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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

CONTENTS RETURNING ARTISTS A selection of last year’s participants tell us why they’re coming back

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BIG IN JAPAN Rewards are there for the reaping in the world’s second-largest music market

9-12

PAUL KELLY Polly Coufos takes an in-depth look at the career of this country’s finest songwriter

15-18

OUT IN PERTH A guide to the beautiful city of Perth

20-23

THE GLOBAL SCENE A whirlwind tour of the weirder side of the global music scene

25-27

MUSIC BUSINESS The industry’s sharpest minds make their predictions for the future of the business

30-31

TODD RUNDGREN A conversation with one of the industry’s true mavericks

32-33

CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

34-36

FRINGE INDUSTRY SHOWCASE

37 38-39

THE MAP

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FESTIVAL OVERVIEW

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A WORD WITH CHUGGI A sneak peek at the year’s hottest book

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SPEAKER/ARTIST FOCUS Brush up on those doing the talking (and playing)

46-49

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

50-51

APRA/AIMS Two pioneering programs supporting artist development

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ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

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PUBLISHED BY: One Movement Pty Ltd PRODUCED BY: Street Press Australia Pty Ltd PRINTED BY: Daniels Printing ADVICE: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this publication may contain images of people who have died. EDITORIAL POLICY: The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. No part may be reproduced without the consent of the copyright holder. No responsibility will be taken by the Publisher, its servant or agents.

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DIRECTOR’S WELCOME On behalf of the One Movement team it is my pleasure to present the second annual One Movement For Music event in beautiful Perth. The feedback from artists, fans and industry during and following last year’s event inspired us to take another ‘step up’ in what we very proudly delivered in our inaugural year. We were truly overwhelmed with the number of tangible outcomes that transpired between the artists and music industry delegates. As a result, we have had significantly more interest from bands and industry wishing to be a part of One Movement 2010. This has culminated in several new additions to the program. Firstly, we have added a very special twilight night onto the two-day festival on the beautiful Esplanade Park which joins the Swan River to the heart of the city. We are delighted to present multi-million CD and Grammy Award-winning artists such as Sarah McLachlan at One Movement By Twilight in only its first year, and the event’s second. To have an Australian icon like Paul Kelly and the legendary Todd Rundgren join this special evening humbles us immensely. Many people have spoken to us about how much they enjoyed the Industry Showcases last year. These unique urban spaces came to life with some of the best emerging and breaking sounds in the business from the world over - so much so that several new venues have been added to the showcase program. Perth’s renowned touring band venues, Amplifier and Capitol are a welcome

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addition to the program alongside the wonderful warehouse/carpark of Dilettante, and a new laneway venue in Amplifier laneway. In another first for the showcases, music fans will join us and the artists to discover the vast array of talent on offer post festival this year. Our third new content addition to OMFM 2010, is the Creative Industries Dialogue. Technology has brought the creative industries so much closer together so quickly. It has created opportunities and challenges for all artists, whatever their chosen field of expression. This convergence of creative talent provides an excellent platform to discuss

these opportunities and to debate the issues it has created. The CID will no doubt touch on so many topics that we will need to further explore this new component of the conference program at OMFM for many years to come. Sat Bisla and his A&R Worldwide team have once again delivered an amazing amount of music, media and technology industry talent for the second instalment of MUSEXPO Asia Pacific. To have this calibre of global industry talent sharing their knowledge and views of our constantly evolving music landscape under the one roof truly is a standout opportunity for members of the Asia Pacific music fraternity to be a part of. Judging by the significantly increased delegate attendance this year I’m sure you’ll agree. Thanks again Sat and his team! So we hope you enjoy the new additions to the OMFM program. I would like to take this opportunity to personally thank Colleen Zulian from Asia Sounds for programming with us the amazing Asian talent performing throughout the event. Also a big shout-out to tastemaker extraordinaire Dan Zilber, of Sydney’s FBi Radio – whose musical knowledge and advice provided an excellent sounding board for us, so thanks Dan! My business partner Andrew Chernov needs a special mention for stepping up to the incredibly challenging Event Director role this year, and of course Mr Michael Chugg for believing in, and sharing, the vision (if your lucky, you might even get a copy of Chuggi’s new book while you’re here!) We look forward to hosting and sharing the next five days of musical bliss with you in Perth. On behalf of Sunset Events, Chugg Entertainment, A&R Worldwide, Eventscorp, City Of Perth, all our sponsors, suppliers, volunteers and our incredible tireless staff and core team (you know who you are) we thank you for making the journey to experience One Movement For Music Perth, 2010. Enjoy! David Chitty MANAGING DIRECTOR, ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

ONE MOVEMENT FOREWORD FROM LORD MAYOR LISA SCAFFIDI MESSAGE FROM THE HON DR ELIZABETH CONSTABLE MLA WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MINISTER FOR TOURISM Welcome to beautiful Perth, Western Australia, for the One Movement For Music Perth 2010. The Western Australian Government is a proud partner of this extraordinary music event, which is developing into one of the most important in the Asia Pacific region. The One Movement For Music Perth Festival is set to unveil many new artists and expose them to the international stage, while reinforcing Perth’s reputation as a major music hub and breeding ground for upcoming bands. The artists will also have access to some of the world’s most influential music leaders and musicians as they gather for a three-day industry conference. Along with our local acts, Karnivool, Xavier Rudd, Paul Kelly, Grinspoon, Children Collide and British India, I extend a warm welcome to some of the world’s most influential and innovative musicians, such as Ben Kweller (USA), Shapeshifter (New Zealand), Dengue Fever (USA), ZE! (Malaysia), Delta Spirit (USA), Via Tania (USA), Raghu Dixit (India) Jonneine Zapata (USA), Bedouin Soundclash (Canada),

KORA (New Zealand), Melodramas (UK), Liz Green (UK), and The Great Spy Experiment (Singapore). The festival is unlike any other held in Perth with 80 artists playing unique 30-minute showcase sets, premiering their latest material. It will complement and enrich our vibrant arts and cultural scene, and add to the atmosphere of inner-city entertainment hubs. If time permits, I encourage our visitors to see more of the extraordinary attractions in Perth, such as Kings Park and our stunning metropolitan beaches, as well as regional Western Australia. I look forward to seeing some of the world’s most talented up-and-coming artists during the festival and I wish everyone involved a successful event. MINISTER FOR TOURISM Dr Elizabeth Constable MLA

Welcome to – or in some cases welcome back to – our city of Perth for the One Movement For Music Festival. Like the Pied Piper, One Movement 2010 will spread a trail of music throughout the city, encouraging us all to experience the best new music Australia and the world has on offer. Perth is the ideal destination to host One Movement. Not only is our West Coast location accessible for our South East Asian neighbours, our many public spaces also allow us to move effortlessly between the high energy environment of a festival to the more intimate surrounds of the industry showcases. The City of Perth has chosen to invest significantly in One Movement as we truly believe that aside from the economic benefit the festival delivers, it is our responsibility to foster our creative communities so that they can achieve great success and international recognition right here in Perth. I would like to congratulate the One Movement organisers for their vision, and indeed their resolve, in staging this event.

For those who have travelled from afar to be here, I encourage you to explore our city, from the laneway bars hidden behind our busy streets to the vast open spaces of Kings Park and our magnificent Swan River. I really wish you all the best for your time here in Perth. May your experiences of our city and our music resonate with you and linger in your memories. THE RIGHT HONOURABLE, THE LORD MAYOR Lisa M Scaffidi

Now in its second year, this event is rapidly growing and we are confident that One Movement will become one of the most important weekends on our Perth event calendar.

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RETURNING ARTISTS Kate Miller-Heidke

Dan Medland, Manager for Passenger “One Movement in 2009 was a major part of our activity with Passenger last year. It opened up a huge amount of opportunities for the act and put the name in many people’s minds. After the conference I have had contact with publishers, agents and other artists that we are now working heavily with in the back end of this year on a new album campaign in this territory. It was a very viable launching pad for the artist, and really gave the project a level of credibility in our first steps into the market. Outside of Australia and NZ, One Movement also provides a rare opportunity to meet with key contacts in Asian markets, which will be a key focus for me this year having spent a fartoo-short week in Tokyo recently. So it will be a case of cementing relationships with existing contacts and again learning a lot about a very different market.”

Colleen Zulian, Manager for Biuret Bill Cullen, Manager for Kate Miller-Heidke “One Movement 2009 was an amazing experience for both myself and Kate Miller-Heidke. We essentially used it as the start of Kate’s overseas campaign, which has seen her go on to support Ben Folds on two tours in the US, play Coachella and do five Lilith Fair shows in Canada. Her album Curiouser has also been released in both Canada and the US by Sony labels. We look forward to Kate’s performance at One Movement 2010.”

Jim McKinnon, Manager for Dead Letter Circus “Dead Letter Circus ushered in the inaugural One Movement festival with a massive set in the Big Top as sunset fell over the Esplanade parklands. In addition to a rowdy and sizeable crowd, a collection of industry moguls from around the globe stood side of stage and took in the show. The impact that show has had on the band is still being felt many months on – from giving Triple J’s Richard Kingsmill, a long-time supporter of DLC, the opportunity to catch them live for the first time, through to excited emails that have popped into our management company inbox from industry types the world over. One Movement was another key peg in helping take Dead Letter Circus to the world. There’s nothing like playing a festival show for the international industry in front of real fans – where there are thousands of people screaming the words right back at the stage. It has a different impact from a simple showcase to a few suits in an empty club, and is part of what makes One Movement a unique experience. It’s also why Dead Letter Circus are pumped to be back at One Movement in 2010 to deliver spine-chilling tracks from their debut album, This Is The Warning, which debuted at number two on the ARIA Charts.”

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“We were extremely excited and at the same time quite nervous and apprehensive about being invited to perform at the festival, as this was the first time we were going to perform to an Australian audience. After long connecting flights across Asia from South Korea we arrived on the Saturday morning exhausted and needing sleep. So we had no time to go out and about to get any sort of vibe about the audiences or the industry present before our first show that night, at Asia Sounds Industry Showcase at Miami Horror

The Belgian Beer Garden. To our wonderful surprise the venue was packed, the audience was very warm and welcoming and we had a great response to our performance. We were high on adrenalin that we had been so embraced. The next day we played our spot at the festival on the main stage, again the response was overwhelming and everyone seemed to enjoy our music and performance. After the show we hung backstage and met some really great people from other bands; bands that we are still in contact with today. The very next day we were so amazed that young people were coming up to us for an autograph; this was quite amazing to us as this was our first ever time in Australia. Since One Movement the band has performed shows in London and Vietnam as a result of connections made through performing at the festival. We also feel that there is a larger international awareness of Biuret and our music since playing in Perth. We are very excited to be coming this year and playing to the wonderful audience at One Movement and we hope that they enjoy our performance as much if not better than last year.”

Jerry Soer, Manager for Miami Horror “The goal of all conferences is to get deals, be they publishing, licensing or something else altogether, and usually the best way to get this done is by impressing people with the live show. (From One Movement, Miami Horror) scored a booking agent in the US and interest from a few overseas record labels. They’re touring the US in September 2010, playing across the country.”


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

Utada-Hikaru

Tokyo

BIG

IN

JAPAN

The Japanese music market has entranced and bewildered many for decades. Tokyo-based journalist Daniel Robson explores the world’s second-largest music market. MUSEXPO Asia Pacific hosts Music Market Focus Japan: Land Of The Rising Sun on Friday, October 8.

T

he Japanese music market is a mysterious beast for the firsttime foreigner. Bearing as many differences as similarities to Western territories, it’s a tough nut to crack. But as the world’s second-largest music market and with an incredibly sophisticated and passionate audience – not to mention a population of 127 million – Japan offers rewards for the reaping.

Music here is quite rigidly divided between domestic and international repertoire, and consumers tend to listen to one or the other: Japanese music (hõgaku) accounts for roughly 82 per cent of sales, according to figures released in April 2010 by The Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ); Western music (yõgaku) takes the remaining 18 per cent, which is on a downward trend. But although sales are falling just like everywhere else

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SMAP

(wholesale revenue is down 16 per cent year on year for Q1 2010 to 54.3 billion yen, or US$589.4 million), Japan is the only major music market in the world to still be in the black, and there are plenty of opportunities to be had here. But first, a little background. Japan’s love for pop music stretches back to the 1920s and a genre known as ryukõka, a sort of hybrid of Western jazz and Japanese folk melody that in the ’30s began to evolve into kayõkyoku, whose vocalists took on a more Western style of enunciation, changing the sounds of words to fit the melody. Later, American soldiers stationed in Japan during and after World War II Distant Mount Fuji

brought with them blues, country and boogiewoogie, and Japanese musicians began to absorb these styles too. Indeed, Western genres would continue to influence Japanese music over the decades, though always with a distinct local twist. The late 1950s brought rockabilly, thanks in part to Elvis but also local artists such as Kyu Sakamoto, whose 1961 song Ue wo Muite Aruk would later hit the US Billboard number one

spot as Sukiyaki. But just as in the West, it was the music of the ’60s whose influence is most keenly felt today. The Beatles were one obvious sensation, becoming the first rock band ever to play at the iconic Nippon Budokan martial arts arena in 1966. But before the Fab Four came The Ventures, the surf-rock band who kick-started Japan’s ‘eleki boom’ (electric guitar boom) when they brought their reverb-laden hooks on a 1962 tour. Since then they have outsold The Beatles, played over 2,400 Japanese shows, won Imperial honours and indirectly given birth to the Group Sounds genre. Things started to splinter in the ’70s. Folk music began

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to take root, as did manufactured pop groups. 1978 saw the breakthrough of now-legendary rock icon Eikichi Yazawa, as well as the debut of Yellow Magic Orchestra, Japan’s first electropop band (featuring Haruomi Hosono of pivotal folk-rock group Happy End alongside Ryuichi Sakamoto, now one of Japan’s most famous exports). Through the ’80s, Japan experienced a period of intense financial growth known as the ‘bubble’, and the resulting prosperity led to a boom in glossy pop production just as it did in the US and UK during the same period. And although the bubble burst at the turn of the ’90s, music sales continued to


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

rise, culminating in teenage singer Utada Hikaru shifting two million copies of her debut album First Love in its week of release in 1999 and a further six million since – the best-selling record in Japanese history. Local media coined the term ‘J-pop’ in the early ’90s, marking the domestic genre as distinct from Western pop. And it continues to be: modern J-pop places far greater emphasis on lyrics and melody than on rhythm; it’s produced with an incredible amount of sheen, and is generally less sexually charged and more emotionally explicit than its Western counterpart. Mainstream J-pop is dominated by a handful of management companies and labels, including the Big Four global majors and some huge domestic indies, as well as production companies that had been applying a 360-degree contract system long before the term was even conceived. Most notable among the latter are Johnny & Associates, which pretty much owns the assembly line boy band market, and Avex, which has a large roster of manufactured female acts. These powerful agencies are able to exert great pressure on the Kyu Sakamoto

media, using their million-selling artists as leverage to influence what is written or broadcast about them and to hog the best exposure. Top J-pop stars such as boy band SMAP not only sing and dance but also host their own regular TV or radio shows and appear in films and commercials, all of which is dictated by their management. Also, there is very little in the way of genuine music programming on terrestrial TV, and no national radio station, which means that independent

artists have very little opportunity to break organically into the media. Throw in a liberal sprinkling of collusion, and it all adds up to a top-down approach whereby consumers buy what the industry tells them to. Thanks to the rise of the internet, however, things are beginning to change. Massmarket TV is losing its appeal as viewers flock to YouTube and domestic video site Nico Nico Douga. Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, along with Japanese SNS mixi, are making it easier for fans to find new music by word of mouth, and a generation of grass-roots artists such as leftfield pop unit Soutaiseiriron and deranged punk band Shinsei Kamattechan are currently enjoying a level of buzz that was previously unthinkable without major-label support. Similarly, Japanese music is finding fans abroad now more than ever, thanks in part to the popularity of anime. Dozens of bands playing visual-kei, a sprawling rock genre with its roots in ’80s metal and goth, have been invited to play several-thousand-capacity shows in the US and Europe over the past few years, often flown in by anime festival organisers, who also book saccharine J-pop groups such as 48-girl group AKB48. The annual Japan Nite strand at South By Southwest pulls regular full houses for a variety of rock and pop bands, some of whom end up with Stateside record deals. And smaller independent acts are undertaking nobudget tours all over the world; among these, Pixies-esque alternative band Molice and female dark-pop artist Natccu were highlighted in an article for Time Out by Keith Cahoon, president of music publisher Hotwire and onetime CEO of Tower Records Japan, as acts to watch in 2010. Sure enough, Molice have just inked a US deal, while Natccu’s forthcoming album features a cameo from Minutemen/Stooges bassist Mike Watt. So where does international music come in to all this? Before embarking on any business endeavours in Japan, there are a few essential points to consider. For one thing, certain genres work better than others. With the exception of the major-league global artists such as Lady Gaga or Beyoncé, and a smattering of manufactured Korean groups, pure pop is less likely to fly than rock or dance music, thanks to a dependence on album sales rather than singles in the international space. Image is hugely important, and fashion and a sense of cool or cute can help a foreign band massively. The average consumer of non-Japanese music is aged 18 to 25.

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acts, expensive bar – so it’s easy to win them over by offering a little extra.

Eikichi Yazawa

There are several music channels on satellite/ cable TV, the largest of which are Space Shower TV and MTV Japan. Foreign music accounts for a respectable 30-40 per cent of the musical output on most of these stations; MTV reportedly draws over six million viewers, and Space Shower even more. Another welcome revenue stream is karaoke, a national sport enjoyed by some 50 million people. Karaoke is usually sung at complexes with dozens of private booths, each with a machine stocked with tens of thousands of songs – a good chunk of which are by overseas artists. These tend to be the major hits, though some surprisingly left-of-centre tracks do sneak through. Each play carries a royalty payment, and of course bolsters a fan’s connection with the artist. But if there’s one thing you should take away with you, it’s this: be prepared to do it their way. Japanese companies might seem rigid and slow sometimes, but you know what? They’re not the ones haemorrhaging money, mate. Be prepared to work in a way that makes Kamatte

Package albums by foreign artists are usually released as an import edition and also a more expensive Japanese release, with bonus tracks and translated tracklist or lyrics. Usually the same Japanese label will license the rights to both versions. Major chains include Tsutaya, Tower Records and HMV, while smaller stores such as Disk Union and RecoFan sell new and used music. Japan’s online sector is totally unique. Despite benefiting from high broadband penetration, Japanese consumers prefer downloading music via cell phones as Chaku-uta Full (fulllength realtones), which account for over 90 per cent of the download market. Despite the majors’ distrust and slow adoption of digital distribution, the market is now seen as a growth sector, both as a means of boosting revenue and also a promotion tool. The iPod and iPhone have become ubiquitous, and Sony does a brisk trade in digital Walkmans. Publishing also works differently in Japan, especially when it comes to sync. Since terrestrial TV is such an overwhelmingly powerful platform for promotion, labels and managements see ad placement or theme

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song tie-ups as an opportunity worth paying for, and often effectively sign away their sync fees (or part of them) to the TV or ad company. So if sync deals are a major part of your strategy for doing business in Japan, you might want to think again – it’s more about exposure than hard cash. The good news is that credibility is less of an issue in unassuming Japan than in the cynical West. There’s no such thing as selling out, so it’s perfectly acceptable to embrace any advertising or marketing

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opportunities that do come your way. Japan has a fairly healthy live music industry, with hundreds of very well equipped venues (from small pay-to-play ‘live houses’ to halls, arenas and stadiums) and several major music festivals. The two main agencies for foreign artists in Japan are Creativeman and Smash, each of which operates nationwide tours for artists of all genres and levels of fame. Fans get exceptionally low value from live shows – high ticket prices, no opening

them comfortable, to engage in the proper etiquette, and to offer fans content tweaked to suit their culture, and you’ll have rewarding relationships for years to come. After all, who’d pass up the chance to be big in Japan? Daniel Robson is a British music journalist and events organiser based in Tokyo, where he writes freelance for The Japan Times, Spin, NME and many other publications. For info about Japanese bands playing abroad and a free podcast, go to itcamefromjapan. co.uk


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WANTED MAN

There is no greater Australian songwriter than Paul Kelly. Here Polly Coufos takes us deep behind the myth of the man and his music. Paul Kelly launches his memoirs, How To Make Gravy, at One Movement on Wednesday, October 6, from 5-6pm on the second floor foyer at the Parmelia Hilton. How To Make Gravy is out now through Penguin.

P

aul Kelly launches his memoir, How To Make Gravy, at One Movement on Wednesday, 6 October, from 5-6pm on the second floor foyer at the Parmelia Hilton. How To Make Gravy is out now through Penguin.

The wiry troubadour with a steely gaze was never a pin up and consequently, unlike many of his one-time contemporaries, he’s never been trapped by that one galvanising image, that single moment frozen in time against which he’ll forever be measured.

There’s a lot to be said for having something less than matinee idol looks.

Somewhere in this world of fleeting fame and diminishing fortune, Kelly has found a way to please his large fan base while losing nothing of himself. To the general public in 2010, Paul Kelly lives in the shadow of his songs the same way he always did. What we know about his private life is about to be expanded with

For more than two decades Paul Kelly has been considered Australia’s most important songwriter. He regularly fills venues of all sizes across the country and has sold millions of albums, but he’s rarely spoken of as a rock star.

the publication of his memoir, How To Make Gravy, but chances are he will only be giving away what he wants. Most likely after ploughing through the 576 pages the fan will continue to decide which parts of his songs are fact and which are fiction. Ultimately

it doesn’t matter for it is the songs that will last, long after his instruments are on display in a museum and all our bones are dust. If he were to never write another song he would already leave us with the single most important Australian song folio. Paul Kelly is a storyteller who also has a way with a heart-melting melody and an easy-onthe-ear voice, but as he enters into the 26th year of musical history that he’ll own up to, above all else it’s the absolute timelessness, and pure Australianness, of his tales that linger. It’s not just the unforgettable line, “Shove it Jack I’m walking out your fucking door” of To Her Door that is glued in your memory but even stronger is the knowledge that you caught yourself wondering what happened to the couple and their kids, and where they are now. Even when you aren’t listening to the song. In three minutes he created people so real it seemed you knew them. With a master’s touch Kelly’s details were sketchy but there was and is always enough for the listener to make such clear mental composite pictures you’d swear you could instantly pick ’em out in a police station line-up.

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that wasn’t even one song too long. (And indeed when it was trimmed to fit on a single CD a few years later it became much less than the whole).

Weddings, Parties, Anything

In the captivating sprawl of rock, pop, blues, country soul, reggae and more, rabid fans looked for pieces of Kelly’s life to see from where this blinding inspiration had sprung. There were whispers of a drug habit and so the squalid misery of White Train and Darling It Hurts were presumed to be true. Likewise it was known he’d grown up in Adelaide and so his kiss off to the city of churches seemed to have a ring of authenticity. If that were so, then it didn’t take much to believe that the scenarios played out in Before The Old Man Died and Going About My Father’s Business must have been somewhat autobiographical. On the other hand every straight man alive understood the hormone-loaded message in I’ve Come For Your Daughter.

WITH A MASTER’S TOUCH KELLY’S DETAILS WERE SKETCHY BUT THERE WAS AND IS ALWAYS ENOUGH FOR THE LISTENER TO MAKE SUCH CLEAR MENTAL COMPOSITE PICTURES YOU’D SWEAR YOU COULD INSTANTLY PICK ’EM OUT IN A POLICE LINE-UP.”

Maralinga (Rainy Land) was his first song dealing with indigenous Australian issues and there were to be many to follow including Treaty, From Little Things Big Things Grow, Bicentennial and Rally Round The Drum. Gossip was the sort of album that made you a fan for life and gave him both the blueprint for his sound and the courage to make music as far reaching as his imagination would allow.

That song was adjudged among the top 30 Australian songs of all time in an APRA (Australasian Performing Right Association) poll in 2001. It may be his most famous song but that notion holds up for dozens more of his hits that were and those that should have been. He’s told songs about characters, either famous, infamous or figments of a furtive imagination, offering clear insights into people we know and we care about. He’s had that rare ability to show Australians, as we are in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, all gangly and unsure as we’ve grown from our various origins around the world to create new lives in this ancient land. He’s grappled with our uptight, puritanical origins and the raw sexuality that oozes out of his work can still catch you by surprise and seem particularly apt.

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Like most artists Kelly had a false start to his career. Both High Rise Bombers and Paul Kelly & The Dots are part of his history he came to dismiss with a single line “I never did one damn good thing ’til I was over 30”, and when he bought the rights to his back catalogue in 2008, he presumably ensured his first two albums will never see re-release. Listening

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again recently they aren’t missed when compared to all that has followed. Paul Kelly as we have come to know him first appeared in 1985 with the stark Post. The album stripped his songs back to basics. It appeared dreams of rock stardom were on hold as he told tales of desperate lives grappling with little decisions. Despite great reviews – something he would get used to very soon – Post failed to find a substantial audience. That changed with his next album Gossip. The story goes that he was locked in a hotel room until he agreed to sign with his record label. The first time you heard the album you could understand why. Gossip was that rare beast, a double album

When it came to the live arena Kelly and his new band The Coloured Girls delivered night after night. They were stalwarts of the famous, act-hardening Aussie beer barns. Kelly barely spoke a word, his air of mystery and danger balanced by the good time rock of his comrades. It was always great but not always the same. It seemed scarcely believable that the same band who had everyone jumping around on a Friday night – even the most charitable observers would be hard pressed to say he got crowds dancing – could wind the weekend down at a Sunday session that would be set off by his more mellow works and some well chosen folk and country favourites. What hasn’t changed since that time is that Kelly, whether solo or with any of the many line-ups he’s fronted since, has remained as close to a guaranteed great night live attraction as this country has produced.


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Gossip made the charts, but like much of his recorded output didn’t do quite as well as might be expected. In total, Kelly has released more than 30 albums with 11 of them reaching the top 20 and only three of them cracking the top 10. Kelly’s best selling album, the four-times platinum Songs From The South made it as far as number two on the ARIA charts. More than anything, Gossip seemed to pull the cork on an endless reservoir of songs. He’s on record as saying songwriting is not something that he finds easy, but he keeps adding to his bulging catalogue. In the course of his career Kelly has co-written with many people including Nick Cave, Kev Carmody, Mick Thomas and Troy Cassar-Daley. He may not advertise the fact now but Kelly even found time to co-write some country songs with TV star Cameron Daddo.

a tour where he played his Stolen Apples album in its entirety. Sure many artists have done something similar, but in every other case they’ve chosen an album that is already considered something of a classic. How much more daring to do it with a brand new release?

Since breaking up The Coloured Girls/Messengers and that name change that spoke of an undeniable ambition to achieve as large an audience as possible without alienating anyone, there’s been fearlessness to the way Kelly has controlled his career. He’s played in practically every venue in each of the capital cities, but also put his hand up to be the support act for musical heroes Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen when they’ve toured Australia. He’s occasionally played his A-Z concerts where he goes through his songbook alphabetically spread over four nights. In 2008 he undertook

There have been occasional missteps along the way, most notably Kelly’s one effort on the silver screen (2001’s One Night The Moon) which ensured there’s

unlikely to be a second. At 55 he’s become a rare thing indeed, a musical elder statesman who doesn’t have to trade on past glories. Even now he rarely looks as happy as when standing on a drum riser playing rhythm guitar while his band of the moment takes one of his songs and makes it brand new once again. And he seems to be getting better looking as he gets older too. Maybe it’s not too late for that iconic image.

Polly Coufos is a Perth-based journalist and regular commentator for The Australian and The Weekend Australian newpapers, as well as The Sunday Times.

Paul with Kev Carmody. Pic by Kane Hibberd

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The following is an extract from How To Make Gravy; a chapter entitled Big Blue Frog. The first song I ever learnt on guitar was ‘I’m In Love With A Big Blue Frog’, recorded by Peter, Paul and Mary. My second-eldest sister Sheila taught it to me when I was thirteen. The chords are G, C, D and A, and they’ve come in handy since. Around ninety percent of my songs contain one or more of them. I liked the words to ‘Big Blue Frog’ too. I’m in love with a big, blue frog A big blue frog loves me It’s not as bad as it appears He’s got rhythm and a PhD On the cover of Sheila’s record there was a name in brackets, (Braunstein), next to the title of the song. Braunstein, the songwriter. I wonder now who he or she was. A sit-down-every-dayat-the-piano type? A writer of children’s songs only? And that question again – I’d love a dollar for each time I’ve been asked it – What came first, the words or the music? I could spiral down the Google whirlpool, disappear for days and come up with a net full of wondrous knowledge and falsehoods, but part of me prefers to leave (Braunstein) in his or her mysterious brackets. I’d rather meditate on the titles of other songs sung by Peter, Paul and Mary – ‘Lemon Tree’, ‘500 Miles’, ‘Go Tell It On The Mountain’, ‘Blowin’ In The Wind’ – as they bring, swimming up to me from the depths, the image of Sheila strumming and singing and forever trying to straighten her curly hair to look like Mary Travers. At home there were long-playing albums belonging to our parents – comedy records by Barry Humphries and Victor Borge, classical, opera, and Harry Belafonte’s Greatest Hits – but Sheila and the eldest of the family, Anne, were the first to buy singles – ‘The Battle Of New Orleans’ by Johnny Horton, ‘Sheila’ (of course) by Tommy Roe, Chubby Checker’s ‘Let’s Twist Again’ and ‘Limbo Rock’; ‘Love Me Do’ and ‘All My Loving’ by The Beatles. Later on came the albums of our generation – High Tide and Green Grass, Highway 61 Revisited, The Best of Françoise Hardy, Sweet Soul Music . . . Anne was a year and a day older than Sheila and they both had December birthdays. There were big, teenage boy-girl parties coinciding with the end of the school year, the start of the long hot summer vacation and the delicious, stretched-out feeling of no-school-for-twomonths. ‘Limbo Rock’ was played on high rotation and we wide-eyed younger ones, staying up late in our shortie pyjamas, were allowed to take our turn under the limbo stick before being bundled off to bed. Lying in our bunks in the dark, we heard songs from another planet drifting through the chat and laughter down the hall – Wilson Pickett’s ‘Land Of A Thousand Dances’, ‘Sweet Soul Music’ by Arthur Conley, ‘What’d I Say’ (a song that sounded like it was recorded at a party to be played at a party), ‘Spanish Harlem’ and ‘Stand By Me’ – as the dancers in my mind’s eye moved closer to each other. Many years on, in the late seventies, wearing long pants and living in Melbourne, I would go and see Jo Jo Zep and The Falcons playing in crowded pubs – the Kingston, Martinis, Bananas and other places. Joe Camilleri, their lead singer, had a Wilson Pickett thing going on. The Falcons were sharp dressers – waistcoats, natty shirts, shiny shoes – but Joe dressed the sharpest of them all. Most other bands of the time were wearing black jeans and ripped T-shirts and snarling at the audience. But The Falcons wore suits of arresting colours and believed it was their duty to entertain. They did house-rocking, roofraising versions of classic and obscure soul, R’n’B and reggae songs: ‘Security’, ‘The Honeydripper’, ‘Dancing Mood’. A lot of their songs were about dancing. The band had horns and strut, stage moves and smiles on their faces. They waved their guitars and saxophones in the air, did everything they could to get over to a crowd. And get over they did. The sweat poured off them and their audience in heaving rooms.

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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

The Falcons were yet to develop their full-blown style. The great nutty soulfulness of ‘Hit And Run’, ‘Sweet’ and ‘Taxi Mary’ was still to come. Joe was just starting to write his own songs. And so was I. Meanwhile he was looking for people to collaborate with. He took a song of mine called ‘Only The Lonely Heart’, containing the chords G, C and D, into the studio and recorded it. For some reason it was released as ‘Only The Lonely Hearted’ – maybe it was a typo, maybe he just liked the sound of that title better – and the words weren’t exactly the same as I remembered giving him, but I wasn’t complaining. It was my first cover. My name was in brackets on someone else’s record. Now I was a real songwriter. Joe was like a big brother to me and helped me get up and running. He recorded another song of mine, ‘Hand Me Down’, mysteriously adapting the words again, and invited me to write with him for The Falcons. Through his influence Mushroom Records offered me a recording deal, putting up the money for my first album, which he produced. Sadly, I don’t have great memories of our time in the studio. I’d done my back badly and couldn’t stand or sit for any length of time, so I had to do most of my vocals lying on the floor. I hated listening back to my singing. It worried me that the studio cost a thousand dollars a day and everything seemed to take so long. I had no idea what I was doing and felt like a fake. If I could gather up every copy of that first record and bury them all in a big hole, I would. But that’s no fault of Joe’s. He put his heart and soul into it. The songs were the problem. And the flailing singer. In 1986 the New Zealand singer Jenny Morris asked me for a soul-pop song. I’d written and made three records by then and was beginning to get the hang of it; had a few songs that were starting to stick, that I didn’t feel like tossing out after a year. Listening to The Temptations and thinking about Ben E. King, I wrote ‘Beggar On The Street Of Love’ pretty quickly for her. She called it ‘Street Of Love’, changed the first three notes so the rip from ‘Stand By Me’ wasn’t so obvious, and did quite well with it. Not long after that, Melbourne folk-rock band Weddings, Parties, Anything recorded a song of mine called ‘Laughing Boy’, based on the life of Irish playwright and poet Brendan Behan. They added a sweet tin-whistle intro and instrumental break to it, but otherwise stuck with the template I’d given them. Same chords – G, D, A and Bm – same melody, same words, same title. We did a lot of shows with The Weddos in the late eighties and early nineties and had all-night singalongs with them after gigs in hotel rooms – sorry, longago neighbours – and at afternoon barbecues in lead singer Mick’s big backyard down by the river. Onions, sausages and chops frying under the gum trees, guitars strewn in the long grass. They were influenced by bands like The Pogues and Fairport Convention, and by early Australian bush-ballad poets Henry Lawson and Banjo Paterson. Between us all we knew a lot of songs. Steve Connolly, who had the great party ability to remember whole songs, not just bits, with the right chords, could pull out ‘Video Killed The Radio Star’ or ‘Money, Money, Money’ right alongside Mick singing ‘Moreton Bay’ or our bass player Jon Schofield tearing into ‘Hawaii’. We liked a drink and weren’t shy about it, but The Weddos made us look like ladies at a vicar’s tea party. Both bands performed together on a radio show one time, squeezed into a little studio. We sang raggedy versions of ‘Beggar On The Street Of Love’ and Woody Guthrie’s ‘Deportees’, the former turning up as a B-side (nowadays known as a bonus track) and the latter floating around out there somewhere in bootleg land. One of these days I may record ‘Beggar’ in a more considered fashion, with a tight soul combo approach – bass, drums, spooky Hammond organ, dry guitar, and add strings, perhaps. I might play around with the melody some. The chords – my sturdy friends G, C, D, plus a couple of extras – I’ll stick with. Thanks, Sheila, and thank you, (Braunstein), for all that lovely frog spawn.


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Northbridge

OUT IN PERTH PERTH CBD

FASHION

Perth’s CBD may be the machine that keeps this city ticking, but it’s also a mighty fine place to wander between shops, galleries, bars and restaurants to experience the best this city can offer. The west end of the central city area – along Hay, Murray and King Streets – offers the biggest range of options. There are several pubs offering casual dining, as well as theatres and bars. Just a few minutes drive from the city, Burswood Entertainment Complex boasts a choice of restaurants, bars, nightclubs and a casino. Here’s a selection of what to do in Perth’s CBD!

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If you want to dive head first into the best in Perth art, fashion and street smarts then look no further than Dilettante, Wasteland, Wheels & Dollbaby, Billie & Rose and Varga Girl for a taste of the best.

DILETTANTE 575 Wellington St and 1/90 King St, (08) 9322 2717 and (08) 9322 9678 dilettante.net

WASTELAND 44 King St, (08) 9481 8487 wastelandone.com.au

MUSIC

THINGS TO SEE

Want to pick up that impossibly rare Victims vinyl? 78s and Dada Records are the places for you:

Want to get high – legally? Head up to beautiful Kings Park & Botanic Gardens for a spectacular view over the Swan River and city.

BILLIE & ROSE

78 RECORDS

KINGS PARK & BOTANIC GARDENS

WHEELS & DOLLBABY

914 Hay St, (08) 9322 6384 78records.com.au

bgpa.wa.gov.au

26 King Street, (08) 9481 8488 wheelsanddollbaby.com

68 King St, (08) 9371 7776 billieandrose.com.au

DADA RECORDS

VARGA GIRL

36 Pier St, (08) 9325 2666 dadarecords.com.au

349 Murray St, (08) 9321 7838

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

COFFEE

FOOD AND WINE

With a strong Italian heritage, coffee is a true obsession in Perth. Flat whites, long macs, skinny lattes or a good ol’ espresso – you’ll find your poison at one of the city’s best coffee haunts.

Perth is never short of a good place to eat and drink. From quick and easy pub grub with a beer through to the finest of dining with great Margaret River wines, the local selection of bars and restaurants cater to all tastes.

TIGER TIGER

44 KING STREET

Murray Mews, 329 Murray Street, (08) 9322 8055 tigertigercoffeebar.com

Fine Bar & Dining, 44 King Street, (08) 9321 4476 44kingstreet.com.au

VELVET ESPRESSO

GREENHOUSE

5/172 St Georges Terrace, (08) 9322 5209

Fine Bar & Dining, 100 St Georges Terrace, (08) 9481 8333 greenhouseperth.com

ZEKKA 74 King St, (08) 9481 1772 zekka.com

HELVETICA

RISTRETTO 160 Central Arcade, 160 St Georges Terrace, 0415 954 814 ristretto.com.au

THE SECRET GARDEN 7/329 Murray St, (08) 9322 5885

COUNTRY ROAD CAFÉ 307-313 Murray St, (08) 9321 3982

ETRO CAFE BISTRO 49 King Street, (08) 9481 1148

Mount Lawley

Whiskey Bar, Rear 101 St Georges Terrace, (08) 9321 4422 helveticabar.com

ANDULAZ Bar & Tapas, 21 Howard Street, (08) 9481 0092 andaluzbar.com.au

TIGER TIGER Informal Dining, Bar & Coffee, Murray Mews 329 Murray Street, (08) 9322 8055, tigertigercoffeebar.com

1907 Bar & Modern Fine Dining, Alleyway, 26 Queen Street, (08) 9436 0233 1907.com.au

WOLFE LANE Rear 321 Murray Street, (08) 9322 4671 wolfelane.com.au

HALO RESTAURANT French-Inspired Fine Dining, Pier 1 Barrack St Jetty, (08) 9325 4575 halorestaurant.com.au

BALTHAZAR Light Tapas & Full Brasserie , 6 The Esplanade, (08) 9421 1206

C RESTAURANT Modern Australian, Level 33, 44 St Georges Terrace Perth, (08) 9220 8333 crestaurant.com.au

BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ Informal Belgian Food & Beer, 347 Murray St, (08) 9321 4094 belgianbeer.com.au

ANNALAKSHMI PERTH Indian & Vegetarian, Jetty No 4 Barrack Street, (08) 9221 3003 annalakshmi.com.au

AMUSE Fine Dining, 64 Bronte St, East Perth, (08) 9325 4900 restaurantamuse.com.au

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Cottesloe Beach

NORTHBRIDGE

COTTESLOE

Northbridge is Perth’s main entertainment district, packed with bars, clubs, restaurants and cafes. The area bordered by William, James, Aberdeen and Parker Streets is where you’ll find restaurants offering every cuisine imaginable, as well as pubs, bars and clubs. Northbridge is 5 minutes from the CBD.

If it’s idyllic Perth you’re after then Cottesloe is your place. To watch the sun set in the Indian Ocean is a popular local pastime. Or even take a dip in the pristine water, before grabbing some fish ’n’ chips and watching the sun take its final bow. Cottesloe is 20 minutes from the CBD.

DRINKS

DRINKS

There’s little better than watching the sun dive into the sea over a jug of draft at the iconic Ocean Beach Hotel. The view over Perth’s most popular beach is postcard perfect.

Perth’s laneway bar culture is on the rise, and Ezra Pound and The Bird are the best of the bunch. Enjoy a tipple, Perth style. Also check out Williams Lane at 189 William St.

OCEAN BEACH HOTEL

FOOD & WINE

FOOD & WINE

Northbridge is the home of Asian food in Perth. From Vietnamese through to Indonesian, Malaysian and Chinese, the food is always good, quick and cheap. For a good ol’ Chinese feast check out Billy Lee’s.

Built in a British Raj style, Indiana (formerly The Indiana Tea House) is one of Perth’s most iconic eateries. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, the restaurant sits directly over the beach in one of the city’s most beautiful locations.

BILLY LEE’S

INDIANA

Unit 6, 66 Roe Street, (08) 9228 9388

91 Marine Parade, (08) 9385 5005

THINGS TO SEE

THINGS TO SEE

William St is exploding with tiny art galleries, street level fashion stores and vibrant creative spaces. Take a stroll to its eastern end to discover some of Perth’s more hidden talent.

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Cnr Marine Parade & Eric St, (08) 9384 2555

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

Cottesloe Beach is one of Perth’s most popular spots. The white sands and blue waters are legendary and make this Perth’s most photographed beach. While Perth’s entire coastline is one of the most beautiful in the world, none are more stunning than Cottesloe Beach.


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

LEEDERVILLE

MOUNT LAWLEY

Oxford Street is always busy in the evenings. Full of after-work professionals, families and students, the crowd is diverse. Many outlets are café style with Mediterranean food, but you can also find Asian and seafood restaurants, pizza parlours and kebab take-aways. Leederville is five minutes from the CBD.

Beaufort Street is one of the most popular and diverse places to head for a day or a night out. Luke Steele (Empire Of The Sun) and The Panics wandered these streets and shared notes at The Flying Scotsman, and so many of Perth’s key bands call Mt Lawley home. With lively pubs, a boom in small bars, and some of Perth’s best restaurants, you can’t go wrong. Mount Lawley is 10 minutes from the CBD.

DRINKS

DRINKS

The Leederville Hotel is a Perth institution – a mixture of midweek student nights and weekend revellers. Enjoy a pint in one of Perth’s icons, complete with its new outdoor bar The Garden.

The Queens is well recognised as one of Perth’s greatest pubs. One of the finest examples of federation architecture, The Queens also boasts the perfect beer garden from which to enjoy the spring rays.

LEEDERVILLE HOTEL

THE QUEENS

742 Newcastle Street, (08) 9286 0150

520 Beaufort St, (08) 9328 7267

FOOD & WINE

FOOD & WINE

Tapas can mean many things, but there’s at least one place in Perth doing it well – and that’d be

Mount Lawley has perhaps Perth’s best range of dining. But if you’re after some of the city’s finest cuisine mixed with its best wine then Must Winebar is the place.

DUENDE

MUST WINEBAR

662 Newcastle St, (08) 9228 0123

519 Beaufort St, (08) 9328 8255

SEE

THINGS TO SEE

Luna Cinema is Perth’s premier indie cinema. Housed in a beautiful art deco building, get versed in the world of experimental cinema at

For the culture junkies among you, you simply can’t go past Planet Video and Planet Books. From arthouse DVDs to obscure CDs and hard-to-find paperbacks, Planet will eternally satisfy.

LUNA

PLANET VIDEO & BOOKS

155 Oxford Street, (08) 9444 4056

634 – 646 Beaufort Street, (08) 93287464

FREMANTLE

Fremantle

John Butler? The Waifs? Eskimo Joe? Tame Impala? Fremantle’s status as WA’s hub of artistic talent and ‘hippie’ culture is unparalleled. A standalone city only 25 minutes from the Perth CBD, Freo has a flavour all of it own with outstanding colonial architecture and some of the best eateries and bars in the state. The city is well known for its big variety of Italian and seafood restaurants, thanks mostly to its cultural heritage as a fishing port. Pasta, pizza and fish ’n’ chips are the local fare, but you can also find quality seafood outlets at Fishing Boat Harbour and along South Terrace. Cafés and pubs are everywhere, all boasting the casual alfresco experience Freo is known for.

DRINKS If you haven’t had a Little Creatures then it’s about time you did. Nestled down in Fremantle Harbour, Little Creatures Brewery is a true icon of Fremantle, and Australia. While the Pale Ale is king, the brewery also boasts many other beers, including a Pilsner, Bright Ale and Cider. The food is also outstanding – try the kangaroo!

LITTLE CREATURES BREWERY 40-42 Mews Rd, (08) 9430 5155

FOOD & WINE For the perfect blend of fine dining in a casual environment, Harvest Restaurant in North Fremantle is the best of a new breed. Experience European-inspired meals accompanied by one of the finest wine lists around in a rustic old cottage. This is fine dining Freo style!

HARVEST RESTAURANT 1 Harvest Road, (08) 9336 1831

THINGS TO SEE There is plenty to see in Fremantle – an entire day can be spent wandering the ancient streets searching art galleries, the harbour, the ocean or the historic buildings. But a must is the Fremantle Markets – grab yourself a massage, some organic brekky and a boomerang all in the same day!

FREMANTLE MARKETS South Terrace, (08) 9335 2515

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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

SALEM

oOoOO

Anita Tijoux

IT’S ALL WORLD MUSIC by Adam Curley

With new genre tags being coined almost daily and ‘music scenes’ being, for the best part, extremely decentralised thanks to worldwide music communities, trying to pin down the origins of new sounds can be like throwing darts at a map. And yet here we are, attempting a rundown of the latest sounds and scenes from around the globe – because we’re obsessed and deranged, yes, but also because there is some fascinating new music cropping up out there and it’s impossible not to be intrigued by where it’s coming from, from Russian Zombie Wave to Finnish Dino Metal. Let the name-calling begin…

Scary Russian Zombie

Moscow, Russia – Zombie Rave We couldn’t have a global zombie obsession without a group of weirdos taking it too far and creating a music genre dedicated to the undead. Well, we could have, but that would have been boring. Zombie Rave mixtapes have started appearing all over the internet, facilitated by a community of producers who love to slow down old Scandinavian (and primarily Russian) pop songs to the point of warped madness, add cheesy industrial rave beats, perhaps a zombie sound effect or two, and then throw the whole lot over a clip of half-eaten faces and bloody brides. Perhaps the best known proponent of this work is (because zombie’s can’t type, stupid), whose rendition of Abba’s Gimme Gimme Gimme is the definitive accompaniment to dancing like you have half a brain.

Texas, US – Witch House The talk of indie blogs over the past six months, the origins of Witch House are often traced to small Texan label Disaro, who’ve released dark, haunted electronica by acts like Passions, oOoOO and the best known, Michigan outfit SALEM. The latter have since gone on to release their debut album through LA’s I Am Sound Records, also home to Telepathe and Simian side project The Black Ghosts, and have been touring their crunchy beats and heavily-echoed vocals around the States since. There’s probably a joke to be made about the witch hunt happening in the White House soundtracked by a band from a swing state who were discovered in Texas, but hey, let’s not go there.

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Melbourne, Australia – Pagan Wave

Washed Out

The US has Witch House and Russia has Zombie Rave, but Australia isn’t missing its own scene of groups messing about with brooding beats and otherworldly keyboard sounds with some connection to the folk religions (okay, so zombies don’t really have a religion, though flesheating is sort of like a ritualistic feast – you should see Christmas lunch with my family). In Melbourne – as well as in Sydney, thanks to a healthy exchange of ideas and gig invites between the ‘underground’ and DIY communities in each city – the use of pagan imagery and ritualistic song forms has infiltrated the art-space crowd. As saturated and dark as Witch House, acts like Angel Eyes and Super Star rely more heavily on rhythmic repetition in their tracks, using primitive beat sequences to underpin eerie synths. El Guincho

Brooklyn, US – PostChillwave Has it happened already? Really? Well, it probably depends on how strong your desire is to coin a new genre term and how much you’re willing to connect sounds and ‘scenes’ to each other. Certainly, the Chillwave phenomenon that has swept the US over the past couple of years – turning everything this last American summer into a lo-fi ‘60s West Coast pop pastiche with the Super 8 video clips to back it – has had a massive effect on new acts appearing on both sides of the great diner-filled continent. Acts receiving both the label and a bunch of kudos of late are Brooklyn’s How To Dress Well, who makes condensed dance-scapes topped by his falsetto, and Georgia’s Washed Out, a one-man coastal beat machine.

Washington, DC, US – Go-go The funk and driving beats of Go-go music will forever be connected to their birthplace of Washington, DC, but recent times have seen a resurgence of the genre many thank for keeping the city on its feet when it hit economic turmoil in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. The same scenario could be cited as the instigator of this latest comeback, particularly as the music and its most well-known names have been brought out at election time. In September, Mayor Adrian Fenty, trailing in the polls, ended his campaign with a concert featuring ‘80s acts Bo & The Junk Yard Band in order to appeal to younger voters, the first time that’s been seen in some decades. Elsewhere, a 2,000-strong crowd welcomed ‘80s and ‘90s group Rare Essence at their reunion gig in September; the group spurred on by being sampled by Jay-Z and backing Ludacris in recent years.

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Dunedin, New Zealand – The Dunedin Sound There’s been a blast of action from the old guard of the iconic New Zealand label Flying Nun Records on Australian shores and in the recording studio, including tours and/ or releases from The Clean, The Chills and The Bats, sparking renewed interest in that “Dunedin Sound” the world over and leaving many pining for the innovative Flying Nun days of the ‘80s. Last year original founder Roger Shepherd bought the label back from the Warner Music Group, which had acquired it in 2006, and has just released its first album since his return, the third album from the Dunedin-formed noise punk trio Die! Die! Die!. There’s no doubt the new era of Flying Nun will have an impact on the world – even if it’s only young, wide-eyed bands tripping over themselves to be on the roster. Die! Die! Die!

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

Barcelona, Spain – Tropicalia Perhaps not with the original form of Tropicalia, but Barcelona has been making a name for itself as the place to look for summer dance anthems that update good ol’ hands-in-the-air Ibiza sounds, complete with steel drums, deep rhythms and soulful vocal leads. Two breakout acts of the past year have been El Guincho, whose Pop Negro record has been released on the ultra hip London label Young Turks (The xx, Holy Fuck), and Delorean, whose sparkly, chopped-up tracks found a release on the Matador-owned True Panther Sounds, also home to The Morning Benders, Magic Kids and Girls. Keep an ear out for Delorean’s producer pal K**O (aka Kigo), whose Mixcloud R&B mixes have been causing a stir.

Nuevo Leon, Mexico – Mexican Wave The inner-city venues of musical hotspots have been inundated with Native American patterns and jewellery the past couple of years, but Aztec prints are fast taking over as the fashion du jour. It might be the next indigenous culture to be appropriated by Western hipsters, but Mexican acts are having their part in the groundswell, too, with a mix of traditional Mexican percussion and rhythms and French new wave electronica, making for a combo far too groove-inducing to deny – Mexican Wave. At the forefront is the La CasaBuenaventura label, which houses the likes of 60 Tigres, who were nominated for Best New Artist at Mexico’s 2010 Indie-O Music Awards, as well as skewed popster Mr Racoon.


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

London, UK – Nu-Merseybeat

Hevisaurus

Chillwave might have come out of the West Coast of America, but when the same penchant for lo-fi recording processes, sunny amp tones and ‘60s pop melodies gets applied to the UK, the result sounds a little different. To be specific, it sounds more like the band from That Thing You Do! rung through a shoegaze filter. A London band called The Vaccines have found themselves at the centre of a blog storm after sending out a clip for a demo track titled If You Wanna, clocking up thousands of hits and downloads in less time than it probably took to upload the thing and truly heralding the Nu-Merseybeat genre. Sound like a load of hot hype? Well, time will tell. In the meantime, dancing to clipped-out, shadowy Merseybeat ain’t so bad. The Vaccines

Santiago, Chile – Chilean Hip Hop Finland – Dino Metal Not so much a genre as a concept band who’ve taken metal to new places, Hevisaurus are a group whose line-up includes former members of Dio and Sonata Arctica who dress and play in green dinosaur outfits in order to take Finnish-language metal to the kids. Formed in 2009, they’ve released a debut album, Jurahevin Kuninkaat, through Sony Music and possibly made more fans out of adult metal geeks than children with their wailing anthems in the process. That their outfits look more like deformed Ninja Turtle heads on top of maggot bodies is neither here nor there. Either way, it’s pretty metal.

Manchester, UK – Nu-Beat Okay, the above genre name is made up (and not even very imaginative), but it makes perfect sense, right? The recent revival of all things Beat, from the literature of Ginsberg and Burroughs to the European beachside-getaway fashion of the ‘60s (the open shirts, the Ray-Bans, the straw trilby, the obligatory paperback in back pocket regardless of whether it’s being read or not) was eventually going to throw up some sounds to go along with it. Welcome, then, Beats & Pieces Big Band, a Manchester outfit spouting the kind of free jazz the Beats got ‘loose’ to but with a palatable big-band sensibility. This is just the tip of this iceberg, no doubt – predictions for a full-blown Beat revival, perhaps incorporated into dance beats and tied into no-wave, are high. Start thinking of genre titles now.

Bandung, Indonesia – Slacker Hair Metal

With their track Pasukan Perang Dari Rawa (meaning “combat troops from the swamp”) popping up on blogs the world over, including Indonesia’s own excellent Deathrockstar, fourpiece Komunal have brought attention to their brand of brutal, growling, dirgey, riff-heavy metal. Even the name of the label they’re released on, Progresiv Barbar Musik, speaks volumes. Metal might be the rock language of Asia, but these guys are speaking new tongues.

This year’s Latin Alternative Music Conference threw the spotlight on Anita Tijoux, a Frenchborn Chilean bringing old school hip hop back in vogue with the nonchalant speed of her Spanish-language raps and old school beats laced with traditional melodies. Recently featured in The LA Times, citing praise from none other than Thom Yorke for her track 1977, Tijoux’s politic-heavy raps bear the trademarks of hip hop greats of old – lyrics based on struggle and conflict, a vocal style all of her own (much of her rapping centres on syllabic rhythm rather than rhyme) and a fine appreciation of the Wu-Tang Clan. What? Every great musician likes the Clan, right?

Komunal

Traditional-dialect Rap – China At a time when ancient Chinese dialects are being picked up by kids who’ve discovered their short alphabets are perfect for text messaging, making them a new form of slang not understood by many in older generations (as their characters and phrases haven’t been in popular use in decades or even centuries), China’s own rappers are getting protective of their language amid the Western hip hop barrage. Jin, one of China’s up-and-coming rap stars (but based in Hong Kong), uses a mixture of Mandarin, English and ancient dialects – including in his hit track Learn Chinese. Ancient slang can also be found in the music of China’s biggest pop acts, a good representation of which are, interestingly, Taiwanese artists who have almost zero recognition outside China, such as the girl group S.H.E. and singer Jay Chou.

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THE FUTURE OF THE FUTURE One Movement For Music partner The Music Network collects some of the industry’s greatest minds to look at the year that was and the year that will be in the music business. Last month The Music Network reached an 800th issue milestone; for a music industry magazine this is no mean feat. While the very nature of the topic forces us to consider all that has been and how much has changed over the past 15 years, of greater interest and certainly where we find more robust speculation is when we grapple with the future of the music industry. Predictions are never an exact science but it is an interesting exercise in educated guess work. No one ever mentioned social networking, Google metrics, aggregated media or the cloud in their forecasts ten years ago. However, there are certain unassailable realities with which the music and media industries are confronted, and in a world of over-abundant ideas and crowd-sourced solutions, the channels through which the music industry must proceed do hold certain predictabilities. TMN spoke to a few of the best forecasters in the industry to glean some insight on what our relationship with music will look like in the not-too-distant future. NOTED FUTUROLOGIST GERD LEONHARD LOOKS AHEAD The main shift is going to be away from the downloading of content and owning of CDs and more towards music in the cloud. That is going to happen with most media, starting first with music and then going into films and books. This is not just a music business issue. We are moving away from the copy to access. This is a very good model for the artist. In the past, most of the money was spent on the physical product – the reproduction, packaging, shipping and retail store. The artist basically got nothing in most cases. Skipping that whole process now means that the brand of the musician becomes the most important thing. This is very good news for the artist,

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the producer and the creator but less so for the industry as it’s much easier to sell a copy than it is to sell access. The idea that the artist just gets, say, ten per cent of the sold product is now out the window. Now the artist will give his agent or service agency some kind of fee – say 25 per cent just as Nettwerk Records and other companies are already doing. The issue is to get attention and clicks from consumers. If that attention is converted into a revenue share based on advertising, a subscription fee or an up-selling process, then as soon as you have attention, you participate. We are still in the old system of counting on revenue per use. That won’t work in the future. The bigger your brand, the bigger the attention you will get and the more clicks you get, the more money you’ll make. I believe that consumers will ask for the access models to be free initially but then after they use it for a while they’ll be quite happy to pay so they can remove the ads or increase the quality of the stream, for example. Music online will feel like free. There is plenty of money to be made from ads, but it’s just not there yet. It’s coming, though. We have seen that advertising just doesn’t work on the internet. It’s so easy to click away the ads or avoid them altogether. Advertising was essentially useless until now as today we are starting to see social advertising, such as on Facebook. Plus, we have mobile advertising. Finally advertising is becoming more useful. The brands are no longer looking to spend one per cent of their budget on social or mobile; they’ll be spending ten per cent or more. There is a total disconnect between the way a new business can be grown and how a lot of rights holders perceive how the business will be paid for by Google or ISPs, for example.

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

MUSEXPO ASIA PACIFIC PROGRAMMER AND ONE MOVEMENT CO-FOUNDER SAT BISLA (PRESIDENT/ FOUNDER A&R WORLDWIDE) REFLECTS ON THE YEAR THAT WAS AND WILL BE. The past year saw numerous challenges facing the world, and the music business was not immune to the uncertainty that surrounded us all. However, music has a way of uniting the world through adversity and music is certainly a potent force to bring a positive light under the dark clouds that have shadowed many of us for the past few years. I see 2010 as a year of defining those who are positive with a great future ahead and weeding out the negative energy that sometimes poisons the good intentions that valuable events such as One Movement For Music emanate. Music has been on this planet as far back as man has and it will continue to be a positive force moving the world together in unity in 2011 and beyond. I’m honoured to be a part of music events that are meaningful, created by true music enthusiasts who have had sound embedded in their nucleus from the day they were born, as I do.

That’s a very bad approach because it makes it impossible to legally grow a new model. You will be much more successful – like YouTube and Last.fm – if you don’t have the right licence and you just do it. That’s a real irony. I don’t think we’ll be able to support new services without a compulsory licence. We need a compulsory licence for music use on the internet so that companies like Spotify, MOG and we7 can use a licence rather than just bang their heads against a wall like they have in Germany and the US. A cloud-based model has to win out in the end – as the costs are so much lower, the sharing is so much

easier. You can put all sorts of ads into cloud-based systems because you always know what the user is doing. There are lots of great benefits there. But the industry hates the cloud-based model as they lose control over distribution.


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

THE PANEL MAX HOLE COO Universal Music Group Int 2IC to Lucian Grainge Label Guru

ARIEL HYATT Founder, director Ariel Publicity Social Media Guru

WHAT ROLE WILL RECORD COMPANIES SERVE? MH: The core business of a record company will be the same in 2015 as it is now and has been forever. Our job is to sign and develop talent. We are a haven, both financially and creatively, that helps build and sustain the stars of tomorrow. Without the investment and specialist knowledge that we provide, it is very difficult for artists to cut through the noise. AH: Record companies will still be taking risks on artists and playing the odds just as they always have, but they may be a bit more calculated in the future. I think that the 360-degree deals are still in their infancy. That space has only just begun. Record labels will become more and more involved in every facet of an artist’s career - taking a piece of all profitable areas as record sales fall more by the wayside in the order of importance for earning money from music. Record companies will still exist and they will still be important for artists who want to gain mass-market exposure. However, what they’re doing now and what will be happening in the future will look different. HG: Record companies will still be an important force for artists. At the end of the day, an artist will still need a company to distribute their product in some form or other. Equally the artist will still need funds to survive and thrive. A record company is an amalgam of A&R, marketing, distribution, PR and a developer of extraneous activity that an artist needs for success. SS: The way the modern consumer hears, buys, shares and stores music has changed forever. Record companies must now do the same. Their old business model is dead. Our new digital media has created a whole new world of opportunity, and reliance on simple record sales will become increasingly secondary to revenues generated by such streams as synch fees and publishing. MM: I suspect they’ll be very much the same as today, although in 2015 they may not all be called “record companies”. Despite what they naysayers might reckon, artists will always need parties to invest in and propagate their music. WHO WILL BE THE MAJOR INDUSTRY POWER BROKERS? MH: Five years goes very quickly and therefore, globally speaking, it will be much the same as now - Universal Music, Sony Music, Live Nation, AEG, iTunes, Spotify.

HARVEY GOLDSMITH MD Harvey Goldsmith Productions Touring Guru

STEVE SCHNUR Worldwide executive and president EA Music Group Gaming Guru

AH: I’m willing to place my bet on managers. Well-directed managers who are on-point are leading artists into the new music business with innovative ideas for licensing, branding, cooperating with advertising agencies, and making lucrative and interesting partnerships with brands. A good manager will help artists strategise how to actually make money. HG: Probably 360-degree companies who offer partnerships to an artist rather than control. These will include media companies, large live promotion companies, some record companies. And private investment vehicles specialising in developing artist careers. SS: The major power brokers will be those who understand and build new business models around a global digital future. The “record business” may be dead, but the music industry is approaching the most creative and financially exciting period in our history. MM: There will be no lions in the jungle. It will be a much flatter and more mixed landscape in five years from now. HOW WILL CONSUMERS ACQUIRE MUSIC? MH: Deluxe physical goods available at shrinking retail, but also in a growing directto-consumer business. Digitally, by a declining a la carte business, but mainly from rapidly growing subscription models to all forms of mobile and fixed devices. We will have to get used to consumers wanting quick and easy access, rather than ownership. AH: In the cloud. Plucking content out of a cloud and putting them onto whatever device is easy and convenient and will be the way that consumers will get whatever it is they want - not only music, but also movies and books. HG: Via mobiles and the internet. Mobiles are fast becoming more important via apps as the internet is already too cluttered. Consumers will decide which apps they like and stick to them. SS: iTunes is here to stay. Subscription networks are on the rise. We are already nearly one half a generation into a world where downloads are the norm. And I continue to love the irony of an industry that has moved forward by going back to selling singles. MM: In all the current, traditional ways, and many more which have yet to be discovered. (Music) will sound like everything. And as always, today’s alternative will be tomorrow’s mainstream.

MARTIN MILLS Chairman Beggars Group and Independents’ Music Assoc, Impala Independent Music Guru WILL RADIO STILL HAVE AN IMPACT? MH: I believe it will, as many consumers will still desire services where music is chosen for them, without them having to do the research. AH: Unfortunately the answer is yes. As long as there is radio, it will still have an impact, as it will still be widely available and free to the masses. Radio will probably continue to be harder and harder to get play on, but it will still have an impact. HG: Radio will always have an impact for music. However, listening to radio will not be in its current form. Radio is still the most popular way for music to be heard. Subscription radio will have advanced and will probably dominate by 2015. SS: As long as there are kids and cars, radio will always have an impact. But strict formatting and rigid corporate playlists can diminish radio’s influence. My hope is that independent stations will survive and continue to take the risks that make the difference. MM: Yes, but decreasingly so. With technology comes the ability to message fans and tap into new channels of music discovery. AND A WILD ONE... WHAT WILL MUSIC SOUND LIKE? MH: We will figure that out nearer the time. I suspect at some point there will be a movement back towards music as art, rather than music as commodity, but we will have to wait and see. If I knew the answer now, I’d bring the music out next year. AH: Of course, music will continue to innovate, delight and inspire, that much I do know. HG: It’s hard to tell. You can never disregard a great song. A great song will always win the day. SS: About the only thing that none of us can – or should try to – predict is what music will sound like in 2015. All we can hope for is that there are at least a few new songs and artists that make the world go “wow!” In any year, it all comes down to the music. MM: It will sound like everything. And as always, today’s alternative will be tomorrow’s mainstream.

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THE WIZARD, THE TRUE STAR Having lived one of the more intriguing careers in contemporary music, Todd Rundgren is the genuine rock’n’roll maverick. Julian Tompkin meets the man behind the mystery. Rundgren followed his nose into production, crafting a not-so-secret double life on the other side of the desk. Steering records from artists as diverse as Patti Smith, Hall & Oates, The Band, New York Dolls, Grand Funk Railroad and Cheap Trick, Rundgren would enter the pantheon of record production with Meat Loaf’s omnipotent 1977 recording Bat Out Of Hell – an album that’s gone on to sell well over 40 million copies worldwide.

R

undgren comes to One Movement For Music by Twilight to share his wisdom, speaking at the MUSEXPO Asia Pacific conference on Friday 8 October (hosted by Molly Meldrum), then joins Sarah McLachlan, Paul Kelly, Kate Miller-Heidke, Pink Martini, Lil’ Band O’ Gold and Mama Kin onstage at the One Movement By Twilight Concert that evening on The Esplanade.

In 1972 Todd Rundgren was a certified pop star. His most recent album, Something/Anything?, was scaling the US charts and flowered a hit single in Hello It’s Me. Complete in Bowie-esque face makeup, Rundgren seemed finally ready to seize his mantle as America’s next pop/icon. But this is Todd Rundgen we’re talking about. By 1973 Rundgren was leading North America’s psychedelic prog rock cavalry in Utopia with sequins firmly affixed and synthesisers unsheathed, starting with the now classic record A Wizard, A True Star. And this from the man who founded his musical existence in 1967 with Philadelphia garage rockers The Nazz! But it wasn’t purely onstage where Rundgren was defining a new musical future. Mystified by the role of ‘the man behind the glass’,

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As the ’70s became the ’80s and then the ’90s, Rundgren found further inspiration in the revolution taking place in music and entertainment technology. In fact, he became one of the field’s pioneers, including video production, computer graphics (for Apple), 3D animation and the very first internet applications for music. Indeed, by the mid-1990s Rundgren had already identified the internet as the earthquake that would rattle the rusty foundations of the music industry and launched Patronet, a service which offered music to fans online for a subscription fee. Five years later Napster would arrive and alter the distribution

of music for good. Rundgren could have said ‘I told you so’, but just kept on making great music instead. Based in Hawaii, 2010 finds Rundgren near-on back at the beginning, offering up a new album of Robert Johnson covers. Technologies may change, but it seems Rundgren’s pure devotion to music is unyielding. In 2010 you’ve almost gone back to the beginning, revisiting the late great blues maestro Robert Johnson. Was this a project that was always in the back of your mind? “Well, at some point to possibly revisit the blues was in the back of my mind, but this was actually a circumstance that came about after finishing recording my last album, Arena. We were looking for distribution here in the US and when we found them they also happened to be administering Robert Johnson’s song catalogue. And being creative in a way that record labels need to be these days – trying to maximise revenue from whatever assets they have – they were looking for an artist to do a cover album of Robert Johnson songs and so they figured, since I was doing this guitar thing in Arena, that I would be a likely candidate. That’s how it came about.” In the ’90s you pioneered a new form of music distribution in Patronet, which preceded all major online music distribution. At that time did you foresee the collapse of the traditional music industry structure as it was, with the advent of file sharing? “It wasn’t just the advent of file sharing. The music industry could have taken advantage of that but they were unable to imagine it. I got involved in the circumstance that put me right in everybody’s office; they could have made the decision to start putting their music on servers. But we couldn’t find anybody who would allow us to put music that people would recognise onto a server; they just couldn’t get their heads around it. It was too complicated. And it wasn’t more than two years later that Napster started doing it for them.” It’s still an extremely polarised battle. Did the industry forfeit a great opportunity to embrace this new technology in the ’90s? “It wasn’t the internet alone; the internet came up against a culture that had evolved into something that was more business than music, and that started happening maybe in the late ’70s. After The Beatles you began to have the sales of music and the margins became bigger, because you had globalised artists. You could say The Beatles coming out of nowhere and taking over the entire planet wasn’t common before that. Then people rode on their coat tales, and all through the ’70s it led to the regular multi-platinum-selling album, which had never happened. Frampton Comes Alive! and Dark Side Of The Moon and albums like this; the margins on something like that is ridiculous.


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

there and make these kinds of decisions’. And moreover, once you’re standing over the consol you can’t help but put your hands on it. And once you put your hands on it then you start noodling with everything and figuring out how it works, and that was how it all evolved from the first recording project I was involved in.” As your production work developed did you discover you needed to have a different mindset as a producer, from a musician?

The amount of money you can make on a multi-platinum album, given that you only spent maybe a couple of hundred thousand, is like no other investment on the entire planet. And when people discovered that, that’s when record companies started getting acquired by holding corporations that made the record company just another one of their businesses. And decisions about who would and wouldn’t be able to make their next record started getting made in some accountant’s office, who only looked at the fricken bottom line. The first big alarm bell that went off was when Warner Brothers dropped Van Morrison, because he wasn’t selling as many records as he was five years ago – but that was after Warner Brothers got acquired by a larger holding company. Some of those decisions stopped being made by people who cared about music. So the whole demise of the record industry has been a long time coming.” What’s the answer to the big question: how to deal with music and the internet? “Well, it’s kind of like the genie is out of the bottle and you can’t put it back in – so it’s not a question of whether it’s good or not, it’s how you best deal with the reality of it being there. There are still certainly other things – the biggest artists in the world are still coming out of really lame, old-school places like American Idol and Australian Idol. But this produces the lamest kind of music for the largest audience, so you can say that, in terms of music, it’s still there. There are still genres of music that are healthy because they have a very predictable audience and they play directly to that audience, like country music. Country music never evolves; it’s always the same fricken thing – same kind of artists that all wear the same cowboy hat and the jeans and the boots, and it just plays completely to audience expectations. There will always be that in some form or another. But people who listen to that are not necessarily music fans – they just like that style of music. There are still going to be people there that like music, and those are the people as an artist or record company you should really be caring about.” You got your apprenticeship in music quite young with The Nazz, which itself was a pretty blood’n’bones rock combo. Where did your interest in technology evolve from? “It sort of evolved from those very first recordings I did with The Nazz, because we had no studio experience and we were especially mystified by the role of the producer. Nobody knew what a producer

was before George Martin, essentially. But because of George Martin’s association with The Beatles, suddenly the role of the producer became hugely important, and we always thought it had more to do with the sound of the record than with the music. On the first Nazz record we just looked at records we liked the sound of and eventually wound up getting a guy we thought was involved in a goodsounding record, which probably had more to do with the engineer than the producer. And we discovered, when the guy was in the studio, all he did was sit there and read the trades and look at his watch, and make sure the sessions didn’t run overly long. He had very few suggestions for us – we were doing most of the creative work. And it was at that point I realised ‘Geez, I could do this – I could get in

“Yeah, I mistakenly thought after I left The Nazz in a huff – well, the band essentially blew up; an emotional battle ground – and I thought that what I wanted to do from then on was be a record producer, and that way I wouldn’t be involved in all of that band politics. I could just focus on music and sound and that would be fun, not realising that half the people that come into the studio with you are not comfortable there and suddenly all of their psychological issues come to the fore, and they are really selfconscious about the possibilities of their record – good and bad. And suddenly now you have to be a shrink again! And I thought I was getting away from all the psychodrama – nope, it was right into the heart of the psychodrama. And that was what I had to learn how to do; to deal with other people’s emotionality and try and explain in completely rational terms what is supposed to happen,

realising that they’re not sleeping at night because they are so fretful about the outcome of their record. You either have to sink or swim, and if a producer doesn’t eventually learn to be the most cool-headed person in the room then it’s not the gig for you, no matter how smart you are about sound and music. You can’t escape these kinds of organic and human things that are essential for some artists. For some artists, that’s what makes them what they are is their ability to bare their emotions.” In terms of sound, what particular quality have you endeavoured to bring to your production work, whether it’s producing New York Dolls or Meatloaf? “The first thing has nothing to do really with me. Any time I get a project, the first thing I do is listen to it and try to not focus too much on the quality of the performance, and certainly not on the quality of the sound, but focus on the songs and see what the possibilities are in the songs – even if they’ve already got ideas about the arrangement, which may be completely inappropriate for the song because they are too close to it or they don’t understand a broader range of possibilities. But if you don’t have a good song, you’re really swimming upstream the whole time. It’s degrading in a way. It’s a much better time, I believe, for everybody in the studio, if you come in with complete and total confidence in the material, because the band can commit themselves to performing it and doing it, which is worth capturing. The problem is people come in and they’re a little unsure about the material and start getting distracted by other things – they think they are singing out of tune, and they’ll sing the same line 30 times trying to get it exactly right. But people don’t care if it’s perfectly in tune; they care whether it sounds like you mean it or not.” You’ve been the master of reinvention, so much so that in the early ’70s you abandoned certified pop stardom to found Utopia. How do you explain your seemingly unstoppable urge to keep redefining who Todd Rundgren is? “Well, it’s a combination of that essential urge and the idea that to stop growing is to atrophy, so I am just fighting off the inevitable old age in one sense (laughs). But it’s also because I had a second career as a record producer. I had the freedom essentially to do my records without any consideration of the commercial possibilities therein – I was just making music. There was a time when people could think that way – they could think ‘I am just making music here, I am not making a commodity’, even though the end result is a piece of plastic that’ll go for a certain amount of money and the music will, if you’re lucky, be commoditised. For me, it was always about the experience of making the music and finding new possibilities in it.” Julian Tompkin is currently the Managing Editor of X-Press Magazine in Perth.

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ONE MOVEMENT CONFERENCE GUIDE WEDNESDAY, 6TH OCTOBER 12:00PM – 9:00PM

REGISTRATION OPEN (First Floor Conference Foyer) 1:30PM – 5:00PM

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DIALOGUE – Swan Room (Parmelia Hilton Hotel) 1:30PM – 1.35PM

WELCOME ADDRESS AND PANEL OVERVIEW 1:35PM – 2:00PM

BROADBAND, THE NBN AND OTHER TECHNOLOGICAL OPPORTUNITIES PRESENTED BY: Maddocks FEATURING: Sonia Sharma 2:00PM – 3:20PM

CREATORS, CONVERGENCE, COLLABORATION, COLLECTION & CASH

MODERATED BY: Eloise Nolan - Rightsholder Relationship Manager, Copyright Agency Ltd (Australia) SPEAKERS Ian Booth - Chief Executive, ScreenWest (Australia) Rob Buckler – Content Manager, iiNet (Australia) Brett Cottle - CEO, APRA/AMCOS (Australia) Larry Lopez – RedDog Capital Partners (Australia) Adrianne Pecotic - Executive Director, Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft (Australia) Jacqui Allen - Deputy Director General, Western Australia Department Culture & the Arts (Australia) 3:40PM – 5:00PM

OPPORTUNITY, ACCESS, AUDIENCES & AWARENESS

MODERATED BY: Marcus Canning – Director & CEO, ARTRAGE Inc (Australia) SPEAKERS Amy Broadfoot – Founder & GM, Amicko Films / Organiser, Future Shorts (Australia) Tanya Denning - Head of Content Management and Digital Media, National Indigenous Television (Australia) Fergus Linehan – Artistic Associate, Edinburgh International Festival / Head of Contemporary Music, Sydney Opera House (Australia) Aidan O’Bryan – Chief Creative Officer, WBMC (Australia) 5:00PM – 6:00PM

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DIALOGUE & MUSEXPO ASIA PACIFIC DRINKS RECEPTION

FEATURING PAUL KELLY’S HOW TO MAKE GRAVY BOOK LAUNCH - 2nd Floor Foyer at the Parmelia Hilton

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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

8:00PM – 12:00AM

SHOWCASES

PRESENTED BY Rolling Stone

THURSDAY, 7TH OCTOBER 8:00AM – 9:00PM

REGISTRATION OPEN

(FIRST FLOOR CONFERENCE FOYER) 8:00AM – 9:15AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST PRESENTED BY Parmelia Hilton 9:15AM – 10:30AM

ONE MOVEMENT KEYNOTE:

THE FUTURE OF THE GLOBAL MUSIC BUSINESS

PRESENTED BY: AEG Ogden MODERATED BY: Keith Welsh – Consultant, One Movement for Music SPEAKERS: Gary Chen – Founder, Co-Chairman/CEO, Top 100 (China) Molly Meldrum - On-Air Personality, Channel 7/MTV/Foxtel (Australia) Seymour Stein – Executive Vice President/Co-Founder, Sire Records Group (USA) Tim Riley – Vice President, Music Affairs, Activision / Blizzard Troy Carter – Founder, Chairman & CEO of Coalition Media Group (Worldwide Manager of Lady Gaga) Michael Chugg – Founder Chugg Entertainment 10:45AM - 11.45AM

WORLDWIDE A&R 2012:

ARTIST DISCOVERY + DEVELOPMENT = THE NEW LABEL BUSINESS MODEL MODERATED BY: Sat Bisla – President, A&R Worldwide / MUSEXPO (USA) SPEAKERS: Arjun Sankalia – Director, Int’l Music & Special Products, Sony Music Entertainment (India) Colleen Zulian – President/Chairman, Asia Sounds (Asia) Damian Slevinson – Director A&R, Liberation Records (Australia) Henning Ahrens - Talent Agent, Four Artists GmbH (Germany) Ron Spaulding – President, Fontana Distribution (USA) 12:00PM TO 12:30PM

MINI KEYNOTE with Richard Kingsmill - Music Director, triple j Radio, Australia MODERATED BY: Lars Brandle – Bureau Chief, Billboard (Australasia) 12:30PM – 1:45PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

HOSTED BY: moshtix (Parmelia Hilton Perth, Conference Terrace) 1:45PM: - 2:00PM:

MINI KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Asia Sponsorship In Entertainment & Media PRESENTED BY: One Movement for Music FEATURING: Jasper Donat – Co-Founder, Branded Asia & President, Music Matters (Hong Kong)


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

2:00PM – 3:00PM

MUSIC IN FILM/TV, GAMES & CONSUMER BRANDS:

THE MONETIZATION FOR THE ARTIST & SONG IN VISUAL MEDIA & BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

PRESENTED BY: Silva Screen MODERATED BY: Adam Zammit - CEO, Peer Group Media (Australia) SPEAKERS: Chris Gough – Managing Director, Native Tongue Music Publishing (Australia) Jasper Donat – Co-Founder, Branded Asia & President, Music Matters (Hong Kong) Kyle Hopkins – Head of Music Supervision, Xbox/Microsoft Media Acquisitions (USA) Scott Schorr – Head of Licensing, Lazy Bones Productions (Australasia) Oum Pradutt – Managing Director, Phase 1 Events (India) 3:15PM – 4:15PM

INT’L LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SUMMIT: TOURING & PROMOTION “FEELING IT LIVE”

PRESENTED BY: Posse MODERATED BY: Michael Harrison – Sr. Tour Coordinator, The Frontier Touring Co. (Australia) SPEAKERS: Bobby Talwar - Partner, Only Much Louder (India) Folkert Koopmans – Founder, FKP Skorpio (Germany) Frank Takeshita – General Manager, Creativeman (Japan) Martin Elbourne – Booking Agent, Glastonbury, The Great Escape (UK) Michael Chugg – Founder, Chugg Entertainment (Australasia) Neill Dixon – President, Canadian Music Week (Canada) Shaw Saltzberg – Sr. Vice President, S.L. Feldman & Associates (N. America) 4:15PM – 4:30PM

NETWORKING TEA BREAK PRESENTED BY: Eventscorp 4.30PM - 5.30PM

PUBLISHING & COPYRIGHTS:

THE REAL ESTATE OF THE GLOBAL MUSIC BUSINESS

PRESENTED BY: AMPAL MODERATED BY: Peter Hebbes – General Manager, AMPAL (Australia) SPEAKERS: Brett Cottle – Chief Executive, APRA / AMCOS (Australia) Damian Trotter – Managing Director, Sony/ATV Music Publishing (Australia) Ian James – Managing Director, Mushroom Music Publishing (Australia) Achille Forler - Managing Director, Deep Emotions Publishing/JV with Universal (India) Spek Hussain - Managing Director, Fairwood Music Publishing (Arabia) Thomas Scherer – International Repertoire, BMG Rights Management, GmbH (Germany) 6PM – 8.00PM

DELEGATE NETWORKING COCKTAIL FUNCTION AT WOLF LANE HOSTED BY: SONY, Billy Thorpe’s Tangier, Howling Wolves Wines, Foster’s Group and Jaegermeister

OFFICIAL BOOK LAUNCH:

CELEBRATING THE RELEASE OF MICHAEL CHUGG’S BOOK “HEY, YOU IN THE BLACK T-SHIRT” OUT NOW THROUGH PAN MCMILLAN AUSTRALIA 8:00PM – 1:00AM

FRIDAY 8TH OCTOBER 8:00AM – 9:00PM

REGISTRATION OPEN (First Floor Conference Foyer) 8:00AM – 9:00AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 10.00AM

GLOBAL MANAGERS FORUM: FROM THE EYE OF THE STORM

PRESENTED BY: AEG Ogden MODERATED BY: Bill Cullen – Manager & Chairman, One Louder & Association of Artist Managers SPEAKERS: Dan Medland – Manager, IE Music (Ladyhawke) Dylan Liddy – Director, Blue Max Music (Hilltop Hoods) Paul Piticco – Founder, Secret Service/Dew Process (Powderfinger) Phil Stevens – Director, Jarrah Music (John Butler Trio) Rebekah Campbell – CEO, Posse/Scorpio Music 10:00AM – 11:00AM

ANARCHY IN THE UK?:

HOW TO IMPORT & EXPORT SUCCESSFULLY VIA THE UK

MODERATED BY: Andrew Phillips – Group Program Director Geraldton, ABC SPEAKERS: Ben Mawson – Legal, SSB (UK) Crispin Parry – Director, British Underground (UK) James Foley – Music Editor, Record of the Day (UK) Martin Elbourne – Booking Agent, Glastonbury, The Great Escape (UK) Mike Walsh – Head of Music, Xfm (UK) Seven Webster – Managing Director, A7 Music (UK) 11:00AM – 11:30AM

MINI KEYNOTE

MODERATED BY: Ian ‘Molly’ Meldrum - Music Reporter/Presenter, Channel 7/ MTV Classic/Foxtel (Aust) FEATURING: The Legendary Todd Rundgren 11:40PM – 12:30PM

AUSTRALIA:

STATE OF THE HOST NATION

PRESENTED BY: Darren Sanicki Lawyers MODERATED BY: Damian Trotter – Managing Director, Sony/ATV Music Publishing SPEAKERS: Harvey Lister – Chief Executive Officer, AEG Ogden (Australia) Leigh Treweek – National Marketing & Sales Director, Street Press Australia Mark Pope – Producer, ARIA Awards Mark Poston – Country Chairman, Australasia & Sr. VP Marketing, Australasia, EMI Paul Piticco – Founder, Secret Service/Dew Process (Australia) Shaun James – General Manager, XYZ Networks (The Music Channels) 12:30PM – 1:45PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

PRESENTED BY iiNet (Parmelia Hilton Perth, Conference Terrace)

SHOWCASES

PRESENTED BY Rolling Stone

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

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1:45PM – 2:35PM

GLOBAL BROADCAST FORUM:

MUSIC COMMUNICATION TO THE MASSES

PRESENTED BY: AirCheck MODERATED BY: Kathy McCabe – Music Editor, The Daily Telegraph SPEAKERS: Ande MacPherson – General Manager, George FM & Kiwi FM (New Zealand) Jimmy Steal – VP Programming, Emmis – Power 106 LA & Hot 97 NYC (USA) Mike Walsh – Head of Music, Xfm (UK) Richard Kingsmill – Music Director, triple j Radio (Australia) Rob Graham – Radio/Media Consultant (Asia) Shaun James – General Manager, XYZ Networks (The Music Channels) 2.30PM – 3.30PM

JOHN LENNON’s 70th BIRTHDAY ‘BED-IN’ A MODERATED FORUM ON THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JOHN LENNON Karri Room of the Parmelia Hilton 2:35PM – 2:50PM

NETWORKING TEA BREAK PRESENTED BY Murdoch 2:50PM – 3:50PM

LET’S GET DIGITAL:

BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN THE VIRTUAL AND REALITY WORLDS

PRESENTED BY iiNet MODERATED BY: Jakomi Matthews – Managing Director, The Music Void Consulting (UK) SPEAKERS: Carney Nir – Director, Secret Service Digital (Australia) David Loiterton – Managing Director, Omnifone (APAC) Kevin Arnold – Founder/CEO, IODA (US) Shayne Locke – Founder, Cowbell Digital Music (Australia) Wu Jun – CEO, R2G (China) Nick Love - Executive Director Business Development MySpace & IGN Entertainment (Australia & Asia) 4:00 PM – 5:00PM

MUSIC MARKET FOCUS JAPAN: LAND OF THE RISING SUN

PRESENTED BY: Audience Magazine MODERATED BY: Rob Zifarelli – Agent, The Agency Group (Canada) SPEAKERS: Frank Takeshita – General Manager, Creativeman (Japan) Keith Cahoon – Founder/President, Hotwire K.K. (Japan) Nori Tsuzki – CEO, Any Sound Inc. (Japan) Sebastian Mair – Founder, Music Solutions (Japan) Taichi Inoue - President, Surfrock International (Japan) Tak Furuichi – Int’l Operations/A&R Manager, JVC-Victor Entertainment, Inc. (Japan) 5:30PM – 7:30PM

DELEGATE NETWORKING COCKTAIL FUNCTION VIP Delegate Facility, The Esplanade, Perth (Festival Grounds)

SATURDAY, 9TH OCTOBER: 9:00AM – 12:00AM

REGISTRATION OPEN (First Floor Conference Foyer) 9:00AM – 10:00AM

NETWORKING TEA (First Floor Conference Foyer) 10:00AM – 12:00PM (Parmelia Hilton Perth, Swan Conference Room)

MENTORSHIP SUMMIT & WORKSHOP:

FEATURING: Tim Riley – Vice President Music Affairs, Activision / Blizzard MODERATED BY: Sat Bisla – President/Founder, A&R Worldwide/MUSEXPO 1:00PM – 10:00PM

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC FESTIVAL The Esplanade, Perth (Festival Grounds) 10:00PM – 1:00AM

SHOWCASES

PRESENTED BY Rolling Stone

SUNDAY, 10TH OCTOBER: 9:00AM – 12:00AM

REGISTRATION OPEN (First Floor Conference Foyer) 9:00AM – 10:00AM

NETWORKING TEA

PRESENTED BY Moves Travel (At the Parmelia Hilton) 10:30AM – 12:00PM (Parmelia Hilton Perth, Swan Conference Room)

THE STATE OF GLOBAL INDEPENDENCE: DOING IT MY WAY

PRESENTED BY: A.I.R MODERATED BY: Nick O’Byrne – General Manager, A.I.R. SPEAKERS: Franz Schuller – President, Indica-Records (Canada) Jaddan Commerford – Co-Owner, The Staple Group (Australia) Mark Smutz Smith – Founder, C Management (UK) Martin Novosel – Founder, Boundary Sounds (Australia) Monte Malone – Vice President, A&R Worldwide (USA) Patrik Larsson – Partner/Founder, Headlock Management/Lights Out! (Sweden) Raghu Dixit – Artist (India) Russell Thomas - Owner, KAOS Entertainment (Australia) 12:30PM – 3:30PM:

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP MENTORSHIP SESSIONS (Fremantle Room at the Parmelia Hilton)

5:00PM – 10:00PM

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC TWILIGHT FESTIVAL The Esplanade, Perth (Festival Grounds) 10:00PM – 1:00AM

SHOWCASES

PRESENTED BY Rolling Stone

36

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

1:00PM – 10:00PM

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC FESTIVAL The Esplanade, Perth (Festival Grounds) 10:00PM – 12:00AM

SHOWCASES

PRESENTED BY Rolling Stone


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

FRINGE FESTIVAL to present their works in a high-quality environment to the music industry and, just as importantly, the community and their fans.

One Movement For Music is delighted to announce the return of the One Movement Fringe Festival. Following on from last year’s success, the streets of the CBD will be transformed once again throughout the week of One Movement, bringing the city to life and helping to truly transform Perth into a lively and vibrant musical hotbed with free performances enveloping the city.

Last year’s Fringe was a tremendous success, hailed by the public and performing musicians alike as helping to transform the perception of Perth as a cultural backwater. “Oddly enough for a showcase festival, my show at One Movement Fringe last year was probably one of the most fun gigs I’ve ever had,” says said Tomas Ford, artist/manager.

The One Movement Fringe Festival provides an opportunity to strategically assist with the development and industry experience of local Western Australian musicians by providing them with a valuable platform to perform to the community, the music industry and the media.

The One Movement Fringe Festival will provide an opportunity for more than 60 Western Australian artists

“Where I’ve found a lot of showcase gigs have a stale air of industry about them, the festival component of One Movement sets it apart. Potential industry contacts get a chance to see acts in their natural environment. More importantly, the event opened my eyes to opportunities in Asia I would have otherwise missed and acts I would have never had the chance to see. I am marking this year’s event in my diary.” Look out for the Fringe Festival pitches around the city and come and check out the talent on offer!

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

37


8.35 - 9.05 RUBYLUX (UK)

9.20 - 9.50 THE RESPECTABLES (CAN)

10.05 - 10.35 DRAWN FROM BEES 10.50 - 11.20 DZHAM (RUSSIA) 12.05 - 12.35 RONIT

9.30 - 10.00 THE GROWL

10.15 – 10.45 EMPERORS

11.00 - 11.30 RTR COMPETITION WINNER 11.45 - 12.15 CAL PECK AND THE TRAMPS

12.30 - 1.00 6S & 7S

9:00PM

10:00PM

11:00PM

12:00AM

12.15 - 12.45 THE TREWS (CAN)

12.15 - 12.45 THE LOST SOULS CLUB (UK)

12:00AM

Venue and times are for reference only and are subject to change

11.30 -12:00 UHNELLYS (JPN)

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

10.00 - 10.30 ELI WOLFE 10.45 11.15 MM9

PRESENTED BY SUNSET EVENTS AND CHUGG ENTERTAINMENT

11:00PM

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

CAPITOL

AMPLIFIER LANEWAY

11.30 - 12.00 MELODRAMAS (UK)

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

AMPLIFIER BEERGARDEN

12.05 - 12.35 LEE MORGAN

10:00PM

PRESENTED BY SOUND OF THE C

12.15 - 12.45 MIAMI HORROR

FRIDAY 8 OCTOBER

12.30 - 1.00 FINAL FLASH (CAN)

11.15 - 12.10 ELLIOT BROOD (CAN)

11.30PM - 12.00 PAPA VS PRETTY

10.05 - 10.35 KARNAGE AND DARKNIS 10.50 - 11.20 THE MEDICS

10.00 – 10.30 OPERATOR PLEASE 10.45 – 11.15 HUNGRY KIDS OF HUNGARY

10.30 - 10.55 JP HOE (CAN)

9.20 - 9.50 JAKE AND THE COWBOYS

9.15 – 9.45 360

9.00 - 9.25 MATTHEW BARBER (CAN) 9.45 - 10.10 THE TREWS (CAN)

8.35 - 9.05 LADY LASH

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP (AIMS) PRESENTED BY SONGLINES

AMPLIFIER LANEWAY

8.00 – 8.30 MIYAVI (JPN) 8.45 – 9.15 PEZ

PRESENTED BY EMI

CAPITOL

8.15 - 8.40 COLIN MOORE (CAN)

PRESENTED BY CANADA MUSIC WEEK

AMPLIFIER BEERGARDEN

10.00 - 10.30 PASSENGER (UK) 10.45 - 11.15 BOYS! BOYS! BOYS!

9:00PM

TIMES

BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ

AMPLIFIER BAR

8.00 - 8.20 DANIEL RATA

PRESENTED BY A&R

8.00 - 8.30 BOOM! BAP! POW! 8.45 - 9.15 THE SPITFIRES

PRESENTED BY RTR

8:00PM

TIMES

AMPLIFIER BAR

BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ

THURSDAY 7 OCTOBER

Presented by y

12.15 - 1.00 BLUEJUICE

11.10 - 11.45 DELTA SPIRIT (USA)

10.20 - 10.50 ERNEST ELLIS

9.30 - 10.00 GUINEAFOWL

PRESENTED BY DEW PROCESS

WOLF LANE CARPARK

11.45 - 12.15 CRASH THE CURB

11.00 - 11.30 THE HONEY MONTH

10.15 - 10.45 MELODICS

9.30 - 10.00 STONEFIELD

8.00 - 8.30 NEW SAXONS 8.45 - 9.15 JESS REBEIRO AND THE BONE COLLECTORS

PRESENTED BY TRIPLE J

WOLF LANE CARPARK

12.15 - 12.45 JINJA SAFARI

11.30 -12.00 BRITISH INDIA

10.00 - 10.30 ELLIOT BROOD (CAN) 10.45 - 11.15 BIG SCARY

PRESENTED BY ONE MOVEMENT

DILETTANTE

12.15 - 12.45 COLIN MOORE (CAN)

11.30 - 12.00 JACKSON FIREBIRD

10.00 - 10.30 ANDY BULL 10.45 - 11.15 THE AUDREYS

9.15 - 9.45 MM9

8.30 - 9.00 NGAIIRE

PRESENTED BY ONE MOVEMENT

DILETTANTE

6TH - 10TH OCTOBER 2010 PERTH


12:00AM

11.30 - 12.00 LIZ GREEN (UK)

10.00 - 10.30 DAN SULTAN 10.45 - 11.15 RAGHU DIXIT (IND)

PRESENTED BY SOUND ADVICE

AMPLIFIER LANEWAY

Venue and times are for reference only and are subject to change

11.30 - 12.00 BRITISH INDIA VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

11.30 - 12.00 FINAL FLASH (CAN)

11:00PM

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

10.00 - 10.30 WOLVES AT THE DOOR 10.45 - 11.15 REDCOATS

PRESENTED BY STREET PRESS AUSTRALIA

CAPITOL

10.00 - 10.30 MATTHEW BARBER (CAN) 10.45 - 11.15 GUINEAFOWL

AMPLIFIER BEERGARDEN

10:00PM

PRESENTED BY SUNSET EVENTS AND CHUGG ENTERTAINMENT

TIMES

AMPLIFIER BAR

BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ

SUNDAY 10 OCTOBER

12.15 - 12.45 BLACKCHORDS

12:00AM

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

12.00 - 12.20 ZE! (MYS) 12.30 - 12.50 ROB PIX AND JAMES FAVA

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

11.30 -12.00 THE SALVADORS

VENUE NOT AVAILABLE

11.00 – 11.25 THE GREAT SPY EXPERIMENT (SGP) 11.35 - 12.00 BIURET (KOR)

PRESENTED BY LIVERPOOL SOUND CITY

11:00PM

CAPITOL

AMPLIFIER LANEWAY

10.00 - 10.30 THE BLOODPOETS 10.45 - 11.15 OKA

AMPLIFIER BEERGARDEN

10.00 - 10.20 UHNELLYS (JPN) 10.30 – 10.50 THE CIRCUS (IND)

PRESENTED BY ASIA SOUNDS

AMPLIFIER BAR

10:00PM

TIMES

BELGIAN BEER CAFÉ

SATURDAY 9 OCTOBER

Presented by

11.30 - 12.00 GRENADIERS

10.00 - 10.30 KYU 10.45 - 11.15 SONS OF RICO

PRESENTED BY TRIPLE J

WOLF LANE CARPARK

12.15 - 12.45 RICHARD IN YOUR MIND

11.30 -12.00 THE HOLIDAYS

10.00 - 10.30 METALS 10.45 11.15 GEORGE AFFAIR

PRESENTED BY SUNSET EVENTS AND CHUGG ENTERTAINMENT

WOLF LANE CARPARK

11.30 - 12.00 DEAD LETTER CHORUS

10.00 - 10.30 ERNEST ELLIS 10.45 - 11.15 SEAMS

PRESENTED BY ONE MOVEMENT

DILETTANTE

12.15 - 12.45 REDCOATS

11.30 - 12.00 CAMERAS

10.00 - 10.30 JP HOE (CAN) 10.45 - 11.15 THE JEZABELS

PRESENTED BY ONE MOVEMENT

DILETTANTE

6TH - 10TH OCTOBER 2010 PERTH


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SNOWBALL STAGE

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SWAN RIVER

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FRIDAY 8 OCTOBER CROSSOVER

SNOWBALL

BREAKTHROUGH BIG TOP

5.15 - 5.50 THE JOE KINGS

6.50 - 7.50 PINK MARTINI (USA)

5.55 - 6.45 TODD RUNDGREN’S JOHNSON (USA)

5.05 - 5.25 JESS REBEIRO AND THE BONE COLLECTORS

5.40 - 6.00 THE HONEY MONTH

6.15 - 6.50 THE MEDICS

9.00 - 10.00 SARAH MCLACHLAN (CAN)

7.55 - 8.55 PAUL KELLY

7.05 - 7.50 KATE MILLER-HEIDKE

8.05 - 8.40 MAMA KIN

Venue and times are for reference only and are subject to change

9.00- 10.00 LIL BAND O GOLD (USA)


SATURDAY 9 OCTOBER CROSSOVER

1.40 - 2.00 THE HOLIDAYS

2.40 - 2.55 APRA PROJECT – MAMA KIN AND RAGHU DIXIT (IND)

SNOWBALL

1.15 - 1.35 WOLVES AT THE DOOR

2.05 - 2.35 MIYAVI (JPN)

3.25 - 3.55 THE MELODRAMAS (UK)

4.30 - 4.55 GYPSY AND THE CAT

5.45 - 6.15 DRAPHT

6.55 - 7.25 BRITISH INDIA

8.05 - 8.35 DEAD LETTER CIRCUS

9.15 - 10.00 KARNIVOOL

3.00 - 3.20 HUNGRY KIDS OF HUNGARY

4.00 - 4.25 RAGHU DIXIT (IND )

5.00 - 5.40 BEN KWELLER (USA)

6.20 - 6.50 MIAMI HORROR

7.30 - 8.00 CHILDREN COLLIDE

8.40 - 9.10 GRINSPOON

2.40 - 3.00 GRENADIERS

3.50 - 4.10 SONS OF RICO

5.05 - 5.30 THE LOST SOULS CLUB (UK)

6.30 - 7.00 GREAT SPY EXPERIMENT (SGP)

8.00 - 8.30 DELTA SPIRIT (USA)

9.30- 10.00 THE ONLY

2.05 - 2.25 NEW SAXONS

3.15 - 3.35 STONEFIELD

4.25 - 4.50 GEORGIA FAIR

5.45 - 6.15 RICHARD IN YOUR MIND

7.15 - 7.45 PARADES

8.45 - 9.15 TIM AND JEAN

BREAKTHROUGH BIG TOP

SUNDAY 10 OCTOBER CROSSOVER

SNOWBALL

1.15 - 1.35 WOLVES (CHANNEL V WINNER)

2.10 - 2.35 THE JEZABELS

1.40 - 2.05 THE CHEMIST

3.15 - 3.45 PASSENGER (UK)

2.40 - 3.10 JONNEINE ZAPATA (USA)

4.25 - 4.55 DENGUE FEVER (USA)

3.50 - 4.20 VIA TANIA (USA)

5.35 - 6.05 CLOUD CONTROL

5.00 - 5.30 BEDOUIN SOUNDCLASH (CAN)

6.45 - 7.15 OPERATOR PLEASE

6.10 - 6.40 BIURET (KOR)

7.55 - 8.30 DAN SULTAN

7.20 - 7.50 KORA (NZ)

9.15-10.00 XAVIER RUDD

8.35 - 9.10 SHAPESHIFTER (NZ)

2.45 - 3.05 KYU

3.55 - 4.15 THE PAPER SCISSORS

5.15 - 5.45 LIZ GREEN (UK)

6.45 - 7.15 AN HORSE

8.10 - 8.40 KOOLISM

9.30 - 10.00 PURPLE SNEAKERS DJ

2.10 - 2.30 CRASH THE CURB

3.20 - 3.40 CARL FOX

4.30 - 5.00 SALLY SELTMANN

6.00 - 6.30 BOY AND BEAR

7.30 - 7.55 ZE (MYS)

8.55 - 9.25 THE MELODICS

BREAKTHROUGH BIG TOP

Venue and times are for reference only and are subject to change


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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

HEY, YOU IN THE BLACK T-SHIRT A co-founder of One Movement, Michael ‘Chuggi’ Chugg needs no introduction. A true Aussie legend and head of Chugg Entertainment, Chuggi is much revered in the global music industry as a both a hugely successful promoter and a true larrikin. In this extract from Michael Chugg’s autobiography Hey, You In The Black T-Shirt (with Iain Shedden), Chuggi recalls the ABBA tour of 1977. Hey, You In The Black T-Shirt is out now through Macmillan and will be launched on Thursday 7 October from 6-8pm in the Delegate Networking Cocktail Function at Wolf Lane. I missed the chaos that engulfed Australian cities when The Beatles came to play in 1964, but I got an idea of what it must have been like 13 years later, when I was Dainty’s tour director for ABBA. The scale of ABBA-mania was more than The Fab Four enjoyed, or rather endured. No tour I had done up to that point prepared me for the two weeks of madness with Bjorn, Benny, Agnetha and Frida. ABBA arrived on 27 February 1977. They had been in Australia a year before on a promotional trip, so anticipation of a concert tour had been building since then. They were enormous here, thanks to the promo trip and the way Countdown had championed them in the two years it had been on the air. They were a staple on the show, not least due to Molly, who was one of their biggest fans. I wasn’t sure what to expect of them or the tour. I’d done a few large festivals by then with big-name acts, but a whole tour, with screaming fans of all ages waiting around every corner, was a new experience. It was by far the biggest tour, in terms of audience numbers and the level of production, I had been involved in. There were more than a hundred people on the road for dates in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth, 13 shows in all. Fans followed us everywhere, plus a film crew shooting scenes for ABBA The Movie accompanied the entourage for the entire trip. I was stressed before the tour started, in Sydney. When the doors of the plane opened and they marched out in their white outfits, it was like a football team arriving. Hundreds of fans had been waiting for hours for the plane to land, but to avoid a frenzy we arranged to be diverted through a private section of the airport to waiting cars. It took about a week to erect the site at Sydney Showground, mostly in torrential rain and strong winds, which didn’t let up for the first night performance. The weather made rehearsals and sound checking extremely difficult. There was a heavy press schedule as well. It seemed every journalist and photographer and TV crew wanted a bit of ABBA. We held a media call the morning after they arrived, at the Sebel Townhouse, the famous rock’n’roll hotel in Kings Cross where everyone was staying, but that wasn’t enough for the eager media. They wanted to keep tabs on ABBA 24 hours a day. Everybody wanted a piece of them. A lot of talk was about how the first night show might have to be cancelled. I had my fingers crossed.

We had 25,000 people standing getting soaked while we counted down the minutes backstage wondering if we should go ahead with that first show. There was a lot to worry about. We had 34 musicians on stage, including a 12-piece band and an Australian 17-piece orchestra that rose out of a revolving hydraulic platform. The four stars were nervous about going on in the conditions and it was a lastminute decision to proceed. If you were there, or if you’ve seen ABBA The Movie, you’ll know just what a shocker of a night it was. It poured down and the stage got soaked. Water and electricity combined are a promoter’s nightmare. We had acquired a couple of hundred towels from the Sebel. The crew, myself included, spent half of the performance mopping up water from the floor to avert disaster, or at least to avoid broken ankles. That didn’t stop Frida from falling over during Waterloo and making the papers next day sprawled on all fours. That and Agnetha’s bum grabbed most of the headlines. The show, however, was a success and the crowd didn’t seem to mind the rain. By the end of it, I was a wreck and I wasn’t the only one. That’s one of the reasons the after-party at the Sebel went off in the way it did that night. Everyone had been working so hard in the lead-up to that first show, not knowing if it was going to happen, that when it was all over something had to give. The party started in the basement ballroom of the hotel straight after the show. ABBA weren’t there, but a lot of the other musicians were, along with the crew and various guests. It was a drunken affair, although that wasn’t the only indulgence. I got to bed at around 4am. The show the next day was at the Showground as well, so I didn’t have to worry too much about being on the move early, or so I thought. At 7am I got a call from one of the production people telling me in a panicky voice to get straight out to the venue. I could hardly speak and I didn’t really know where I was, but what I was confronted with out at the Showground soon woke me up. I was fiercely hungover, with the sun burning into my eyes. Among the technology ABBA had brought with them from Europe was a large inflatable roof. In terms of staging, it was quite a revelation. At 6.30am that day, a security guy had noticed that the roof had a huge dip in it and was hanging just above the stage. It was full of water, rain that had built up during the

night as we were enjoying the after-party. The sag was so severe that it was in danger of collapsing, so the security guy had let the air out of the roof so that it didn’t sink the whole structure and everything underneath it. I felt so ill standing there, looking at thousands of chairs around the stage floating in about three feet of water, but I was relieved as well. If it hadn’t been for that security bloke’s quick thinking, we could have lost the whole tour. The Melbourne shows went off without incident. The Myer Music Bowl held about 14,000, but there were just as many people assembled in the nearby Kings Domain to hear the performances. It was the same for the one show in Adelaide, at the West Lakes Football Stadium, with thousands of extra fans listening in the car park. Finally, we did five concerts in Perth at the Entertainment Centre and the first one was subject to a bomb scare; another great opportunity for me to have a chat with a police commissioner. He told me we had to evacuate the hall. I had to walk onstage while ABBA were mid-song and whisper into Benny’s ear for him to tell everyone to leave the stage. Then I had to ask the crowd, without telling them why, to leave the room in an orderly fashion, which they did in just a few minutes. After a police search of the building, the show went on as normal. ABBA flew back to Sweden the day after their final show.

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

45


SPEAKER FOCUS human resources, legal, marketing, promotion, merchandising, publishing, non-traditional, and much more. The key is to give all of the different areas the right amount of time at the right time. I love being busy and having tons of change during the day, so it keeps me on my toes.”

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Wow! Not enough paper here to write them all. I will give you some of the Fontana artists for this interview; Tech N9ne – OG, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros – Home, Dirty Heads – Lay Me Down, Bun B – Trillionaire, Keith Sweat – Test Drive, Brother Clyde – Lately, David Gray – A Moment Changes Everything and Gyptian – Hold You. That is one song right?”

RON SPAULDING EXECUTIVE VP/ GM, FONTANA

How did you start working in the music industry? “I didn’t choose the music business, it chose me. I am sure glad it did too. Out of college I found a job as an hourly ($3.25 per hour) employee at a Venture Store in Alton, Illinois. Venture Stores was a division of May Department Stores, and by luck my store manager recommended me for their Executive Training Program. I was accepted and left for Chicago where I worked in the stores over the next year and was promoted to Operations Manager. I was then transferred back to St Louis to become the Assistant Buyer in Music for the Venture Stores chain of approximately 80 stores. That was really my first experience in music as a profession.”

Got any hot tips for artists that you believe will break through later this year? “I believe Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros will break along with Dirty Heads.”

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why? “I love AC/DC and Midnight Oil. My favourite song and group from Australia is INXS’ New Sensation, Mystify and Beautiful Girl.”

and put seven concerts for Cui Jian in venues like Palladium, Bottom Line Blub and Fort Mason Centre. The tour was very successful and was covered by all major media. I was broke but happy.”

What’s been the highlight of your career so far?

What’s been the highlight of your career so far?

What’s the hardest part of your job?

“Worked with many top musicians in China whom I respect and love. Founded Top100.cn with Yao Ming and Erik Zhang in 2005 in China to start doing legit online music service. Google joined Top100.cn as a strategic partner and investor and launched Google music search in China in March 2009. Now Top100.cn has over ten million users and over 200 million download and streaming monthly. Many advertisers have signed on.”

“We’ve got lots of ground to cover therefore remaining focused on priorities and things that will make a difference is the key.”

What’s the hardest part of your job?

“Washington – really like that – and also have had the Space Invadas album on high rotation.”

“Improve myself as an entrepreneur every day.”

What’s the hardest part of your job? “Prioritisation. We serve so many masters in distribution. We have artists, labels, managers, customers, strategy, 46

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Don’t have a favourite but have been listening to a lot of Kasabian lately.”

Got any hot tips of artists that you believe will break through later this year?

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “The whole album Gu Zheng Raggie by Xie Tian Xiao. A perfect fusion of Chinese Gu Zheng, reggae and rock.”

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why? “Hard As A Rock by AC/DC. I still remember the scene the first time I listened to it. It is great and I still listen to it, especially when I travel to poor, small towns in China.”

MIKE WALSH

HEAD OF MUSIC, XFM NETWORK

What’s been the highlight of your career so far? “There are so many! I loved my experience with Priority Records where I worked for almost ten years during the ’90s. As a true independent, I had the opportunity to be involved in many different aspects of the company. Although I was Vice President of Sales, I was able to touch A&R, accounting, marketing, promotions – literally every area of the company. Fontana has been great too. I have learned so much being a part of this organisation. I am privileged to work with such great people like Jim Urie, President and CEO of Universal Music Group Distribution, who challenges me to grow every day.”

“Too many to mention – I’ve been fortunate to work with a fabulous bunch of inspiring people over many years.”

How did you start working in the music industry?

GARY CHEN

CO-CHAIRMAN AND CEO, ORCA DIGITAL INC How did you start working in the music industry? “In 1995 I was still a banker in San Francisco. I thought I had saved enough money to do a premier tour for China rock legend Cui Jian in the States. So I did. I did not know anything about concert promotion but made it happen. I hired a few part-time first timers

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

SHAUN JAMES GENERAL MANAGER, XYZ NETWORKS

How did you start working in the music industry? “I started as a sales representative for Festival Records in Melbourne, Victoria, 1989.”

“I used to hang out at my local BBC radio station when I was a little kid as my mum was, and still is, a presenter there. That gave me the bug for music and radio very early on. I then went on to student radio in the UK, college radio in the US and eventually Parlophone Records before moving back into radio ten years ago.”

What’s been the highlight of your career so far? “Honestly too many to mention just one but, putting on an exclusive Xfm listener gig at London’s Roundhouse with Red Hot Chili Peppers when they were arguably the biggest band in the world, four years ago, was pretty exciting. Doing similar gigs more recently with


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SPEAKERFOCUS Kings Of Leon and Kasabian were also a big buzz. Also, being the first radio station in the world to play Mumford & Sons, and then watch their national and international success has been very rewarding.”

What’s the hardest part of your job? “Being part of such a small and extremely busy team, I often feel guilty about not being able to get through the sheer volume of new music that we get sent.”

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “There have been quite a few this year – Funeral Party NYC Moves To The Sound Of LA is very exciting, as is Kele’s debut solo single Tenderoni.”

Got any hot tips for artists that you believe will break through later this year? “There is a band from the North West of England called Kids On Bridges, just signed to the uber-cool Wall Of Sound label. Massive pop songs with a cool electro delivery.”

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why? “Again, that’s a tough one – it’s either INXS’ New Sensation for just being one of the greatest balls-out pop songs of all time, Powderfinger’s These Days for a particular time in my life, or Back In Black for being the greatest rock’n’roll song ever - so I guess it has to be AC/DC!”

KYLE HOPKINS HEAD OF MUSIC SUPERVISION, MICROSOFT MEDIA ACQUISITIONS

How did you start working in the music industry?

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why?

“Slinging vinyl singles at an indie dance specialist shop. It was a dream come true!”

“I can’t decide on just one. Confide In Me by Kylie Minogue, Don’t Dream It’s Over by Crowded House and Yothu Yindi’s Treaty (Filthy Lucre Remix) are among my favourites. Why? Because they would all have been chosen as Record Of The Day on my watch. They’re that good.”

What’s been the highlight of your career so far? “There’s a highlight every week, but two things stand out in particular from the past few years: working with the remix artists to shape the new remixes of iconic classics featured in the Xbox title Crackdown 2, and DJing ahead of Massive Attack and Horace Andy to a sold out 2,600 person crowd at Seattle’s historic Paramount Theatre.”

What’s the hardest part of your job? “Helping the game developers embrace the world of music that lives beyond their personal music collection.”

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Lenzman Open Page (feat Riya) on Metalheadz. It’s the sound of late summer nights.”

Got any hot tips of artists that you believe will break through later this year? “Andreya Triana, Mount Kimbie, Hanni El Khatib, and The Duke & The King will turn a lot of heads by the end of 2010. Delphic, The Drums and Aloe Blacc are already on their way this year, and I expect the momentum to continue.”

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why? “Van She’s Kelly – a tune that is frozen in time, like a long lost ‘80s hit just uncovered. Van She perfectly captured the mid-‘80s sound with shocking authenticity – and it’s a great pop tune.”

JAMES FOLEY

MUSIC EDITOR, RECORD OF THE DAY How did you start working in the music industry? “I freelanced as a journalist in Dublin and then London before falling in with the Record Of The Day crowd, first as Music Assistant and later as Music Editor.”

What’s been the highlight of your career so far? “It’s an ongoing highlight to hear that the track selections made for ROTD are picked up by the wider industry. It’s very gratifying to be in a position where your choices can give an artist the coverage they need to make the right impact, whether they are unsigned or established.”

What’s the hardest part of your job? “Finding amazing music is constantly tricky, but never a chore. In the larger scheme of things, my job isn’t hard. It’s just listening to music and going to gigs and music events. I’m very lucky.”

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Picking one is too difficult, so I’ll pick three. A Villagers’ track, The Pact (I’ll Be Your Fever), Alicia Keys’ Try Sleeping With A Broken Heart (a single in the UK this year) or Indestructible by Robyn. All three are beautiful.”

Got any hot tips of artists that you believe will break through later this year? “Rumer, I hope – I love her. Also, I can never recommend Villagers to enough people, so check out the album Becoming A Jackal.”

FRANK TAKESHITA

EXECUTIVE GM, CREATIVEMAN PRODUCTIONS How did you start working in the music industry? “I joined the Warner Music group more than 20 years ago when they were looking for a bilingual speaker.”

What’s been the highlight of your career so far? “So far, meeting with Ahmet Ertegun!”

What’s the hardest part of your job? “Long working hours, but it is also the enjoyment of the job.”

What’s your favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Difficult question and I don’t think I have one yet...”

Got any hot tips for artists that you believe will break through later this year? “I feel upcoming young artists/bands would not really understand the business side of what is required to take them to a next level, and they should seek guidance from someone experienced that they can trust to keep/ expand their career.”

What’s your favourite song by an Australian artist, and why? Kylie Minogue! Joking, but I respect her very much as an artist. I love The Temper Trap but my all-time favourite will definitely be AC/DC, and I don’t think you need a reason for that.

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ARTIST FOCUS Favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “FurLined’s How To Destroy Angels, because it’s the return of Trent Reznor in some brilliant musical form.”

Favourite musical moment of 2010 so far, and why? “Playing a sold out show at a festival at the beginning of the year; the fact that I injured my back while playing the show due to excessive stage ‘antics’ is just a testimony to how much fun the show actually was.”

Favourite music video of all time and why? “Perfect Drug by Nine Inch Nails, because it is the perfect blend of Dali-esque landscapes in poetic visual motion.”

You’re a musician. Why? What compels you?

BIURET (SOUTH KOREA)

Finally, please recommend our readers an amazing band/artist from your hometown, and tell us why you love their music.

Favourite song of all time, and why?

“The Koxx. Like us they are helping to build the Korean rock scene.”

HYE WON MOON – VOCALS/GUITAR

“My favourite album of all time is Ten by Pearl Jam. It’s just that I have listened to this album so many times over and over when I was young.”

Favourite musical moment of 2010 so far, and why? “Our favourite moment has to be playing at the Pentaport Rock Festival in Incheon (South Korea). The crowd and the energy were phenomenal.”

Favourite music video of all time and why?

THE CIRCUS (INDIA)

What’s more important to you: living comfortably from your art (financially), or artistic integrity? Is it possible to have both?

Favourite song of all time, and why?

“The charm of being a musician is the pursuit of living comfortably from your art while retaining your artistic integrity; and the endeavour to achieve a balance of both is what makes this pursuit challenging yet fulfilling.”

ARSH SHARMA CO-MANAGER/ GUITARS/VOCALS “Radiohead’s Everything In Its Right Place, because it is just an awesome piece of music.”

“Pearl Jam’s Even Flow. I love the energy.”

You’re a musician. Why? What compels you? “I had an affinity towards rock since high school, which led to songwriting. And I always thought about performing on stage.”

What’s more important to you: living comfortably from your art (financially), or artistic integrity? Is it possible to have both? “Neither. I think what’s most important is being able to connect and share with the audience through music.”

What do you hope to achieve as a result of playing at One Movement? “I don’t necessarily have an objective of result; but would like the audience to enjoy our music and gain new fans.” 48

“Despite being a professionally certified architect, the will to be a musician and being at it professionally is the only thing which compels me to go forward. The fact that as a career option it is uncertain and adventurous adds to its charm, and the fact that a person can feel absolute love by their own creation completes the package, and leaves one with no option but that of being a musician.”

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

Social media for musicians: friend or foe? Do you buy into

Facebook, Twitter and the ‘share everything, all the time!’ mentality? “Definitely friend. I buy into the whole Facebook/Twitter side of things, as it rids us of the middleman between musician and listener and allows for actual unprejudiced growth of a musician’s art – where absolute honesty is conveyed one on one between artist and listener.”

Potentially controversial statement: your recorded music is an advertisement for your live show. You should not expect that people will buy your music. Agree/ disagree? “Definitely. In today’s day and age, music CDs are outdated as a medium for spreading of music and act only as a representative of the band at a particular point in time. It is now definitely an advertisement as well as an accessory for a complete live performance.”

What do you hope to achieve as a result of playing at One Movement? “International exposure and an opportunity to learn from playing at a completely foreign festival are some of the primary goals of the band, as far as what we are taking back from the festival is concerned.”

Finally, please recommend our readers an amazing band/artist from your hometown, and tell us why you love their music. “Undying Inc from New Delhi. An absolutely phenomenal metal band whose music is probably better than anything I’ve heard in recent times. As a band they are truly torchbearers of the Indian metal and underground scene.”


ONE MOVEMENT ONE MOVE O MENT FORMOVEMENT MUSIC PERTH 2010 FOR PERTH 2010 MUSICMAGAZINE OFFICIAL OCTOBERMAGAZINE 6-10 OFFICIAL OCTOBER 6-10

ARTIST FOCUS CHILDREN COLLIDE (AUSTRALIA)

JOHNNY MACKAY – VOCALS/GUITAR Favourite song of all time, and why? “B-52’s Rock Lobster – because it has the lyrics “Everybody had matching towels” and “Here comes the narwhal ”.”

Favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “MIA’s Born Free, because it makes me move my head back and forth really quickly.”

Favourite musical moment of 2010 so far and why? “Band Of Horses at SXSW. I cried. I also got inappropriately excited during Warpaint there. Seeing tame Impala at Splendour In the Grass made me feel like a proud out-of-town cousin.”

Favourite music video of all time and why? “I usually answer Close To Me by The Cure. I love how claustrophobic it is. I also love the comb. I also love Brittany Spears’ Toxic. Also, The Rolling Stones’ Waiting On A Friend is good for pure awkward comedy.”

You’re a musician. Why? What compels you? “The ghosts of a thousand shit jobs.”

What’s more important to you: living comfortably from your art (financially), or artistic integrity? Is it possible to have both? “Ummmmm. I just do what I do. I think if you spend time considering either it’s not going to come out right. Being honest and free with yourself is the most important thing. Worrying about being cool (or whether or not you have

integrity) or being commercially viable/ successful are equally unsatisfying paths to travel down. I actually hate the attitude that tries to divide people up like this.”

Social media for musicians: friend or foe? Do you buy into Facebook, Twitter and the ‘share everything, all the time!’ mentality? “I’m pretty sure no one is interested in when I’m doing my laundry, and I’d get us in trouble if I had control of the Twitter account at 2am on a Saturday. On the other hand, I think you’re crazy if you don’t at least investigate taking advantage of every avenue open to you to make your music available to people.”

Potentially controversial statement: your recorded music is an advertisement for your live show. You should not expect that people will buy your music. Agree/ disagree? “I don’t really expect anything of anyone. Our recorded music usually comes with nice artwork but people stealing music is a fact of life. Personally, I find buying music fun.”

What do you hope to achieve as a result of playing at One Movement? “To start our own movement.”

Finally, please recommend our readers an amazing band/artist from your hometown, and tell us why you love their music. “Josh Armistead. He’s a singer/ songwriter who doesn’t really play around much anymore, but he was an early inspiration to me when I first started singing and writing songs with vocals in them. His songs continue to blow me away to this day. He’d probably find it weird that I wrote this.”

THE MELODICS (AUSTRALIA) JAMIE BARLOW – BASS

Favourite song of all time, and why? “That’s a tough one of course. So many to pick from; let’s just say Pyramid Song by Radiohead. Such great lyrics, with the music encapsulating the tone of the song. A great example of how Radiohead make something so complicated feel so natural and accessible, bringing interesting and timeless music to the masses. Brilliant!”

Favourite song of 2010 so far, and why? “Radar Detector by Darwin Deez. I guess because it’s so catchy, fun and fresh. Why not? Pure, simplistic pleasure.”

Favourite musical moment of 2010 so far, and why? “The Dirty Projectors at the Hi-Fi Bar in Melbourne. One of the greatest live shows I’ve seen; they sound so tight but at the same time loose as hell. Incredibly intriguing music; was great to see them pull it off live.”

Favourite music video of all time and why? “I don’t check out that many video clips, but who can go wrong with Here It Goes Again by Ok Go. Clever stuff.”

You’re a musician. Why? What compels you? “I guess I’m a musician because it allows me to be creative and also to present that creativity in such an inspiring and fun atmosphere. It’s just such a great balance; you know you can get bogged down in being creative, dwelling on your craft, stuck in a room and very rarely seeing what becomes of your craft. But what’s great about being a muso is that you get to present and alter your art much more frequently, and that can often be a positive thing. Taking the ‘me’ out of the art and thinking about ‘who’ you’re offering it to.”

What’s more important to you: living comfortably from your art (financially),

or artistic integrity? Is it possible to have both? “I think it’s important to have artistic integrity but also be able to be financially stable. I mean, if you drop your integrity ball you just become another run of the mill, over-produced puppet that will fade faster than wallpaper. I think we’re living in a really exciting time where people are starting to take notice – digital downloads are helping people form communities of artists and to accept new music and seek it out. It’s really opening up a grand platform for people to be creative and be accepted. I mean, you wouldn’t have had bands such as Grizzly Bear/The Dirty Projectors/Pivot et cetera touring successfully ten years ago.”

Social media for musicians: friend or foe? Do you buy into Facebook, Twitter and the ‘share everything, all the time!’ mentality? “I think social media is great for bands, especially those bands just starting out. It’s such a great avenue to take advantage of, the more places you can be seen the better. Especially if you’re trying to get your name out there. Once you’ve made it quite big though I guess it’s time to stop harassing your 1,042 ‘real’ friends about your next up-andcoming gig. Ha!”

Potentially controversial statement: your recorded music is an advertisement for your live show. You should not expect that people will buy your music. Agree/ disagree? “Disagree. I think the band has focused a lot on giving our recordings a live and energetic feel, which is what we’ve tried to encapsulate with our live show. The live show should sell the recording and vice versa.”

What do you hope to achieve as a result of playing at One Movement? “We’re wanting to gain some interest from record labels and also hopefully an international band booker. We would love to record an album next year with some funding and take it worldwide.”

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CREATIVE INDU 6TH OCTOBER

A CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DIALOGUE With advances in technology at the point where a book can contain moving images plus paintings plus music plus connectivity – think iPad and Kindle – the creation, distribution, export and funding of the works of creators & artists are rapidly changing. To date, there have been few congregated forums where participants drawn from across the range of all Creative Industries are given the opportunity to hear from local and international experts, and to engage with fellow practitioners, to discuss current innovations and

participate in active, positive discussion about the future of the Creative Industries. In response to this need, One Movement for Music has extended its program this year to include the One Movement Creative Industries Dialogue (OMCID) providing the opportunity for creators, their representatives, technologists, media and community leaders to gather in one place, at one time to discuss the exciting opportunities - and some of the challenges - that the world of convergence now offers us all. Troy Carter (USA) Founder, Chairman and CEO of the Coalition Media Group, the worldwide manager for Lady Gaga

SPEAKERS TROY CARTER

Rob Buckler (Aust) Content Manager, iiNet

AT OMCID YOU WILL... ● Meet representatives from all Creative Industries and Government ● Hear what technical, creative and marketing experts see as opportunities for the future ● Be part of the process of growth and discussion on how individual works are priced within a larger work ● Network with other CI professionals and investigate coproduction opportunities with them ● Explore possibilities with Government agencies and their involvement ● Share your inspiration about the role of the Creative Industries in our culture and business arenas ● Create business opportunities ● Demonstrate the scope and size of the Creative Industries in employment, cultural definition, revenue generation and social influence ● Mingle with international and local delegates ● Open doors to export and international partners

Jacqui Allen (Aust) Deputy Director General, Western Australia Department Culture & the Arts Tanya Denning (Aust) Head of Content Management and Digital Media, National

JACQUI ALLEN

Indigenous Television Ian Booth (Aust) Chief Executive, ScreenWest Eloise Nolan (Aust) Rightsholder Relationship Manager, Copyright Agency Ltd


STRIES DIALOGUE 2010 • PERTH

For more information go to www.onemovementmusic.com

OPPORTUNITIES ES S All Creative Industries (including film, painting, g, photography, writing, sculpture, multimedia, music, games, apps) are affected positively by technological change while being challenged at the same time. OMCID will explore these opportunities including those for: ● Greater collaboration ● Facilitation of the creation of new forms of expression & distribution channels ● Increased immediate audience ● Clarification of issues relating to ownership, rights & payment ● Creating awareness about the work/artist in amongst the clutter of billions of pieces of information ● Future forums for the sharing of ideas

PROGRAM 12:00PM – 5:00PM REGISTRATION OPEN (First Floor Conference Foyer) 1:30PM – 5:00PM CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DIALOGUE Swan Room (Hilton Parmelia Hotel) 1:30PM – 1.35PM WELCOME ADDRESS AND PANEL OVERVIEW 1:35PM – 2:00PM BROADBAND AND OTHER

Brett Cottle (Aust) CEO, APRA/ AMCOS Adrianne Pecotic (Aust) Executive Director, Ausralian Federation Against Copyright Theft Brendan Coady (Aust) Communications

MUSEXPO ASIA PACIFIC DRINKS RECEPTION Featuring: PAUL KELLY’S HOW TO MAKE GRAVY 2:00PM – 3:20PM BOOK LAUNCH CREATORS, 2nd Floor Foyer CONVERGENCE, COLLABORATION, at the Parmelia Hilton COLLECTION & CASH TECHNOLOGICAL OPPORTUNITIES Presented by: Maddocks

3:40PM – 5:00PM OPPORTUNITY, ACCESS, AUDIENCES & AWARENESS 5:00PM – 6:00PM CREATIVE INDUSTRIES DIALOGUE &

ADRIANNE PECOTIC

Lawyers, Maddocks Amy Broadfoot (Aust) Founder & GM, Amicko Films / Organiser, Future Shorts Marcus Canning (Aust) Director & CEO, ARTRAGE Inc

THOUGHTS FOR CONSIDERATION ● With With tthe Wi h advent of n he new ew ttechnologies echn nolog gie i s from mobile phon ph ones on e to o iPods and iPad a s, there is a grea e ter Convergence phones iPads, greater between the different Creative Industry practitioners and businesses than ever before as we all start to share the same platforms ● While the technical ability for cross-collaborative forms has been used by so-called ‘multimedia’ artists for some time, the newer technologies, from the beginnings of digital but now even more so with those which have arisen in the past two years, have made collaboration and distribution easier ● This convergence means that different creative forms (and the products or works created within them such as a book on an iPad) can now contain various other artforms and rights which enhance the user’s experience* ● How is this handled within a multiple convergence, easily transferable, item? ● What lessons can we all learn from each other, not just to survive but actually do things better in the new world? ● Have the Creative Industries effectively presented the size and scope of the sector as employers, income generators and drivers of positive change to legislators, business and the general public? ● There is always Strength in Numbers *Are we now more ‘the same’ than we have ever been or are we all still ‘too different’? Using an example of the enhanced e-book for an iPad which allows the reader to interact with the book by enhancing the reader’s experience, along with the text (the work of the author), this production may also contain non-moving images/ pictures (the work of photographers or painters or sculptors), music (songwriters and owners of sound recordings) and pieces of film, animation or TV footage (rights holders in the footage). How does this bringing together of everything work in a practical way? Is it a book with film and music? Or a film with music and text? Are the possibilities now endless and where can we take it? How do rights fit around this and is the contract still king? What’s the effect on each individual work contained in any one production and what is the role for the representing collecting societies?

Sonia Sharma (Aust) Communications Lawyers, Maddocks Fergus Linehan (Aust) Edinburgh Festival & Sydney Opera House Aidan O’Bryan (Aust) Chief Creative Officer, WBMC

FERGUS LINEHAN

One Movement For Music The essential tastemaker and music industry event in the southern hemisphere returns in 2010.


CANADIAN MUSIC WEEK AND MMF CANADA PRESENTS

Canada Rocks FINAL FLASH

COLIN MOORE

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MATTHEW

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ELLIOTT

BROOD WWW.ELLIOTTBROOD.CA

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TREWS

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383 MURRAY ST

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7

8:00PM - 1:00AM

AMPLIFIER BEERGARDEN


ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP (AIMS) It has always been an aim of the One Movement partners to ensure that real benefits to Australian artists and, in particular, indigenous artists are realised through the hosting of OMFM in Australia. As such, as part of this commitment to fostering new talent, OMFM founded the Australian Indigenous Music Scholarship (AIMS). The scholarship is designed to provide an opportunity for indigenous artists to gain high-level industry experience and exposure to ultimately achieve their career objectives. AIMS is a pioneering partnership between OMFM, Skinnyfish Music and MGM Distribution, supported by Sonicbids and Songlines Music Aboriginal Corporation. OMFM invited indigenous artists from across Australia to apply via Sonicbids to participate in the 2010 scholarship, offering an opportunity to showcase at the One Movement Music Festival as well as gain professional and performance development experience.

The state finalists for this year are: Lady Lash (Vic) Jake & The Cowboys (WA) Karnage & Darknis (SA) The Medics (Qld) The finalists from each state receive: the opportunity to showcase at OMFM in an intimate environment to music industry representatives from around the world; a three-hour development and mentoring session with renowned and experienced professionals from within the music industry, covering areas such as A&R, marketing, management, presentation and publishing; an invitation to attend One Movement For Music and a delegate registration per band to attend the MUSEXPO conference; a contribution towards flights to Perth from their nearest capital city and accommodation (for residents of SA, Vic and WA, supported by their local arts body); and a three-month Sonicbids membership.

APRA CROSS-CULTURAL SONGWRITING COLLABORATION PROJECT The project allows for a unique presentation of cross-cultural musical collaboration as part of the international One Movement Music Festival and is focused on highlighting musical talent in the Asia Pacific region. It provides APRA members with the opportunity to collaborate with international artists with a view to creating and developing new material which is showcased immediately to national and international delegates at One Movement. This year’s APRA Cross-Cultural Songwriting Collaboration Project includes Australia’s Mama Kin and Raghu Dixit from India, who will work together from a Perth-based studio and present the outcome of this cross-cultural initiative at the One Movement Music Festival on Saturday 9 October at the Esplanade in Perth. “The opportunity to collaborate with a songwriter of Raghu’s calibre is as exciting as it is petrifying,” Mama Kin says. “Not only am I grateful for the challenge, I’m really intrigued as to what a Raghu/Mama song will sound like. I’m a big fan of APRA’s work and this initiative is testament to their passion and support of songwriting as a craft.” Jenral Group’s Paul Knowles, Raghu Dixit’s manager, said, “It shows wonderful vision and creativity by APRA to introduce Raghu Dixit, a high-profile Indian songwriter, to Mama Kin from Australia. I’m sure that the results of this songwriting collaboration will be quite sensational. Our camp are very excited by the initiative and it’s great to see APRA spearheading such projects”. “A project that seeks to marry the diverse creative interests of songwriters is always an exciting prospect. To then have the results of that collaboration offered to a hungry audience is an inspired concept. Congratulations to One Movement on a unique project that APRA is thrilled to be a part of. Happy collaborating to Mama Kin and Raghu,” says Sally Howland, director member services, APRA|AMCOS. The Medics

The overall winner will further receive, in addition to the above benefits: a minimum four-hour session in a Perth-based recording studio with members of the panel to mentor the production and recording process; a six-month Sonicbids membership; the opportunity to play at the Share The Spirit Festival on 26 January, 2011 (provided by Songlines Victoria); and a live recording of their winning showcase performance. State arts bodies including Songlines Victoria, Arts SA and Arts Qld will provide the finalist from their respective state with a contribution towards travel and accommodation expenses to take up this opportunity and appear at the showcase in Perth. The panel for the 2010 AIMS program are Mark Grose (director, Skinnyfish Music), Rhoda Roberts (festival director, GARMA Festival and creative director, Sydney New Year’s Eve), James Ware (creative director, Waving At Trains), Guy Ghouse (musician and educator, Desert Child) and Mark Richardson (founder and creative director, Forum 5). The panel will judge the live showcases at OMFM and determine a winning act based on their performance in areas such as technical ability, level of experience, originality, songwriting ability, overall artistic ability and an assessment of their past experience.

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ESSENTIAL PERTH INFO INTERNATIONAL DIALLING To phone international you’ll need to dial 0011 followed by the country code and then the number you wish to call.

TAXIS Swan Taxis: 131 330 Black and White Taxis: 131 008

SHOPPING IN THE CITY The two main shopping malls in Perth are the Murray and Hay Street malls. Both of the malls are closed to traffic and offer a wide range of specialty stores. There are several arcades that run off either Murray street mall or Hay street mall and link the city from St George’s Terrace to Wellington Street.

SHOPPING HOURS Perth City shops are open 9am to 5pm on Monday to Thursday and Saturday. Late night shopping hours extend until 9pm on Fridays while on Sunday most shops are open from 12noon until 6pm. Fremantle also has seven days a week shopping. Late night shopping in the suburbs is Thursday night until 9pm.

CITY BUSES Perth has a free bus service that operates around central business district. These buses are called CATS (central area transport service). The buses have a set route and arrive approximately every five to ten minutes. The CAT routes are either a red or blue route from Monday to Friday and a special modified yellow route for weekends.

METROPOLITAN TRAINS AND BUSES Perth also has an extensive metropolitan train and bus service. The trains run on five lines to Armadale / Thornlie, Fremantle, Joondalup, Midland and the new Mandurah line.

NOTE FOR WEEKEND TICKET HOLDERS: Show your ticket to the driver or inspector on your way to the festival on the Saturday and your wrist band on the way home on Saturday night. Your wristband will be your valid public transport ticket on your way to the festival on the Sunday and on the way home on the Sunday. NOTE FOR WEEKEND + UPGRADE TICKET HOLDERS: Show your ticket to the driver or inspector on your way to the festival on the Friday and your wrist band on the way home on Friday night. Your wristband will be your valid public transport ticket on your way to the festival on the Saturday & the Sunday and on the way home on the Saturday and Sunday. NOTE FOR GOLD PASS TICKET HOLDERS: Show your ticket to the driver or inspector on your way to the showcases on the Thursday and your wrist band on the way home on Thursday night. Your wristband will be your valid public transport ticket on your way to and from the showcases on the Friday and to and from the festival/ showcases on Saturday and Sunday. NOTE FOR GOLD PASS UPGRADE TICKET HOLDERS: Show your ticket to the driver or inspector on your way to the showcases on the Thursday and your wrist band on the way home on Thursday night. Your wristband will be your valid public transport ticket on your way to and from the festival/showcases on the Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Information regarding special event transport services can be obtained by contacting the Transperth InfoLine on 13 62 13 (TTY: 9428 1999) or by visiting the Transperth website at www.transperth.wa.gov.

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ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010


OFFICIAL SPONSORS PRESENTING PARTNERS

MAJOR FESTIVAL PARTNERS

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 6-10

MAJOR EVENT PARTNERS

CONFERENCE PARTNERS

MAJOR MEDIA PARTNERS

KEY INDUSTRY PARTNERS

PRODUCT PARTNERS

ASSOCIATED MEDIA PARTNERS

ASSOCIATED INDUSTRY PARTNERS

ONE MOVEMENT FOR MUSIC PERTH 2010

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WELCOME TO ONE OF THE TOP TEN PLACES ON THE PLANET. AS CHOSEN BY LONELY PLANET. Each year Lonely Planet chooses 10 regions they believe to be the world’s most incredible to visit. And this year, they’ve selected Western Australia’s South West. With its famous vineyards, white-sand beaches and tall-tree forests, it is one of the world’s most extraordinarily diverse places, so perhaps we shouldn’t be too surprised. South West Region, Western Australia

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