” before the conversation swerves into how “not hot” Keanu Reeves has been looking recently. “Well,” defends a smiling Lenffer, “he’s looked good for so long that I think he’s allowed to start looking fat and old.” WHAT: Dream Cave (Ivy League Records)

“Wait,” adds Wright, “they’re not Australian.”

WHEN & WHERE: 21 Aug Spotted Cow; 22

“Oh right,” apologises a sheepish Lenffer. “Sorry.”

24 Aug, Kings Beach Tavern

Aug, Coolangatta Hotel; 23 Aug, The Tivoli;

GENRE JOURNEYS

one. This next one’s going to be a little bit more upbeat and have a positive element… I think it’s going to be partly heavier, partly catchier, partly more experimental, but I think it’s going to be uniquely Voyager.”

Voyager’s singer Danny Estrin plays a keytar and belts out pop melodies over progressive and power metal madness. Tom Hersey tries to wrap his head around what this all sounds like.

“I

reckon, deep down, everybody really loves a good pop song,” Voyager vocalist Danny Estrin muses as we’re trying to get to the bottom of the Perth band’s sound. It’s no easy task either, seeing as the group have been confounding audiences since their beginnings way back in 1999. There’s talk of prog metal, power metal, Estrin even throwing out – and dismissing – the dubious ‘pop metal’ label. The vocalist’s best guess as to what the band offers is, “If [pop music is] combined with some heavier riffs and driving guitars

and pumping drums, it’s probably a failsafe equation for a good time.” We’re talking about the band’s delightfully idiosyncratic sound because there’s a new album in the works, the band’s fifth, their last 2011’s The Meaning Of I. “We’ve had a history of releasing a record every two, two-and-a-half years, and now we’ve pretty much got a whole album written already. We’re in the stages of pre-production now so hopefully at this show we’ll be able to throw in a new one to show people the direction we’re heading in. [The new record] is definitely more positive than the last

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Rather than simplifying, the new record has the band delving deeper into the extremities of Voyager’s sound. “One of the things I like doing is to write a metal song with a pop sensibility. So you have a relatively simple song with a relatively simple melody, and then under that you’ve got instruments doing odd, progressive things. So there’s something for the music lovers to enjoy and the people who like good, simple melody can also latch onto.” International touring and high profile support slots on bills with Children Of Bodom and Alestorm makes their upcoming show a de facto The Meaning Of I album release. The headlining slot has also allowed Voyager to extend a hand to the local metal scene, the quintet offering up the opening two slots to any band willing to submit their music. “I remember what it was like starting out. And so what better opportunity for some local, young talent to express their interest and for us to select them based on merit. It’s worked out really well, and I think it’s really cool to help out bands. I wish back in my day there were bands who had done this.” But we didn’t reach any consensus about Voyager’s sound. “I don’t think we’ve had too many problems per se. It’s actually kind of been the selling point of the band. Of course there’s going to be hardcore death metal or grindcore fans who are going to go, ‘No, we don’t want to hear any pop influences’, but at some shows I’ve seen big, burly guys with Slayer T-shirts singing along to our most poppiest pop songs.” WHEN & WHERE: 23 Aug, Crowbar

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 29

fashion

ONESIE MOMENT, PLEASE… They crept in among us like a cute, fluffy armada of awkward, oversized animals. But Natasha Lee explains why she welcomes our new onesie overlords, and finds out the deal behind the haters and conspiracy theorists of the trend.

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dmittedly, I have a lot of problems. But regressive, infantile fantasies that see me constantly battle a painful urge to wear adult nappies and suck my thumb in public are not one of them. Nor do I crave, as Freud believed we all do, “to return to the womb”. Okay, not so sure about the last one given it could actually exist somewhere deep, deep in the inherent cesspool that is my subconscious, but who’s judging? My world does not, as the ABC’s Annabel Crabb (alas, one of the many columnists who have expounded their nauseating pseudo-psychological theories on the subject) writes: “structurally infantilise me to a degree where I now see no alternative to dressing like an actual baby. I should be independent by now, but here I am – an overdeveloped house pet, in effect”. Wait, what? Now, I’m no Carl Jung, but how’s this for a theory: onesies are a fad. You know, a trend. These things come in waves; like planking, My Little Pony and mankinis. Maybe, just maybe, there is no need to read any kind of sick Freudian theory into it. I have worn a onesie, albeit only once, to a friend’s themed birthday party. Needless to say, my mother was horrified and refused to believe that I had willingly 30 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

ordered the onesie, saying that, “the delivery man has made a mistake and dropped off a baby suit”. Oh mother, there’s no mistake. That garish pink pig is mine.

who make a big deal about wanting to, ‘stand out, man’, but they do it by being a conformist! It’s about trying to be on trend by being ridiculous.”

Contrary to popular myth, it did not cause me to sink into a childish mess, but rather, provided me with some jolly good, warm comfort. End of.

“I can’t say I’ve seen it a lot in real life,” says Cousens. “I have seen it a lot on TV or online media, and people tend to wear them at music festivals.”

So why all the hate?

“I don’t get why people are making onesies sound like some weird fetish,” says 22-year-old Brighette Ryan, who claims that Ryan Gosling was behind her decision to purchase her pink giraffe playsuit.

Radio broadcaster (and non-onesie wearer) Stephen Cenatiempo likens the cuddly, animal suits to flaunting your pyjamas out in public: “It’s a bit like the goth uniform,” he explains. “You know, all those people

But co-founder of online opinion site Something Clever, Daniel Cousens, finds onesie wearing is more a case of reel life, rather than reality.

The trend has spawned a stack of online stores, while at the time of publication there were 80,847 results for onesies on eBay.

“I think Ryan promoted them on Ellen, and that’s why I went a bought mine. Look, they’re just a fad, but they’re a comfy fad.” Cenatiempo agrees, kind of, adding that they’re merely plush vehicles for attention seekers: “They’re not even real onesies, anyway. They don’t even come with socks.”

CREDITS MODELS:

Blue Onesie – Nicole Lau Pikachu – Danae Pearl Tiger – Chelsea Burroughs

STYLIST: GIRL

CO-ORDINATED BY: GIRL

PHOTOS:

Nathan Mewett

“THESE THINGS COME IN WAVES; LIKE PLANKING, MY LITTLE PONY AND MANKINIS.”

Needless to say, the hate and vitriol against the Japaneseinspired playthings has come thick and fast. Earlier this year, former Kevin Rudd spokesperson Lachlan Harris started an online petition calling for a onesie ban.

But don’t worry; both Cousens and Ryan are certain the fad is close to fading.

“As hard as it is to believe,” began Harris, “you are adults now. One of the least talked about, but most important, elements of adulthood is the responsibility to stop wearing clothes designed for small humans in nappies.” Ouch. (Despite several attempts, Harris did not return any of The Music’s calls/SMSs/tweets).

“It probably won’t last much longer now, because once it becomes a ‘thing’, which onesies have, these things usually fade,” explains Cousins.

The pro-onesie world hit back, launching a counter petition, titled ‘Lockie Harris And Anyone Born Before 1983: Stop Petitioning Gen Y To Stop Wearing Onesies’.

Ryan, however, isn’t ready to throw out her pink giraffe just yet, saying that she believes they’ll stick around until at least next year.

Sufficient mudslinging took place. Insults were served. And, as expected, both parties managed to achieve absolutely nothing. Ultimately, as with every obtusely, oversaturated fad, the real winners here are mates Tom Cohn and Nick Harriman, who are the co-founders of Kigu – one of the biggest online onesie retailers. The pair originally bought 300 suits back from Japan for a cool two grand. A few years on, and their turnover has blown out to almost $1.7 million.

“I mean, I think it will be around next winter,” she says, “but that’s it. I think after that people will just get really sick of them.” Oh well. Back to planking it is then. THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 31

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OFF THE SHELF

of indie pop, Dave’s Pawn Shop’s roots lie in the murkier worlds of punk, grunge and garage rock.

Dave’s Pawn Shop are happy establishing their place in the Brisbane scene without taking their foot off the distortion pedal. Matt O’Neill speaks to frontman Jake Williamson about stirring the stylistic melting pot.

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ave’s Pawn Shop have accomplished a lot in a short period of time. Formed in 2011 by friends studying the same university degree, they’ve released two EPs, performed countless shows, delivered multiple tours and strutted their stuff as part of the Big Day Out. For frontman Jake Williamson, who moved to the Gold Coast with hopes of some day forming a successful band, it’s been a pleasantly surprising run. “Yeah, I guess we are pretty surprised. I guess it’s just being part of the Brisbane scene. My hometown is really small. When I moved up here, it was just really easy

to get gigs. There were just lots of awesome musicians all around the place. I think all of that helped us to pick up speed really quickly,” he says. “We really didn’t have any idea what we were going to do when we first got together. We were just experimenting.” The interesting twist is that Dave’s Pawn Shop aren’t your typically accessible outfit. Their songs are strong and memorable but they’re also coated in unsettling swathes of distortion and vitriol. Whereas many of Australia’s successful younger outfits take their cues from the more immediately contemporary realms

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“Whatever we kind of listen to at the time, we take a bit out of. Obviously, we still have a lot of ‘90s music that we still love and listen to and it all gets mixed into that. I’d say we’re trying to aim for this kind of alternative, kind of punk sound. Just a bit psych-y, a bit grungy and aggressive,” Williamson explains. “Tool are probably the band that made me want to be in a band. If you asked the others, they’d probably say Nirvana.” It hasn’t done anything to halt their ascent. Despite having already released an EP this year, Dave’s Pawn Shop are currently finishing up recording a two-track vinyl release for later in the year. Following that, there are plans to record an EP or even an album in 2014. In the interim, they’ll continue playing shows with acts like recent QMA winners The Trouble With Templeton and trying to find their niche in Brisbane’s scene. “We want to do a debut album pretty soon. We don’t ever want to stop. We write so many songs and we’d just love to put a debut album together and really help make Brisbane a really great, healthy hub for grungy alternative music,” Williamson says. “You know, Brisbane’s a real melting pot of styles. We don’t play with a lot of bands that play like us. We play with really different bands that we really like and are really good. “But bands like Violent Soho and DZ Deathrays, they’re really great bands,” the frontman says. “I’d just like to help build that part of Brisbane’s music scene. To be able to support either of those guys would be amazing.” WHEN & WHERE: 24 Aug, The Zoo

people than we are as a band. And that sits alright with me, because I don’t give a stuff about the music side of it really – it’s just a hobby for me. But what a hobby! Some people collect stamps, I have to stand up onstage for fuckin’ an hour in some part of the world and drink free beer, it’s great fun!”

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Of course there is, as Knight suggests, always a serious side to any long-term endeavour, and a lot of this is broached with great poignancy in Blokes You Can Trust. For instance the acrimonious departure of founding drummer (and industry stalwart) Bill Walsh is dissected from all angles, and gives a fascinating insight into how interpersonal dynamics can affect a band’s bigger picture. “Yeah, that’s all really a personal thing – it was really in-house and in-band business – but it had to be mentioned. It was disappointing at the time, but things move on – there’s more important things happening in the world than what’s happening within the inner sanctum of some shitty little pub band.”

BACK IN TOWN Usually only chart-topping unit shifters hit the road promoting films documenting their fascinating career arc, but iconic rockers Cosmic Psychos sure ain’t no pop stars. Frontman Ross ‘Knighty’ Knight talks to Steve Bell about fuzz, farms and famous friends.

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or fans of Oz rock legends Cosmic Psychos it’s always been a bit of a mystery why the veteran outfit aren’t more venerated here in their homeland. For nigh on 30 years, they’ve been an institution on the local scene, releasing great albums and eternally owning it onstage in their yobbishly boisterous but otherwise understated manner. But to many they’ve always been more famous for being a cause célèbre in the nascent years of the Seattle grunge explosion rather than for their own canon of brilliant fuzz-laden rock’n’roll. Which is why new documentary, Blokes You Can Trust – the baby of director Matt Weston (until now best known as bassist for The Nation Blue) – is such a timely reminder of this great outfit’s many merits and achievements. As people the Psychos have always been the most unlikely rock stars you’ll ever meet – especially songwriter and cornerstone Ross ‘Knighty’ Knight (vocals/bass) – and a lot of their charm has always been in their laddish, from-the-land bonhomie, a trait that endears because it’s so clearly genuine rather than some calculated affectation. “He did a top job,” the ever-jovial Knight offers of Weston’s efforts. “He was just given permission to do whatever he wanted and we didn’t really have much to do with it. It’s brought back a lot of good memories for me, that’s for sure. I’d forgotten how much fun I’d had – I could spend the rest of my life in a rocking chair with a couple of bottles of plonk laughing my head off thinking about everything. “The only reservation I had was that I didn’t want to make it a Ross Knight film, and there’s a bit of my private life in there I suppose, which doesn’t sit that easy with me because I’m a pretty quiet kind of a bloke, believe it or not. But it was a great opportunity; I didn’t know Matt at all when the idea came though, I sat down and had a couple of beers with him and thought, ‘Oh he’s not a bad bloke’, and away we went. All we had to do was answer a few questions, and he basically put boxloads of shit that we’d collected over the years together in some

way – he did a good job sorting through all of that crap, because my filing system’s fucking terrible. What I can’t fit in my ute I just chuck in a box in the shed!” While the film provides fascinating insight into how the band’s formation was inherently linked to Knight’s upbringing in rural Victoria, and goes a long way towards explaining the band’s ongoing farm-related iconography – tractors, guns and bulldozers have always figured prominently in the Psychos’ lyrics and artwork – its power is derived from providing a human dimension to this gruff, ragtag outfit, and their delightfully flippant approach to a craft that’s often afforded far too much gravitas. “I’ve been so lucky to be in a band like the Psychos. We’ve never been serious about it – it’s had serious moments obviously – but it’s just been fun. We’ve just bumbled our way through – I guess we’re more famous for knowing famous

Some things, however, can’t be brushed aside so easily, and the 2006 passing of the Psychos’ long-term guitarist Robbie ‘Rocket’ Watts is fittingly treated with great love and respect. Indeed the scene of Knighty visiting his friend’s grave and sharing a beer with him (both literally and figuratively) is one of the film’s most powerful moments, especially when contextualised in relation to his long-term drug habit.“Yeah, that was the hardest thing to talk about,” Knight reflects softly. “Every day I think about the little bugger, and it’s a really hard thing to get over. You put a lot of time and effort into keeping someone ticking away, and when it doesn’t work out it’s pretty disappointing. But it’s great to see his little head back again. I couldn’t watch it – the first rough copies that Matt showed me when it was talking about Rob I had to go outside and have a beer. It was

“WE’RE MORE FAMOUS FOR KNOWING FAMOUS PEOPLE THAN WE ARE AS A BAND.” hard. He was such a wonderful bloke, and hopefully that comes over in the film, what a great guy he was.” And of course the grunge royalty by whom the Psychos were always held in such high regard make an appearance to explain the band’s influence on one of music’s most important eras – Eddie Vedder, Mark Arm, Steve Albini and Butch Vig all sing their praises – and this hammers home the overall importance of these most unlikely rock’n’roll heroes. “Yeah, it was a nice touch. Probably the funniest thing for me was that I was going through a pretty bum time during the making of the doco, and when Matt went over there and did the interviews they all put a little personal message on for me – I found that not only humbling but so uplifting. That’s why they’re me mates – they’re really good people.” WHAT: Blokes You Can Trust (Umbrella Entertainment) WHEN & WHERE: 24 Aug, The Hi-Fi; 19 Jan, Big Day Out, Metricon Stadium & Carrara Parklands, Gold Coast THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 33

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BRAVE WORLD They’ve been together for a little over 18 months, but already Canada’s Obey The Brave are signed to Epitaph, have a debut full-length under their belts and are smack bang in the middle of a world tour. Guitarist John Campbell talks about the wild ride with Tom Hersey.

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here’s no rest for the wicked man,” Obey The Brave’s John Campbell says with a laugh. And as though to prove his point, the guitarist calls while on tour through the USA. So far, 2013 has been a wild ride for the Montreal deathcore five-piece. Formed in early 2012 by buddies from Despised Icon and Blind Witness, this year has seen the band tear it up across North American and European stages, with their debut record Young Blood

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earning rave reviews. But according to Campbell, the band’s amazing business wasn’t something that they had planned. “When we started the band we weren’t quite sure what we were going to do,” Campbell explains. “The first talks we had when we got together happened when we’d all come out of bands that had toured fairly heavily, so we were thinking about starting something where we’d play some shows on weekends. As the songs came together we got more into it and decided that we wanted to do it full-time – give it 110 per cent.”

As the band was writing for their debut, everything just clicked. From the way Young Blood seemlessly marries a melodic metalcore sensibility with a brutal deathcore edge, to getting signed to punk institution Epitaph Records, it became apparent that, despite the band’s initial plans to keep things small, the opportunity to do something much bigger was beckoning. “The music is the primary reason that we all enjoy being in the band but, even if you’re 100 per cent behind your band, you might not get the opportunity to be able to travel and put a record out. So getting signed up with Epitaph just made us more driven to do this as a full-time thing, and take this band as far as we can. Just do as much as we possibly can, because it’s not an opportunity everyone gets. “And it’s one thing to write a song, but it’s a whole other thing to actually play that song live,” says Campbell. “I think there’s a whole different dynamic. Sometimes one of the least favourite songs on the record becomes one of [the best] to play live. And that all becomes good food for thought when thinking about writing a second record.” According to Campbell, that second LP is very much on the way. “Ideally it would be out early to mid next year. We’ve been writing for a while now. It is more difficult being on the road to get stuff done, but [we’re getting it] done, we’re fitting it in.” WHAT: Young Blood (Epitaph/Warner) WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 24 August, Thriller; Sunday 25, Tall Poppies Studios (all-ages)

FUCK THIS The Stiffys’ Jason Leigh tells Samson McDougall that their erection rock is no gimmick and that really they’re all heart.

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ock rockers The Stiffys have their angle sewn up. Their mission statement: “The Stiffys are a two-piece rock’n’roll band that dress up like sailors and sing about erections. There is no deeper meaning to our songs and if the topic isn’t stiffies then we will not sing about it.” Their ambition: “To be Melbourne’s number one erection-based rock band...” The sailor suits are about getting noticed, standing out from the humdrum. “The thing about the music business is that it’s an image-based business, you’ve gotta look snappy at all times,” says Stiffys bass-playing mouthpiece Jason Leigh, who, incidentally, does not have a stiffy during the interview. “You’ve gotta look your best. We like to dress up a little bit, we like to look sharp. We’re very popular with the ladies and we just wanna do whatever it takes to impress the ladies.” Their shtick has already granted them major support slots, national tours and spots on festival stages and they’ll now tour their latest single, Champagne. “It’s about something that’s really important to us,” says Leigh of the song. “We didn’t want to be one of those bands that just sings about anything, we really just wanted to open our hearts and sing about our favourite thing, which is champagne.” Themed rock a new concept. The Beards are kicking international goals right now with nothing more than songs about facial hair; The Zimmers took the pensioner market by storm with their reinvention of punk tunes; there’s a band of spontaneous performing cyclists, The Cycologists, in Melbourne; there’s The Burqa Band, an 34 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

all-female, indie-rock band from Kabul, Afghanistan; there’s even Mini KISS, a KISS tribute band made up entirely of midgets. “The thing about The Stiffys is that we’re not just some novelty band, we’re pouring our hearts out and just trying to express ourselves with our unique brand of rock’n’roll. I’d definitely be open [to a tour] if Mini KISS could commit to giving 110%.” Leigh and his buddy Adam Stagg have copped mixed receptions on tour. “Due to the nature of our unique brand of rock’n’roll, I think that some rooms can pose different challenges,” Leigh laughs. “Some of the more rural locations have taken a bit longer to become part of The Stiffys.” And they’re not exactly popular in your everyday establishments. “Due to the changing nature

of society... We find that sometimes it’s hard for The Stiffys ‘cause we get turned away from a lot of restaurants and stores due to the nature of our unique brand of rock’n’roll and our drinking habits. We find that hanging out in Red Rooster stores is the best way to relax, have a nice time, have a couple of drinks in the bathrooms, eat rooster rolls, eat big macs, do kickflips, meet girls – things of that nature.” Leigh is not averse to the concept of adding, ahem, members to the band, it’s just a matter of logistics. “We’ve got about four girls that play horns with us and one that plays percussion with us whenever we can. The thing is with The Stiffys, because we’re so focused at all times on having such a nice time, it can be hard to lock down a rehearsal time with all of us. “There’s 24 hours in the day... Sometimes I just need time for me; sometimes Adam and I just need to focus on our music – it can’t just be about ladies 24 hours a day. It’s like, ‘C’mon, guys, let’s think about it for one second. We’ve gotta play rock’n’roll, we can’t just kiss girls all day. It’s not just some kind of kissing booth, we’re not Ian Thorpe.” WHEN & WHERE: 22 Aug, Surfers Paradise Beer Garden; 23 Aug, The Spotted Cow; 24 Aug, Ric’s

In the blink of an eye, from playing Green Day covers at their parents’ houses to supporting the band on a European tour, ten years passed. “At this point in our career, we realise we’re a career band; we’ve made it this far, we can make it another ten years, easily. I mean, it feels like it’s gone by so quickly. We’ve proven to ourselves and the people that we’re going to be around for a while and we’re not going anywhere.”

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The release of their fifth studio record, Don’t Panic, saw them leave major label Interscope, a choice that ensured the mentality between one another remained relaxed and productive. “It’s just a good feeling to be able to do whatever we want, when we want to do it, how we want to do it. We can kind of be a little bit more relaxed about everything and just be on our own schedule. I guess it’s a little bit more like being your own boss. It’s cool – it’s definitely the right move for our band, and I think it’s cool to be on a label where you get a lot more attention rather than being on a major.

BAND OF BROTHERS Forming in the ninth grade, All Time Low could barely play their instruments. Approaching their tenyear anniversary with the same line-up, guitarist Jack Barakat looks back on the dream that became a reality while Daniel Cribb tries to decipher the magic formula.

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fter seven weeks in Europe, All Time Low’s Jack Barakat finds himself slumped on the couch, watching baseball and eagerly anticipating their next journey. “We’ve played Europe so many times now that we’ve got a good following there. We were over there opening up for Green Day for seven weeks, so it was awesome, but it was definitely a new crowd; we were playing to a bunch of new people,” Barakat begins. It’s only been five months since their appearance at Soundwave, and a return next month is proof of their tireless efforts. “If you see us at a festival and you see us at a headlining show, it’s a completely different show. With festivals, we’re working a bunch of new fans over and putting on a less relaxed show; we’re a little bit uptight and focused when we’re on festivals because we’re trying to gain some new fans, but if you come see us at a headlining show at a club, it’s going to be a lot more relaxed, we’re going to be messing around with people and bringing people up on stage. It’s a different kind of vibe.” It’s not that the four-piece make a conscious effort to spend almost all of the year on tour, it’s just all they’ve ever known. In ninth grade, Barakat was playing in a band with a few friends when he met vocalist/guitarist Alex Gaskarth. They got Gaskarth onboard and then slowly tweaked the line-up to somewhat of a local “dream team”, finding the best drummer in the school, Rian Dawson, and finally tracking down Zack Merrick, a bassist that everyone in town was raving about. At 17, while other students where sending off college applications, All Time Low were sealing envelopes addressed to record labels and trying to scope out a manager. “We could barely play our instruments, we definitely didn’t know how to write songs – we were just playing covers at that point. I definitely didn’t think we’d be doing it for a long time,” he admits. “We were so young when we started playing, and we got pretty serious about it by 17, so at that

point, I mean, most people still don’t know what they want to do. We knew that we wanted to play music. There was never anything that we were passionate about that wasn’t music, so no one ever even talked about or thought about college. Going to college wasn’t even a real thing. “We’ve been touring for so long now that we have it down to a science – we get along so well. We all kind of grew up together and it’s really like a touring family. We don’t really have a problem at all.” On top of that, they’ve had the same line-up since forming. “A lot of drugs,” Barakat swiftly responds when queried on the secret. “No, I’m just kidding,” he laughs. “We have a really good time touring and if you enjoy doing what you’re doing then it kind of makes for a stress-free environment where everyone’s in good spirits, everyone’s in a good mood. If you’re enjoying it, it makes it a lot easier to keep doing it.”

“It wasn’t as terrible as I’m sure other artists have had. We still had a lot of creative control, we still wrote all the songs – no one was writing songs for us or any of that kind of stuff – we just had more people giving their opinions; more cooks in the kitchen, and I mean, there was so many people giving their opinion that it was swaying everyone differently and no one could agree on the same thing, so everything took longer.” The main aspect of being on a major label that was appealing was the financial support provided. Now everything has to be paid for by the band and they no longer have a budget to tour with a large crew. Once finalising a budget for it, they’ll be employing a fulltime cameraman on tour to piece together their second DVD. “Since the last time we’ve done a DVD, we’ve

“WE’VE BEEN TOURING FOR SO LONG NOW THAT WE HAVE IT DOWN TO A SCIENCE – WE GET ALONG SO WELL.” toured the world a bunch of times. I think this time, it’s going to be a lot more involved with world stuff, and not just the US tours we based the first one on” Although they’re about to embark on their second world tour of the year, they’ve still taken some time to record a couple of songs and write some more. A new record won’t be out anytime soon, but with any luck they’ll find a substantial break next year to get stuck into album number six. “I think Don’t Panic was quite possibly the strongest comeback we’ve ever had, and I’m not really saying it’s a comeback because we didn’t really go anywhere, but I just feel like it really kind of re-energised our fanbase, and re-energised us as a touring band. I think it was definitely the perfect record to make at the perfect time. “At this point we’ve kind of found our sound, and there’s always going to be an aspect of us that’s going to be a little more rock than pop, and there’s always going to be a couple of songs that are going to be a little bit more poppy. So [the new songs] are definitely similar, and I think it’s going to be a Don’t Panic 2.0. At this point we’ve honed in on our sound and I think we’ve got it.” WHEN & WHERE: 28 Aug, The Tivoli (all ages) THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 35

travel

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here’s an unusual sound filling the air of New Delhi on this overcast March morning. Absent is the cacophony of car, motorcycle and tuk-tuk horns that usually soundtracks a transport system best described as Delhi Dodgems, replaced instead by an eerie silence – or perhaps, more accurately, the sound of expectation. The annual Holi Festival has arrived in the bustling Paharganj district, home to countless tourist-filled hotels, honest street vendors, and just as many shady street hustlers. Last night, small bonfires were lit on the side of the narrow streets and laneways to burn evil spirits as part of the Holika Dahan ritual. If that was a solemn undertaking, the main festivities are far more celebratory. Later tonight parties will rage across the city, with artists such as Ace Ventura and Liquid Soul bringing the psy and progressive sounds familiar to Australian bush doof goers into New Delhi’s cultural melting pot. Daytime, though, is where the real fun lies – just not fun of the good, clean variety. For Holi, at its essence, is the Indian equivalent of an Australian high school muck-up day; reminiscent of the water fights of Thailand’s Songkran Festival, but with colour. Lots of it. While families tend to enjoy their own Holi celebrations behind closed doors, groups of Indian males – predominately in their teens and 20s – roam the streets and laneways of Paharganj. They’re bearing bags of richly coloured food dyes to smear on the hair, face and bodies of their fellow man so that everybody looks the same, hence breaking down barriers of age, sex, caste and creed for the day.

THE MANY FACES OF HOLI Kris Swales walks the streets of New Delhi’s Paharganj district for the Holi Festival, a day where humanity is united by colour, but some of Delhi’s demons can’t help but show their face.

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Meanwhile, the rooftops above are lined with snipers eyeing off unsuspecting passersby – some simply emptying buckets of water on their prey, others throwing water balloons with the ferocity of a pitcher on the plate for the first innings of baseball’s World Series. There’s a largely carnival atmosphere in the air as perfect strangers, both local and foreign, greet each other with the “Happy Holi!” cry, trade colours, then hug warmly. Men who don’t participate with the enthusiasm of their brethren are chided as being “macho”, but in a city where public displays of affection between males are commonplace, the machos are few and far between. Futuristic water pistols, gigantic air pumps and spray cans of foul-tasting coloured foam are also part of the arsenals of seasoned Holi veterans, who drench anyone who walks past whether they’re prepared or not. Throngs of party-goers gather en masse in some areas where the colour trading feels more like competitive sport, though always with the same smiling faces. Some side streets, strangely, remain as silent as the morning air. The colour and water fights begin to die down around lunchtime, just as proceedings take on a sinister edge. A pair of British sisters are groped first by one young local man, then by a mob which quickly forms around them. This isn’t an isolated incident for a female tourist today, so it’s time to go back to the hotel and take a good, hard look in the mirror. These dyes are colourfast, and it’s going to take more than one scrubbing session before the face looking back at you is a familiar one.

travel

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SPATIAL AWARENESS In second album, Hidden Horizons, Ghost Notes have found the space needed to bring their special aesthetic to life. Brendan Telford speaks to drummer Cameron Smith about it all.

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nstrumental explorers Ghost Notes have expanded their loose approach to expansive soundscapes on second album, Hidden Horizons, with a deliberate emphasis on warmth and space, opening up new avenues for the five-piece to investigate. They’ve had a while to hone their focus… “Some of the songs were done before the first album (double LP, By Cover Of Night) came out, and that was two years ago,” drummer Cameron Smith concedes. “We played two songs at the launch that are on this record.

Last year we didn’t really play many shows; we decided that we wanted to focus on writing. We knuckled down and wrote a dozen songs, and last year we recorded them all in two sessions. That’s ended up being two albums of which Hidden Horizons is the first.” Having that wealth of music and time, Ghost Notes have been able to collate an album Smith believes showcases the band in another light, effectively driving home their unique artistic vision whilst providing a new perspective. “It’s intentionally a shorter album because we wanted to use the limitations of forty

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minutes to throw up new challenges, because we are a band that traditionally works better over longer periods of time. The challenge was to make something that was substantial enough within the 12” LP parameters. We’re a band that tends to unveil slowly within a song and an album. We also had some different mindsets sonically. We placed down some restrictions, so there is no double tracking or much overdubbing of anything; there’s no instrument that we aren’t playing right there, everything there is something that we play live. Yet we’ve done things like running things through distortions and delays, big reverbs so that it was more stylistic.” It’s evident from the slow build of tracks like Esperance and King Wave that the peeling back of layers is a delicate, intricate factor in how Ghost Notes functions as a band, and the added space that this deliberate approach has provided has allowed Hidden Horizons to plumb new depths for the band. “I think the album is mellower than By Cover Of Night. Even the songs that are loud, like Pinnacles, aren’t really aggressive. We are a loose band, and deliberately so, but there was an emphasis to how we could work as a unit, because we had all this time to write and we wanted to push ourselves into places we hadn’t been in before. The song Esperance was one of the first songs we wrote and the last that we got down, because it was by far the hardest thing to perform and write that we have ever done. It’s essentially one chord for ten minutes, without any real signifiers for change; it just slowly goes from one thing to another. To not overplay it, to keep things sparse.” WHEN & WHERE: Sunday August 25, Black Bear Lodge

STAY TUNED Enigmatic psych/drone outfit Silver Screens are not prone to rush things. So, even though they have an upcoming show to support new release Special Request, there’s a steady stream of Screens still to come, Tim Fitzpatrick tells Mitch Knox.

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he thing about ‘fringe’ bands (and that term is used with the utmost respect) is, due to their extremely DIY, often experimental nature, audio documentation is frequently sparse, limited, or released on cassette for some reason. And for five years Silver Screens had fallen into that trap, leaving scant evidence of their existence around for existing and prospective fans to find. But they’ve been working hard of late to change that. “We’ve been doing a fair bit of recording, so that’s keeping us busy,” Fitzpatrick says. “We’re doing that limited release-type thing, and that’s kind of related to that. We’ve been just doing bulk recordings for the past few months, so we’re trying to stagger out the release when we can. We’ve got five of those recordings on [Special Request], but... I think that clocks in at over an hour, and we’ve got a bunch more recordings as well that we’re going to do a few other releases with.” Doing things at their own pace is inherent in Silver Screens’ dynamic, originally angling themselves as a drone/psych trio. “We’ve been plugging away for about five years now, and that was the idea behind how it all started, but I guess it’s kind of changed a lot, beat-wise, just with Danny [Ford] working his samples and synths, so it’s definitely incorporated a few more aspects now. In our case, it started off just stretching out jams for as 38 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

long as we could. Trying to get gigs, we’d just use [the drone tag] as a bit of a cover, so we were kind of approaching it from the duration aspect. Just maintaining the rhythm or the groove and stretching that out for a gig.” Although their songs have retained their jam-based roots over time, Fitzpatrick says they’re much tighter compositions these days. “Now we’re reducing it a lot more, so it’ll be kind of poppy, five-to-ten minutes or something, but originally it was always 15-plus, 20-plus. We launch them off different samples or beats that Danny will

come up with, so there’s always that kind of background, and we’ll have set structures that you use for each song, so it has that recurring thing but we keep it as improvisational as we can [work] within those settings.” With added sensory depth in the form of traditional oil projection-inspired splashes of colour and the occasional black-and-white noir film backing up their expansive arrangements, the unpredictable video and soundscapes amount to a thoroughly intriguing proposition. And even if you can’t make a show, you should at least have an easier time finding more songs. “We’ll do some more recordings and try and get as many shows as we can. It’s always been the approach we’ve had, but I guess we’ve been documenting things a lot more recently.” WHAT: By Request (Independent) WHEN & WHERE: 23 Aug, The Waiting Room

were going to make any difference. Not that we’re trying to ‘make a difference, but seeing that happen at one of your shows is so kind of heartbreaking.

STICKS AND STONES A random act of violence on their last tour not only badly hurt a friend and confidante but nearly split up The Smith Street Band. Frontman Wil Wagner tells Steve Bell about turning agony into ecstasy by using this fucked up situation as motivation for their awesome Don’t Fuck With Our Dreams EP.

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on’t Fuck With Our Dreams is a relatively provocative moniker for any piece of art, but for Melbourne’s The Smith Street Band their new EP’s title is a rallying cry following an unsavoury act of violence which marred a Byron Bay gig during their massive Young Drunks tour in February. They say that whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, and this uncalled for thuggery – while nearly splitting the tight knit band asunder at the time – certainly galvanised them in the long run. “I can’t revisit the incident itself – there’s legal stuff still afoot pertaining to it – but basically someone showed up out of nowhere and was very drunk and very aggressive, and some shit went sour and he ended up hurting a really good friend of ours from one of the bands we were touring with. It was really, really horrible,” The Smith Street Band’s frontman and songwriter Wil Wagner recalls sadly. “On the night of the show we didn’t really understand the gravitas of what had happened, because it was all over very quickly – we came out right at the end, and [our mate] was thrown in a car and driven away, but the guy was still hanging around. It was very intense and we moved the show, it was, like, ‘This is fucked, we don’t want to play here. Who knows, the guy could come back with his mates!’ “We had to get out of there, so we went and finished the set on the beach. We’d been in Byron for a few days prior, just hanging out on the beach and having this beautiful ‘Byron is the best place on earth’ kinda time – ‘everyone here is so nice and just gorgeous and amazing’ – and then we got to the show and it all got fucked up. But we moved the show and finished the set at the beach,

and then we were sorta getting phone calls throughout the night and the next day about what had happened to [our friend], he was in a pretty bad way. “We were really disillusioned by it – it was a really confronting thing to happen at one of our shows. We’re all very anti-violence, of course, but it was really full-on having that thing go down while we were playing, and we couldn’t shake the feeling of real responsibility. I was the guy on the mic, and I couldn’t stop thinking that I could have done something differently. We were sitting in that fucking van and I was saying, ‘Pull the fucking van over, I’m out, I can’t do music anymore’ – we were all questioning what we were doing and if we

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“It was really eye-opening and fucked for all of us that that kind of thing could happen in a music environment, which for us has always been this loving thing and a safe kind of place – when we were all losers growing up we all found music and found this safe environment – and having that shattered is like breaking a bone for the first time and realising, ‘Okay, I’m not invincible’. It was scary but then the way that everyone dealt with it and the aftermath was the most inspiring thing to be a part of, and that’s what the EP is about – how everyone bonded together and said, ‘We’re not going to let people like that win’. We all believe in what we’re doing really, really strongly and passionately, and it was such an amazing experience in the aftermath seeing all of the things that we say we believe in – how we’d get drunk and say, ‘Man, I’d do anything for you!’ – all that shit was actually happening, and everyone was doing everything for everyone else, and that’s what Don’t Fuck With Our Dreams is about, that spirit.” It would have been a travesty indeed if The Smith Street Band juggernaut had been derailed at this crucial juncture. The years that they’ve spent slogging it out in the underground DIY scene have been coming to fruition in recent times, with their increased profile here in Australia being matched abroad and opportunities starting to open for them afar (UK singer-songwriter Frank Turner, for instance, just invited them to open for him on a two-month tour of the States). Plus you get the sense that the enigmatic

“ALL OF THE THINGS THAT MAKE ME A WEIRD, SAD PERSON ARE WHAT MAKES ME KEEP WRITING.” Wagner just wouldn’t know what to do with himself without his mates and his music... “I worry every day that I’m not going to be able to write songs anymore,” he ponders. “I’ve got a lot of doubt in myself, that’s why I write – all of the things that make me a weird, sad person are what makes me keep writing. I have belief in what we doing, but at the same time I don’t think I write good songs – I still think I’m years off writing what I want to do. I hope that this lasts a long time, because I’m really enjoying myself. I’ve even known ever since I was a kind that this was all I’ve ever wanted to do, and the fact that we’re getting the opportunities that we are now makes me want to do more and work harder – I’d put out two albums a year if I could, I live and breathe this shit. It’s literally all I care about. I like my girlfriend and I like music, that’s all I’ve got.” WHAT: Don’t Fuck With Our Dreams (Poison City) WHEN & WHERE: 29 Aug, The Zoo THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 39

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reviews

ALBUM OF THE WEEK

This week: Zola Jesus covers herself, Matt Damon fights to get off earth in Elysium and our thoughts on the MXR Super Badass Distortion Pedal

KING KRULE

6 Feet Beneath The Moon True Panther/XL Jake Bugg ruined the blanket statement: no other 19-year-old in contemporary music could summon the pathos of Archy Marshall, King Krule. Krule’s debut album 6 Feet Beneath The Moon is angry and simple, but too long, and overwrought (great art being not what is put in so much as what is taken out, etc.). Track one Easy Easy is recognisable as a previously released single – it’s a wonderful song. Marshall’s vocals come apart again and again like a pre-schooler’s shoelace. He sounds as if he’s cooking the lyrics up as he goes along; a rare and precocious talent in a musician. His work is his voice, hoarse and sonorous. “I need the warmth of your mother to hold me down/Hold me down/Girl, let me lay here,” Marshall howls oedipally in The Krockadile. A very young man boiling himself alive with self-loathing right there.

★★★½

TRACKLIST 1. Easy Easy 2. Borderline 3. Has This Hit? 4. Foreign 2 5. Ceiling 6. Baby Blue 7. Cementality

8. A Lizard State 9. Will I Come 10. Ocean Bed 11. Neptune Estate 12. The Krockadile 13. Out Getting Ribs 14. Bathed In Grey

There are standouts in 6 Feet... – pools of gloom, ironically, hiding from proverbial streetlamp light. The record is too well-produced. Gone is Krule’s grit, 6 Feet... turns Zoo Kid’s A Lizard State into a ska track. There’s also a second incarnation of Has This Hit? on the record, supplanting the lo-fi halo of its first incarnation with a question mark (literally) and the magnesium-flare of top dollar production values. Still, Marshall is a brilliant lyricist, largely because he sings every word like he is blaming the listener (and the critic) for his having written it. Callum Twigger

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 41

album reviews

FRANZ FERDINAND

AVENGED SEVENFOLD

Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action

Hail To The King Roadrunner/Warner

Domino/EMI It’s been almost a decade since France Ferdinand announced their arrival with hit single, Take Me Out, and their self-titled debut. They emerged confident in their sound then and haven’t messed with it too much since. Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action sees the next small, but not disposable, step in their evolution. Opening track, Right Action, shows from the get-go that the Franz guitars are as jangly and the rhythms as staccato and precise as ever. But don’t be fooled, this isn’t just a rehashing of that signature sound. Evil Eye is a jaunty, theremin-infused number that sounds like it could be used in the opening credits of a ‘50s sci-fi parody. Love Illumination returns to that vintage Franz Ferdinand sound, with singer Alex Kapranos philosophising about a “sweet love celebration”. It almost sounds

★★★ ½ like a self-help affirmation, but is somehow sweet and genuine. The Universe Extended delivers a late album breather that’s a little more contemplative than the rest of the record, before Brief Encounters brings a laidback ska rhythm to continue the low-key wind down. Goodbye Lovers And Friends marches towards the closing moments, with Kapranos going so far as to finish the album with, “This really is the end”. If Franz Ferdinand were attempting any neck-jarring changes in direction, they failed miserably. But if their goal was to make another record of catchy, tight-jeaned alt. rock, Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action more than delivers. Pete Laurie

If there was ever an American band that sounds like America, it is Avenged Sevenfold. Like fellow patriots George W. Bush, Chris Brown and Michael Bay, these Californian rockers have never allowed other people’s opinions or common sense stand in the way of their doing whatever the fuck they want to do. What they want to do, as becomes immediately apparent on their sixth album, Hail To The King, is play balls-out stadium rock and to be like Guns N’ Roses, minus those god damn sissy ballads. Paring back on the intricacies of 2010’s Nightmare, songs like the title track and This Means War are beefy slabs of Zacky Vengeance and Synyster Gates showing off their rock god guitar licks, while new drummer Arin Ilejay somehow manages to make a drum kit sound more bombastic than Phil Collins’ In The Air Tonight and frontman M.

SARA STORER

ZOLA JESUS

ABC Music/Universal

Sacred Bones/Inertia

Storytelling is at the heart of any great country artist and Sara Storer is still a great storyteller. Lovegrass, her fifth studio record and her first of entirely new material since 2007’s Silver Skies, comes after marriage and family life – experiences that are on this album’s sleeve. She openly admits the title track is written for her husband (it doesn’t have the same tension as a Kasey Chambers/Shane Nicholson duet, it’s far warmer) and other cuts – Come On Rain, Heart & Sold, You’re My Everything – can be attributed to that same family muse. Even when it’s not about them, a romanticised Australian country life underpins everything here.

Zola Jesus, or Nika Roza Danilova as she is rarely referred to, has clearly transcended her electro-gothic roots. After being asked to perform at New York’s Guggenheim Museum in 2012, Danilova took the bold idea of performing her songs in a stripped back, small orchestral arrangement. This album is the result of those performances.

Lovegrass

One point that the record steps out from personal accounts is on ANZAC ode Pozie, which features a particularly wise-sounding John Williamson. It cements this as a proud Australian record, but it’s not flag-waving nationalism, it’s a tactfully42 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

★★★ Shadows does his best Axl wail. It’s an obvious formula, but A7X manage to keep it interesting for the album’s duration. Hail To The King is the sonic equivalent of a stretch Hummer monster truck with Bald Eagle decals and a vanity licence plate driving through a McDonald’s drivethru to order a McGriddle and an extra, extra-large Dr Pepper. The thing is big, decadent and completely over the top. And like that McGriddle and Dr P, Hail To The King might leave you feeling a little queasy afterwards, but when you’re there and you’re in the moment, its delights are undeniable. Avenged Sevenfold, FUCK YEAH! Tom Hersey

Versions

★★★ ½ delivered and humble dose of self-esteem. The musicianship is impeccably unobtrusive; existing as a platform rather than an engine room, with Matt Fell’s producing equally balanced and restrained. If there is a fault here it’s the overarching familiarity and lack of experimentation, but such excitement would be at odds with this selection of songs. Storer doesn’t need to prove anything on Lovegrass after the career she’s had, and the break has given her a chance to choose the time and manner of her return. This feels right, it feels natural and it feels comfortable. Scott Fitzsimons

As wonderful as the existing Zola Jesus albums are, lush and beautiful are hardly terms that come to mind when describing them, so it’s all the more wonderful that this album works as well as it does. Stripped of the gothic dark wave electronica, we are given more room to marvel at how utterly gorgeous a singer Danilova is when she allows herself to be. The new arrangements, for the most part, stick to the original in terms of structure, but the string and minimal beat backing breathes a human immediacy into the music that

★★★ ½ simply wasn’t there before. The new versions of Hikikomori and Seekir are so excellent that it’s difficult to hear the originals presented as they were. Of the nine songs here, only one is a new track and five are from her most recent LP, so there is a tendency to compare these to the originals or perhaps feel slighted by a cover album of one’s own songs – but this wouldn’t be fair. Danilova hasn’t necessarily created magic with this record per se, but in revealing these songs for the beautiful pieces they clearly are, she’s certainly discovered it. Andrew McDonald

album reviews

★★★½

TIRED PONY The Ghost Of The Mountain Universal With members including Gary Lightbody (Snow Patrol), Richard Colburn (Belle & Sebastian) and Peter Buck (REM), Tired Pony could collapse into a terrible mess of conflicting egos. But The Ghost Of The Mountain manages to highlight the respective talents of its members, while becoming something in its own right. Light, sincere and reflective, The Ghost Of The Mountain is a great example of a supergroup creating something new and worthwhile. Pete Laurie

★★★½

★★★½

★★½

BELLE & SEBASTIAN

CROCODILES

A$AP FERG

Shock

A$AP Worldwide/Polo Grounds/Sony

Rough Trade

The gentle rock‘n’roll of Crimes Of Passion makes an unashamed nod to The Jesus & Mary Chain’s Psychocandy – the main difference being a little less fuzz and a little more warmth.

The Third Eye Centre The Third Eye Centre, a collection of rarities, collectibles and nonLP tunes (Belle & Sebastian’s second such release), covers their work over the last ten years and deftly demonstrates why they are so highly lauded. There are a number of remixes included, the most notable being the Avalanches’ tribal transformation of I’m A Cuckoo. With such perfect indie pop offerings as Heaven In The Afternoon, The Third Eye Centre is a definite must have.

Crimes Of Passion

The camaraderie of light and dark that exist throughout the album are a refreshing and more palatable departure from the more noise-laden albums past, though there’s just enough fuzz to remind us of the band’s earlier catalogue, with an additional softness that makes it far easier to digest. Justine Keating

Dominique Wall

Trap Lord

Ferg, often described as the only member of the A$AP clique besides Rocky with star potential, is tough to pin down. He’ll drop a Bone Thugsn-Harmony tribute the next track after a Bone Thugs-nHarmony cameo. He’ll disclose his ambition to “be as known as Jesus” in interviews. He’ll send out a sing-song guest spot: Kissin’ Pink. He’s becoming known as someone who brings excitement. Sadly, Trap Lord is not that artist’s album; this is not the fun Ferg promised. It’s a debut, sure, but for now his apparent destiny seems a little way off. James d’Apice

★★★½

★★★½

★★★

BLESSTHEFALL DEVILDRIVER Hollow Bodies

Winter Kills

DON WALKER

Fearless/Shock

Roadrunner/Warner

MGM

On their fourth album, posthardcore outfit Blessthefall combine fatalistic riffs within in an organised display of mayhem, combining sickly sweet melodic phrases with downright aggressive passages that by any logical means should not work. After years of terrorising stages across the globe, Hollow Bodies is the band’s most cohesive work to date. The band’s adaptability in combining metalcore and pop sentimentality is perfectly demonstrated in the single, You Wear A Crown But You’re No King, and the album’s title track, yet it’s the grittier songs where Blessthefall sound more comfortable – and they do that honourably.

Meat and potatoes remain popular because they mostly hit the spot. Groove-oriented metal cohorts DevilDriver must recognise this because they haven’t altered the recipe too radically after six records. Everconsistent, the Americans’ attack bristles with potency; fusion of Pantera-esque stomp, melo-death trimmings, monstrous circle-pit fodder (Gutted) and memorable hooks (Winter Kills) ensuring they could teach the Germans a few lessons regarding efficiency. Covering indie/electro mob AWOLNATION’s Sail deviates from their norm, but proves to be a misfire. Few curveballs, but another mosh-friendly beast.

He is among the best – the most Australian – of songwriters. And that might be part of the problem on parts.

James Dawson

Brendan Crabb

Hully Gully

He has the turn of phrase, the so drily laconic voice. The stories, like the drive out of the ‘Cross in Young Girls, or the wait as the tide ebbs On The Beach, are heat-hazed atmospheric things, but elsewhere it seems he feels the need to play up that nasal twang to almost parody. Maybe accept the lift but perhaps pretend to doze when some of the yarns seem a bit arch. Ross Clelland

★★★½

ELLIOTT WHEELER

The Long Time MGM Elliott Wheeler has emerged with a suitably cinematic, orchestrated and dark solo debut six years in the making. Wheeler’s gentle falsetto vocals decorate a handful of tracks, accompanying the slick electronic production on Crystal Love, reminiscent of Antony & The Johnsons, while a collection of charming guest female vocalists grace the remaining tracks. The Long Time is a rounded and complete effort compiled from the flowing and orchestral influence of Wheeler’s experience shaping film scores, but with the added pull of modernity, electronica and beats. Lorin Reid THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 43

live reviews

VIOLENT SOHO, ROKU MUSIC, POSTBLUE 16 Aug

different time and space), and this versatility is beguiling. There are strange arrangements and proggy breakdowns amidst the default shoegaze textures, and even their most tender moments seem urgent and discordant. An already fascinating band dripping with potential.

There’s an air of expectation and excitement in the cramped confines of Crowbar as the crowd files in to witness the unveiling of a new chapter for some returning local heroes, but first we’re treated to a set by rising Byron trio Postblue, fresh from winning the local spot to play at the recent Splendour In The Grass bash. They seem to be mining similar territory to tonight’s headliners – namely ‘90s alt.rock and grunge, with the occasional emo flash of bands such as Jawbreaker

The local man about town who’s recently become famous as the nude cyclist in Violent Soho’s clip for In The Aisle is holding court near the newly-refurbished bar, but it’s the band who people are pumped to see, hence the rush towards the stage when the four familiar faces emerge from the backstage darkness and begin to take their places. Soho are here tonight to introduce new album Hungry Ghosts in the live realm, and the lack of familiarity with these tunes

Crowbar

VIOLENT SOHO @ CROWBAR. PIC: STEPHEN BOOTH

or Knapsack flickering in the mix – and they really seem to be feeling the music, which is sometimes half the battle. They’re still pretty rough around the edges, but there’s plenty to like about a fistful of songs from tonight’s set. Next up are Brisbane four-piece Roku Music, the ever-changing outfit formed around the nucleus of guitarists/vocalists Donnie Miller and Innez Tulloch, joined recently on drums by Thomas Roche (from The Rational Academy) and on bass by Jody Gleeson (The Madisons). They’re immediately more in sync than the openers, locking in and letting Miller do his thing out front, although as the set progresses they mix it up a bit – when Tulloch and Gleeson start to harmonise it sounds like a different band (not better, not worse, just from a

writhing mass of flesh before them united in ecstasy. They detour from the album here and throw in last year’s catchy single Neighbour Neighbour, before the groovy build of Liars and the frantic Eightfold bring us back to uncharted realms. They finish an incendiary set with Tinderbox – also from 2012’s standalone 7” – and take their leave, but the sweaty and fired up throng are having none of it, an unrelenting chant dragging the Soho boys back for an encore of old faves Jesus Stole My Girlfriend and Scrape It, which somehow take the adulation to another level again. Tonight marks the second coming of this great local mob’s already fascinating career; people of Brisbane, prepare to be made proud. Steve Bell

VIOLENT SOHO @ CROWBAR. PIC: STEPHEN BOOTH

for many in attendance doesn’t dim enthusiasm in the slightest, the crowdsurfers igniting from the get-go and giving the low ceiling a workout during opener Dope Calypso. The band stick to the tracklist of the new album for a while, frontman Luke Boerdam spitting venom during Lowbrow – which features a bevy of really cool guitar lines and tones snaking amidst the riffs – before the crowd gives in to the pummelling intensity of Covered In Chrome, the ‘90s refrain and quiet/loud dichotomy captivating in the extreme. Soho seem tighter than ever and seem to be having a blast digging their teeth into this new material, with hair flying liberally as we’ve come to expect, and songs like the hook-laden Saramona Said – almost a pop song except that the bed is so jaggedly heavy – and the aforementioned single In The Aisle don’t disappoint, the

and Chelvis Chesley never let up, their synth-driven hip hop rhythms a den of aural delight. Kellie Lloyd takes to the cosy stage next, and rather than be an anomaly on this tenuouslythemed evening, she is joined by the thunderous Branko Cosic on drums, albeit armed with brushes, and what transpires is an intimate, assured take on Lloyd’s guitar rock musings. Lloyd proves as arresting a figure with six-strings at her disposal as with the familiar four and goes about attacking her craft with vigour, despite visibly tackling the oncomings of the flu. Her voice rarely falters though and her sonorous guitar lines dip in and out of distorted shoegaze territory, underscoring her penchant for ‘90s guitar heroes.

VIOLENT SOHO @ CROWBAR. PIC: STEPHEN BOOTH

TINY SPIDERS, KELLIE LLOYD, BRAINBEAU The Hideaway 13 Aug A secret soiree is under way at The Hideaway for the Two’s Complement Duo Fest, a triad of two-pieces put on by Sonic Masala to provide respite from all the negative elements of Ekka Eve. Kicking off proceedings is Brainbeau, who deliver an electrifying, amorphous set that solidifies their growing reputation for being one of the most underrated bands in Brisbane. Their homespun Balearic synthetic confectionery becomes increasingly addictive with each lesson, and Katie Martin

A rampant birthday party helps bring further life to the cosy confines, just in time for rapacious rapscallions Tiny Spiders to hit the floor – and hit they do, with drummer Cam Smith obliterating the senses in the first few seconds. Due to an amp mishap in soundcheck there is an imbalance between the instruments, the guitar ofttimes disappearing altogether, and Innez Tulloch does her best to rise above the din. But for the most part this is a standard Spiders set, tearing through short stabs of scrappy guitar pop with a hefty injection of manic energy and boisterous abandon, while some new songs found their way into the setlist. Three great acts to help us forget the state of the rest of the Valley and focus on getting inebriated in style and with a smile. Howie Tanks THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 45

live reviews

CLARE BOWDITCH, SPENDER The Hi-Fi 16 Aug Strikingly tall in a suit with a black electric guitar to match, Melbourne’s Spender cuts a fine if lonely figure on The Hi-Fi’s stage. The stripped setting works in his favour and the songs speak for themselves, the varied guitar work adding weight and interest to the solo delivery. Tonight performing more narrativedriven works inspired by true events (“My songs are a like a diary. A public diary.

character on the show, and ‘stalking’ Jeff Buckley in her youth. She is charismatic and hilarious, in turn both sassy and wise. She opens with the sisterly-advice of Amazing Life – “you don’t have to be just one thing, but you have to start with something” – and with just her acoustic guitar, beguiling voice and arresting stage presence, she is in fine form. The whole set is bursting with energy and there is a palpable sense of community, from the choir created by the crowd singing ‘g’day’ and ‘Powderfinger’, to teaching the harmonies of Little Black Cave, and the impromptu invitations for audience members to climb onstage. The collaboration is continued with local artists Andrea Kirwin and Bree

CLARE BOWDITCH @ THE HI-FI. PIC: TERRY SOO

That you can dance to.”), he is a consummate writer, and a song about the death of a street kid in Sydney is an early set highlight. The Lake is another folk gem, and on closer We Go Painting Every Night he calls for silence to play the rollicking Prince-like intro. Spender is clearly comfortable onstage, slowly but surely winning the audience over. His banter is witty but feels a little scripted. He is a strong performer, but is lacking a little bit of heart. Making up for any potential lack of heart, Clare Bowditch waltzes onto the now decorated stage greeted by cheers and hollers. This is not just a show, this is a meeting of friends and Bowditch chats about Channel 10’s Offspring (in which she both acts and sings), the death of a beloved 46 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

KARL S. WILLIAMS, SAWTOOTH Black Bear Lodge 18 Aug While the Black Bear Lodge stage is usually bare, tonight it’s decked out with whimsical floral arrangements, which is telling of the night’s proceedings – pure and fanciful. The opening act’s Aiden Moore is usually the frontman for local neo-psyche troupe Moses Gunn Collective; however, tonight he’s performing solo under the name Sawtooth. While he brings simply himself and

CLARE BOWDITCH @ THE HI-FI. PIC: TERRY SOO

Bullock chosen to perform a song each alongside Bowditch as part of the Winter Secrets tour concept, each bringing a renewed sense of connection and fun to proceedings. Spender returns to the stage as guitarist, back-up vocalist and partner in crime, culminating in a fantastic moment where the two are playing teapots. After a stunning rendition of You Make Me Happy, the inevitable encore is the final quirky jewel on the Clare Bowditch crown. Evoking karaoke at a boozy girls’ night out, the stunning performance ends on a mashup of Martika’s Love, Thy Will be Done, The Proclaimers’ I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles), Survivor’s Eye Of The Tiger and even a terrible attempt at Eminem’s Lose Yourself. Amorina Fitzgerald-Hood

that for Be’elzebub, where the talents of the harmonica are utilised, the floor of the venue has never shaken so tremendously – the place is literally pulsating to the beat; it’s phenomenal. Williams takes the stage on his own for a few tracks and reminds us of how endearing he is as a solo artist by performing a trumpet solo of his own through pursed lips, and then really gets the crowd clapping for White Hotel, which he tells us will keep the devil away. The final track of the night is dedicated to (presumably) his girlfriend, which is a great representation of his character, and a reminder as to why we’re all here tonight – love. Jazmine O’Sullivan

CLARE BOWDITCH @ THE HI-FI. PIC: TERRY SOO

a guitar to the stage, his performance is much more than that – his many pedal effects bring a bold presence, his vocals are angelic yet commanding, and his sneaky guitar accompanist adds an extra touch of grandeur. Included in his set is a tribute to Don Quixote, and possibly Nick Cave, as he plays a murder ballad of his own. Karl S. Williams’ set kicks off with Darkest Cloud, the opening track from the album that he is launching tonight, Heartwood, which is a stunning piece to introduce his accompanists with – they’re on cello, back-up guitar and drums. For various tracks he’s also joined by a trumpet player and a harmonica player, who act as a shining example of everything in its right place. It must be noted

THE BELLIGERENTS, TUNDRA, TWIN HAUS Black Bear Lodge 15 Aug It’s a measly crowd that greets local quartet Twin Haus as they take the stage tonight, which is a real shame, as these guys are pumping out arguably some of Brisbane’s freshest underground pop beats at the moment. It’s the instrumental jams that really get your juices flowing; serene, dream-like psychedelic guitars, echoing wails from multiinstrumentalist frontman Daniel Grima, and of course, the smooth bass and beats are the

T

live reviews cherry on the allegorical cake. Having been together as a band for only a short time, the boys don’t have an expansive backcatalogue yet, however each track they do have is played with conviction and flair, even to an audience this small. Let’s hope it’s not too long before we see this group playing to larger audiences, as their tranceinducing performance has already improved in leaps and bounds over their short career. Tundra are next up, and keep the pop dream alive with their equally impressive melodies. They’re one of those bands who make you feel shit about yourself for not achieving what they have at such a young age – only just scraping past the legal drinking age, these guys have a tight sound and really

provides many “lose yourself ” opportunities for spectators, particularly with tracks Steal Your Money and She Calls The Shots. The single they’re here to promote, All I Have, starts out with a real poppy tone which morphs into a fantastic psychedelic freakout towards the end; it’s a true privilege to experience live. There are also several stunning synthfuelled moments throughout the night – notably Imagination and Wait – where Andy Balzat really brings the funk. After their set, the boys are coerced by the crowd to keep the party going, if only for a few more minutes, with an encore, to which they humbly oblige. With each act hailing from Brisbane, tonight’s performances further demonstrate just why

THE BELLIGERENTS @ BLACK BEAR LODGE. PIC: FREYA LAMONT

get the crowd grooving with a stage presence that seems well beyond their years. Commotion and Puppetmaster prove to be crowd favourites tonight, due to the infectious guitar riffs and sing-along moments. As headliners The Belligerents now command proceedings, the audience seem more willing to crowd around the stage and be part of the action, which creates an exciting buzz. Bassist Konstantin “Konsti” Kersting has to win the best dressed prize tonight, donning a fabulous set of dark denim overalls as he jumps around the stage, which is a fantastic spectacle to behold. The Belligerents are true masters of genreblending, infusing their style with bits of pop, psychedelia, dance and indie, to create an entirely pleasing sound which

Beetle Bar line-up with some politically charged punk rock. The three-piece pack a pretty awesome ‘80s punch at times with some cute touches like Slice Of Heaven’s “Da-da-dup” worked into a ramshackle Slow Boat From Indonesia. The ghost of Chrissie Hynde nearby forces her way onto a table as Joh-era punks start to enter the establishment. Murwillumbah’s Raygun Mortlock introduce themselves with a sneeringly sarcastic, “We’re from a farming community,” before jumping into a blisteringly likeable set dripping with youthful attitude. In-between mocking the crowd to “Clap. Clap. Clap”, lead singer James Doyle

THE BELLIGERENTS @ BLACK BEAR LODGE. PIC: FREYA LAMONT

we’re a city to watch out for in the music stakes – brilliance from every band. Jazmine O’Sullivan

THE LEFTOVERS, PUBLIC EXECUTION, LOVECRAFT, RAYGUN MORTLOCK, WHITE DEVIL Beetle Bar 16 Aug White Devil get proceedings underway tonight on a packed

gives off a Joey Ramone-ish cartoon presence out front, which for the most part captivates, the band’s large debt to Motorhead and The Stooges no bad thing either. A caustic, slowed down cover of I Wanna Be Your Dog gives the classic some extra menace and proves that they’re ones to watch as hopefully they’ll develop a slightly more distinct sound and style with time. Lovecraft are on next and it’s hard to know what to make of them. Part Shakespeare’s Sister out front of Jefferson Airplane with flamenco drums to boot, are the touchstones that skip through the mind during this most unusual performance, Wendy Seary like a slightly witchier Fiona Horne in a performance that still captivates with it’s eccentricities.

When questioned post-show as to whether he’d played a gig in a while, the lead guitarist from Public Execution’s answer was a relaxed, “Oh, not for about 30 years or so”. And they’ve lost nothing in that time as antiJoh interludes are sandwiched between old classics like Say Goodbye To Tommy Not The Comfy Chair and a snarling take on Buzzcocks’ Boredom (introduced as Border Boredom). 999 Homicide and Don’t Go To Thailand round out a fanstastically intense and sharp set, which is accompanied by some slightly amusing middle-aged slam dancing. You get a good feeling about a gig when the lead singer of the main act praises the recently finished last support act before informing you

THE BELLIGERENTS @ BLACK BEAR LODGE. PIC: FREYA LAMONT

not to expect much from the next guys. It’s this nostalgic, re-formation humour which pervades tonight’s celebration of one of the missing links to Brisbane’s anarchic punk past. The Leftovers take to the stage and deliver a brilliant set, chugging ferocity from Jim Shoebridge’s guitar during classic single Cigarettes And Alcohol as charismatic frontman Warren Lamond dedicates various tunes to Joh Bjelke-“Fucking”-Petersen and Campbell “Fucking Cunt” Newman. You’re under no uncertainty as to whether the old flame still burns brightly as the legends deliver a fantastic finish to a night that could only have been topped if the police had shut the place down. Come on Campbell, you can do better than that! Ed Matthews THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 47

arts reviews

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

ELYSIUM

La Boite, Roundhouse to 31 Aug

The latest dystopian sci-fi to hit our cinemas is District 9 director Neill Blomkamp’s Elysium, a film that continues his fixations with the disenfranchised and explosive CGI. Set in 2154 Los Angeles, Matt Damon plays Max Da Costa, a factory worker trying to leave his dubious carjacking past behind him. After a work accident sees him suffering a near fatal dose of radiation, his only means of averting death is finding a way to get from ravaged, overpopulated Earth to the much-coveted space station Elysium for treatment. The asylum seekers analogy reveals itself here, as Elysium is populated by the rich few and its air space is fiercely guarded to prevent uninvited spacecrafts entering.

Theatre

A good script can wear a lot of blunders. Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie is such a text. Read by semi-literate high school students, it would still resonate. As such, La Boite’s unfocused take on the classic is still broadly enjoyable. It just falls considerably short of the script’s potential. There are nice parts. Helen Howard’s Amanda Wingfield is an almost faultless performance. If anything, her rendition of the overbearing matriarch of the play is a little too effective – coaxing more sympathy from the audience than the character deserves or demands. Elsewhere, there are some clever design tricks that will truly dazzle an audience. Unfortunately, the overall direction of the work is deeply flawed. Director

OTHER DESERT WHAT MAISIE CITIES KNEW

Film

In cinemas

Aesthetically, even though this future earth is a hellhole, it’s been beautifully shot, particularly the opening panoramas. In

ELYSIUM

Theatre

Film

QPAC to 1 Sep

In cinemas 22 Aug

The Wyeths are a family of secrets; ghost of deceased son Henry walks with them, the circumstances of his death omnipresent. When the family comes together for a Palm Springs Christmas, daughter Brooke (Rebecca Davis) reveals her faulty memoir and history and present collide. Playwright Jon Robin Baitz dissects both family and post-9/11 America; the Wyeths are simultaneously real and analogical. It’s smart theatre, tension carefully escalated until truth ultimately prevails. Kate Cherry’s direction is quietly masterful; the play takes place in one room, action entirely verbal. Cherry keeps the cast moving, creating action from virtually nothing. Janet Andrewartha gives a pinpoint precise performance as matriarch Polly; not a single gesture fails to add to the character’s complexity.

It’s a dour subject for a film. Maisie is the daughter of a troubled couple – an art dealer and a narcissistic, ageing rock star, played by Steve Coogan and Julianne Moore respectively. The film is based on an 1897 book by Henry James, but shifts the setting of the story from 18th century England to current day New York City. The child’s parents both display some pretty unappealing character traits, Moore’s character in particular. She is a hugely damaged, self absorbed woman and it’s uncomfortable watching Moore grapple with it. He is selfish and unreliable, she is narcissistic and thoughtless and they probably should never have had a child together. As the couple breaks up, they use the poor girl as a bargaining tool and a pawn in their own emotional turmoil. It’s heartbreaking to watch Maisie

WHAT MAISIE KNEW

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

David Berthold bizarrely tries to turn the play into some kind of farcical comedy. The innate tension and volatility of the script is neutered almost utterly in favour of forced laughs. Equally frustrating, only Howard nails the necessary regional American accent of the script. Kathryn Marquet and Jason Klarwein skew for completely different dialects. Stripped of both its (profoundly relevant) sense of locale and underlying narrative tensions, Berthold’s ...Menagerie loses all propulsion and pathos. Only the script remains to be enjoyed.

terms of performances, Damon’s softly spoken Max may be hard to swallow as an ex-con, but his physicality gets him over the line (once again). Jodie Foster’s performance as the Machiavellian Secretary Delacourt is surprisingly wooden, but the supporting cast is great, with Wagner Moura’s charismatic Spider the standout. Elysium merges frenetic live action with special effects in a very taut, thrilling way. Not as emotionally charged as District 9, the film still succeeds in gripping the viewer firmly, in what is ultimately a fun, tension-filled ride.

Robert Coleby as patriarch Lyman is a study in quiet pain and avoidance; youngest son Trip is wonderfully rendered by Conrad Coleby, an actor with rare presence. Fractured daughter Brooke is a more problematic invention. Some will empathise with her fragility, blamed on a mother she believes fabricated a mythology that bears no resemblance to the truth. Others will see her as a self-entitled brat unable to recognise that the suffering she clings to is not hers alone. Nonetheless, Other Desert Cities is a skilful and engrossing examination of family, sacrifice, histories and loss.

being forgotten about, shunted about between people she sometimes barely knows, and being used as collateral by her arguing parents. Films that centre on children absolutely require perfect casting and Onata Aprile is continuously impressive as Maisie. And she has really great hair. Empathy for the little girl grows as each parent re-partners, the parents get more and more repulsive and the family dynamics become even more tumultuous and damaging. The little girl’s stepparents become the surprising new grounding force in her life.

Matt O’Neill

Glenn Waller

Helen Stringer

Kate Kingsmill

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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 49

muso

NEWS

THE NANCY WILSON NIGHTHAWK STANDARD Heart guitarist Nancy Wilson has long been a fan of one of Gibson’s more powerful “modern alternatives” and in recognition of the union of artist and instrument, Gibson USA has introduced the Nancy Wilson Nighthawk Standard, an elegant variation on a contemporary classic, featuring a figured Grade AAA maple top dressed in a high-gloss nitrocellulose Fireburst finish with Cherry back and neck, and a commemorative “Fanatic” truss-rod cover. The guitar retains all the distinctive ingredients that made the Nighthawk stand out initially, including the 25½” scale length for firm lows and chiming highs, the comfortable body contours, through-body stringing and unique Nighthawk bridge, and the superb versatility of the pairing of Nighthawk mini-humbucker and Nighthawk lead humbucker, with five-way switching for a range of humbucking and single-coil combinations.

YAMAHA LIVE CUSTOM KITS The Live Custom series of drum kits from Yamaha has been designed with a greater focus on their playability in the live context. The kit uses 1.2mm oak plies that are ten per cent thicker than those used on Yamaha’s Oak Custom drums. Bass drum shells are comprised of eightply designs while the rack tom, floor tom and snare shells are constructed with six. The Live Custom therefore delivers a sound with greater strength and depth, providing rich expressive power that the manufacturer hopes “exceeds your imagination”. 50 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

IN THE STUDIO: GOSSLING/OH MERCY Stepping out of their respective musical comfort zones, Helen Croome aka Gossling and Alexander Gow of Oh Mercy took on the challenge of recording in French for a remarkable Australian compilation album. They talk to Michael Smith about flying to Paris to film a music video.

A

ustralian label Inertia had the idea that it might be fun to invite some of Australia’s most interesting contemporary artists to reinterpret some of the most famous of French pop songs, in French. The opening and first song lifted from the album, Mélodie Française, as a single was La Minute De Silence, written by one Salvadore Poe and interpreted here by Helen Croome aka Gossling and Oh Mercy’s Alexander Gow. “The producer of the track was Pip Norman, though he goes under the name Countbounce,” Croome begins. “He’s a hip hop dude,” Gow adds, “so they’re allowed to have pseudonyms!” “So it was at his studio in Preston in Melbourne.” That’s Bounce County Studios, and Norman is a founding member of the electrohip hop outfit TZU. Recording with Logic Pro 9, his favourite piece of gear is his much-prized RCA Dx77 vintage ribbon mic. “It’s impossible to know where something is going to go,” Gow continues. “Helen and I had discussed a few options, but to be fair to Helen, I probably got a little overexcited and probably was working on a bit of a different level to Helen, and kind of went ahead and followed my whim, and luckily it turned out great, ‘cause if it didn’t… I would have been to blame,” he laughs. “I know Pip’s studio really well. We didn’t have a ton of time to do it. We did it all in, maybe, six hours or something

like that, from scratch. So his understanding of his studio and being able to make things happen really quickly… As I said, I was kind of going at a hundred miles an hour and he was able to keep up with that, so in that he was particularly useful, doing the analogue synth you can hear on the track, which is one of my favourite parts.” “When we recorded the song, I only had a basic understanding of the lyrics,” Croome admits. As it happens, those artists that felt they needed a little help in their performances in French had the opportunity to with French tutors both in the studio and via Skype. The bonus for Croome and Gow in being the first cab off the album was the opportunity to go to Paris to film the promotional video for their song, thanks to French web-based music streaming

“IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO KNOW WHERE SOMETHING IS GOING TO GO,” service, Deezer. Croome and Gow even launched the track in a performance at Deezer’s Paris office, while the production crew were given unprecedented permission to film in and around the legendary Moulin Rouge. The filmmakers based the black and white clip’s storyboard on old French films. “We probably did two ten-hour days, if not more, to film the clip. It was kind of a sightseeing adventure – you’re not going to send a couple of Australians to Paris and put them in a studio somewhere with green screen, so we got to walk around. I’d never been there before – Helen had once. We had some French camera people, but Lucy [Perrett], from the label, and her partner Jim [Yeomans] directed the clip.” Yeomans is a director at ampbox.tv, a London-based company, and specialises in fly on the wall, on the move footage. Shooting on the road for Kasabian, he has mastered the art. Due to the limited time available in Paris and the desire to shoot in as many locations as possible, he shot with two Canon 5Ds – one with shoulder rig – and a Canon 7D with a monopod and a bag of lenses. “There was a crew of four,” he explains. “We knew certain locations we wanted but also knew we would see stuff on the fly, so being able to run around town and not get tired was important. It was a case of walking, cabs and trains.” “It isn’t hard work,” Croome chuckles, “spending four days walking around Paris pretending that you like someone!” Mélodie Française is released by Inertia 16 Aug.

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 51

muso

COLE CLARK ANGEL GUITAR

The “Angel” is the company’s latest addition, with a piezo pickup on the bridge, a face sensor and a mic inside the pre-amp box, which gives the option of all three or any one in combination. The Angel is full-scale length – with a smaller and more compact body than their Fat Lady range. Solid bunya wood is used for the soundboard, while the neck is Queensland maple.

There are three new “Mini” versions of the iconic Dunlop Fuzz Face available that all contain the original circuitry from those classic pedals, but in a much smaller format to fit comfortably on your pedal board. I had a chance to check out the bright, bold, aggressive tones of the little blue version, which is based on the original circuitry of a prized 1970 Fuzz Face fitted with silicon BC108 transistors. As always the simple two-knob format is perfect for instantly dialling in a killer tone, and a diverse array of sounds are achieved by plugging in different guitars with different pickups and manipulating your volume knob and pick attack. New features include reversed ins and outs, a bright blue LED, AC power jack and convenient new 9V battery door, making this design much friendlier to use alongside other on-stage pedals.

Steve Flack

Reza Nasseri

The Cole Clark story, in a nutshell, is that Cole and Clark, who met working at Maton, together had a vision of a different design style, one of a steel string guitar that has the integral neck and Spanish heel of a nylon string guitar but amplifying these guitars with multiple pickups in various places on the body rather than just on the bridge or in the sound hole of the guitar.

GREG BENNETT GD ACOUSTIC GUITARS

52 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

DUNLOP SILICON FUZZ FACE MINI DISTORTION

MXR SUPER BADASS DISTORTION

Greg Bennett is the man responsible for pouring quality back into what was once a “budget” brand, putting more thought into design and sourcing quality materials from around the world while still keeping costs low for the working man. His new GD series of acoustics retains the same philosophy and provides acoustic musicians with incredible value for money across the whole range. The Greg Bennett GD acoustics all feature a solid Sitka spruce top, mahogany back and sides, rosewood fingerboard and bridge, multi-ply bindings, die-cast tuners and their own ‘Thunderflex’ bracing system, which was designed to give the guitars a richer, louder sound. At the top of the range, the GD 100-S has a beautifully balanced voice that’s nice and even, with a crisp zing when chords are strummed out, and a delicate brilliance for fingerstyle playing.

The new MXR Super Badass Distortion is easily one of the most versatile distortion pedals out at the moment. What happens if you have found the perfect amp that sounds amazing clean but gets muddy when you crank the drive or switch channels? Or what if your amp sounds amazing when it’s distorted but terrible when clean? Do you need two separate rigs to achieve tonal perfection? Hell no! Throw your stack in the bin, get a killer little combo amp and throw a Super Badass in front of it. This pedal is a 100% fullspectrum analogue distortion that goes from a mild breakup to all-out liquid saturation, with a beautifully notched three-band EQ to shape your tone. A word of warning though – there’s a lot of output with this pedal, so it can make a combo sound a lot bigger than it looks.

Reza Nasseri

Reza Nasseri

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Sydney based progressive rock band looking for male lead vocalist. We are looking for a professional, creative and motivated individual who has a strong voice, is a dynamic melody-writer and connects well with the music. To hear current demos: www.reverbnation.com/borahorza Email us: borahorzaband@hotmail.com Feel free to call- Tom: 0411288190 Rich: 0414997996

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call Paul on 0412 478 247 THE MUSIC • 14TH AUGUST 2013 • 53

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the guide

Member answering/role: J. Dracman – vocals How long have you been together? As a band, two years, but Darkc3ll has been alive for around four years. How did you all meet? Post Mortem Matt (guitars/keys) and myself have been writing and recording together for around five years, and had been writing the kind of music we have longed to create, so naturally one gets curious and wants to unleash their sounds in a live arena. With this band, Rit Derelict (bass) and Jay Macabre (drums) round out what I consider a kickarse unit of chaos! You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? Hmmm... tough one. Old school Sevendust always gets the nod. Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? Scrumfeeder! Cherry Rock. What part do you think Brisbane plays in the music you make? The social demographic and daily grind in life always awakens the subconscious mind. What reality TV show would you enter as a band and why? MasterChef... the mess we’d make in kitchen... What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? All ages show at The Hive with Mars Attacks, Gorefield and Pyromance. Then soon after we release our second album, new filmclip and national tour. BOOM!

DARKC3LL

Darkc3ll play The Hive on 31 Aug (all ages), The Transcontinental Hotel 11 Oct and Miami Shark Bar, Gold Coast on 19 Oct. Photo by TERRY SOO.

lifestyle

eat

culture

travel

sport

the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

BACKLASH DEAD AND ALIVE How much money does one person need? Why would someone like Jon Bon Jovi appear on a show as heinous as The X Faxtor – even he must have a legacy to protect, right? Bill Hicks will be turning in his grave…

DOMESTIC SOUNDS

ON THE MUSIC STEREO

FORK OFF

Hungry Ghosts VIOLENT SOHO

The International Journal of Surgery Case Reports has printed an x-ray from a 70yo Canberra man who decided to insert a fork into his old fella. Now we know what Pete Townsend was on about…

Defend Yourself SEBADOH

BATTLE OF THE FREAKS

13 In My 31 MY RED CELL

How random is the Twitter skirmish between Gaga and Perez Hilton? It’s like watching a slow motion car crash on social media, there can be no winners in a war between wieners…

Electric Slave BLACK JOE LEWIS Nothing Can Hurt Me BIG STAR

ANBERLIN LOCAL ADDITION Melbourne pop rockers Masketta Fall have snagged the coveted opening slot for the upcoming Anberlin tour. Along with The Maine and William Beckett, the guys will play The Hi-Fi, 4 Sep and Coolangatta Hotel, 5 Sep.

Are You Life LITTLE SCOUT Desperation OBLIVIANS Boys And Girls In America THE HOLD STEADY

CHILLY HAZE

HER TIME IS NOW

They latched onto the sounds of summer with their first EP, and now with Winter Session, Sydney’s Mar Haze are doing the same for the colder months. Hear the vibe at The Loft, Gold Coast, 30 Aug.

After lending her vocals to the works of Angus Stone and Mt Warning, Brisbane chanteuse Tori Lee will present her new moniker Seavera with an all-girl band. They play Southside Tea Room, 14 Sep, with Wolf & Napoleon.

FRONTLASH BOSS IS BACK!

The Boss is back! Springsteen fans rejoice at news that Bruce is returning in February less than a year after his last visit, being joined by the reformed Hunters & Collectors. Legend!

KEEP ‘EM HUNGRY We’ve been listening to Violent Soho’s new album Hungry Ghosts (out 6 Sep) and it’s awesome, but seeing them play these songs live last weekend was incredible. And they’re still doing it for the 4122!

SIX OF THE BEST Congrats to local producer Matt Redlich for being involved in six winners at last week’s Queensland Music Awards – one of the premier results of a brilliant night!

PROCRASTINATION TECHNIQUES JASMINE RAE When things aren’t working what do you do to avoid recording? I use a few different techniques, but mostly I’ll go out to eat, drink or shop. I usually hate shopping for clothes, but when it’s in another country, it seems much more fun. Jasmine Rae’s new album If I Want To is out now.

BIG MONTH Little Odessa are smashing out support slots through August: 17, Beetle Bar; 21, Black Bear Lodge; 22, Alhambra Lounge; 30, Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast and 31, The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba. Check The Guide at theMusic.com.au for full line-ups.

PEELING THE PAINT

TRASHCAN TROUBLE

Having already played The Viper Room and Whiskey A Go Go, Sydney rock queen Aimee Francis can kick it with the best of them, so get along to Ric’s, 21 Sep, when she launches new single Losers Game.

Behind the slick, swinging howls of Papa Pilko & The Bin Rats frontman Cyris ‘Papa’ Bilko, the septet rock’n’roll with the best of them. They do a number on The Joynt, 23 Aug.

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DOMESTIC SOUNDS

ALBUM FOCUS

ALBUM FOCUS

PALMS SEE RIGHT THROUGH YOU Let your body bath in that sensual, soothing reverb when Soviet X-Ray Record Club bring their cloudy Brisvegas shoegaze to Trainspotters, Grand Central Hotel, 24 Aug, launching new track Magnetic North alongside Wolver and Charles Buddy Daaboul.

SHAPING UP

WELCOME RETURN

The Currumbin beachfront turns into one of the most scenic modern art galleries on the planet with the Swell Sculpture Festival, happening from 13 to 22 Sep. The event will also feature live music from Bobby Alu and Robbie Miller.

Black Bear Lodge will host The Spoils on 14 Sep, with members of the dark Melbourne group heading north in trio mode for their first Brisbane show since 2006. Recover from BIGSOUND or just kick on harder – we don’t judge.

STUCK ON US Baggy generation revivalists Sticky Fingers are on the bill for a bunch of local festivals, and have now decided to do a headline club show amongst all the tent-related performing. They hit The Northern, Byron Bay, 26 Oct.

A BIG WARM HUG

NINJA AND WARRIORS

A finalist in this year’s QMusic Awards, Megan Cooper and her Pretty Pennies will show why her touchy country ditties are generating such a buzz. Along with Phil Smith, she plays Dowse Bar 22 Aug from 7pm.

Melbourne’s incomparable Twelve Foot Ninja have confirmed supports Caligula’s Horse and Humality for these dates: The Tempo Hotel, 6 Sep; Parkwood Tavern, Gold Coast, 7 Sep.

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Member answering: Al Grigg (vocals/guitar) Album title: Step Brothers Where did the title of your new album come from? My dad and Tom’s dad were single at the time and we were chatting about how they both used to love watching Just Shoot Me and smashing a bottle of red wine after work. We joked that they should get married, and then we’d be Step Brothers. Da-dah! How many releases do you have now? Step Brothers is our debut album. So, one. Before that we just put a few songs out on the internet. How long did it take to write/ record? Mainly the songs were written in a really fruitful six months. We recorded it in our friend’s kitchen in three days, but spread [songwriting] out over about a year. Not a hugely efficient use of time in retrospect. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? When Tom and I called it a day on Red Riders, it really opened up the creative floodgates. We let ourselves do all the dumb, simple, fun stuff we were always too straight-laced to do in RR. Also, I developed a really dumb, misguided crush on someone. Standard. What’s your favourite song on it? This Last Year ‘cause it basically sums up the whole point of the album in three-and-a-half minutes. Also, ‘cause Dion rips the most legendary solo on it. Will you do anything differently next time? More shredding, bigger choruses, tighter leggings, bigger hair. Palms support Cloud Control at Spotted Cow, Toowoomba on 21 Aug, Coolangatta Hotel on 22 Aug, The Tivoli on 23 Aug and Kings Beach Tavern, Caloundra on 24 Aug. Step Brothers (Spunk) out 30 Aug.

TOM WEST Album title? A Spark In The Dark Where did the title of your new album come from? It’s a lyric from the second track, All The Bees Fled. I think it summarises the spirit of the record. How many releases do you have now? This will be my first album. I’ve done a couple of EPs a few years back. How long did it take to write/record? I spent about a year writing the songs, and then we tracked and mixed it over about four months – most of it in a shed. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? It was great to track the album ourselves so we had the luxury of playing around and exploring with the sounds a bit. What’s your favourite song on it? The current single, Malecon. I think it’s a track I’ve been trying to come up with for a long time. Will you do anything differently next time? Next time I think I’ll set myself a shorter time limit and do a bit more of the experimenting during the demo-ing process. Tom West releases A Spark In The Dark (Independent) at The Hideaway on Saturday 24 Aug.

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 57

the guide qld.live@themusic.com.au

LONG PLAYER SESSION

EP FOCUS

FOREIGN ARRIVALS

TARA SIMMONS Artist name: Tara Simmons Album covering: Portishead’s Dummy. Why did you choose this album? My teen years fell fairly and squarely in the ‘90s, and everyone knows that the music you listen to in your adolescence sticks with you forever, so when I was asked to cover an entire album, the obvious choice for me would be something from this era. In my opinion, one of the most influential, inspired and quintessentially ‘90s albums you can come across is Portishead’s debut album Dummy. When did you first hear this album? Despite singles from the album saturating the radio and sparking my initial love for the songs and the sound, it wasn’t until years later while visiting family on the central coast of NSW, sitting on the floor of my cousin’s room, that I finally heard the album in full and realised exactly what kind of beast it was. Does playing this album in its entirety present any specific challenges? Taking on this album without being able to replicate the production and sound that is so incredibly distinctive to Portishead is a challenge. The songs are brilliant and the biggest challenges lies in reinterpreting some of the sounds without pissing anyone off. Tara Simmons plays Portishead’s Dummy in full (alongside Charlie Horse playing PJ Harvey’s Bring You My Love). The Long Player Sessions at Brisbane Powerhouse on Friday 23 Aug.

58 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

CHARLES BUDDY DAABOUL Artist: Charles Buddy Daaboul EP Title? Three Colours Green How many releases do you have now? This is the first official release. The other two were just homemade demos recorded on cassettes. Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Falling in love with nature and the western suburbs of Sydney that I grew up in. When you’re older and take yourself away from it you learn to like all the dumb things about it! What’s your favourite song on it? Have A Grouse Day. It’s a 1.50-minute instrumental that I recorded outdoors under an aqueduct in Picton. We’ll like this EP if we like... Nature adventures and magic.

HUMBLE RUMBLE Polynesian-cum-Melbourne crew T-Rhythm have been labelled “the best reggae band” in the Victorian capital, and now the nine-strong ensemble are rolling north to play at Five Nightclub, Acacia Ridge Hotel, 4 Oct. Support from One Sound, B for Bandit, DJ Deeze and DJ Noiz.

STANDING SOLDIER

CIAO EROS

Straight out of Kingston, Jamaica, reggae/dancehall star Demarco will be shining down on us at Transcontinental Hotel, 14 Sep, with Rhythm Collision Sound, Junior, Wade, Oscar, Issa, Tuff Thomas and more. Mega times.

European superstar Eros Ramazzotti is excited to be bringing his virtuoso rock and pop skills Down Under, with the Noi tour hitting the Convention & Exhibition Centre, 17 Nov. Tickets on sale now through Live Nation.

Charles Buddy Daaboul launches Three Colours Green (Independent) at The Waiting Room on Friday 23 August.

MAKING FRIENDS Following their slot at BIGSOUND, Canada alt.rockers Your Favourite Enemies will hang around a little longer, playing a special Gold Coast show at Miami Tavern Shark Bar on 13 Sep.

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TOURING THIS WEEK

BRISBANE BOUND

PERSONAL BEST RECORDS

TULLY ON TULLY HOLA HOMBRES!

Name: Iain MacRae

Rev up with some reborn rockabilly from Los Trios Cardios, the lively three-piece headlining Beetle Bar on Thursday alongside the Motor City-influenced The Miscounts, pictured, and The Sunday Bests. $8 on the door from 8pm.

TRACER Member’s Name: Mike Brown Home ground: Adelaide Describe your live music/ performance style as succinctly as possible: Loud, proud, sweaty, boozy rock! Is this your first foray to Brisbane? If not how many times have you performed in our midst? Yeah, first time in Brisbane or us, we tour overseas so this is our first Oz tour!

FILL YOUR POCKETS

UNDER THE MILKY WAY

The Exchange Hotel will be kicking off their weekly Friday live music sessions this week with The Voice favourite Alex Gibson, who’ll perform on the rooftop 5-9pm. Free music to soundtrack your knock-off drinks.

A night under the stars: Out Of Abingdon play Wednesday (tonight!) at Limes Rooftop Bar from 7pm. They’ll then back it up Sunday at Eagle Street Pier 1 from 3pm.

Please relate your impressions of performing in our fair city: We’re looking forward to Brissie, especially for the weather. We’re freezing our tits off in Adelaide! What can we expect this time around? People can expect a fun and loud rock show. Has anything exciting been happening in your world of late? Recorded in LA with Kevin Shirley, sold out headline tour of UK, 36-date Euro tour in October. What will you be taking home as a souvenir? Hopefully a singlet tan and a hangover! Tracer play Ric’s Bar on 22 Aug and support The Angels at Victoria Point Sharks Club on 23 Aug and Racecourse Hotel, Booval on 24 Aug.

Best record you stole from your folks’ collection? 3 Feet High & Rising by De La Soul… It’s a toss up between that and Straight Outta Compton by NWA. First record you bought? Enema Of The State by Blink-182. I had a pretty massive pop punk stage when I was ten. Or it could have been the Eiffel 65 album. Record you put on when you’re really miserable? Curtis by Curtis Mayfield is probably my favorite pick me up album. Move On Up is the most uplifting song of all time. Record you put on when you bring someone home? Ha ha, I dunno, something by Little Dragon maybe... Get some chilled vibes happening. Most surprising record in your collection? Frank Zappa’s discography. It’s about 100GB of weird and wonderful music. Last thing you bought/ downloaded? Cloud Control’s new album Dream Cave. It’s on high rotation at my place. Tully On Tully play Rics Bar on Friday 23 Aug and The Rails, Byron Bay on 24 Aug.

RAMBLING BANDS All aboard the Brisbane blues train! It’s leaving the station with Transvaal Diamond Syndicate, pictured, Dead Zephyr, The Baskervillans and The Con & The Liar, pulling into the Transcontinental Hotel on Friday. $10 on the door.

FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 59

opinion

OG FLAVAS

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

URBAN AND R&B NEWS WITH CYCLONE

METAL, HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH LOCHLAN WATT

Horrorshow’s comeback, King Amongst Many, has debuted at No. 2 on the ARIA charts. Today Australian hip hop is huge, but there are no high-profile female MCs. This makes the ascent of expat Iggy Azalea (AKA Amethyst Kelly) so remarkable. In 2006 a teen Kelly, obsessed with 2Pac, left NSW’s coastal Mullumbimby for the US, determined to become a superstar rapper. After songs like Pu$$y went viral, she signed to TI’s Grand Hustle Records. Kelly was selected for XXL’s 2012 ‘Top 10 Freshman’ edition, infuriating Azealia Banks. Now the Work femcee, meant to replace Angel Haze at the ill-fated Movement Festival, will support Beyoncé in Oz. Oddly, her adults-only lyrics caused ‘issues’ when she toured with Rita Ora. Azaleans supposedly should expect the rapper’s album, The New Classic, next month via Island Def Jam – almost a year on from her timely, Diplo-blessed mixtape TrapGold. Kelly, indebted to Ke$ha as much as to Nicki Minaj, is no Missy Elliott-style suffragette, her image a parody of pornographic femininity. The rapper, who’s dated A$AP Rocky, might be Coco “Mrs Ice-T” Austin’s minime. Besides, her music is less hip hop than EDM. Kelly appears blithely ignorant of an ancient taboo in skip hop: thou shalt not fake an American accent. Happily, Aussie hip hop has two new ‘queens’ to join Elefant Traks’ Sky’High. Chelsea Jane will be the lone femcee at Sprung Festival, while Adelaide’s Kimence recently dropped her Butterthief debut, One View – the song The Quest is about conquering a man’s world.

IGGY AZALEA 60 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

LAMB OF GOD

There’s been a lot of international tours announced lately... perhaps you could even say an overload? Here’s some metal, hardcore and punk bands coming through this country from September through to December alone: Lamb Of God, Meshuggah, Soilwork, Bring Me The Horizon, Crossfaith, Amorphis, Behemoth, Hour Of Penance, Kvelertak, Black Flag (sidenote: lawsuits are heaps punk and Greg Ginn is obviously a legend), Boysetsfire, The Ataris, Snuff, No Fun At All, For The Fallen Dreams, The Plot In You, The Devin Townsend Project, Church Of Misery, Palm, Korpiklaani, Stratovarius, Rolo Tomassi, Nile, The Faceless, Volumes, Every Time I Die and loads, loads more. Granted, some of these bands are in fact touring together, but with such a sheer volume it doesn’t do much to dilute the absolute megaload of choices. With only about five cities included on the majority of these tours – Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth – it doesn’t take a genius to work out that there’s going to be a lot of clashes, and you only need to look at The Guide for proof. Some of these clashing gigs are being announced months after the other, displaying either complete ignorance or disregard. It’s also worth noting that very few of these tours include Australian acts – kudos to those promoters who still make the effort, because there’s a reason the most successfully corporate touring companies don’t usually practice this. We should all be grateful that we’ve got more choices to make about our live entertainment, but the current situation is unprecedented, and presents a

number of questions. Where does the oversaturation of international shows leave local gigs? What about upcoming Australian bands trying to tour off their own backs? It feels like we’re seeing less of that than before, or perhaps the tours of Australian bands are just struggling for visibility in this rather busy market. Do we have a big enough population that can afford to regularly purchase enough $50+ tickets for all these touring companies to survive? Is the bubble about to burst, or is our live music industry simply blossoming and I’m all worried about nothing? Here’s some things for promoters to consider. Communicate with each other in advance: try and avoid clashes before they happen, as they can annoy punters just as much as promoters. I’ve seen a Facebook group set up for Melbourne metal promotions that’s already proving handy, though it is interesting to observe those who decline to share what’s up their sleeves. Tour more regional areas: there’s dozens of viable country towns screaming out for live music, and instead of having five regular stops in the mix, we could eventually have ten or fifteen, which means less clashes by default. It might not be as calculated a bet as being able to comfortably book three Melbourne stops, but persistence will build scenes and open up new pathways for musicians, businessmen and music lovers. Don’t forget that we’re all in this together, and that the music industry thrives on community. Ultimately though, it’s the people who buy tickets that will shape where things go from here, and the next six months is set to be a very interesting time for the heavy music industry in Australia.

QMUSIC QUEENSLAND’S BEST HONOURED AT 2013 QMA Queensland Music Awards celebrated some of the most exciting musical talent the state has to offer for another year. The Tivoli played witness to the unveiling of 22 QMA category winners, including the awards’ inaugural Music Video category. Winners included Emma Louise, Sam Cromack of Ball Park Music, Thelma Plum, The Jungle Giants, and more. Go to www.qldmusicawards.com.au to see the full list of winners! BIGSOUND 2013 UNOFFICIAL APP NOW OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS To keep track of all the unofficial events happening during BIGSOUND, we present the Unofficial BIGSOUND App. If you are hosting an event during BIGSOUND week, get onboard, register and let the world know! Event submission details are at www.bigsound.org.au. ARTIST MANAGERIAL MENTORSHIP PROGRAM APPLICATIONS OPEN The Association of Artist Managers, with support from APRA|AMCOS, Warner Music and the Jimmy Little Foundation, has announced that its Artist Manager Mentor Program is open for applications. Created by The Association of Artist Managers (AAM), the Artist Manager Mentor Program puts young managers in touch with AAM Executives and high profile managers for yearlong communication partnership. Applications close Friday 30 August. Visit www.aam. org.au for more details. WANT TO KNOW MORE OR BECOME A QMUSIC MEMBER? For these stories, memberships and more, go to www. qmusic.com.au.

opinion

DANCE MOVES NEW CURRENTS WITH TIM FINNEY I first started drawing for the term “Balearic” in a nonhistorical context back in about 2003: then it was to describe the early work of British duo Reverso 68, being all voluptuous laidback disco featuring frisky guitar breaks and hallucinatory flashback Yellow Magic Orchestra synths. In the ensuing ten years, Balearic dramatically expanded to become perhaps the most prominent organising principle behind revivalist tendencies in dance music, as it wormed its way through a series of micro-incarnations – space disco, yacht rock, DJ Harvey’s “beardo” disco, edits culture and even indie-rock crossover via Studio and Destroyer. Amsterdam-based producer Young Marco is an all-tooappropriate new star in this aging galaxy, charting the outer limits of Balearic in a manner that clearly highlights its possibilities while also tracing out its limitations. Last year’s single Nonono defines

the centre of his aesthetic handily, marrying a rolling disco groove to ruminative keyboard patterns for a particularly meditative dancefloor experience. But Marco’s other 2012 tunes (Darwin In Bahia, Video Days, Later Than U Think) are even better, all sparkling, rippling, quasi-gamelan affairs. At once geometric in construction and organically expansive, these are as evocative of (variously) Steve Reich, Jon Hassell and The Black Dog as they are of actual disco or house. Balearic revivalism has a lot of form when it comes to offering desexualised post-Tangerine Dream astral concoctions: see Prins Thomas’ remix of Hatchback’s White Diamond, or Todd Terje’s Snooze 4 Love. What distinguishes Marco’s work is how integrated and complete his vision seems, and how his productions reach these starlit climes while retaining an equatorial warmth (mostly through quasiCaribbean percussive intricacy)

THE LOOKING GLASS A JOURNEY THROUGH ARTS WITH HELEN STRINGER Like so many, I was desperately hoping I’d be able to get through the month without having to think about the federal election at all. I was hoping to wake up to the news that because Rudd and Abbott had become the same person both parties had decided to have them surgically attached, making Australia the first country on Earth to have a two-headed, four-armed leader of the nation, thereby negating the need for me to vote at all. No such luck. We’re being asked to choose, as always, between two arseholes. We can only choose which arsehole we

dislike less. I’m well aware, for the politically pedantic, that officially you vote for a party not a Prime Minister. I’m also aware this little bit of pedantry is bullshit and we actually vote for the PM not the party. You can make this choice on many criteria. Policy, yes; but that’s a bit dull. It would be far more effective if we openly voted according to arbitrary, superficial judgment. How about sartorial superiority: K-Rudd, for instance, was wearing a purple tie during a press conference and I liked it. That’s Kruddy-1, Tony-0. Or perhaps intensity of gaze:

KRUDD/ABBOTT

RALPH HEIMANS

that most other producers would struggle to balance. Notwithstanding – or perhaps because of – its consummate blend of influences, this music definitely feels like “end point” music, the final chapter in a story rather than the start of something new, with Marco’s exquisite sonic solutions marking the final frontiers of Balearic reterritorialisation. Of course I might be wrong about that – it’s usually impossible to properly predict the next chapter until it’s already emerging – but this ambivalent quality also emerges on Young Marco’s mostly excellent DJ mixes. When he draws for some patchouli-soaked lysergic disco-rock jam from ages past, I could be listening

during the wank-fest they call the Leader’s Debate Tony undressed the public with his eyes. On several occasions he actually slightly raised one eyebrow and pouted with his head on a slight angle, Zoolander-style. So that’s Kruddy-1, Tony-1. You get the idea. I’m so sold on superficial decision-making I propose we extend the method to policymaking. Let’s ban politicians from law-making altogether and relegate them to purely ceremonial status, requiring them only to walk around in excellent, four-armed suits, staring intensely into cameras. Australians should adopt a system whereby we formulate personal policy that suits our individual ideologies. There are those of us, for example, who believe it’s seriously fucked to base policy-making on who can deny the most legally enshrined human rights to the largest number of people. Under the ‘personal policy’ policy we could implement schemes to restore such rights. Policy is always quid pro quo, so to uphold democratic traditions we would have to make a personal sacrifice

to just any fine Balearic DJ circa 2007. However, at their best – such as the early parts of his Juno Plus Podcast from the end of last year, or the later portions of his recent LN-CC Store mix – they can sound like a spliff-session for Morricone, Vangelis and Sakamoto at the Mos Eisley Cantina: a feverdream of overlapping keyboards, clarinets, chimes and synth burbles that out-avants even the greatest efforts of the erstwhile (and undersung) champions of Balearic boundary-walking, Ronny & Renzo. Whether this is enough to grant Balearic revivalism continuing relevance, or it’s just one final glorious victory lap, either way it makes for essential listening.

to implement whatever greater good we’re aspiring to. We could, for instance, swap pets for boat people. I’m not suggesting that the value of an animal’s life is at all comparable to a human being’s. But based on the wider public’s xenophobia (which I see verified nightly on that bastion of journalistic integrity, A Current Affair) I’m guessing asking for larger sacrifices is futile. So, I’ll take one refugee family in exchange for the cat I love slightly less; that slightly less loved cat could then be entombed in a refugee camp for the rest of its days, the refugees coming to live with me. How about a matrimonial donation scheme? I don’t give a shit about marriage but do I believe in equal rights, including the right for absolutely everybody to become as ambivalent and disillusioned as me. So as a heterosexual able to respect the institution of marriage I am happy to give same-sex couples my right to marriage. In return I’ll take on the pain of being refused something everybody else can do, for no better reason than that a bunch of people are unbelievably stupid. THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 61

the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au Jeremy Neale + Feelings: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley

THE MUSIC PRESENTS Cloud Control: Spotted Cow Aug 21, Coolangatta Hotel Aug 22, The Tivoli Aug 23, Kings Beach Tavern Aug 24 Pluto Jonze: Alhambra Lounge Aug 22 The Stiffys: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden Aug 22, Spotted Cow Aug 23, Ric’s Bar Aug 24 Open Frame 2013: Brisbane Powerhouse, IMA, LRAG Aug 22-Sep 28

Beach Tavern Sep 12, Spotted Cow Sep 13, The Hi-Fi Sep 14 Rudimental: Eatons Hill Hotel Sep 20 Gangsters’ Ball: The Tivoli Sep 21 Big Scary: The Spiegeltent Sep 21 Peace: The Zoo Sep 23 The Drones: The Hi-Fi Sep 27

Dialectrix: Coniston Lane Aug 23

Asta: Brisbane Powerhouse (AA) and Alhambra Lounge Sep 28

Cosmic Psychos: The Hi-Fi Aug 24

Foals: The Tivoli Oct 2

Josh Pyke: Kings Beach Tavern Aug 29, SoundLounge Aug 30, The Tivoli Aug 31 Hungry Kids Of Hungary: Coolangatta Hotel Aug 30, Spotted Cow Aug 31, The Spiegeltent Sep 24 Japandroids: The Zoo Sep 1 The Paper Kites: SoundLounge Sep 5, The Hi-Fi Sep 6, The Northern Sep 7 Twelve Foot Ninja: Tempo Hotel Sep 6, Parkwood Tavern Sep 7

Ngaiire: BMAC Oct 3, Solbar Oct 4, The Northern Oct 5 Boomerang Festival: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm Oct 4-6 Xavier Rudd: The Tivoli Oct 8 The Cribs: The Zoo Oct 25 The Jungle Giants: Solbar Oct 25, The Hi-Fi Oct 26, Alhambra Lounge Oct 27 The Breeders: The Tivoli Oct 29 Dan Sultan: Old Museum Oct 31, Woombye Pub Nov 1

The Real Mckenzies/The Go Set: Miami Tavern Shark Bar Sep 6, Prince Of Wales Sep 7

Horrorshow: Spotted Cow Oct 31, The Zoo Nov 1, Solbar Nov 2, Beach Hotel Nov 3

Red Deer Festival 2013: Mt Samson Sep 7

Boy & Bear: Beach Hotel Nov 7, Coolangatta Hotel Nov 8, The Tivoli Nov 9

Plus One Showcase: The Zoo Sep 10 Jinja Safari: Woombye Pub Sep 11, Spotted Cow Sep 12, The Hi-Fi Sep 13, Coolangatta Hotel Sep 14 Dead Letter Circus: Kings

WED 21

Glass Towers + Little Odessa + MKO: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Golden Days Festival: Coolum Sports Complex Nov 9 Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby Nov 21-24 Festival Of The Sun: Port Macquarie Dec 13-14

Out Of Abingdon: Limes Hotel (rooftop bar), Fortitude Valley Step It Up: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Beejays Club Night + Various: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Mark Sheils: Royal George, Fortitude Valley

Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Ash playing 1977 in full: The Hi-Fi, West End

GIG OF THE WEEK COSMIC PSYCHOS: 24 AUG, THE HI-FI Open Mic Night feat. various: The Loft, Chevron Island

George Benson: QPAC Concert Hall, South Bank

Ron Walker: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Tracer + Black Mustang: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

Cloud Control + Palms: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba

Jeremy Neale + Feelings: Solbar, Maroochydore

Acoustic Session with Jye Whiteman + Tiama Ogburn + guests: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Jazz On Sunday feat. various: Spiegeltent (2pm), Brisbane

Bernie Baroca Brown: The Vault, Southport Cartel + Lydia + Wake The Giants + Skies Collide: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

THU 22

Pluto Jonze + Little Odessa + Hey Geronimo: Alhambra Lounge, Fortitude Valley Gympie Music Muster feat. The Mavericks + Jimmy Barnes + Troy Cassar-Daley + Catherine Britt + Adam Brand + Graeme Connors + Sara Storer + Busby Marou + Russell Morris + Don Walker + Jasmine Rae + James Blundell + more: Amamoor Creek State Forest Park, Gympie

Twisted + The Stiffys: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden, Surfers Paradise The Getaway Plan: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden, Surfers Paradise

Kelsey Giarola Quartet: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Zac Gunthorpe + She + Jen Mize: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa Cloud Control + Palms: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta Being As An Ocean + Sierra: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Megan Cooper & The Pretty Pennies + Phil Smith: Dowse Bar (Iceworks), Paddington Foxsmith: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Kim Sheehy: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton Ragdoll + Jabba: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Stormy Weather: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Ballad Boy: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt

Alan Western & Peter Vance: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point The Long Player Sessions feat. Tara Simmons + Charlie Horse: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm Mia Wray + DJ Karlos: Cafe Le Monde, Noosa Plan Of Attack + Crooked Face + Albion Gold + more: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley

Ty Fader: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Dialectrix: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley

Open Mic Night feat. various: The Retro Bar, Kenmore

Sam Meddows: Coorparoo Bowls Club, Coorparoo

ASH: 21 AUG, THE HI-FI The Music Kitchen feat. Ultra Ego + Poncho Pilot + The Bear Hunt + Trojan Horse + more: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Voyager + The Matador: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

Book Club + various: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley

The Familiars + The Vernons: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise

Frazer Goodman + friends: The Vault, Southport Moonshine Sally + Floodsnake + Magenta Voyeur + Junkyard Diamonds: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Ben Hauptmann Quartet + Boplore feat. Jac Manricks: Turnaround Jazz Club, Bowen Hills Snitch feat. Lydia + Young Lions + Ash McIntyre + Adam Douglas: X&Y Bar, Fortitude Valley

FRI 23

Open Mic Night feat. various: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane

Sounds of the Footpath + DJ Oscar + MC XY: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley

Pigeon: Paddy’s Shenanigans Irish Pub, Airlie Beach

The Lazy Valentines: Albany Creek Tavern, Albany Creek

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Black Bear To Brooklyn + various: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Glass Towers + Lyon Apprentice + Jordan Leser: The Loft, Chevron Island

Los Trios Cardios + The Miscounts + The Sunday Bests: Beetle Bar, Brisbane The Vernons + Gravity Scam + MNTS: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Gympie Music Muster feat. The Mavericks + Jimmy Barnes + Troy Cassar-Daley + Catherine Britt + Adam Brand + Graeme Connors + Sara Storer + Busby Marou + Russell Morris + Don Walker + Jasmine Rae + James Blundell + more: Amamoor Creek State Forest Park, Gympie

Peking Duk: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill

Trainspotters feat. Hunter & Smoke: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Tyson & Shake: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton Le Breeze: Lambert’s Restaurant, Kangaroo Point Mojo Webb: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End The London Cartel: Miami Tavern (Malibu’s Bar), Miami The Latin Cave feat. various: Mick O’Malley’s, Brisbane The Black Swamp + Galactic Acid + The Stone Fox: Prince of Wales Hotel, Nundah The Seed Project feat. Marcus Blacke + Alone With Wolves + The Orchard: QPAC (Melbourne Street Green), Southbank

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the guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au

SAT 24

The Seed Project feat. various: QPAC Concert Hall, South Bank The Getaway Plan: Racehorse Hotel, Booval Tully On Tully + Love Like Hate: Ric’s (downstairs), Fortitude Valley DJ Simon Says: Ric’s (upstairs), Fortitude Valley Devil’s Kiosk: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna Vikki Grant: Saltbar, South Kingscliff

Cookie Jar: 633 Ann, Fortitude Valley

The Enterprise: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Gympie Music Muster feat. The Mavericks + Jimmy Barnes + Troy Cassar-Daley + Catherine Britt + Adam Brand + Graeme Connors + Sara Storer + Busby Marou + Russell Morris + Don Walker + Jasmine Rae + James Blundell + more: Amamoor Creek State Forest Park, Gympie

Ger Fennelly: Mick O’Malley’s (afternoon), Brisbane

The Dunhill Blues + Dirty Sluts + Nimbin Antibodies + Lords Of Wong + The Rared + Shrewmssun: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

The Chocolate Strings + His Merry Men: Solbar, Maroochydore

DJ Phil Istine: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Dubmarine + CC The Cat + Felicity Lawless: Soundlounge, Currumbin

Jake Barden Quartet: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Being As An Ocean + Sierra: Studio 454, Enoggera

Lindsey Stirling: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm

Alex Gibson: The Exchange Hotel (rooftop) , Brisbane Tetrameth + One Tasty Morsel: The Hi-Fi, West End Papa Pilko & The Bin Rats: The Joynt, South Brisbane Sam Brittian + Marcus Blacke + Ella Fence + Eilish-Ellen: The Loft, Chevron Island

Thriller feat. Obey The Brave + Boris The Blade + The Storm Picturesque + Never Lose Sight: Coniston Lane, Fortitude Valley Trainspotters feat. Soviet X-Ray Record Club + Wolver + Charles Daaboul + guests: Grand Central Hotel, Brisbane Deon Powter: Hamilton Hotel (afternoon), Hamilton

John Wilkenson: The Plough Inn, Southbank

Brooksy & Co: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton

The Stiffys: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba Zombie Apocalypse Theory + Electric Samurai + more: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Various DJs: The Tempo Hotel (Bowler Bar), Fortitude Valley Cloud Control + Palms: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley

Cloud Control + Palms: Kings Beach Tavern, Caloundra Devil’s Kiosk: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Ger Fennelly: Mick O’Malley’s (afternoon), Brisbane The Angels + Tracer: Racehorse Hotel, Booval

Jazz & Shriaz feat. Gosha: The Vault (afternoon), Southport Lesyah: The Vault, Southport Charles Buddy Daaboul: The Waiting Room, West End

Joe Tee & Afrodisa: Kerbside, Fortitude Valley

The Stiffys + The Real Eyes + DJ Valdis: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley DJ Cutts: Ric’s (upstairs), Fortitude Valley

PLUTO JONZE: 22 AUG, ALHAMBRA LOUNGE Bertie Page Clinic + guests: Royal Mail Hotel (afternoon), Goodna The Trophy Brides: Royal Mail Hotel (afternoon), Goodna The Zone: Saltbar, South Kingscliff Dialectrix: Solbar, Maroochydore Bree De Rome & The Lion’s Children: Southside Tea Room, Morningside The Getaway Plan: Springwood Hotel, Springwood Cosmic Psychos + Six Ft Hick + Happy Times: The Hi-Fi, West End Tom West: The Hideaway, Fortitude Valley Soul Simple + Sneeky Picnic + Tuesday’s Good + Dan Stone: The Loft, Chevron Island 22 Hotels: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank Nathan Pursey: The Plough Inn, Southbank I Shall Devour + A Night In Texas + Beckon The Dead + Vitals + Justly Delt: The Sands Tavern, Maroochydore Jeremy Neale + Feelings: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba The Vernons: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba Radioutkast: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley Manhattan Transfer: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley

Johnny Nicol + Band: The Vault, Southport The Halls + Love Hate Rebellion + Daves Pawn Shop: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley The Ten Fours + The 52 Pickups + West Texas Crude + The Howls: Transcontinental Hotel, Brisbane

Transvaal Diamond Syndicate + Dead Zephyr + The Baskervillans + The Con & The Liar: Transcontinental Hotel, Brisbane Manhattan Transfer: Twin Towns, Tweed Heads The Angels + Tracer: Victoria Point Sharks Club, Victoria Point

THE GONZO SHOW: 25 AUG, RIC’S BAR

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Jazz, Swing & Rock feat. various: Robina Bowls Club, Robina Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Valley Kellie Lloyd + Emma White: Shucked Lane, Newstead DJ Chantal: Stoke Bar, Southbank

Thriller feat. Obey The Brave + Street Pieces + Box Falcon + Supercaine: X&Y Bar, Fortitude Valley

Obey The Brave + more: Tall Poppy Studios, Brisbane

SUN 25

DJ Phil Istine: The End, West End Karma: The Plough Inn (afternoon), Southbank

Rock n Roll BBQ feat. The Dunhill Blues + more: 633 Ann (afternoon), Fortitude Valley

Sunday Sessions feat. various: The Tempo Hotel (afternoon), Fortitude Valley

Gympie Music Muster feat. The Mavericks + Jimmy Barnes + Troy Cassar-Daley + Catherine Britt + Adam Brand + Graeme Connors + Sara Storer + Busby Marou + Russell Morris + Don Walker + Jasmine Rae + James Blundell + more: Amamoor Creek State Forest Park, Gympie

Revfest feat. Kissperience + Ride The Lightning + Blizzard of Oz + Her Way To Hell + special guests: The Hi-Fi, West End

MON 26

Rockaoke feat. Various: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Ghost Notes + Turnpike + Roku Music: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley Toni Zaffa Quintet: Brisbane Jazz Club (brunch), Kangaroo Point Jindalee Jazz Orchestra: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

TUE 27

Pete Hunt: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Basement Mixtape: The Taste Test feat. various DJs: Metro Arts (Basement), Brisbane The BUg feat. Two Crows + The Fiddle Music of Joe Yates: New Farm Bowls Club, New Farm

The Jason Recliners: Coorparoo Bowls Club (afternoon), Coorparoo

Indie Rock Escalate with Tremors + Stone Vandals + The Vices + Manic Radiation: The Tempo Hotel, Fortitude Valley

Beaver: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

Comedy Night feat. various: The Vault, Southport

Marie Wilson: Dowse Bar (Iceworks), Paddington

Women In The Arts: What Difference Does It Make? A Panel Discussion feat. various: The Zoo (afternoon), Fortitude Valley

Spike: Hamilton Hotel (Public Bar/afternoon), Hamilton

5–8PM FRIDAYS 9 August to 11 October

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The Gonzo Show + Galapogos: Ric’s, Fortitude Valley

Don McLean: Twin Towns, Tweed Heads

2013 Bulimba Festival feat. Joe Camilleri + Wilbur Wilde + Frankie J Holden + The Royal Australian Navy Band + more: Bulimba RSL, Bulimba

Kodiak Empire + Skin & Bones + The Moose: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Out Of Abingdon: Mr & Mrs G Riverbar (afternoon), Brisbane

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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 6 5

tour guide qld.gigguide@themusic.com.au King Parrot: Sands Tavern Sep 6, Thriller Sep 7

INTERNATIONAL Ash: The Hi-Fi Aug 21

Bob Evans: Byron Theatre Sep 6, The Spotted Cow Sep 7, Soundlounge Sep 12

Being As An Ocean: Crowbar Aug 22, Studio 454 Aug 23 (AA)

Tonight Alive: Alhambra Lounge (U18 Matinee), The Zoo (evening) Sep 7

David Toop: Institute Of Modern Art Aug 22, 29

Paul Kelly: QPAC, Sep 7

Cartel: The Zoo Aug 21

Don Mclean: QPAC Aug 23, Twin Towns Aug 25 Lindsey Stirling: Brisbane Powerhouse Aug 24 Obey The Brave: Thriller Aug 24, Tall Poppies Studios Aug 25 (AA) All Time Low: The Tivoli Aug 28 (AA) Akio Suzuki: Institute Of Modern Art Aug 29, Lismore Regional Art Gallery Aug 30 Pink: BEC Aug 29, 30, Sep 7, 8 Guttermouth: The Northern Aug 29, The Tempo Hotel Aug 30, Parkwood Tavern Aug 31 Fat Freddy’s Drop: The Tivoli Aug 30 The Game: Parkwood Tavern Aug 30, The Arena Aug 31 Japandroids: The Zoo Sep 1 Anberlin: The Hi-Fi Sep 4, Coolangatta Hotel Sep 5 The Real McKenzies: Shark Bar Sep 6, Prince Of Wales Sep 7

THE CULT: 1 OCT, EATONS HILL HOTEL

Volumes: Crowbar Sep 12, Eagleby Community Hall Sep 13 Amanda Palmer & The Grand Theft Orchestra: The Tivoli Sep 12 Francisco Lopez: Brisbane Powerhouse Sep 12 Mark McGuire: Brisbane Powerhouse Sep 13 R.A. The Rugged Man: Coniston Lane Sep 13 Hit The Lights: Crowbar Sep 13, Trinity Hall Sep 14 (AA) Kvelertak: The Rev Sep 14 Ghostpoet: The Spiegeltent Sep 15 Calexico: The Spiegeltent Sep 17, 18, Byron Theatre Sep 20 Murphy’s Law: The Zoo Sep 18 Beach Fossils: The Spiegeltent Sep 19 Laurel Halo: Brisbane Powerhouse Sep 19 Rudimental: Eatons Hill Hotel Sep 20

Cosmic Psychos: The Hi-Fi Aug 24

Russell Morris: The Spiegeltent Sep 11

For The Fallen Dreams: Thriller Sep 21

Tom West: The Hideaway Aug 24

Hernan Cattaneo: The Met Sep 21

The Dunhill Blues: Beetle Bar Aug 24, 633 Ann Aug 25

Jinja Safari: Woombye Pub Sep 11, The Spotted Cow Sep 12, The Hi-Fi Sep 13, Coolangatta Hotel Sep 14

Kikagaku Moyo: Beetle Bar Sep 21, The Time Machine Sep 22

The Smith Street Band: The Zoo Aug 29

The Basics: The Spiegeltent Sep 12

Xavier Rudd: Byron YAC Oct 7 (AA), The Tivoli Oct 8

Josh Pyke: Kings Beach Tavern Aug 29, Soundlounge Aug 30, The Tivoli Aug 31

Dead Letter Circus: Kings Beach Tavern Sep 12, The Spotted Cow Sep 13, The Hi-Fi Sep 14

Regurgitator: Kings Beach Tavern Oct 10, The Hi-Fi Oct 11, Coolangatta Hotel Oct 12, The Northern Oct 13

Illy, Allday: Oh Hello! Sep 13

FESTIVALS

Olafur Arnalds: The Spiegeltent Sep 22 Peace: The Zoo Sep 23 Alan Jackson: BEC Sep 26, 27

The Trouble With Templeton: The Spotted Cow Aug 29, The Zoo Aug 30, The Brewery Aug 31

Wolf Mail: The Joynt Sep 26; Bangalow Bowling Club Sep 27; Joe’s Waterhole Sep 28; Royal Mail Hotel Sep 29

Jack Carty: Railway Friendly Bar Aug 29, The Spotted Cow Aug 30, Joe’s Waterhole Aug 31, Black Bear Lodge Sep 1

Rihanna: BEC Sep 28

Dumb Blondes: Alhambra Lounge Aug 29

Swervedriver: The Zoo Sep 26

The Cult: Eatons Hill Hotel Oct 1 Foals: The Tivoli Oct 2 Soilwork: The Hi-Fi Oct 2

Pigeon: Oh Hello! Aug 30, Coolangatta Hotel Sep 19, Beach Hotel Sep 20, Solbar Sep 21

Doku Rai Band: The Spiegeltent Sep 13 Rainy Day Women: X&Y Bar Sep 13 British India: Australian National Sep 13, BCEC Oct 27 Tumbleweed, Money For Rope: The Zoo Sep 13 Bloods, The Peep Tempel, The Demon Parade: Black Bear Lodge Sep 13

Midnight Juggernauts: The Hi-Fi Aug 30, The Northern Aug 31

Ed Kuepper: Brisbane Powerhouse Sep 13, 14, Soundlounge Oct 11

Oscar Key Sung: Black Bear Lodge Aug 30

Dick Diver: The Spiegeltent Sep 14 The Spoils: Black Bear Lodge Sep 14

Me First & The Gimme Gimmes: The Hi-Fi Oct 4

Hungry Kids Of Hungry: Coolangatta Hotel Aug 30, The Spotted Cow Aug 31, The Spiegeltent Sep 24

Steven Wilson: The Tivoli Oct 5

I, A Man: Alhambra Lounge Aug 30

Bring Me The Horizon, Of Mice & Men: The Marquee Oct 5

Sampology: Coniston Lane Aug 30, Beach Hotel Sep 15

David Liebe Hart Band: Crowbar Oct 4

Rolo Tomassi: Crowbar Oct 10, Sun Distortion Oct 11 (AA)

NATIONAL

Ego: Never Land Bar Aug 30, Beach Hotel Aug 31 Little Scout: Coolangatta Hotel Aug 30, The Spotted Cow Aug 31, Black Bear Lodge Oct 18

Glass Towers: Black Bear Lodge Aug 21, The Loft Aug 22, The Northern Aug 23

Vance Joy: The Zoo Aug 31

Cloud Control: The Spotted Cow Aug 21, Coolangatta Hotel, Aug 22, The Tivoli Aug 23, Kings Beach Tavern Aug 24, Beach Hotel Aug 25

Topology: Matthew Flinders Performing Arts Centre Sep 1

Triple J House Party: The Hi-Fi Aug 31

The Paper Kites: The Soundlounge Sep 5, The Hi-Fi Sep 6, The Northern Sep 7

Northlane: Surfers Paradise Beer Garden Sep 19, Racehorse Hotel Sep 21

Mitchell Creek Rock N Blues Festival: Upper Kandanga, Mary Valley Sep 20-22 Sprung Festival: Victoria Park Cricket Ovals Sep 21 One Epic Event: Pine Rivers Park Sep 22 Boomerang Festival: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm Oct 4-6 Caloundra Music Festival: Kings Beach Park Oct 4-7 Rap City: The Hi-Fi Oct 5

Golden Days: Coolum Sports Complex Nov 9

Big Scary: The Spiegeltent Sep 21 Ashleigh Mannix: 5 Church Street Sep 21, The Joynt Sep 26, The Up Front Bar Sep 27, Valley Markets Sep 28, The Loft Sep 28 Dreamtime: Beetle Bar Sep 21, The Time Machine Sep 22

Emma Louise: The Spiegeltent Sep 25, 26

Sietta: Alhambra Lounge Sep 5

Tracer: Ric’s Aug 22, Victoria Point Sharks Club Aug 23, Racehorse Hotel Aug 24

The Grates: The Spotted Cow Sep 5, Elsewhere Sep 6

The Drones, Harmony: The Hi-Fi Sep 27

Dubmarine: Soundlounge Aug 23, The Northern Sep 20, Metro Arts Centre Sep 27

BIGSOUND: Fortitude Valley Entertainment Precinct Sep 11-12

Alison Wonderland: Elsewhere Sep 21

The Growl: Black Bear Lodge Sep 5

Twelve Foot Ninja: The Tempo Hotel Sep 6, Parkwood Tavern Sep 7

Red Deer Music Festival: Samford Valley Sep 7

Island Vibe: Home Beach Park Oct 25-27

Jeremy Neale, Feelings: Solbar Aug 22, Alhambra Lounge Aug 23, The Spotted Cow Aug 24

The Snowdroppers: Alhambra Lounge Sep 6

Paul Dempsey: The Zoo Oct 5

Lanie Lane: Black Bear Lodge Sep 20

Sures, Go Violets: Black Bear Lodge Sep 25

The Stiffys: Surfers Paradise Beergarden Aug 22, The Spotted Cow Aug 23, Ric’s Aug 24

Rüfüs: The Zoo Oct 4

Listen Out: Cultural Forecourt Oct 6

Seekae: Oh Hello! Sep 5

Pluto Jonze: Alhambra Lounge Aug 22

Chance Waters, The Griswolds: Alhambra Lounge Oct 4

Snakadaktal: The Hi-Fi Sep 20, The Northern Sep 21

Hits & Pits 2.0: Coolangatta Hotel Nov 15, The Hi-Fi Nov 16 Harvest: City Botanic Gardens Nov 17 Mullum Music Festival: Mullumbimby Nov 21-24 Warped Tour: RNA Showgrounds Nov 29, Coffs Harbour Showground Nov 30 Stereosonic: RNA Showgrounds Dec 7-8

The Preatures: Black Bear Lodge Sep 27

Festival Of The Sun: Sundowner Breakwall Tourist Park Dec 13-14

Harrison Craig: QPAC Sep 27, Jupiters Casino Sep 28, Star Court Theatre Nov 19

Falls Festival: Byron Bay Dec 31-Jan 3

Jimmy Barnes: Eatons Hill Hotel Sep 28, Lake Kawana Community Centre, Sep 29

Big Day Out: Metricon Stadium and Carrara Parklands Jan 19

1000S OF GIGS AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. FOR MORE HEAD TO THEMUSIC.COM.AU 66 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

The Delta Riggs: Alhambra Lounge Oct 3, Elsewhere Oct 4

Lamb Of God, Meshuggah: The Tivoli Sep 20

Katchafire: Byron Bay Brewery Oct 3, The Hi-Fi Oct 13, Parkwood Tavern Oct 20

Kele (DJ Set): Oh Hello! Sep 12

Ngaiire: BEMAC Oct 3, Solbar Oct 4, The Northern Oct 5

Kieran Ryan: Alhambra Lounge Sep 10

Machine Gun Kelly: The Hi-Fi Sep 7

Villainy: Solbar Sep 13, The Northern Sep 14

Hellions: Snitch Oct 3

Voyager: Crowbar Aug 23

UK Subs: Prince Of Wales Oct 2

Cory Branan: Crowbar Sep 11, The Loft Sep 12

Parkway Drive: The Tivoli Sep 29, 30 (AA), Oct 1

Zomby: The Spiegeltent Sep 20

The Commitments: Eatons Hill Hotel Sep 7

Cyndi Lauper: Jupiters Casino Sep 10, QPAC Sep 11, 12

Roger Knox: The Spiegeltent Sep 8

Spit Syndicate: Solbar Sep 28, The Loft Oct 10, Woody’s Surf Shack Oct 11, Alhambra Lounge Oct 12

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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 67

eat/drink

POLE POSITION Dylan Stewart debunks European myths to experience some new flavours that have long been bringing people together. Pic by Holly Engelhardt.

I

do my shopping at the market. Given the hordes at the Queen Victoria and Preston markets in Melbourne, and Paddy’s and the Parramatta Farmers Market in Sydney, I’m not the only one. The meat section brims with glory, the fish section has a fresh appeal and the general mayhem of the fruit area is enough to drive anyone to spend $20 on blueberries in the middle of winter. But without fail, the best place in any market is the deli. Offering meats, pickles, cheeses and strange, mysterious delights, it’s a place where foreign tin cans line the counters, offering wondrous preserves and unique flavour experiences to those who dare sample from their contents. And it’s as good a place as any to discover European cuisine. As little as five years ago, to hear a restaurant labelled as ‘European’ would mean Italian influences, some Greek and French smatterings offered, and perhaps tapas or a schnitzel. Nowadays, the proliferation of European restaurants is, like the cuisine itself, subtle but satisfying. With the Cold and Balkan Wars ending in the past 25 years and the subsequent tensions settling in the time since, emigrants (and their offspring) in Australia are now focusing on life enjoyment rather than pure survival. A generation of chefs are drawing inspiration from their ancestors to bring their traditional dishes to an Australian public on the lookout for a wholesome, friendly dining experience. One such purveyor is Daniel Dobra, head chef of Melbourne’s soon-to-be-open Brutale. Having grown up in a proud Croatian household in Esperance, Western Australia, Dobra has spent most of his life working in hospitality in WA and Victoria. “My goal through Brutale is to break down the stereotypes related to European food,” Dobra said. “I want to educate the people of Australia [on] the true beauty that lies hidden within Eastern and Central Europe’s food, drink and culture.” With 20-plus countries, a population of over 400 million, and a fractured, still-developing history, this might seem a large task, but it’s one that he’s up for.

68 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

TOP EUROPEAN DISHES

PIEROGI Dumplings first boiled then baked or fried, usually in butter with onions. They are normally stuffed with sauerkraut, ground meat or cheese.

“I think due to the nature and trends of Australia, a majority of people these days want a high quality meal at an affordable price with not too much fuss and hassle when they go out for dinner. People want to eat food that they can share with their friends and family. The days of single entree, main course and dessert are not over, but people want simple pleasures they can relate to. European food is extremely simple, can be made at low cost and can be shared and enjoyed by one and all.” After speaking to Dobra, I decide to test his theory, and after visiting Babcia (grandmother) at Preston Market’s Slovonia Deli and Peter Langtry’s Polish Deli at the Queen Vic Market I arrive home with a Slovenian salami, Polish wedding sausage, Baltic pickled herring, pierogis and the ingredients for ćevapi, börek, borscht beef and fritule. With the borscht beef – beetroots, diced beef, shredded cabbage and onions – slow-cooking for five hours, it’s not difficult to recruit some friends to give their opinions on my European smorgasbord. Ćevapi, hand-rolled pork and beef mince sausages cooked tenderly on the barbecue, whets their appetites as the spicy beef börek is pulled from the oven. The borscht beef is the perfect meal for a cold winter’s day, warming the insides of everyone at the table as it’s washed down with wine. Finally, the fritule, or Croatian donuts, are the piece de resistance. Kneaded dough with raisins, lemon zest and brandy, the spoonfuls of mixture sizzle temptingly in an oil-filled pan, before they are drizzled with extra brandy, dusted with icing sugar and served hot. Sure, the ingredients in European food are not groundbreaking. They do, however, have the ability to draw friends and family together and warm the soul. Goulash, rakija (fermented fruit-based liquor), and anything cooked in a peka (a cast-iron dish in which meat is cooked in a wood-fired oven) have had Europeans loving and laughing around the dinner table for centuries. For Daniel Dobra, the goal is simple: “I just want to share the true beauty of Eastern European food.” It shouldn’t be too difficult.

POLISH SAUSAGE WITH PICKLES This is an arvo dish best eaten with vodka.

BORSCHT The worst soup to eat if you’re wearing a white top. Served hot or cold, Borscht is a beetroot based soup.

eat/drink

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• the food •

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THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 69

sport

5 SPORTS YOU DON’T KNOW YET Scott Fitzsimons discovers five sports he might actually excel in. in

A

re you starting to realise that you’re never going to make it to the Olympics? You’ll never get to party in the athletes’ village and never earn the right to get the Olympic rings tattooed on your arm. It’s a depressing fact that most of us have to come to terms with… but there’s a cure. We’ve had a look through the margins of the organised sport canon and found there are at least five less-than-mainstream but still incredibly prestigious sports you can earn that arm tatt in.

CHESSBOXING Pretty self-explanatory: you start with a chess game and then jump in the boxing ring, take a minute’s rest and then do it over again. Bout ends when someone loses either the chess game or the fight, with each getting more difficult to concentrate on over the course of 11 rounds (six chess, five boxing). Mainly played by Germans and Russians, it’s yet to really take off in Australia, which gives us a unique opportunity to get in early and organise a ‘National Championship’ before a real governing body notices. Not to be confused with the traditional Australian ‘pub chess’, where if you lose the game you belt the bloke opposite you with what’s left of your schooner.

VIGORO Mainly played by women, Vigoro is a cricket hybrid, with paddles instead of bats and two ‘bowlers’ (chucking is encouraged) at a time from the one end of a pitch. Most popular in New South Wales, it tends to confuse the hell out of people when played after the morning kids’ cricket divisions finish up. The sport enjoyed a hint of popularity earlier this century, but has since found itself overshadowed by traditional cricket given that the national women’s team is doing so much better than the men’s. There is a real chance that you could walk into the Australian squad now.

RIDE-ON LAWN MOWER RACING This is probably the greatest human pursuit of all time. Born during a lunch session in an English 70 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

pub by a group of blokes who wanted a cheap motorsport alternative, it involves taking the blades out of your ride-on mower and modifying the engine, according to stringent technical regulations, so that it becomes a triumph of engineering and speed. Sir Stirling Moss and Derek Bell (Formula 1 and Le Mans legends respectively) took part in the first ever 12-hour lawn mower enduro in the late ‘70s (they only bloody won), setting the tone for one of the most illustrious events on the international sporting calendar. There is a local association, so get off your arse and we’ll see you at the Deni Ute Muster meeting.

COMBAT JUGGLING

Juggling in an arena where, as well as throwing your batons up in the air and catching them again, you’re using one of said batons to whack your opponent’s. Fast-paced and sometimes brutal, Major League Contact promotes game variations such as ‘Kill The King’, ‘Sumo’ and ‘Zombie’. There is, however, a feeling that it is made up of all the kids who not only couldn’t make the cross country team, but were overlooked for the school tunnel ball squad as well. It looks pretty bloody hard, but so is cutting off your own thumb with a butter knife or ‘drifting’ in motorsports – a lot of dedication, will power and practice goes in, but at the end of the day you still look like a moron.

TASMANIAN APPLE & SALMON RACE

Let’s be honest, any reason to go to Tassie (and we mean any reason) is a good reason. If you need to spend an afternoon standing by a river with a Boag’s Draught in hand and one eye on an apple floating down the stream then count us the fuck in. The Huon Apple and Salmon race is an annual fundraiser for the local Rotary club, and while postponed for this year (local power struggle, we reckon) that just gives us more time to perfect our release technique and ability to identify the fastest rips. You may think that dropping an apple or fake salmon in a river may be all about luck, but that’s what separates the champions from the pretenders.

FACT:

The 12-hour lawn mower race in West Sussex is the pinnacle of human endurance.

FACT:

Everything should always be played to raise money for Tasmanian Rotary Clubs.

FACT:

We could not confirm that anyone who plays Combat Juggling has ever been laid.

lifestyle

TWEETRATURE? Usingg twitter in the wayy one might g write a haiku, haiku, Nigeriang American writer Teju j Cole has been creating a new kind of literature, literature as Oliver Coleman discovers.

T

eju Cole, the Nigerian-American author, began writing on twitter as an exercise in form. Initially, he was responding to the work of Félix Fénéon, a Parisian writer who worked during the early 20th century. Fénéon wrote fait divers, a type of short newspaper article that was usually grim, darkly humorous and with Fénéon’s touch, pointedly ironic: A dishwasher from Nancy, Vital Frérotte, who had just come back from Lourdes cured forever of tuberculosis, died Sunday by mistake. Cole appropriated the form of the fait divers as a homage to Fénéon and titled his own work, Small Fates. He began the project while researching an upcoming nonfiction work about daily life in contemporary Lagos, the Nigerian metropolis where he grew up. His mission was

to show the complexities of Lagos, a place so often thought about in the “broad and meaningless category of Africa”. Cole wanted “to show that what happens in the rest of the world happens in Nigeria too, with a little craziness all our own mixed in.” He discovered that the fait divers was the perfect fit for the 140 character limitations of twitter: Pastor Ogbeke, preaching fervently during a storm in Obrura, received fire from heaven, in the form of lightning, and died. Or,“Nobody shot anybody,” the Abuja police spokesman confirmed, after the driver Stephen, 35, shot by Abuja police, almost died. Cole articulates the delight of crafting the perfectly balanced small fate; he worked each tweet through around 12 drafts. “Somehow, some of them were so odd and so shocking that people started to pay attention.” Cole’s following began to increase and he now has over 100,000 followers. Part of the attraction of twitter for Cole was the “eruptive” potential of a conscientiously

composed tweet that could strike through an otherwise unremarkable twitter feed. “I knew that each day, as I was writing, that timelines are filled with other kinds of narratives or information and so there was a sense of, not a wish to shock, but a wish to arrive in people’s timelines; in a sense to arrive in their consciousness with something different.” There are the obvious obstructions when writing on twitter: it’s fragmented and ephemeral. Cole points out that while writing a book is “a marathon”, writing on twitter is more of a “long jump”. Twitter does however enable direct and immediate contact between writer and audience. The foremost attraction for the artist working on twitter is it solves the problem of distribution. While writing itself is not prohibitively expensive, the actual costs of publishing are. “Twitter is kind of a wonderful, peculiar solution to that problem. Let’s say you have 200 followers. That’s 200 people you can send out a thought to in an unmediated way. If you happen to have 10,000 followers, or one-hundred thousand, or one million, then the scale of the thing is actually quite staggering.” After Cole had written several thousand Small Fates the project came to a natural conclusion as he began to work on other projects. A recent work that extended its life beyond twitter was Seven Short Stories About Drones. Cole took the opening lines of famous works of literature that introduced their famed characters and interrupted their narratives with targeted strikes by military drones. He questions how the United States government has assassinated upwards of 5000 people in its drone war. “The reason a crime of that scale could just happen was because these people... were not treated as if they were real human beings. There was an empathy gap; a failure of compassion somewhere in there.” Cole sought to bridge that gap by replacing the nameless, faceless targets of the assassinations with characters with whom we hold ongoing and deeply empathetic relationships. “You can’t do that to Mrs Dalloway. You can’t kill her off just like that. But this is what the US was and is doing to actual real life human beings whom we do not know.” THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 71

travel

SONGS FOR SWAZILAND Two Australian volunteers with two completely different skill sets have joined forces in Swaziland to boost the pride and identity of rural Swazi women through song. Myles Mumford and Isabel Ross talk about their experience.

CURRENT ASSIGNMENTS ON AUSTRALIAN VOLUNTEERS INTERNATIONAL Forestry Management Trainer – The United Republic of Tanzania Auto Electrics Technical Instructor – The United Republic of Tanzania Midwifery Tutor – Ethiopia Surgeon – The United Republic of Tanzania Physiotherapist – Namibia Accountant – Papua New Guinea Vocational Education Mentor – Solomon Islands Medical Supplies Support Officer – Solomon Islands

S

waziland is one of the last remaining absolute monarchies in the world. To visitors, it appears like an idyllic kingdom that escapes the conflict and poverty of other African countries. However, to those that live there, Swaziland paints a very different picture. With just one million people in a country half the size of Tasmania, Swaziland suffers the highest rates of HIV in the world, and the lowest life expectancy. Around one-third of women are sexually abused by the time they turn 18 and, until recently, women were considered minors under the legal guardianship of their husbands. This juxtaposition leaves volunteers like Myles Mumford and Isabel Ross constantly reframing their views and expectations. “One day I’m Skyping my family in Australia, then the next day I’ll be talking to a teenage girl who is forced to sell her body just so that she can eat,” says Mumford. One thing that Swaziland does enjoy, though, is a love of music. Thanks to radio, music such as reggae, gospel and house can be heard blaring everywhere you go, especially in restaurants and on public transport. Radio reigns supreme, forming the main means of mass communication in the country because it’s free and easily accessible by all. Despite the musical obsession, the local music scene in Swaziland is very small. Musical equipment including instruments are very expensive; recording and production costs are very high and often poor quality; plus, there is no copyright control or royalties in the country. As a result, musicians there make very little money except through the occasional live performance or sponsorship deals, and many try to develop their careers in South Africa, leaving a massive brain drain. Myles Mumford is a recording engineer with Lusweti Institute for Health Development 72 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013

Communication. During his time in Swaziland, Mumford has been able to build a recording studio with a grant from the Australian High Commission. Using this, he has produced local radio content and created a number of musical projects around positive social behavioral change. Meanwhile, Isabel Ross works as a Health Program Advisor with Gone Rural boMake (‘women’), a community development organisation that works with 800 women artisans and their communities on health, education, water, sanitation and women’s empowerment initiatives. Seeing the joy that singing gives to women in Swaziland, Ross and Mumford decided to team up and record six groups of Gone Rural artisans singing their choice of traditional songs. Seventyone women donned traditional dress and walked miles to be a part of the recordings, which despite the sometimes heartbreaking lyrics, they sang with great gusto and joy. Many commented that they came because they wanted to use their talents to spread their message to the world through song. “We chose these songs because they have meaning in our lives as women. Life can be hard in Swaziland, but as women we are powerful, and we know that we have the strength to face these challenges,” said Nokuthula from Lavumisa. “Singing is a great way for us to come together and celebrate as women.” The songs have been compiled into an album that is being sold through Gone Rural stores and online to raise funds for Gone Rural boMake’s projects. In addition to this, Mumford has recorded an album of Lubombo musicians to raise funds for Swaziland’s first community radio station.

Researcher/ Campaign Officer – Lebanon Audiologist – Namibia To hear the music, and to support these projects, please go to: gonerural. bandcamp.com or lubombocomm unityradio. bandcamp.com For more info on becoming a volunteer head to: australian volunteers.com

culture One photograph. Every day for a year. Plus a quote – an overheard statement, a song lyric, a passage from a book – Anything, as long as it was text. What followed became a strange, unwieldy, funny, silly and occasionally strangely profound portrait of 365 days featuring the people I loved and the curious things I photograph for money in the independent theatre industry. People started getting competitive about being quoted. It all got joyously out of hand. And it gave me a year’s worth of memories to clutch onto. sarahwalkerphotos. com

CLUTCH

A 365 day project by photographer Sarah Walker.

THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013 • 73

the end

NON-PERFORMANCE ENHANCING DRUGS POT

CHEMICAL MAKEUP Grass clippings from the MCG, SCG and the Gabba.

KNOWN FOR? Helping you believe that you can reach the top.

LIKELY USER University Games team.

PROS? Great team-building exercise.

CONS? Funds allocated for training equipment diverted into extra-cheesy Doritos storage.

KROKODIL CHEMICAL MAKEUP

Extreme morphine laced with white line fever.

KNOWN FOR? Being Russia’s most devastating drug/playing mind games with the other teams.

LIKELY USER Team Russia.

PROS? Scaly skin makes it easy to identify other teammates.

CONS? You’re usually dead within a month, so teams will likely offer you match payments over a three-year-contract.

HEROIN

CHEMICAL MAKEUP The tears of your enemies.

KNOWN FOR? An effective painkiller to smash through the barrier of that snapped Achilles.

LIKELY USER Wooden spooners.

PROS? The feeling of winning, all the time, every time.

CONS? Hard to take a top-up mid-game.

74 • THE MUSIC • 21ST AUGUST 2013


The Music (Brisbane) Issue 2