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09.09.15 Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Issue

101

Brisbane / Free / Incorporating

Bring Me The Horizon TELLI NG US W H Y THE SCREAMI NG HAS STO P PED MUSIC MUSIC

Grenadiers

Iron MAiden

Jason Mewes Straight Outta Compton COMEDY

FILM


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JONSON STREET BYRONBAY FRI 11 SEPT

GRENADIERS, COLUMBUS, BLEACH GIRLS SAT 12 SEPT

MAR HAZE, YES SIR NOCEUR, THE VULTURES FRI 18 SEPT

LYALL MOLONEY SAT 19 SEPT

OCEAN ALLEY FRI 25 SEPT

CHESTA HEDRON SAT 26 SEPT

THE GARDEN AND WAX WITCHES THU 1 OCT

THE JUNGLE GIANTS, ART OF SLEEPING, HOCKEY DAD FRI 2 OCT

THE SMITH STREET BAND SAT 3 OCT

DRUNK MUMS FRI 23 OCT

BOO SEEKA TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE WWW.THENORTHERN.COM.AU

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Music Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

AIR Award Noms

Chet Faker

Hermitude has been nominated for four AIR Awards, while #1 Dads, Courtney Barnett and Vance Joy are all up for three; the four plus Chet Faker are nominated for Best Independent Artist. The AIR Awards will be held 22 Oct.

Oh Kay!

Citizen Kay

Following the release of his newest single Wax On Wax Off, from his debut album With The People, Citizen Kay celebrates with a national album tour, with Coda Conduct supporting. They starts with Sounds Of The Suburbs, Cronulla, 27 Sep.

Romeo And Juliet

Real Aussies Melbourne artist Alexis Winter has crafted these Vegemite/ Real Australians Say Welcome pins, continuing the message artist Peter Drew started with his posters. $5 from the sale of each pin goes directly to Asylum Seeker Resource Centre. Available through Etsy. 8 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Real Australians Say Welcome! Pin by Alexis Winter. Pic: Siahn Davis


c / Arts / Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Godfather Of Double Bass

Dave Lombardo

Allans Billy Hyde are bringing one of the most influential heavy metal drummers, Dave Lombardo, a founding member of Slayer who has become synonymous with 16th note double kick drumming, to Australia for a series of masterclass performances in Oct.

Bell Rings

I Know Leopard

The first Bell Shakespeare program under the sole Artistic Directorship of Peter Evans has been announced. Opening 2016 will be Romeo And Juliet, touring to Canberra and Melbourne in April. Othello will open in Melbourne in July, before touring nationally.

Leopard In Another Life Sydney dream-poppers I Know Leopard have announced a 15-date national tour (incorporating regional areas) in support of their second EP Another Life, due out 11 Sep. The tour kicks off 25 Sep in QLD.

Number of industry professionals who will be awake at 8am Friday after two nights showcasing the best Australia has to offer at BIGSOUND 2015.

Hauschka

Abandoned In Australia Pioneering German composer, experimental musician and one of the most influential exponents of the prepared piano Hauschka, aka Volker Bertelmann, will tour Australia for the first time in Nov, showcasing his latest album, Abandoned City. THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 9


Lifestyle Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Gruen Is Back

Gruen

Wil Anderson is back on ABC hosting Gruen again, alongside Todd Sampson and Russell Howcroft. Their marketing tricks will be back on air 9 Sep at 8.30pm.

Kevin Hart

Have Hart Veteran comic and actor Kevin Hart has had crowds in the States in stitches for years, and finally, Australia can join them. The comedian has announced he’ll be bringing his acclaimed What Now? live stand-up show to Australia next February.

6,000

$

Approximate royalties Happy Birthday generates each day for Warner/Chappell.

The Creases

On Point Brisbane outfit The Creases’ new single, Point, is ready to roll and in celebration, the four-piece band have announced they’ll hit the road for a run of headline shows to launch the track. It begins in Sydney on 15 Oct. 10 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015


e / Cultu Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Petting Zoo

My Own Pet Radio

Ball Park Music frontman Sam Cromack, performing and recording as My Own Pet Radio, is releasing his debut album, Goodlum, 25 Sep, and will be touring it in a run of intimate shows in Nov.

Pie Time Martha Brown returns as Banoffee with her second EP, Do I Make You Nervous?, boasting production from Oscar Key Sung, Martin King and GXNXVS. She’s also announced her biggest tour to date, kicking off 17 Oct in Adelaide.

Banoffee

Still Unwritten Nineties alt-rockers Unwritten Law haven’t forgotten about you, Australia. The Californians have announced they’ll be returning this December for an eightday tour, bringing along none other than Adelaide stalwarts Grenadiers along for the ride.

Unwritten Law

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Music / Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Brisbane Ablaze

Kangaroo Point will see fire and water come together on 26 Sep as Riverfire returns in 2015. The exclusive event on the river’s edge boasts an array of extravagant food (views and brews!), pyrotechnics and much more.

Riverfire

Story Time The Music is proud to present At The Dakota’s first ever national tour in support of their debut EP, Stories. The Darwin five-piece bring their indie pop grooves to major cities all throughout Oct.

At The Dakota

Yeo, What’s Up

Refused

Multi-instrumentalist and electro-pop artist Yeo has a new single, Icarus, and is presenting a short east coast tour in Oct to launch it and preview tracks from his forthcoming album, due towards the end of the year.

Can’t Refuse

Yeo

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Refused have been announced as the fourth act for next year’s Soundwave on the back of their June-released album, Freedom, their first in 17 years following a return from hiatus and their second reunion.


Arts / Li Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

My Disco

Frontlash

Disco Dancing

Melbourne rockers My Disco have slated in the release of their fourth album, Severe, 30 Oct, and how better to mark the occasion than with a national album tour? They’ll make their way to seven cities plus Paradise Music Festival.

Oh, It’s On!!

It’s BIGSOUND time again; so many bands and so many parties, what is one to do? Get amongst it! 150 bands in 15 venues what’s not to love?

On The Brink

Lashes

Better late than never, right? Just went on a binge and caught up to date with Jack Black’s new HBO high farce The Brink; such a great premise with a cast and scripts to match.

Poetry Slam

Fisha Outta Water Kingfisha

Newly signed with The 123 Agency, roots-rock fivepiece Kingfisha have a new single, Water Running, and will launch it with an extensive east coast tour through Oct, after BIGSOUND. The single is a taste of their forthcoming second album.

Le Diner en Blanc

Saw Damian Cowell (former TISM frontman) do his brilliant Hara-Karaoke show at Queensland Poetry Festival last weekend, and his closing medley of 30 TISM songs in three minutes had to be seen to be believed... Cheats Never Prosper

Backlash Not So Grand

It hurts to think that someone gets paid big dollars to select the AFL Grand Final entertainment. Bryan Adams? Chris Isaak? Ellie Goulding? Would suit croquet.

Rules Are Rules

All of a sudden the Poms are paragons of virtue, ODI captain Eoin Morgan calling Aussies bad sports for following the rules? Isn’t his carrying on and disputing the umpire’s decision actual bad sportsmanship?

Dining Delight

Sun Touched

The French-originated concept, all-whiteattire open-air dinner party, Le Diner en Blanc returns to Brisbane for the fourth time on 17 Oct. It’ll be held at a secret location known only to guests. For more info, head to brisbane.dinerenblanc.info.

Congrats to the fool who made the fake ‘pregnant French tourist’ video in an attempt to go viral, you made Queensland look like it’s full of dipshits instead of our actual smattering.

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Music

No Breakdowns

Though Bring Me The Horizon have always been known as the quintessential metalcore band, the quintet have slowly been shedding the genre’s stamp from record to record. But as frontman Oli Sykes wakes up in his Sheffield, UK home to tell Upasana Chatterjee, their move in the direction of more indie rock sensibilities has “so much more to offer” than their heavy predecessors.

S

ounding sort of reserved at first, it’s clear when Sykes starts talking about his work, there’s no stopping him. The passion in his voice is indubitable, and he regularly litters his prose with “you know what I mean?” as he retracts words and corrects himself to better expand on his insights on the band’s philosophy. With the album out on 11 September, it’s almost go time. “I guess there are just so many things that keep you up every day... you’re scared about it leaking, obviously. A leak is imminent, so every day you wake up and that’s the first thing I do: ‘Has it leaked yet?’ Also, there’s no pressure... but from the label’s point of view, it’s one of their biggest priorities of the year so they’re really hoping to top the charts or at least get really high. Again, every day is like, ‘How has it been in the charts? How is it selling?’ “It’s exciting but it’s very draining every day as well. I’ve never been on the internet so much in my life. I’m not someone who really uses Twitter or Instagram that much, and my girlfriend” - he corrects himself here with a chuckle: she is now his wife, the pair having gotten hitched just six weeks ago - “she’s always like, ‘You’re glued to your phone!’ It’s just not normal for me.” Arguably the most nerve-racking thing for Sykes and the rest of the band is the reaction they’ll receive to That’s The Spirit. With the record’s production undertaken by Sykes and keys/ vocalist Jordan Fish themselves, the 11-track album is much more alt-rock and pop rock focused than ever before - not that Sykes is resentful of this fact at all. “The stuff they’ve heard so far is arguably the heaviest on the record... we put out Happy Song and we thought people were going to be like, ‘Oh yeah! It’s heavy!’ but some people are

You can’t get across sarcasm, you can’t get across vulnerability, you can’t get across even boredom!

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like, ‘This is like, radio rock,’ and we’re thinking, ‘Oh my god, what are you gonna think when you hear the rest of the CD?’ “I fully believe this is the best record we’ve wrote by miles; every single song on the record is perfect, in my opinion. We worked on it so hard, there’s not one bit we’d change about it. And yeah, it’s a lot softer but it’s got so much more to offer than any record we’ve done before. “It’s more melodic because that’s what felt natural, we’re not doing it for any other reason other than that’s what came out. We tried to write some heavier stuff for it and it just sounded so forced, it didn’t fit in whatsoever. At the end of the day, we couldn’t have wrote anything else other than this record if we wanted it to be genuine, you know what I mean? This record could tank, it could bomb, but we’ll never go back to what we used to do. No matter how it gets received, we’ll push on,” Sykes concedes. One of Sykes’ most distinguishable talents - his raucous throat vocals - is all but gone on their newest record. When Sykes accepted the band’s Album Of The Year award for Sempiternal at the Alternative Press Music Awards in 2014 for the first time, Sykes came clean about his drug addiction to ketamine. He tells the crowd that once he’d left rehab, he “didn’t want to scream anymore, he wanted to sing from the fucking rooftops”. The curious part is, he seems to have meant it quite literally. Ever since he left rehab, Sykes seems to have so much more to say and so many more ways to say it. “Before Sempiternal, when I was writing with Jordan and stuff, I said to him, ‘I kind of want to sing because I’ve taken screaming as far as I can and there’s only so much you can convey with it.’ Only a single note, and a single voice, you know? I wanted to more freely illustrate points and emotions and really all you can get across with screaming is anger - anger and desperation. You can’t get across sarcasm, you can’t get across vulnerability, you can’t get across even boredom! All that stuff for this album, it was so important that we could. “We wanted Happy Song to be ironic, it’s got lyrics that are dumb, because it’s about a dumb thing. It’s like a stupid answer to a stupid question in the way it’s like, ‘I’m depressed but I’m going to fucking fill my thoughts with superficial and trivial stuff just to stop thinking about it’. It really needed


How Bring Me The Horizon Avoided A Breakdown - Pun Intended

to get across that point. I think if I was just screaming lyrics like ‘I’ve had enough/There’s a voice in my head/Says I’m better off dead’, it’d just be a crap lyric, so it’s important that it comes off very monotonous and then bursts into this screaming. “The first track, Doomed - I think it’s very interesting because a lot of people will be expecting a really heavy opener with a title like that, but the title is actually sung in a falsetto. It’s that contrast to get this point across. Me screaming ‘I think we’re doomed’, yeah it might sound cool but it’s not bringing anything new to the table, it’s not giving you any new emotions. When you’re saying something that hopeless, in the nicest Disney-like voice you can sing it, it really gets across what depression is to me and when you allow yourself to feel antibodies and happiness rush up and combat that sadness. It’s this weird euphoric feeling - it was just so important to get across those deeper emotions rather than just anger and desperation.” Despite their major label backing, the band was eager to cover new ground in the making of That’s The Spirit. Forgoing a big-shot producer, the band wrote at home and alleviated the stresses of tracking the album in the most stress-free place they could imagine - Santorini, Greece. Recording at their own pace, song by song, rather than instrument by instrument as is the norm, the

band found it a surefire way to protect their vision from external influences. “No disrespect to anyone we’ve worked with before, because we could’ve been given the biggest name, the biggest producer in the world, and we would’ve still been unhappy. You find out quickly when you have your own vision... bringing other people into it just waters down that vision and taints it. “Sometimes, from my point of view, their opinion is just there because they feel like they need one. Because how are they making their paycheck if they don’t? It just ends up becoming a compromise of the music, you know what I mean?” Make no mistake - Bring Me The Horizon are not having a whine. Admirably, they’re entirely confident in their vision and their ability to reach it on their own, at all costs. “We’ve produced the fuck out of these songs, we’ve worked on this album for six months in total with the recordings and everything. We don’t need someone to come in and go, ‘Why don’t you change that? Why don’t you change that?’ We know how we want the vocals to sound, we know how we want the drums to sound, we know how the guitars should sound, so why bother spending hundreds of thousands on someone?” No point, we guess, as long as their fans are digging it - and from what the fans have heard from tracks Happy Song, Throne and True Friends, digging it they are.

What: That’s The Spirit (Sony)

Sykes describes that writing and recording can be an immensely gruelling task - but we all knew that. The question is, is there a way to make it easier? By forgoing a producer for That’s The Spirit, the boys had a few extra pounds lying around. So they made recording fun... and hired a personal trainer, too. “The first thing was going to Santorini at Black Rock Studios. Usually, we do it the other way around - we spend the writing process secluded like Scotland, but this time, do all the writing here at my house, then go somewhere beautiful to actually do the recording process. Recording albums can be the most stressful thing in the world - it’s very time-oriented. It’s always like, ‘You got a week to do this, you got a week to do this.’ Usually people break down, and we just wanted to come at it a completely different angle. Let’s at least be in the least stressful place we can be in. “With the personal trainer, we’re all getting to a point in our lives where we’re older and when you’re recording, you have a lot of dead time. You need to fill that dead time and you can either do it with something negative like drinking or sitting around watching TV or you can get something positive, like working out. You’ve got so much time to do nothing, you’re going to lose your mind if you don’t have something to put your energy into.” THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 15


Music

Re-Writing The Book Cancer-free and recuperating well, Iron Maiden frontman Bruce Dickinson tells Brendan Crabb about the art of “twofingered piano playing”.

T

he call from Iron Maiden’s office arrives during an eight-hour interview day for vocalist Bruce Dickinson. Audibly in positive spirits, the singer, pilot, fencer, author and ale aficionado enthuses that doing press is, “good when you’ve got a good record to talk about. If it was a shit record I wouldn’t like doing it”. The Book Of Souls is the metallers’ 16th full-length and first studio double-album. The English sextet began work in 2014, recording at Guillaume Tell Studios in Paris, where they’d also crafted 2000’s ‘reunion’ affair Brave New World. However, its release was delayed following the discovery that Dickinson had a cancerous tumour on the back of his tongue and also another lump in his neck.

I wasn’t sure whether or not I was even going to be on the fucking planet, let alone on the stage.

The frontman was ultimately afforded the all-clear earlier this year. “I got diagnosed in December and the doc sat me down. It was, ‘How long ‘til I’m feeling better?’ He said, ‘It’s going to be about a year.’ I went, ‘Well, I’ll beat that,’ being competitive and all the rest of it. He said, ‘You might by a month or a couple of months maybe, but there’s some stuff that needs healing up on the inside that will take a while.’ Of course he’s the doctor, and he’s right,” Dickinson admits with that distinctive chuckle. “But I am, in his words, way ahead of the curve in terms of recovery and getting better. I’m jumping around all over the place and have been for a while now. So I’m really just waiting for the inside bits to fully get themselves back up to speed and then I can start having 16 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

a bit of a sing and a wail again.” The Book Of Souls boasts 18-minute Empire Of The Clouds, penned solely by Dickinson, whereby the frontman makes his piano debut. It’s an epic befitting of recent progressive leanings, but perhaps not one some could have envisioned appearing on a Maiden record decades ago when ‘The Air-Raid Siren’ and bassist/leader Steve Harris possessed opposing viewpoints regarding the band’s creative direction. “The Bruce of 25 years ago would have thought this song was indescribably cool, and how did he manage to do that?” he laughs. “That one was a bit of a journey, which involved an awful lot of two-fingered piano playing. ‘Cause I’m not in any way, shape or form a pianist, but I happened to write the song on piano and so there was nobody else around to play it.” Fellow new cut If Eternity Should Fail “was actually the title track of what was going to be another solo record”. As for the greater number of solitary Dickinson songwriting credits (two in total) compared to recent releases, he points to a prolific ‘90s solo career. “That really translated directly into Brave New World, which obviously came out of the blocks and everybody went, ‘Wow, what a good record.’ I thought it was a fantastic record. “Of course, we’re back full circle in the same studio, similar kind of vibe. But we’ve moved on, done a bit more of the proggy type thing since. This album really I think has been able to breathe, because it wasn’t restricted by having to learn everything as if it was going to be live before we played it live. So we could learn things and do it bit by bit, and that’s a luxury you can only get when you’re in the studio. So I’ve written a bit more or a bit less on various things. Sometimes it’s just the way the cookie crumbles when everybody comes steaming in, jumps in feet first and goes, ‘I’ve got two songs for the new album,’ and you think, ‘Oh well, I won’t bother then,’” he jokes. As for representing the record live Down Under, the screamer is amusingly cagey, while essentially confirming it. Mere days later however, it’s official; Maiden will return in May, as part of a 35-country jaunt in 2016. Dickinson will pilot the biggest-ever Ed Force One, a customised Boeing 747-400. “This record is such an outrageous record. It’s so good, and my next thing I’m thinking about is the tour. I’m very excited to get back on the stage. As of last Christmas, I wasn’t sure whether or not I was even going to be on the fucking planet, let alone on the stage.” Aside from successful retrospective-themed tours, Iron Maiden have typically displayed great credence towards fresh output within the live environment. “Loud and proud, new material. That’s why we’ve got a lot of young fans. It’s not because we’re a bunch of old codgers playing karaoke stuff; it’s because we’re doing new material and they discover it, and that’s in a way what makes us, still I think, kinda cool at the ripe old age in my case at 57. So how does that work with a bunch of 15 to 24-year-olds? The answer is it works real well, because there’s so much stuff out there that is shallow and forgettable that’s got very little future, let alone a past and a present.”

What: The Book Of Souls (Parlophone/Warner)


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Film

Corey Hawkins talks finding “the truth” for his role as Dr Dre in a gritty biopic about California hip hop group NWA with Cyclone.

T

he gritty bio-pic Straight Outta Compton, about California’s infamous hip hop supergroup NWA (Niggaz Wit Attitudes), tells the story not only of charismatic individuals and the origins of gangsta rap, but also of ongoing black struggle. NWA - formed in the ‘80s by DJs Dr Dre and Yella, MCs Ice Cube and Ren, and (the late) hustler/mogul/hype man Eazy-E - unleashed the controversial track Fuck Tha Police, protesting police abuse and racial profiling in their impoverished Compton, Los Angeles neighbourhood. These cultural

[NWA] kept their foot on the gas instead of pulling back.

revolutionaries raised the FBI’s ire, foreshadowing the LAPD’s widely-televised beating of Rodney King and the ensuing riots. Directing SOC, its title from NWA’s debut LP, is F Gary Gray, whose credits include Friday (written by and starring Cube). Corey Hawkins plays Andre “Dr Dre” Young alongside O’Shea Jackson, Jr, credibly embodying his father Ice Cube, and Jason Mitchell as Eazy-E - plus Paul Giamatti, unrecognisable as NWA’s likeably roguish manager Jerry Heller. Hawkins views NWA as both political and personal: “I think for me, especially being a young black man growing up in America, it’s one of those sort of cultural markers. What they were doing 18 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

and talking about back then, the things that they were tapping into, the social constructs and the things that they were trying to shed light upon, in terms of police brutality and all of that kinda stuff, they were ‘hood stars. They wanted to just make music for their community and they ended up tapping into something that I think a lot of people were afraid of at the time - and they kept their foot on the gas instead of pulling back.” Hawkins, 26, wasn’t born when NWA blew up, but he was exposed to their “reality rap” at home. “My mother’s a police officer, but she was also a fan of the music.” A star graduate of the Juilliard School’s drama program, Hawkins is an established stage actor. Recently, he joined TV’s cult zombie series The Walking Dead. Yet, in Young, Hawkins depicts someone who is real, alive and a producer of the film. This was “a daunting, scary task.” Young quit NWA to launch Death Row Records with Marion “Suge” Knight (a menacing R Marcus Taylor), but moved on again as the encroaching street drama became too distracting. Today the stoic super-producer is hip hop’s most private, and inscrutable, figure. “He’s a quiet guy but, when he makes noise, he makes noise,” says Hawkins. Already cast by Gray, he met the “legend” himself over a meal. “At the end of the dinner, I remember Dre had my audition tape on his iPhone - and he was proud of it.” Hawkins felt relief. Gray, meticulous in his pursuit of authenticity, insisted the thespian learn to DJ. “He was relentless that we had to get this right. He was like, ‘Specificity - I want specificity’.” However, Young was more concerned that Hawkins capture the intangible - his “inner-life” and, ultimately, “the truth”. Indeed, Hawkins conveys Young’s terrible anguish at losing his younger brother. Young visited the movie set daily - and Hawkins had him on speed dial. “I could call Dre at four o’clock in the morning if I needed to - if I was still on set and we were working through a moment or something like that. He’d be at the studio working [laughs] and he would answer the phone and we would go through it and work it out.”

What: Straight Outta Compton In cinemas


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Music

AWARDS

And The Nominees Are

Pushing Against The Shore

The 2015 Carlton Dry Independent Music Awards nominations were recently announced and the nominees in the major categories are:

Best Independent Artist #1 Dads Chet Faker Courtney Barnett Hermitude Vance Joy

Best Independent Album #1 Dads - About Face Courtney Barnett - Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit Flight Facilities - Down To Earth Hermitude - Dark Night Sweet Light Vance Joy - Dream Your Life Away

Best Independent Single Or EP Bad//Dreems - Cuffed & Collared Courtney Barnett - Depreston Courtney Barnett - Pedestrian At Best Hermitude - The Buzz (Feat. Mataya & Young Tapz) Vance Joy - Fire And The Flood

Breakthrough Independent Artist Of The Year #1 Dads Briggs Client Liaison Japanese Wallpaper Totally Mild

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Tidal waves, Billy Thorpe and electric warriors playing rugby are just some of what makes Los Coronas tick, as guitarist David Krahe tells Samuel J. Fell.

I

nstrumental surf rock has a long history. It’s never become a largely popular style of music, instead remaining confined to pockets of ardent believers the world over, but its groove and feel bring with it a passion and call to mind a place and time, perhaps more so than other forms of rock’n’roll. Since the days of Dick Dale, Link Wray, The Ventures and a host of others, surf rock has spread and today is practiced in countries all over the globe. Los Coronas, out of Spain, are one of the genre’s giants. Formed in 1991, this quintet has taken the style and made it their own, drawing not only from the pioneers of the genre, but infusing elements of their own musical heritage as well. As guitarist David Krahe says, “Sometimes we say we play flamenco-surf. Even though we are not skilled enough to play flamenco music, our touching on that style is the main hook to play out of Spain.” Further influences include the compositions of Ennio Morricone and Dimitri Tiomkin (the links between the ‘Western’ themes and surf rock are more than obvious, and classic films like Sergio Leone’s The Good, The Bad And The Ugly were actually filmed in the south of Spain), but it’s the rock’n’roll and how it translates that truly makes it real for Los Coronas. “The groove factor is essential in

instrumental rock’n’roll music,” Krahe enthuses, “The rhythm section has to make people dance, the trumpet contributes with the emotional factor and the guitars are taking the responsibility to protect the bandmates. They create a wall of melodies, riffs, chaos, whatever, they are representing the epic factor in the band, like electric warriors playing rugby.” You get an idea, listening to Krahe talk, of what the band would be like in the live setting, for as an instrumental band, this is where they shine. “Our secret weapon is the triple F: Fiery Fiesta Factor... the message would be something like ‘Twist and Sweat!’. We try to imagine there’s a fight between the ocean and the shore - we represent the ocean and the public’s the shore. We create a kind of tidal wave with our rhythm section and the only way people can save themselves, they must take a longboard and enjoy the experience.” Los Coronas are appearing at the Brisbane Festival on their third trip Down Under, their first only three years ago. However, as you’d expect in a country with a long surf tradition, the band have been welcomed here, and as Krahe recounts, have given back on an emotional level. “[We played two shows at Sydney Festival] and had a cover [of Billy Thorpe’s version of] Poison Ivy up our sleeve - we dedicated it to Billy’s memory. Only one week before, we had been playing in San Remo, next to Phillip Island, at the same stage where Billy did his last gig and suffered the heart attack. So when we finished the gig, many people came to us and told me they appreciated our words. We were able to feel how special Billy Thorpe was for Australia’s rock’n’roll scene. It was a very emotional moment.”

When & Where: 22 & 23 Sep, Brisbane Festival, Spiegeltent


Music

New Moon Old Moon

A man of many musical and acting projects, ‘90s American alt.rock icon Dean Wareham hopes his September tour of Australia will be better than his last 17 years ago, as Evan Young discovers.

“L

ast time [I toured] Australia it rained for two days and there was no gas in one of the cities,” Dean Wareham recalls, laughing down the phone line. “There had been an explosion and there was no hot water in a few places, and certain restaurants couldn’t cook. It wasn’t exactly ideal.” Wareham’s upcoming stopover is with soft rockers Luna, who quietly re-formed late last year for a world tour. Founding the group after his 1991 departure from minimalist dream poppers Galaxie 500, singer-guitarist Wareham led Luna through a decade and a half of favourable releases before their mid-noughties breakup. Beginning with Lunapark in 1992, evolving with Penthouse in 1995 and cresting with 2004’s Rendezvous, the group’s delicate, understated sound provided an auxiliary to his narratives of the late night. Though reunited and recharged, Wareham and Luna have stressed that, for now, they’re focusing on touring and enjoying themselves once again. A new album is unlikely, though they’ve confirmed there are other projects in the works that will appease fans. Work on a documentary, Tell Me Do You Miss Me, for instance, has been completed. “I don’t think we’re gonna do any new material. My feeling is that there is enough

Luna albums in the world,” Wareham jokes. “But there is going to be a vinyl reissue project. The first five albums are going to be released in a box set and individually by [US record label] Captured Tracks. The documentary’s [first screening] just happened too. It’s in that period where the band is breaking up and kind of bitching about each other obviously there’s a better mood in the van now. It was a bit uncomfortable to watch looking back at my younger self, [but] it’s a beautiful film.” After Luna first disbanded, Wareham and bassist Britta Phillips, who he married in 2007, continued to tour and record as Dean & Britta. Wareham also began work in the film industry with indie director and good friend Noah Baumbach, something he continues today. Wareham has scored a number of Baumbach’s titles and appeared in this year’s While We’re Young as an actor. “I got to do a scene with Naomi Watts, which was fun. I play a shaman in an Ayahuasca ceremony. I give the main characters drugs and then leave on a Vespa with a girl I picked up,” he laughs. “[Baumbach]’s got another film coming out called Mistress America in which I play a paediatrician, [for which] Britta and I also did the score. Ten years ago we [scored] The Squid And The Whale, and before that Luna worked on for Mr Jealousy. I’ve just stayed in touch with him. He’s one of my best friends.” With Luna’s exact future unclear beyond the current world tour, Wareham says film projects will likely continue to fill the breaks in whatever musical adventure comes next. “I’m available for work I always tell people,” he chuckles. “But pursuing acting work... It’s worse than the music business, I think. I really enjoy it, but it just seems like people are just so desperate to make it. So for me it’s just something I do on the side.”

AWARDS Best Independent Hip Hop Album Baro - 17/18 Briggs - Sheplife Citizen Kay - Demokracy One Day - Mainline Seth Sentry - Strange New Past

Best Independent Hard Rock, Heavy Or Punk Album British India - Nothing Touches Me King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard - I’m In Your Mind Fuzz Northlane - Node The Peep Tempel - Tales The Smith Street Band - Throw Me In The River

Best Independent Dance/ Electronica Album Collarbones - Return Flight Facilities - Down To Earth Hermitude - Dark Night Sweet Light Seekae - The Worry Ta-Ku - Songs To Make Up To

Best Independent Dance, Electronica Or Club Single Collarbones - Turning Generik - The Weekend (Feat. Nicky Van She) Hayden James - Something About You Nicky Night Time - Gonna Get Better (Feat. Nat Dunn) Rüfüs - You Were Right For a full list of nominations checkout themusic.com.au

For a full list of nominations checkout themusic.com.au

When & Where: 15 Sep, Spiegeltent, Brisbane Festival THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 21


Music

Break On Through Around for more than half a decade now, it suddenly seems as if Grenadiers simply exploded onto the scene. Jonty Czuchwicki sits down with frontman Jesse Coulter and learns The Kinks made him do it.

T

hree-piece punks Grenadiers have been bouncing from strength to strength all year, from supporting Cold Chisel at the popular Adelaide Clipsal 500 to having their second album, Summer, featured on triple j. “Oh man, it’s been a long and arduous one,” admits Grenadiers frontman Jesse Coulter of the band’s journey to this point. “We started as a four-piece with completely different members to who we have now. We’ve gone through a bunch of different line-ups. I’ve kind of pulled a Wolfmother and I’m the only one left!” Grenadiers’ debut album, Songs The Devil Taught Us, went pretty well but

People are starting to listen to something that we’ve been doing for fuck knows how long!

when contemplating the new record, Summer, Coulter expresses feelings of rebirth. “It feels like the band only started six months ago in a way. In another way it feels like we’ve been around forever because we have... People are starting to listen to something that we’ve been doing for fuck knows how long!” We move on to talk about his earliest musical influences. “I’ve loved The Kinks since when I was like four years old!” starts Coulter with a smile. The Grenadiers frontman also enjoyed The Beatles, but goes onto to explain that he “was always more attracted to The Kinks because they were a bit rougher.” The first CD Coulter ever purchased was The Red Hot Chilli Peppers’ Greatest Hits. “Don’t hold that against me,” he says. “I was six years old!” He’s always “been attracted 22 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

to garagey, loud, primal, aggressive music that makes you jump around or bang your head against a wall or something.” Adelaide is often considered a tough city to break commercially, so Coulter diplomatically gives his take on being an Adelaide band. “It’s good and bad; bad because you’re so far away from everything in terms of industrytype shit, [but] good as well because it forces you, if you really want to have an impact nationally, to try a lot harder.” Although the perils of over-saturation are much more dire in Adelaide, Coulter still has great things to say about the scene. “If you’re from Melbourne you can probably play 40 gigs a year just in Melbourne. You can’t do that in Adelaide.” Despite this he believes that “rock music is starting to build up again in Adelaide.” He cites Horror My Friend and The Hard Aches among Adelaide’s hardest-working bands. Speaking of national impact, Grenadiers have been touring ever since their early days. “Our second or third show was in Melbourne,” Coulter recalls. “I’ve always realised the importance of playing outside the state.” Grenadiers are fully booked until the end of the year. Of what will equate to over 60 shows, only eight or nine will be in Adelaide. “We went to the Northern Territory... We’ve never been there before! It’s a different universe up there man. It’s fucking bizarre but great... they have all these gorgeous beaches up there but no one is swimming in them because you’ll die!” Coulter remarks that Grenadiers are by no means a big band. Although they get a few spins on triple j he considers that Darwin is more used to the odd international headliner. “So really [in Darwin] I think a lot of people came out just because we were a rock band coming to Darwin, which is pretty rare. “It was a modest crowd, but the people that were there, they fucking loved it. We played every song that we had in our set that we knew how to play and people were chanting for more! We were like, ‘We literally don’t have any more songs, so, we can’t do anything,’ and they were like, ‘Just play something else again!’ We were backstage and the owner said, ‘Get back out on stage.’ We told him we didn’t have any songs and he was like, ‘I don’t give a fuck fuck, get back out there!’ That was awkward but at least that means that they liked it!” Grenadiers are heading back out on the road in late Aug August through the end of September. Coulter has a few choice words with regards to touring. “Not dying is probably the first thing. I think that’s the basis of everything - not dying!” Besides a massive national tour, which includes an appearance at BIGSOUND in Brisbane, Grenadiers will continue writing for the follow-up to their second album, slated for an early 2016 release. As for the future, Grenadiers have several European countries in their sights.

What: Summer (Independent) When & Where: 9 & 10 Sep, BIGSOUND, Brisbane; 11 Sep, The Northern, Byron Bay; 12 Sep, Quicksilver Boardriders, Coolangatta


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 23


Music

Risk Management

Releases

This Week’s Releases

Slayer Repentless Nuclear Blast/Caroline

Beirut No No No 4AD/Remote Control

The Necks Vertigo Fish Of Milk

Low Ones And Sixes Sub Pop/Inertia

24 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

FIDLAR might stand for ‘Fuck It Dog, Life’s A Risk’, but frontman Zac Carper tells Steve Bell that sometimes taking a career gamble ain’t so easy.

Y

ou definitely got the impression from their 2013 eponymous debut full-length that the members of party-loving skatepunks FIDLAR lived life on the edge, but not to the extent that their hometown of Highland Park, LA resembles a warzone. “I’m doing well, there was a drive-by shooting two nights ago and a stray bullet came into our house, but other than that we’re doing fine,” laughs frontman Zac Carper. “Unfortunately we live in a kinda rough neighbourhood, so it’s the price you pay. I’m just glad nobody got hurt.” Carper is on the promo trail for FIDLAR’s second album Too, and given the stylistic shift away from the brazen balls-out punk of their debut into more diverse terrain he’s aware that he might have his job cut out for him. “I have a feeling that this new record is gonna go either way - people are going to love it or they’re going to just absolutely fucking hate it,” he admits. “When you’re under the gun to make a record it’s kinda a weird pressure thing, and it’s hard... Especially for our kinda genre - the garage-y, punk kinda stuff - I think you get it in your head that some people expect a certain thing from you and you want to deliver and make them happy, but at the same time, fuck that! There was definitely some weird vibes about where we should go,

but we wanted to try something different - that’s what it really boils down to. “We’re not the kind of people who can just make the same album again and again - we were fucking two decisions away from making like a full-on hip hop album! That would have been awesome, like a total left-field thing. When things become just ‘standard’ it’s weird - once we went on tour and when we came home all of a sudden there was this ‘garage rock scene’ and a ‘punk scene’. When we started those scenes weren’t around, it was indie rock and art-punk and all this stuff, so when what we were doing became standard we were like, ‘What the fuck?’ - I felt like I wanted to fight it, I always like going against the grain.” Carper explains that they didn’t know where they wanted to take Too, just that it was somewhere new. “A lot of it was kinda written in my head on this road trip, when I put my surfboard in my car and slept in my car for a couple of weeks and just went surfing,” he tells. “A lot of the melodies and lyrics were formulating in my head and I was writing stuff down and singing stuff into my phone - I wrote 30 songs for this new record, but the first 20 songs were just absolute garbage because I had it in my head that ‘I need to write a FIDLAR record’ instead of ‘I just need to write music, that’s the bottom line’. When I learned that all I needed to do was write songs and not worry about things like, ‘How do I make this a punk, garage-y kind of song?’ it all came together.”

What: Too (Warner)


From under the underground.... pop.

greg

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sur fa 7 i ce ma nch il e.p vin . yl and Out n ow dow on nlo ad

AND IN BRIS egg records, rockinghorse records, tym guitars, rockaway records, IN BRUNSWICK HEADS valiant music anchorspopband.bandcamp.com www.facebook.com/anchorspopband

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 25


choose from it’s impossible, really.

Indie

Silent Feature Era: Kyle identifies because his mum’s a bitch, but I loved The Head On The Door the most. Probably because my older brother thrashed it.

Lovecats: A Tribute To The Cure

The Jensens: Probably not, I’d say Boys Don’t Cry or Wish are our favorites, but Disintegration is so influential and it’s great to listen to. Garrett Kato: I like Japanese Whispers, but mainly it’s because I’m half-Japanese. It’s a sushi thing.

After the success of The Triffid’s last two tribute nights Born To Run: A Tribute To Bruce Springsteen and Go Your Own Way: A Tribute To Fleetwood Mac, the venue are now hosting Lovecats: A Tribute To The Cure. Ahead of the event we chat to the acts on the line-up, Baskervillain, Eden Mulholland, Silent Feature Era, The Jensens and Garrett Kato, about their The Cure feels. When you think of The Cure which of their songs first springs to mind? Baskervillain: Definitely all the classic tunes like In Between Days, Just Like Heaven and Close To Me spring to mind; I listened to them a lot during high school. Eden Mulholland: Friday I’m In Love. Ultimate hooks. This song has hooks for hands.

Garrett Kato

Does your own music channel the inner-angst of Robert Smith and co? Baskervillain: No, not really - it tends to channel our own thoughts, feelings and ideas. Eden Mulholland: Most definitely. In my earlier days and in another band, I have been known to wear eye makeup. Silent Feature Era: Not intentionally. But maybe unconsciously and surely through our own influences who were Cure fans. They had a pretty wide impact. The Jensens: Yes, of course it does, we’re a bunch of angsty bitches! The Cure definitely got me into a lot of bands with that sad heartbreak vibe. Garrett Kato: I’m gonna say no it doesn’t, but I wish it did. And if it did I think I’d be way better than I am... Oh god. In your experience is The Cure’s assertion that Boys Don’t Cry an accurate one? Baskervillain: The title of that song is meant to be a bit tongue-in-cheek, right? Maybe Smith was touching on how so many boys at a young age learn that we shouldn’t be too open or expressive of our feelings and instead try to hide emotion for fear of being judged as weak or feminine by their peers. I personally think that’s silly, but it seems to stick with a lot of us throughout life. Eden Mulholland: Not really. Boys that cry is usually a sign of heightened sensitivity, potentially a winning characteristic in this modern age. Silent Feature Era: Unfortunately, no. Men really should listen to Robert. Get a grip on repressing those unhealthy emotions - how else are you going to generate your angst?

Silent Feature Era: The Love Cats; second is The Caterpillar. The Jensens: Boys Don’t Cry, maybe Friday I’m In Love? Or Close To Me. Or In Between Days. Definitely Killing An Arab.

The Jensens

Garrett Kato: In Between Days - it’s a rad song and I think it’s got a beautiful melody. When Robert Smith turns into Mothra in South Park and triumphs over Mecha-Streisand, Kyle yells out “Disintegration is the best album ever!” Do you agree? If not which is your fave The Cure album?

The Jensens: I think we feel as sarcastic about that remark as Robert Smith does. Garrett Kato: No way, I cry all the time, I am deeply lonely.

Baskervillain: I wouldn’t say it’s the best album ever, but definitely one of my faves by The Cure. I’ve got a soft spot for both Three Imaginary Boys and The Head On The Door too. Eden Mulholland: As a newcomer to Cure fandom, I cherry pick my favourite album as Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me. But there is SO much to 26 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

When & Where: 18 Sep, The Triffid


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 27


In Focus Selahphonic Pic: Terry Soo

Member/role: Jamie Coyle (vocals/guitar) How long have you been together? We’ve been doing what we do for a year-and-a-half. How did you all meet? I met Tim and Luke through the youth working circles which we all worked in. Dave and Joel came through random introductions from other people. You’re on tour in the van – which band or artist is going to keep the most people happy if we throw them on the stereo? We were driving to Rockhampton last week and Joel put Musicology on by Prince which was like a car atmosphere changer. We listened to Prince stuff for a good hour after that. Would you rather be a busted broke-but-revered Hank Williams figure or some kind of Metallica monster? If I got to keep my soul and integrity and be a Metallica monster I’d chose that, but I don’t know if that’s me living in a fantasy land. So give me Hank. 28 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Which Brisbane bands before you have been an inspiration (musically or otherwise)? I listened to Passenger by Powderfinger 100s of times as a grommet yet shamefully never saw them live. Recently I’ve loved watching the take off of Ball Park Music, they’re such good songwriters. What part do you think Brisbane plays in the music you make? Coolum Beach on the Sunny Coast is our home so that effects our sound more than Brisbane, but Brisbane has been the place that has helped cut our teeth and shown us the standard we need to be at. What’s in the pipeline for the band in the short term? Finishing our EP tour then in October we go to New York for three weeks for CMJ and to record a new single.

Selaphonic play Bon Amicis, Toowoomba on 11 Sep, Sogo Bar, Noosa on 12 Sep and Eat Street Markets on 2 Oct.


Comedy

Peas In A Pod

sure what to expect in the beginning but I feel like it came easily, just us starting Jason Mewes with Kevin Smith to do the show and getting in front of people and being open and honest with stuff and getting the reaction we got – although definitely in the beginning I’d say I was a little wary of it,” he admits. “That’s how the podcast started – I had a relapse and Kevin asked why and I was explaining that I wasn’t accountable Kevin Smith has helped him and didn’t want to check into rehab and created talk about it, and he an ‘intervention’ podcast; wanted to do the podcast and said, ‘I think you should tell everybody and be accountable to Jason Mewes tells Steve Bell whoever comes to the shows and listens.’ In about the power of friendship. the beginning I was like, ‘I don’t know, what if people are mean or whatever?’ I think in the beginning it took a little while for me to start ometimes friends can be taken for opening up, but as soon as we started those granted, but other times friends go so first eight episodes where Kevin told a lot of far above and beyond the call of duty stories and then after that me continuing to that to underestimate their efforts would be tell the stories it just got easier and easier, nigh on impossible. For Jason Mewes, for and by about the 20th episode it just seemed instance, the role Kevin Smith has played natural and smooth and not at all difficult in his life has been overwhelming. First he to say what’s on my mind or what’s been cast Mewes in a string of roles including going on. Clerks (1994), Mallrats (1995), Chasing Amy “I didn’t expect it to have any effect on (1997), Dogma (1999), Jay And Silent Bob other people. Recently I had a guy coming up Strike Back (2001) and Clerks II (2006) that and say, ‘Hey man, I’ve been sober for just over would come to define his career, each time a year and it’s because I started listening to playing Jay alongside Smith’s Silent Bob, but, your podcasts,’ and when you hear that it feels more importantly, Smith was also there for amazing. When we started it wasn’t about Mewes when his life started derailing into helping people it was more just for myself – substance abuse. but helping others does help me. When there’s As far back as the late ‘90s Smith had tough times I don’t want to disappoint anyone entered Mewes into a series of drug rehab or let people down – I’ve had bad dreams clinics, but nothing seemed to work for long. where I’ve woken up and been, like, ‘Oh shit, After one lengthy stint of sobriety last decade we’ve got shows this weekend and I’ve got Mewes relapsed, and it was then Smith to tell everyone that I drank!’, but it was really stumbled upon the idea for the Jay And Silent me just waking up from a dream where I was Bob Get Old podcasts. The regular recordings drinking in my dream.” act as a ‘weekly intervention’, the pair

S

appearing on stage and discussing at length Mewes’ ongoing quest to stay clean and healthy. The podcast quickly gained so much traction that they began touring it overseas, their inaugural Australian visit in 2012. This month, they’re returning once more. Mewes doesn’t mind putting so much of his personal life in the public eye. “I wasn’t

What: An Evening With Kevin Smith When & Where: 19 Sep, The Tivoli

A Majestic Woman Queen Elizabeth II becomes the longest-reigning female monarch in history on 10 September. Here’s just a fragment of what has happened in the music world while she’s been on the throne... 1950s The term ‘rock’n’roll’ is used for the first time (1954), EurovIsion (1956) launches

Queen Elizabeth II

1960s The Beatles conquer the world, Bob Dylan ‘plugs in’ (1965), ‘summer of love’ (1967)

1970s Black Sabbath (1970), Queen (1971), ABBA (1972), AC/DC (1973), The Ramones (1974) and Sex Pistols (1975) start their careers

1980s CDs hit the market (1983) and The Smiths disband as Green Day forms (1986)

1990s Nirvana’s Nevermind (1991), first Big Day Out (1992) and triple j Hottest 100 (1993)

2000s Apple releases first iPod (2001), YouTube (2005) and Spotify (2006) hit the internet

2010s Paul McCartney releases collab single with Rihanna and Kanye West (2015) THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 29


Indie Indie

Flick The Bean

Anu Sava

Reud Mood

Jeanie

EP Focus

Single Focus

EP Focus

EP Focus

Answered by: Luke Colombo

Answered by: Sarah Vardy

Answered by: Michael Bradshaw

Answered by: Aaron D’Arcy

EP title? Grandma’s Bags

Single title? Set Yourself Free

EP title? Visions And Happenings

EP title? Crazy

How many releases do you have now? 2012: Caught Red Handed, 2013: Make Me High, 2014: Daily Dosage, 2015: Sunny Side Up and Grandma’s Bags.

What’s the song about? Set Yourself Free is about liberation from constructs and belief systems that aren’t supporting your way of life.

How many releases do you have now? We currently have two releases. They are quite contrasting in style and structure.

How many releases do you have now? This is our debut EP with the album coming out early 2016.

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? Two years ago we were garage musicians, mates and partners in crime. After living, breathing, performing, partying, touring and beer-drinking together, another level has been added to the PARTY-VIBE of the band.

How long did it take to write/ record? It took about a week to write and polish the main guitar and vocals. The drums were figured out in a couple of goes. Took around a week to record with some tea breaks.

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? It was an organic process where the songs were written, then pieced together through jamming. There were moments of ecstatic inspiration during recording that resulted in the soundscapes that segue the sections - Visions and Happenings.

What’s your favourite song on it? Grandma’s Bags is the band’s fave, and the younger crowds bang out hard to Granny’s Bags at live shows! We’ll like this EP if we like... Aussie rock-bands from late ‘90s to early ‘00s triple j vibe absorbed a shitload of influence from the Seattle grunge scene and a side of cheeky wit. Website link for more info? triplejunearthed.com/ flickthebean

Is this track from a forthcoming release/existing release? Yes, it’s from a forthcoming album set to drop in early 2016. The new album is more stripped back than previous releases with a distinct rock/dark-folksy vibe. A hybrid of PJ Harvey and SleaterKinney. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Nashville is brimming with religion. There’s very deep-set belief systems, some of which propagate negative, often controlling ideals. Groups and individuals are cast out of religions due to their sexuality or alternative life preferences. We’ll like this song if we like... Sleater-Kinney, challenging the status quo, jumping around and letting it all hang loose, women in rock, setting yourself free. When and where is your launch/ next gig? Beetle Bar on 17 Sep. Website link for more info? facebook.com/AnuSava

30 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

What’s your favourite song on it? The last track, name’s The 4th Happening. It is the most dynamically diverse and encompasses a variety of styles. We’ll like this EP if we like... Visions And Happenings is a stylistic melting pot. In it you will find the likes of Opeth, The Mars Volta, Stevie-Ray Vaughan, Alice In Chains, Pond, Deep Purple. When and where is your launch/ next gig? The EP is out now - you can listen to it on Bandcamp, Soundcloud etc. Our next show is at The Helm, 25 Sep, supporting Hobo Magic’s NO GROOVE NO GOOD tour. Website link for more info? facebook.com/ReudMood

Was anything in particular inspiring you during the making? It’s always exciting working on a new project and the first with ABC Music. Writing and recording for a duo is inspiring as you can feed off each other to tell the story. What’s your favourite song on it? The first single You’ll Be With Me Till I Die. Always a great feeling to hear it on the radio. We’ll like this EP if we like... First Aid Kit, Cory Chisel, Speed Orange and Robert Ellis. When and where is your launch/ next gig? 24 Sep, Black Bear Lodge. Website link for more info? facebook.com/jeanietheband


Music

Circa Of Life To read the full interview head to theMusic.com.au

Fiercely creative and surprisingly spiritual, Anthony Green of prog-rock band Circa Survive talks to Upasana Chatterjee about #musicworship, seizing the moment and the band’s fifth album.

S

oft-spoken and endlessly polite, Anthony Green is at home in Doylestown, Pennsylvania with his two dogs, having just put his three sons to bed after a tiring day at the zoo. Regularly sharing personal titbits of his family life on Instagram, it’s evident Green is an immensely doting father and husband, and as one would expect, it pours out into the music he writes. “I tend to write about relationships and those are the greatest relationships that I have,” he admits, pausing. “I would say that they influence me in a way that they remind me of the urgency of a feeling. Little kids are very spontaneous and sporadic, and you never know what’s going to come out of their mouths or what they’re going to do. “Music is beautiful in that way and creating music is beautiful in that way, and for somebody like me who is also very much like a child with ADD, when I get a melody in my head that I really love, I have to record it. I have to somehow put it down so that I can remember it or else it flutters back into the ocean of melodies.” To the community of 138,000-strong Instagram followers welcomed into Green’s world with his #littlegods, Will, Luke and

James, and his wife, his #pixiequeen, Green unashamedly also hashtags many of his photos with #reallove, #realmagic and #musicworship. “For me, #musicworship is just being surrounded by music. There’s a rhythm to everything, you know? There’s a rhythm to the way our blood flows in our body, there’s a rhythm to the way our earth moves. There’s an underlying music that’s kind of encompassing every little thing. When we go out and we listen to music or we put on something that we love to hear and we’re driving around or we create music, we’re sort of saying a prayer to that entity that encompasses all living things.” As he speaks, his fervent passion for what Circa Survive does is unmistakable, and he seems to get lost in his thoughts. “I love making music, I love celebrating music. I think it’s the lifeblood of everything. The vibration of sound and the vibration of all living things are very connected and there’s a sacred melody that runs through life, and when you listen to music and when you play music, when you dance to music or when you just give into it, you’re sort of becoming part of it. It’s my god, and I worship that.”

Five Best Iron Maiden Albums With the release of their new album The Book Of Souls, we go back and highlight our five best Iron Maiden albums:

The Number Of The Beast (1982)

Powerslave (1984)

Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son (1998)

When & Where: 18 Sep, The Met Fear Of The Dark (1992)

The Final Frontier (2010)

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 31


Album / E Album/EP Reviews

k e e W E H T F O m Albu

Jarryd James Thirty One Dryden St/Universal

★★★★

Jarryd James is Brisbane’s most visible shy guy. Thrust into the spotlight these last few months, last year the reserved singer-songwriter was still struggling to juggle making music with his full-time job as a youth worker. Two years before he was playing guitar and singing in the middling indie-rock band Holland, although don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of them. They recorded a debut album only to experience the slow agony of watching their label permanently shelve the project. James fell into depression and temporarily quit making music. Thirty One is now his debut solo release, and things couldn’t be looking better. Having recently performed at Splendour In The Grass, he’s already achieved massive success with the first two singles. The bittersweet themes of Do You Remember permeate the rest of this album, as Sure Love mixes a little sunshine into this sense of nostalgia and Undone turns to a deeper shade of melancholy blue. Meanwhile, tracks like This Time (Serious Symptoms, Simple Solutions) and The Way You Like It bring James’ hazy reminiscences crashing into the complicated present. The maximalist stomp of Give Me Something and string flourishes of High showcase the album’s textured production, as James and his team of producers blend naturalistic sounds with electronic undertones. Ripe with repetition, the songs here are made to reflect the kind of seminal tracks that inspired James himself. The details are little vague around the edges, but that’s exactly the way our memories feel. Roshan Clerke

Empress Of

Bring Me The Horizon

Me Terrible Records/Remote Control

That’s The Spirit

★★★½ Time to sound the narcissism alert? Ordinarily, anyone with the audacity to call their debut album Me might expect to get a glass of cold water thrown over them. But the origins of Me reveal that Lorely “Empress Of” Rodriguez isn’t afraid to tread her own path. Rejecting calls from her record label to team up with a super-producer, Rodriguez retreated alone to rural Mexico for five weeks to pen this, her debut album. A statement of brave originality, Me is the work of someone determined to work their art out for themselves, and it’s among 2015’s freshest-sounding albums to date. Its production is immaculate. The rippling keys of Water Water excite while the striking arpeggios of Kitty Kat, her diatribe against ubiquitous cat calls and wolf whistles, are dynamic and compelling. But it may be her voice that is 32 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Sony

★★★½

Rodriguez’s strongest card. While the album gets underway with the dressage of vocal tricks that is Everything Is You, she elsewhere demonstrates a Hope Sandovalesque capacity for expressing much without running up and down scales. Most importantly, Rodriguez’s music doesn’t sound like anyone else. The differences between her and other electronic pop singers may be subtle but they’re priceless in establishing her as a unique proposition. Me isn’t a perfect debut. For every alluring melody there’s another that’s a little awkward or forced, but it all confirms Rodriguez has a deep well of talent to draw on. Christopher H James

Obviously, Count Your Blessings came out a while back (Oct 2006). But when you consider the sound of That’s The Spirit, Bring Me The Horizon’s entire discography save for Sempiternal - feels like a lifetime ago. Tunes like Happy Song might carry traces of alternative rock and groove metal, but the band’s focus has certainly shifted towards ambient soundscapes with an emphasis on rhythm. Experimentation is the name of the game on this record, with every track featuring at least one or two elements that stand out as inventive or otherwise unexpected, from the backwards string sections that kick off the album to the looped, percussive vocal fills that crop up here and there. The singles - Drown, Happy Song and Throne - provide a few decent reference points for the album’s sound, but the sheer scope of the band’s experimentation really needs to be

heard to be believed. The shift in tone for both the band and Oli Sykes’ vocal style makes for essentially no throwbacks to the band’s earlier material. However, the album’s sombre atmosphere, jagged tempo shifts and dark-as-death lyrics elevate it to a new degree of heaviness, even if it isn’t delivered the old-fashioned way. At times, Bring Me The Horizon’s ambitions overtake their compositions and they fall into a “heavy-chorus lightverse” formula as they attempt to reconcile their influences. That said, the whole thing begins to come together towards the second half. This album will divide fans, but the band won’t be on the losing side. Cameron Cooper


EP Reviews Album/EP Reviews

Gary Clark Jr

Natalie Imbruglia I Know Leopard

Low

The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim

Male

Another Life

Ones and Sixes

Sony

Independent

Sub Pop/Inertia

★★★

★½

★★★½

★★★½

Hailed as something of a blues saviour, a wunderkind of the genre, Gary Clark Jr. returns with his second full-length album. More ambitious than its predecessor, 2012’s Blak And Blu, The Story Of Sonny Boy Slim incorporates grandiose, sweeping arrangements that evoke Kanye over Clapton. Clark’s guitar playing is as good as any of his contemporaries, but too often it’s left to wail in the background, and while that affects the overall album, it does mean that - on songs where his axe comes to the forefront, like Grinder - there are moments of pure brilliance.

Natalie Imbruglia has basically produced a fourth studio album of cover songs by male artists and gave them a female touch. Instant Crush is missing the techno element Daft Punk brought to it while Friday I’m In Love isn’t the same with added banjos and missing Robert Smith’s iconic vocals. Her method has lost the magic of the originals. For example, I Will Follow You Into The Dark isn’t as emotional and romantic as the Death Cab For Cutie original. She may have a beautiful, graceful voice and good intentions, but Imbruglia didn’t give these songs the justice they deserved.

Dylan Stewart

Aneta Grulichova

Sydney-based band I Know Leopard are the sound of summer. Released just in time to coincide with the change of seasons, this celestial collection centres around nostalgia and second chances. “Hits me like it’s a memory,” frontman Luke O’Laughlin sings on the opening lines of Close My Eyes, serendipitously describing both how their music sounds and the familiarity it entails. “I’ll make up for my mistakes in another life,” he sings on Another Life, while Spaceships pegs its hopes on extraterrestrial intervention. Perfect Picture is all sunshine and sincerity, rounding off the most wistful indie-pop release of the year so far.

While retaining their trademark spaces among sometimes clouded emotions, there seems a different tension on this to 2013’s Invisible Way. Where Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy had their so-human voices among warmer layers of sound, new producer BJ Burton’s approach on the opening Gentle has Mimi Parker’s words bumping over against a perhaps more mechanical backing. There are still those nagging doubts in Alan Sparhawk’s questions, but songs like Landslide have an almost wound-down industrial atmosphere to them. Low remain a haunting thing that can seep into you, but there’s maybe a more insistent desire for you to feel and share their melancholy.

Warner

Roshan Clerke

Ross Clelland

More Reviews Online Various Daptone Gold II

theMusic.com.au

Duran Duran Paper Gods

Stereophonics Keep The Village Alive

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 33


Album / E Album/EP Reviews

Beirut

The Stiffys

No No No

Art Rock One

4AD/Remote Control

Independent

Micachu & The Shapes

Slayer

Good Sad Happy Bad

Nuclear Blast/Caroline

Repentless

Rough Trade/Inertia

★★★½

★★★

★★★½

★★★½

Beirut are in musical rehab. American singer-songwriter Zach Condon has stripped back the sound of his project down to their essential elements with this latest album, an elegant second chance. After a messy divorce a few years ago, he suffered a physical and mental breakdown, putting everything on hold. Recorded with his bassist and drummer, this record is, then, the sound of a man recovering from his winter of discontent. The title track documents the jubilant sense of healing he’s found in a new lover, all but abandoning much of the Balkan folk music he appropriated on earlier albums.

This EP is a pretty groovy collection of songs. You’ll either love or hate the weird satirical angle the band is going for - it’s hit and miss, but there’s enough musical punch to ensure a good time. Office Boy and Space Blog stand out, showing The Stiffys getting distorted and weird. The band could benefit from solidifying themselves as something more than a gimmick, perhaps by revelling in it less. Creatively The Stiffys are onto something... sure enough with some more focus on musical content and less on being trendy they could just get there.

After crafting an eerily beautiful soundtrack for Under The Skin, Mica Levi reunites with The Shapes for their latest album. Reportedly inspired and pieced together from a jam, the London three-piece deal out 13 rough and raw experiments in avantgarde pop that charm with buoyant energy and childlike naivety. It takes a little patience to enter the space they create on this album. The abrupt endings leave these jams feeling perhaps a little unfinished. They totally rip up the rule book and defiantly put it all back together on their own highly original and instinctively musical terms.

With guitarist Jeff Hanneman’s death, many predicted Slayer’s demise. Repentless proves them wrong. Sure, this is no Reign In Blood, but it does sits comfortably alongside Divine Intervention and Christ Illusion as perfectly acceptable Slayer. Thankfully the already released track, the lacklustre When The Stillness Comes, is by far the weakest thing here. Instead, check out the infectious You Against You, the frantic title cut and the Nazi-obsessed Piano Wire - the album’s sole Hanneman creation. Add to this Tom Araya’s customary vocal dominance and guitarist Gary Holt’s seamless entry into the Slayer fold and Repentless delivers the goods.

Jonty Czuchwicki

Guido Farnell

Roshan Clerke

Mark Hebblewhite

More Reviews Online The Necks Vertigo

34 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

theMusic.com.au

The Dandelion Seeds Flowers & Magical Powers Of The Dandelion

Guilty Simpson Detroit’s Son


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 35


Live Re Live Reviews

Imagine Dragons @ Riverstage. Pic: Bobby Rein

British India, Imagine Dragons Riverstage 5 Sep

Imagine Dragons @ Riverstage. Pic: Bobby Rein

Imagine Dragons @ Riverstage. Pic: Bobby Rein

Tumbleweeed @ The Zoo. Pic: Terry Soo

Megan Washington @ The Spiegeltent. Pic: Bobby Rein

Tumbleweeed @ The Zoo. Pic: Terry Soo

36 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

British India opening the show is a real treat, even if it is a slightly odd pairing with the headline act. It’s always great to see Australian talent accompany international heavyweights, and the Melbourne four-piece quickly prove their worth and get heads bopping along with Plastic Souvenirs and Wrong Direction. The band clearly has a lot of fun on stage and is in high spirits. Guitarist Nic Wilson bounces around the space to pair up with the other beaming band members. Lead singer Declan Melia takes a moment between songs to reminisce on a gig at Riverstage where they played to “a total of about 30 punters”. It’s clear though that tonight’s thousands-strong crowd is really waiting in earnest for the headliners as emphatic performances of Vanilla, I Can Make You Love Me and I Said I’m Sorry go by without much from the crowd except obligatory applause. There’s no doubt that this set would definitely have killed at a headlining show. Nevertheless, the audience is thoroughly warmed for the main event. It’s a quick transition to fever pitch as Imagine Dragons take to the stage and open with Shots, the first track from album Smoke + Mirrors. It is clear that the show is going to be filled with lights, high energy and a lot of love. The show is an allages affair; the Riverstage is filled with screams of tweens, whistles and more traditional cheering from seasoned punters. The band launches straight into Trouble and It’s Time with singer Dan Reynolds offering ample opportunity for crowd participation. It’s easy to believe that Reynolds hails from Las Vegas, he’s truly a showman - taking time to share some

anecdotes about the band’s last Australian tour - and it’s quite clear that Imagine Dragons are veteran performers as they follow this personalised moment with a surprise rendition of Midnight Oil’s Aussie classic, Beds Are Burning. The band

It is clear that the show is going to be filled with lights, high energy and a lot of love. infuses their own style into the song, offering heavyhitting guitar riffs and a drum solo, however the song’s political message seems a little lost in translation. The rest of the setlist is a mix of tracks from the most recent album and the band’s back catalogue. It’s perfectly curated; the audience sings along to every song with gusto. An a cappella cover of Forever Young (popularised here by Youth Group), Demons, Friction and Radioactive (the show closer) are all highlights. The crowd is left chanting for more but are clearly sated by an engaging show. There’s no denying that Imagine Dragons are one of the best live acts to tour in recent years and one can only hope that their oft-noted love for Australians brings them back soon. Dan Etiel

Megan Washington The Spiegeltent 5 Sep Once a year it comes around where Brisbane’s Southbank


eviews Live Reviews

becomes a melting pot of culture and arts, putting forward some of the best food, drink, theatre, comedy and music for all of us to enjoy as part of Brisbane Festival. Tonight is no exception, and as the festival lights up for the opening night, The Music has the pleasure of witnessing the very best that Brisbane has to offer with a performance from Megan Washington. As the sold out crowd begins to consume The Spiegeltent, it becomes exceedingly obvious how the two-time ARIA Award winner’s audience has grown since her 2010 release I Believe You Liar, with families and the young and old alike keen to see the Brissie-bred indiepop star in action. It isn’t long until Washington graces the stage, accompanied only by her keyboard. Tonight marks the first show of Washington’s Tangents tour and is the first time Brisbane listeners get to see her play solo, but this is surely no disappointment. Fans probably hoping to hear some of Washington’s chart toppers are pleasantly surprised with her selection of brooding piano ballads, making hearts swoon with her signature honest, poetic and natural lyrical content. And as if Brisbane music lovers weren’t delighted by Washington already, she manages to charm the audience with her tales of overheard audience murmurs during her solo shows, naming a few of her favourite comments as “I thought she’d be taller,” “When is she going to play something we know?” and some ocker bloke telling his friend how “fucking depressing” this show is. The Spiegeltent - one of the beloved institutions that rolls through with the Brisbane Festival annually, bringing with it a certain elegance and flair - is a perfect backdrop for Washington’s majestic voice and melancholic, relatable tunes. Although at times festival noises from outside the tent

spill through the venue, it never manages to detract from the dulcet tones of Washington’s performance, only acting as a reminder of the wonders of the Brisbane Festival and the many things it has to offer. Throughout the set Washington manages to slip in a couple of stripped-back crowd favourites such as the title track from her first record I Believe You Liar, Limitless from her 2014 release There There and

Among the remainder of the setlist is an array of beautiful songs, showcasing the artist’s vulnerability and wonderful storytelling abilities. the beautiful How To Tame Lions, a song that reminds the crowd of when the local songstress released her first EP of the same name back in 2009. Among the remainder of the setlist is an array of beautiful songs, showcasing the artist’s vulnerability and wonderful storytelling abilities. Georgia Corpe

Tumbleweed, Heavy Roller, Sacred Shrines The Zoo 4 Sep Burgeoning local psych troupe Sacred Shrines open

proceedings tonight, seemingly taking their cues from first generation psych outfits like ‘60s Texan crazies The 13th Floor Elevators, and while they don’t have anyone playing electric jug they sure have an unearthly drone underlying nearly everything they do. The songs are well crafted and catchy and the jangly guitars offset a trippy ambience nicely, the band adroitly moving through a few musical styles while keeping everything defiantly retro in tone. Fellow Brisbanites Heavy Roller also have one eye on the past, except they sound like they crawled out of a Palm Desert generator party circa-1994. Thick grooves and pummeling guitars prevail and it should be no surprise given their oeuvre to spy former Rollerball skinsman Cam Roach behind the kit. Their titular track Heavy Roller is a dark, pulsating and primal beast, while numbers like Getting By and Barfly exhibit molten grooves and they fittingly complete a terrifyingly blistering set by dedicating Demon to recently passed horror maestro Wes Craven. The crowd looks like some weird high school reunion featuring all the long-haired stoner kids from every school as Wollongong legends Tumbleweed arrive to celebrate the 20-year birthday of their awesome second album Galactophonic, but any element of surprise which is lost as they attack the album in order is made up for in sheer power and musicianship. Frontman Richie Lewis may be dressed elegantly but you can’t hide your roots, and he channels his flannel-clad younger self with ease as tracks like Hang Around, TV Genocide (with its cascade of weird circular riffs), Nothin’ To Do With The Weather and Armchair Ride come and go, each sounding as smooth and vital as they did back in the day. The four familiar Weed faces are joined by Hytest

bassist Luke Armstrong - who’s filling touring four-string duties due to the sad passing of Jay Curley last year - but its sonically pristine, and the years strip away like cracked paint on an old farm shed as they continue through the album, heads banging in unison on stage and off during numbers like Feed The River, Circus Sideshow and crowd fave Gyroscope. As the mayhem of Pocket Veto/Interstellar

The years strip away like cracked paint on an old farm shed as they continue through the album. Overdrive fades out signifying the end of the album’ proper there’s an extra jolt of energy shot through the crowd as the Weed go into greatest hits mode, Daddy Long Legs really getting things heaving right off the bat. They throw in some rarities like B-side Round The Bend and their awesome cover of The Dirty Lovers’ Shanty Town, before Sundial tears the room a new one, and the party continues for a while yet before wrapping up with Rainbow Waterwillow eases us into the night. This band remains the real deal - far more than a facsimile - and accordingly tonight feels much more imperative than a mere jaunt down memory lane it so easily could have been. Steve Bell

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 37


Live Re Live Reviews

Oh Mercy, Machine Age, Rolls Bayce Woolly Mammoth 4 Sep

It’s dark and empty upstairs at the Woolly Mammoth this evening. Brisbane producer and singer-songwriter Adrian Mauro is performing as Machine Age to a small but appreciative crowd, wearing a green jacket with the collar raised defensively high. Layering ambient guitar effects, he builds the sounds until the room is enveloped in his atmospheric embrace. His lonely voice aches like a country singer as he moans through All I Ever Wanted and Chivalry, twitching in time to the melancholy rhythms. Rolls Bayce are the next act on stage tonight, the three-piece consisting of the flotsam and jetsam of other Brisbane bands from the past and present. “Tried to be on my own,” frontman Dean McGrath laments on the infectious opening song. The growing crowd are beginning to get down to his catchy catharsis as the group channel a ‘70s psych-rock sound, churning through the cyclic grooves of Arrows and Don’t Get Me Wrong. Their seven-minute closer is a carbon-copy Tame Impala soundalike, although no one seems to be complaining. There’s rapturous applause as Alex Gow and his current six-piece incarnation of Oh Mercy walk on the stage. While the sequined jacket from his Deep Heat tour days has been laid to rest, there’s a hint of its playfulness left in the golden guitar strap Gow wears over a black patterned shirt. The band have an excellent back catalogue of indie-pop hits to draw from, with his latest album providing the opening I Don’t Really Want To Know and Sandy. The wry wit in his writing comes through on the latter track, lending a sense of self-awareness to the song that Gow’s only recently began to 38 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

explore. Stay, Please Stay and My Man reach back into his previous recordings and receive a warm welcome from the crowd. The live stage banter is almost equally as good a reason to come to Oh Mercy shows as the music, and tonight is no exception. Dedicating Iron Cross to anyone who’s fallen for a man’s priestly thighs and confessing his desire to be Shannon Noel before Let Me Be Him, Gow is at his everarticulate best. He switches in and out of a falsetto during a shaky performance of Drums, before the band leave him alone on the stage for an

The live stage banter is almost equally as good a reason to come to Oh Mercy shows as the music. intimate performance of Lady Eucalyptus. It drags a little in contrast to the rest of the set as the younger crowd members grow restless, but it’s not long before Can’t You Hear My Body (Calling Out To You) and Without You sweep them away again. Small clouds of impassioned spittle fly from his mouth during a blistering cover of Leonard Cohen’s One Of Us Cannot Be Wrong, before he invites the Rolls Bayce members back on stage for the celebratory closer, Deep Heat. Roshan Clerke


Arts Reviews Arts Reviews

Rise For The Oceans

Rise For The Oceans

Festival QPAC Concert Hall, 5 Sep

★★★ Rise For The Oceans brings together a well curated range of creative and academic names to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Australian Marine Conservation Society. Opening with one of Australia’s foremost didgeridoo players, William Barton pays homage to the Southern seas as brilliantly crisp footage plays beyond a stage adorned with coral and jellyfish light installations that remain mesmerising throughout the whole program. The care taken in selecting key pieces of ocean cinematography

continues to be evident with the unveiling of Rise For The Oceans, a heart-tugging recording of piano and harp from Antony & The Johnsons set to fascinating close-ups of coral spawning from Emmy Award-winning North Stradbroke Island cinematographer David Hannan. The program turns somewhat variety show as he introduces Bernard Fanning, and later Katie Noonan who is ethereal at the grand piano as she reworks Judith Wright’s The Surfer, with overzealous pageantry. Fanning is his usual charismatic self, wheeling out Powderfinger cut Sail The Wildest Stretch on acoustic guitar, and premiering a newbie on grand piano. Jessica Watson, fearless solo sailor, wanders onto stage with a headset to chat about her record-breaking voyage. Full dues for her courageous adventuring, though by this point the program is a join-the-dots exercise, and given the material and guests involved it should instead feel like a wonderful, cross-platform collage. When finally tonight’s most revered guest - author and AMCS patron Tim Winton - takes to the stage with his relaxed Western Australian demeanour, the audience is delighted to hear: “I’ve had so many wees I’m afraid I might self-combust.” Having spent much of his career telling stories of Australia’s love of the ocean, Winton puts into very real terms the reasons why AMCS must exist. Rise For The Oceans gets another run as the musical guests are accompanied by a stunning array of underwater imagery being beamed onto the upper reaches of the Concert Hall. Tyler McLoughlan

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 39


Comedy / G The Guide

Wed 09

Nico Ghost

Brisbane Festival presents Halfway: Spiegeltent, South Bank Lil Nix: The Bearded Lady, West End

Laura Marling

Jimi Beavis + Suicide Swans + The Mighty Kind: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane Hanna Rosa: The Triffid (Front Bar), Newstead

The Music Presents Brisbane Festival 2015: Brisbane 5-26 Sep An Evening With Kevin Smith: The Tivoli 19 Sep

Thu 10 Helen Russell Trio: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Marina Prior: Brisbane Powerhouse (Visy Theatre), New Farm

At The Dakota: Ric’s Bar 2 Oct, Shamrock Hotel 3 Oct

Nico Ghost: Elsewhere, Surfers Paradise

Red Deer Festival: Mt Samson 3 Oct

Sharny Russell + Redbop Jazz Band: JMI Live, Bowen Hills

Bad//Dreems: Woolly Mammoth 16 Oct, Miami Shark Bar 17 Oct

Des Reid: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt

Laura Marling: The Tivoli 21 Oct

Brodie Graham: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore

The Phoenix Foundation: Woolly Mammoth 23 Oct

Brisbane Festival presents We Two Thieves: Spiegeltent, South Bank

Gig Of The Week Pulsating hip hop aficionado Nico Ghost will be flowin’ verses two nights in a row this week. Catch him at Elsewhere on 10 Sep or TBC Club on 11 Sep. Caxton Street Jazz Band: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Dezzie D & The Stingrayz: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

Marina Prior: Brisbane Powerhouse (Visy Theatre), New Farm

Nights On Ocean: Solbar (on the street), Maroochydore

Mumford & Sons: Brisbane Riverstage 7 Nov

Franky Smart: The Bearded Lady, West End

Julie Hayes: Burleigh Brewing, Burleigh Heads

Speakeasy: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore

A Day On The Green – Paul Kelly: Sirromet Winery 29 Nov

Holly Terrens + Wells: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane

Purling Brook: Cardigan Bar, Sandgate

Dubarray + Fieu: Solbar (Main Stage), Maroochydore

Mew: Max Watt’s 4 Dec

Dallas Frasca: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba

Father John Misty: Max Watt’s 6 Dec

Leanne Tennant: The Triffid (Front Bar), Newstead

Dragon: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley Super Best Friends: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley

Bully: Woolly Mammoth 12 Dec

Avaberee: Currumbin Creek Tavern, Currumbin Waters

Bluesfest 2016: Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm 24-28 Mar

Passport to Airlie Beach - Battle of the Bands 2015: Dalrymple Hotel, Garbutt

Jimmy Watts: Statler & Waldorf, Brisbane

Jimi Beavis

Dana Gehrman: Eat Street Markets, Hamilton Celtic Woman: Gold Coast Convention & Exhibition Centre, Broadbeach Alan Boyle: Habitat Restaurant & Bar, South Brisbane

Eddie Boyd & The Phatapillars

Get Phat With a new single, A Lover And A Fool, to show off, Eddie Boyd & The Phatapillars play 11 Sep at Helm Bar in Mooloolaba.

The Screaming Jets: Harvey Road Tavern, Clinton

Beavis Blues

Jabba: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Towering Brisbane bluesman, Jimi Beavis will be hitting The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar on 9 Sep along with Suicide Swans and The Mighty Kind. On 18 Sep he’ll be at The Spotted Cow providing a dose of Friday night boogie!

Aldous Harding + Tom Cooney + Anthony Tonnon: Junk Bar, Ashgrove Bowie Unzipped feat. Jeff Duff: Kedron Wavell Services Club, Chermside PureVelour: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Atmosphere Band: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central Katchafire: Magnums Hotel, Airlie Beach

Fri 11

Joshua Radin: Max Watt’s (formerly The Hi-Fi Brisbane), West End

Hobo Magic + The Royal Artillery + In Void + Dead Sun: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

King Social + The Badlands + Tayla Young: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley

We All Want To + Halcyon Drive + The Lulu Raes: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

The View From Madeleine’s Couch: Queensland Multicultural Centre (QMC), Kangaroo Point

Selaphonic: Bon Amici Wine Bar, Toowoomba James Johnston: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion

40 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

The Stiffys + The Flangipanis: Ric’s Bar, Fortitude Valley

Nico Ghost: TBC Club (The Bowler Club), Fortitude Valley Moski Jo + Rivermouth + Virginia Sook: The Bearded Lady, West End Orpheus Omega + Chronolyth + Hollow World + Tria Mera + Vessel Born: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley Scraps + Thigh Master + Cannon + Teva + Young Trouble: The Foundry, Fortitude Valley


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 41


Comedy / G The Guide

Le Pie + Bec Sandridge + The Phoncurves: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane

Brisbane Festival presents Luna: Spiegeltent, South Bank

Dallas Frasca

Wed 16

Baltimore Gun Club + Ghost Audio + Lunar Seasons: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Bart B More: Upstairs Nightclub, Caloundra

BJC Club Nite: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

The Snowdroppers + Eddie Boyd & The Phatapillars + The Hi-Boys: Wharf Tavern (The Helm), Mooloolaba

Two Little Ducks + Donnelle Brooks: Ric’s Bar, Fortitude Valley Jouk Mistrow + Shady Bliss + Jacket: Sonny’s House of Blues, Brisbane

Pearls + Ali Barter + Sunbeam Sound Machine: Woolly Mammoth, Fortitude Valley

Brisbane Festival presents Myele Manzanza & The Eclectic: Spiegeltent, South Bank

Sat 12

Dallas Does Spotted

Lords Of Wong + New Jack Rubys + Shrewms + Los Pintar: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

Riff -aden rockers, Dallas Frasca will be showing the bovine love 10 Sep at The Spotted Cow. The show is part of a huge string of shows throughout September and October.

Watch Your Step feat. Various DJs: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley

Be Rad: The Bearded Lady, West End

Mankunion: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion Celtic Woman: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, South Bank

Progressive Tan: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Ann Vriend: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Lateo: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

Majestique: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central

Brisbane Big Band: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point

The Biscuit Factory feat. Herobust + Twine + Hydraulix: Max Watt’s (formerly The Hi-Fi Brisbane), West End

Celtic Woman: Brolga Theatre, Maryborough

Obserd + Kingston Stompers + Rollo + Hanny J + Steve Reed: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley

The Stiffys

Passport to Airlie Beach - Battle of the Bands 2015: Miami Tavern (Shark Bar), Miami Dallas Frasca + John Malcolm: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna Jesse Taylor: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore Halcyon Drive + The Lulu Raes + Ends Eve: Solbar (Main Stage), Maroochydore Brisbane Festival presents Lady Rizo: Spiegeltent, South Bank

Champagne Stiffys Everybody’s favourite party boys, The Stiffys play consecutive shows this weekend. The party begins at Ric’s Bar 11 Sep with The Flangipanis and finishes with their show at The Bearded Lady with The Durries and El Bravo on 12 Sep.

Disentomb + Tomb Of Doom + Coffin Birth + Laceration Mantra + Expulsed: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Little Billy: Eat Street Markets, Hamilton Lee Kernaghan + The Wolfe Brothers + Christie Lamb: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill Passport to Airlie Beach - Battle of the Bands 2015: Glenmore Tavern, Norman Gardens Round Mountain Girls + Resident Trademark: Hamilton Hotel, Hamilton Katchafire: Harvey Road Tavern, Clinton Ramjet: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

42 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Purling Brook: Statler & Waldorf, Brisbane The Stiffys + The Durries + El Bravo: The Bearded Lady, West End Bayharbour + Sentiments + Headwound The Pony: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley Totally Mild + Donny Benet + Motion Dag + Shorts: The Foundry, Fortitude Valley Bowie Unzipped feat. Jeff Duff: The Majestic Theatre, Pomona Born Lion: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane King Social + The Badlands + Tayla Young: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba The Gangsters Ball: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley Tree & Ray + OK Badlands + Trails + Lewis O’Leary: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley Bommer + Creation + Squnto: Woolly Mammoth, Fortitude Valley

Sunday Sessions with The Green Sinatras: Dublin Docks Tavern, Biggera Waters 80s Mania feat. Paul Young + Go West + Nik Kershaw + Cutting Crew: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill Mark Lowndes: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Sounds on Sunday with Dan England: Redland Bay Hotel, Redland Bay Bart Thrupp + Ryan Delaney + Holly Borich: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore Brisbane Festival presents Lady Rizo: Spiegeltent, South Bank

Triffid Seeds feat. Creature Kind + Charlotte Ivey: The Triffid, Newstead

Thu 17 Garrett Kato: Black Bear Lodge, Fortitude Valley The Mulder Pulford Nonet + David Theake: Brisbane Jazz Club, Kangaroo Point Earth Caller: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Des Reid: Loving Hut, Mount Gravatt Megan Washington: Miami Marketta, Miami Hayden Hack: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore Brisbane Festival presents Conrad Sewell: Spiegeltent, South Bank Folklore feat. The Bone Merchants + Cameron Milford: The Bearded Lady, West End Ocean Alley + Maefire + Shady Bliss + Muddy Chanter: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley

Seer Green + Dinosaur Dreams + Sawtooth: The Bearded Lady, West End

We Two Thieves

The Screaming Jets: The Lionleigh, Wandal Revelation Groove: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane I Love Life Fest feat. The Smith Street Band + Andrew Jackson Jihad + Iron Chic + Modern Baseball + The Sidekicks + Oslow + Walken: The Tivoli, Fortitude Valley Jurassic Jam with Roger The Cabin Boy + The Manilows + The Vinyl Frontier + The Hanovers + The Budgee Smugglers: The Triffid, Newstead Triffid Roots feat.+Riley Pearce + The Altais: The Triffid (2pm), Newstead

Mon 14 Toni Braxton: QPAC (Concert Hall), South Brisbane

Stealing You As part of Brisbane Festival, the Spiegeltent hosts We Two Thieves on 10 Sep. The duo features Emily Lubitz (Tinpan Orange) and ARIA nominee Mama Kin, showing off their folk, gospel and soul blend.

Melody Beat: The Bearded Lady, West End

Sun 13 Dragon: Blue Mountain Hotel, Harlaxton Geeves & Wooster: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion

Tue 15 Jake Bristow: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Village

Vincent & Jules Show: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane Sleeping With Sirens + Story Of The Year + Storm The Sky: The Triffid, Newstead


Gigs / Live The Guide

Uncle Buck + Donnie’s Guns + Sound of Truth: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

FRI 18

Beer InCider Experience feat. British India + All Our Exes Live In Texas: Albion Park Harness Racing Club, Albion Deon Powter: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion Darren Middleton: Brisbane Powerhouse, New Farm Ry: Burleigh Brewing, Burleigh Heads Kyle Lionheart: Cardigan Bar, Sandgate

Richard Perso: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

4114: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central

Megan Washington + The Tambourine Girls: Solbar, Maroochydore

Dub FX: Max Watt’s (formerly The Hi-Fi Brisbane), West End

Mitch King: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore

Mitchell Creek Rock ‘n’ Blues Fest 2015: Mitchell Creek, Kandanga Creek

Yes Sir Noceur + Creature Kind + Alex Edwards: Soundlounge, Currumbin

Lee Kernaghan + The Wolfe Brothers + Christie Lamb: Nambour Civic Centre, Nambour

Bootleg Rascal: The Bearded Lady, West End That Thing feat. Various Artists: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley

Long Holiday + Two Headed Dog + Dead Wolves + In Void: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley

Flowertruck + Hollow Everdaze + Good Boy: The Foundry, Fortitude Valley

The Screaming Jets: Parkwood Tavern, Parkwood The Massive Fergusons + The Stained Daisies: Royal Mail Hotel, Goodna

Bec Sandridge. Pic: Angela Padovan

Drawcard + Nerdlinger + Chin + Worse For Wear: Solbar (Main Stage), Maroochydore SoLar: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore

British India

InCider Info The Beer InCider Experience is on 18 Sep, with the likes of British India and All Our Exes Live In Texas providing the tunes to go with your delicious food and drink. Head to Albion Park Harness Racing Club.

John Flanagan: The Bison Bar, Nambour First Sight + Avarice’s Fall + Boston Blackout: The Brightside, Fortitude Valley Little May + Gordi + Jim Lowrie: The Foundry, Fortitude Valley Rise Overrun + The Buzzbees: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane

Three’s A Charm It’s triple the fun at The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar on 11 Sep, with Le Pie, Bec Sandridge and The Phoncurves all raring to slay it on stage.

Megan Washington: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba Kevin Smith + Jason Mewes: The Tivoli (5pm), Fortitude Valley Kevin Smith + Jason Mewes: The Tivoli (8.30pm), Fortitude Valley

Nerdlinger + Drawcard + The Flangipanis + Smoking Martha + Fire Away: Crowbar, Fortitude Valley Lee Kernaghan + The Wolfe Brothers + Christie Lamb: Empire Theatre, Toowoomba Alan Boyle: Habitat Restaurant & Bar, South Brisbane Jabba + Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane Dub FX: JCU Ampitheatre, Smithfield Tom Gleeson + Cal Wilson: Jupiters, Broadbeach Tea Society: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Circa Survive + PVRIS: The Met (all ages), Fortitude Valley

Ocean Leaves + Average Art Club + Littlelam + Winter Solstice: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Granite Belt: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane Jimi Beavis + Suicide Swans + Average Art Club: The Spotted Cow, Toowoomba

The Smith Street Band

Lovin’ Life

Sat 19

Mitchell Creek Rock ‘n’ Blues Fest 2015 feat. The Tommyhawks + Backsliders + Caravana Sun + Evol Walks + Genevieve Chadwick + Fiona Boyes & The Fortune Tellers + The Lachy Doley Group + Cheap Fakes + Urban Chiefs + Marji Curran Band + Papa Pilko & The Bin Rats + Frank Sultana & The Sinister Kids + Phil Barlow & The Wolf + Laura & The Blackjacks + The Soul Men Blues Brothers + more: Mitchell Creek, Kandanga Creek

Beer InCider Experience feat. Busby Marou + Skipping Girl Vinegar + The Glorious North + The Mae Trio + Hazlett: Albion Park Harness Racing Club, Albion

Trinatyde + Freethought + The Cilikis + more: New Globe Theatre, Fortitude Valley

Sebastian Bach: Coolangatta Hotel, Coolangatta

Tijuana Cartel: Woolly Mammoth, Fortitude Valley

The Screaming Jets: Norths Leagues & Services Club, Kallangur

Cherrybomb + Locky: Irish Murphy’s, Brisbane

Sun 20

Myon & Shane 54: Platinum Nightclub, Broadbeach

Jess Ribeiro: Junk Bar, Ashgrove

Tall Pop Syndrome + Basement Dreamers: Ric’s Bar, Fortitude Valley

Sounds on Sunday with Raku O’Gaia: Redland Bay Hotel, Redland Bay Bear Foot + Ben Cummiskey: Solbar (Lounge Bar), Maroochydore Lower Class Brats: Southern Cross Tavern, Bilinga Brisbane Festival presents Megan Washington: Spiegeltent, South Bank Brisbane Festival presents: 4ZZZ Flashback: 40 Years of Independent Radio : Spiegeltent, South Bank

Triffid Roots feat. Ben Wright Smith + Fieu: The Triffid, Newstead

Silk: Logan Diggers Club, Logan Central

I Love Life Fest is on 13 Sep, featuring The Smith Street Band, Andrew Jackson Jihad, Iron Chic, Modern Baseball, The Sidekicks, Oslow and Walken bringing the fun to The Tivoli.

Lower Class Brats: Chardons Corner Hotel, Annerley

Wandering Eyes: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

Mitchell Creek Rock ‘n’ Blues Fest 2015: Mitchell Creek, Kandanga Creek

The Demon Drink + Mermaid Avenue: The Milk Factory Kitchen & Bar, South Brisbane

Between Kings + Faleepo Francisco + Dream Thieves + Buck Dean & the Green Lips: The Zoo, Fortitude Valley

Tom Foolery: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion

Mark Lowndes: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End

John Flanagan: The Bearded Lady, West End

Love Cats: A Tribute To The Cure feat. The Jensens + Baskervillain + Eden Mulholland + Silent Feature Era + Garrett Kato: The Triffid, Newstead

The Screamin’ Stevie’s: Beetle Bar, Brisbane

Sunday Sessions with Bone Lazy: Dublin Docks Tavern, Biggera Waters

Mon 21 Mitchell Creek Rock ‘n’ Blues Fest 2015: Mitchell Creek, Kandanga Creek

Tue 22 Sebastian Bach: Eatons Hill Hotel, Eatons Hill Brad McCarthy Band: Lock ‘n’ Load Bistro, West End Christian Andrew: Ric’s Bar, Fortitude Valley Mark Sheils: Samford Valley Hotel, Samford Village Brisbane Festival presents Los Coronas: Spiegeltent, South Bank

James Johnston: Breakfast Creek Hotel, Albion Lee Kernaghan + The Wolfe Brothers + Christie Lamb: Brolga Theatre, Maryborough

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 43


09.09.15 Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Brisbane / Free / Incorporating

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N U O BIGS Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Time For A Break

BIGSOUND outdoors

You need to refuel between panels (and binges), so head to BIGSOUND’s wonderful outdoor space The Winn (3 Winn St) between 2-8pm daily for music, food, bars and much more!

Blokes You

Cosmic Psychos

Can Trust

Oz rock legends Cosmic Psychos may be the elder statesmen of this year’s BIGSOUND but don’t expect them to be well behaved! Catch ‘em at the Deathproof pre-party on Tuesday night or their official slot the following evening.

Vinyl Destination Check out the panel discussing the awesome phoenix-like return of the indie record store, The (Not So) Humble Record Store, featuring a fine cast including Jet Black Cat proprietor Shannon Logan.

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Shannon Logan


5 1 0 2 ND Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Short Memory

Peter Garrett

Peter Garrett has long campaigned for societal change, whether out front of Midnight Oil or during his time in Parliament. An amazing orator, his keynote speech is sure to both cover a lot of ground and open a lot of minds.

Ngaiire

Bringing It Home This year’s BIGSOUND features its first ever closing party, which is being held at The Triffid between 4pm-2am on Friday, featuring Ngaiire and many more fine artists strutting their stuff. One for the road!

Tim Byron

Live venues dedicated to BIGSOUND showcases this week

With A Bullet Sydney musician/ journalist Tim Byron is fascinated with the charts, and his mini-keynote, Tim Byron’s Year Of Number Ones, promises to be thought-provoking and fun in roughly equal measure.

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 15


N U O BIGS Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

It’s Alive!

BIGSOUND Live Queue

The Valley is never the same beast as it is during BIGOUND Live, probably because it’s the only time of year when everyone has a ticket to basically everywhere! 150 bands on 15 stages over two nights, what’s not to love?

Immigrant Union

BIGSOUND app

Download And Go Fine And Dandy Melbourne outfit Immigrant Union used to be known as the band featuring the Dandy Warhols’ drummer (and Courtney Barnett), but after stunning recent album Anyway they won’t be in anybody’s shadow for long!

They say that ‘proper preparation prevents piss poor partying’, so don’t forget to download your free BIGSOUND 2015 mobile app for the full rundown of everything happening at the conference and showcase series!

Average number of hours of sleep BIGSOUND delegates get during the conference.

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5 1 0 2 ND Music / Arts / Lifestyle / Culture

Luke Daniel Peacock

Birds Of A Feather

Brisbane-based Luke Daniel Peacock is so far best known as an integral part of Halfway and The Painted Ladies, but the dulcet vocal tones displayed in his new solo guise mean he’s soon going to be known in his own right. Check him!

He Ain’t Heavy

If you love your music on the brutal side then don’t miss the Milestones In Heavy Music panel, which looks at our world-class metal scene taking on the world. Facilitated by esteemed photographer Kane Hibberd (aka Kanye Lens).

Perch Creek

Go With The Flow It’s all in the family for the gorgeous Perch Creek, whose harmony-rich take on folk-rock has found them travelling the world to great acclaim. And it all kicked off just down the road in Northern Rivers shire!

Kane Hibberd

THEMUSIC MUSIC• •9TH 9THSEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER2015 2015• •17 3 THE


N U O BIGS Peace TRAININ’

It’s BIGSOUND time again, and Steve Bell braces for the storm about to hit Brisbane as the multitudes of bands and delegates converge for the conference and showcase mayhem. Cover pics by Markus Ravik.

Hip hop artist and activist Brother Ali guides Steve Bell though the ideas that music can inspire change and that we’re all potentially far more than the product of our environment.

F

B

Thinking & Partying

or years now BIGSOUND has been Australia’s - and the Southern Hemisphere’s - preeminent music industry conference and showcase shindig. For this 14th installment of BIGSOUND there’s a cerebral tinge to the conference aspect of proceedings, which will fortunately make you feel less guilty after you’ve cut loose and unleashed your inner party beast amid the nighttime showcases. This year the BIGSOUND conference has enlisted some of world music’s finest thinkers and agitators - erstwhile Midnight Oil frontman/ politician Peter Garrett, hip hop icon and activist Brother Ali, esteemed author and Pitchfork editor Jessica Hopper among many more proponents of positive transformation - who collectively give voice to the possibilities of change not only inspired by musicians and music but also within the confines of the industry itself. There are keynote speeches, talks and panels on topics ranging from the future direction of music on a macro level, women in the music industry, the return of the record store, the emergence of prominent boutique festivals, the second coming of EDM culture, the changing face of music journalism, the role of the producer and manager, strategies for heavy bands, the ongoing importance of community radio, the need for safe spaces and so much more - there is literally something for music lovers and aspiring industry moguls of all persuasions. But then there’s the more hedonistic side of BIGSOUND’s fascinating duality - the live music and parties! With 150 bands playing on 15 stages over two nights, the official component of BIGSOUND Live provides the complete urban festival experience. Plus this year there’s so much more on offer in the way of the official and unofficial parties which augment BIGSOUND Live and make it all so fun and exhausting - 2015 even marks the first-ever Friday night closing party at The Triffid. So grab your wristband, download the BIGSOUND app, outline a plan of attack with your mates and get amongst it! For those of you who can’t make it to this year’s BIGSOUND The Music has a crack team on the ground covering the festivities from every angle, so check out theMusic.com.au for all your BIGSOUND coverage and reportage. 18 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

rother Ali is nothing if not versatile, balancing his concurrent roles as a renowned hip hop artist, activist and spiritual thinker with a calm aplomb. The Minneapolis-based artist lived a comparatively challenging upbringing he was born with albinism and is legally blind, traits which led to cruelty from unempathetic classmates - but discovered his beloved hip hop culture at an early age, making music something of a personal sanctuary. He’s subsequently spent his career spreading the doctrines of truth and justice, and it’s these same tenets which are going to provide the crux of his inaugural BIGSOUND keynote speech. “I think that we’re all experts in our experience,” Brother Ali explains. “We’re all experts in the tyranny that life has given us and they way that we’ve navigated it. So the themes that tend to come together in my music are about hip hop as global youth culture, and the messages of hip hop and also the reality that Islam is its unofficial religion. I’ll definitely talk about hip hop as global youth culture and the voice of voiceless oppressed people, and the way that hip hop has been manipulated in systems of domination to serve those systems. So hip hop is something that was created by black and Puerto Rican people in the South Bronx in New York in the ‘70s, and it originally rose up to really create a voice and a freedom of expression space for those communities. But there


5 1 0 2 ND from oppression - it’s not seen that way by the West, but it’s absolutely seen that way by oppressed, marginalised, voiceless people.” There’s certainly an apparent schism between the religions and cultures that’s broadening rather than narrowing in these troubling times. “Not so much between the religions, more so between Islam and post-Christian modernity, western modernity,” Brother Ali continues. “I think that there are devout Christians, there’s just not that many of them left in the West. I think that Western modernity is anti-traditionalist and very reductionist, and I think it sees itself as having evolved past religion, whereas traditionalist societies view themselves as wanting to submit to God and align themselves with the creator. I think that’s more the misunderstanding between the two, and honestly I think that Islam is very misunderstood by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. The West really funded and selected a particular type of Islam, the same way that

I definitely think that music can be and is a healing force when it’s done with the right intent.

was a time when the business community, the corporations and the government really conspired to turn mainstream hip hop into a force that perpetuates white supremacy, perpetuates misogyny, perpetuates individualism, consumerism, hyper-capitalism and all that kind of stuff. Those were not things that the hip hop community did, these are things that the dominant culture transformed hip hop into. “[I’m also hoping to] to address the overlap with Islam. Because if hip hop is global youth culture and the culture and expression of oppressed people, Islam also really speaks to oppressed people and there’s a definite link that I think a lot of people, nowadays especially, are not aware of. There are really interesting manifestations of this in the States, as the spirituality and entrepreneurship and really the spirit of hip hop is black American Islam. These are things that America and Europe and Australia are really kind of wrestling with, because Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world and it’s the religion of justice and freedom

they did with hip hop.” Fortunately, Brother Ali is firm in his conviction that it’s possible to usher in change via music, even if it’s just making people address and think about important issues. “Music at its best connects people and fills people with love... And spirituality and religion at its best does that too. Hip hop’s culture is based on when Afrika Bambaataa founded the idea of hip hop and brought together these principles; peace, love, unity, having fun, freedom, justice, equality... Islam is based on there being one creator and one humanity and everyone in creation are the children of Adam... I definitely think that music can be and is a healing force when it’s done with the right intent.”

Mall Faces

The plaques featured on The Music’s cover this week are all located in Fortitude Valley’s Brunswick Mall to commemorate Brisbane’s rich musical heritage. BIGSOUND producer (and former QMusic Executive Officer) Denise Foley explains their background. Cover photos Markus Ravik. “There’s two batches [of plaques]. Originally Brisbane City Council put together a reference group to come up with plaques recognising Queensland artists who’d contributed to the Queensland scene... When they were laid it prompted a lot of criticism about who was left out. They always intended to do another batch, but were frightened off by the backlash even thought they’d convened an industry focus group. Then a few years ago the mall’s management was working with QMusic on Valley Fiesta and the conversation turned to having more artists recognised with plaques in the mall, and potentially using the Queensland Music Awards winners as a way of curating and filtering who the new plaques should be. It was decided that the plaques would go to winners of the QMA Song Of The Year award. When those plaques first went down there was a whole new raft of criticism, mainly about younger artists being recognised.”

When & Where: 10 Sep, Keynote Speech (10am)

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N U O BIGS Industry

Fight For Your Writers

Pitchfork editor Jessica Hopper tells Steve Bell that music criticism is difficult enough without arbitrary barriers which preclude half the potential scribes even getting a look in.

C

hicago-based music and culture critic Jessica Hopper has pretty much done it all over the course of her journalism career, starting out producing her own fanzines and working her way up to her current role as Senior Editor of Pitchfork (and Editor In Chief of the site’s print quarterly, The Pitchfork Review). But her interests and expertise in the music field run far beyond that of just chronicling new bands and into the realms of social commentary, given that she’s also a long-standing advocate of shining a torch on the gender imbalance that still seems all-pervading throughout the music industry.

We just tend to doubt women’s ability to truly understand or appreciate or participate in music that speaks to them.

The child of prominent journalists herself, Hopper started out covering the Riot Grrrl movement - editing the Hit It Or Quit It zine for 14 years - but her interest in the role of women in various scenes eventually manifested elsewhere, with her Punk Planet essay Emo: Where The Girls Aren’t (2003) and her first book, The Girls’ Guide To Rocking (2009), being prominent examples. Her most recent tome, The First Collection Of Criticism By A Living Female Rock Critic, continues her commentary on this passion, and will help form the basis of her inaugural BIGSOUND keynote speech. “I’m hoping to talk about basically the things that lead you to writing in the music industry - just the act of putting out and promoting music - and the things that we do that sometimes marginalise women, particularly young female fans,” Hopper explains. “There’s sometimes this implication that they don’t count, or that they’re not real fans, or the different ways that they’re made to feel that maybe this 20 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

isn’t the place for them and that they’re interlopers. Part of the reason that I want to talk about this is that I do have obviously some experiences of the different levels you need to navigate as a writer and an editor and so forth, but in some ways I was also an exception - I was someone who very fortunately was very much supported with both my interest in music and my interest in writing. Right from the start I felt that this was something I could do and do as a career and really pursue without necessarily being plagued by self-doubt, and I don’t think it’s because I’m some special human being, but rather because I had a lot different reception than most women receive when they’re getting into the industry.” It seems disingenuous that gender is even an issue in regards music criticism let alone a barrier - surely a good writer is a good writer? “It’s not so much necessarily in the actual writing, but it’s sometimes the hoops that one has to jump through,” Hopper continues. “There’s a very particular idea of what fandom looks like, and lots of times young female writers are written off as being ‘fan girls’ and it’s just assumed that they see a band in a particular way - that they’re attracted to them, or that they like them for surface reasons and not because the music speaks to them or even inspires them as a musician themselves. We put different motives on why they might be paying attention, and usually they’re ones that sort of assume that young girls aren’t into it as deep as guys or don’t have a true understanding. We just don’t take young female fans seriously - we just tend to doubt women’s ability to truly understand or appreciate or participate in music that speaks to them.” Naturally Hopper is implicitly aware that the title of her new book isn’t entirely accurate - it’s meant to be thoughtprovoking rather than a truism - and there’s been plenty of female trailblazers before her, including prominent Australian scribe Lillian Roxon whose writing in the late’60s and ‘70s helped set the foundation for serious music criticism. “There’s certainly a good amount of writing about music these days but there could always be more, especially with women in positions of power to help balance things out,” she muses. “I don’t know how it is in Australia, but Stateside we historically have very few women in the ‘pop critic’ roles at the bigger papers, but the really great thing is that a lot of young women and people with perspective instead of being pushed to the margins of criticism or participation, because of outlets like Tumblr and Twitter they can suddenly have voices, and are also starting to have careers born from their work outside official channels. They’re writing from their own Tumblrs and for more niche music publications or things that they started themselves, and we’re getting a much more diverse world of music criticism, with people who can look at something and bring in their own unique viewpoint rather than people who subscribing to a very old guard, fixed canon of what’s good and what counts and all of that.”

When & Where: 10 Sep, Keynote Speech (2.05pm), Why We Write (3.45pm)


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N U O BIGS Industry

FAREWELL FOLEY!

Open Booker

BIGSOUND producer Denise Foley has overseen ten separate BIGSOUNDs since taking the role in 2006, 2015 being her swansong in the hot seat. She recounts some of her favourite memories from amidst the BIGSOUND mayhem and magic:

In 2009 we had The Middle East showcase at Family and had Robert Schneider from The Apples In Stereo and Van Dyke Parks do keynote speeches, and we had 60 showcasing bands in six venues that year. In 2011 we jumped to 120 showcasing artists, and now we’re at 150. That was a great year which really consolidated BIGSOUND’s viability.

The Gurrumul closing keynote in 2013 was probably the only full panel I’ve watched at BIGSOUND. We had the live stream out in the foyer and I started watching it then grabbed all of our registration people and all of the team and we went inside and sat in the second row and watched it together. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house.

Watching Intercooler at Rics during my second year at the helm was a personal highlight, just because I loved the band and it was so packed and full of tastemakers from around the world. We didn’t have many venues back then and I knew that night that BIGSOUND could become something special.

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Leading US booking agent Marshall Betts tells Steve Bell why curating the live careers of his artists beats pulling teeth.

“F

estival season here is just starting to wind down, and I’ve spent pretty much every weekend this summer travelling somewhere to go to a festival, so it’s nice to have a couple of weekends off before I head down to Australia for BIGSOUND.” It seems like a pretty tough life for Marshall Betts of US booking agents Windish Agency, but as always there’s a lot of hard work to be done before the watching bands and partying kicks in. Betts started out in management, working with an eclectic array of artists such as Guided By Voices, Yoko Ono and Tift Merritt, before drifting into the field of booking agents. Currently he books tours and festivals for a roster including Courtney Barnett, Alvvays, White Lung and Cibo Matto, and these bands all having one foot in the indie rock realm is by design rather than accident. “I think if I worked with bands that I didn’t like then I’d rather be a dentist,” Betts chuckles. “I sign the bands that I like and I’ve always come from an indie rock background - that’s the music that I’ve gravitated towards. I work with bands that I admire and enjoy and whose music I like. There’s other stuff that I enjoy but don’t necessarily have the background in and probably wouldn’t be the best agent for, like on the electronic side of things, but I leave that for people who really love that music.”

Betts explains that with declining album sales it’s more important than ever to nail an artist’s live booking. “That’s where bands get a lot of their money today,” he offers. “A lot of the bands tour for the money because they’re not making as much on royalties or things like that anymore - they aren’t selling as many CDs or records - so they have to lean back on the live aspect of their music. Also people are spending more on live music now more than ever, so it’s definitely an important part of any new artist’s career to understand and develop their live show and to book things on a strategic level. “I’d say that it’s much more competitive than ever before, but I feel that more competition breeds better music. If there’s a million bands that sound like you then you’ve got to find a reason to stick out, and you’ve got to be damn good at it because otherwise you’ll just get passed by. A lot of good stuff gets passed by just because of sheer volume, but I also do think that the ability for artists to go and record something amazing on their home computer and go and tour the world because of it’s a pretty amazing thing. Look at Courtney [Barnett], she started everything from her bedroom including her record label, and that would not have been possible 15 years ago. Well maybe she would have pulled it off because she’s pretty incredible, but you get the gist of it - there are so many ways for people to get their music out and heard now, but I think that competition is a good thing.”

When & Where: 9 Sep, Touring Asia With Purpose (11.20am)


5 1 0 2 ND Industry

Unbeaten Path

Nettwerk Music Group’s Rachel Cragg tells Steve Bell how deviating from the norm can parlay into impressive strategic results.

S

ome things just seem meant to be. Rachel Cragg is Director of A&R for the Nettwerk Music Group, the Vancouver-based music conglomerate which is widely recognised as one of the planet’s most influential indie labels, but her career path was far from the norm. Growing up in a small Canadian town that didn’t even have a record shop, at the tender age of 18 years old Cragg fell in love with a roadie from Red Hot Chili Peppers and followed her heart to LA. She soon started touring with bands selling merch, fell into tour managing and eventually into artist management, before being handchosen to join the prestigious Nettwerk team. “I’ve been at Nettwerk probably eight or nine years - a long time - and it started out doing day-to-day management with a lot of amazing artists including Sarah McLachlan, Dido, Stereophonics and other amazing groups,” she explains. “Then I realised that I love discovering music - that’s really what I’m into - and I love nurturing artists who are just starting their career. So I started managing some smaller artists and that expanded my role, then I started doing that more full-time and then about five years ago Terry McBride - who’s our CEO of Nettwerk - asked me if I wanted to do A&R, and at first I basically said, ‘No, I’m a manager. I don’t want to do A&R.’ “Eventually we talked it out and my role progressed within Nettwerk and I started a

kind of democratic system of A&R which basically entailed me bringing a bunch of stuff to a meeting every month with everybody contributing - so everyone from the CEO to interns can contribute music - and we basically sit in a room and talk about it every month. It’s the first time that we’d done that -and the first time I’ve heard of it being done at a label - where we’d take this process which is usually left to one or two gatekeepers and instead actually ask the people working the record, ‘What do you think from a marketing perspective?’ or from a press angle, or from a radio angle, or from a digital sales angle. Checking what they think and whether they’re excited about the music, and it opened up the conversation in a really interesting way that I didn’t expect at the time. Now that’s our process internally for the label - we run each artist through the democratic process.” Cragg explains that despite occasional difficulty in reaching consensus, her system has proved beneficial for the label’s roster. “It’s definitely difficult because everyone has an opinion about music, it’s completely subjective, but the system actually realigns a lot of things,” she tells. “You can get more perspective as you get more information, which means that you’re making a more educated signing. If something does get signed with Nettwerk you know that you have the support of all the different teams and we haven’t overlooked any aspect of the artists - we’ve all conferred and decided that the artists ticks all the boxes, and the team’s behind it and really excited about it.”

FAREWELL FOLEY!CNTD.

2009 was also the first time we utilised the Artisan car park, the outdoor stage prompting another realisation of how BIGSOUND could eventually grow. Just being outside in the great weather and meeting people for drinks during the day, and watching bands like Philadelphia Grand Jury and Giants Of Science play great sets at night captured BIGSOUND’s essence.

In general I’ve been inspired by how many Queensland artists we’ve been able to showcase over the years, and really made the most of their opportunities and gone on to take the rest of the country by storm. It’s in many ways what we’re trying to achieve with the whole thing.

Standing next to (venue owner) Jamie Trevaskis at The Troubadour when the room was too full and there was a line down the mall and Michael Gudinski could not get in to see The Jezabels (who signed a publishing deal with Mushroom that night anyway).

Standing at a Valley intersection behind two high-profile American delegates who were talking about how the best thing about BIGSOUND is that nothing is more than five minutes away from each other, and having them see the value of the Valley’s infrastructure. I’m so parochial but I love what BIGSOUND does for Fortitude Valley and all the local businesses and traders.

Denise Foley

When & Where: 11 Sep, These Are A Few Of My Favourite Synchs (11.30am); 20 Questions (1.30)

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 23


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

Adam Lewis Business: Secret Garden Festival Position/Title: Festival Programmer

How did you first become involved in the music business? I was always a huge music geek and looked for ways to get involved. That’s included hosting radio shows, throwing parties, writing, DJing, and now booking festivals and venues. In a way I kind of stumbled into doing this professionally, but participation has always been important to me. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? I think it’s in finding exciting music and bringing it into a context where people can immerse themselves in it and fall in love with it. I’ve always been a really enthusiastic music listener, sharing songs and mixtapes. And I learnt how to do it with venues and stages. In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product? I think there always will be - but it’s changing. Actual physical music products are now for either enthusiasts (downloads/streaming are still the worst quality product) or superfans who want to physically “own” their passion. Others prefer convenience. The two can co-exist. Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s never a bad time to make music. From a purely financial point of view it’s complicated (it’s never been so affordable to create, and income streams

24 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

are both broadened and diminished), but who approaches it from a purely financial point of view?

an independent record label in Australia and I gained experience in this field by attending the University Of Doing It Yourself!

What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Be a part of your community and be an advocate for what you love. Listen to types of music that you don’t identify with and learn from them. Soak up everything around you and make something personal and new. Don’t be a dickhead.

Popular culture tells us that the music industry is all about hedonism, drugs and partying - how true is this in your experience? Almost as true as in sport!

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? I’m representing Secret Garden Festival, a boutique festival that I’ve programmed for two years now. I’ll be talking about our approach and what’s important to me when I’m in the process of putting together our stages and line-ups. What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I want to meet lots of great people, see lots of great bands and be exposed to different ways of thinking about programming music.

Some pundits espouse that the future of music is electronic-based - in your opinion is rock’n’roll passe? This question is kind of ridiculous.

Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s as good a time as any. Reaching an audience is always going to be a random combination of luck, talent, timing, bravado and persistence. What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Get involved in as many different parts of the music world as possible - do a radio show, write for a blog, play music, put on shows, run a label. Be generous with your time, help out people with their projects, make lots of friends and get in peoples faces! What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? The importance of independent labels in fostering a musical community. Australia’s too small for everyone to be trying to claw their way to the top.

Guy Blackman Business: Chapter Music Position/Title: Co-Manager How did you first become involved in the music business? I started presenting on 6UVS FM in Perth in 1990 (aged 16) and put out my first music fanzine in October that year. Chapter Music had its first release, a compilation cassette of Perth bands, in 1992. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? My area of expertise is running

What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? Someone else’s success doesn’t take away from your own efforts, and vice versa. It all has a beneficial impact on the world you’re a part of - look at how much the success of Total Control, Royal Headache, Courtney Barnett, Twerps etc has done for international awareness of Australian music. What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I hope to escape with my liver intact, but I’m not sure it’s going to be possible!


5 1 0 2 ND BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? I believe we’re appearing on a panel about the relevance of community radio in the independent music world and how this has affected us.

Three things you should always consider when writing a press release 1. Keep it short - Three brief paragraphs should do it. No one is giving you points for an extended word count. Media get literally hundreds of these things daily and don’t have time to read through pages of info.

Joe Alexander Business: Bedroom Suck Records Position/Title: Director How did you first become involved in the music business? I become involved in the music business first as a musician, and later as a label director. The sheer quantity of great local music was what originally inspired me to start an independent record label. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field: I guess this would have to be A&R! As an artist myself, I think a strength of the label is our interaction and close relationships with artists. It’s a family! In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product?: I think there will always be a place for physical production, as that interaction with a physical medium is something that is impossible to replace. It’s a matter of presenting your product in a way that is compatible with new media. Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s certainly an interesting time - the sheer quantity of music being made available through new media is overwhelming, and certainly amounts to a competitive and saturated environment. By the same token, access to this technology makes it a lot easier for some. What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Love what you do! And keep at it. Ultimately, a passion for what you are working on is the only thing that will keep you going.

Jo e S chiavon Business: Global Live Position/Title: Promoter How did you first become involved in the music business? My uncle was in a punk band in the ‘80s that were signed to EMI, so I kind of grew up around it, playing in bands at school and organising little gigs in the school hall. I did a music business degree and it went from there. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? I work in live music, concerts and festivals, but I certainly wouldn’t call myself an expert by any means. I’ve recently started as a national promoter, and learned more in the last couple of months than the last few years, and hopefully that will only continue!

2. Keep your main point and the most important info to the first paragraph even better - try to sum up your point in a punchy headline. Think of your press release as an article in a newspaper full of similar articles. You want to pull the reader in and give them reason to read your story above all the others.

3. Try to avoid cliches, superlatives, and sweeping generalisations. And for god’s sake spell check and use correct grammar and punctuation!

Heidi Braithwaite is a principal at Riothouse Publicity heidi@riothouse.com.au

In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product? I think ours is probably the last generation that will really use physical products, because we’re nostalgic about it. Children who grow up with iTunes and Spotify will probably just continue streaming because that’s what’s natural to them. Assuming nothing better comes along! Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? I don’t think there’s ever a good or bad time really. While THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 25


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

the internet makes it a lot easier to get your message out there, it also means you’re competing in a global marketplace, which you wouldn’t have been 20 years ago. It just forces you to work harder.

What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Start small, grow your thing gradually and learn from your mistakes. I started promoting a club night in a bar in my hometown and just expanded from there, making my own share of mistakes along the way but becoming a much better promoter as a result. What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? I’d imagine it’ll be the usual contenders - festival exclusivities, the lack of headliners, the future of ticketing etc.

What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? Hopefully they’ll learn some of the differences between how the UK/Australian markets operate (I might actually learn that myself), some of the things we work on, the challenges we face and some of the things that might or might not be happening in the coming months/years.

eventually given a job.

giving each thing a go.

What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? I’m not sure that I’m an expert in any field but I work on the label and tourpromoting sides mostly. I’ve been lucky enough to have had some fantastic mentors who have guided me through both fields and answered more than one of my many stupid questions.

Popular culture tells us that the music industry is all about hedonism, drugs and partying how true is this in your experience? I guess experiences vary from person to person, but I don’t think the music industry holds a candle to the finance or IT industries when it comes to partying.

Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s a great time, the artists have so much power these days that’s a truly fantastic thing!

What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Write good music, know who you are and find a way to stand out and connect with your audience. Work out what makes you better than every other band.

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? Which parties have the free drinks/food.

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? How Australian heavy rock bands are making waves in overseas territories.

What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? Good times, good music and a solid hangover.

What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? Hopefully they can get a snapshot of what it actually takes to make it overseas, so they can decide whether its something they’d like to pursue. What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I love meeting people and talking to them. BIGSOUND gives young people a chance to learn from the mistakes others have made. I’m glad to have a chance to share some of my knowledge.

What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I’m just excited to visit Australia for the first time, meet some of the delegates, see some bands, and hopefully have a great time in the process!

Luke Logemann Business: UNFD Position/Title: Head of Recorded Music

Jo ha nn Po nni a h Business: I OH YOU Position/Title: Founder How did you first become involved in the music business? I interned for a management company in Melbourne/slept on people’s couches for a while until I was 26 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

How did you first become involved in the music business? I started putting on my own shows and started a small label when I was about 16. It started purely as a hobby and everything just snowballed from there, really. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? I manage artists, run a record label, promote a festival and run an online merchandise store. So I have experience across a few different areas of the industry, which I have gained by just going out and

Mag gie Collins Business: Fans Creative Management Position/Title: Managing Director How did you first become involved in the music business? My first role in the music world was volunteering at 4ZZZ. I volunteered on front desk and eventually got my own show and became Music Director.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 27


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

GET EXPOSED

Manager and PR specialist, Nick Lynagh, has a few tips for bands starting out to help you tackle your own PR and get your music in front of the right editors and bloggers. Get prepared

Establish which media outlets are most likely going to be interested in your music. You want to find these people and then build a list of contacts. Have a bio, a press shot and a link to stream your music ready to go.

Keep it brief Editors and bloggers receive hundreds of emails a day so it is really important to keep things brief – literally a few sentences should do the job and if they are interested in learning more ensure you have provided relevant links.

Follow up, politely Don’t be disheartened when you have sent out 100 emails to editors and nobody has gotten back to you. Sometimes they just need to be politely reminded about you. Give it a week or two and follow up with a friendly reminder.

What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? I focus on a few different areas: radio, artist management and bookings. I can’t speak for everyone, but I’ve found I need to diversify to stay afloat. Also I like the variety.

In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product? Personally I haven’t played a CD by choice in years. As a consumer, music streaming services are the best thing that’s ever happened. The jury’s still out on how good it is for an artist though.

Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s a GREAT time!... to start. To continue on, though, and have longevity will be the question. What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Have good taste. Be a decent human. Don’t be lazy. What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? My experience as an artist manager whose acts have spent a lot of time touring the UK and Europe. What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? That nothing is impossible, but you’ve got to do a lot of work to achieve your goals. What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I love BIGSOUND. Alongside Splendour it’s my favourite event on the Australian music industry calendar. I just want to have a good time!

Own your hometown If you can’t make it work in your own city, then what makes you think it will work in others. So at the early stages of your career focus all your media efforts on your local city.

Build genuine relationships PR is 100% about building genuine and long-lasting relationships with people. When editors hear your band’s name you want them to think ‘nice people’, so be polite and friendly.

Nick Lynagh is head honcho at Habit Music 28 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Ruth Barlow Business: Beggars Group Position/Title: Director of Live

How did you first become involved in the music business? I did work experience at XFM. Within a couple of months I was assisting on various shows, and within two years was the station’s Senior Music Producer, responsible for specialist booking sessions and guests. And sitting on the station’s playlist, which opened up the world of labels to me. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? My background is radio, then radio plugging, the last decade of Live. My experience comes from many years of listening and learning in various areas of music. My current area of expertise is live licensing and the issues/concepts behind that and how they relate to the music business today.

Popular culture tells us that the music industry is all about hedonism, drugs and partying - how true is this in your experience? I’m not gonna say I haven’t had a nice time over the years, but I’m very rarely not at my desk from 10am. And I think that’s true to say of many people in the industry. Some pundits espouse that the future of music is electronic-based - in your opinion is rock’n’roll passe? This question suggests that electronic-based music can’t be rock’n’roll and that rock’n’roll is strictly linked to non-electronic music and instruments. Surely it’s a state of mind, a reaction? I’ve seen crowds kicking off to someone ‘pressing a button’ and ‘strumming a guitar’... What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? Most people who work in music didn’t set out to “work in music”, they did stuff; put on gigs, wrote fanzines, played records, bands, went to gigs, connected with people who did the same. Opportunities come about when you are enthusiastic, engaged; in the right place at the right time. What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? I’m on a couple of panels. The first will be a broad discussion about the industry; what’s happening and how it relates to the Australian industry. The other is about digital music distribution. Both will be spring boards for lots of interesting debates. What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? I hope they learn that the industry is changing quickly; we all have to be on our toes. I


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THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 29


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

5 Panels You Should Attend

hope they also realise that the people on the panels are involved in music primarily because they love music and care about its place in culture and securing its future.

Peter Garrett – Opening Keynote

What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? Looking at my meeting schedule I’m going to be walking away with lots of business cards and music! But I want to take away the feeling of being connected to a whole different scene, new music and lots of new people.

Peter Garrett is one of the most iconic figures in contemporary Australian music, having spent time as the frontman for venerated local rockers Midnight Oil for nearly three decades as well as making the leap into federal politics, serving as the Minister for Environment and the Arts, and Minister for Education, under the Rudd/Gillard governments.

Size That Matters This panel is facilitated by Triple R’s Lauren Taylor and canvasses the why, how and what-next for the next generation of niche events.

Facilitated by abc’s jacinta parsons, this panel pulls together some of the nation’s hardest-working, most vital independent record labels to discuss the integral nature of such companies in breaking bands and launching their careers.

Darr yl Bailey Business: Six Boroughs Media Position/Title:

Why We Write

Director

The Music Brisbane editor Steve Bell hosts a panel with a remarkable roster of music scribes, featuring freelancers Kate Hennessy and Laura Snapes, Pitchfork senior editor Jessica Hopper, and THUMP’s Lachlan Kanoniuk.

How did you first become involved in the music business? I always wanted to be on the radio so while doing a radio-announcing course I scored a job at a record store in suburban Brisbane in the late ‘80s. It was there that I realised it was actually selling music that I liked. I started at Warner in 1990.

Safe Spaces The issue of sexual harassment, violence and other threatening behaviour in australian venues — particularly directed towards straight and lgbtqi women — has been one gaining increased attention of late, which is both a relief, for those who have spent far too long suffering in silence, and somewhat regrettable, as it’s a damning indictment of the state of aussie nightlife culture.

30 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Some pundits espouse that the future of music is electronic-based - in your opinion is rock’n’roll passe? That’s crazy talk! Music trends are such a cycle. Each time it goes around it picks up new sounds. Rock’n’roll is no different. There’s great rock released all of the time and it’s evolving like other genres. It’s only a matter of time before the old is new again. Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? There’s never been a better time. That’s if the artist is doing it for the right reasons. If it’s about money and stardom then they’re doomed from the start. To have the ability to reach a global audience from your bedroom or garage is pretty incredible.

Festivals: It Ain’t The

Indie Labels & Community

the choices I have. I think access is one thing but curation will become one of the most important factors in the digital age. Physical for “super fans” will be around for some time yet.

Popular culture tells us that the music industry is all about hedonism, drugs and partying - how true is this in your experience? It’s not about that at all. It exists of course and probably more in certain areas of the industry but in terms of selling music to media and the music-buying public, the music comes first. Our job is to give it every chance. The public does the rest. In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product? I know as a music consumer I’m a bit “deer in the headlights” at

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? Demystifying commercial radio for young artists. A lot of artists start their career at community radio, triple j, etc so we’ll be discussing what makes commercial radio tick. What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel/interview? Commercial radio have one goal in mind, keeping their listeners so they can make money. I hope that delegates learn that it’s not personal when it comes to music choice on commercial radio. It’s powerful when you get it but when is the right time to push for it? What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? 150 bands across 15 venues over two nights. That’s not counting launch parties on Tuesday night! It’s like musical tapas. Can’t wait.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 31


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Speaker profiles

Pitchin’ Radio

any of our lifetimes.

Some pundits espouse that the future of music is electronic-based - in your opinion is rock’n’roll passe? Everything is cyclical. There is a lot of exciting exploration happening in the electronic space for sure, but I think it’s premature to put a nail in the coffin of rock’n’roll. I expect to see a lot of music that sits somewhere between those two spaces.

SGC’s head honcho Stephen Greens gives you 4 tips when pitching your track to radio. 1. Understand the station you’re contacting.

Do they play your style of music? What are the criteria they look for in new songs? Are they programmed locally? Who is the right person to chat to there? This is one of the biggest reasons to hire a plugger. They know the market and they know where your music could fit. If you’re taking the DIY approach, do it professionally and do your homework.

2. Crawl before you walk. Does the station have an Australian music show you can try to get a foot in the door? Does the station have a “nights” playlist that you could pitch for before you ask for high rotation?

3. Pitch professionally. Make sure when you pitch your music that it’s to the right person, that you don’t send large attachments, that you include links to stream the music as well as links to download the WAV or MP3 and put the key points they need to know succinctly. Platforms like Play MPE can assist delivering professionally and securely to the right people, even if you are not in a position to hire a plugger.

4. Keep your expectations in check. The number of Australian artists being added across the board to major commercial networks in any given month can usually be counted on fingers and the number of independents added to high rotation in a given year can usually be counted on one hand with a few fingers change. Make sure you go into your commercial radio campaign with that in mind-- that means if you DO get some spins, make sure you say the magic words.... THANK YOU.

32 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Robb Nansel Business: Saddle Creek Position/Title: Owner/President

How did you first become involved in the music business? I grew up with a bunch of really talented friends, which provided a natural support group. I wanted to share the music that my friends were making with other people. When other labels weren’t interested in working with us, we decided to start our own label. What do you perceive to be your area of expertise and how did you gain experience in this field? Out of necessity, I learned how to be frugal. Our approach has always been more reactive to things; as opposed to putting excessive amounts of resources into each and every project and seeing what catches on, we have tried to give projects an outlet to grow more “organically”. Popular culture tells us that the music industry is all about hedonism, drugs and partying - how true is this in your experience? It’d be foolish to say that there isn’t an element of that in the music industry, but it’s certainly exaggerated in terms of prevalence. There are plenty of people in the music business (bands and industry folks) that don’t participate in any of that. Hedonism makes for a better story. In this time of technological change how do you see the dissemination of music changing in the future? Is there still a place for physical product? Absolutely. I believe there is a portion of fans that will always want something tangible. It may become more of a collectors/niche market, but I don’t think we are going to see a 100% digital space in

Do you think it’s a good or bad time to be starting out as a musician? It’s a great time. There are so many outlets and opportunities for musicians. I think it’s easy to get caught up in the doom and gloom of the music business, but that doesn’t seem like a healthy headspace. Societally, music is more important than ever. What advice would you give young practitioners in your area starting out today? I think you have to be passionate to survive in the music industry today. It’s certainly not a get rich quick road. From that perspective, I think you need to follow your heart. If that leads you to the music industry, then you’re in the right place.

What will you be primarily discussing during your appearance at the BIGSOUND conference? I am on the “Indie Labels and Community” panel, which is about the elements of local music scenes and record labels and how those two things nurture each other and evolve; how they are synonymous and how they are different. So, I guess I’ll be primarily talking about that! What are you hoping that people will be able to learn from your panel? I hope the takeaway is that you can create your own scene/ identity anywhere in the world and on your own terms. There is no template that has to be followed. Figure out what you want, and carve your own path. What do you personally hope to take away from your time at BIGSOUND? I am simply looking for new experiences. I have never been to Australia so I am excited about that. I hope to meet some new friends. And if new business partnerships arise, that would be a bonus as well.


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“Grandmas Bags” Available Now

Go to triple j unearth to download facebook.com/Flickthebean

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 33


N U O BIGS Eat/Drink

Persian Love Cake

1 raw cup of sugar1 cup of brown sugar3 cups of almond meal1/4 pound of butter6 heaped tablespoons of natural Greek yogurt 2 eggs1 tablespoon of nutmeg Handful of pistachios Most rooms and certain venues on tour provide either a microwave or an oven of some type. For the best results, use an oven preheated at 160 degrees.

Recipe On The Road:

1. Rub butter and dry ingredients until it begins to form a crumby base.

Gang Of Youths

2. Take half the mixture and press into the bottom of a baking tin lined with butter.

3. With the other half of the mixture add the Greek yogurt, eggs and nutmeg and stir well before pouring on top of the crumby base and sprinkling some pistachios around the edges (replace butter, yogurt and eggs with flaxseed oil, coconut oil, coconut/soy yogurt if you want to be tempted into the vegan boundaries of love this cake has to offer). 4. Place in the oven for 37 minutes, not a minute more, not a minute less.

Joji Malani, guitarist of Gang Of Youths, shares a special recipe with us. On the road, you can become fairly lonely and grow to miss either your significant other or the accompaniment of friends and family. All of whom bring so much love and flavour into our lives. Fortunately enough for us, due to an unlikely encounter with a wonderful African Cafe in the regional town of Ballarat on tour, we identified a way in which we could take love with us on the road: The Persian Love Cake. The main ingredient of love in this Middle Eastern plate of decadence is natural Greek yogurt and it’s enjoyed most when this recipe is lathered in its love.

Leave to cool a little and serve with a nice big tablespoon of yogurt and enjoy. Remember, the yogurt is the ingredient of love in this recipe and, much like love, the more you put in, the the more you experience its goodness. 6 tablespoons is just a recommended amount. You can add as much or as little as you’d like based on how loving or sour you are. Best shape, Joji

The Winn stage - BIGSOUND. Opening hours during BIGSOUND: Wednesday and Thursday, midday to midnight. Style of cuisine: Healthy burgers. Take-away available? Yes. Specialty dish: Mustard And Pickle Slider.

Grilld Airstream

Serving? Lunch and dinner. What dish from your menu would you recommend to BIGSOUND-goers and why? Definitely two sliders and chips! The Airstream is specifically serving up small burgers (that are easy to eat) for those partying at The Winn (outdoor stage). There’s also chips and a veggie option! Do you have food/drink specials or BIGSOUND deals? All those with a delegate pass can grab a burger and beer from a Grill’d restaurant in Fortitude Valley and Emporium for $15 by simply flashing their pass. Licensed? Yes. Average meal price: $11-20

34 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015


5 1 0 2 ND Eat/Drink

290 Brunswick St Mall, Fortitude Valley Answered by: Rob Hueston (owner).

Opening hours during BIGSOUND: Wednesday, 10am-2am; Thursday, 10am-4am; Friday, 10am-5.30am. Style of cuisine: Hot dogs, fries, poutine, meat, vegan. Take-away available? Yes.

Specialty dish: Chili dog, poutine.

Serving: Breakfast, lunch, dinner, all-day dining, late night, bar snacks. What dish from your menu would you recommend to BIGSOUNDgoers and why? Chili dog: hand made chili bratwurst, chili con carne with cheese. Also poutine: fries, cheese, gravy, awesome.

5 Dogs

Do you have food/drink specials or BIGSOUND deals? $5 lunch, every day: hot dog or roast meat roll plus a bottle of Coke or water, 10am3pm. Wednesday: vegan dogs, $5 until 10pm. Licensed? No. Average meal price: $5-10

Bear Bones Espresso And Roastery 68 McLachlan St, Fortitude Valley; 0466 271 740 Answered by: Trent Goodwin Opening hours during BIGSOUND: Wednesday - Friday, 7am-3pm. Style of cuisine: Australia cafe. Take-away available? Yes. Specialty dish: Pulled pork. Serving: Breakfast, lunch. What dish from your menu would you recommend to BIGSOUND-goers? Pulled pork sandwich.

Do you have food/drink specials or BIGSOUND deals? Pulled pork sandwich and coffee - $13. Licensed? No. Average meal price: $11-20 THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 35


N U O BIGS Eat/Drink

Ben’s Burgers

The Boss

New York Slice Pizzeria

Picks

360 Brunswick St, Fortitude Valley; 1300 NEW YORK

Answered by: Todd McGregor (CEO)

Opening hours during BIGSOUND: Wednesday, 11am1am; Thursday, 11am-5am; Friday, 11am-6am.

QMusic Executive Officer Joel Edmondson runs his eyes over the best food The Valley has to offer. Breakfast Ben’s Burgers - 5 Winn Ln You have never had a bacon and egg burger like this. Campos Cafe - 11 Wandoo St This is where the locals go for coffee that never misses.

Style of cuisine: Awesome pizza by the slice! Take-away available? Yes.

Mighty Mighty

Lunch Fat Dumpling - 368 Brunswick St The best Asian greens in town, to say nothing of the fat dumplings. Maha Latchmi Indian Sweets and Catering McWhirters Centre, 24 Warner St An incomparable $10 meal deal straight from the buffet.

Dinner Gerard’s Bistro - 14/15 James St My favourite restaurant in Brisbane, this five-star adventure into southern Europe, the Middle East and north Africa will leave your business contacts with special memories.

Shop 6/7, 100 McLachlan St, Fortitude Valley; (07) 3666 0184 Answered by: Josh Inglis (Head Chef). Opening hours during BIGSOUND: Wednesday-Friday, 12pm ‘til late.

Take-away available? Yes.

Late Night

What dish from your menu would you recommend to BIGSOUND-goers? We would recommend our 16-Hour Beef Brisket. This melt-in-the-mouth juicy brisket is perfectly paired with a full-bodied American brew - amber, rich and golden. Think American pit-master wisdom meets city chic.

Bloodhound - 454 Brunswick St Peruvian-Chinese fusion - who would have thought IT WOULD BE SO AMAZING? 36 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Serving: Lunch, dinner, all-day dining, late night. What dish from your menu would you recommend to BIGSOUNDgoers and why? New York Slice is the home of authentic New York-style pizza by the slice. Our pizzas are massive - come and try our famous Pepperoni or our ever-popular Spinach & Ricotta. Do you have food/drink specials or BIGSOUND deals? $9.95 Meal Deal: any slice, garlic bread and drink. Licensed? No. Average meal price: $5-10

Style of cuisine: American smokehouse meets city chic.

Wagaya - Level 1, 315 Brunswick St Because I enjoy ordering amazing but cheap Japanese from a touchscreen that is slightly confusing - just like in Japan!

Kwan Bros - 43 Alfred St Street food from across Southeast Asia. Moo Shoo Cow Bao is the late-night pick for absorbing alcohol (if you are the rare sort that drinks at BIGSOUND).

Specialty dish: Pizza by the slice.

Specialty dish: 16-Hour Smoked Beef Brisket. Serving? Lunch and dinner.

Do you have food/drink specials or BIGSOUND deals? Exclusive to BIGSOUND attendees, we’ll be serving our 16-Hour Beef Brisket and a schooner of tap beer for $36! Simply show your BIGSOUND pass, get smoky and leave with a happy belly and glad heart. Licensed? Yes. Average meal price: <$30


WEDNESDAY 9 SEPTEMBER 8:50 - 9:20PM THE PRESS CLUB BRUNSWICK ST

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 37


N U O BIGS Industry

Top 15 Acts

We’ve convinced our BIGSOUND team to share their gigging schedules with us and these are the acts they are frothing most about.

World Champion

Muscles

Rainbow Chan

World Champion They just signed to Future Classic and released a groovy li’l song called Avocado Galaxy, because they appreciate breakfast foods for how beautiful they truly are.

Luke Daniel Peacock

Big White

This member of Halfway and The Painted Ladies has a voice like Jeff Tweedy and the songs to match, his new solo foray might just prove special.

The trippiest, flippiest pop going - who else is channelling Teardrop Explodes these days? Can it translate live? We are very fucking excited about finding out.

Ngaiire It’s her time to shine. If her set is only half as good as her single Once we are still in for a BIGSOUND highlight.

Immigrant Union Their most recent long-player Anyway is an absolute revelation of upbeat good vibes and it shall be fascinating to see it rolled out live.

38 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Polish Club

The Goon Sax

All of Sydney’s talking about them. A whole city can’t be wrong, can it?

How is this happening all over again? Brisbane is fast regaining its crown as the home of pure indie pop and this trio is leading the charge.


5 1 0 2 ND Industry

Rainbow Chan

Anthonie Tonnon

How Chan has not yet broken through yet is a mystery to us. Maybe, just maybe, enough industry folk will check her out this week and she can start planning for next level success.

Because his new album Successor sounds like if Darren Hanlon and Morrissey had a fist fight then made up and moved to New Zealand and made an album.

Gang Of Youths

Because have you heard David Le’aupepe’s voice? I’d like to see if it sounds even better live.

Anthonie Tonnon

High Tension

Jaala

A band to see for every hardcore-lovin’ girl who has tried to sling around her long hair to try and be as badass as Karina Utomo.

High Tension

Muscles

Gang Of Youths

Harts

It’s been a while between drinks, and the Melbourne electro-whiz has to channel all that pent-up energy from his recently nixed tour somewhere, so expect this gig to be a big’un.

Saw him at Splendour. Will watch him again at BIGSOUND. Raw charisma and refined virtuosity meet in a funky, funky explosion of rock. If you still haven’t seen him, make this a must.

K21

They describe their music as ‘shed’. Not garage. Not house. But shed. That’s enough for us.

There’s not a huge hip hop presence this year so K21 is the one to watch. He’s got the Hilltop Hoods seal of approval, ‘nuff said.

Jaala

And if we could have a bigger list we’d also namecheck: All My Exes, Gold Class, Le Pie, Shocking Pinks, Totally Mild, Tiny Little Houses, Perch Creek, friendships and Born Lion.

THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 39


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

TOP 5

Ali

Steve Bell Editor

Bar ter

Hometown: Windang

Psycho Therapy

Could the Cosmic Psychos be discovered at BIGSOUND and become the new poster boys for Aussie rock’n’roll?

Cold Cold Change So, so looking forward to see Peter Garrett’s keynote now that’s he’s unfettered by party politics and able to speak freely.

Short description of your band and your music: Angry, pretty, indie-pop songs played by randy rockers.

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Playing with The War On Drugs last year was pretty special and I recently travelled to LA to do some songwriting, which was super-inspiring.

Party Time The array of official and not-so-official parties before, during and after BIGSOUND expands each year, this year’s line-up is killer!

Southern Comfort Catching up with the massive influx of friends from down south who only stray to Brisbane once each year for BIGSOUND.

Post-Bigsound Sleep In It’s getting harder each year to party four nights straight (and work in between) but we do our best - the weekend looms like a sanctuary.

An n Vriend Hometown: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? We just got an endorsement from Yamaha so that’s cool. In Germany we played and stayed at a castle Napoleon stayed at. Recorded at the Hit Factory in NYC where some of my heroes recorded.

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? ‘Cause I have a great band of randy shredmasters and what the world needs is more shredding. I also shred, which may or may not be a good thing.

the BIGSOUND conference? How to do business in a way that works with my personality and artistic goals so that it’s fun AND actually gets me from A to B. Outside the box kinda stuff. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? We have been selling out of merch at our live shows because people love it so much. I’m super proud of my band; kinda can’t wait for Aussie crowds to hear us together.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from

Cosmic Psychos. Pic: Markus Ravik

Ben Wright Smith Hometown: Windsor Short description of your music: Australian folk-rock singer-songwriter. What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Me and the fellas got to live in Nashville last year recording, which was really where our new album came to life. 40 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I release my music independently through my own label Ronnie Records and I’d love to learn how to get better at doing this so I can put out music and still eat dinner.

Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? I think the live realm is where we really sit. The boys are real shredders and I feel like the songs really come to life in a live setting. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’d like to find out how to stay creative and on top of everything. What acts are you looking forward to checking out at the BIGSOUND showcase? The Pretty Littles, Dorsal Fins, Sex On Toast... the list goes on!


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 41


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

TOP 5

If you could have any act past or present join you on your next tour who would you tap? Hendrix, Bob Marley, Jeff Buckley.

Tiki

Andrew

Group Managing Editor The Goon Sax

Was pretty much gonna head to Brissie just to see these guys anyway. The timing is great.

Ta a n e

Papamoa Beach, NZ

Short description of your band and your music: One man band looping.

Wearing Shorts To Gigs

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Surving 24 years of playing music.

Yeah, suckers, it’s Queensland so I’m gettin’ my legs out. You’ve been warned.

Are your ambitions mainly artistic or commercial? Artistic first and foremost.

Shlix How is it that the best salad bar in Australia is in the Valley?

Garrett We either want to hear a Midnight Oil reunion confirmation or some opinions on Abbott. Promise we won’t bring up pink batts.

Witchgrinder Melbourne

Big White Member/Role: Travis Everett/Vocals, guitar CAN’T. FREAKIN. WAIT.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’m open to whatever happens. What acts are you looking forward to checking out at the BIGSOUND showcase? Everyone on Thursday.

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? There ain’t many doing it how I do.

I need to learn but mostly I would like to learn as much as I can about touring overseas where the best places and worst places for us to go. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? There is no other band like us at BIGSOUND. We have a certain style and energy that is our own. We wouldn’t waste our time if we were not here to impress you.

Short description of your band and your music: A high energy industrial thrash-metal band. Straight out of a horror movie. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? There are billions of lessons

Big White Sydney

Member/Role: Jack T Wotton/Singer, guitar Short description of your band and your music: We’re a New Wave-ish, guitar-pop five-piece from Sydney’s inner west. There’s a big white house there that we all live and play popular music in. What industry lessons would you like to take away from 42 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

the BIGSOUND conference? I guess we’re all looking forward to the great music on display and meeting like-minded people within the industry. Some of the keynotes, like the Peter Garrett one, look alright too. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? It’s no round robin but I reckon you should check us out. We’re fun and we won’t hassle you too much for drink tickets if they run out.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 43


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

Mojo

Ur tekk

Adelaide

Member/Role: Ben Smith/Drums

Short description of your band and your music: We’re an electronic band with a mainstay focus positioned at the dancefloor. Think techno played with traditional instruments not just machines. Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Live, without a doubt, we’re a party band. It’s dance music, so with a dancefloor and the crowd’s energy we can’t help but feed off it and explore other worlds.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I don’t know yet, maybe hit me back after BIGSOUND and I can tell you in retrospect. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? There’s free beer at the venue (I don’t know that for sure). We’ll give you a beer.

Juju

Melbourne

Short description of your band and your music: 5’3” of wise-cracking, sass mouthing, jump-jiving attitude wrapped up in a zoot suit and propped up on Cuban heels.

Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? For sure. I’ve had my fair share of party. But I’ve heard BIGSOUND is where it’s at right? It’s about to get real. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? My biggest interest is strengthening my overseas connections. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? I come from a family of musicians. I’ve been honing my craft all my life and perfecting it on the live circuit from a young age. I’m having fun but I’m ready and I mean business.

Le Pie Sydney

G o rd i Sydney

Short description of your band and your music: Indie-pop act from Newtown, influenced by grunge, punk and ‘60s girl groups.

Short description of your music: I play indie-folktronica music - I won’t blame you if you think I just made that up as a genre. But it’s a real thing.

Are your ambitions mainly artistic or commercial? Mainly artistic. For musicians at my level the music industry involves a lot of investment before it becomes commercially viable. You’ve got to love the art to do it.

Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Definitely the live realm. I’m particularly excited about upcoming gigs because the full band show is sounding better than ever.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’d love to get a better understanding on how to tour efficiently and economically in Australia, as well as try and make as many contacts as possible with both artists and industry.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’d like to learn when is the right time to look at really pushing your music in overseas markets.

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? We deliver sugary, ‘60s melodies with a lot of punk-rock grit. We may look pretty in pink, but be careful ‘cause we bite. Hard.

44 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Because I’ll buy you a beer. No, I’m joking, I won’t, that’s an unrealistic expectation and I don’t have a lot of money. Come because you’re bound to find something that you connect to. If you don’t, someone good will be after me.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 45


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

TOP 5

USA shows. Couldn’t ask more much more really!

H o c key

Uppy Chatterjee Editor

Point And Shoot Music

Dad

Hometown: Windang

Photography Exhibit

As a photographer myself, I’m always up to see the work of others - especially the ‘togs that shoot for us!

Free Coffee For Delegates At Foundry Records

Member/Role: Billy Fleming (drums)

Short description of your band and your music: Two best mates from a small coastal town, with salty serenades of their brand of gritty and melodic surf-pop.

much. Getting to bed early on the road for us is when you go to bed before 5am.

Catching The Delicate Tunes

Immigrant

of Timberwolf

The Official BIGSOUND After Party Sponsored By US! Party time With Rolls Bayce and Moses Gunn Collective DJs on Thursday night at the Woolly Mammoth.

Meeting So Many Powerful/

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Well Zach [Stephenson, vocals] just cut himself a mullet, and I heard there’s going to be cheap beer where we’re playing. I’m convinced.

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? We’ve recently just booked our first ever run of

They had me at “record store with a bar and a cafe and a small stage”. And I like free things.

The perfect soundtrack to my Spring days.

Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Our recordings might be more delicate in some ways, but we’ll forever be a bit howyagoin’ in our live shows.

Union Hometown: Portland, Oregon Member/Role: Brent DeBoer (guitar, vocals) Short description of your band and your music: Classic country rock. Bit of blazing wall of psych. Stoney. Lazy. Dreamy. Lyrical. Melodic. Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? It’s been just a bit

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Touring with Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Opening for Noel Gallagher. Playing on TV was a rush. CMJ in New York was the fastest week of my life. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? If people like crafty stoner hippie rock songs played by a bunch of obsessive trippers they should come see us.

Awesome People It’s my first BIGSOUND, and I’m hoping everyone gets name tags.

In Death ... Hometown: Brisbane Member/Role: Krugga (vocals) Short description of your band and your music: In Death... is a five-piece metal act from Brisbane. We play death metal that is heavily weighted towards groove. Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? Yes, to say the 46 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

least! It’s well-known that we, as a group, enjoy a beverage or two with our growing number of pals that come along to our shows. We embrace the party, haha! What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? We’ve just finished our first overseas tour - a solid month of shows all across the USA. If you could have any act past or present join you on your next tour who would you tap? Pantera!!! But for our next tour, we’d love to go round with the likes of King Parrot, Psycroptic or Thy Art Is Murder.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 47


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

Chaos

Hadal

Divine

Maw

Perth

Melbourne

Member/Role: Ryan Felton/Guitar

Member/Role: Rob Brens/Drums

Short description of your band and your music: We’re a five-piece heavy progressive-rock band drawing influences from Devin Townsend, Mastodon, Porcupine Tree and Opeth.

Short description of your band and your music: We’re a metal band that’s working to try and do something we haven’t heard yet.

Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? Sharing a tiny hotel room with four other smelly dudes on tour isn’t exactly a party ;) What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? Pay attention to, support and nurture the local music scene, because without it new bands don’t have a platform to get noticed. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Being a heavy band from Perth, we hope our sound is a little different to others on the line-up. For those that like it heavy, big and catchy.

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’m not sure and that’s what we’re hoping to find out. If we don’t learn anything then that probably means we’re on the right track. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Who doesn’t love eight-string guitars? We’re easily the heaviest Latin folk band out of the whole conference – surely that’s worth something.

Ja ck T he

Sex On

Stripper

To a s t

Melbourne Member/Role: Luke Frizon/Vocals Short description of your band and your music: Jack The Stripper are ferocious and chaotic. Live and recorded, the band’s been called a relentless, unique and extreme experience. What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Crowdsurfing our way through the punk and metal venues of Japan was a recent highlight What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? The industry is in a constant state of flux so I’d love to learn more about where the future is headed, as well as some sweet tips on putting albums in more stores worldwide. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Every time we play, we aim to deliver the most intense live show you’ve ever seen. It’s candid and visceral. 48 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? That’s a tough one – I think whenever we hear that we’ve directly influenced someone in some way, that’s pretty huge.

Melbourne Member/Role: Angus Leslie/Vocals, guitar, benevolent dictator Short description of your band and your music: Sex On Toast is a ten-piece band that specialises in synth-funk, blue-eyed soul and eccentric mischief. What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Probably supporting Angry Anderson a few weeks ago and hearing him talk on stage about being on a combination of pingers and Viagra. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? How we can get on more stages around the world and get nasty! Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Because ten-piece bands are sort of like rare animals, we’re becoming extinct! People watch David Attenborough all the time, consider us rare peacocks playing BLAZING funk.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 49


50 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 51

8:00 – 8:30

08:20

12:10

12:00

11:50

11:40

11:30

11:20

11:10

11:20 – 11:50

COSMIC PSYCHOS

10:30 – 11:00

10:50

11:00

BORN LION

9:40 – 10:10

10:40

10:30

10:20

10:10

10:00

09:50

09:40

09:30

SUPER BEST FRIENDS

8:50 – 9:20

09:10

09:20

HIGH TENSION

09:00

08:50

08:40

08:30

GRENADIERS

08:10

08:00

TIME (PM)

THE NEW GLOBE THEATRE

11:30 – 12:00

IN DEATH…

10:40 – 11:10

A BREACH OF SILENCE

9:50 – 10:20

HADAL MAW

9:00 – 9:30

WITCHGRINDER

8:10 – 8:40

JACK THE STRIPPER

CROWBAR

11:40 – 12:10

MOSES GUNN COLLECTIVE

10:50 – 11:20

BABAGANOUJ

10:00 – 10:30

METHYL ETHEL

9:10 – 9:40

PEARLS

8:20 – 8:50

WAAX

THE ELEPHANT HOTEL (OUTDOOR)

11:30 – 12:00

11:40 – 12:10

AVABERÉE

10:30 – 11:00

ELLA THOMPSON

9:40 – 10:10

RAINBOW CHAN

8:50 – 9:20

OLYMPIA

8:00 – 8:30

WOODES

THE BRIGHTSIDE (OUTDOOR)

11:20 – 11:50 KATY STEELE

10:50 – 11:20

SAHARA BECK

10:00 – 10:30

ALL OUR EXES LIVE IN TEXAS

9:10 – 9:40

ROBBIE MILLER

8:20 – 8:50

ANTHONIE TONNON

BLACK BEAR LODGE

NGAIIRE JAALA

10:40 – 11:10

GOLD CLASS

9:50 – 10:20

FOOD COURT

9:00 – 9:30

TEMPURA NIGHTS

8:10 – 8:40

SUIIX

RIC’S BAR

11:20 – 11:50

10:30 – 11:00

HARTS

9:40 – 10:10

BEN SALTER

8:50 – 9:20

BEN WRIGHT SMITH

8:00 – 8:30

HALCYON DRIVE

THE FOUNDRY

BIGSOUND LIVE 2015 TIMETABLE WED 9 SEPT

11:30 – 12:00

SHOCKING PINKS

10:40 – 11:10

CATLIPS

9:50 – 10:20

PORSCHES

9:00 – 9:30

SET MO

8:10 – 8:40

PLANÈTE

THE BRIGHTSIDE


52 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

11:20 – 11:50

CITY CALM DOWN

10:30 – 11:00

SLUM SOCIABLE

9:40 – 10:10

CHARLES MURDOCH

8:50 – 9:20

GREEN BUZZARD

8:00 – 8:30

WORLD CHAMPION

THE WINN STAGE (OUTDOOR)

11:30 – 12:00

YUKON BLONDE

10:40 – 11:10

THE LULU RAES

9:50 – 10:20

ALI BARTER

9:00 – 9:30

ALDOUS HARDING

8:10 – 8:40

BIG WHITE

THE ZOO

11:20 – 11:50

DONNY BENÉT

11:40 – 12:10

HARVEY SUTHERLAND

10:50 – 11:20

11:30 – 12:00

HOLY HOLY

10:40 – 11:10

11:20 – 11:50

LE PIE

10:30 – 11:00

9:40 – 10:10

LIFE IS BETTER BLONDE

10:30 – 11:00

POLISH CLUB

9:50 – 10:20

MATHAS

9:00 – 9:30

8:50 – 9:20

URTEKK

FAIT FRIENDSHIPS

10:00 – 10:30

HOODLEM

9:10 – 9:40

GRRL PAL

GORDI

8:10 – 8:40

SEX ON TOAST

9:40 – 10:10

MANGELWURZEL

8:50 – 9:20

NEW VENUSIANS

8:20 – 8:50

8:00 – 8:30

PRESS CLUB

LUKE HOWARD DEAFCULT

TRIPLE J UNEARTHED STAGE @ OH HELLO!

WALLACE BUOY

MANE STAGE @ WOOLLY MAMMOTH

8:00 – 8:30

THE ALEHOUSE @ WOOLLY MAMMOTH

11:30 – 12:00

WOODLOCK

10:40 – 11:10

TASH SULTANA

9:50 – 10:20

HOWQUA

9:00 – 9:30

TIMBERWOLF

8:10 – 8:40

MIKE WATERS

THE FLYING COCK

12:10

12:00

11:50

11:40

11:30

11:20

11:10

11:00

10:50

10:40

10:30

10:20

10:10

10:00

09:50

09:40

09:30

09:20

09:10

09:00

08:50

08:40

08:30

08:20

08:10

08:00

TIME (PM)

BIGSOUND LIVE 2015 TIMETABLE WED 9 SEPT


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 53

8:50 – 9:20

09:10

9:40 – 10:10

10:00

12:10

12:00

11:50

11:40

11:30

11:20

11:10

11:20 – 11:50

AWAKEN I AM

10:30 – 11:00

10:50

11:00

CHAOS DIVINE

10:40

10:30

10:20

10:10

JERICCO

09:50

09:40

09:30

09:20

DUMBSAINT

8:00 – 8:30

GUARDS OF MAY

09:00

08:50

08:40

08:30

08:20

08:10

08:00

TIME (PM)

THE NEW GLOBE THEATRE

11:30 – 12:00

CAULFIELD

10:40 – 11:10

EARTH CALLER

9:50 – 10:20

HELLIONS

9:00 – 9:30

DRAWCARD

8:10 – 8:40

WORLDLINES

CROWBAR

11:40 – 12:10

SHINING BIRD

10:50 – 11:20

SUNBEAM SOUND MACHINE

10:00 – 10:30

TIGER CHOIR

9:10 – 9:40

CAITLIN PARK

8:20 – 8:50

BANFF

THE ELEPHANT HOTEL (OUTDOOR)

11:20 – 11:50

THE RUMJACKS

10:30 – 11:00

MESA COSA

9:40 – 10:10

THE PRETTY LITTLES

8:50 – 9:20

THE OCEAN PARTY

8:00 – 8:30

MORNING HARVEY

THE FOUNDRY

BIGSOUND LIVE 2015 TIMETABLE THU 10 SEPT

11:30 – 12:00

SKEGSS

10:40 – 11:10

US THE BAND

9:50 – 10:20

JONNY TELAFONE

9:00 – 9:30

ASTRAL SKULLS

8:10 – 8:40

THE GOON SAX

RIC’S BAR

11:40 – 12:10

AVALANCHE CITY

10:50 – 11:20

IMMIGRANT UNION

10:00 – 10:30

TINY LITTLE HOUSES

9:10 – 9:40

ANN VRIEND

8:20 – 8:50

FANNY LUMSDEN

BLACK BEAR LODGE

11:20 – 11:50

TIJUANA CARTEL

10:30 – 11:00

TIKI TAANE

9:40 – 10:10

MOJO JUJU

8:50 – 9:20

DORSAL FINS

8:00 – 8:30

BEN ABRAHAM

THE BRIGHTSIDE (OUTDOOR)

11:30 – 12:00

MOONBASE COMMANDER

10:40 – 11:10

JOY.

9:50 – 10:20

R.W. GRACE

9:00 – 9:30

CLN

8:10 – 8:40

NULL

THE BRIGHTSIDE


54 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

11:20 – 11:50

WINTERBOURNE

10:30 – 11:00

THE BELLIGERENTS

9:40 – 10:10

HEY GERONIMO

8:50 – 9:20

STONEFIELD

8:00 – 8:30

THE SNOWDROPPERS

THE WINN STAGE (OUTDOOR)

11:30 – 12:00

GANG OF YOUTHS

10:40 – 11:10

THE JOHN STEEL SINGERS

9:50 – 10:20

FRASER A. GORMAN

9:00 – 9:30

JESSE DAVIDSON

8:10 – 8:40

I KNOW LEOPARD

THE ZOO

11:20 – 11:50

HOCKEY DAD

10:30 – 11:00

MAJOR LEAGUES

11:40 – 12:10

KOI CHILD

10:50 – 11:20

MUSCLES

10:00 – 10:30

11:30 – 12:00

TIRED LION

10:40 – 11:10

CREPES

9:50 – 10:20

11:20 – 11:50

PERCH CREEK

10:30 – 11:00

GABRIELLA COHEN

9:40 – 10:10

8:50 – 9:20

PADDY MCHUGH

8:00 – 8:30

LUKE DANIEL PEACOCK

PRESS CLUB

9:40 – 10:10

BARO

9:00 – 9:30

AYLA

8:10 – 8:40

GILL BATES

TRIPLE J UNEARTHED STAGE @ OH HELLO!

JILL BETH SUI ZHEN

9:10 – 9:40

MILWAUKEE BANKS

8:20 – 8:50

RARA

MANE STAGE @ WOOLLY MAMMOTH

ANGIE

8:50 – 9:20

TOTALLY MILD

8:00 – 8:30

DARTS

THE ALEHOUSE @ WOOLLY MAMMOTH

11:30 – 12:00

K21

10:40 – 11:10

HAU

9:50 – 10:20

KWEEN G

9:00 – 9:30

PHILLY

8:10 – 8:40

MARKSMAN LLOYD

THE FLYING COCK

12:10

12:00

11:50

11:40

11:30

11:20

11:10

11:00

10:50

10:40

10:30

10:20

10:10

10:00

09:50

09:40

09:30

09:20

09:10

09:00

08:50

08:40

08:30

08:20

08:10

08:00

TIME (PM)

BIGSOUND LIVE 2015 TIMETABLE THU 10 SEPT


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 55


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

TOP 5

our concerts and they knew our music over there.

Skegss

Mitch Knox Editor

Muscles

It’s been a while between drinks, and the Melbourne electro-whiz has to channel all that pent-up energy from his recently nixed tour somewhere, so expect this gig to be a big’un.

The ‘Clickbait, Listicles & Features’ Panel

Byron Bay

Member/Role: Ben Ben Bograil/Lead singer

Short description of your band and your music: Three best mates playing comical punk rock’n’roll.

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? Free beer and meal vouchers, plus we went and toured America and Canada and people bought tickets to

Mostly so I can sit in the audience looking sad that I wasn’t invited to speak.

Harts Saw him at Splendour. Will watch him again at BIGSOUND. Raw charisma and refined virtuosity meet in a funky, funky explosion of rock. If you still haven’t seen him, make this a must.

Tijuana Car tel Byron Bay

Jessica Hopper (Pitchfork) Keynote Speech I just expect it to be fascinating. I really don’t have a more exciting reason than that.

Official BIGSOUND Party

Member/Role: Paul George/Singer, guitarist Short description of your band and your music: Indie, psychedelic, electronic with epic bits of bass and Moroccan space tunes.

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? ‘Cause we make it look like anyone can do it.

Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Our new album is a sort of concept album, so I’d recommend listening to it on a good set of headphones. If you want to feel the adrenaline then come and see us live. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I’d like to see where everyone’s heads are at. I’d like to see what other people in this very weird industry are thinking and see where we sit.

We spend more time chasing beats and tunes than chasing down dealers and after-parties.

With free-flowing alcohol and a captive room of increasingly drunk industry folk, this thing is a journalist’s best friend.

but the others party like there is no tomorrow.

To t a l l y Mild

Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Our music is best rendered in the Blank Realm.

Melbourne

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? What is life?

Member/Role: Elizabeth Mitchell/Lead vocal, guitar

Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Whoa.

Short description of your band and your music: Dreamy friendship pop. Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? Tinnies, waves, ciggies and babes. LOL, yes? I’m pretty tame these days, 56 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? I guess after playing CMW you need to make industry connections before you play at music conferences, otherwise you’re just playing to the bar staff and security at the front door.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 57


N U O BIGS BIGSOUND 2015 Band Profiles

Ji l l

Beth

M ath as

Brisbane

Perth

Short description of your band and your music: My songs and sound fall somewhere between Americana, country, folk and pop.

Short description of your band and your music: I make begrudgingly optimistic, over-analytical hip hop music. Usually the songs highlight some of the silliness in human self-importance.

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? After a year of promoting my first release, Don’t Let Go, getting to perform at Canadian Music Week 2015 in Toronto and share my music abroad was a huge thrill.

Are your ambitions mainly artistic or commercial? My ambitions are artistic but I feel compelled to introduce my music to as wide a fanbase as possible and a certain amount of commercial success is inherently linked to that principal. Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? Live at this stage though I base that partly on how much I like to connect with my audience. Being in the studio also feels like home though, so I’m hoping people love both experiences.

Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? I’m at that point in my life where I’ve been partying for so many years that I either have to sober up and start eating chia seeds or pick a Class-A shovel and start digging.

What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? I received a letter from a prison inmate telling me that on her worst day my song had stopped her crying and “changed her mind”. Is your music best rendered in the studio or the live realm? The stage is where I do my best work. I try to have everyone in the room leave as my buddy. My studio is myself in my underpants, so the records reflect that.

The

The

S no wdro ppers

Ru mj ac ks

Sydney Member/Role: Pauly (guitar) Short description of your band and your music: Blues punk soul rock’n’roll. Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? It’s been a wild ride of tax-deductible cheese platters, occasional cab charges, music streaming trial accounts, awkward listening parties - and a surprising lack of complimentary Class 1 drugs. Born too late, I guess. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? How to make money. How to do less things that cost us money. Where the best free food and beverages are. Why should people come and see you from amongst the many cool bands at BIGSOUND? Well, we’ve been called one of the country’s best live acts, so you can try and figure out why. 58 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

Sydney Short description of your band and your music: Punk rock with some Celtic flavours thrown in and even a dash of reggae. Has the party side of the music industry been all you were hoping for so far in your career? Any party that any industry puts on, we will be there. Forever on the search to further educate ourselves on the ‘party’ side of the industry. What is the best thing that’s happened to you/your band so far? This year’s European tour had been a huge standout. Especially playing at Montelago Celtic Festival to over 15,000 people. What industry lessons would you like to take away from the BIGSOUND conference? The best thing we could take away from BIGSOUND is an even greater network of friends, both professional and personal.


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 59


N U O BIGS Industry

Labour Of Love

Their boutique label’s newly signed talent is showcasing at BIGSOUND and OneLove’s Antonio Celestino and Matt Nugent tell Bryget Chrisfield they intend to groom Australian acts of all genres for worldwide success.

O

neLove HQ is bustling with activity when we call in for a chat following the announcement of the brand’s expansion to include the OneLove Talent Agency and growing artist roster, which includes Perth duo Slumberjack, Brisbane’s own Flex Cop plus popular Melbourne acts Torren Foot and Dance Cult. Antonio Celestino, OneLove’s A&R Manager, is visibly excited about the brand’s future. “We work for Frank Cotela who’s, like, the craziest guy in dance music in the best possible way, you know? Because his model is just passion, excitement and ‘back it ‘til it works’,” he laughs. “When he set out with the clubs, he was like, ‘I’m

We keep our ears to the ground for everything. You’ve gotta like everything; people don’t just exclusively listen to one thing. g

gonna build the biggest club brand in Australia,’ when he set out with festivals, ‘I’m gonna make the biggest festival brand in Australia,’ and with the label - I don’t know if he wants to build the biggest, but he definitely wants to build the most exciting; you know: ‘Fuck you, we do what we wanna do and have fun doing it,’ ‘cause that’s a big part of what we do. You’ve gotta have fun to work here.” Both Celestino and OneLove’s General Manager Matt Nugent work on the music group’s International Licensing, which Celestino says was their “predominant business” for a long time. Nugent worked as dance consultant at Sony, taking over the responsibility of compiling and licensing the OneLove compilation series. “Basically, we discovered that to do that you had to do such an extent of licensing that you might as well pick up records for the territory,” Celestino 60 • THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015

explains. “So we started to dabble in that and found, straight off the bat I think it was Rozalla - Everybody’s Free (To Feel Good).” Correct, that was a monster hit in the early ‘90s. From licensing deals, Celestino observes, “We’ve had some great artists that we’ve fed into festivals and to clubs, so it’s been a good way to network the different arms of the business and the relationships.” When asked to supply a couple of examples, Nugent suggests, “We worked on Australian single releases for Bingo Players early on, including the double platinum Get Up (Rattle), and were the Australian home for the Bingo Players label Hysteria for some time, which led to forming a solid partnership with Bingo Players and Bingo Players playing at onelove and Totem OneLove events including Stereosonic.” “The licensing side of the business was pretty good and it’s still a big part of what we do,” Celestino stresses, “and it still means that us working those artists here, as an independent, and having them as priority; that’s why we’ve been able to be successful with artists like Tiga and Bingo Players, and Crookers recently. And we can take a record which would never have a shot otherwise and actually make something happen with it - or give the artist that in - in our territory. But moving more into the A&R side and developing artists, and doing records and putting artists out - it’s good. It’s ultimately where we are comfortable.” Both gents have examples of deals that have been inked, as Celestino puts it, “in the shadows, between the strobe lights backstage or something”. “Like, Skrillex’s label manager at OWSLA came up to me at Stereosonic last year, and we’d been talking about an act, and basically said we have to do something together with this act. And then I saw Skrillex and he was like, literally, ‘We’ve gotta talk about this,’ and it was, ‘Ok, let’s step into my office, backstage,’ you know what I mean? ‘Let’s talk about this, right now, while I’ve got you’.” Nugent provides another example: “A couple of years back in Miami, at Ultra Music Festival, we saw the impact of Cedric Gervais’s single Molly when played on the main stage; we realised it was turning into an organic viral club hit. We had been with his manager a few days earlier so we tracked him down before we left to come back to Australia and made a verbal agreement on the spot, which led to a contract and us licensing the track for Australia and New Zealand.” “We keep our ears to the ground for everything,” Celestino reveals. “You’ve gotta like everything; people don’t just exclusively listen to one thing... Matt comes from deep in a hip hop background, I came from a graffiti and hip hop background a long time ago, and it’s sort of like we’re excited about R&B and rap again... We’re definitely excited about working with different genres; we’re excited about working in different models, working with writers - adding writers to our roster. Getting back into live more and more is exciting for us and for the brand and, yeah! Let’s just see where it takes us.” “Moving forward, we’re focused on developing Australian acts for the world,” Nugent concludes. “We feel we have some world-class artists on the roster with artists like Slumberjack, Nicky Night Time, Generik, Kaz James, JDG and Samual James kicking goals all around the world right now.”

When & Where: BIGSOUND OneLove showcase, 9 Sep, The TBC Club


THE MUSIC • 9TH SEPTEMBER 2015 • 61

The music (Brisbane) issue #101  
The music (Brisbane) issue #101  

The Music is a free, weekly magazine of newsstand quality. It features a diverse range of content including arts, culture, fashion, lifestyl...