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SARAH BLASKO

DESCENDENTS

BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE

DEAD CAN DANCE DEER TICK CYPRESS HILL DIRTY BEACHES

N O W AVA I L A B L E O N I PA D • W E D N E S DAY 6 F E B R U A RY 2 013 • I S S U E 12 6 0 • F R E E

THE BRONX

www.themusic.com.au


Strong crude humour, sexual references, nudity, violence and coarse language

IN CINEMAS FEBRUARY 7


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CHUGG ENTERTAINMENT & BLUESFEST TOURING PRESENT

AU S T RA LI A

2013

THURSDAY 11 APRIL PRINCE BANDROOM MELBOURNE SATURDAY 13 APRIL THE BENDED ELBOW GEELONG SUNDAY 14 APRIL CARAVAN MUSIC CLUB MELBOURNE

ON SALE NOW GO TO CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM OR BLUESFESTTOURING.COM.AU FOR MORE INFO

ALSO PLAYING BLUESFEST

NEWTONFAULKNER.COM • CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM • BLUESFESTTOURING.COM.AU

MONDAY 25 MARCH

SIDNEY MYER MUSIC BOWL ON SALE NOW ticketmaster.com.au or 136 100 JASONMRAZ.COM | CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM

2008 St. Jermone’s Laneway Festival alumni return… “The band has grown. The music has evolved. But the message of feeling alive despite all odds is more apparent than ever.” – Paste

WITH SPECIAL GUEST PHEBE STARR

MELBOURNE SUNDAY 10 FEBRUARY CORNER HOTEL

VœÀ˜iÀ…œÌi°Vœ“NäΙ{ÓÇ™£™nN/…i œÀ˜iÀ œÝ"vwVi

ON SALE NOW

25 MARCH PALACE THEATRE TICKETS ON SALE TODAY TICKETEK.COM.AU OR 132 849

OUT NOW

YOUARESTARS.COM CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM

6

CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM

MANUCHAO.NET


PRESENTS

SUPERTRAMP

WITH

MAVIS STAPLES

ARTS CENTRE MELBOURNE STATE THEATRE WED 27 MAR

BRINGING HIS FULL BAND TO AUSTRALIA FOR THE FIRST TIME

PALAIS THEATRE THU 28 MAR SELLING FAST!

PRESENTS

EXPRESS & STAR

JON ANDERSON AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH

THE VOICE OF

YES

THE CORNER WED 10 APR THU 11 APR BOTH SHOWS LIMITED GA SEATING

CAPLAN IS TO FOLKBLUES WHAT SMOKE IS TO BOURBON. RUGGED, RASPY & ROARING WITH CHARISMA AND THE GROWLING INTENSITY OF SEASICK STEVE & TOM WAITS.

& ORLEANS AVENUE

“GENIUS PLAYER” LENNY KRAVITZ “COMPLETELY BLOWN AWAY” JEFF BECK

ARTS CENTRE MELBOURNE HAMER HALL TUE 26 MAR

PRESENTS

PRESENTS

‘THE HARDER THEY COME’ ‘MANY RIVERS TO CROSS’ ‘YOU CAN GET IT IF YOU REALLY WANT’

JIMMY THE KING OF REGGAE

BEN CAPLAN CLIFF SOLO

“YES, JON STILL IS THE VOICE...ANDERSON’S VOICE REMAINS EXQUISITE.”

TEDESCHI TRUCKS TROMBONE SHORTY

BAND

BONNIE RAITT ROGER HODGSON THE LEGENDARY VOICE OF

EVERYBODY’S TALKIN’ THEIR BRILLIANT LIVE ALBUM OUT NOW

WITH GUESTS

‘DREAMER‘ ‘GIVE A LITTLE BIT’ ‘THE LOGICAL SONG’ ‘IT’S RAINING AGAIN’ ‘BREAKFAST IN AMERICA’

A UNIQUE PAIRING OF BLUES AND SOUL

PRESENTS

PRESENTS

NORTHCOTE S.C. THU 4 APR PRESENTS

THE CORNER WED 27 MAR

“EXTRAORDINARY SONGS, MESMERISING GUITAR PLAYING, AND A VOICE THAT GOES EFFORTLESSLY FROM BRUISE-TENDER TO SCARHARD IN A MATTER OF MINUTES ... SHE HELD THE AUDIENCE SPELLBOUND.”

PRESENTS

THE GUARDIAN

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH

SHAWN COLVIN

THE CORNER MON 1 APR LIMITED GA SEATING

PRESENTS

“AN ATOMIC BOMB IN LIPSTICK - THE QUEEN OF ROCKABILLY” BOB DYLAN “SHE’S LIKE MY ROCKABILLY ETTA JAMES. I LOVE HER, SHE’S SO BRILLIANT. I DON’T THINK ‘ROLLIN’ IN THE DEEP’ WOULD EXIST IF IT WASN’T FOR WANDA JACKSON” ADELE

THE CORNER WED 20 MAR & THU 21 MAR 8

“WHEN I HEARD SOJA’S LEAD VOCALIST AND SONGWRITER JACOB HEMPHILL, I IMMEDIATELY THOUGHT HERE IS THE NEXT MAJOR VOICE OF CONSCIOUSNESS IN MUSIC IN A LONG LINE STARTING WITH BOB MARLEY THROUGH TO MICHAEL FRANTI AND BEYOND.... DON’T MISS THE URGENCY OF THE MESSAGE OF THESE FREEDOMNOBLE SOLDIERS” FESTIVAL DIRECTOR BLUESFEST PRINCE BANDROOM SAT 6 APR PETER


THE ULTIMATE BLUES REVUE:

Robert

BLUESFEST TOURING PRESENTS

DIRECT FROM THE US A GOSPEL SPECTACULAR

g

Smokin Gun

Y A R C

Don’t Afraid Be the Darof k

THE BLI N D BOYS OF L MAHA o tri Taj

&

e i g g S hu

S I T O

p to Going Uuntry, the Co t My Pain Blue Mailbox

ROYAL SOUTHERN SOUTHERN ROCK SUPERGROUP

Fishin’ Blues

Lovin My Ba in by Eyes ’s

PRESENTS

ALABAMA

BROTHERHOOD FEAT CYRIL NEVILLE (OF THE NEVILLE BROTHERS & THE METERS) DEVON ALLMAN (ALLMAN BROTHERS) HIGHLY AWARDED BLUES GUITARIST MIKE ZITO CHARLIE WOOTEN & YONRICO SCOTT (OF TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND)

SPECIAL GUEST JD MCPHERSON 100% ROCKABILLY SWAGGER THE CORNER SAT 30 MAR

PLUS

ALLEN TOUSSAINT

PRESENTS

ALSO

SWEET HONEY

Strawberry Letter 23

CENTRE HAMER HALL ARTS MELBOURNE SUN 24 MAR

PRESENTS

“JAKE IS TAKING THE INSTRUMENT (UKE) TO A PLACE THAT I CAN’T SEE ANYBODY ELSE CATCHING UP WITH HIM.” EDDIE VEDDER

AFTER RELEASING HIS OWN ALBUM OF UKULELE SONGS

JAKE

SHIMABUKURO THE CORNER FRI 5 APR

PRESENTS

ALBUM OUT 15 MARCH

“ALLEN STONE HAS THE BEST EFFING VOICE I’VE EVER HEARD.” MTV

“THE SON OF A PREACHER MAN... PITCH-PERFECT POWERHOUSE” USA TODAY

ALLENSTONE US SOUL SENSATION

NORTHCOTE S.C. THU 28 MAR

IN THE ROCK

ARTS CENTRE MELB, HAMER HALL WED 3 APR RICHARDS “PUT ME IN THE FAN CLUB!” KEITH

“ONE OF R&B’S GREATEST ...VOCALISTS.” “ONE OF THE RAITT MOST INCREDIBLE R&B SINGERS SINGING TODAY.” BONNIE ELVIS COSTELLO

& SOUL “ONE OF THE BEST SOUL VOICES EVER.” BLUES

JOHN “RAW, GRITTY. GUT WRENCHING ... “INCREDIBLE ARTIST” ELTON ONE OF R&B’S BEST KEPT SECRETS.” BILLBOARD “SHE IS GONNA GROHL FOO FIGHTERS STEAL THE SHOW... UNBELIEVABLE.” DAVE

“THE GREATEST FEMALE SOUL SINGER.”

RY COODER

“THE CURRENT QUEEN OF SOUL” HITS “THE MOST EMOTIVE, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE EMOTIONAL SINGER IN THE R&B WORLD.” THE

THE FINEST MUSICIANS FROM THE STREET CORNERS OF THE WORLD UNITE ONSTAGE TO CREATE CHANGE.

PLAYING

FOR CHANGE ALSO APPEARING WITH ROBERT PLANT FOR SELECT PERFORMANCES

THE CORNER MON 25 MAR

“THERE’S NO-ONE MORE SOULFUL.” CNN

PRESENTS

“HER VOICE ... CONTAINS MORE CHARACTER AND DEPTH OF FEELING THAN ... ANY OTHER SINGER THIS SIDE OF BILLIE AND DETROIT SHERYL FREE PRESS “JUST A MASTER” CROW ARETHA.” THE

HUFFINGTON POST “HIGH PRIESTESS OF R&B.” THE NEW YORKER “THE LAST GREAT VERNACULAR BLACK SINGER.” THE BON JOVI “SOME SINGERS SING... THEN THERE IS BETTYE.” JON

“RIVALS ARETHA FRANKLIN AS HER GENERATION’S MOST VITAL SOUL SINGER.” THE NEW YORK TIMES

BETTYE

LAVETTE THE CORNER THU 4 APR

MUSIC MAKER BLUES REVUE! THE REAL BLUES

FEATURING

IRONING BOARD SAM

|

|

MAJOR PAT DR. HANDY WILDER BURT WITH NASHID

ABDUL-KHAALIQ ARDIE DEAN | ALBERT WHITE | NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB WED 27 MAR

ARTISTS ALSO APPEARING AT BLUESFEST TICKET INFO: BLUESFESTTOURING.COM.AU 02 6685 8310 ALL

ALSO TOURING:

SOLD JOAN ARMATRADING OUT!       SOLD RODRIGUEZ OUT!         NEWTON FAULKNER

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LIVE NATION, NICHE PRODUCTIONS, TRIPLE J’S THE HIP HOP SHOW & MTV PRESENTS

CURATED IN ASSOCIATION WITH NAS

NAS BLISS N ESO

2 CHAINZ CHIDDY BANG JOEY BADA$$ ANGEL HAZE

SPIT SYNDICATE THUNDAMENTALS * BRIS, MELB, PERTH

+ SYDNEY ONLY

FRIDAY 26TH APRIL SYDNEY HORDERN PAVILION TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM TICKETEK.COM.AU

SATURDAY 27TH APRIL MELBOURNE MUSIC BOWL TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM TICKETMASTER.COM.AU

SUNDAY 28TH APRIL BRISBANE RIVERSTAGE TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM TICKETMASTER.COM.AU

TUESDAY 30TH APRIL PERTH RED HILL AUDITORIUM TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM OZTIX.COM.AU & TICKETMASTER.COM.AU

TICKETS ON SALE 9AM MONDAY 11TH FEB: MOVEMENTFESTIVAL.COM.AU LIVENATION.COM.AU / NICHEPRODUCTIONS.COM.AU / TRIPLEJ.NET.AU / MTV.COM.AU


FRIDAY MAY 3 PALAIS THEATRE WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.AU VENUE PRESALE FRIDAY 8 FEB AT 9AM - MONDAY 11 FEB, 2PM WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.AU | PASSWORD: KOOKS

GENERAL PUBLIC ON SALE WEDNESDAY 13 FEB * ALSO TOURING NATIONALLY ON GTM FESTIVAL JUNK OF THE HEART OUT NOW

CHUGGENTERTAINMENT.COM XIIITOURING.COM THEKOOKS.COM


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Go your own way.

Fleetwood Mac Rumours - 35th Anniversary Edition (Expanded Edition) This 3CD deluxe set features the remastered version of the original album, including extra B-side track ‘Silver Springs’, a second disc of previously unreleased live performances compiled from the 1977 tour and a third disc of tracks from the recording sessions, also previously unreleased. Additionally there are new liner notes by David Wild housed in a 16 page booklet.

Two Gallants The Bloom And The Blight

Robert Ellis Photographs

Australian edition adds two bonus tracks, including a cover of Blind Willie Johnson’s “Dyin’ Crapshooter’s Blues.”

Exclusive Australian edition featuring 3 bonus live tracks.

“… a meaty, moody vision of North America, coming over like the Grand Ole Opry bringing its country swagger to CBGB.” – 8/10, NME TOURING: Feb 8- Annandale Hotel, Feb 9 & 10 – Northcote Social Club, Feb 12 – Perth Festival www.twogallants.com

www.fleetwoodmac.com

“A lithe Houston virtuoso who harkens back to the days of Merle Haggard, Kris Kristofferson and Townes Van Zandt…” The Huffington Post “The quiet perfection of each song. The knockout songwriting. The curator’s knowledge. And the timeless voice.” The Associated Press Mojo

Uncut

ROBERT ELLIS NOW ON TOUR WITH JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE www.robertellismusic.com

Gary Clark Jr. Blak and Blu

Lianne La Havas Is Your Love Big Enough?

YOU’RE GONNA KNOW MY NAME….

UK iTunes Album of the Year

“There’s a chance the searing, unforgettable heat of this year’s Big Day Out may have been generated by the phenomenal guitar playing of Gary Clark Jnr, who effortlessly proved he could play the blues, rock and anything else he tried his hand at.” - Sydney Morning Herald

“Sugar coated vocals” Q “A Superb, smoky voice” Guardian www.liannelahavas.com

Regina Spektor What We Saw From The Cheap Seats Latest album from the forever charming singer-songwriter “A singular songwriting voice that spans genres and personas with grace and apparent ease.” NPR Music www.reginaspektor.com

“He’s the future” - President Barack Obama “His songs are as notable for his soulful vocals as they are for the skilled guitar playing.” The Australian “There’s a natural rawness to him, and the music, that draws you in.” Rhythms Magazine www.garyclarkjr.com

WWW.WARNERMUSIC.COM.AU

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THE SP RTING CLUB THURSDAY

Donnie Dureau Free in the Front Bar 8pm FRIDAY

Brooke Russell & The Mean Reds Free in the Front Bar 6pm SUNDAY

Dan Watkins & Paddy Montgomery Free in the Front Bar 6pm

27 WESTON ST, BRUNSWICK Tues - Fri 4pm till Late Sat & Sun 12pm till Late

THURSDAY

EMILEE SOUTH MUSTERED COURAGE

6PM 8PM $10

FRIDAY

BRONI 6PM ALICIA ADKINS + LES THOMAS + LACHLAN BRYAN + BILL JACKSON 8PM $7 SATURDAY

DAVID BRAMBLE QUINCE PASTE

3PM $10 5PM

SUNDAY

NICK SAXON & THE ELUSIVE FEW DAN & AMY Open...MON - SAT...from 12pm ‘til late Kitchen til 10pm SUN...from 12pm ‘til 11pm Kitchen til 9pm

Live Music Bookings wesleyannebookings@gmail.com www.wesleyanne.com.au

NEW SUMMER MENU 16

4PM 8PM $7

TUESDAY

OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH KATE WALKER

Summer Special 2 for 1 meals weekdays before 6pm $12 jugs of Boag’s and Cider OPEN FOR LUNCH FROM MIDDAY

bookings: 9482 1333

7PM


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ISSUE 1260

W E D N E S D AY 6 F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 3

Thu 7. 6pm - LoopHole February Exhibiting Artists Opening Night Anastaszia Ward & Anna Feery Fri 8. 10pm - In:Session Liquid/Deep/Dark Drum & Bass//Dubstep Baron Von Rotten, Raider, J Chau, Indika, Deall B2B Rubix, Deep Element B2B Complicit, MC Harzee - Visuals by Dougstep Sat 9. 10pm - ebb&flo Lister Cooray, Jon Beta & Nikko bringing the grassroots of the ebb&flo sound to Loop - Netzair on visuals Tue 12. 7:30pm - Pleasure Forum Australia February Gathering: What is a Sex Geek? Panelists Louise Bourchier, Gareth Durrant, Kate McCombs, Alex Tanglao Wed 13. 6pm - The Melbourne Producers Club

JIM JAMES

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INPRESS 20 22 24 26 27 28 30 32 34

all levels of experience welcome

36 38 40

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Foreword Line brings you all the latest tour announcements Moves and shakes with Industry News Cover boys Neil Finn and Paul Kelly Descendents don’t wanna be like other adults Sarah Blasko stops to chat about I Awake Bullet For My Valentine’s frontman levels and The Bronx take us through touring highs Deer Tick are on their way, and stuff Dead Can Dance describe the magic Cypress Hill get into hip hop, marijuana laws and their new album Dave Larkin has a crack at the Taste Test Dirty Beaches gets into relationships and Jim James revels in his own sound We get all southern with Royal Southern Brotherhood, Ryan Francesconi has been listening to baroque lute music, Clubfeet are riding an ‘80s new wave, and Ruby Boots scoots it On The Record rates new releases from High Highs to Green Day

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47

BACK TO INPRESS 49

52

53

54 58

FRONT ROW 45

BRUNSWICK

SATURDAY ARVO RESIDENCY

The Blackeyed Susans Woohoo! The beloved Susans return for a summer residency to play four big arvos of countrified alt-rock. These are special shows; miss them at your own risk. 5pm

SATURDAY 9 February

Chris Wilson & Band Mighty harmonica legend Chris Wilson delivers a hoot of a night with his always-rockin’ band. See him two Saturdays in a row! 9pm

SUNDAY 10 February

Tess McKenna & the Shapiros Fans of Bob Dylan: CHECK OUT THIS SHOW. McKenna and co play a brilliant reimagining of The Times They Are a’Changin, a follow-up gig to Pure Pop’s Summer of Classic Albums. 5pm

THE UNION HOTEL

BRUNSWICK 109 UNION ST, BRUNSWICK 9388 2235

18 • To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags

Check out what’s happening This Week In Arts and Art Or Not? FlickerFest opens this week and we sit down with festival

director Bronwyn Kidd; plus buff brothers The Ceaser Twins on at The Famous Spiegeltent We review Neil Young’s book, Movie 43, The Other Place and GIRLS; as well as Cultural Cringe and Fragmented Fish Comedians Brendon Burns and Harley Breen, and cabaret artist Naomi Price

60 65 66

For Gig Of The Week see Brooklyn’s The Men and LIVE: Reviews hangs at Laneway Festival Sarah Petchell will Wake The Dead with her punk and hardcore talk; the freshest in urban news with OG Flavas; Dan Condon blues and roots in Roots Down; and heavy shit with Adamantium Wolf Pop culture therapy with The Breakdown; hip hop with Intelligible Flow; Foreign Objects with Clare Dickins; and diggin’ up the good shit with Search & Destroy The best Live gigs of the week and Sorted For EPs If you haven’t appeared in Fred Negro’s Pub, your mother probably still speaks to you and Jeff Jenkins gets down and local in Howzat! Our Gig Guide fills your diary for the weekend Find your new band and just about everything else in our classy Classifieds Gear and tech talk in Muso

GIVEAWAYS GALORE!

This week we have five double in-season tickets to see chilling documentary West Of Memphis; plus we’ve got three double passes to see The Presets at the Palace Theatre this Thursday 7 February. Get into it!

CREDITS

McMahon, Luke Monks, Fred Negro, Mark Neilsen, Danielle O’Donohue, Matt O’Neill, James Parker, Paul Ransom, Dylan Stewart, Izzy Tolhurst, Nic Toupee, Rob Townsend, Dominique Wall, Doug Wallen.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

EDITORIAL Group Managing Editor Andrew Mast Editor Bryget Chrisfield music@inpress.com.au Assistant Editor Samson McDougall Editorial Assistant Stephanie Liew Arts Coordinator Cassandra Fumi frontrow@inpress.com.au Staff Writer Michael Smith

ADVERTISING sales@inpress.com.au National Sales & Marketing Director Leigh Treweek National Sales Manager – Print Nick Lynagh Account Manager Anna Moull Account Manager Okan Husnu

Senior Contributor Kane Hibberd Jesse Booher, Andrew Briscoe, Chrissie Francis, Jay Hynes, Lou Lou Nutt, Heidi Takla, Elaine Reyes.

INTERNS Jan Wisniewski

EDITORIAL POLICY The opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. No part may be reproduced without the consent of the copyright holder. By submitting letters to us for publication, you agree that we may edit the letter for legal, space or other reasons. ©

DESIGN & LAYOUT artroom@inpress.com.au Art Direction Matt Davis Layout Matt Davis, Nicholas Hopkins, Eamon Stewart

ACCOUNTS & ADMINISTRATION accounts@streetpress.com.au Reception Kathleen Dray Accounts Receivable Anita D’Angelo

CONTRIBUTORS Senior Contributors Jeff Jenkins Overseas Contributors Tom Hawking (US), James McGalliard (UK), Sasha Perera (UK). Writers Nick Argyriou, Aleksia Barron, Atticus Bastow, Steve Bell, Sarah Braybrooke, Luke Carter, Anthony Carew, Rebecca Cook, Adam Curley, Cyclone, Guy Davis, Liza Dezfouli, Dan Condon, Simon Eales, Guido Farnell, Sam Fell, Bob Baker Fish, Warwick Goodman, Cameron Grace, Chris Hayden, Andrew Hazel, Brendan Hitchens, Ching Pei Khoo, Kate Kingsmill, Baz McAlister, Tony

DEADLINES Editorial Friday 5pm Advertising Bookings Friday 5pm Advertising Artwork Monday 5pm General Inquiries info@inpress.com.au (no attachments) Accounts/Administration accounts@streetpress.com.au Gig Guide gigguide@inpress.com.au Distribution distro@inpress.com.au Office Hours 9am to 5.30pm Monday to Friday

PUBLISHER Street Press Australia Pty Ltd 584 Nicholson St, Fitzroy North 3068 Locked Bag 2001, Clifton Hill VIC 3068 Phone: (03) 9421 4499 Fax: (03) 9421 1011

PRINTED BY Rural Press Victoria


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FOREWORD LINE

NEWS FROM THE FRONT

MANU OH MANU Along with his appearances at Bluesfest and West Coast Blues & Roots festival, two headline shows for Manu Chao and his band La Ventura have been announced. The Melbourne show will be held at the Palace Theatre on Monday 25 March. Chao has made music since the late ‘80s as leader of rock outfit Mano Negra and then as a solo artist. He has sold more than 10 million albums and has eclectically gathered influences from rock, reggae, salsa, dub, folk, gypsy and West African – with compositions sung in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French, Italian and Spanish.

WEDNESDAY 6 FEBRUARY

RESIDENCY – OPENING NIGHT

ANIMAUX FARROW THE RED LIGHTS ENTRY $8, 8.30PM

Frightened Rabbit

THURSDAY 7 JANUARY

ON THE MOOVE

OH, SLEEPER (USA) FOR ALL ETERNITY STORM THE SKY PRETTY LITTLE LIARS EMERSON ENTRY $30 DOOR, $25 THRU MOSHTIX, 7.30PM $2.50 POTS, $5 VODKAS!

Sun’s coming up on a pure gold Groovin’ The Moo this year. From Flume, The Amity Affliction, Midnight Juggernauts, Tame Impala, The Temper Trap and Seth Sentry to Example (UK), The Kooks (UK), Tegan & Sara (CAN), Matt & Kim (USA), Frightened Rabbit (UK) and The Bronx (USA), the GTM community of 75,000 from across the country are in for a premium shindig. The tour stops off at Bendigo’s Prince Of Wales Showground on Saturday 4 May. For more details and the line-up so far, visit gtm.net.au.

FRIDAY 8 FEBRUARY

INPRESS PRESENTS

PLUDO ASIAN ENVY MIDI WIDOW ENTRY $18 DOOR, $13 THRU MOSHTIX, 8.30PM

SATURDAY 9 FEBRUARY

CHEAP MONDAY BACKYARD SESSIONS – ROOFTOP SHOW

KING GIZZARD AND THE LIZARD WIZARD MURLOCS TICKETS AVAILABLE AT GENERAL PANTS, FAT, DAKOTA, 1PM

ALBUM LAUNCH THE CHARGE ALTAMIRA ENTRY $15 DOOR, $12 THRU MOSHTIX, 9PM

SUNDAY 10 FEBRUARY

MATINEE SHOW

KAT ARDITTO FOX ROAD FLY YOU FOOLS THE FALSE ECONOMY ENTRY $10, 1.30PM

EVENING SHOW

THE SEVEN UPS ECHO DRAMA DJ MICKEY SPACE ENTRY $5, 7.30PM

MONDAY 11 FEBRUARY

RESIDENCY

PRIVATE LIFE TULLY ON TULLY WINDSOR THIEVES DJ YASUMO ENTRY $2, 8.30PM

San Francisco deep house favourite Miguel Migs returns to our shores in late February. Kicking off his illustrious career in 1998, Migs has slowly but surely moved beyond the limitations of the house scene in which he first made his name. His deep-seated love of reggae and dub shines strongly through as well as his passion for classic rock, blues, funk and soul. Miguel Migs performs at New Guernica on Saturday 23 February.

RETURN OF THE FLAVA

ATOLLS

MASSIVE THE WELLS

MIGUSTA

Something For Kate

SOMETHING STAR-CROSSED

Craig David is returning to Australia in March for the first time in about ten years. His 13 top ten singles, including Fill Me In, 7 Days, Walking Away, What’s Your Flava, Hot Stuff, and the duet with Sting, Rise And Fall, established David as an indisputable commercial success, and proved that British urban music had the power to go pop. Craig David is currently working on his next studio album. He performs at the Plenary on Saturday 30 March.

Something For Kate are excited to announce their first extensive Australian tour in over six years this coming May and June. The Star-Crossed Cities Tour will see the band showcasing material from their new album, the critically acclaimed Leave Your Soul To Science, as well as a comprehensive selection of material from their large and enviable back catalogue. Joining the band for all shows will be Courtney Barnett. The tour stops off at Ferntree Gully Hotel on Friday 10 May, Pier Live (Frankston) on Saturday 11, Theatre Royal (Castlemaine) on Friday 24 and the Forum on Friday 14 June.

SIMPLY SMASHING

LOOK AT THEM

In her latest release for ABC Classics, Catch Me If You Can, internationally acclaimed classical saxophone virtuoso Amy Dickson brings to life the works of some of the film world’s legendary composers. A brilliant interpreter of contemporary music, Dickson has performed with the world’s leading orchestras. See her live with Melbourne Symphony Orchestra and Benjamin Northey on Wednesday 20 February at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl.

Look At Me, the new single from Vaudeville Smash, is taken from the band’s eagerly anticipated forthcoming debut album, due for release mid-2013. With a disco chic groove and smooth vocals, Look At Me separates Vaudeville Smash from the pack. They’re launching the single at the Espy on Friday 22 February, and also playing Moomba Festival on Sunday 10 March.

Californian five-piece Smash Mouth have finally rescheduled dates for their Australian tour. Smash Mouth had several singles crack the ARIA top 20 charts back in the day, with Walking On The Sun hitting number one on the alternative charts. This tour follows the release of their latest album Magic. See them live at the Hi-Fi on Wednesday 13 March.

CHASING AMY

IT’S YOUR FUNERAL Over the course of a decade, Funeral For A Friend have remained one of the most fascinating bands to come out of the UK. Their debut album Casually Dressed & Deep In Conversation has long been upheld as a landmark punk album of the 2000s but it by no means bred a sense of self-satisfaction for the ambitious Welshmen. Having spent most of 2012 recording their new album, Conduit, Funeral For A friend return to Australia, refreshed and reinvigorated. Catch them at the Corner on Tuesday 14 May and at Pier Live (Frankston) on Wednesday 15.

BARRY’S BEATS Club Spiegel in Melbourne’s most-loved pop-up venue the Famous Spiegeltent offers visitors late-night entertainment and risqué revelry on Friday and Saturday nights from 11pm, featuring a revolving roster of special guests from circus, cabaret, theatre, burlesque and barnstorming bands. It opens this weekend, with DJ Barry’s Organ Beats Explosion (the one and only Barry Morgan from The World Of Organs) on Friday and Saturday. The Shuffle Club will be Club Spiegel’s resident house band and will take over the tent at 12.30am after the headline act and offer up some swing and jive tunes. For more info visit artscentremelbourne.com.au.

SALLY SINGS Having commenced 2012 with a series of shows alongside Grammy Award-winning artist Bon Iver, Sally Seltmann quickly and quietly decamped to her home studio to commence work on her fourth studio album as a solo artist. At the Famous Spiegeltent on Wednesday 20 March, she will perform one of her first shows in 12 months, playing stripped back versions of songs from her most recent album Heart That’s Pounding on piano and acoustic guitar, as well as previewing songs that will feature on her forthcoming album.

TUESDAY 12 FEBRUARY

RESIDENCY

EL MOTH OLD MEDICINE

FACEBOOK.COM/THEWORKERSCLUB INSTAGRAM @THEWORKERSCLUB TWITTER.COM/THEWORKERSCLUB TICKETS FROM THEWORKERSCLUB.COM.AU

MATT KELLY ENTRY $2, 8.30PM

COMING UP

TIX AVAILABLE THRU MOSHTIX: PRIVATE LIFE (MONDAYS IN FEBRUARY) EL MOTH (TUESDAYS IN FEBRUARY) ANIMAUX (WEDNESDAY IN FEBRUARY) RACHEL BY THE STREAM – EP LAUNCH (FEB 14) SQUARE SOUNDS FESTIVAL (FEB 15 + 16) DIAMOND – RETURN SHOW (FEB 21) J-DILLA TRIBUTE NIGHT (FEB 22) THEY – EP LAUNCH (MAR 9) ELECTRIC HORSE – ALBUM LAUNCH (MAR 14) XENOGRAFT/KETTLESPIDER/BEAR THE MAMMOT – SPLIT EP LAUNCH (MAR 16) DEMON HUNTER + I, A BREATHER – USA (MAR 30)

SIGN UP TO WORKERS NEWSLETTER DURING FEBRUARY TO WIN MARCH GOLDEN TICKET - DOUBLE PASS TO EVERY SHOW IN MAR - $40 FOOD AND DRINK VOUCHER

WED 6 FEB

WED 13 FEB

20, 27 FEB, 6 MAR

AND HIS BOTTLES OF CONFIDENCE (FEAT. MEMBERS OF POND,

(SINGLE TOUR) THE WALTERS

(WEDNESDAY RESIDENCY)

‘CINEMATIC’

THU 21 FEB

DAN MURPHY THU 7 FEB

DAN WEBB

(ALBUM TOUR) SPENDER BENNIE JAMES (SYD)

BUFFALO TALES THU 14 FEB (VALENTINES DAY) ‘THE RIPE 1ST BIRTHDAY PARTY’ FEAT.

KUJO KINGS

TEXTURE LIKE SUN

CITY CALM DOWN

THU 28 FEB TIMOTHY COGHILL PRESENTS

EVERY MONDAY!

THU 14 MAR

BEN ABRAHAM

DJ FLETCH (11 FEB) KOVACULAR (18 FEB)

(ALBUM LAUNCH)

SAT 2 MAR

SAT 9 MAR

THE DEMON PARADE

COLLARBONES

SUN 3 MAR (MATINÉE SHOW) ‘TIMBER & STEEL PRESENTS’

FRI 8 FEB

FRI 15 FEB

FRI 22 FEB

(ALBUM LAUNCH) THE DEAD LOVE THE PRETTY LITTLES

MILK TEDDY DUMB BLONDE

(SYD – EP LAUNCH) THE APHILLIATES FLUENT FORM

JULIA & THE DEEP SEA SIRENS TUESDAYS IN MARCH RESIDENCY

STRANGERS

FEELINGS

DIALECTRIX

SAT 16 FEB

SAT 23 FEB (SLAM DAY)

(WA – SINGLE LAUNCH) GRIZZLY JIM LAWREY ROSCOE JAMES IRWIN

WHITAKER AL PARKINSON

JEREMY NEALE (VELOCIRAPTOR) MANOR

WILLOW BEATS

SUN 24 FEB (MATINÉE SHOW)

THU 7 MAR

THE LITTLE STEVIES GUNG HO

SUN 10 FEB (MATINÉE SHOW) ‘TIMBER & STEEL PRESENTS’

SUN 17 FEB (MATINÉE SHOW) ‘TIMBER & STEEL PRESENTS’

(EP LAUNCH) EVAN & MISCHA LUCY WISE (SOLO)

(LIVE CD LAUNCH) TOM RICHARDSON WHEN IN ROAM

NICK & LIESL

20 • For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news

JUNGAL

ULTRAVIBRALUX (ALBUM LAUNCH) THE 7 UP’S DJ CHRIS GILL (3RRR)

BROTHERS HAND MIRROR

AMALI WARD FRI 15 MAR

KINGFISHA

ROMY RODEO

SUN 10 MAR 2013 (LABOUR DAY PUBLIC HOLIDAY EVE)

IKARII

(SINGLE LAUNCH)

SAT 16 MAR

SPLIT SECONDS RAINY DAY WOMEN THE RED LIGHTS

(ALBUM LAUNCH)

SAT 9 FEB

RUBY BOOTS

LA NIGHTS

SUN 10 MAR (MATINÉE SHOW) ‘TIMBER & STEEL PRESENTS’

SARAH HUMPHREYS

SUN 17 MAR 2013 (MATINÉE SHOW) ‘TIMBER & STEEL PRESENTS’

KAURNA CRONIN (SINGLE LAUNCH)

COLD HIKER

WED 13 MAR

FRI 22 MAR

(SINGLE LAUNCH)

(ALBUM TOUR), JACK CARTY

FARROW

JORDAN MILLAR


WEDNESDAY 6TH FEBRUARY

THE PRESETS

THURSDAY 7TH FEBRUARY

THE PRESETS

TICKETMASTER.COM.AU, PH 136100 & OUTLETS

WEDNESDAY 13TH FEBRUARY

MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS TUESDAY 19TH FEBRUARY

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THURSDAY 21ST FEBRUARY

MAC MILLER

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FRIDAY 22ND FEBRUARY

MY BLOODY VALENTINE TUESDAY 26TH FEBRUARY

KYUSS LIVES! WITH RED FANG

TICKETS ON SALE THURS. 10TH JAN TICKETEKEK.COM.AU, PH: 132849 & OUTLETS AND OZTIX.COM.AU & OUTLETS.

WEDNESDAY 27TH FEB

FLOGGING MOLLY TICKETS ON SALE TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS AND OZTIX.COM.AU & OUTLETS

THURSDAY 28TH FEBRUARY

BILLY TALENT / SUM 41 TICKETEK.COM.AU & OZTIX.COM.AU FRIDAY 1ST MARCH

SLAUGHTERHOUSE

WITH SCHOOLBOY Q AND FULL TOTE ODDS. TICKETMASTER.COM.AU, PH 136100 & OUTLETS

FRIDAY 5TH MARCH

FUN

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WEDNESDAY 6TH MARCH

THE OFFSPRING SUNDAY 10TH MARCH

PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS, OZTIX.COM.AU & OUTLETS.

THURSDAY 14TH MARCH

OPETH

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MONDAY 25TH MARCH

MANU CHAO

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FRIDAY 29TH MARCH

HITS & PITS

MAD CADDIES/GOOD RIDDANCE/WILLEM SCREAM/VOODOO GLOW SKULLS/ THE FLATLINERS/DIESEL BOY/ ONE DOLLAR SHORT AND MORE ON SALE 1ST NOV TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS

THURSDAY 4TH APRIL

PENNYWISE

WITH FACE TO FACE + THE MENZINGERS.

NOTE: ALL TICKETS HELD FOR AUG 2012 POSTPONED SHOW ARE VALID FOR THIS SHOW. TICKETS ON SALE FRI. 8TH FEB TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS AND OZTIX.

THURSDAY 11TH APRIL

PUBLIC IMAGE LTD.

ON SALE TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS

SUNDAY 21ST APRIL

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FEAT: HOODOO GURUS, THE FLAMIN’ GROOVIES, BLUE OYSTER CULT, BUZZCOCKS, PETER CASE, THE STEMS + MORE. ON SALE FRI. 8TH FEB TICKETEK.COM.AU, PH 132849 & OUTLETS & OZTIX.

SUNDAY 5TH MAY

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WEDNESDAY 15TH MAY

GASLIGHT ANTHEM WITH DAVE HAUSE

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FRIDAY 17TH MAY

DEFTONES

SATURDAY 18TH MAY

DEFTONES

20 - 30 BOURKE ST CITY - 9650 0180

WWW.PALACE.COM.AU 21


FOREWORD LINE

NEWS FROM THE FRONT

GLORIOUS AGORIA French DJ/producer Sébastien Devaud, aka Agoria, entered the world of electronic dance music at a peculiar moment in time. Unlike the first generation of techno producers, he’s too young to have been actively listening to early ‘80s electronic pop by groups such as Depeche Mode or New Order. But unlike younger DJs and musicians, he’s been exposed to house and techno more or less since the start of these genres. Check out what he can do at Brown Alley (daytime) on Saturday 2 March.

I N D U S T RY N E W S W I T H S C O T T F I T Z S I M O N S frontline@streetpress.com.au

FUTURE FUNK ARIA Award-winning funk-master Ross McHenry and the exciting pianist/DJ/producer Mark de Clive Lowe (USA) team up with four of the world’s foremost musical innovators to form Ross McHenry Future Ensemble. With a focus on new improvised music inspired by the Los Angeles beat scene and the worldwide new jazz movement, the Ross McHenry Future Ensemble traverse unique sonic landscapes, re-imagining the jazz age through the lens of contemporary music production. Catch them at the Toff on Thursday 7 March.

Still owed for Peats Ridge, headliner John Butler Trio

PEATS RIDGE IN $1.2 MILLION HOLE The embattled Peats Ridge Festival owes over $1.29 million to creditors after the company was put into liquidation earlier this month. The list of creditors has been released by liquidators Jirsch Sutherland with companies and individuals all across the music industry affected. Headline act John Butler’s Butler Brown Touring Co is owed $95,579, while bar providers Sorted Events are the biggest creditors with $283,726 owed. The festival’s booker Damien Cunningham is owed $49,477 through his company Elastic Entertainment. Artists such as The Falls, Cass Eager & The Velvet Rope, Fanny Lumsden & The Thrillseekers, Lolo Lavina and Unknown Mortal Orchestra (through agency Artist Voice) are listed – The Black Seeds are owed $11,500 – but many more are owed money through touring companies or agencies. Liquidators told theMusic.com.au that at this point they have not been able to ascertain what ticket revenue is still to be realised. Last week festival promoter Matt Grant told theMusic.com.au he was still hopeful of finding an investor to rescue the situation.

UNIVERSAL CALL EMI REDUNDANCIES ‘UNFORTUNATE’ Universal Music Australia president Australasia George Ash has stressed that EMI will remain its own entity following Universal’s purchase of the historic label. As reported by theMusic.com.au last week, EMI Music Australia has lost about 20 staff – approximately 30 per cent of its local workforce – as new owners Universal integrate it into their operations. Ash told theMusic.com.au in a statement that the label’s “restructuring has unfortunately resulted in some redundancies, [but] EMI is retaining a significant portion of its people with its own dedicated Marketing, Promotions and A&R functions.” He added, “Our goal is to maximise the resources available to us to continually reinvest in our company so we can do what we [do] best: find, develop and promote artists, increase the output of new music and expand opportunities for digital innovation.”

SUPAFEST HOPE TO RETURN DESPITE $2 MILLION DEBT The Supafest music festival and Paperchase Touring company had entered administration, Smart Company writing that the hip hop event and touring company appointed Jirsch Sutherland as the administrators last week, and while the creditor’s report is still being prepared, the debts are believed to be “in excess” of $2 million. The early indication is that the festival will try and trade its way out of debt, with Sutherland’s Sule Arnautovic telling Smart Company that promoter Dwayne Cross and some creditors were hoping to restructure the businesses through a deed of company arrangement. “Our priorities are just to defer the wind-up app[lication] to try and save it and to try to give Mr Cross an opportunity to secure support from who he needs to… The creditors understand the high prospect they won’t get a return if the company doesn’t have any concerts.”

BALL PARK MUSIC APPOINT NEW MANAGEMENT TEAM Splitting with previous management Mucho Bravado late last year, Brisbane’s Ball Park Music has now signed a new management deal with One Louder’s Bill Cullen and Stop Start’s Andy Bryan. The deal is believed to be a co-manage arrangement, with Cullen focusing on Australia and Bryan looking at international opportunities. The band are familiar with Stop Start as they signed a label deal with the company last year. They’re also booked by Select, whose head Stephen Wade is a co-founder of Stop Start.

PRESENTED BY

LISA’S CRITTERS Look at this picture of Lisa Mitchell with the very endangered (and very cute) Leadbeater Possum. All together now: awww. No guarantee that you will see this happening at her performance at Zoo Twilights this Friday, but if you attend, you’ll be contributing to the proceeds going towards saving such endangered animals in Australia. Gates open at 5.30pm, with the show starting at 7pm. Book at zoo.org.au.

INPRESS PRESENTS

KOOK OUT After a rapturous performance at Splendour In The Grass last year, The Kooks return to Australia in 2013. They will perform headlining shows in April/May around the national Groovin’ The Moo Festivals. Tickets go on sale Wednesday 13 February. Having sold out two previous Australian tours, including Festival performances at Falls, Southbound and Splendour In The Grass, The Kooks are eager to return and play to Australian audiences. See them at the Palais on Friday 3 May.

TENSION IS HIGH Melbourne’s High Tension have announced a debut tour across the East Coast to launch their self-titled 7”/digital EP. Featuring ex members of Young & Restless (Karina Utomo, Ashley Pegram), The Nation Blue (Matt Weston), and Love Like Electrocution and Heirs (Damian Coward), the band have already made their presence felt despite a relatively brief existence. Catch them at the Old Bar on Friday 8 March and as part of Pushover’s 21st Anniversary all-ages concert at Sidney Myer Music Bowl on Monday 11.

TOUGH GUY Over the past few years Mano Le Tough has become one of the shooting stars of the international dance music scene. The Irish artist/producer, whose real name is Niall Miannon, quickly garned interest through his unique mixture of modern disco, atmospheric house and electronica. He went on to remix for the likes of Aloe Blacc and Roisin Murphy, before releasing his first album, Changing Days. Miannon is now coming down under for his debut Australian tour. Catch him at Revolver on Friday 1 March.

LOOK A FIGHT Formed in 2003 when the trio were barely teenagers, Title Fight started as a way for these young kids to explore their burgeoning love of music. Their tireless practising eventually transformed them into one of the most exciting punk acts in recent memory. Having toured in 2011, Title Fight return to Australia in March with Tasmania’s Luca Brasi joining them on all dates. Catch them at Reverence Hotel on Saturday 16 March with Apart From This and at Phoenix Youth Centre on Sunday 17 with Cavalcade (all-ages).

HERBY GOOD TIMES Having just released their seventh studio album, There Were Seven, The Herbaliser DJs are headed south for a string of Australian festival and club dates, including a free show at the Espy on Saturday 9 March. Jake Wherry and Ollie Teeba are the West London jazz-rap innovators whose discography and contribution to the UK music scene in the ‘90s can be described as enormous. More than 18 years into their musical journey, There Were Seven marks the start of a whole new chapter for The Herbaliser DJs.

When The Darkness announced their Australian tour in 2012, the shows sold out within the first hour. New shows were added, and those sold out not long after. In 2010, legendary rock goddess Joan Jett and her band The Blackhearts came to Australia after a 15 year absence to headline The Falls Music & Arts Festivals and Sunset Sounds in Brisbane. In April, they return to our shores to play together. See both bands at Hisense Arena on Saturday 6 April with support act Jackson Firebird.

WHOLE LOTTA LOVE Celebrating the tenth anniversary of one of the longest running large scale Led Zeppelin homage concerts and the 40th anniversary of the groundbreaking album Houses Of The Holy comes the Whole Lotta Love Led Zeppelin Celebration. Featuring some of the country’s best rock musicians, this mammoth homage to Led Zeppelin will celebrate and recreate the music from one of the most influential bands that have walked the Earth. Be part of it at the Palais Theatre on Friday 10 May.

The increased heaviness and pace Dragonforce have injected into their music has made them a fresh voice in the world of metal, and one that fans have responded to as a result. The Sword are a flat-out, supercharged, adrenaline-pumping outfit, a chromeplated war machine. Coming off 2010’s concept album Warp Riders, they wrap poetic and poignant imagery in a haze of crushing riffs and ethereal melodies in latest offering Apocryphon. They play a sidewave together at Billboard on Monday 25 February.

To celebrate the upcoming release of their album, Partly Animals, the latest musical collaboration by German wolfman Tex Napalm and fellow French brother in arms Dimi Dero, the two are heading down under for the first time. On top of their already announced tour dates, they have just been announced to perform as part of the Rowland S Howard ‘The Prince Of St Kilda’ Tribute on Friday 1 March at Memo featuring an awesome line-up of special guests, before kicking on for a second show that evening at the Prince Of Wales with Bitter Sweet Kicks.

22 • For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news

Tav Falco is an American legend; let’s be honest, his chainsawing of a guitar on stage is the ultimate statement. Here primarily for Bluesfest, Tav Falco & The Panther Burns’ fans can finally rejoice with exclusive shows in Sydney and Melbourne. Expect tunes from the latest album Conjurations: Séance For Deranged Lovers (2010) as well as old favourites. See the show at the Tote on Saturday 30 March, with support from Japanese all-girl combo The Go Devils.

TIGER AT SEA Melbourne sextet The Tiger & Me are not afraid to explore each end of the musical spectrum. They’ve been described as a lot of things but their new single Made It To The Harbour – the follow-up to Pantomime, the first release from second album The Drifter’s Dawn – sits clearly in the pop folk foot-tappin’ category. To celebrate, the band are hitting the road, playing at Riverside Live (Southbank) on Friday 1 March, Elsternwick Hotel on Friday 15, before a couple of launch shows at Workers Club on Friday 12 and Saturday 13 April.

JETT BLACK DARKNESS

DRAGON SWORD

SEMI-ANIMALISTIC

FLYING FALCO

ECHOLALIA Josh Groban is an internationally renowned singer, songwriter and actor whose baritone voice is instantly recognisable and unparalleled among his peers. Groban will be joined by an ensemble of world class musicians plus a local eight-piece orchestra when he embarks on the All That Echoes April 2013 Australian Tour, in what will be only his second Australian tour following a stellar sold-out debut tour in September 2007. Fans can expect tunes from throughout Groban’s hugely successful recording career beginning with his 2001 Australian-platinum self-titled debut album, twiceplatinum Closer, ARIA top five Awake and 2010’s Illuminations. He plays at the Palais on Tuesday 20 April.

MIXTAPE MOVEMENT On Saturday 27 April, the Sidney Myer Music Bowl will host the Melbourne leg of the inaugural Australian Movement Festival. Filling the void of credible hip hop events in Australia, the Movement Festival places Grammy Award-winning hip hop heavyweights with mixtape kings and local heroes in what’s destined to be the foremost hip hop and urban event each year in Australia. The lineup so far includes Nas, Bliss N Eso, 2 Chainz, Chiddy Bang, Joey Bada$$, Angel Haze and Spit Syndicate.

YA DIG?

Pennywise

WISE GUYS In October last year, Pennywise announced the return of the band’s original vocalist Jim Lindberg, much to the delight of fans across the globe. Marking their 25th anniversary, Pennywise are returning to Australia. Their postponed dates from last year have been rescheduled for this April. Catch them at the Palace on Thursday 4 April with Face To Face and The Menzingers. All tickets held for the August 2012 postponed Pennywise shows will be honoured at the rescheduled shows.

The first line-up announcement for Hoodoo Gurus’ Dig It Up! has been announced. On Thursday 25 April, playing on four stages across the Palace, the Spleen Bar and a third venue nearby TBC, will be Hoodoo Gurus (performing Mars Needs Guitars in its entirety, plus other smash hits) plus Blue Oyster Cult, Flamin’ Groovies, Buzzcocks, Peter Case Band, The Stems and loads more. Take advantage of all-day pass outs, a street full of quality food, and restricted capacity. Tickets go on sale this Friday.

X MARKS THE SPOT Songwriter Bertie Blackman is playing a special free show in the Espy Front Bar this Saturday. Her longawaited fourth album, following on from 2009’s acclaimed Secrets And Lies – a record which took out the 2009 ARIA for Best Independent Release, and the AIR Award for Breakthrough Independent Artist – Pope Innocent X was released late last year and is 11 tracks of visual, evocative storytelling: spiky, fertile pop blended with electrifying sonic tales and otherworldly dark dares.


NEWS FROM THE FRONT

FOREWORD LINE

IV FOR X The Bronx, Australia’s favourite LA punk band, are back with their first album in five years, IV. IV marks the ten-year anniversary of the band and will see them return to Australia this April to share it with fans all around the country on their most extensive national tour ever, playing headline shows as well as Groovin’ The Moo. You can witness them live at the Corner on Tuesday 30 April with guests Violent Soho and Blacklevel Embassy, and again on Wednesday 1 May with DZ Deathrays and Batpiss.

A LITTLE BIRDY TOLD ME Following the success of her 2012 ARIA number one album and ahead of her first-ever Australian tour, Birdy has announced additional headline shows. As the final remaining tickets for Birdy’s Melbourne debut at the Palais on Monday 8 April are snapped up, Hamer Hall will be the home of Birdy’s second and final Melbourne performance on Tuesday 9. Birdy has invited and is pleased to welcome two support acts at all shows, 20-year-old UK singer-songwriter Lewis Watson, and local act Lakyn Heperi, who shot into the spotlight after appearing on TV show The Voice.

GOOD WILSON Greg Wilson was instrumental in breaking the new electronic, post-disco records coming out of New York – a sound he has dubbed ‘electro-funk’ – and he was one of the first DJs in the UK to pioneer the then new trend of beat mixing records together (before mixers as we now know them were invented). He was the first DJ to put together radio mixes and to mix live on British TV. Now, 30 years later, he’s still keeping on. He plays New Guernica on Sunday 10 March, supported by Phil K, Agent 86 and Heavy Freek.

WAKE UP In Hearts Wake have premiered their new music video for single Loreley (The Lovers). The music video depicts a heartfelt storyline, shot against the backdrop of the Byron Bay band’s stunning surrounds. To coincide with the video release, In Hearts Wake are embarking on a string of regional dates throughout Australia and New Zealand. Catch them at Commercial Hotel (South Morang) on Thursday 14 February, Ferntree Gully Hotel on Friday 15, Pier Live (Frankston) on Saturday 16 and Pushover Festival on Monday 11 March (all ages).

DAVE IN THE HAUSE Philadelphian troubadour Dave Hause has been announced as the support act for The Gaslight Anthem this May. Now, as a budding solo artist, the frontman for The Loved Ones seems to have found his inspiration. Armed simply with a guitar, Hause has the ability to make you feel like you’re just an overfilled backpack and bus ticket away from some fantastic journey or its fantastic end. See for yourself on Wednesday 15 May at the Palace.

FAN-TAS-TIC For those who might be in the area, Cat Power and George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic are playing at the MONA Stage in Hobart. Cat Power performs on Sunday 10 March and Clinton on Monday 11, with gates opening at 1pm. For a hundred bucks (or $85 concession), you get to see both. You can also get one-day tickets. If you’re in Tasmania at the time, why not see these two truly special acts over the course of one lazy, sunny (hopefully), beer-sippy, bean-baggy MONA long weekend?

FRENCH ‘EM, SMITH ‘EM This year marks the tenth anniversary of Frencham Smith, and their much loved debut album Into My Room. To celebrate this milestone, Liz Frencham and Fred Smith will be playing a series of concerts leading up to the National Folk Festival, where the duo first performed together. Catch them at the Yackandandah Folk Festival on Saturday 23 March and Kyneton’s Pizza & Wine Club on Thursday 11 April.

INPRESS PRESENTS

SANDSTONE Alt.folk sibling duo The McMenamins are proud to announce a national tour to celebrate the launch of their fourth album, Sand And Stone, due for release in March. The tour will also include the duo’s debut at Bluesfest. The McMenamins have shared stages with a dazzling array of luminaries and have been invited to perform at many of the country’s most popular festivals. Check out the Queensland Music Award winners at the Toff on Thursday 14 March with special guest Emma Heeney.

PURE HEADACHE

Riding the success of their debut release Shrines, Purity Ring will bring their otherworldly rapture to Australia next month, playing headline shows as well as Golden Plains Festival. Joining them for all headline shows is fellow Canadian Headaches (Landon Speers), who combines his fertile, close-knit upbringings with the dance floor aesthetics of his new home, New York. Sydney-based duo Fishing will begin proceedings. The Corner Hotel show on Friday 8 March is now sold out.

COMING CLOSER Canadian singer-songwriters Tegan & Sara will return to Australia this April and May for a run of headline dates, alongside the already announced Groovin’ The Moo festival. Their seventh album Heartthrob is just about to drop, so when they get here they’ll be armed with an entire arsenal of new tunes as well as their canon of trusty old faves. The first single, Closer, which Sara has taken to calling her “let’s get it on” song, is indicative of the bigger, bolder and happier sound of the new album, and is bound to go over superbly in the live realm on these upcoming dates. See Tegan & Sara at the Palais on Thursday 2 May.

FUNKI SOUL

ME AND MS JONES Rickie Lee Jones brings her The Devil You Know Tour to Australian and New Zealand shores this March, showcasing her unique vocals and her extraordinary and celebrated song catalogue spanning nearly 35 years. Audiences can expect a varied set list of musical offerings plucked from throughout her extensive career, across a wonderfully spirited patchwork of folk, rock, jazz, soul and pop. She performs with Jeff Pevar on guitar, bass and keys, and Ed Willett on cello at the Athenaeum Theatre on Thursday 7 March.

BREATHE IN AYR

Upon Ayr, the debut album by Fletcher, is a compelling, storytelling record that opens with an ode to the sadness of Jack Kerouac’s legacy; closes with the creak of the foot driven mechanical pump of an 1840s western harmonium; and paints scenes of Polynesian whale myths, a 1920s synchronised swimming mermaid’s dream and the death throes of a love affair. Currently performing with Sarah Blasko on her national tour, Fletcher will perform at the Workers Club on Sunday 17 March.

INDUSTRY NEWS WITH SCOTT FITZSIMONS frontline@streetpress.com.au

Multi-Grammy Award-winners Soul II Soul exist as some of the most legendary pioneers in UK soul music. Their career began way back in 1988 when the group first began attracting attention as a sound system, playing records at house and street parties, where their clothing and music style of an eclectic mix of rare groove, classic soul, house and reggae was dubbed “Funki Dred”. They’ve been together more than 20 years, had a string of number one hits and multiple platinum records and now Soul II Soul are heading back down under to get up close and personal with their Australian fans. Check them out at Trak Lounge on Thursday 28 February.

COME INTO THE KARAVAN Wild-eyed and exhilarating, the fourth annual Karavan! International Gypsy Music Festival brings the sounds of Eastern Europe to Australia. Karavan! 2013 will be headlined by The New York Gypsy All Stars (USA), alongside national partystarters such as Sydney’s The Margaret Street Project, Melbourne’s own illicit Russo-swing lords Vulgargrad, the debauched feast of horns, string and drums that is The Woo Hoo Revue and the hot swing of old-world Francophiles, La Mauvaise Reputation. The festival stops off at the Thornbury Theatre on Saturday 2 March and the Caravan Club on Sunday 3 (minus The Woo Hoo Revue).

Flume

FULL $30,000 AMP SHORTLIST ANNOUNCED The final five acts that have made the shortlist of The Coopers Amp were revealed at the Amp Alive event at Federation Square last week. The $30,000 album prize has added Flume (Flume) (pictured), Tame Impala (Lonerism), The Presets (Pacifica), Liz Stringer (Warm In The Darkness) and Daily Meds (Happy Daze) to the finalists’ list. They join previously announced contenders Grand Salvo, Jess Ribeirio & The Bone Collectors, Hermitude and Urthboy. Prize Director Scott Murphy thanked the judges saying, “The feedback from the judges favours the new entry/judging system that we put into place in 2012. The judges all fully support all nine titles making this shortlist and have stressed to me that there were in fact many more titles that they were individually passionate about but that they obviously couldn’t be squeezed in.” The winner of the PPCAdonated cash prize will be announced March.

FLUME BEATS BIEBER TO CHART PEAK Sydney producer Flume has ridden the wave of a strong Hottest 100 presence and festival prominence to bullet to the top of the ARIA Album Chart this week. As well as four entries into triple j’s poll, Flume geared up for his weekend Laneway sets and was announced on the Groovin’ The Moo line-up. Sitting at 16 last week, the self-titled record even beat Justin Bieber’s new album, Believe Acoustic, which debuted at two. Mid-week chart figures last week had indicated that Flume would be the biggest beneficiary of a Hottest 100 bump, but few expected the album – which had previously peaked at two – to knock off the teen pop star and other titles such as Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, whose album, The Heist, dropped to four. His single, Holdin’ On, also re-entered the ARIA Singles Chart at 25 – its highest point. Other bullet albums came from alt-J’s An Awesome Wave, which is up to 12 from 22, Frank Ocean’s channel ORANGE, up to 17 from 30, Tame Impala’s Lonerism, up to 21 from 33, The Rubens’ The Rubens, up to 23 from 39, and triple j’s own Like A Version 8, up to 25 from 44.

AACTAS POOR RATINGS BLAMED ON NETWORK The Sapphires was the dominant film at the recent AACTA Awards, as Australia’s answer to The Oscars once again struggled to attract viewers. The second year of the re-branded and “re-positioned” awards ceremony was held last week at Sydney’s The Star casino, but failed to crack the top 20 shows for the night. Condensed into an hourlong delayed broadcast on Channel Ten the show attracted just 318,000 viewers. It was trounced by Seven’s My Kitchen Rules (1,655,000) and Home And Away (897,000), Nine’s repeats of The Big Bang Theory (748,000) and movie, Miss Congeniality 2: Armed And Fabulous (489,000), ABC’s ABBA documentary, Bang A Boomerang (925,000), and QI repeat (703,000). AACTA CEO Damian Trewhella told theMusic.com.au, “We only announced the broadcast partner a couple of weeks ago, so the fact that anyone found it at all was quite remarkable… The figures we got are pretty solid for what that network’s doing at the moment.” Trewhella said that the loss of their commercial naming rights partner Samsung hindered their ability to secure a network earlier, as they no longer had a guaranteed advertising spend for the program. “When we lost Samsung it was quite difficult to get a network to commit,” he said. “Considering everything that’s happened it was a pretty good result.”

PRESENTED BY For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news • 23


Two of our region’s greatest ever songwriters and performers are joining forces for a massive tour, and the music fans of Australasia are the lucky beneficiaries. Paul Kelly and Neil Finn discuss forming their mutual admiration society despite the tyranny of distance and how they’re going to cull their massive joint canon into one manageable setlist with Steve Bell. ast November a small contingent of members from the Australian media were gathered together at the Sydney Opera House for a special tour announcement. All in attendance had been briefed beforehand on the information about to be conveyed, but it was still a great surprise and delight

Leaps And Bounds, giving a whole new lease of life to the Australian staple.

when the great Paul Kelly strode into the room, picked up an acoustic guitar and delivered a stunning rendition of the Crowded House classic Into Temptation. Before anyone even had a chance to ruminate on what had just happened, the equally legendary Neil Finn entered the fray, picked up his own acoustic, and delivered a faultless version of the gorgeous Kelly album track You Can Put Your Shoes Under My Bed (from 1985’s Post). The songs sounded incredible in each other’s hands – somehow transformed by this new mode of delivery without either being dramatically altered – but those marvels paled into virtual insignificance when the pair then joined forces and burst into a shared take on Kelly’s evergreen

bulk of the concerts they will be accompanying each other on their own songs – not visiting each other’s songs as they’d done this morning – although anything was possible once the actual tour got underway.

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This brief but bountiful musical component of the media call done and dusted, the two Antipodean music legends took a seat and were joined by host John Doyle – of course in his irreverent guise as “Rampaging” Roy Slaven – and proceeded to explain the logistics of their impending Australasian joint tour. A family affair – the band for the run also containing Paul’s nephew Dan on guitar and Neil’s son Elroy on drums – the sets will find them visiting the depths and breadths of each other’s catalogues in a united manner. They were at pains to point out that for the

“Yeah, and there was a time you lived in Melbourne when I saw you a lot more, when was that, late-‘80s?” Kelly quizzes. “Up until 1993 we lived in Melbourne, and we used to play a bit of tennis together and hang out fairly regularly,” Finn smiles. “Plus you’d just run into each other out and about, all cities are fairly small in their own way. Our paths would cross at airports and hotel lobbies and music awards and things like that.” There’s readily available online footage of Kelly and Finn playing tracks together onstage in Western Australia on ANZAC Day 2011 – perfectly in keeping with the Trans-Tasman nature of the collaboration,

“We have an idea how it will work, but you never know until you actually do it so there’s that little element of ‘toeiness’ to it, but yeah, we’re really looking forward to it.” It must be daunting even contemplating a setlist given the incredible catalogues of songs at their disposal – as well as Kelly’s exceptional 30-plus

a room, otherwise we’re just talking about theories and looking at names on a piece of paper.” “And apart from just the two of us,” Kelly joins in, “once we get together with the band I think certain songs will suit the band better than others, and that will help in culling them down a bit.” “We want to do familiar songs for people, I enjoy doing them anyway,” Finn rejoins, “but there’s going to be enough room in the set to do both wellknown songs and also a few delightful obscurities that just seem suited to this environment. We’ve already got a couple of those still on the list.

WORDS AND MUSIC There was an easy rapport between the two songwriters as they discussed what lay ahead of them, a connection built from years of friendship and mutual admiration. They first toured together way back in 1987 when Paul Kelly & The Coloured Girls supported Crowded House through America, and they’d appeared briefly at each other’s gigs on occasion over the intervening decades, but this tour was to mark the first official shared tour between the two icons. When Street Press Australia was granted a private audience with the pair following the conference, they were quick to point out that they’d forged an enduring long-term bond despite not having spent that much time in each other’s company.

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“At stages we’ve seen a bit of each other, but long stages go by when we’re not moving around or not in the same cities as each other,” Finn offers warmly. “But there’s a good friendship there, and that’s the thing about friendships – you don’t have to see each other all the time, you can just pick up where you left off. There’s no obligations.”

Finn of course being of New Zealand heritage – but they don’t believe that this was a major precursor to the tour that we’re discussing today. “That was just a one-off show really – even before that show we’d been talking for years about doing a tour together,” Kelly reflects. “So it’s been batted back and forth a bit, we just haven’t had the chance to make our schedules align until now.” “Yeah, suddenly windows in both of our schedules opened up in both of our lives, and it seemed to be good timing for it,” Finn interjects.

“The times that we have done shows together, we’ve got up and sung with each other, so I guess coming out of that Perth show where we sang about three or four songs together – and Dan Kelly was with me and he got up too, and Liam [Finn] was there with Neil – that was really starting to sow the seed for a blended show, where it wasn’t just ‘I sing my songs and you sing your songs’ – really knitting the two together,” Kelly admits. “We’ve been discussing it on email for a while how to really knit the show together, and we got together yesterday and pushed that a bit further along.” Do the pair know of any precedents for such a blended collaboration as the one they’re about to undertake? “There was Billy Joel and Elton John, I didn’t know about that until today,” Kelly laughs. “I remember that coming through,” Finn says, also suppressing mirth. “There are various things that aren’t dissimilar, there was The Highwaymen that went through with Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson [and Johnny Cash], and I believe that was really good. It doesn’t happen a lot, but there’s a few things that go around on that basis – in New Zealand my brother [Tim Finn] did a tour with Bic Runga and Dave Dobbyn and they were all onstage together, so it’s not entirely without precedent. But I think the one thing that we want to make sure we do is give it its due and take it beyond any feeling of it being a novelty or a gimmick, and make sure that it’s something that’s a substantial musical collaboration and people are going to walk out having heard versions of the songs that they’ve never heard sounding like that before. We want to give it a sense of specialness.” All such large-scale tours must be fairly special undertakings for the artists involved, but Kelly concedes that this joint run is even more nerve-wracking than normal. “I generally look forward to tours anyway, because I try to make each tour different than the last one, and there’s always new things to play – you go out and you’ve usually got new songs to play – so for me it’s usually a mixture of excitement and nerves,” he tells.

year career Finn has celebrated songwriting credits with Split Enz and Crowded House as well as his accomplished solo work to bring to the table – but the pair maintain that they’re not fazed by the forthcoming decisions, and may even throw a few of each other’s lesserknown tracks into the mix. “We got it down quickly to about 50 songs, but we think it will be more tricky to get it down to about 30 songs which we figure is what we’ll need as a pool to draw from,” Finn states nonchalantly. “It’ll mean leaving out some good ones, but when we get together next time we’ll probably whiz through the songs and play them all a little bit, and it will be a lot easier to identify what works when we’re playing them in real time together in

“I pulled out Paul’s A-Z list [2010’s The A-Z Recordings]

and listened to them all, and it was great because I could listen to them without their recorded parts – they were just sitting there as songs – and I just kind of responded to a few that I actually didn’t know, but I thought when I went by, ‘Oh, there’s something about that which I could imagine suiting this environment’. But it’s all just a hunch at the moment.”

And even though Kelly is yet to substantially tour his excellent 2012 Spring And Fall album, he’s not planning on integrating much of that into this shared venture. “No, I see that as a separate thing,” he reveals. “I’ll probably do a few songs from Spring And Fall, but because we have so many songs to sing between the two of us – and as Neil said, we want to have some well-known songs and some songs that suit the two of us – that’ll do. We might do an Everly Brothers type thing, where we just break down the show to a duo or a trio and just do some really good ol’ harmonies. Some of those Spring And Fall songs are super, it’s just a matter of making them fit. I’d like to do, down the track, a tour where I play the full record – it is something that is meant to be played in order. But that’s down the track.” WHO: Paul Kelly & Neil Finn WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 16 February, Monday 18, Tuesday 19, Wednesday 20, Monday 4 March, Tuesday 5, Wednesday 6, Palais; Saturday 23 February, A Day On The Green, Yarra Valley


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DON’T WANNA BE LIKE OTHER ADULTS Due to other commitments, Descendents shows are very rare. Frontman Milo Aukerman tells Dan Condon why he’s so happy to be successfully leading his double life. ilo Aukerman has just returned home from a college basketball game and is now settled with a beer, his cat and his dog in the Delaware home he shares with his wife and kids. His team, University of Delaware, lost the game, though Aukerman isn’t too concerned.

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“I like watching sports,” he says, like a classic American everyman. But looking at Aukerman’s life on paper, he seems as far from a ‘regular guy’ as you could imagine. Since 1980 he has been the frontman of one of the most influential punk rock bands in the history of the world, Descendents. Well, kinda… From 1983-1984, 1988-1995, 19972002 and 2004-2010 Aukerman wasn’t available for Descendents commitments as he pursued a career in science – he

now works a day job as a researcher for the massive DuPont chemical company and holds a doctorate in biochemistry – seemingly a lifestyle far from being a world famous punk rock musician. But, while Aukerman acknowledges the differences, he also explains the many similarities between his two lives. “Yeah, it obviously has a lot of differences. I can be on stage and have this massive release of pent-up energy and this kind of euphoric, in the moment, at one with the music kind of thing which obviously I can’t get in my other gig. “But there are lots of things that are in common because of the creative process. In songwriting you have these moments of whatever you want to call it – epiphany or breakthrough in a particular song that allows you to finish it or whatever – and the same thing happens in science, I have these moments of epiphany or breakthrough in science. I live for those moments as a songwriter and a scientist, that’s the shared characteristic that I have in my two existences.” Now Aukerman is able to continue living both sides of his life as he finds a balance between his professional and family life and the life he leads with Descendents. “That is the most unusual and gratifying thing that has come out of this,” he admits. “I struggled for many years to find a balance; it’s really hard to do because both of these things require so much of your time. Basically [in the past] I’d have to clone myself and have two of me – one on tour and one in the lab – and that obviously was not going to happen. But now, we can kind of make a go of it as a band and only play fifteen shows a year. I feel very, very fortunate to be able to have this balance. “Music is fabulous, but it can really take a toll on your normalcy. I’m not saying that everyone has to be normal, but I have a certain desire to have a family and I have a certain desire to keep my scientific career going. That’s always been a struggle in the past with music kind of encroaching upon it but now we don’t have to worry about that, so it’s kinda nice.” It is at this pace that he hopes Descendents will continue for the foreseeable future. “This is the kind of pace that really I don’t see being an issue for me. I’m sure people would like to say we need to tour more, but it’s not going to happen because I have another career. Which is to say, I have a career and I have music as a hobby, basically. That’s how I view it. I’m at a position where I can keep my career and have music as a hobby. Obviously the hobby has been quite an extensive one, it’s been something that’s really satisfied me very much in a creative sense.” Much of the brilliance of Descendents lies in their simple, naïve and often, frankly, stupid lyrics. Even though he’s now 50 years old, Aukerman doesn’t have any issues singing the lyrics he or his band mates penned 30 years ago. “These songs are all about our lives at that point, so that makes it a little easier to get in the spirit of it because it’s actual stuff that happened so you feel kinda close to it, even thirty years down the line. When you grow up, your teenage years are indelibly marked on your memory.” There’s a certain honestly and authenticity in the lyrics that the band have penned over the years and both Aukerman and drummer (and prolific songwriter) Bill Stevenson have admitted that they have only ever written from direct personal experiences. “People come up and say, ‘That song that you wrote describes me to a tee’ and I go, ‘Well that’s because it really happened to me.’ We’re not writing about fictional situations or fictional characters, it’s all real. That just makes it that much easier for people to relate to. “Bill’s the same way, he only writes songs about real girls, real people, that’s the only way we know how to write. In some senses it’s a disadvantage because we kind of painted ourselves into a corner; we can only write about our immediate lives and our immediate relationships and surrounding so it’s kind of limiting, but at the same time I think it does make the music come across that much more powerful.” There will be a new Descendents record at some stage; plenty of songs are written but there’s no plan as to how and when they will get them onto tape. “Yeah we’ve all written new songs; those guys they never stop writing, they always have new songs. Bill got sick a few years back and at that point I hadn’t really written songs in several years, we were all so worried about him and once he got better I wrote a song about it – that was the first song I’d written in a while but it led to others. “So the songwriting happens, that’s one piece of the puzzle, but the other piece is recording them and that’s one thing we’re trying to take one step at a time. We can’t just hole up in a studio for three months and record, we’ve kinda gotta do it piecemeal. So that’s what we’re trying to do now, trade digital files back and forth and get to the point where we’ve worked up some songs amongst us. Maybe that’s gonna take a year, maybe it’ll take two years, we don’t really have a set time frame.” Writing new music isn’t something Aukerman has necessarily been able to easily incorporate into his life as a family man, but he makes it work. “I kinda have to squeeze in my musical creations on the fly, because we’ve got kids now. It’s got to be me driving in the car and humming a tune and making a lyric up on the spot – you get creative and you try and make it work given your current situation and it seems like it’s worked pretty well.” WHO: Descendents WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 9 February, Festival Hall

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STAYING AFLOAT Sarah Blasko needs to feel as though she might sink or swim in order to move forward creatively. Triumphantly splashing her orchestral visions over fourth record, I Awake, she tells Tyler McLoughlan of the challenges presented, and the final one to come. t times I thought this record would kill me… I felt I would sink beneath it,” admits Sarah Blasko candidly in the liner notes of I Awake. Known for an innate attention to detail that has always made the softlyspoken Sydneysider stand out among her peers, Blasko makes it clear that she chose this challenge – to manage the grandiose statement of using an orchestra within a pop context, to self-produce the resulting “behemoth”, and to undergo the uneasy writing exile that led to both.

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“I like to do something different with each record. This time I chose isolation,” Blasko suggests quietly of the period spent writing I Awake by the English Channel in Brighton. “It was this amazing experience to have so much time to yourself, and then it was really difficult. A lot of things came up that I didn’t expect, but I think it’s important to take that time to truly exist within my solitude. This album was very much written in that [headspace]… You have this chance to let your imagination run wild, think about things you dream of doing, and working with an orchestra was definitely something I’d wanted to do for a long time.” For most, the enormity of coordinating a 52-piece orchestra would be enough to bite off for one record, though Blasko laughs awkwardly at the suggestion that also taking on the role of producer reinforces the idea she needs the rush of a sink or swim challenge. “I don’t know if I thrive on it but some sort of sick and twisted part of myself needs it in order to move forward,” she confesses.

had to rehearse on the day. It’s kind of terrifying... it really keeps you on your toes. There’s a level of nervousness that’s probably healthy. If you get too comfortable you can see it when people do a show. Every time you’re around that amount of players, that in itself is an amazing thing. I was listening to some of the arrangements the other day and was getting a little teary thinking about how beautiful it’s gonna sound.” WHO: Sarah Blasko WHAT: I Awake (Dew Process/Universal) WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 14 February, Hamer Hall

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There’s more to this story on the iPad “It felt like a natural thing,” she continues of self-producing I Awake. “I was gonna work with Bjorn [Yttling, of Peter, Bjorn and John] on this album as I did the last, but we couldn’t make the time work. Then I knew that if he didn’t want to do it I would want to do it myself. It felt like it was the right time,” she admits, though the role was not without its trials. “All the time,” Blasko says quickly of whether she second-guessed her ability to steer the project. “You have to be very direct and strong and hold onto what your vision is. It can be hard to do that along the way but I knew that the arrangements were gonna be a really big part of it, so recording with the band was just about keeping all of that fairly simple. It was easy to doubt myself when I’d taken on such a big thing and to convince everybody to let me record with an orchestra, so I had a lot to live up to. “I have good people around me who just kept reminding me what I was doing, particularly Lasse [Mårtén], who mixed the album – he was really encouraging and [we] had talked really clearly about what I wanted before we started. Having someone who kept reinforcing what I was doing really got me through it all.” Recording once again in Stockholm, Blasko visited the birth country of her paternal grandfather for two days to record the Bulgarian Symphony Orchestra in Sofia. She wasn’t ready for the impact of hearing her musical vision in such a setting, particularly in a country that held a certain familiarity despite it being her first visit. “You can’t really prepare yourself for that sort of experience and just hearing them in that huge room – it was such a powerful sound. Because I recorded the song Here live with the orchestra and that was the only one I sung in Bulgaria, I found it hard to sing it at first because it was too overwhelming; it was really emotional. It was so surreal having written this song all that time ago and seeing it develop and then recording it with an orchestra, it was quite a mind-blowing experience. I felt so incredibly lucky.” Her most ambitious project to date complete, Blasko still can’t find the words to adequately describe how she got through the challenge of I Awake. She just knows that she did. “I feel relieved that I made the beautiful record I wanted to and I feel proud that I got through it. It’s amazing to feel like [...] you somehow blindly go forward, something drives you and afterwards you just think, ‘Wow, I don’t know how I found the drive to do that.’ It feels amazing to think that you even halfway pulled it off.” Blasko worked tirelessly to ensure her musical vision of I Awake connected with the movements of the orchestra while leaving ample space for both her band and her lyrical themes of conjuring strength and being true to oneself. The result is a record of depth, courage and beauty made far greater for its marriage of two musical worlds. “I feel proud of how it’s been received – I think people have understood it,” Blasko says happily. “I wanted to make sure people understand it’s not this watered-down version of things. It’s not a tame record; I think sometimes people get that in their head when they think of an album with an orchestra… I don’t want that to overshadow everything. It’s just the palette that I chose to hear the sounds I chose to use. It’s got a strength to it, it’s not a weak thing. To me it’s a vibrant album.” With one final challenge of the record remaining, Blasko will present I Awake with a different symphony orchestra for each of the six cities scheduled on the upcoming national tour. “It’s gonna bring this element of freshness and difference; it’s gonna sound different every night. The only thing I’ve done similar to this is when I put out What The Sea Wants [The Sea Will Have] I did some shows with a chamber ensemble and we

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OUT IN THE OPEN Not much makes Matt Tuck lose his cool, but the laidback Bullet For My Valentine frontman’s patience was pushed to its limits recently, forcing the Welsh metallers to settle their intra-band tension. Brendan Crabb throws a hissy fit. hen we get on the phone with Matt Tuck, vocalist/guitarist for Welsh metal sensations Bullet For My Valentine, the band are about to begin a period of intensive rehearsals. The release of new album, and fourth overall, Temper Temper, is a few weeks away at the time of our conversation. It’s also the calm before the proverbial storm. Sitting in his living room, Tuck explains that their hectic schedule is already filled up to 2014. After a oneoff show in Cardiff, they officially begin worldwide touring in support of the record at Soundwave.

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Tuck is asked if he’s become accustomed to having his life planned out more than 12 months in advance. “Yeah, it’s how the boys and I have lived our lives for the past seven, eight years. It’s kinda been mapped out for us behind the scenes, so in a way it’s nice to know we’re still super relevant and still gonna be super busy. It makes things easier in a way. Like when we come home, we don’t have a schedule, and it’s just like off time – we’re kinda like lost sheep,” he laughs. “It’s weird, because we’ve got nowhere to be… So it’s like, ‘Okay, I guess I’ll just go out for a drive’. So it’s become normality for us, but we actually enjoy it because it just makes our life easy. It is so busy that we literally… There’s no other way that we’d be able to keep up.” They almost couldn’t. Despite their status as one of metal’s biggest names, the quartet struggled to ensure their health and sanity remained intact. A seemingly innocuous, light-hearted question relating to the new album title – namely, what grinds Tuck’s gears – eventually reveals far more than anticipated. “Honestly, not very much. I’m a very mellow guy, I’ve never really once in my life lost my shit to the extent where I’ve done something stupid or got into a crazy fight or anything. For me Temper Temper is that saying that your mum would say when you were a kid getting angry – ‘temper temper’. It’s more about almost losing your shit, but always keeping control of the situation. So that’s how I’ve always been and that’s why the album is called what it is. It’s a very angry album; there’s not one moment where it totally loses its fucking

mind – it’s always on the edge. The songs are more about that situation; anger management, temper, all that kind of shit, but keeping control of that situation. Almost doing it is scarier than actually doing it.” From what sources did they channel such rage? “Mainly it was stuff going on behind the scenes on the (2010) Fever Tour, between the band members. We went through a bit of a sticky patch for about six months where things started to kind of implode. Even though we’d been around for a while, we were starting to fall into a case of almost not caring anymore. (We were) starting to get into bad habits of drinking and experimenting with certain fucking drugs, just doing stupid shit that everyone in bands kind of does at some point. But for us it wasn’t at the start, it was now when we’d become established and things just started to become awkward. “We weren’t talking to each other much, and we just started to resent being in the band. It just all got to us really, because we were riding a wave of success and being busy, which is great. But at the same time we almost started to dislike it, and being away from home. So it took its toll, but thankfully we’re such a tight unit that we addressed it and nipped it in the bud. Things are a lot better now and everything’s cool. I got that down on paper, almost as therapy, just to get it out of the system and it was nice to write about situations that actually did mean something to me personally. A lot of stuff on this album is real to me and the boys, so it was nice to have that edge.” When it came time to resolve said differences, there was no Phil Towle in sight. “It was literally doing it as friends,” he continues. “We got into a dressing room – got our tour manager to get it all together – got in there, locked the door and basically spoke to each other. It was almost like a little therapy group. But we weren’t speaking to each other, and I think that was the biggest part in almost starting to melt down. We weren’t communicating anymore, which is weird because we’re friends and have been for many years. It was like, ‘Guys, what the fuck’s going

on? I think we’re all in the same boat’. Together we decided, ‘Okay, let’s just wipe it on the carpet, let’s just be cool, let’s just get through the tour’. Everyone was feeling the same, so it was good to sit down and talk as friends, rather than just ignoring each other. It was just a simple conversation that we needed to have, which had been brewing for a long time.” Since the release of 2005 debut album The Poison, they have become media darlings in addition to having legions of devoted fans. While such acclaim and adoration formerly fed into their inner conflict, Tuck now seems better able to reflect on their “tidal wave of fucking success” and the associated responsibilities, some of which extend beyond merely being four guys in the here and now, playing in a metal band. “We’ve been through hard times, but mostly we seem to be getting bigger all the time, and believe we’ve been creating great albums,” he ponders. “So it’s been a bit of a whirlwind since day one. The last eight years have flown, so I think in that sense what was so exciting on The Poison has just become normality for us now. So it’s hard, but keeping perspective of what

we are, where we are and what we’ve achieved is essential to keep us grounded and to keep everything cool, because it is easy to get lost in what we’ve achieved… Just trying to come to terms with the fact we’ve worked so hard for literally half our lives, and sacrificed so much along the way to achieve this; it’s like, ‘Don’t fuck it up now’, you know? We’re in a dream situation, so just having a perspective of life, what we do as a band and our career was something we needed to discuss. There were definitely some people in the band losing sight of that, so they needed a bit of a reality check. We’re just super content at the minute. We made a great album, we love it. Everything seems to still be on the ascendancy to great things, so we’re going to just keep riding that wave until we can’t anymore, I guess.” WHO: Bullet For My Valentine WHAT: Temper Temper (Sony) WHEN & WHERE: Friday 1 March, Soundwave, Flemington Racecourse

THE ALCHEMY OF MODERN MUSIC The shift from punk to mariachi music allowed The Bronx the space required to let their latest heavy work evolve on its own terms. Vocalist Matt Caughthran talks Brendan Hitchens through the critical and touring highs, the major-label second album mistakes and a misguided Jet comparison. unching out 12 tracks in just under 40 minutes, The Bronx IV has picked up where The Bronx III left off,” crows their label’s official press release. Calling from his Californian home, singer Matt Caughthran disagrees. “Honestly, it wasn’t even like picking up where we left off; it was like starting over again,” he says of their aptly-titled fourth album, with a sense of contentment. “That’s what it felt like, the start of a new band. Having four or five years between a record really let it happen naturally, to become inspired and to become excited to make this record and jump back in to the world of The Bronx. Now it feels like a first record all over again.”

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Between releases from the Los Angeles punks came a sojourn into world music, with a Mexican-inspired side project in Mariachi El Bronx. Heralding two successful records and opening the band up to new audiences, Caughthran admits it made the band better musicians, evident, he says on the new record. “I came from a punk band and became a singer because I couldn’t play an instrument. It’s not like I was a singer or knew how to sing, it just happened because I was the guy in the garage who didn’t have an instrument. You go from that to actually being in a band that puts out a record and then being in a band that gets to tour all over the world and it’s amazing. But when you are actually able to expand outside of that into a world that you really have no business of being in,” he pauses, searching for the right words, “you learn so much about yourself and so much about music. That has a profound effect on your confidence and what you think you’re capable of doing. I’m definitely a better musician, a better singer, artist, better everything since doing El Bronx.” Five long years between releases may be a death sentence for many bands, but Caughthran says, if anything, their fruitful side project, which inadvertently haltered The Bronx, was the much-

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needed inspiration they needed to get their punk band reenergised. “After the first Bronx record people were really stoked on the band and we had our major-label record coming out next. We had this big old producer, an A&R guy, label reps and all the shit that comes along with it,” he opens up candidly. “We’d go into the studio to make a punk record, and that record ends up taking a year and a half to make. People pretty much forgot about the band. Then the second record comes out on Island and doesn’t sell a hundred million copies so Island drops you. It’s one of those things where you learn a lot in a short timeframe. So when El Bronx started doing really well, it was like, ‘We can make a Bronx record right now but it doesn’t feel right. Our heads are still in Mariachi land. We’ve got at least six songs already written, we’re all inspired to write more, everyone’s feeling good and people are digging the band. Let’s not make the same mistake twice and take another three years to do another El Bronx record, let’s just crank one out now, while we’re all feeling it.’ So that’s what we did and I’m stoked we did because I love that record and also it gave The Bronx the time it needed.” Caughthran, who says the new record represents the highest evolution of the band, hasn’t let past mistakes qualify his enthusiasm. “Whether it’s our best record is up to whoever cares. This is us, after three Bronx records and two Mariachi El Bronx records, in a spot where we’re really stoked to be alive and making music still. I think that represents a high point for us as individuals and a group. We never thought we’d get this far and accomplish the things we’ve accomplished. It’s that sort of thing when you reach the goals that you’ve set, no matter how big it is in the world’s eyes, it means a lot to you and that is very revitalising and very refreshing, and that gives the energy for the next ten years.” Early reviews for the album, while positive, have been varied, with MTV making comparisons to Foo Fighters and The Black Keys and one blogger even referencing Australia’s own Jet. “Jet?” Caughthran questions in hysterics. “I don’t really see The Black Keys. There’s a lot of rock‘n’roll on this record, I’ll happily admit that, but I’m the wrong guy to come to for comparisons,” he pauses. “To me it just sounds like The Bronx.”

Recorded in their own studio by friend and Saosin guitarist Beau Burchell, the record sees the band once more in control of their destiny. “We pride ourselves on being self-sufficient and taking care of everything on our own. That’s the blessing of society; if you’re going to have the luxury of being able to record in your bedroom then make the most of it.” Along with being the first Bronx record in five years, IV also marks the tenth anniversary of the band. “We have a huge box set that is being developed at the moment,” says Caughthran of their celebratory plans. “We’re re-releasing all the records on vinyl, so you’ve got I, II, III and IV coming out on vinyl plus an extra record of all B-sides, along with a book and that sort of stuff. It’s in the works right now and will be a cool retrospective of the band and where we’ve been and where we’ve come from.” Together with the box set, celebrations will also include an Australian tour. Last in the country little more than a year ago, touring with the Big Day Out as Mariachi El Bronx and playing two sideshows as The Bronx supporting Soundgarden, Caughthran reveals they’ll be back. “I’m very honoured that we’ve got our own little world going in Australia. We love going there every year and we’d go there twice, three times a year if we could. I’m really looking forward to getting over and

playing new shows. It’s going to be in April and we’ll have a lot of special stuff lined up for then.” First touring Australia in 2004 on the back of their debut, outside of their native America, Australian audiences were amongst the first to truly embrace the band. As such, they have toured regularly since and become Caughthran’s favourite touring destination. “I think it’s the honesty in the music,” he tries to identify what clicked so early with Australian audiences. “In a world where there are a lot of smokescreens, I think Australians are really authentic. They love real rock‘n’roll and real punk music and they don’t like bullshit. They don’t like someone pretending they’re something they’re not. I’ve always believed that no matter what you do, if you’re honest about it and put forth hard work and you’ve got some talent, people are going to believe in it. I think that’s why Australians got us straightaway.” WHO: The Bronx WHAT: The Bronx IV (White Drugs/Shock) WHEN & WHERE: Tuesday 30 April and Wednesday 1 May, Corner Hotel; Saturday 4, Groovin’ The Moo, Prince Of Wales Showground, Bendigo


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PARTY ANIMALS Lock up your daughters and your liquor cabinets (maybe not in that order), irrepressible rockers Deer Tick are on the way! Frontman and creative lynchpin John McCauley explains to Steve Bell about flippantly fucking up and how most rock bands today are pussies. ver the last few years Rhode Island rockers Deer Tick have the shed the ragged country-rock persona which characterised their early years and become the epitome of the hard-livin’, hard-drinkin’ road hogs that have long existed on the fringes of the American rock’n’roll scene – the mantle once held proudly by their heroes The Replacements, as well as bands like Supersuckers, Zeke and other rebels of their ilk.

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Their music has changed over time to reflect this transformation, their fourth album, Divine Providence, being ramshackle and sloppy in the best possible way, full of tales of reckless hedonism and calculated abandon. It’s messy, occasionally silly – and there are moments where you’d swear they were trying to shoot themselves

in the foot – but there’s still a heart beating at the core of their songs, and moments of introspection that transcend the record’s more overt party elements to give it an undeniable substance. Still, the mantra of Divine Providence’s opening gambit, The Bump – a shouted refrain of “We’re full grown men, but we act like kids/We’ll face the music the next time we roll in” – acts as a pretty clear summation of the Deer Tick ethos. “We wanted to explore a couple of new things,” shrugs frontman and chief songwriter John McCauley about the tone of Divine Providence. “I mean even when War Elephant (2007) and Born On Flag Day (2009) came out and we were touring behind those albums, our shows were still really loud and very rock’n’roll – very debaucherous. We’ve just been playing that way live for so long, we had to see if we could capture it on tape and I think we did – it has its moments. “I guess with any record that you make, as time passes you kinda wish that you’d done some things differently, but I think all in all it turned out pretty good – we’re happy with it.” McCauley is certainly not perturbed at having shed the ‘altcountry’ tag that followed them early on, not that you get the impression he loses much sleep over such matters. “I’d consider us more of a rock band than anything else. I mean I love bands like Drive-By Truckers and we’re playing shows with them later this month, but I kind of hate the term ‘alt-country’. We’ll play with anybody really – when we’re doing a tour, it’s always just important to like the band that you’re touring with. We’ve done some great tours with bands like The Felice Brothers, Turbo Fruits – we even played a show opening for Nas once! That was in Providence, our home town, and we were friends with the promoter – it was actually a pretty awesome show, us and then Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings and then Nas. They’re the kind of shows we want to play!” Which augers well for their impending debut Australian tour, which finds them sharing bills with San Franciscan rock duo Two Gallants – two different-sounding bands who nonetheless should complement each other well.

There’s more to this story on the iPad “We’ve never played together, but we know the guys,” McCauley says of the pairing. “They’ve come to our shows and we’ve gone to their shows and stuff like that, but this is our first tour together. I’ve been a pretty big fan of them for a while, so this is exciting. I think the two bands together will make for a good show.” Deer Tick seemed to start as a solo project for McCauley and morph into its current incarnation over time, but he explains that this was always his intention from the outset, especially as nowadays the other members are contributing more creatively. “It did start as a band but I just wanted to tour way more often than the other people I was playing with, so I ended up just playing alone a lot of the time. And then I was just grabbing people to join one by one when they became available to me – I’ve been trying to get Dennis [Ryan – drums] and Chris [Ryan – bass] as my rhythm section for years, and then I finally got them over. I’ve pretty much come to a decision that this is the line-up, and if someone were to leave the band for any reason, I don’t know that we would continue, you know?” Even Divine Providence’s straightforward drinking anthem, Let’s All Go To The Bar, was a co-write to some degree. “That was just this idea in my head and I was just having trouble writing some of the lyrics, so we hung around late at the studio one night and Robbie [Crowell – keys/sax] and Ian [O’Neil – guitar] and me finished the song. It’s kinda funny because it’s like the simplest, most boneheaded song on the record, but it’s the one that we had to put the most effort into writing. But it’s always fun to play live – it makes people do some stupid things. You’ve got to watch out for flying beer bottles and shit.” So does Deer Tick actually get up to as much hell-raising on the road as these songs would suggest? “You know, shit happens,” McCauley smiles. “We’ve done some pretty funny things, on and off-stage. Shit like taking insane amounts of LSD and flooding our hotel room, and lighting our guitars on fire, whatever... Sometimes we’re in the mood, sometimes we’re not. I mean we always try to put on a good show, and when we don’t we generally feel pretty bad about it. But I think seeing us live makes our records make a little bit more sense. There’s not a lot of bands around now that do what we do, which is anything that we fucking want. “I don’t know, when I read The Dirt, that Motley Crue book, I was, like, ‘Man, musicians today are a bunch of fucking pussies!’ We get frowned upon for acting up and doing some of the things that we do, and it’s just kind of, ‘Well, look at who our heroes are!’” But it’s McCauley’s list of musical rather than maniacal influences that goes a long way towards best explaining the Deer Tick aesthetic. “I kinda have things in different categories – my favourite bands are, like, Nirvana and The Replacements and The Band, but as a songwriter I really admire John Prine, Townes Van Zandt and folks like that,” he reflects. “I guess part of how I come up with the songs that I come up with is that I try to write a good quality song that I would consider to be maybe half as good as a John Prine song, and then I kind of throw it through the machine of all those musical influences, and then it turns into something Deer Tick. Don’t ask me how.” WHO: Deer Tick WHAT: Divine Providence (Dine Alone/Shock) WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 9 February, Northcote Social Club

30 • For more interviews go to themusic.com.au/interviews


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THE DANCING DEAD “I know you can’t understand me,” Lisa Gerrard admits to Guido Farnell as she does her best to describe the “rare and innate magic” she touches on with her Dead Can Dance composing partner Brendan Perry. ast year Dead Can Dance surprised many by releasing Anastasis, which reveals that the duo, with their origins in Melbourne, have become stronger composers over the years and are more than capable of producing some of the most exquisite music imaginable. Armed with beautiful and powerful visions of what their music should sound like, Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard experiment with traditional music from the Middle East, Greece and the Balkans and bring these diverse influences into uniquely modern contexts to thrilling effect. It is simply a delight to be able to talk to Lisa Gerrard who is one of those often overlooked, iconic vocalists who has emerged from Australia in the ‘80s. Those who follow Gerrard’s career as an accomplished recording and soundtrack artist would know that over the

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course of her 30-years-and-counting career her voice has lost none of its power, multi-octave range and capacity to astound listeners. On the phone from her home in country Victoria, Gerrard is intense and passionate but also business-like when she talks about her work. We start by talking about life on the road with Dead Can Dance and it turns out Gerrard prefers performing live to recording in the studio. “Some of the baroque pieces, like Host Of The Seraphim, are so much more interesting live. They have the kind of magnitude of sounding like they are being played in a cathedral. You never can completely achieve that kind of sound on record. I find that exciting… The live shows give the work a weight, width, depth and a sort of dimension that I don’t think you can achieve on an album. “I really don’t feel that the albums capture my best moments. I always feel like they are my worst moments. I have never been happy with any of the recordings I have done – I hate them! I always feel so much happier playing live. It is an extraordinary opportunity to work with the energy of live musicians. Then there is that wonderful energy in the room that is created uniquely by every audience. There are so many factors involved that bring light, excitement and electricity to a live performance. Even if the tuning isn’t fabulous or whatever, it is so much more exciting. Recording in a studio is very sequenced and static. You keep doing performances over and over again that strive to be accurate and perfect in a sense, but sometimes I think [recording] lacks the magic of a live performance.” The question on everyone’s lips, however, is how Gerrard and Perry got around to working on a new Dead Can Dance album after all these years. “It was almost like an unfinished puzzle. I often think of music as a problem that you solve. You have a series of chaotic things that you put together to try to solve a kind of mathematical equation that leads you to a place with a wonderful bond of sympathy with soulful tissue, you know. So the thing is I met Brendan when I was seventeen, and when we started to think about music it was clear that we had such an incredible vision for what we wanted to do with the music. What drove us is that we formed this bond of sympathy for the work and that we have a very similar kind of excitement and passion for the music. We both were passionate about wanting to explore new ideas and music. Brendan had come from a post-punk world of Joy Division and all of that sort of thing. At that age I was more interested in quite dark things really, avant-garde music and even classical Japanese, Chinese and Turkish music, probably because I had grown up in Prahran. Brendan was interested in those things too but he was interested in finding a way of expressing himself by more traditional methods at that point. When we did actually write a piece together it was something called Frontier. It was recorded at Ron Rude’s house in Belgrave. It was the first time we worked together and [neither of us really didn’t knew] what would happen. It was recorded with some old kerosene cans, Yang Sh’in and some voices. It turned out to be a really magical piece and we realised that when we work together that something just happens and we are able to create something unique. It was the beginning and we wanted to explore this further and ended up going on to London. “I have done lots of wonderful things with lots of other composers. I have worked with many, many people from Morricone to Hans Zimmer but there is a rare and innate magic that Brendan and I touch on that we have never been able to explain,” Gerrard says, sounding emotional. “I know you can’t understand me. This is what draws me back because being separated from the pieces you have written together, well you grieve those. You know the potential of what you can create together has not been completely fulfilled. You also feel, as an artist, that you have to overcome those things that ego brings. That between us – through neuroses or anxiety about wanting to create perfection, which is completely impossible – you strive for this ideal, but there has been friction. You reach a point in life where you want to leave a legacy of work that is not haunted by the memory of the problems you had because of your artistic vision. It should be haunted by the legacy of the wonderful work and how you overcame those problems.”

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As Gerrard talks it seems that the pair’s passion for music simultaneously draws them together but also has the capacity to drive them apart. Consequently it is hard not to wonder about their collaborative relationship and how the intricate and beautiful sounds of Anastasis were forged There are so many variables when we work together. There are times when we work separately and times when we bring things together. Brendan had a very clear vision on this album in terms of the exotic dimension of what he wanted to create, that it is of the Mediterranean and there were scales and rhythms that he wanted to explore for the album. This was exciting for me because when you have to write something against those it really pushes the envelope because you go outside the boundaries of 4/4 or even 5/4. There are pieces on the album that are 9/4. It forces you to completely rethink the narrative you want to create. There was that side of it but Brendan also has a very strong sense of ballad. He always has a very literary and literal desire to communicate with pearls or kernels of wisdom from his own life experiences. He is not being imposing by doing that, he is being poetic. I think the wonderful thing about the combination of the two of us being together is that we both want to do the same things. I do it with abstract vocal expression. It makes the concerts that much more exciting because of various areas we have explored individually and together the palette becomes very broad and exciting. One piece leads to a completely different medium of work but ultimately or quintessentially they are linked because of the same desire to open up the pathway to the heart.” WHO: Dead Can Dance WHAT: Anastasis (Liberator) WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 6 February, Palais

32 • For more interviews go to themusic.com.au/interviews


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GREEN FOR THE PEOPLE Since 1988, California’s Cypress Hill have been a dominating and highly influential force in the world of hip hop. Never shying from speaking his mind, vocalist B-Real chats to Lochlan Watt about his website, marijuana legislation in the USA and the group’s next album. ’ve been keeping busy,” describes 42-year-old B-Real of his 2013 so far, continuing, “I like to not relax too much. I’m down here at our new studios that we’re building down here. We do our live stream broadcasts from here but we’re also building a recording studio so we can sort of do both on our social networks, and also record our records, obviously. I’ve been keeping busy trying to get all that together, and all that.”

“I

Credited as the first-ever hugely successful Latino rapper, B-Real is not content with leaving behind a legacy that only includes eight studio albums, five EPs, various compilations and singles with Cypress Hill, a colourful solo career that has seen countless collaborations, numerous mixtapes, six years of production work and film and TV appearances. B-Real (born Louise Freese) has recently been putting his efforts into his innovative and interactive website: www.brealtv. “The 420 Show is one of many shows that we do on our site. It’s a social network of its own. It’s a live stream site and also a blog site and what not. We’ve just been filling it with content – I do a show there on Mondays to Fridays when I’m not on tour, and even when I am on tour the show runs with the DJs that DJ the show. We’re running it like a radio station, but obviously it’s a little bit more interactive. It’s internet based and we’ve been doing pretty well with it. We want to expand it and grow it – just another tool for us to market all of our Cypress Hill music and videos and whatever else we have going on. At the same time, being able to help market and promote other artists as well, whether they are up and coming or veterans. It’s just a new platform I’m trying to create here.” Moving on, it’s time to talk about the politics that get B-Real motivated. It’s no secret that Cypress Hill love weed – Hits From The Bong is one of the most well known tracks from their 1992 breakout album Black Sunday, as well as the name of their greatest hits record. Last year two US states, Washington and Colorado, decriminalised marijuana. Living in the state of California, which historically has led the way for the cause (having reduced the penalty for possession to a petty offence

that carried a $100 fine in 1975, and become the unofficial capital of medicinal marijuana use), he describes the situation as something that elated Cypress Hill but also carried a certain disappointment. “California should have been the first state to do what Washington and Colorado have recently done,” he says. “Due to some confusion going on with some people involved in the legalisation party, it kind of... There was a whole momentum off, and now you have Washington and Denver which have gone before us, and that’s a great thing. Our only setback was that we could have been the ones to set the standard and push it forward. I imagine that in the next voting cycle California will probably be the next state to do the same thing. It would be ridiculous for us not to.” Without needing further prompts, he continues by explaining some of the reasonings behind his beliefs. “Given that the whole industry with dispensaries, and even the people that have to grow it... It takes staff to run these things, and it creates a lot of revenue for each city and state that allows it. Right now there’s not really any new revenue streams, new capital coming from anywhere for all the states that might be hurting. California has got so many different types of revenue streams that come through here with the movie industry, and music, and art and all that stuff – same thing with New York and all the other major cities. But most cities don’t have those types of opportunities, and this would be perfect because it’s a proven, flowing and growing revenue stream. I think it’s something that all states in America should consider. We have to fight the bullshit thinking and realise that people need jobs, and this is one way to create it.” For such a well-known act to be so open about beliefs that contradict the law, one wonders if Cypress Hill have ever faced any serious trouble with the police? “We’ve had a few scrapes, but we know what’s within our rights and what not. We try not to antagonise them, but at the same time speak our minds and speak the truth. I think that as long as you’re not

speaking against them, the law enforcement is just doing what the federal government tells them to. “I tell you what – if there was an off the record poll that you could take with policemen I bet that a good third or fourth of them are actually marijuana smokers themselves, but they can’t do it or can’t admit it because of their job and the drug testing and what not. And then there’s another percentage that are sympathetic to it, and then you still have that small group of old-school thinking that can’t get it past their heads that this is not the same type of drug as cocaine or heroin or methamphetamine. They look at it as all the same. There’s always that old-school thinking type of police officers. However, younger police know what’s up. They don’t have to arrest you unless you’re going out of your way to fuck up, you know?” And just how much impact does B-Real think his words have had on the matter? “I think our contribution was big. How big? That can’t really be measured. I know that we did create a lot of awareness, and got a lot of people think a lot more open-minded as opposed to how they were thinking before our records came out. I think we inspired a lot of other artists to come out and talk about it and represent it.”

In case you were wondering, his favourite strain of weed “since 1995” has been OG Kush. Sour Diesel and The Headband are cited as other favourites. B-Real reveals that the group are “just starting” work on their new album, and with no further record label obligations are very much considering releasing completely independently. “We’re going to start the early stages of production – picking out music, going through concepts and chopping it up with Muggs, and see what we go with first. I don’t anticipate this taking that long, because we’re all very excited to do this and Muggs has got a different type of sound in mind, and when that happens it’s going to be incredible. I don’t have the timeframes but I don’t anticipate it taking that long to make. We want to get it done and we want to get it knocked out, and give people a genuine, vibey-as Cypress Hill album. Something different.” WHO: Cypress Hill WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 28 February, Forum; Friday 1 March, Soundwave, Flemington Racecourse

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DAVE LARKIN: TASTE TEST FIRST ALBUM I BOUGHT WITH MY OWN MONEY Different Light by The Bangles, on LP. I bought it from Glenhuntly Records for 12 bucks and I’ve still got it today. It was a lot of scrimping and saving, passing on pennies, et cetera. They were really great popsongs. I know they didn’t write many of them, but that doesn’t matter to a 12-year-old boy when you’ve got four or five hot girls playing guitars and drums.

THE ALBUM I’M LOVING RIGHT NOW Most of the music I listen to is really old, so my new favourite album is actually Blue Öyster Cult’s Secret Treaties. I’ve only gotten into Blue Öyster Cult in the last couple of years, and I’ve only just come to realise what a great band I’ve missed out on. I’m still trying to get my head around the true history of rock’n’roll, and when I came to Blue Öyster Cult, I was like, ‘Wow, these guys were really good’. Great songwriting, great guitarplaying, great band. They kind of went missing in time, being dwarfed by Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin and those other rock giants of the era. There’s your standard rock’n’roll history that journos and magazines always write about; the classics, the canon. But if you don’t go looking under the cracks, go looking yourself, you miss a lot of the good stuff. I want to educate myself on what was actually really happening back at the time, not just those handful of bands that’ve lasted the test of time. So, most of the new shit I listen to is really old.

MY FAVOURITE PARTY ALBUM Hey Hey It’s Daryl & Ossie. It’s as bad as it sounds. It’s got one of the most garish album covers of all time. It’s songs sung in a Denise & Ernie style. It’s a stinker. I’ve never actually played it at a party, but I always know that I’ve got it if I really want people to leave. The other week I was DJ-ing at a pub, and the staff really wanted to go home, so they told me to put on something that’d clear the room. I put on Suicide, Frankie Teardrop. And it did, everyone cleared out really quickly.

MY FAVOURITE COMEDOWN ALBUM Anything by The Killers or Franz Ferdinand. That’ll help bring on the vomit.

THE FIRST GIG I EVER ATTENDED The first gig I ever went to was actually the first gig I ever played. Technically, it was seeing Celtic Rhythm Express play at Molly Bloom’s in Port Melbourne. But I was there with my high-school rock

band, we were called Rising Tide [much laughter]. A bunch of 15-year-olds, playing our first-ever support gig, literally learning to play on stage. We were supporting them during the breaks, playing as close to an Irish set as we could, trying to fill 30 minutes. Which meant U2 songs, obviously, and then we figured Irish folks like The Beatles so we did a couple of Beatles songs. We were awful, just awful. We couldn’t sing. But somehow we went down really well, and I thought I was such a rockstar.

THE WEIRDEST GIG EXPERIENCE I’VE HAD I was one of those guys who for years has been telling everyone that I was there at that great gig at Meredith when Dirty Three were playing under the lightning storm. You were in the middle of thinking that maybe you should run back to your tent, like, ‘we’re all gonna die’, because the lightning felt like it was going to hit the stage. But also thinking this was the greatest light show ever, watching a band hit their peak in the middle of a storm. The band is incredible without the light show, but with God on lights, they were amazing. So it was weird not in that it was strange, but in that it was amazing; it definitely stands out amongst all the gigs I’ve seen over the years. It was pretty memorable.

BIGGEST NON-MUSICAL INFLUENCES I don’t know... chocolate donuts? Terry Daniher? The Essendon Footy Club 1984 Grand Final?

THE BIGGEST CELEBRITY CRUSH I’VE EVER HAD

THE COOLEST PERSON I’VE EVER MET

Wow! Are sure this isn’t for Dolly magazine? Judi Dench is smoking. Anne Haddy. All the olds do it for me. But back when I was a kid, I guess, to go back to what we were talking about before: Susanna Hoffs from The Bangles. Belinda Carlisle... Is this really gonna go to print?

I met Burt Bacharach. He was pretty cool. Or, more so, that was really cool for me. I did a gig with him about five years ago, in Sydney. It was a whole bunch of Aussie artists doing Burt Bacharach songs at the State Theatre. It was all like Idol people, but I loved him so much that I just really wanted to get my name on the bill and do a song. I ended up doing 24 Hours From Tulsa, but, when I got to the rehearsal I’d learnt the song in the wrong key, and I turned around to the orchestra and said: ‘oh, canya do it in C?’ They weren’t impressed. But Burt is pretty cool; he’s dashing with that white hair. For some reason I thought he’d be really tall, but he’s tiny and frail, about five-foot-nothing. A skinny little thing. He looked like he enjoyed a bit of the solarium action. Or maybe it’s just the California sunshine. He was well sunned, let’s put it that way. And looking good.

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IF I COULD HANG OUT IN ANY TIME AND PLACE IN HISTORY If you’re talking about music, I guess it would’ve been pretty cool to be the coffee clerk at Abbey Road in the late-’60s. Or hanging around the Bowery in the mid-’70s. But if you’re talking not about music, maybe just go back to when the Big Bang happened. See where it all began. Take my camera, come back, play the video to Christians.

IF I WASN’T MAKING MUSIC I’D BE Making scones? Making cake? Making excuses?

This question seems strange to me, because I don’t actually know anyone who lives on their rock’n’roll, unless you’re talking about the Julia Gillard rock’n’roll. I’m making music, sure, but I also have a day job: a digital designer; websites, graphic design, all that shit. I was smart enough to have a Plan B in place, because Australia’s not much interested in artists over 35. There’s no hope for us, mate; we just have to play the old records, and think about the good times. Interview by Anthony Carew WHO: Dave Larkin WHAT: The Best Of Bon Scott, 33rd Anniversary Tribute WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 9 February, Yarraville Club


Eats, treats and hot summer beats. Feb 8 – 28. Headline act February 8 5.30pm – 6.30pm.

Other acts at Summer Sounds: The Zanes, Luke Legs, Vela, Eagle & the Worm, Cavanagh & Argus, . Phoebe and the Night Creatures and more

Check out gig times at qv.com.au

Be in the now.

37


LOVE HURTS

THE POWER OF ONE

Alex Zhang Hungtai, aka Dirty Beaches, chats with Nick Argyriou about being naturally drawn to melancholia, escaping to Berlin and the two records he’ll release in 2013. orn in Taiwan, Alex Zhang Hungtai has made Toronto, Honolulu, Vancouver, and Montreal his homes, and now it’s Berlin where the soundscape artist will rest his head, possibly for the next year. His move there last month was fuelled by his want for a change of scenery as a result of a personal issue, he reveals. “I just ended a five-year relationship, so I just wanted to move to a different city, you know, where I don’t speak the language and kind of start new.”

He’s made legions of fans as the creative lynchpin of My Morning Jacket, but now Jim James is taking a detour on his lonesome. He tells Steve Bell about revelling in solitude and stumbling across his own individual sound.

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Since shifting to Berlin, Hungtai’s recorded two albums to deal with the hurt. There’s one instrumental, and another with vocals that integrate his trademark noir beats and fuzz that have forever attempted to emulate the mood of his idol, Hong Kong filmmaker Wong Karwai. Love Is The Devil and Drifters are both due in the coming months, on the back of Dirty Beaches’ previous records Night City (2010) and Badlands (2011). With the entirety of the instrumental Love Is The Devil being written in a few weeks in December as Hungtai dealt with his private crisis, the record takes on the gloomy feel of his state of mind. As his verbatim tweet back on Thursday 3 January informed: “Just submitted ‘love is the devil’ to @zoomusic666 and the cover art as well”, before adding, “A lot of blood & tears went into this instrumental LP”. There was also the tweet the following day that continued the despair: “Was actually crying in the studio alone in Berlin. 5am. One take. #emo #pit #bottom #mellotron”. “I was having a really rough time there,” explains Hungtai, “I pretty much went cold turkey in the sense that I sold all my stuff, gave possessions away to friends and packed [for Berlin] like I was going away on tour, like really minimal. I didn’t want anyone to find me, and I just found it all cathartic.” Drifters, meanwhile, is an electronic-based album, recorded with an expanded threepiece that includes Bernardino Femminielli and Shub Roy with drum machine looping, synths, guitar and vocals logged throughout.

38 • For more interviews go to themusic.com.au/interviews

“The idea of Drifters is definitely a nighttime record, and conceptually it’s a reflection of life on the road and being in different cities all the time,” says Hungtai. “Drifters has really got this sabotaging a reality kind of subtext… I don’t want to say, like, druggy,” he laughs. The word ‘hypnotic’ is offered for Hungtai to run with instead, which he does. “Yeah, it is hypnotic and is me translating all of that, which is pretty much my life of the past two years,” he confesses. It’s clear that this melancholia in the Dirty Beaches armoury has forever stemmed from a genuine place. Brutally honest and refreshingly rousing, Hungtai’s early days singing vocals in a metal band, his early morning hours spent as a video clerk in a porn store working the graveyard shift from midnight until 9am, his upbringing in Taiwan and adoration for auteurs David Lynch and the aforementioned Wong Kar-wai have all aided in sculpting the performer’s symphony. “I’m just more naturally drawn to this melancholy,” admits Hungtai. “I was in Croatia on tour recently and people would come up and say, ‘Oh, are you okay, you look really sad!’” he chuckles. But it’s an undulating wave of emotions for Hungtai. “[A lot] of times in reality [which subsequently translates into the music] I’m neither happy nor upset – more neutral.” It’s a curious balance for Hungtai, this ‘sad and beautiful world’ he subsists in, and it has to be this way otherwise the ramifications would be dire. “I’m trying to justify everything because if I don’t, then I’ll be in this really deep depression trying to make sense of my life,” he attests. WHO: Dirty Beaches WHEN & WHERE: Sunday 10 February, Tote

im James’ unmissable voice aside, his brand new album Regions Of Light And Sound Of God – his first ever solo effort – sounds nothing like the body of work that he’s crafted with his Kentucky outfit My Morning Jacket over the last decade or so. That band’s six acclaimed albums are each derivations of the country-rock template – though there’s plenty of experimentation and diversity within that canon – while this new collection is a different beast entirely, all hazy soundscapes and abstract instrumentation, a more languid and somehow intimate experience for the listener, while no less compelling.

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James explains that he wasn’t originally setting out to make his own album – and that My Morning Jacket is still very much an ongoing concern – but having set up a new studio in Kentucky, suddenly having both unfettered time and the freedom to experiment just led him organically down the solo path. Over the course of the next two years – between My Morning Jacket tours – he played basically all of the instruments on the record as well as engineering and producing it all himself. “I’ve never really had a need to [do a solo project] before, because I’ve always just been in My Morning Jacket and that’s always fulfilled my needs and my wants – and it still does – but this is kind of a different thing,” the songwriter offers. “Because in the past I was always [working on my own], but it was always demos for a My Morning Jacket record, and this time I just felt like I didn’t want to do demos anymore, I had enough songs that I just wanted to make a record. “In the band we all encourage each other to do as many different things as we can – I think that’s one of the beautiful things about being a musician or any career in life, just experimenting and finding different ways to express yourself within that. In My Morning Jacket we encourage each other to get out there

and explore what’s out there to be explored.” Once he realised that a bunch of the tracks he was working on did indeed lend themselves to a separate project, James let the songs themselves take him to the disparate realms which characterise Regions Of Light... “A lot of the songs knew what they wanted to be, but I didn’t really know how to do some of it at first, so it took quite a bit of experimenting and messing around,” he admits. “But in my mind I had a pretty clear vision of what I wanted it to be. It was actually a lot of fun because it was really just me experimenting in the studio and I really didn’t put any pressure on myself to finish it by a certain date or do any of those things that normally come with making a record. I didn’t want any of that pressure so I decided to just let it take its course and take as long as it needed to take.” And distancing himself from the distinctive My Morning Jacket sound wasn’t a major ambition for the record, more a by-product of this new process. “I like playing music by myself and I like being in the studio by myself so it was kinda just born from that,” James muses. “I mean, I love being in My Morning Jacket too and I love playing in a band – they’re just kinda two different worlds. This is more the side of me that loves experimenting with sounds and playing with different instruments, and just really enjoying being a musician by myself.” WHO: Jim James WHAT: Regions Of Light And Sound Of God (Spunk/Co-Operative)


THI

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EK E W

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Friday 3 May • Northcote Social Club, Melbourne www.northcotesocialclub.com

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On Sale Wednesday 13 February www.chuggentertainment.com • www.xIIItouring.com

LATEST RELEASE ‘Lightning’ OUT NOW

39


SOUTHERN MAN

NOW WE’RE A BAND

Devon Allman of Royal Southern Brotherhood didn’t even meet his rock-star father until he was 16 years old. He tells Warwick Goodman it was probably for the best. he deep, warm, Texan voice of Devon Allman wafts down the line from St Louis, Missouri, where he’d played a show the night before, one of the last before he headed home for Christmas. “Sometimes in the last few years touring I’m not able to be home for Christmas,” he admits, “but this year I will be. I’m going to spend time with family and have a good time.” And what a family it is – Allman is the son of Greg Allman of the great Southern rock and roll band The Allman Brothers. Imagine the great parties they must have thrown in their time. My kingdom for an Allman Family Christmas.

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Allman is coming to Australia in March with his band Royal Southern Brotherhood to play Bluesfest in Byron Bay, as well as some headline shows of their own. The band also features another member of a famous musical family in Cyril Neville, originally of the Neville Brothers, who is more of Allman’s father’s generation. “He’s old enough to be my father,” agrees Allman of the Brotherhood’s percussionist and singer. “He’s a musical legend. There’s several points in the night where I look over and I can’t help but smile from ear to ear. I’m playing with a legend every night.” His demeanour is relaxed, thoughtful and he’s softly spoken – he’s a lovely guy. Allman didn’t grow up as a typical son of a rock star. His parents split up when he was young and he didn’t meet his father until he was 16 years old. “Thankfully, I didn’t really grow up in the circus, you know. My parents split when I was an infant, and I got to have a very normal upbringing.” A chuckle erupts in his tummy, as if this might not be the truth at all, or maybe because, against the odds, he really did have a very normal upbringing. “For one,” he continues, “it just allowed me to be a normal kid. But for two, it really did allow me to blaze my own trail in music, without

After a “sleeper” album success, Clubfeet became a band and cut a second record, as Sebastian Cohen and Montgomery Cooper tell Michael Smith.

T being directly influenced [by my father]. Which is nice, to know that I did this all on my own.” Allman really did find music all on his own, and from a very young age. “I became a music fan by about age five,” he says. Most kids are still learning to swim at that age, but he was already collecting records. He laughs in his low, humble, friendly way: “Ahhh, I was swimmin’ in music. It was just exciting, I loved it. I was collecting records when I was a kid and around that time it hit me who he was. I always knew that I would meet up with him, and I did. When I was sixteen I met up with him and we got along great. It was strange, we instantly felt comfortable together and we developed a bond very quickly. And, you know, I really think it worked out how it was supposed to.” Allman has never been to Australia and he is enthusiastic about the chance to visit. “I have to say that it’s been a lifelong dream. It’s really, really going to be something special. I’m going to try to take it in as much as I can, I’ve heard nothing but amazing things about the country so whatever I can squeeze into a very busy schedule I look forward to.” Most of all, he looks forward to playing the big Bluesfest. “I can’t wait to see Robert Plant and Santana. And my friend Derek Trucks [of Tedeschi Trucks Band] is playing on the festival. It’s very cool for me because not only do I get to perform and help bring our music down to a new continent, but I get to go to a very huge concert, with a bunch of my heroes. It will be cool.” WHO: Royal Southern Brotherhood WHEN & WHERE: Saturday 30 March, Corner Hotel; Thursday 28 March to Monday 1 April, Bluesfest, Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm

yan Francesconi is, these days, bordering on being an honorary Australian. He owes his introduction to these shores – and his Australian girlfriend and collaborateur Mirabai Peart – to Joanna Newsom. It was through membership in her live crew – first as part of the Ys Street Band, touring behind her 2006 LP Ys, then as ‘musical director’ of 2010’s triple LP Have One On Me – that Francesconi first visited as a tourist; and Peart, he met as a violinist drafted to play Have One On Me tours.

just the barest of bones; to make music as simply as I could, without any tricks or overdubs. And solo guitar seemed like the simplest expression of that.”

“It was massively important, and massively influential,” Francesconi says, with no understatement, of his involvement with Newsom. “It really opened up my horizons to the scope of projects I could work on.”

And, so, came Parables. “When I was writing that stuff I was pretty much listening only to baroque lute music,” Francesconi says, of his solo-guitar debut. “I found it so peaceful, but really technically intriguing. I was interested in that juxtaposition: that something could satisfy a compositional statement, but at the same time not be overpowering, or too much about the ego. It’s really simple but also incredibly complex, and there’s not much music that actually fits into that category.”

Growing up, the guitar was Francesconi’s first love; he was, confessedly, a “basic heavy-metal guitar kid” whose solo musical ambition was to be “a shredder”. But enrolling in the composition program at CalArts, he got deep into the abstract with ambient electronica. “I went pretty deep into that world, which is perhaps why I had such a strong desire to exit it,” Francesconi says. Making ambient electronic music under the name RF, Francesconi found performing it – with the involvement of computers – “incredibly dissatisfying as an instrumentalist”. “I enjoyed recording visceral, textural music, but performing it felt really weak,” he says. “I reached a point where I really wanted to strip any sound to

40 • For more interviews go to themusic.com.au/interviews

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“The kind of record we wanted to make,” adds keyboards player Montgomery Cooper, “[was] something that kind of mixed our love of band music and love of dance music.” The new album is quite the great leap forward from their first, 2010’s Gold On Gold, which, as Cooper tells it, they “made on a whim, in a lounge room, when Seb was staying on our couch for a while and we kind of had a bit of downtime. So we weren’t even thinking about that. We made the record and it ended up getting some exposure and kind of doing okay, almost in spite of us and in spite of itself!” All of which is quite the understatement, considering that first album became something of a subtle hit, picked up for release in the US by seminal New York underground dance label Plant Music after the label discovered the band on a blog. A positive Pitchfork review led to a spate of remixes and a resurgence of interest in the album a year after its original release. And that led to Clubfeet travelling to New York. “That was the first time that we played live, as the whole band,” Cooper continues. “Like we’d done

a few DJ shows and a few stripped-down things, because we were probably being slapdash about it, but in the lead-up to going to the States, we spent a month or two jamming a lot and regularly. So the first ever show we played was in New York at Pianos. We ended up, I think, playing ten shows that week at CMJ. Some of those shows were, like, lunchtime shows to two people, but some of the shows, The Strokes were there, Danger Mouse was there.” “I feel like we did become a band at CMJ,” adds Cohen. Expat Australian Victor Van Vugt, whose credits include records for Nick Cave and PJ Harvey among many, mixed the album in New York. “We’re old friends with him from other things and he kind of said he wanted to do it,” laughs Cooper, “so when he said he wanted to do it, that meant we were, like, ‘that sounds great’, because we’re pretty limited in what we can do, technically. So it was kind of nice to be able to do all the chaos in recording, make the tracks and send them off to him. “Some of the last ones we added were the most – not all of them but in a way probably the least, I guess, pop songs, were a bit more deeper and less songdriven because we felt like there were plenty of those moments on the record already and that wasn’t our idea of what we wanted to do. We didn’t want it to be purely a pop record, even though we’re a pop band; like we kind of wanted it to find a balance of our tastes.” WHO: Clubfeet WHAT: Heirs And Graces (Illusive/Liberation) WHEN & WHERE: Friday 8 February, Star Bar, Bendigo; Saturday 9, Ding Dong

Though they’ve been preparing for their forthcoming debut album for a while, WA’s Ruby Boots lucked out with their latest single, Kellie Anne, as Michael Smith discovers from vocalist Bex Chilcott.

From “basic heavymetal guitar kid” to classical folkie, by way of listening to a lot of baroque lute music, Ryan Francesconi’s career trajectory isn’t quite what he expected. He chats with Anthony Carew about sliding towards the highbrow.

These days, Francesconi and Peart split time between Sydney and Portland, Oregon, playing not only in Newsom’s band, but as an instrumental guitar/ violin duo exploring long, shapeshifting compositions influenced by Balkan folk music. Their co-billed 2012 LP, Road To Palios, came out on Bella Union in the UK, and grew out of a ‘reinvention’ Francesconi staged with his first album for solo guitar, 2010’s Parables.

“The blend came naturally, I think,” Clubfeet lead singer and guitarist Sebastian Cohen suggests. “There was never a conscious decision. I think that’s just the music that we love, pretty much. It’s a combination of that and all of us coming together with our own tastes. We all have that in common, loving that era of music, the aesthetic and everything. But we do love the new dancey stuff, I suppose; which you had back then as well, so I think it’s just an extension of the ‘80s anyway.”

ACCIDENTALLY KELLIE ANNE

SHAPESHIFTER

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wo years in the making, recorded in lounge rooms in Melbourne, Sydney and Cape Town, Melbourne fivepiece Clubfeet have finally released their sophomore album, Heirs And Graces, a powerful mix of ‘80s new wave synth pop, contemporary indie pop and electronica.

Those ‘couple of years’ were, coincidentally, spent working with Newsom, arranging the songs on her mammoth triple-album, and then for the live setting. “Performing with her, we were playing completely acoustic,” Francesconi says. “It really helped me realise what I wanted to do with my own music.”

Both Parables and Road To Palios have been compared to classic solo-folk guitarists like John Fahey and Robbie Basho – and contemporary figures like James Blackshaw – but Francesconi is, contrarily, steeped in medieval composers and Turkish folk. “You can tell when a reviewer comes at it from a rock’n’roll perspective, or when an audience is more of a rock crowd,” he says. “There’s a different frame-ofreference when someone is looking at you from a Joanna Newsom perspective, or whether they’re looking at you from a classical, folk-music perspective, which is a little more true to what the music is.” WHO: Ryan Francesconi & Mirabai Peart WHAT: Road To Palios (Bella Union) WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 7 February, Toff In Town

ver the past year, singer, songwriter and frontwoman for WA alt.country combo Ruby Boots, Bex Chilcott, has taken the odd opportunity to take herself off to the US to soak up firsthand some of the places that have been instrumental in the creation of the music she loves: Memphis, New Orleans, Nashville… and Utah?

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“Yeah, I’m going back to Utah at the end of this tour actually,” she explains. “Utah’s kind of a special aspect of the States. [Fellow former Sandgroper] Vicki [Thorne] from The Waifs lives on a ranch over there and I slept my jetlag off there last time, and we started doing a little songwriting. We write together pretty well, so we’re just going to give it another go, spend a bit longer there… It’ll be colder,” she laughs. “It’s gonna be really good weather to bunker down.”

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Originally coming together in 2010, the six-piece Ruby Boots have put out two EPs – a self-titled release and 2012’s At Last – picking up WA’s equivalent of the ARIAs for Best Country Act along the way. Next on the list is the debut album, for which Chilcott has already written a stack of material that Ruby Boots will be recording in May with Australian producer Tony Buchen (Tim Finn, John Butler Trio, Blue King Brown). But first, a new single, Kellie Anne, was unexpectedly recorded in Nashville, which wasn’t part of the plan. “I’d probably been thinking about going to the States for about nine months, as a holiday, and then Ashwin [Subramaniam, drums] had just been, so I was like, ‘I’m going’,” she laughs. “I kind of really wanted to do the South and just walk through that history. I’d applied for a grant for a three-month residency in Nashville, which I didn’t get, but through that it opened up a bunch of opportunities that I wanted to explore. So a bit of both – bit of work, bit of holiday.”

Meanwhile, the band’s manager had a couple of contacts in the States, including Mike Dixon, who manages Ron Sexsmith, and through him, Chilcott was put in touch with Nashville-based songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer Robin Eaton, who’s probably best known here for co-writing Jill Sobule’s 1995 hit, I Kissed A Girl. “I’d wanted to start co-writing to just learn how other people write – I have my own set ways and it’s kind of dangerous getting stuck in ways – you don’t learn anything – and so I wanted to go and write with people that do it all the time, just see what they had to offer my brain, what lock they can unlock. “Robin was great, a really lovely guy and I’m still in contact with him all the time. We got together and wrote two songs in two days, and that’s how Kellie Anne came about. He had a bit of a melody, I had a great chorus, we started writing verses and it was really strange – he didn’t know what the chorus was about but we were still writing the same song. It was kind of magical, you know.” All of a sudden they were in the studio, the songs totally fresh, and Ruby Boots had a new single. Even then there was the odd surprise: “I was sitting on my laptop on my bed at home about midnight, and I get this email from Robin saying, ‘Hey, what do you think of the steel?’” she laughs again, unaware that Eaton had called in an old friend, Paul Neihaus from Calexico, to drop some pedal steel on the track. WHO: Ruby Boots WHAT: Kellie Anne (MGM) WHEN & WHERE: Thursday 7 February, Beav’s Bar, Geelong; Friday 8, Baha Tacos, Rye; Saturday 9, Workers Club


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41


SINGLED OUT WITH STEPHANIE LIEW

ON THE RECORD

THE DRONES

How To See Through Fog MGM

The Tiger & Me

Four|Four/ABC Music The male lead’s cottony, sexy just-woken-up vocals and the folky R&B, soothing, escapist vibe of Made It To The Harbour belie its rather bleak subject matter, but boy, the group harmonies, Indian tabla drums and Hammond organ get your heart pumping. Its three verses and two instrumental choruses challenge the traditional pop song structure, yet not in a way that’s gimmicky. Close runner-up for Single Of The Week.

ELOQUOR FEAT GINGER VAN ES New Day

Myspherical Entertainment/Obese Distribution Considering the popularity of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, will hip hop focus on positivity and acceptance more, rather than ‘bitches and hoes’, cars, drugs and dem Benjamin$? New Day is one such track, preaching living life in the present and doing your best. It’s a commendable, great message but unfortunately, a pronounced Aussie accent (a drawcard for some, a deal-breaker for others), rippling, arpeggiated keyboards that clash with the chilled bass and drumbeat and a forgettable chorus melody make for a song that’s not so great.

Rules

GREEN DAY Tre

HIGH HIGHS Open Season

Remote Control

Reprise

Fine Time/Sony

Rules is the debut album from two Australian expats who met in Barcelona and spent the next two years constructing its songs. As the title suggests, they set themselves some strict guidelines with which to write the instrumental music that would comprise their debut album, a record that thrives on energy, ebullient yet melancholic melodies and some brutal and primitive rhythms.

In the interest of full disclosure: this reviewer hasn’t followed Green Day’s progress in years. In fact, since 2004’s bigwig-baiting American Idiot was burning up the charts interest has been completely lost. But there has been a successful Broadway musical, an average Rock Band edition, another record and a live DVD. The fact that all this had to be looked up is probably more down to my waning interest in commercialised punk rock than anything else, but it has to be said that the lads probably lost their renewed grip on relevancy a while ago.

The debut album from the Sir Elton John-approved Highs Highs begins with Dey, an instrumental introduction to the sounds of the Brooklyn (via Sydney) duo. The soft thud of the electronic percussion beneath a gorgeous piano track lays the path for the excellent production quality on what is a lovely-sounding album. The first taste of Jack Milas’ vocals comes on Milan, majestically rising with the sensitive electronics of Oli Chang. Flowers Bloom, which first appeared on their 2011 self-titled EP, adds an understated bass line to the mix but follows much the same blueprint drafted on Milan.

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MADE IT TO THE HARBOUR

LIVE

CIVIL CIVIC

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From the trickling piano and stumbling drum beat of the alluringly minimal verses, to the bitter and jaded resentment evident in the guitars – grainy and eerie to complement the disappointed words Gareth Liddiard spits and sighs – How To See Through Fog is as gorgeous and majestic as it is depressing. Watch out for that guitar solo; it’ll cut through you like a saw.

Instrumental albums either cast aside traditional song format and head into more obtuse territory or they let their musical ideas and playing construct the hooks that the vocals would normally provide. Aaron Cupples and Ben Green firmly chose the latter and as a result Rules is brimming with the types of catchy riffs and solos that lodge deep in your memory receptors. They also excel in a wide range of styles from Strokes-ish surf and sci-fi garage rock to M83 maximalist synth anthems. That may sound like a chaotic mess but it works because the duo anchor their songs in programmed drums that create a mechanistic cohesion to the album. Run Overdrive and Sky Delay are pure ‘90s fuzz and deliver collegerock guitar workouts while they also show a post-punk/ goth-pop streak in songs like Lights On A Leash that sound like a Cure or New Order demo before descending into a subterranean fetish nightclub. Mayfield virtually dispenses with drums, creating a beautiful billowing guitar and bass composition that sounds positively angelic in light of the surrounding static and beats. By stripping their electronic instruments back to an analogue-sounding skeleton, Civil Civic have allowed the melodic strengths of their guitars to take centre BDstage and the result is an impressive exercise in collaborative cohesion that doesn’t sacrifice songcraft for style.

Either way, we now have Tre; the final chapter in a trilogy (the first two chapters obviously titled Uno and Dos) released over the course of the last four months. It comes hot on the heels of Armstrong’s recent (and very public) meltdown and subsequent stint in rehab for substance abuse, but if the pint-sized frontman has been hitting the sauce it certainly hasn’t affected a propensity to pen his trademark variety of punk pop tunes. The record starts promisingly enough with the Costelloesque Brutal Love, but unfortunately it dissolves pretty quickly into a collection of songs that sound like… well… Green Day. Which begs the question: did anyone really need more than 30 of these? Packaged and sold three times over? Could they have whittled them down to make one good album as opposed to a trio of average ones? Who knows. At the end of the day the trilogy feels more like an attempt to mask a dearth of social currency with volume not quality. And just because you can do that it doesn’t mean that you should. Chris Hayden

By the time the title track rolls around the High Highs’ formula is easy to recognise, Milas delicately singing over guitar or piano while Chang adds depth to the tracks with some background atmospherics before the song swells for an oft-wordless chorus. This makes for an attractive, well-measured 12 songs. The duo’s penchant for subtly is admirable, refusing to take the easy route with the big chorus when the opportunity regularly presents itself. But what is lacking on Open Season is diversity in sound and emotional pull. As each track brushes by the beautiful production becomes less impressive and the sound less attractive, if only because it feels so familiar. The back half of the album begins to drag though the song quality remains strong. On an individual level, out of the context of the album, any number of these songs could become personal favourites – especially those that add a slight twist to the formula. The folk-tinged Bridge is compelling through its short running time, while the more extravagant Love Is All is perhaps the pinnacle of the album. Jan Wisniewski

Chris Familton

BENNY WALKER Woman

Independent Serenades often attempt to get the serenadee into bed, maybe ‘just for tonight’ or ‘all night long’, but how often have you heard lyrics about the specific number of times to do the deed? The best part of Woman is the verse where Walker (that cheeky bugger) sings, “You do it once it feels so good/ But do it twice if you’re in the mood/And three times can be a charm/But four times won’t do no harm”. Other than that, it’s your typical notthat-exciting, summery acoustic roots ditty.

BILL PARTON TRIO Going Away Independent Thought process while listening to this: Parton’s voice is really similar to Adam Levine’s; annoying and whiny but undeniably charismatic. Did he take these lyrics from the Livejournal he had as a teen? Top notch production makes this sound like stadiumstandard, piano pop rock. Is this enjoyable or painful? Dunno. A punchy hook suggests the former, but then the line, “This place drives me so insane/I’m gonna get back on the plane”, fits into the latter category. Maybe this is what some would call a ‘guilty pleasure’; the kind of thing you listen to with your normie mum. Wait, why is Parton pronouncing the ‘s’ in “say” like it’s a ‘z’? End verdict: yeah, nah, mate.

FEELINGS Intercourse Independent Facts first: Feelings are former Philadelphia Grand Jury frontman Simon Berkfinger’s new project, featuring Dave Rennick (Dappled Cities) and Dan Williams (Art Vs Science). Intercourse was co-written with Yves Klein Blue’s Michael Tomlinson. Whatever you’re imagining Intercourse to sound like is probably not far off the mark. The “sexpop” tune is fun and a guaranteed earworm; a must on all your near-future party playlists. Just be specific when trying to Google it, unless you don’t mind trawling through Sex Ed websites aimed at adolescents.

42 • For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews

I AM KLOOT

KRIS MENACE

MY BLOODY VALENTINE

EMI

Compuphonic

Independent

First popping up around the turn of the century and lumped in with the nascent ‘quiet is the new loud’ movement of the time (see: Starsailor, Travis and a pre-Gwyneth Coldplay), Manchester’s I Am Kloot have always had more in common with friends and collaborators Elbow than any long forgotten Northern wailers – and not just in their relative longevity. In fact, Guy Garvey (on production and arrangement duties here as he was for previous effort Sky At Night) has listed Kloot’s front man John Bramwell as a major influence – lauding his Lennon-esque songsmithery as “far in advance of my own”. This assertion, as well as the band’s general stick-toitiveness, finally paid off in 2010 as they were nominated for the prestigious Mercury Music Prize.

Now, let me put this out there before we go any further: I’m not a clubber, raver nor prolific booty-shaker. Sure, when the time is right I can wipe a dancefloor clean with some sweet-arse moves, and have been known to stay up into the wee hours throwing down 50 shades of boogie, but I’m the first to admit there’s a lot about the dance music scene that I don’t know about.

It’s one of the most hotly anticipated releases in the history of indie rock; almost 22 years after their classic Loveless, My Bloody Valentine are back. m b v kicks off with She Found Now, a song with the kind of warm fuzziness we expect from the Irish shoegaze progenitors; a distorted drone sits in the background as cleaner guitars chime through and Kevin Shields croons gently over the top of this warm bed of sound. Only Tomorrow follows; it’s plain and sweet with a fantastic vocal line that does most of the work as the band just churn away.

Let It All In

As I Am Kloot’s seventh record, there is an established sense of familiarity to this delightful collection of tunes. The title track proves an early highlight, as drummer Andy Hargreaves and bassist Peter Jobson provide laid back and comfortable accompaniment to a familiar Bramwell meditation on his infamous ramshackle lifestyle. “I haven’t got a job or a hobby or an occupation” he laments – his weary tone entirely convincing. On Mouth On Me things are bit more upbeat, though no less street worn as an apologetic Bramwell regretfully recalls lost time and no less than a few regrets. It’s all put together with deft humour though, and the earnest way in which Let It All In endears to the listener is a skill in itself. I Am Kloot may not have the popularity or sales figures of their Mancunian counterparts, but another solid showing here proves them to be no less consistent or charming. Chris Hayden

Features

What I do know, though, is that Kris Menace is more than your standard DJ, and Features is more than your generic house album. Menace (not his real name, FYI) has for the best part of a decade been a fixture on the German electro scene, and his brand of music has unsurprisingly translated into the UK dance scene and beyond. Throughout his career he has collaborated with Alan ‘Stardust’ Braxe, and remixed everyone from Moby to Bag Raiders (both of whom seem vaguely present during Love Is Everywhere), as well as Robbie Williams, Kylie Minogue and Depeche Mode. On Features, as the name might suggest, Menace works with a different vocalist on each song. Julian Hamilton from The Presets offers his distinctive vocals on the slow-burner Higher Love, and Daft Punk collaborator Romanthony lends a hand on the comedown track (and annoyingly-titled) 2Nite4U. Unlike many of his contemporaries, Menace has created an album that could easily – and brilliantly – come together live on stage with a full band. Watching Features on the stage, showcasing the impressive line-up of vocalists alongside a sixpiece band (an orchestra would be more suitable at times), would be something of an event. But then again, I don’t know much about dance music. Dylan Stewart

mbv

Shit gets weird very quickly from here; the woozy Who Sees You is discomforting, a wash of guitar chords are battered, bent and twisted out of shape – it’s the aural equivalent of seasickness. Droning, pulsating synths and the gentle coo of Bilinda Butcher make Is This And Yes feel therapeutic while New You is cruisy and might be the band’s finest pop song yet, Debbie Googe’s fuzz bass providing a foundation for an irresistible vocal melody and a terrific synth line. In Another Way is driven by a hectic electronic beat as a meandering synth line ensures its groove never becomes comfortable, but it’s nowhere near as maddening as Nothing Is; essentially a one second industrial sample looped incessantly for an entire song. It doesn’t feel like an attempt to rile up the listener and the album is richer for its inclusion. m b v needed to be a record we were happy to have rather than one we could have done without and it’s a welcome addition to the small My Bloody Valentine canon. Dan Condon


TOMAHAWK

THE D.O.T.

THIS TOWN NEEDS GUNS

Ipecac/Inertia

Shock

Sargent House

Almost six years after their last record, Tomahawk return with a re-jigged line-up and tighter focus on fourth studio album, Oddfellows. Gone are the Native American influences that marked 2007’s Anonymous as one of Mike Patton’s more out-there sonic experiments as the band focus on the experimental, metal rock they were originally known for. According to guitarist Duane Denison (Jesus Lizard), Tomahawk’s main purpose is for the band to simply play music, rock out and have fun. As a result most of the material here is pretty accessible and may even stray pretty close to Faith No More territory.

Mike Skinner only ended The Streets last year, but it’s been eight years since A Grand Don’t Come For Free, and Rob Harvey’s The Music’s 2011 break-up went largely unnoticed; so how does this union stand up compared to Skinner’s past and The Music’s 2002 flash in the pan?

New albums from bands you love are like the New Year: fraught with the possibility of the horrible realisation that you’ve already peaked, yet still full of promise and hope that better things are ahead. So it’s fitting that 13.0.0.0.0, the second full-length from Oxford-based math rock trio This Town Needs Guns, is an album so surrounded by new beginnings.

Oddfellows

But where the 2013 version of Tomahawk differs is that FNM allowed their songs to develop and gave experimental sections time to be explored. This doesn’t happen on Oddfellows, where most of the tracks clock in at three minutes, meaning many of them feel like unfinished classics that could have been so much more. The best examples of this are the brooding A Thousand Eyes, which finishes without any fanfare, and its follow up Rise Up Dirty Waters – powered by The Mark Of Cain and Battles drummer John Stanier’s jazzy backbeat, this song could have gone in a million cool directions yet instead simply winds to a close. But there are still some quality moments here. Opener Oddfellows launches the album with a metal guitar assault wrapped around a 7/4 time signature, while first single Stone Letter would almost be a boring verse-chorus jam but for Patton’s snarling vocals. But the band truly gel while tearing through the big riffs on album highlight South Paw, a song given space to breathe, showing what could have been if they had done that for all these tracks. Paul Barbieri

And That

13.0.0.0.0

The album’s music is unquestionably more popdriven than we’ve heard from Skinner in the past. The beats, most reminiscent of 2011’s Computers & Blues, shuffle and keep a constant and modern hip hop pace. It’s very easy to see how interested in production Skinner has gotten since he started his career ten years ago. He takes a vocal backseat on this record, but his voice is all over it. Rob Harvey sings lead on the lion’s share of the album, but Skinner’s production is so tight, groovy and glowing, Harvey can’t help but sound like a guest on his own record. The album is largely a straight-up electro pop/rock outing, with highlights like Goes Off and Weapon Of Choice treading familiar Streets territory of lost nights and broken hearts. Harvey belts it like he’s always been able to, yelling: “Fuck me like you used to”, on Like You Used To – it’s the kind of melancholic and ‘too honest’-sounding lyric we accept, and revel in, from Skinner. Though it’s unfortunately a statement we might direct at Skinner himself – And That is a fine record, enjoyable and well produced by two people whose camaraderie shines through the beats. Though knowing what Skinner is capable of, even as recently as last year, it can’t help but be a minor letdown. Andrew McDonald

There’s the title – a reference to the Mayan calendar – and the fact from the next album they’ll be officially known as TTNG, but this also marks the band’s first release as a trio and, moreover, without frontman Stuart Smith. Assuming vocal and bass duties is Henry Tremain, of obscure Norwich band Pennines. Smith’s distinct voice was as much a defining factor in the band’s sound as the tweedle-dum-tweedle-dee guitar work of Tim Collis, but Tremain pulls it off, showing in opener Cat Fantastic and everything thereafter that he can do everything Smith can do; some things, better. Collis remains as influenced by everything a Kinsella brother has ever done as ever and, as a result of his maturation as a player, the songs cover more exploratory, jivey compositional ground than before, no longer as pop-dappled or straightforward as they once were. Rewardingly, more focus has been placed upon bass lines, and Tremain expertly provides everything from angular bottom-end grit (I’ll Take The Minute Snake) to funky, imaginative, rolling melodies (Left Aligned, +3 Awesomeness Repels Water). There is some filler (such as the excellently titled Nice Riff, Clichard), but even so, 13.0.0.0.0 genuinely makes you believe that maybe these really could be the best days yet. Mitch Knox

VARIOUS ARTISTS Official: The Best Of Australian Hip-Hop Vol 1 Warner Best-of compilations are usually hit or miss, and while Nate Flagrant (DJ Flagrant) has compiled together a collection of some of the better work from Australia’s hip hop artists, to define these 20 tracks as ‘the best of Australian hip hop’ would be unfair. However, from a commercial stand point, and if this album was put together as a means of introducing new listeners to the genre, then it would be perfect. The mix of Hilltop Hoods, Bliss N Eso, Urthboy, Pez and 360 showcases what many would deem the Australian hip hop heavyweights. Conversely, where the compilation seems to fail is through the consistency of having radio friendly tracks deemed as ‘the best of’, for example Seth Sentry’s annoying The Waitress Song and Pez featuring 360’s The Festival Song. It was also interesting and somewhat questionable to find 1200 Techniques’ Karma make the cut given that it is slightly dated having been released in 2002. Another example of this is through Drapht’s Rapunzel, as you could scour any of his entire back catalogue to find better tracks from 2005’s Who Am I? or 2008’s Brothers Grimm. But there are also some great tracks that Flagrant has chosen that will resonate with new listeners as well as hip hop purists such as Urthboy’s We Get Around, The Herd’s 2020 and a classic from Pegz in What Would Happen? It seems that Flagrant has just assembled together a list of songs that have found some life through commercial airplay within the Australian charts, that he deems are the ‘best’. It’s definitely not a ‘best of’ but perhaps a good introduction to Australian hip hop. Eli Gould

DAWN McCARTHY & BONNIE ‘PRINCE’ BILLY WHAT THE BROTHERS SANG A collection of Everly Brothers songs.

JIM JAMES

REGIONS OF LIGHT AND SOUND OF GOD Singer, songwriter and guitarist from My Morning Jacket releases his debut solo album. INSTORE NOW

“An incredible, one of a kind slow-burner.” - triple j magazine “A spaced-out soul soundtrack.” - Pitchfork Media

EELS

WONDERFUL, GLORIOUS

New studio album from the ever-changing project of singer/songwriter and multiinstrumentalist Mark Oliver Everett (aka E), EELS. INSTORE NOW

“One of the most prolific, adventurous and moving songwriters of the past decade.” - Q Magazine

COMING SOON

MA JOR L A ZER, BL ACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB, DARWIN DEEZ, KIER AN RYAN, JOHN GR ANT, VERONICA FALLS, COLD WAR KIDS, CAITLIN ROSE, THEME PARK.

For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews • 43


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THIS WEEK IN

ARTS

its has done a lot for bringing itself an appreciation of short films into popular conversation. It’s in proved with the amount of pr venues its touring alone that the ve demand for and understanding de of the format is growing. “I hope we‘ve [helped]” Kidd agrees. “Certainly… we helped pioneer it. “C I remain as passionate about it as I was back then, and I think we’ve managed to bring over the years these short films to a growing audience, and I hope we’ve been a part of that growing enthusiasm.”

Silent

WEDNESDAY 6 The Rape of Lucrece – based on the Shakespearean poem, a work performed by Camille O’Sullivan, with original music played live by Feargal Murray. Southbank Theatre: The Summer, 8pm; to Sunday 10 February Harold Night – a night of improv comedy that prescribes to a 30-minute non-stop piece based on a single audience suggestion. Dan O’Connell, 7.30pm.

THURSDAY 7 Anna Feery: Recent Work – a new exhibition from artist Anna Feery, who looks at animal forms and body language to explore fragility, animal instinct and family. Opening, Loop, 6pm, exhibiting to Saturday 2 March. Silent – a one-man show written and performed by Irishman Pat Kinevane; a touching story of homelessness and a man who once had splendid things. Opening, Southbank Theatre: The Lawler, 7.30pm; to Sunday 10 February

FRIDAY 8 Spirit Of The Staircase – a collection of drawings and paintings by Stacey Williams and Riley McDonald. Opening, Kaleidoscope Gallery at Courthouse ARTS, 6pm, exhibiting to Thursday 21 February. 4000 Miles – a play written by Amy Herzog and directed by Mark Pritchard that explores the relationship between a grandson who can’t face his life and a grandmother who struggles to remember hers. Opening, Red Stitch Actors Theatre, 8pm; to Saturday 9 March. DJ Barry’s Organ Beats Explosion – Mr Barry Morgan from the World

of Organs with a devised DJ set. Sure to get you shaking yah thang. The Famous Spiegeltent, 11pm.

SATURDAY 9 Candice Breitz: The Character – the first major Australian solo exhibition from South African artist Candice Breitz, exploring to what extent our lives are scripted for us by the media we consume. A collection of interviews, fan performances and montage cinema sequences, Breitz’s works present a new take on contemporary portraiture. ACMI to Monday 11 March. The Dark Party – a piece of physical comedy performed by the Dirty Brothers, who smash the boundaries of traditional circus/ sideshow trick-based performance by placing sideshow stunts into emotional theatrical contexts. The Famous Spiegeltent, 9pm; to Saturday 16 February.

SUMMERTIME SHORTS Flickerfest’s director Bronwyn Kidd chats with Sam Hobson about all things shorts: what’s new and what’s changed for the film festival in 2013. The international short film festival behemoth Flickerfest is back. As it does every year, the proceedings will begin in Sydney, at Bondi Beach, where over 100 handpicked films will vie for honours in a range of competitions for ten days and then, once that’s all over, the festival will begin touring its winners and highlights across 46 venues country-wide. And this year, Flickerfest has got a big announcement up its sleeve.

“We became Academy accredited with our international competition in 2002,” its director Bronwyn Kidd proudly explains, “and now this year we’ve just become Academy accredited with our Australian competition, which means the film which wins the best Australian film award will have an opportunity to go forth to the Oscars!” No doubt encouraged by that recent accomplishment, the festival this year has also grown some 200 submissions on last year’s entry numbers. “It’s just bigger every year!” Kidd exclaims. “We’ve about 2300 entries this [time], which is an enormous amount to get through. And to put the program together that takes many, many months.”

Metropolis – the legendary 1927 German expressionist sciencefiction film directed by Fritz Lang, about a Utopian society in which its wealthy residents live a carefree life. The Astor Theatre, 1.30pm.

TUESDAY 12 In Brief Issue Launch: Paradise – the launch of the fourth In Brief issue, Paradise, a free quarterly mag. Three Below, 7pm. The Trip – this cabaret is direct from Berlin featuring The Caesar Twins, Polish stars of Royal-Variety and La Clique; David Pereir, a Boylesque contortionist; Baby Jane, a New York drag queen, and Ethiopian juggler, Girma Tsehai. The Famous Spiegeltent, 7pm; to Sunday 3 March.

OR

So, what does this mean for audiences? Well, a lot to look forward to, for starters. Flickerfest

Pablo Caesar, one half of sibling acrobat duo Caesar Twins, chats candidly with Sarah Braybrooke about the struggles and triumphs that have come with the swinging high life. Headlining the Spiegeltent from Tuesday 12 February, circus show The Trip is a medley of acts united by their connection to German arts hub Base Berlin. The collective is helmed by the Caesar Twins and includes The Trip’s originator, contortionist David Pereira, along with others including New York drag act Baby Jane and Ethiopian juggler Girma Tsehai.

SPOTTED: Laneway Festival, Footscray Community Arts Centre. To continue the discussion head to @frontrowSPA and tweet us

“It’s a huge job,” she admits, “but it’s a labour of love, and it’s always exciting to discover the next generation of talent and see some really amazing work from here and all around the world. It really is the cutting edge of cinema: it’s creative, and it’s innovative, and [for us] it’s really exciting to be a platform for [that] discovery.”

DON’T LOOK DOWN

SUNDAY 10

ART NOT?

To help process this sea of films, Kidd has a committee of over 50 peers who watch and review every single submission, and then she and two other curators spend about 18 hours a day parsing their recommendations from that into a rough top 100.

With matching bicep tattoos and heads of flowing white-blonde hair, you could be forgiven for thinking that identical acrobat act the Caesar Twins were more of a gimmick than

a pair of finely-tuned gymnasts. But as Pablo Caesar explains, he and his brother Pierre have earned their acrobatic chops several times over, in a double-career that has included highs and shattering lows. “We started when we were five years old. Then we did acrobatics and gymnastics, and step by step we won some big competitions. Slowly we began to think about [performing in] shows. Then we went to the circus … we became quite famous [and] began to think that this was our career,” he recalls. “And then I had an accident.”

Rumours about the exact nature of Pablo’s accident abound – the fact that he was apparently performing an act called ‘The Wheel of Death’ at the time makes for a particularly dramatic story. He lays out the facts. “In 2001 I fell eight metres. After that I was in a coma for something like two weeks. I couldn’t walk.” Pablo’s Polish-German accent intensifies as he becomes more emphatic. “If you have an accident, it is always terrible. But for acrobats, people who do sport or performers doing physical things, it is twice as difficult, because they can’t do what they love. It was quite hard.” He corrects himself. “It was really hard.”

The festival has achieved such success, Kidd says, through a dedication to ever-increasing diversity. “I certainly think we’ve evolved into showcasing a lot more diverse work. We’ve got environmental shorts, a national high school [and] primary school section, a program for families and for kids; we’re even doing an Elvis special this year, [as well as] comedies – it really has evolved into quite a diverse range of films.” “[And] perhaps my tastes have become a little more sophisticated,” she laughs modestly. “I certainly see a lot, and I’m really not wanting to just do easy programming for people, I’m wanting to show work that I think is amazing. I want the festival to be world class, and I want the level of competition to be world class.” So in short, the longer she does what she does, the better Flickerfest festival we get. WHAT: Flickerfest Festival WHEN & WHERE: Wednesday 13 February, Kino Cinemas After the accident he had to decide whether to try and return to his former life. It was a surprisingly easy decision, because of his love (or as he puts it, “luff”) for performing. “Love for the stage, that is the most important thing. I love what I do.” After extensive rehabilitation for his back injury, he says that he is now almost back to his pre-accident level of fitness, something he attributes to various factors. “I have friends on my side, I have a family on my side, and of course I have luck. And God. I think God was the most important thing... Most of the time I was fighting with myself to not give up... But of course, we also have a reputation [to maintain].” The Trip is just the latest show in a succession since Pablo’s return to form, and he’s delighted by the line-up that Pereira has put together. He calls the close-knit community of performers, some of whom toured with in Cirque du Soleil, “a group of friends who perform together”. He describes the show as light, cheeky and funny, and if the press release is anything to go by, the audience can also expect a hint of the erotic as well. The Caesar Twins’s act is described as ‘a half-nude circus and gymnastics routine inside a fishbowl filled with water’. “I don’t apologise,” Pablo says. “People come to us and they forget the outside world. They come to us for some magic time.” WHAT: The Trip WHEN & WHERE: Tuesday 12 February to Saturday 3 March, The Famous Spiegeltent

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REVIEWS WAT C H I N G

GIRLS

C U LT U R A L

IT’S A SHAME ABOUT RAY E4, S2 This Week On Girls? Tonight is both bittersweet and cringeworthy. Hannah hosts a dinner party for Charlie, Audrey and Marnie but despite tension in the room Hannah won’t let anyone leave. Elsewhere, Jessa meets Thomas-John’s parents (Griffin Dunne and Deborah Rush) for the first time at a restaurant she hates (oh yeah, she lets them know). Back at the disastrous dinner party, Shoshanna realises that Ray has moved in with her (that old trick!) while Charlie chases Marnie, not Audrey, up to the roof. End result of the evening: Jessa and Thomas-John end their marriage, and Shosh and Ray profess their love to

MOVIE 43 FILM Where does one begin inspecting the wreckage of something like Movie 43, a collection of comedy sketches (well, they’re allegedly comedy) with the sole uniting quality being their nagging insistence that they’re just so shocking, outrageous and politically incorrect? I don’t know... maybe how so many high-profile performers got roped into appearing in said sketches, usually in ways that make the viewer feel embarrassed for them? (Seriously, what did Dennis Quaid do to deserve this? He seems like a nice enough fellow.) Maybe that some of the sketches have been on the shelf for so long the actors are noticeably younger

Shirtless Adam Watch? With Adam missing in action again (cooooome back, pleeeease) we’ll have to suffice with Hannah singing Wonderwall in the bath. Girl On Top? Shoshanna. She was this week’s least self-involved character and had the balls to reveal her feelings to Ray in a touchingly naïve Shoshy way. What We Learnt: Jessa only snorted heroin, she didn’t shoot it. Cassandra Fumi Screening every Monday night, 8.30pm, Showcase

In cinemas Thursday 7 February

far America was willing to go in pursuit of the man behind the physical and psychological trauma it suffered when the World Trade Center towers fell. (Bigelow’s decision to open the film with a black screen and actual audio of a woman trapped in one of the towers that morning sets the tone perfectly.) The pursuit is personified by Maya (Jessica Chastain, whose subtlety, poise and understated doggedness are astonishing), a CIA operative who relentlessly tracks her quarry despite personal misgivings and bureaucratic apathy; following her over the course of her ten-year quest makes Zero Dark Thirty an utterly compelling film experience, a procedural on par with the likes of Munich, Zodiac and All The President’s Men. Guy Davis In cinemas

46 • For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews

WITH REBECCA COOK The Opening Night for the Melbourne Theatre Company’s The Other Place was in fact held in the other place – the Arts Centre, not the MTC’s home. Half of Melbourne turned out to see the New York play featuring former Rush star Catherine McClements and directed by Nadia Tass (The Big Steal, Malcolm). Marieke Hardy, David Williamson and a swathe of local TV actors – Jane Harber (Moody’s Christmas), Richard Davies (Offspring), John Adams (City Homicide) – together with local theatre legends Brett Cousins and Dion Mills, were among those standing in the longest box office line Cringe has seen at the Arts Centre. And here’s a tip – it was well worth it. The Other Place was the tightest piece of writing Cringe has seen in a while. The near to full house is something of an anomaly, according to the latest statistical overview of arts and culture in Australia by the Australian Bureau Of Statistics. Only around 20 per cent of women and about 15 per cent of men had attended a theatre performance in the 12 months prior to the survey. Australian households spend less than $3 a week on performing arts (although, perhaps the majority of the opening night crowd didn’t even spend this), yet they outlay $10.86 a week on TV, electronic media and films. Mind you, if we had a DeLorean and went back to 1984, the queue at the Arts Centre would have been shorter as the average household only spent 80 cents a

FRAGMENTED

Guy Davis

Catherine McClements is superb as the caustic quick-witted geneticist Dr Juliana Smithton in MTC’s production of The Other Place. Juliana’s story is an ugly one: the onset of early dementia, silhouetted against her engagement with an early family tragedy sees her reduced from the imposing über-professional of the play’s opening to a scared and vulnerable woman by the end. US playwright Sharr White’s play is a text-heavy work lightened by glinting black humour. Mordantly witty Juliana becomes convinced that those around her, including husband Ian (David Whitely), are conspiring to deceive her. While delivering a lecture at a medical conference, with vicious eloquence she attacks

Zero Dark Thirty doesn’t evoke the emotions one might automatically associate with a Hollywood movie about the decade-long hunt for Osama bin Laden following the September 11 terrorist attacks on America in 2001. Following up their Oscar-winning Hurt Locker, director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal don’t offer a taut tale of international intrigue topped with a ‘Mission Accomplished’ sense of resolution, even though their movie is a master class in sustained tension that culminates in an ‘action’ sequence of undeniable impact. Instead, this film – both sprawling in reach and tightlycontained in intent – is ambiguous, thought-provoking and occasionally discomforting, as it explores how

Girl Talk Of The Week? “I’m a miracle. I’m a unicorn. I’m a needle in a haystack and you’re just a hipster munching my hay.” Thomas-John to Jessa.

than they are today? (Oh, hi there, baby-faced Chloe Moretz.) Maybe the way most of these bits have one joke, no joke or an inability to follow through on their premise so they simply stop? One could go on and on, but I feel like I’ve already expended enough energy discussing this shit. Movie 43 isn’t completely devoid of laughs – the sketch with Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber as parents giving their home-schooled teenage son the total high-school experience, complete with bullying and sexual humiliation, is fun – but for the most part this is like being trapped in a room with an annoying kid who’s just discovered the joy of dirty words and rude humour and simply won’t shut the fuck up.

THE OTHER PLACE THEATRE

ZERO DARK THIRTY FILM

each other. It’s a tearful ending for everyone – including viewers.

CRINGE

an audience member, a woman clad in a yellow bikini, leading to her own first awareness of her mental deterioration. The significance of the yellow bikini is revealed in a sentimental touch at the end of the play via video sequence. Despite Juliana’s powerful personality, the audience slowly starts to doubt her version of reality. The Other Place, here directed by Nadia Tass, has a dated, tele-story feeling to it and, subject matter notwithstanding, it never takes the audience anywhere truly emotionally discomfiting. Juliana’s clever sarcasm renders the other characters pale in comparison, especially that of her husband. The night definitely belongs to McClements, whose performance is the true joy of the proceedings. Liza Dezfouli MTC production (Arts Centre Playhouse) to Saturday 2 March

week on performing arts. And while you can feel sorry for the poor Australian performing arts industry, the music industry is the one that’s really hurting with households only spending 92 cents a week on new music; this is down from $2.07 a week in 1998-99. But while the internet might be having an impact on music sales, it’s not yet hastening the demise of the book industry with literature still clocking up over $9 a week of household income. Speaking of books and music, libraries are the standout cultural institution for Australians with 5.9 million Aussies or 34 per cent of the population aged 15 years and over having visited a national, state or local library in the 12 months prior to interview. Libraries also attract more repeat visitors with 70 per cent of library goers getting amongst the stacks at least five times a year; this is higher than the 53 per cent who had been to the movies five times in the 12 months. Libraries also employ more than 7300 people a year, which is about on par with the number of people employed by museums and galleries across the nation. But while government funding for the arts sector has stagnated and donations are on the decline, pretty much every large festival or event Cringe has been to in the past year has reported a record attendance or a box office bonanza, so go figure! Based on the enthusiasm on opening night, I doubt there’ll be many spare seats at The Other Place during its run – perhaps all the spare seats are at another place.

FISH

WITH BOB BAKER FISH Cabin fever on film has always been fertile ground for filmmakers keen on demonstrating man’s unique ability for self-destruction when left to his own devices. A unique subset of this gruelling world is the sole man in space scenario that has almost become a genre unto itself, a shipwrecked survivor for the 21st century. Usually of course they’ve bumped off the rest of the crew to get in that position. Or at the very least the computer has. Space works so well in films like Moon, Solaris (yes even Soderbergh’s) and Sunshine because of the contrast between the limitless expanse of space that is so inaccessible yet full of possibilities, and the limited expanse of the pod/ spaceship/space station that is vulnerable man’s only means of experiencing this final frontier. Love (Shock) poses a simple question. What happens if the only human connection that man has (via a radio feed with those back in mission control on earth) is severed? The answer of course is not good things. For one the cabin fever becomes more apparent. The distractions don’t work anymore and all thoughts turn inwards. That’s rarely a good thing. Particularly in cinema, a form obsessed with stupendously radical character arcs in the space of two-and-a-half hours. You can tell that the solo man in space genre hasn’t gone unnoticed by cinematographer turned director William Eubank in his debut feature, Love. It’s a strange and beautiful, but somewhat elusive tale. In fact, it’s the perfect low budget first

film. A limited set and one actor, it couldn’t be better, aside from the fact that Eubank successfully manages to merge into it a similarly obtuse civil war tale amidst the solitude. The links are tenuous, but this isn’t a film about narrative development. They made it on the smell of an oily rag, funded entirely from the band Angels & Airwaves, an offshoot of Blink-182 who provide the rich electro rock sheen of the score. Aside from a wilfully obtuse ending that exists selfconsciously somewhere between 2001: A Space Odyssey and Solaris, without the rigour and resonance of either, Love is a well-crafted tone poem, an overwhelming audio and visual feast for the senses that ponders whether a life lived alone is truly a life at all. Once Upon A Time In Anatolia (Directors Suite) is a slow, hypnotic, immensely beautiful film from Cannes darling Turkish filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Three Monkeys). Set over the course of one night, the golden hues of stark headlights against the bleak blackness of the night are startlingly beautiful, making it clear we’re in the presence of a real master. The film follows a murder suspect, police, prosecutor and doctor as they attempt to locate a body in the hills of the Anatolian desert. The problem is the suspect was drunk when the murder took place and can’t remember where he left the body. As the night wears on and tempers fray, motivations cloud and strange interconnections begin to appear. It’s the most beguiling existential police procedural film you’ll ever see.


FRONTROW@INPRESS.COM.AU

IRRATIONAL THINKING IT’S GONE CACTUS, JACK Rumour Has It: Sixty Minutes Inside Adele is no joke, nor is it a mere jukebox musical. Creator/performer Naomi Price runs Paul Andrew through the thematic depths of the show and the power of music in general.

Self-professed “curvy cabaret redhead” Naomi Price makes it perfectly clear at the outset; while she lapped up every nuance of Jersey Boys, she is not a great fan of the jukebox musical. “Rumour Has It is not a jukebox musical about Adele,” she asserts. “It’s a cabaret… It’s sixty minutes inside Adele”, she adds, “[and] is obviously partially named after one of her most well-known songs. My colleague Adam [Brunes] and I thought it was the ideal title for the show because we are deconstructing celebrity and rumours throughout the piece – so many Adele rumours. The other part of the title came from our slightly naughtier side, where we wanted to highlight that this is something of an exposé on her life, but that we want to do it in a cheeky way. “Why a cabaret about Adele? I suppose for me personally her music speaks to me. Her songs have punctuated monumental moments in my life, and I can still remember where I was when I first heard them, and what was happening in my life. I connected with her raw emotion and her ability to so eloquently describe painful or difficult situations.“ Price is honest about her method. “I wish I could say that we spent a long time developing and considering our approach to this character, but essentially my co-devisor Adam and I sat down with a bottle of wine and I started to talk in this ridiculous and really broad Cockney accent. I would say the worst things I could think of on a wide variety of topics, and if Adam cried out loud with laughter, then those were the lines that ended up in the show. It was such a fun creative process in that regard. We realised early on

that the show could very easily become a complete piss-take with a lot of cheap shots at obesity, at vocal nodules and at workingclass mentality.” She adds the big “‘owever” in her best Cockney. “It was a dear colleague of us asked us a very important question: why? We realised that just singing her songs and making people laugh wouldn’t be nearly enough. It was then that we delved into the heart of the piece; we pored over biographies, we watched countless indepth interviews and eventually, truth-be-known, we came up with something quite depressing. I think the show as it stands now is a combination of the ridiculous, outlandish humour and moments of absolute poignant truth.” We chat about heartache, about torch songs that capture the popular imagination, and what it is about music that provides us with consolation, when everything seems against us. “In fact one of the lines in the show concerns why music is so amazing – it can take us to a single breath, a place, a moment,” she explains. “That’s why, I believe, people connect so deeply with music, because we associate so much emotion and memory and experience with the songs we hear. And that’s not necessarily about raw emotion. That can be as a result of impacting lyrics, or a hypnotic musical riff, or shared experience. Music is divine. It transcends natural, rational thinking and transports us to other places or moods in an almost supernatural way. And then, sometimes, music is just bloody good fun.”

Dallas, Texas, a few decades ago, and a nine-year-old Brendon Burns has an epiphany on a family holiday. It’s the first time he will ever come across stand-up comedy, at a Flip Wilson show. And it’s the first time he’ll ever watch wrestling. And he was hooked. “If I hadn’t seen Flip Wilson, things could have turned out very differently,” says the Perth-born comedian.

Comedian Brendon Burns talks to Baz McAlister about embracing his two great loves – comedy and wrestling – on a stand-up tour with his hero Mick Foley.

Over the years, as Burns pursued a career in comedy, his wrestling fandom was never far from his heart. “I based the first ten years of my career on ‘heel’ [wrestling villain] psychology,” he says. “I only ‘came out’ as an avid wrestling fan about three years ago and because it’s such a secret handshake, and so many of us are closet fans – a lot of guys go

SUITABLY UNSUITABLE By his own candid admission, Harley Breen was shit at everything else except making people laugh; luckily, he knows his way around a joke or two.

WHAT: Rumour Has It: Sixty Minutes Inside Adele

Harley Breen knows that the life of a comedian can take you far away – although not always. An Elsternwick local, Breen is gearing up to take part in his neighbourhood venue The Flying Saucer’s second Comedy Invasion night, where he’ll share the stage with Dave Hughes and Dave O’Neil.

WHEN & WHERE: Friday 8 February to Saturday 9, Chapel Off Chapel (part of Stage Art Xposed)

It isn’t the first time a gig of Breen’s has been a bit close to home – one of his worst comedy experiences

Aleksia Barron k to t the th speaks Melbourne comic ahead of his appearance at The Flying Saucer’s Comedy Invasion Two.

was at a family function. “It was at my sister’s wedding, about six months after I started comedy,” the exuberant comic explains. “She made the bad decision – I’ll totally blame it all on her – of getting me to be the MC and do stand-up.” Unfortunately, Breen’s sister wasn’t entirely cognisant of the gulf between her guests and her brother’s comedic style. “I got up

‘It’s bullshit’ but then you’re on the road with them and they start knowing a whole bunch of names that they shouldn’t.” And then he met Mick Foley. Burns was doing a wrestling TV show with comedian Jim Smallman, who was supporting Foley on tour. Smallman invited Burns onto the bill. “If wrestling fans find out that you’re in the public eye and a wrestling fan, they seek you out. They know who you are.” From there, Burns and Foley (aka Mankind, Cactus Jack and Dude Love) started collaborating on a tell-all, ‘evening with’-type show they planned to take to Montreal’s Just For Laughs Festival. Burns sold the festival to Foley as “the Wrestlemania of comedy” and told Foley they’d be competing for ticket sales with household name comedians. Don’t be disheartened, he said, if the show didn’t sell out. “They were queued around the block, chanting his name,” Burns says, “and every gag I did was gold. It’s going to be hard going back to comedy! Mick is crazy famous. Mick is famous in the Middle East. He was the number three guy when wrestling was at its peak. You walk down the street with him and every five seconds you’re reminded how famous he is. He’s like a real life superhero, 6’5’’ in all directions. And the funny thing is, I have to bounce for him because there are grown men wanting a cuddle off him. And I have to say, ‘You can’t have a cuddle, they threw him off a cage, he’s really

sore’. Meeting Mick is the difference between meeting Christian Bale, and meeting the actual Batman.” Foley’s been doing stand-up for only about three years now, but Burns says it’s been an easy adjustment; the comedy and wrestling worlds are common bedfellows. “Mick’s a five-time New York Times bestselling author; he knows how to tell a story. And wrestling promos are similar to stand-up. It’s the only other art form where the performer adjusts what he’s doing based on the audience reaction. Every newbie comic talks about their day job: Mick has the most bizarre day job of all time.” Sharing a stage with a man he confesses is one of his heroes, Burns says, is both a pinch-yourself moment and entirely natural thanks to Foley’s down-to-earth, everyman attitude. “It was the greatest meeting of your hero you could ever set up,” Burns says. “Imagine being a huge Iron Maiden fan, and you’re a world-class plumber. And you find out that Bruce Dickinson wants to get into plumbing, and needs plumbing tips from you!” And what of the old, hackneyed question all wrestling fans get asked ad nauseam – what does Burns say when someone archly says to him ‘You know it’s all fake, right?’. “My stock answer is, ‘Do you like Star Wars? Then go fuck yourself!’,” he says.

and in the audience of the weddi wedding were six ordained ministers of th the church, a federal politician and a couple of state politicians. It cou could not have gone worse if I’d tried harder. It was disgracefully bad.” How bad? “At one point, one of my m cousins was laughing, and anoth another of my cousins hit her on the leg aand said, ‘Don’t. You’ll encourage him him!’”

you produced it, you directed it, and an audience still might go, ‘Ah, nah.’” Theatrical classics carry less pressure: “If you get up and perform a scene from Macbeth and people aren’t into it, it’s like, ‘I don’t care, dude wrote it five hundred years ago.’”

Fortunately, few of Breen’s more recent gigs have turned out quite so poorly (and he’s MC’d severa several less awkward weddings since, too). He’s been on the comedy circuit for several years, and started gaining broader attention after winning the Piece of Wood Award at the 2011 Melbourne International Comedy Festival for his show, I Heart Bunnings. By his own admission, entering the world of stand-up was something of an accident. “I was another one of these comedians that was trying to be an actor and that wasn’t really taking, because I wasn’t a big enough wanker,” he laughs. “I got sick of the acting industry and jumped up on the stand-up stage and just caught the buzz – an unhealthy addiction to the adrenaline that you produce in your own body!” On the difference between acting and stand-up, Breen is clear: with stand-up, it’s all on you. “When you fail, holy crap, you fail. You wrote [your material], you performed it,

WHAT: Mick Foley & Brendon Burns WHEN & WHERE: Monday 11 February, Athenaeum Theatre

Still, Breen considers himself a comedian through and through these days – as he says, “I got into comedy because I was shit at everything else.” He’s enjoying the opportunity to play a local show before he takes on the traditional national comedy circuit over the coming months, and Melbournians can look forward to his next MICF show, Some Kind Of Something. It’s a more ambiguous title than, say, I Heart Bunnings, but Breen underwent a steep learning curve when it comes to show names in 2012. “Last year’s title was going to be Let’s Zumba, which was about fitness and exercise and body image, and talking about body image from a male perspective… and Zumba tried to sue me for using their name! So I had to change it to Shape Up.” Fortunately, for both comedy and The Flying Saucer, Breen has emerged litigation-free to once more take the microphone. WHAT: Comedy Invasion Two WHEN & WHERE: Friday 8 February, The Flying Saucer Club

22ND IN SHORTT E R N AT I O N A L FILM FESTIVAL

ECSTATIC PARTIES EXOTIC LOCATION EXCITING FLICKS

IN THE WORLDS LUSHEST PARADISE OF SHORT FILM!

WAVE T FILM R O SH LT THE ENAU

Presenting partner

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WI

To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags • 47


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GIG OF THE WEEK THE MEN TONIGHT, NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB When Brooklyn’s The Men dropped their third proper album, Open Your Heart, last year there was a lot of ‘wtf, who are this new band?’ going on. Reality was, and is, they’ve been around for fucking ages and released a whole lot of pretty legit punk stuff; it just took a radio hit (the album’s title track) to get the stragglers on board. Now they’re here for Laneway and the reports are that they hark back through much of their lineage in their live sets – that is, they fucking smash it. This show (with White Walls and NuN in support, no less) will go down as one of the highlights of the year. Don’t die wondering.

Japandroids

FRONTLASH LISTENING PLEASURE

The Bulmers Brick Lane bar added some awesome variety to Laneway on Sunday. Not only could you make your own personalised badges (for free), but the Vinyl Moments ‘record store’ featured 365 records, one for each day of the year, to enable visitors to sit down and absorb a tune that matched your day of birth. Blur’s Country House? Nailed it.

SHINY, HAPPY AXES Bat For Lashes Pics by Lou Lou Nutt

LANEWAY

FOOTSCRAY COMMUNITY ARTS CENTRE: 03/02/13 Returning to its spiritual home of Melbourne, this year’s Laneway comes blazing a trail of success. With other festivals rebranding and reorganising, Laneway has selected a line-up heavy on blog-love and therefore, in many cases, music made, mixed and reviewed in small rooms that sounds great on headphones. Which raises the questions: can these acts cut it live? And, with festivals more a rite of summer for triple j listeners than a gathering of fans of particular bands, does it matter? Opening the day at the Dean Turner Stage are Kings Of Convenience, a band made for small rooms if ever there was one. The gentleness of the music clashes beautifully with the loud, beery fun-lovers who have just poured off the train, held to almost immediate silence by the lilting Norwegian harmonies of Erlend Øye and Eirik Glambek Bøe. Beginning as a duo, Mrs Cold and 24-25 captivate, before a backing band is brought on for a rousing take of Boat Behind and the brilliant I’d Rather Dance With You, guaranteeing KOC to be the discovery of the day for many. Discofolk shouldn’t: a) exist, or b) sound this good. While Twerps are on typically blazing form, at the Eat Your Own Ears stage Brooklyn-based quartet The Men take churning garage rock, remove any gaps, overlay the results with endless guitar solos and punish it through Marshall stacks. Their wild, semi-naked drummer could be beamed in from Sunbury (suburb or festival) and is a total asset. Their set ends suddenly with a guitarist looking at his watch, taking off his guitar and leaving the stage, the others immediately following suit. On the auspiciously-named Future Classic Stage, Julia Holter is building strange bubbling atmospheres with synth, drums, cello and a swimming pool’s worth of reverb. The music is intriguing and is composed and arranged rather than felt, her talent enhanced not hidden by filters and echoes. Despite this precision, many subtleties don’t make it through the chattering crowd, most of whom are clustered beneath shady trees and talking over her bewitching tunes. As the heat increases and shady spots become highly prized, the River Stage sees Perfume Genius suffer a similar fate; his music never reaching the heights it does on headphones. His voice is a cloudy, vaguely inert instrument, the reverb rendering his lyrics indecipherable and his

symphonic electric piano and synth playing is reduced to moody noodling. Though his backing band provide some energy, it all seems confused, and undoubtedly better in a small, dark venue. Real Estate benefit from bringing dispositions to match the weather, and their bright chiming riffs and breezy harmonies go down nicely. Though they’re not about to surprise you with distortion or anything, smartly made, tightly played songs like Suburban Dogs, Fake Blues and the crowd-rallying It’s Real remind you why they’re here, and why a large number of people are willing to get badly sunburned to see them. Recasting memories of Real Estate as a mid-paced snoozefest, Cloud Nothings pull off one of the most relentless and intense sets of the day. Opening with a blistering Fall In, the pace never drops. Dylan Baldi’s harsh, ripped vocals wail atop bludgeoning bass and a drummer who rarely stops playing a fill. As their set plays out though, long, forceful yet indulgent instrumental sections in songs like Wasted Days and Separation eat up much of the set. Instead of playing pithy strokes of genius like Cut You and Stay Useless – which sounds like it took five minutes to write – Baldi seems infatuated with the sound of chaos, which is face-meltingly awesome; it’s just not showing what the band can really do. Nite Jewel (aka Ramona Gonzalez) shows exactly how to take the DIY tropes of ‘80s pop (cool reverb, shimmering guitars and spacey keyboards) and make it sound immediate, catchy and fresh. Her arresting stage presence helps songs like One Second Of Love and She’s Always Watching You feel strange, engaging and genuinely new. Despite the festival selling out, moving between stages is easy; keeping a spot in the shade is less so. Back at Future Classic Stage mix-maestro Holy Other is pushing a womb-like mix of woolly bass, warm pulses, exhausted beats and snatches of vocal; if Burial has a wife and she were pregnant, this is probably what that zygote is bugging out to. Poliça are surprisingly unremarkable. Though initially arresting, primarily due to Channy Leaneagh’s powerful voice, there is little variation in sounds, tempo or dynamics throughout their set. Opener, The Maker, I See My Mother and single, Dark Star, are punchier, but their reliance on the same effects and sounds wears thin, and anyway, Of Monsters & Men are exerting some serious gravitational force. Sounding about as Icelandic as a Big Mac, the biggest crowd pullers by some measure today play a tight, rousing set. They know when to pull a trumpet out to drive a melody home, when to let the crowd take over and how to

shout “hey!” Mountain Sound and Little Talks get the biggest singalongs so far today, though the band have surprisingly weak vocals for such strong melodies. As the (recyclable) rubbish piles up, the queues for the toilets and phone chargers grow, and sunburns become increasingly common, crowds surge towards the Eat Your Own Ears stage. Canadian duo Japandroids pretty much embody everything that’s been missing so far today; brevity, showmanship, great songs and energy. The duo rarely let up in their quest for killer riffs and emphatic “whoah-oh” choruses. Boasting more guitar amps than feasible, every watt is used for opener, Adrenaline Nightshift, the gargantuan Nights Of Wine & Roses and ‘hit’, The House That Heaven Built. Here are a band whose New Jersey/ Springsteen-style rock suits the backdrop of towering dockyard cranes and passing cargo trains and they make a powerful sight. This set is a triumph. Sacrificing Alt-J for Jessie Ware, we are immediately rewarded with some hilarious banter, made even funnier for its incongruous setting between some sparkling neo-soul songs. Speaking in a strong Adele-like South London accent, Ware launches into the spellbinding title track from her Devotion LP. Her young, three-piece backing band wait while she tells us of St Kilda’s lobster rolls, bands we should see and apologises for her clumsy keyboard playing: “‘onestly, these fingers o’ mine are like fuckin’ chipolatas today,” she says, before casting another glittering spell on us. Night Light, 110% and Wildest Moments are all highlights of the day. The taut, edgy rock of Divine Fits is fitting for music made from Spoon’s Britt Daniel and Dan Boeckner of Wolf Parade. Though the guitar spirals and smears more than chops, deceptive simplicity is still their greatest asset. Winning over the crowd, the band’s ‘50s-rock in a post-punk framework proves surprisingly flexible, especially for a take on Rowland S Howard’s near-sacred Shivers, which they pull off nicely; all calamitous guitars and huge dynamic shifts. The strange mixing of Nicolas Jaar gives audiences the only time they genuinely don’t know what’s going to happen next; genre, sound, rhythm, anything. A saxophone/pianist and guitarist flank Jaar, who’s dressed in a cape, looming over a laptop issuing skinny pulses, occasional trouser-flapping bass lines and meandering Rhodes chords. Completely unhurried, he teases and taunts us, forcing our attention to the textures and surprises that epitomise his journey, only occasionally hinting at a big-beat payoff. It’s masterful. Unable to stop smiling for her entire set, Natasha Khan (aka Bat For Lashes) seems happier than anyone

Richard Hawley’s “Australian backline tech”/ guitar polisher. When he wasn’t handing Hawley his multitudinous axes, every spare moment was spent lovingly polishing said instruments. And the show was ridonculously good also.

BONG RATS Props to the naughty Brisbane duo Dune Rats who fulfilled their promise to re-enact DZ Deathrays’ The Mess Up clip, but replacing Jägermeister with “lavender and tobacco” bongs, once their Facebook post announcing the idea attracted 1,000 likes (within a day, 1,400 fans got their like on). Check out Red Light Green Light (Green Version). Shouldn’t that be purple and brown version?

BACKLASH SHOO HOO

If you thought Die Young was bad and ripped off the subject matter of One Direction’s Live While You’re Young, wait ‘til you hear Ke$ha’s Woo Hoo song that (badly) samples Blur’s Song 2! It’s heinous and really needs to just go away. There is no punishment grim enough to befit this crime against the original musical masterpiece.

DIRTY LAUNDRY So the recent, unexpected floods in Queensland are expected to lead to Government water restrictions. Huh? Brain hurts.

SUPER SNORE ADS The annual parade of big budget ads filled our computer screens as the Super Bowl unfolded on Monday. But other than the hilair Amy Poehler one, it was grim pickings: dancing babies, Psy and trailers for The Office that were so clever they weren’t funny. Sad face.

to be here. Resplendent in a multi-coloured sparkly gypsy dress, she dances, swoons, laughs, claps and emotes her way through her rich trove of songs. With cello, Cocteau Twins-style guitar and busy electronic percussion and drums, Khan holds our attention almost as well as her album cover. Laura gets a predictably huge response, but later songs, the synth-driven dynamics of Marilyn and the closing Daniel allow her to stretch from epic longing to intimate revelations. It’s her smiling face, beaming down from the big screens that we see before turning to go, as the happily chattering masses surge through the streets to the station. Andy Hazel

For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews • 49


Everyone has been hanging on for close to three hours for The Killers to file on stage, and when they finally do, the crowd nearly brings the balconies down. All dressed in black, famed lead singer Brandon Flowers is taut and charged in a leather jacket. In the flesh, he is diminutive in stature alongside his bandmates but he definitely crackles with the most energy and charisma, his face beaming with a delicious grin. They kick off with their most successful track, Mr Brightside, which sounds surprisingly tinny. It is a never-fail crowd pleaser, however, and not a soul seems to mind.

Clare Bowditch Pic by Aleksandar Kostadinoski

CLARE BOWDITCH, ROYAL JELLY DIXIELAND BAND MELBOURNE ZOO: 02/02/13 If there were an award for Melbourne’s best outdoor music venue, Melbourne Zoo would be a small but worthy competitor for their Zoo Twilights series. Across the park, friends and families are scattered in picnicking, winesipping contentment as the Royal Jelly Dixieland Band play an energetic, accomplished set. Who wouldn’t want to be serenaded at sunset by jazzy swing numbers played by a band that is equal parts rambunctious and refined?

should be a triumphant closing instrumental crescendo begins to test patience as it extends towards the tenminute mark. However, the band quickly reconvene on stage for a much more elegant final tune – bringing an end to an enjoyable if somewhat distant set. Jan Wisniewski

It’s the perfect setting for Clare Bowditch, whose relaxed stage presence and effortless banter suits the summer evening vibe brilliantly. Backed by her talented band (and a fair few of the Royal Jellies, who jump back on stage to lend a hand), Bowditch works her way through a set encompassing country, indie and jazz influences. She’s not afraid to switch it up, revelling in the throaty insistence of The Start Of War one minute and belting out the bodacious, hip-swinging song, Cocky Lady, the next. She exudes goodwill and the crowd love her for it. Even her foibles – she performs Paul Simon’s You Can Call Me Al and gets the lyrics jumbled up, eventually making up her own verse – are laughed off by herself and her audience. With a spectacularly lovely rendition of You Make Me Happy, she is released from the stage… Almost. The floodlights come on, but the crowd doesn’t stop cheering, coaxing Bowditch back for a solo encore. She takes up her guitar and plays the song that 95% of artists ruin, and the remaining 5% transform into wonder: Hallelujah. In her third verse, she nails a vocal fall of such astounding purity that it cuts through the night, searing itself into the memories of the audience and silencing even the lions. Aleksia Barron

WOODS, MILK TEDDY TOTE: 27/01/13 Milk Teddy’s Tom Mendelovits is in a devious mood tonight, announcing that the band will play all the songs from their debut album in full before quickly giving up on the joke. After some early issues with a still-sitting crowd, the band play some choice cuts from Zingers plus a few older tunes. It may not be too long until they play their own sell-out Tote headline show. Brooklyn four-piece Woods amble unassumingly onto stage. A simple “thanks for coming out tonight” from guitarist Jarvis Taveniere gets the formalities out of the way before they launch into Pushing Onlys, the opener from 2011’s Sun And Shade. Jeremy Earl’s acoustic guitar and melody-enriched falsetto sit neatly amongst the neo-psych sounds produced by the other members. Fears of a thinly populated bandroom are unfounded as the music draws the punters away from the beer garden. A harmonica intro signals the beginning of last year’s single Cali In A Cup and many take the chance to get their heads nodding to match the charming stage movement of Taveniere and bassist Kevin Morby. A taste of Woods’ penchant for the live jam comes after the fourth song but once Earl picks up his electric guitar it quickly morphs into Bend Beyond, the set’s centrepiece and highpoint. Morby and new drummer Aaron Neveu provide a surprisingly muscular rhythm section, and an extended middle section is wrapped up perfectly as Earl cuts back into the big chorus. As the night continues it becomes clear that their set is very similar to the one they played at Sugar Mountain a week back – although the inclusion of Blood Dries Darker from 2010’s At Echo Lake is a very welcome addition. With seven albums to choose from along with other minor releases, Woods don’t rely too heavily on last year’s Bend Beyond tonight. The crowd is subdued during older tracks, but comes right back up again when Is It Honest? and Size Meets The Sound appear. As the set nears its end, what

50 • For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews

The playlist intersperses selections from their most recent album Battle Born (2012) – including the poignant Runaways and Miss Atomic Bomb – with tracks from their previous three albums, and the fans eagerly fill in every word to Read My Mind, Spaceman, Smile Like You Mean It and All These Things That I’ve Done. Laser lights and dry ice are employed for the stellar Somebody Told Me and Human. Even without the amplification of Flowers’ vocals that makes him the stand out in the audio version, the audience is drawn to his energetic skipping across the length of the stage and nimble footwork atop the foldbacks at climatic moments. A truncated rendition of Crowded House’s Don’t Dream It’s Over is greeted warmly, and some in the audience would have probably sprung on stage and tearfully wrapped Flowers in an Aussie flag if they had one on hand. As a prelude to the last song in their encore, Flowers modestly explains how they unexpectedly hit it big with their first album – “We were so shocked, we had to get passports and cellphones and go on tour, and when we got back, we were scared because we didn’t have anything for our second album; but when we got this song, I just knew we would get our album.” When We Were Young closes off a night worth the long anticipation. Here’s hoping we don’t have to wait that long again for their next return. Ching Pei Khoo

THE VAUDEVILLE SMASH, SEX ON TOAST EVELYN: 28/01/13

Alabama Shakes Pic by Jay Hynes

ALABAMA SHAKES, BOB LOG III FORUM: 24/01/13 The less said about Bob Log III’s gig-as-gimmick support slot the better. While a sparkly jumpsuit, chrome mask and some helium balloons may work well at a party, these distractions from simplistic slide guitar, inaudible vocals and some basic blues widdling is not enough to make you forget this was the same shtick that he was pulling in 2007 and it was an irritating diversion then too. However, many in the crowd are won over by the novelty. From the outset the five-piece Alabama Shakes are incredibly tight, but the band remain defiantly in the background of frontwoman Brittany Howard. In fact, Bono would be defiantly in the background of Howard were he to appear on stage. Hang Loose showcases her jawdropping talents, and playing their ‘hit’ Hold On this early is a bold move. Following with their contribution to the soundtrack for the film Silver Linings Playbook, Always Alright is a rip-roaring ride through the Deep South that allows her a Chuck Berry impersonation. Bassist Zac Cockrell in overalls, nodding trucker cap, voluminous beard and physical stoicism looks hilariously cartoonish, while other members stand stock-still as Howard absorbs attention. Cutting an Odetta-like figure with her semiacoustic tucked under her arm, her wildly expressive voice and nerdy glasses, she roams the stage, never letting the intensity drop. The joy in watching someone do what they were born to is almost overwhelming. I Found You is another batch of roots rock straight out of the deep fryer, as is the ensuing Rise To The Sun. “We’re from the south,” says Howard, wiping her face with a towel before fixing us with a stare. “But ya’ll are super southern!” she says, cracking up and launching into a blistering take of new song Making Me Itch. Drummer Steve Johnson’s cymbals burst briefly into flames at the start of final song Heavy Chevy, a feat that causes the hundreds to scream with delight and frantically video the song. On exiting, the crowd is rife with dodgy takes on the band’s southern accent. All agree the house was rocked and, regardless of who Alabama Shakes remind you of, that’s what they came to do. Andy Hazel

THE KILLERS, STEVE SMYTH PALACE: 22/01/13 The packed Palace is pumped up early. Support act Steve Smyth, armed only with an electric guitar and a sidekick drummer, is impressive with commanding vocals and original songwriting.

Sex On Toast are probably the greatest band on earth. They are nine men, and between them they possess all the raw sexual power of Prince, the musical prowess of James Brown and the cheesy goodness of an ‘80s game show host. Sex On Toast bring the ruckus. This is the fourth Monday of a month-long residency and each week the crowd has increased in size and fervour. Angus Leslie is wonderful and it’s only right that his nipples get a lot of attention. Shirtless is the only way to sing classics like Deep by Blackstreet, and Gigolos Get Lonely Too by The Time. Zak Pidd gets down to his jocks and is only saved from being arrested for public full-frontal by a quick sleight of his own hand. The crowd bays for an encore as soon as the band leave the stage but all we get is a Leslie groin thrust. If the last three weeks are anything to go by, this is not the last we’ll see of them.

as it sounds. Beginning with Nobunny Loves You, it’s clear from the start the sentiment is reciprocated by the capacity crowd. On and off the stage, the Tote soon becomes a scene of chaos, with beer swilling and crowd surfing, as he bounces about the stage more out of impulse to his music than homage to his moniker. Associated with the Goner Records label (Jay Reatard, Eddy Current Suppression Ring, The King Khan & BBQ Show) his sound, on the surface, is lo-fi garage pop, but delving deeper is a history lesson exploring everything from The Ramones to The Beach Boys and Chuck Berry, all delivered with feverish punk-rock urgency. Lifting from 2008’s Love Visions and 2010’s First Blood, Champlin knows how to write a catchy pop song, most of which are under two minutes, have repetitive choruses and no more than four chords; the greatest example being crowd favourite Chuck Berry Holiday. It’s the bunny act that gets people’s attention, but the songs that hold it. Brendan Hitchens

ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS, JOE CAMILLERI PALAIS: 25/01/13 Filing in with the chattering masses, it’s clear Elvis Costello is going all-out in his vaudevillian theme. A third of the stage is occupied by his Spinning Wheel Of Song (aka the showbiz marvel of our age), there is a small Society Bar, a trompe-l’œil backdrop and the Hostage To Fortune Go-Go Cage with strings of beads for bars. Looking surprisingly at home, Joe Camilleri (whose song So Young Costello covered in 1987) brings one-time Jo Jo Zep and The Black Sorrows members George Butrumlis and Jeff Burstin on accordion and guitar to flesh out his tunes. Camilleri’s own compositions sound right at home next to some choice covers, though it’s the set-closing take on Willy DeVille’s No Such Pain As Love that highlights Camilleri’s Van Morrison-esque delivery and the trio’s musical chops. With minimal fuss, The Imposters, a four-piece including original Attractions keyboardist Steve Nieve and drummer Pete Thomas, and go-go dancer Miss Kelly (aka the former Mother Superior Of Our Lady Of Perpetual Torment) unleash a seamless burst of I Hope You’re Happy Now, Nick Lowe’s Heart Of The City, and Uncomplicated and Radio Radio, before stopping to say hello. Donning a top hat and grabbing a cane, Costello introduces himself as Napoleon Dynamite (a character he invented in the early‘80s) and draws the first audience member up to spin the wheel, who selects Oliver’s Army and is seated on stage with a drink. Nieve’s complex keyboard playing is a genuine marvel and it’s rare for a talent this big to be given the freedom he is to pluck motifs from songs and reinvent whole sections of others, almost teasing our memories. The next audience member up is Sam who spins My All Time Doll and chooses to go-go dance in the cage in a manner that causes Costello’s rich, expressive voice to drift off-mic and crack. With Sam happily back in the crowd, couple Erin and Michael spin up The River In Reverse and I Want You, both showcasing Costello’s penchant for slipping better-known songs into his own (in this case Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood, and a later segue from (The Angels Wanna Wear My) Red Shoes into Purple Rain is a genuine laugh-out-loud moment).

Sex On Toast are a hard act to follow but the wonderful Vaudeville Smash do it with panache. (Check out their Pozible campaign and get Vaudeville Smash to SXSW.) Their smooth, synth-heavy sound is where disco collides with the soundtrack of every ‘80s movie montage you’ve ever seen. It makes you move. Theirs are songs about drunken cowgirls, roller discos and dirty old men. Sex On Toast brought the sex. Vaudeville Smash bring the sax and the flute. They are masters of the catchy hook and the hands-in-the-air chorus. The brilliant Devil’s Said segues into Daft Punk’s Around The World via James Bowers’ talk-box genius; Hey There Danny sees guitarist Nick Lam shred like it’s 1987, and Hey is utterly joyful. And then comes the best part of the night – there’s 13 sweaty, musical men on stage playing the best version of Warren G’s Regulate you’ve ever heard. “This has been the greatest residency of all time,” says Zak Pidd, and it’s not just hyperbole. It really might be the truth.

Though due for a brief encore, the set is barely twothirds done as a brace of classics follow – Chelsea, High Fidelity, a cover of the Stones’ Out Of Time, Watching The Detectives, Pump It Up and a closing (What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace Love And Understanding? Though Costello sometimes fumbles with the guitar parts and plays with lyrics in an offhand way, his wry wit and deft charm fuel the show. He appears to be having as much fun as we are, which really isn’t that hard.

Kate Kingsmill

Andy Hazel

NOBUNNY, BITS OF SHIT, GOOCH PALMS TOTE: 01/02/13 Newcastle’s Gooch Palms are eye catching. Wearing nothing but a Stratocaster, Leroy Macqueen thrashes his guitar’s headstock through the signalled frequencies of a theremin, while Kat Friend provides a backbeat on a makeshift drum kit, consisting of just a floor tom and snare. It’s a blitzkrieg merger of punk, surf and garage sounds spanning four decades of influences. Though their attack is simplistic by intention, Macqueen’s voice is not. At times he flirts between Lux Interior, Joey Ramone and Del Shannon-like vocal stylings, all with a reckless and soulful abandon. Bits Of Shit don’t write pop songs. Their sound, and so too their performance, is manic and unhinged, mixing the fuzzed out, abrasive bass of Big Black with early era Black Flag guitar sounds. They’re the odd ones out on this line-up, but to their credit, they’re probably the odd ones out on every line-up they play. Nobunny is 30-something San Francisco local Justin Champlin. Dressed in a tattered, nose-less rabbit mask, bare chested and in black y-fronts, it’s as outrageous

Elvis Costello Pic by Andrew Briscoe


tradition, tongue-in-cheek but surprisingly inviting. Once Brendan Huntley finishes rearranging microphones, Boomgates get their set underway. A string of excellent shows in recent memory stands them in good stead for the night, but the punters don’t really come alive until they play Layman’s Terms. The highlight though is finale, Whispering Or Singing; picking up the tempo that won’t relax again for the remainder of the night.

Thee Oh Sees Pic by Leila Morrissey

THEE OH SEES, BOOMGATES, NOBUNNY, EAST LINK HI-FI: 31/01/13 On entering the Hi-Fi we are welcomed with the sight of four guitarists – backs turned to the small crowd that has assembled. Their eyes are fixed on Al Montfort who is knocking out a simple drum pattern while putting the rest of his energy into his vocals. They seem unsure when to finish their set but East Link eventually launch into a noisy closer that fits nicely with the ethos of the night. Justin Champlin appears on stage in his usual half-arsed rabbit attire as Nobunny. Apparently he and his band of mild-mannered, West Coast punks have just got off the plane but their set certainly doesn’t lag. Their sound sits firmly in the Ramones’

With John Dwyer’s acrylic-bodied guitar jacked up high, Thee Oh Sees launch into a ferocious set. From the first burst of noise, the crowd has situated themselves in their preferred positions. Those who are content to rock-out introspectively form a horseshoe around a frenetic pack of punters in need of urgent energy release. The band doesn’t disappoint them. Dwyer manipulates his whole body around his guitar, moving effortlessly from captivating psych licks to full-blown distorted jams. As he drives the lightning tempos from front and centre, drummer Mike Shoun holds an expression of intense concentration, only broken to wince at the poor technique of the stage divers. His solo that leads into Contraption/Soul Desert is a lesson in controlled power. He is ably supported by Petey Dammit, who merges the roles of bass and rhythm guitar to create a relentless platform for Dwyer’s playing. Standing behind the band, both in the mix and physically, Brigid Dawson brings a lighter shade of melody to the vocals of Dwyer, which is invaluable to the band’s sound. The San Fran outfit manage to demand full attention for a set that extends well over an hour. Punters react joyously as each new song is struck up, with The Dream and Lupine Dominus going down particularly well. When a band make it near impossible to single out the high points, you know they’ve killed it. Jan Wisniewski

HERMITUDE, JONTI CORNER: 01/02/13 “Last week I was challenged to make a song with a basketball,” says Jonti, the bespectacled, beanie-

sporting man standing behind a formidable array of electronic music-making devices. The track he opens with features samples of the satisfying smack of a basketball, with his own vocal lines layered in as the song progresses. The set is fun and energetic and gets the swelling crowd dancing, although Jonti perhaps relies a little too heavily on pre-recorded material to truly show his compositional strengths live on stage.

gigs. Independently, they also played in a lick of notable indie-punk rock outfits, including Be Your Own Pet, and have collaborated in recent years with Best Coast and Jack White, artists not unfamiliar to Australian shores in this period either. Thankfully now, the duo once again bring their no bullshit, energetic musical offspring to the Corner hotel, amidst their broader Big Day Out tour.

The sold-out room has come to see Hermitude though, and Luke Dubs and El Gusto receive the warmest of welcomes when they take the stage. They are masters of their dancefloor domain, and they get the crowd moving early with All Of You and Sloucho Darx. Their set is heavy on tracks from their latest hit album, HyperParadise, with a smattering of hip hop and older work thrown in for good measure.

While, generally speaking, little good amounts from incestuous relationships, the siblings continue to produce not only savoury, but utterly enthralling music and live shows. Support band King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard (KG&TLW) are a chaotic seven-piece whose music is untamed in spirit but certainly not without technical prowess and refinement. KG&TLW are a refreshing reminder that making music is about having a fucking good time on stage, leaving a legacy of feeta-tappin’ as they rumble through their set.

Live producers’ sets can be tough to execute – a straight DJ set doesn’t usually cut it, and the fiddly finesse required for great production doesn’t often translate well to the stage. Hermitude tackle this issue by delighting in the chance to showcase their talents live – Luke Dubs drops some fiendish keyboard solos (including a particularly impressive one summertime anthem, Golden), while El Gusto scratches up a few storms. The duo keep the crowd thoroughly engaged – in fact, they only welcome one vocal guest to the stage: Chaos Emerald, the vocalist for Speak Of The Devil. They round out the set with the dark swagger of The Villain before being coaxed back for an encore – the hauntingly strange Cloud City. There’s no question that they’ll leave the night on such a relaxed note, though – after all, this is Hermitude. Before they leave the stage, they make sure the audience is dancing, sweaty, exuberant and thoroughly satisfied. Aleksia Barron

JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD, KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD CORNER: 24/01/13 Jake and Jamin Orrall are busy Tennessee brothers. Most importantly, they’re JEFF The Brotherhood (JTB), and as such, have seven albums to their moniker and have played over 400 shows in the past two years alone. Holy hell, that’s a lotta

Guitarist and singer Jake moves on stage like a cobra; the ones you see in Arabian tales, lured in and out off a wicker basket, instantly and endlessly mesmerised by his own fuzz rock, with this fixation clearly contagious to the audience. Perhaps more poignant is the musical cohesion between the musicians – perhaps just an extension of their genetic bond – but whatever it is, the set is tight and hard to fault. They near conclusion with crowd-pleasers such as Sixpack and Whatever I Want already dished out, and the boys take a rough-and-ready approach to the encore. They announce the serving of two or three more songs without an extended exit and a laboured return to stage. Rather, JTB endure without pretention or indulgence. Closing finally with U Got The Look from their 2009 album Heavy Days, the song credited with bringing them global attention and repute throws the audience into exultation. JTB have humble beginnings, their first instruments cast from paper and plastic, but rigid determination and diligence (plus a tremendously musical father, Robert Ellis Orrall) have allowed the boys to become masters of their genre in only their 20s. Their Corner show is a reminder of this. Izzy Tolhurst

For more reviews go to themusic.com.au/reviews • 51


ROOTS DOWN

ADAMANTIUM WOLF

WAKE THE DEAD

BLUES ‘N’ ROOTS WITH DAN CONDON ROOTS@INPRESS.COM.AU

THE HEAVY SHIT WITH LOCHLAN WATT

HARDCORE AND PUNK WITH SARAH PETCHELL

score you the Digital Lite EP in an immediate download. The band’s fourth album Digital Lies is out through Riot! on Friday 22 February. The Amenta will release their third full-length Flesh Is Heir on Friday 22 March. The band are expected to release a video clip for the first single Teeth this week. They will launch the album at metalobsession. net’s fifth birthday party on Saturday 23 March at the Evelyn Hotel alongside Okera, The Levitation Hex, Departe, Desecrator, Arbrynth, Mortification, The Seaford Monster, Hadal Maw and Heisenberg.

Emmylou Harris Two of the finest names in the world of Americana, Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell, first collaborated almost 40 years ago now, Crowell joining Harris’s The Hot Band way back in 1975 as a guitarist and harmony singer. But it has taken this long for the two artists to join forces officially and release something under both of their names, which makes Old Yellow Moon a very enticing proposition for any lovers of American country music. The album, which is out through Nonesuch Records/ Universal on Friday 22 February, was produced by Brian Ahem, who is responsible for working on a number of Harris’s incredible records throughout the years as well as Crowell’s 1978 debut LP, and they have enlisted some old buddies from The Hot Band to help them bring these songs to life, as well as a couple of big names in the country world like Stuart Duncan, Vince Gill and Bill Payne. Crowell – a Grammy-winning songwriter – contributes four songs to the 12-song record and the rest of it is made up of reinterpretations of killer tunes from the likes of Roger Miller, Hank DeVito and Allan Reynolds. I doubt we’ll be seeing the duo in Australia anytime soon given that Harris was just here, but this record is a must-own for all Americana fans. Any new Neil Young release is a pretty exciting proposition, and this latest DVD that he is releasing next month is particularly intriguing. The film, which was made by long-time Neil Young filmmaker – and Silence Of The Lambs director – Jonathan Demme, follows the musician as he makes the trek (in a 1956 Ford Crown Victoria, no less) from his home in Omemee, Ontario to Toronto’s Massey Hall where he was to finish up his Le Noise tour in 2011 with two dates. I haven’t been given the chance to see it yet, but apparently it gives a pretty nice insight into Neil Young both on and off stage. It’s out on DVD through Universal Sony Pictures on Friday 20 March. Steve Lukather is going to be back in Australia for the Ringo Starr All Starr Band tour very soon, but he’s also just released a brand new LP called Transistion, so it’ll be interesting to see if he busts any of that material out while he’s in the country. Lukather has been involved in some of the biggest pop hits of all time, most notably as guitarist for Toto and on the smash hit Michael Jackson record Thriller, and this record sees him blazing away at his finest. I’ll be honest, this record is far too cheesy for my liking and I do not like it one bit, but the tech-heads out there (and I know there are quite a lot of you, and that you like emailing me) might want to keep an eye out, because the playing is very impressive indeed. It’s out now through ADA/Warner. One of the most celebrated contemporary world music artists around, Manu Chao hasn’t given his Australian fanbase all that much to cheer about in the past with not very much live action coming our way from his camp. But he’s changing that for the 2013 Bluesfest, showing up to play that festival and now a couple of sideshows including one in Melbourne! These performances from his band Manu Chao La Ventura will no doubt be as dynamic as we are led to believe they tend to be; he is one of the most heralded live performers in the game and if you’re into this kind of multicultural mish-mash that brings in plenty of different elements of world music as well as different styles of contemporary music, it’s for you. The band will be playing one show at the Palace on Monday 25 March, so whether you’re into punk, rock, reggae, ska, salsa, French chanson or Algerian rai, you’ll well and truly be stoked on getting the chance to witness this band performing live.

52 • For more opinion go to themusic.com.au/blog

Dragonforce The latest in Soundwave sideshow announcement news is that power metal group Dragonforce will join up with classic metal/stoner rockers The Sword for a show at Billboard on Monday 25 February. A huge number of Australian extreme metal acts have been confirmed to perform at Hammersonic – renowned as the biggest metal festival in South East Asia. Ouroborus, The Amenta, Whoretopsy, Sensory Amusia, Advent Sorrow, Inanimacy and Voyager will perform on Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 April in Jakarta, Indonesia alongside such international metal greats as Cannibal Corpse, Cradle Of Filth, As I Lay Dying, Lock Up, Dying Fetus, Epica and more. Hails!

Epic progressive Perth metallers Chaos Divine have confirmed that they are seven tracks deep in writing their third album. The band promise that the new material has gone “above and beyond” their previous works. Brisbane post/black metal group Hope Drone have dropped their debut release over at Bandcamp. com. Featuring members and ex-members of IRONHIDE and The Fevered, the record has blast beats and atmospheres abounding. You can stream it for free or download it for $6.

Byron Bay metalcore group In Hearts Wake have released a new video clip for their track Loreley (The Lovers). It’s taken from their debut album Divinations; just head to YouTube and chuck a search if you’re interested.

Sunshine Coast extremists Portal will take their horror to Europe for the first time in July, with a number of confirmed festival appearances in Germany and Denmark already confirmed. They’ll be playing alongside Electric Wizard, Repulsion and more at Hell’s Pleasure Festival, as well as with fellow Australians Hobbs Angel Of Death and Vomitor at Metal Magic. The band’s fourth album Vexovoid is due out on Tuesday 19 February through Profound Law Records.

Brisbane death/groove metal group In Death... will release their new EP Thanatos on Saturday 23 March. The five-track effort was mixed and mastered by Logan Mader (Machine Head, Soulfly) with a new track called Meaten available from their triple j Unearthed profile.

Check out Scumfest this Saturday 9 February at the Reverence Hotel to see sets from God God Dammit Dammit, Debacle, Agonhymn, Clagg, DEAD, Poisonous Viper Gang, Funeral Moon, Batpiss, Mangel Wurzel, Iron Worzel and Mob Queens. Doors at 3pm for $15.

There’s a bunch of pre-order options for the new album from Sydney power metal group LORD over at lord.net.au – any of which will

Don’t forget about Converge, Old Man Gloom and The Broderick at Billboard next Friday 15 February. I promise that it’s going to be heaps sick!

SEARCH AND DESTROY DIGGIN’ UP THE GOOD SHIT WITH SAMSON MCDOUGALL pretty linear) diversified and My Disco have steered their ship down the rocky road to minimalism.

My Disco The My Disco tenth anniversary show at the Corner this Friday (have you seen the fucking line-up: HTRK + New War + Standish/Carlyon + Crumbs + Home Travel + Brain Children DJs = OMG!) got me delving for all things metronomic. Also this week, the pre-release of PVT’s new album, Homosapien, rocked the office. ‘So fuckin’ what?’ you yawn. Well, they’re two bands from Australia (Melbourne and Sydney respectively) that now exist at least partially outside of the country. They are also two bands that all of my ‘musician’ mates (there’s three of them, and at least half of them would probably struggle with the term ‘mate’ in this context) think are underrated – and I have to say I agree with them. People complain about the direction My Disco have taken. I take exception with this. In my view (and if you weren’t already asleep, you’ll be nodding off now – some consider this column a cure for insomnia) they have boldly trodden where few have had the guts to tread. Remember they emerged from that batch of mid-’00s Melbourne Super8 Diaries bands that included the likes of (now largely defunct or making music in different forms) Eddy Current, Baseball, Tucker Bs, Love Of Diagrams, Bang, Bang Aids and Aleks & The Ramps. Sure, the actual DVD was released in 2008, but it took them a few years to get it up, so to speak. Where this is going is that the bands that have continued to create from that bunch have (with the possible exception of Love Of Diagrams, who have thankfully kept their trajectory

I point to a late-arvo Golden Plains set by My Disco a few years back as an all-time Supernatural Amphitheatre highlight. This is not ‘journalistic’ hyperbole, no, no, no… This shit happened and was witnessed and I reckon it marked a turning point in their sound whereby they somewhat opted out of the stripped-back and fucking ear-bleedingly loud and entered the world of hypnotism, and still ear-bleedingly fucking loud. Now they’ve taken this further and for this I am thankful. They (at least probably) saw where their ‘scene’ was headed at an early stage and decided to live by their own fucking constructs. My Disco, I salute you. And I will be doing so on Friday at the Corner. PVT followed a totally different path, but equally individualistic. Sure, they dropped the vowels around the same time Tic Toc Tokyo (who?) did it too, but it doesn’t mean by any stretch that they suck. Au contraire, they’ve managed to tread a trail from more minimal (can you even say that?) to more pop and they’ve done so while maintaining maximum artistic integrity. That means: they make music that is too interesting to be popular despite the fact that their songwriting is clever and refined enough to exist within a mainstream media; it’s just that said media is/are too stupid to recognise good music even when they’re being figuratively banged with the stuff. Homosapien is living proof of this ‘growth’ and will go down as their ‘defining’ record to date. Look beyond these two groups and there’s so much metronomic/mathematical/complexly structured music out there right now that it’s unbelievable. For a veritable one-stop shop for all things Asia-Pacific and complex and musical and good’n’shit, take a look at a label called Tenzenmen. This fella really knows his stuff and (barring the odd soft kinda punk release he puts out) has already gone to the trouble of sifting the region, and beyond, for the best stuff (check: Euripedes Berserker, Duck Fight Goose and Snapline for starters). But for now, My Disco on Friday and PVT in March should keep you satisfied.

High Tension Soundwave have announced another round of Sidewaves and this one is for all the punks out there, with The Wonder Years, Such Gold, Living With Lions and Versus The World hitting the stage together. The Wonder Years are that type of pop-punk that, while fun, has a slight emotional edge. Such Gold have built up a huge name for themselves in a few short years, and you need look no further than their debut album Misadventures to understand why. Living With Lions are that band with the LP with the biblical poop imagery. Called Holy Shit the album shows a band whose music is both dynamic and melodic. Lastly, Versus The World is a super group of sorts, made up of members of Lagwagon and The Ataris, delivering pure punk. This show is 18+ and tickets are on sale now for the show on Thursday 28 February at the Corner Hotel. A little while ago you may have seen me raving about a band out of Melbourne called High Tension, but in case you don’t remember here’s the lowdown! The band features ex-members of Young & Restless in vocalist Karina Utomo and Ashley Pegram on guitar, Matt Weston of The Nation Blue on bass and Love Like Electrocution and Heirs drummer Damian Coward, and the music they are making is incredible! Beautifully brutal is the correct term of phrase, with Utomo’s vocals ranging between violent and clean, while the music underneath is just plain exciting. Having just released their debut 7” EP (which you can order through OSCL’s website) the band are heading out on the road for a bunch of shows on the east coast. You can catch them in their hometown as a part of the Push Over Festival on Monday 11 March, otherwise they’ll be taking over the Old Bar in Fitzroy on Friday 8 March for a cheap, $10 show. No excuses not to check these guys out! Rolling Stone magazine has reported that Black Flag founder Greg Ginn has reformed a version of the band for a new album and a handful of live shows. But this isn’t even close to being the bizarre part as, simultaneously, former Black Flag members Keith Morris, Chuck Dukowski and Bill Stevension are also touring under the Flag moniker with Descendents member Stephen Egerton. Neither of the bands have mentioned an Australian tour as being on the cards, however, Ginn’s version of the reformed band, according to a statement, is “putting finishing touches on a new album” with singer Ron Reyes, drummer Gregory Moore and bassist Dale Nixon (which is apparently a pseudonym for Ginn, so it’s unclear who will be playing bass when the bands perform live). Gigs so far include headline slots at festivals in the UK, Germany and Tennessee. The most important part, however, is that Henry Rollins is not involved. Heading back to the land down under, the Groovin’ The Moo line-up for its 2013 run of shows has been announced. With over 26 acts on the line-up, the two most pertinent to our interests are The Amity Affliction and The Bronx. This announcement ties in nicely with The Bronx releasing their fourth album (sticking with tradition, it’s called IV) this Friday through Shock Records. Most importantly, in case you can’t make it to the festivals, it has the rest of us sitting here with fingers and toes crossed in anticipation for potential Groovin’ The Moo sideshows where we all can see The Bronx in their best form, live on stage. GTM this year hits Bendigo on Saturday 4 May at the Prince of Wales Showground, with tickets on sale as of today. Last up for this week, mark 20 February in your diary as that’s when local photographer Kane Hibberd will be launching his photo book Kanye Lens Vs Soundwave Volume 1. The exhibition will be open until 4 March, running concurrently with the Soundwave Festival for 2013 in an excellent demonstration of time appropriateness. The exhibition will be held at Thousand Pound Bend (361 Lt Lonsdale Street) with opening night on Wednesday 20 February from 6-to-9pm. Copies of the book will be for sale at the space throughout the duration of the exhibition so make sure you head along and check out some excellent music photography, including that of some really rad bands!


FOREIGN OBJECTS

OG FLAVAS

INTELLIGIBLE FLOW

FIFTY SHADES OF TRAVEL WITH CLARE DICKINS

URBAN AND R&B NEWS BY CYCLONE

HIP HOP NEWS & COMMENTARY WITH ALEKSIA BARRON

Childish Gambino Everyday I’m Shufflin’ I’ve been out of Australia for 28 of the past 30 months, flying out of Tullamarine on a oneway ticket three days after Kevin Rudd was disposed as Prime Minister. I left because I had to get away. I’d been retrenched from my dream job and when you’ve had the wind knocked out of you like that, the compulsion to shake things up and chase an adventure is strong. So save for a recent two-month stint back home for Eclipse Festival last November, followed by six weeks in Melbourne, I’ve been chasing the musical dream overseas, desperate to avoid the whole ‘saving for a house/wedding’ grown-up vortex that’s enveloped so many of my friends and is the presumed course of behaviour once you’ve hit 30. Indeed, while they’re sensibly putting down a mortgage deposit on a block of land in Point Cook or the like, I’m farewelling the grey climes of London to relocate to Ibiza for the summer. It’s well documented that absence makes the heart grow fonder, but similarly it sharpens your perception and appreciation of the differences between your motherland and your adopted home country, as well as the places in Europe you visit along the way. If anything, coming home late last year cemented so much of what I’d experienced overseas. You don’t quite realise what a city of speed-loving techno kids we are ‘til you land back in Melbourne after a couple of years abroad and see what a relatively miniscule spot on the radar the likes of the Hot Creations crew, Solomun and even, to a slightly lesser extent, Maceo Plex are – especially when you find someone like the very de jour Miguel Campbell dropping his hyped brand of French touch disco house in a low profile gig at Revolver’s Late Show on a Sunday night, while half of the city is frothing at the mouth at the prospect of Luke Slater’s return. I don’t think it’s a case of Melbourne needing to get with the overseas dance music program either, as I once snobbily thought: we’re just really comfortable in our skin, and it’s a credit to our long lineage in electronic music that the city has such a definable sound. One advantage of living in London is the opportunity to participate in what is arguably one of the world’s more upfront and vital clubbing cities. It’s for this reason that I enjoyed a hearty chuckle when news broke of the ‘new’ and ‘controversial’ shuffling craze that’s been sweeping through clubs and raves, causing widespread debate throughout the country. Unlike our Australian equivalent, the shuffle is specific to the house scene and participants – typically groups of guys with a preference for dark shades and snapback hats – refer to the dance moves as “cutting shapes”. Such is the ruffle its caused in clubland that the more ‘infamous’ proponents of shuffling have even been refused entry to clubs, including South London institution Cable, after clips of them cutting their shapes on YouTube were widely circulated. There’s even an “Anti Foot Shuffling Campaign” started on Facebook currently standing at over 4,700 likes with the tagline “It’s not the shuffle… it’s what comes with it” that’s dubbed it “London’s current virus”. A recent feature in Mixmag featured an interview with a spokesman from the group, who blamed shape cutters for “bringing badman mentalities to raves”, slamming them for wearing “moody shades and dancing like chickens”. I can’t help but feel vaguely cheated by this ‘new’ dancefloor phenomenon. Growing up, mythology dictated that if you busted out a shuffle in the UK, you’d be promptly bumrushed and asked if you were from Melbourne. Admittedly, arriving in London in 2010 probably meant I missed the craze by a decade, but still I always harboured secret fantasies of getting a shoulder tap on the sporadic occasion I busted out the ol’ sideways glide. Now with the current climate in London clubs, you’re more likely to cop a glare and risk rejection to said club next time you return. Damnit.

Last February, OG Flavas appraised the Big Day Out’s 20th anniversary, and Kanye West’s headlining gig, incidentally mentioning how the hipster rapper Childish Gambino (aka Donald Glover) is indebted to him. This year, by coincidence, Glover himself appeared with a band. The Georgia native launched a career as a comedian while attending college in NYC, later writing for 30 Rock. He’s also acted in the NBC sitcom, Community. Glover, the Childish Gambino handle from a Wu-Tang Clan name generator, issued his first major album, Camp, in 2011. Since then, apart from touring, he’s released the ROYALTY mixtape and cameo-ed here and there, his oddest collab being with Leona Lewis on Trouble and most progressive Flux Pavilion’s Do Or Die. There’ve been rave reports of Glover’s Oz performances. On BDO’s Essential Stage in Melbourne, the MC, kicking off with Fire Fly, had the crowd in his hands – although he experienced a lull mid-way after Heartbeat. Glover’s main problem? He has no distinct or consistent sound, swaying from modern epic boom-bap to EDM rap (as typified by his hit, Bonfire). Glover’s persona, too, is sometimes that of an eccentric, ironic and droll indie MC, others swag rapper (the bass-heavy You See Me). OG spotted local comic (and hip hop nerd) Chris Lilley, disguised in a beanie, watching Glover. Of course, Lilley gave us the controversial S.mouse! character, possibly inspired by Soulja Boy, on Angry Boys. Perhaps the biggest surprise at the rebranded BDO was the booking of Atlanta’s B.o.B (aka Bobby Ray Simmons), the dude more commercial than the fest’s traditional hip hoppers. In 2012, BDO had the alt Odd Future, whose Tyler, The Creator has dissed Simmons. Signed to T.I.’s Grand Hustle Records, the flamboyant rapper, singer, instrumentalist and producer dropped his second, Strange Clouds, in May. Simmons, accompanied by

a DJ and dancers, and again on the Essential Stage, would have benefited from his band showing up. Still, he energetically performed songs like 2010’s Bruno Mars-featuring mega-hit, Nothin’ On You (the crowd singing along), live PA-style. Simmons even repped his street side with the mixtape cut Beast Mode. Aussie mega-star 360 followed. BDO did much to break Lupe Fiasco and MIA in Oz. Hopefully, next time organisers get Drake or even a ‘new’ hip hop saviour like Kendrick Lamar or A$AP Rocky (aka Rakim Mayers). Mayers’ US #1 Long.Live.A$AP is 2013’s first key urban album – and well overdue. The Harlemite established himself as the most exciting post-Drake MC with 2011’s LIVE. LOVE.A$AP mixtape (home to Purple Swag). He scored a reputed $3 million deal with Sony. Mayers, who offered the single, Goldie, last year, sticks to his purple drank-laced – or opiate – rap on this debut. Mayers doesn’t have Lamar’s lyrical or conceptual flair. He’s a decidedly phlegmatic, though comic, rapper. However, Mayers demonstrates a greater appreciation of musical experimentation. Indeed, he has extolled Nirvana’s grunge – a conceivable influence on his tempo shifts. The east coaster has obviously co-opted Houston’s chopped and screwed, but he’s also into atmospheric post-dubstep and avant synth-hop (illwave). Soufien 3000’s Pain layers Mayers’ pitched-down vocals over ambient techno, while Danger Mouse’s Phoenix could be tranquillised alt-rock balladry. Mayers’ buddy Skrillex masterminds Wild For The Night, a trap banger that sounds a lil’ fake – and incongruous. Santigold rejects being tagged ‘urban’, but she’ll collaborate with rappers. The Afro-punk sings on the uncanny Hell, fallen angel rave from Mayers’ ol’ New Jersey ally Clams Casino, hip hop’s most intriguing new beatmaker. Weirder is Florence Welch’s hook on the Lupe-esque ‘bonus’ I Come Apart, courtesy of Emile Haynie (Lana Del Rey). Lamar guests on two joints – one Noah “40” Shebib’s anthem Fuckin’ Problems, alongside Drake. Mayers has commendably challenged hip hop’s homophobia and so his casual use of “dyke bitch” here is disappointing. As a lyricist, he’s the King of Cliché, lauding pussy, money and weed on T-Minus’ otherwise awesome low-end PMW (All I Really Need).

THE BREAKDOWN POP CULTURE THERAPY WITH ADAM CURLEY

Arthur Russell In 2004, New York City renamed a street in Greenwich Village after him. He’s widely regarded as one of the great early influencers on not only the style but the catalogue of Bob Dylan. Friends included Joni Mitchell and Tom Paxton. He had a record deal with Mercury and in 1965 he played Carnegie Hall. He was even famous enough to be mentioned by name as an onlooker drawn to action in the Stonewall riots in a 1969 article in the Village Voice. But Dave Van Ronk’s name is rarely mentioned alongside the names of those who popularised the New York folk scene. That isn’t too likely to change in the immediate future, but the Coen brothers have at least thrown parts of his life onto the screen in their new film, Inside Llewyn Davis, which will be previewed by a private audience before the Grammys in LA this Sunday. As the title suggests, the film isn’t a biopic. The Coen’s have taken a 2005 memoir, written with Elijah Wald (Van Ronk died in 2002), and worked the setting and character into a fictional film about a folk singer struggling to make it in NYC in 1961. The movie stars Oscar Isaac, John Goodman, Carey Mulligan and... Justin Timberlake. So while Van Ronk gets only a precursory mention, it’s been enough to warrant the reissue of his debut 1959 studio record, Dave Van Ronk Sings Ballads, Blues & A Spiritual, through Doxy Records last week. Van Ronk is only the latest folk singer to be plucked from history and given another spin. Of course, the genre has a seemingly never-ending list of obscure artists from which to draw, helped by the ease and style of recording at the time. But recent months have thrown up some pearlers, Van Ronk included. In August

last year, the English folk singer Bill Fay released his first album of new material in some 40 years following a rediscovery (or, arguably, a discovery) of his songs by the producer Joshua Henry and Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy. Wilco covered Fay’s song, Be Not So Fearful, live, and Fay returned the favour with Tweedy in tow on his album, Life Is People (Dead Oceans), covering Wilco’s This World. It’s Fay’s own lyrics that stand out on the record, as well as his delivery of them. Though a band accompanies Fay for swelling folk rock numbers, the best of the record is its stark moments in which Fay is joined only by a piano or strings or, in the standout song Be At Peace With Yourself, a gospel choir. Fay’s voice is raspy if searching; burdened and looking for the light. In the 2012 US film, Keep The Lights On, which played at the Melbourne International Film Festival last year and continues to find audiences around the world, the songs of American songwriter Arthur Russell add a fair heaping of heartbreak and drama to the story of a relationship damaged by drugs. Russell is rarely called a ‘folk singer’ – more often the words ‘experimental’ and ‘minimalist’ and ‘composer’ precede his name – but at the heart of much of his work is a desire to tell simple stories through simple melodies, and certainly his voice, often compared to Nick Drake’s, fit with a folk style. That said, his best known work is as a producer of disco hits, including Loose Joints’ Is It All Over My Face. He also worked with (and reportedly dated) Allen Ginsberg, playing cello alongside Ginsberg’s poetry in the ‘70s and ‘80s. The film’s soundtrack (Audika Records) pulls songs from Russell’s angelic, shuddering, reverb-saturated 1986 album, World Of Echo, released by Rough Trade in the UK, as well as songs released through Audika comps in the last decade, some of which were digitally restored by Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor for the 2008 compilation, Love Is Overtaking Me (Rough Trade). It’s an entry point, as much as these songs and the best of the folkies are an entry point to some grand, scary exploration we seem to be forever revisiting.

Kerser What have you been listening to for the last week? If the answer isn’t the 2013 Golden Era Mixtape I will be very, very surprised. It’s an hour of gold from the GE powerhouse, featuring the talents of DJ Jaytee in the driver’s seat and Vents as host, as well as contributions from the entire Golden Era stable. There are plenty of highlights to be found on the 22-track release – Suffa & Sesta Pt 2 is an absolute cracker, and the scallywag Funkoars are in their element with Larry Emdur (surely the ultimate Twitter in-joke). It’s also quite promising that some of the mixtape’s best moments come courtesy of Golden Era’s newest signing, longtime collaborator K21. A previous winner of the Hilltop Hoods Initiative, K21 has been racking up time on various Golden Era releases over the last few years, and given the promise shown on his 2012 debut album Single Minded Civilian, it’s great that he’s been officially signed to the label. K21’s mixtape track Won’t Stop, featuring none other than Pressure, is one of the release’s finest bangers, and his remix of the Hilltop Hoods’ Rattling The Keys To The Kingdom is an admirable interpretation of an instant classic. If you haven’t gotten your paws on the mixtape yet (and really, if that’s the case, what on earth have you been doing for the last few days?) you can download your copy for free at goldenerarecords.com.au. Get on it. Trouble’s heading to town – and by trouble, I mean Kerser. The Campbelltown MC is touring to celebrate the release of his second album No Rest For The Sickest and is coming Melbourne-way on Saturday 9 February. He’s had a bumper year – No Rest did some serious damage on the iTunes charts – and he looks set for even bigger and better things in 2013. Kerser will be playing two shows at the Hi-Fi – an under-18s gig kicking off at 3pm, and an 18+ gig from 7.30pm. It’s great to see another hip hop artist sticking his neck out to give the kids a show – underage gigs can be a thankless task, so kudos to Kerser and the Hi-Fi for getting this one off the ground. Kerser will be supported by Nino Brown, Fortay At Large and Rates, and tickets are available from Moshtix. The triple j Hottest 100 is so two weeks ago (and the number one song was totally a novelty hip hop track that mentions onesies and I love it, so deal with it, folks), but with the release of the top-voted tracks from 101 to 200, I just wanted to draw attention to the sheer volume of Australian hip hop that scored significant love in the countdown. In past years, we’ve usually seen a handful of singles from the same artist make it in, depending on whoever released a tentpole album that year, and there’s usually an outlying hip hop single or two thrown into the mix. But this year, we saw a lot of hip hop voted in, created by a lot of different artists – and with the announcement of the “second” Hottest 100, there are even more names in the mix. On Australia Day, we heard Seth Sentry, Chance Waters, Hilltop Hoods, Thundamentals, Allday, Illy, 360 and Hermitude tracks make it into the top 100 – and there’s still more! Congratulations to Tuka, Urthboy, Spit Syndicate, Pez and our favourite genrecrossers TZU for getting tracks into the 101-200 portion of the countdown. These are officially no longer niche votes – people are loving what Australian hip hop artists are putting down. It’s not the countdown that’s so important – it’s the quality of great hip hop being created by passionate people. Kudos.

For more opinion go to themusic.com.au/blog • 53


HAVE YOU HEARD

ST KILLS

TOUR DE NOTHING

The Mercy Kills light the fuse at the Espy Front Bar for the annual St Kilda Festival’s main day this Sunday. The Espy will have all three stages blasting with over 15 bands throughout the evening from around 5.30pm. Money For Rope, Kingswood, Barbarion, Dune Rats, TZU with DJ Mu-Gen, Daryl Braithwaite, Dale Ryder Band, Nudest Funk Orchestra, Bad Boys Batucada and Ms Butt play the Gershwin Room with The Relatives, Volts and Swamp Moth in the Basement. It’s free entry with doors open from 12pm.

Kids Without Bikes have honed their show into something daring and brilliant, and with their unique brand of indie rock’n’roll, they will have you out of your seat in no time. The band will be launching their new single Control Freak at Revolver this Friday with special guests Fifth Friend, Nebraskatak and The Black Alleys.

FEELING STRINE

YEO How did you get together? Yeo Choong, synth/bass/guitar: Luke [Brennan, drums] and I met a long time ago when I lived in Brisbane and he lived in Berwick. He kindly got in touch after hearing my music, saying he liked it. In turn, I had a listen to his stuff and I discovered he was a very talented kid. Consequently, I chose him as a support act on my first tour to Melbourne, and it turned out to be his first show with his band, which also featured John [Barkley, keys]. After moving here, I played with John and Luke in different incarnations of my band over the years, and though the new material is not what they are used to playing musically, it felt natural to have them on board for it. Have you recorded anything or do you prefer to tool around in your bedroom? I’ve never hired a studio to record my own songs, because the way I prefer to work is without a time limit. I have a small studio set up in my loungeroom and very lovely neighbours, so it works well. Can you sum up your band’s sound in four words? Electro-Pop-Post-Hop. If you could support any band in the world, who would it be and why? GD&Top, because they are the slickest K-pop duo on the planet. They would pull off an incredible high-budget show and expose us to tons and tons of screaming girls who like to dance.

This Tuesday the Curtin presents mega harmony, alt-country quartet Strine Singers free in the front bar. Breeding earnest country pop songs, the brother/sister/brother/sister outfit take time out from recording to play two sets from 8pm.

LOW EXPECTATIONS Officially kicking off the last leg of his tour at the Empress Hotel on Friday 15 Feburary, Phil Barlow Band are bringing a unique mix of rock, blues and reggae to Melbourne audiences. The Brisbane singersongwriter is excited to be joined by Melbourne band members, Karl Evans (bass) and Desmond Nazareth (drums). He will be supported by Al Parkinson on the night. Doors open at 8pm with $10 entry.

If you invited someone awesome ‘round for dinner what would you cook? Okonomiyaki is my specialty! What’s your favourite place to drink in Melbourne? Nihonshu – the friendliest bar staff and always something new to try on the drink menu. When and where is your next show? We’re launching the new record, Sell Out, on Saturday 9 February at the Toff In Town supported by Francolin and Dot.AY.

WHAT HE WAZ The Waz E James Band is made up of musicians who have enjoyed Australian and worldwide success in a range of different bands in the 1990s. They will be bringing their infectious goodtime country blues to the Retreat Hotel this Saturday from 7.30pm in the front bar, following The Lowriders. The doors open at 4pm. Entry is free.

STREAMS OF BUTTER

Hailing from Belfast and longtime procurers of the famous Feel My Bicep blog, Bicep will play this Sunday at Revolver Upstairs with local supports Sleep D, Spacey Space, Isaac Fryar, Harold, Grant Camov, With Love, Jackson Hookway and Dylan Batelic. Tickets are available via the Summer Series Facebook page.

GET IT RISING Mojo Juju and friends Stella Angelico and Twincest (Sydney) will hit the Public Bar stage in SLAM Day style on Saturday 23 February, performing full sets and helping each other out with a few numbers. DJs Mexicali Mammas Heels On Decks and Blaberunner are going to make this a party and a half all they way through to 7am. The ReChords

Touring abroad for most of 2012, Aurora Jane has creative mojo to burn and is focused on recording her new (fourth) studio album. Her trio will be playing shows around the country this summer on the Lazy Monday Summer Tour and will be joined by the amazing Sam Lohs this Sunday night at the Retreat Hotel from 8.30pm. Entry is free.

ROCKABILLY BEAT Held from Friday 15 February to Sunday 17, the Ballarat Beat Rockabilly Festival is the latest instalment from rockabilly king, Arthur Matsakos. The Desperados (USA) and Omar Romero (USA), as well as amazing local artists such as The ReChords, Sun Rising and The Yard Apes are sure to keep you rocking throughout the festival. A pre-party will be held at the Karova, featuring all the international acts in a wild jam session to get you warmed up for the weekend.

ROAD TO FRANCESCONI

ELEMENTARY BEHAVIOUR Fire Behaving As Air are back playing another of their special toned-down, reverbed-up, dreampop psychedelic sets this Thursday as part of the annual Ecstatic Sound Circle. Starting the night will be Kirtan, and once everyone’s souls are nicely cleansed Fire Behaving As Air will take over and finish the night with songs off their debut EP Desire. Head to the Northcote Uniting Church from 7pm.

DIRTY LAUNDRY

In recent years, Portland’s Ryan Francesconi has established himself as a leading figure in acoustic composition and performance. He visits the Toff this Thursday to perform with his partner, violinist Mirabai Peart, for the duo’s debut performance of their new Bella Union release, Road To Palios. The doors open at 8pm with $15 entry.

ALL SOLD OUT This Saturday Yeo is bringing us his newest album, Sell Out. Think James Blake’s intimate prism of future garage songcraft combined with the playful work ethic of Prince and Chet Faker’s blue-eyed hooks. Brisbanite Dot.AY’s experimental jams and Melbourne party-starters Francolin are supporting. Doors open at 7pm with entry $10. The Perfections

What’s a Thursday without a tiny bit of a hangover and a fond memory of partying the night before? Probably a pretty normal one. If you’re not really into normal, or just feel like doing something a bit different, Laundry brings dubstep/grime/drum’n’bass and drink specials to hump days. This week’s special guests are Kay-hat and Kodiak Kid (Whomp), plus residents Baddums, Gingus and the Bass Art crew. Free entry every week from 9pm until late.

Melbourne hardcore punks Aviar put on one hell of an explosive and energetic live show. They will be joined on stage at Revolver Upstairs this Thursday by fellow punks The Pitys and the laid back musical attack of Witness To Treason, who have both recently released debut EPs. The doors open at 7.30pm with $7 entry.

NEW MAN, OLD NOISE

SOLITARY CAT

Harry Hookey is a musician of the alt.country, roots and rock variety. Together with his band, Hookey promises a night of eclectic tunes with sultry harmonies and rough, rootsy rock’n’roll. Catch Harry Hookey tonight (Wednesday) in the Retreat front bar from 8.30pm. Entry is free.

Lone Tyger bring their explosive boogie blues rock to the Vic hotel for a Saturday night residency during February. They will be playing two sets including never before heard songs and rocking blues covers. This week the support comes from Peter Ewing. Entry is free with the doors open from 9pm.

54 • For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news

What is your venue famous for? Cracking Australian and international music acts in a quirky suburban garden-inspired setting. What sets your venue apart from other venues? The Garden Party isn’t just a music venue with a killer line-up, it’s a summer chillout space complete with yummy food, ice-cold drinks and lots of grass to soak up the Melbourne summer sun. What’s the venue’s most memorable moment? So far, it would have to be Fantine belting out her cover of When Doves Cry set against the spectacular Australia Day fireworks you could see from our grass roundabout.

Sum up your venue in three words: Free flowing sunshine. Upcoming highlights: Oh Mercy ripping up the stage with Bertie Blackman on Saturday 16 February; and a night of electro, pop, soul and jazz on Saturday 9 February with The Electric Empire, Jonti and The Raah Project. Contacts for the venue: thegardenparty.info or facebook.com/GardenPartySouthBank

RIP MATT SYKES With great sadness Paul Greene has confirmed the passing of Matt Sykes, drummer for Paul Greene & The Other Colours, after a tragic boating accident. Although in shock and mourning, Greene and bass player Neil Beaver will go ahead with their upcoming single tour, as Greene said that’s what Sykes would have wanted. It will now be a celebration of Sykes’ life and work. See them at Baha Tacos (Rye) this Friday, Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine) this Saturday and the Toff this Sunday.

ARCTIC TIDES Lowtide celebrate the new year with a Tuesday night residency at the Toff in February, where the band will unveil new material from their forthcoming debut album. Forming in 2009, Lowtide’s richly layered and textured sounds quickly gained the band the reputation as one of Australia’s finest purveyors of shoegaze and dream pop. Glacier are supports for this Tuesday. The doors open at 7.30pm with entry $8 dollars.

OUT OF SHAPE So with it being Warped’s 21st year of existence, the lads will return to their home ground, the mighty Tote, for two shows over two nights. This Friday and Saturday, Warped will be playing different sets, with songs from the whole catalogue being played by past and present members. They are joined by Midget, The Dacios and Uptown Ace on Friday and Bored, Dynamo, The Sure-Fire Midnights and MBX-Ray on Saturday. Tickets are available through Oztix.

RAW AS AVIAR

Melbourne mashup mistress Rachel By The Stream will release her new EP Smooth Like Butter on Thursday 14 February at the Evelyn Hotel. She will be joined by Mattriks on sampler and live beatbox. The doors open at 8.30pm with $10 entry or $15 including a copy of the EP.

THE GARDEN PARTY

What is your venue doing to help the local music scene? Our line-ups are very Melbourne artistheavy. We have the likes of Brous, Gossling, Graveyard Train, Hiatus Kaiyote and Oscar + Martin gracing our topiary-covered stage.

THE APOLOGY

If a higher power smites your house and you can only save one record from the fire, what would it be? Kazemachi Roman by Happy End. I have an original pressing from the ‘70s and I spent a ton to get it. Do you have a lucky item of clothing you wear for gigs and what is it? Not specifically for shows, but my Nintendo baseball cap is never far from being on my head.

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

JANE LIGHTS UP

A concert will be held on Wednesday 13 February on the lawns of Federation Mall, Parliament House to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the historic Apology to the Stolen Generations. The free concert, held from 5.30 to 10pm, features an amazing line-up of awardwinning Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musicians, including Microwave Jenny and hip hop sensations The Last Kinection, as well as The Black Arm Band.

HAVE YOU BEEN TO

PETER OUT BLOODY PERF It’s time to let your hair down, take your shoes off and shake it all over. Join Judge Pino & The Ruling Motions, The Perfections and PBS DJ Mohair Slim for an unforgettable night of wild soul and reggae music at Revolver this Saturday. This killer line-up will be playing and spinning everything from ‘60s rocksteady, garage and soul, to early reggae, lover’s rock to dancehall. This is going to be a one Saturday night dance lesson not to be missed. The doors open at 8pm with entry $15 on the door.

Peter Bibby (Frozen Ocean, Fucking Teeth) writes tunes and sings them like Shane McGowan lost in Kalgoorlie while he clumsily strums along on his guitar. Emlyn Johnson could be the Australian child of Bob Dylan and Syd Barrett. Bibby and Johnson play the Vic Hotel this Sunday from 5pm. Entry is free.

CRAIGSLIST Craig Westwood (ex Headbelly Buzzard) brings his weekly oldtime music jam session to the Vic this Saturday afternoon. It’s bring your own instrument or you can just hang out and enjoy the music in the beer garden. It kicks off at 5pm with free entry.


SORTED FOR EPS WITH JAN WISNIEWSKI

DUNE Oh Innocence Independent Dune is Jade MacRae’s not so secret reinvention as an independent artist. The debut EP from the project is an effort that should see her push her new artistry agenda to wider public consciousness. All recorded in her home studio, at times it feels as if too many ideas have been forced onto the tracks – choking the hooks. But MacRae is a proven songwriter and there are some great moments here. The muscular debut single Shoestring is the celebratory sound of an artist freed from commercial limitations. Alien tells the familiar story of isolation in society but its slight off-centre production and delivery sees it rise above the other tracks on Oh Innocence.

ELI WOLFE Perfect Moment Magic Journey/MGM To make this kind of heart-on-sleeve, wideeyed pop without inducing cynical cringes you’ve got perform wholeheartedly and make sure the tunes are damn good. On his new release, Eli Wolfe does both these things. The title track evokes a certain ‘90s nostalgia – a big “alternative” pop song to sing along with. We All Started Something and Born In The Sun are in a similar celebratory vein, before Wounded Heart closes the EP on a slightly more downhearted note. The polished sheen that producer Lachlan Mitchell (The Jezebels) has brushed over Perfect Moment coupled with Wolfe’s optimistic outlook will turn some off straight away, but the EP deserves a chance.

UNDERCOOKED

WHAT HEATHER SHALL YOU DO

KIT FOR KAT

Raw Brit features Mick Pealing (Stars) on vocals, Bob Spencer (Skyhooks/Angels) on guitar, Jason Vorherr (Little River Band/Scarecrow) on bass and Peter Maslen (Boom Crash Opera) on drums. They are a hard rocking four-piece specialising in British rock from the ‘60s and ‘70s. They play the Flying Saucer Club this Saturday with Lee Bradshaw and Stuart Frazer. Doors open for dinner at 6.30pm.

Heather Stewart Band play sassy country blues from Leadbelly to Cajun grooves, Bessie Smith to Mississippi Sheiks. The band have just finished recording their next big album of originals and goodtime blues. Catch Heather Stewart in trio form this Sunday afternoon when they play the Retreat Hotel beer garden from 4pm. Free entry.

Up and coming Melbourne songstress Kat Arditto plays soulful acoustic roots/rock tunes ranging from bittersweet to upbeat. Backed by a full band, she will take to the stage this Sunday at the Evelyn Hotel. She will be joined by a Fox Road, Fly You Fools and The False Economy. Come along to enjoy an afternoon of sweet sounds as it kicks off at 1.30pm.

A NIGHT OF SONGS

New Zealand singer-songwriter Jonathan Harding is stopping through Melbourne promoting his new EP Half Of Me with an acoustic set at the Retreat. Catch Harding when he plays the Retreat Hotel front bar on Tuesday with support from Dan Parsons. The music starts at 8.30pm. Entry is free.

Songs have announced that we will be returning to Melbourne for their first show in over a year. At the Gasometer this Friday they’ll be playing songs from their upcoming album Malabar and will be joined by Gold Tango, Day Ravies and Velcro. Doors open at 8pm with $10 entry.

OF THE UNDERWORLD A sequel to the successful 2012 Night Of The Living Death, Dawn Of The Death will be night of extreme and technical metal with some of Melbourne’s heaviest bands upstairs at the Gasometer this Friday. Orpheus will be joined by Eternal Rest, who are launching their debut album Prophetic. Also on the night will be Create|Destroy and Catacombs, who impressed at the recent Feast Of Metal.

BLANKETY BLANKS Blank Realm have dropped their third and finest record to date, and they’ll be celebrating the launch at the Gasometer this Saturday. They are renowned for their ecstatic live performances and boundarypushing records, all within a comfortable Fleetwood groove. They are supported by Angel Eyes, White Hex and Steady Hell. Doors from 8pm with $10 entry.

Mixmash

The Plight Of The Stern Tern

GOING SWIMMING The Shark Attack Independent This local quartet make fun surf punk with their EP serving as a quality tasting platter for what is sure to be a wild live show. Lead single Sharm el-Sheikh rips through in less than two minutes and despite the energy is probably the weakest track on offer. It is easily outshined by the punfilled The Gentleman Song, which riffs on some of Hollywood’s great leading men. Final track Brutus is infectious with a backing chorus vocal that hits the sweet spot. The sheer intensity of the The Shark Attack makes for a memorable debut. With a good vocal mix and streaks of humour running through their tunes, these guys could become cult favourites. They play Cherry Bar this Friday.

Singalong Society is all about relaxed community singing. It happens the first Wednesday of every month (tonight) from 7pm at the Caravan Music Club. The much loved Melbourne singer-songwriters Rebecca Barnard and Billy Miller will direct things. Entry is $15.

DEATH OF A DARLING Kill Ya Darlins return to Bar Open with their fusion of sequined-glam and riff-laden blues rock every Wednesday night in February. They blend their bluesy rock’n’roll with splashes of soukas and salsa rhythms and three sassy ladies up front. Support’s from Citrus Jam, A Very Small Band and Jack Jack Jack. Doors open at 8.30pm with free entry.

BACK TO NATURE Supernaturalist combines Sunday Night nature docos with live music in mind-bending wind-down heaven with live soundtrack genius from some of Melbourne’s finest musicians. This Sunday will feature sets from Anonymeye, Simon J Karis, Five Islands and Von Einem. Doors open at 8pm with $5 entry.

Head to the Caravan Music Club this Friday to catch three couples performing: Chris Wilson and Sarah Carroll, Dave Steel and Tiffany Eckhardt, and Jeff Raglus and Vicki Gaye. The doors open at 8pm with general admission $20+BF. and reserved seating $27+BF.

THE REAL RUSSELL Russell Morris was a major pop star in the late ’60s and went on to become one of the country’s first internationally recognised singer-songwriters. He returns to the Caravan this Saturday, with special guests. Doors open at 8pm with general admission for $25+BF and reserved seating $32+BF.

Oh, Sleeper are ready to annihilate Australian stages as they support their third full-length album Children Of Fire. Joining them on tour are Sydney’s For All Eternity and Storm The Sky. They play this Thursday at the Evelyn along with Pretty Little Liars and Emerson from 7.30pm.

PLUDONIC Pludo was Anthony Kupinic’s solo project but whilst in Sydney he befriended stick wizard Alex Cooper. The pair had a few jam sessions and not only did their two styles instantly gel together but Cooper brought a much needed electric energy to the live performance of the songs. They play the Evelyn this Friday with Asian Envy and Midi Widow. The doors open at 8.30pm.

VERY LARGE Massive are launching their debut album at the Evelyn this Saturday before embarking on a 40-date national tour covering every state and territory including a stint in Northern Territory’s mining towns. Special guests on the night are The Wells, The Charge and Altamira.

PERSONALS Private Life sound like the kind of music people should be playing at roller-skating-rinks. Recently formed, the band have had success on triple j and scored themselves accolades from across the board. They play this Monday at the Evelyn as part of their February residency with Tully On Tully, Windsor Thieves and DJ Yasumo. Doors open at 8.30pm.

El Moth play this Tuesday at the Evelyn as part of their summer residency. Expect some guest musicians and epic jams, and of course the mood-elevating blend of reggae, funk, rock and hip hop that the lads are known for. The night will also feature sets from Old Medicine and Matt Kelly. Doors open at 8.30pm.

WALKING AND FLYING This Sunday the Drunken Poet are wrapped to welcome Raised By Eagles to their stage. They are supporting Van & Cal Walker, local favourites in whatever guise you see them in. From flat-out rock’n’roll, to the power-pop sensibilities of The Livingstone Daisies and the pared country-folk of Van’s solo work, it’s all good stuff. The music starts at 4pm.

The Stetson Family are a five-piece band of local knockabouts, who bring a fresh twist to the timeless sound of bluegrass and highlonesome country/folk. Catch the Stetsons this Saturday from 9pm at the Drunken Poet.

DRY TALENT

GREAT SAX

Iain Archibald has been likened to famous acts such as Keith Urban and Jason Aldean, bringing modern sounds of country to Australia. Perfecting his music and show over the last two years, there’s something for everyone. He will be playing at the Retreat Hotel this Saturday night from 11pm, following some country blues rock from Lot 56. Doors open at 10pm with free entry.

After their debut European tour, Sydney based duo Fabels bring their debut record upstairs at the Gasometer. They play psych, gaze-goth and dream pop with projections enhancing the noise and melody of their sound. They are joined for this occasion by Laura Alumni, Shade Of March, Sand Pebbles alumni The Golden Breed and The Vorstand Circus. The doors open at 8pm with $10 entry.

ALL IN THE FAMILY

The Stillsons return with a Thursday night residency at the Retreat Hotel throughout February, with support from some of their favourite bands. This week they will be teaming up with Sean McMahon’s Western Union for what promises to be a fantastic night of music, kicking off at 9pm in the Retreat back bar. Entry is free.

PRIZED MUSICIAN

GOOD MORALS

LIGHT ATTRACTION

STILLSON UNION

Musician, presenter, musical composer and voiceover guy, Nick Saxon is all three of these and more. Saxon has marked his name on the world’s maps, shooting and composing his own soundtracks along the way. Saxon will be launching his brand new single this Friday night at the Retreat Hotel with support from Austin Busch. The music kicks off at 9.30pm with free entry.

What started off as a few friends jamming on some Afrobeat in a tiny share house soon grew into the nine-piece juggernaut, The Seven Ups. Drawing inspiration from legends such as Sly Stone, James Brown, The Funkees and of course Fela Kuti, they will be doing an Evelyn headline show this Sunday. Entry is $5 on the door with Echo Drama and DJ Mr Lob supporting. The doors open at 7.30pm.

TRIPLE DATE

SLEEPER HOLD

Independent Three interludes are interspersed with the five tracks proper on the debut EP from Turtle & Fox – a sign of ambition and willingness to push the boundaries from the Rawlins siblings. The folk-based tunes push past their humble designs with sprawling middle sections, distinct backing vocals and a band room full of instruments. While much of the lyrical content deals with the brighter side of life, Stern Tern and Solitary Drink provide dark centre-points to the EP. Closer My Sleep fares best in the mix of experimentation and straight songwriting with the various sections complemented by quirky sibling harmonies. A solid debut effort from the local duo, though the full-length album may be their ideal format.

SINGING IN THE CARAVAN

It’s no secret that Melbourne pop favourites Animaux can’t get enough of the Evelyn Hotel. So it’s no surprise that they’re putting on another of their infamous residencies at their favourite venue on Wednesdays in February. Tonight they are joined by Farrow and The Red Lights. Doors open at 8.30pm.

Let Me See You Do It

TURTLE & FOX

UP BY SEVEN

FAUX ANIMALS

OLIVER TWIZT Keeping up the prolific release record of Mixmash Records, Dutch producer Oliver Twizt is back with the Let Me See You Do It EP. It features both an original mix of the title track and a trap remix that Twizt has gone and done himself. The original mix is propelled along by Twizt’s trademark dark and heavy synth build-up before the track drops in a slightly underwhelming fashion. The trap mix upstages the original – the less urgent approach allowing Twizt to add some more variety into the mix. The pitch-shifted vocal sample swears the song is a “certified gangster classic” but despite being a strong track, it really isn’t.

ALL OF JONATHAN

CARR TALES

Every now and again you walk into a bar, and there is a young player on stage doing things with their instrument that simply do not make sense. Tash Sultana is one who has likely caused this reaction in many a stunned punter. Sultana is one of the most exciting young talents in town and is playing at the Drunken Poet’s ‘Wine, Whiskey, Women’ tonight (Wednesday) at 9pm.

Announcing the release of his debut EP Blood & Bone, Buffalo Tales is Wes Carr’s new project. Buffalo sees Carr return to his singer-songwriter roots and is a natural fit with folk/alt.country overtones. See Buffalo Tales at the Workers Club on Wednesday 13 February, Baha Tacos (Rye) Thursday 14, Wellers Restaurant (Kangaroo Ground) Friday 15 and Beav’s Bar (Geelong) Sunday 17.

SHORE SHENANIGANS This Friday head to the Northcote Social Club Beach Party – a co-headline tropical treat starring the exuberant and irresistible sounds of Flap! and the surf and western stylings of Mikelangelo & The Tin Star. Very special guests will include St Clare, Tas Fleming’s Hawaiian Trio and go-go dance action with Go Girl Gadget Go Go. The doors open at 8.30pm with $17 entry on the door if still available.

For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news • 55


MONDAY FREE TIME

PAPER ADHESIVE

ZIPPITY ZAP

Monday Night Mass sees LA Free Time and Early Woman making appearances. From 6pm smash a chicken parma or veggie burger for the bargain price of $15 and jugs of Draught all night for $12. Bands start from 8.30pm, kitchen open till 9.30pm, free pool, heated deck and smoking area till close.

Sticky’s Paper City festival starts with a full-on ‘do’ at Yah Yah’s this Thursday with bands-who-make-zines, DJs-who-make-zines and dancing. Brothers Hand Mirror, Madam Acne & The Screw-Ups, Moonsign. Giz Medium and The Church Of Hysteria will all appear. There will be a zine stall and DJ sets from Cassettes And Chocolate Milk, DJ Supernowoczesna, Project Bridget and Stitches In My Head. Entry is $8.

The Zaporozhets formed in Melbourne in 2011 from a common love of Eastern European music, spaghetti western themes and a passion for writing new music inspired by these sounds. Catch them perform two sets at the Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine) this Friday. Entry is $10. Doors at 8.30pm.

NOT SIGNATORIES Super Unsigned is the top industry showcase for unsigned bands in Melbourne. The Corner Hotel will host this event over two stages on Wednesday 13 February. Featuring Portraits Of August, Karly Jewell, Stella, Mr Woo, Palace Of The King, Strada 9, Mistress Of Ceremony, Dizz Beats & Miss Emily, Alana Porter, Wildfires, and Avantair. Doors open at 6.30pm with $20 entry.

A LOVING MAN

ALL GROWN UP The Little Stevies, the hippest harmony singin’ sisters, are back with some new tunes and some more seemingly endless stories with no point or purpose that somehow still make you smile. Come to the Workers Club on Saturday 16 February to see them and their new limited edition live album. They will be supported by the always magnificent Whitaker. Entry is $16.

YEAR OF THE SNAKE

Dan Brodie will celebrate the launch of his long awaited new album Deep Deep Love on Sunday 17 March at a special matinee show at the Northcote Social Club. He will be supported by Alycia Mancau. Doors from 1.30pm, kids welcome, $18 on the door.

River Of Snakes continue their sonic onslaught on the Melbourne pub scene, playing a show at the newly re-furbished Public Bar this Saturday with Small Town Incident and Blood Relative. The Snakes are releasing a free digital album of live material through their bandcamp page.

SXSW CORNER MEET-UP

SPOTTY BASTARDS

At the Corner Hotel this Tuesday from 5 to 7pm, there will be a SXSW social meet-up. The event is free, there’s no need to RSVP, and it’s open to SXSW registrants, past attendees, bands and those who want to go this year or in the future. It will be a great opportunity to meet your peers and contemporaries from the music, interactive, film and creative content industries to exchange tips, techniques, strategies and contacts well in advance of SXSW starting.

Riotous surf/rockabilly party sensations La Bastard are back with their brand new album Tales From The Beyond. It infuses La Bastard’s trademark sound and energy with a sultry, moody underbelly. They’re launching the new album at the Spotted Mallard this Friday night. To top it all off, La Bastard is pleased to be joined by two of Melbourne’s finest bands: Australia’s greatest purveyors of Americana, western swing and rockabilly, The Rechords and fabulous country-punk-bluegrass four piece Cherrywood.

RECREATION THURSDAYS Recreation continues to be built as a night intended to make you forget your responsibilities, cast aside your worries and embrace a weeknight party. Week four brings the wondrous British India Duo, the Massive Weiner boys and Carlos Turner, supported by weekly residents Smoking Toddlers and Yes Tesla. Ding Dong Lounge this Thursday from 8pm for $10.

YOUNG BAD NEWS Young Maverick released their debut EP in 2012. The EP is collection of fun, summery tunes. Eager to hit the stage again, Young Maverick will be joined by DJs/mash-uppers Bad News Toilet for a show at Ding Dong this Friday. Doors open at 8pm and entry’s $10.

56 • For more news/announcements go to themusic.com.au/news

SINGLE FOCUS

FAT TUESDAY Gumbo Kitchen is putting on its second annual New Orleans Fat Tuesday event this Tuesday from 5pm in Hardy’s Reserve, along the northern border of the Melbourne Cemetery. At this free event, The Lowdown Street Orchestra will be playing in a classic New Orleans second line at 5.30pm; the second line will walk along the border of the cemetery for about 30 minutes. Then the Johnny Can’t Dance Cajun Trio with Craig Woodward will play a set at 6.30pm, before Lowdown play another set at 7.30pm. Jules Boult will close with a Dr John-inspired set at 8.30pm.

SONGS – BOY/GIRL What’s the song about? Ela Stiles, bass/flute/vocals: It’s about naughty boys and girls who have trouble telling the truth; honesty, trust and sex. Is this track from a forthcoming/ existing release? Yep, it’s from our second album called Malabar which comes out on Friday 8 March. How long did it take to write/record? Max wrote this one ages ago but we only whipped it into shape last year for the album. What was inspiring you during the song’s writing and recording? Umm, I don’t know what Max was thinking when he wrote that one... He was probably drawing on memories from his sordid past. We’ll like this song if we like… Saxophone players with stupid hats on. Do you play it differently live? Yeah, looser. Will you be launching it? Friday 8 February at the Gasometer with Gold Tango, Day Ravies and Velcro. For more info see: facebook.com/songstheband


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57


HOWZAT! LOCAL MUSIC NEWS BY JEFF JENKINS

The Meanies

THE MEANIE OF LIFE Twenty-one years after their debut album, The Meanies are back. They’re doing it live for PBS, as part of Drive Live 2013. A stack of great acts are playing live on PBS every day this week between 5 and 7pm. The Meanies are part of Thursday’s line-up, with Spinning Rooms and La Bastard. Head to pbsfm.org.au for more info. When Howzat! asked Wally Meanie what he loved about PBS, he replied, “Absolutely everything. Peebs were the first to play The Meanies and they’ll probably be the last.” Hopefully they’ll have some new Meanies to play soon. “We’ve got nearly thirty songs just sitting there ready to record,” Wally reveals, “so we’ll do that soon. But we’ve been saying that for a while now, so don’t hold your breath.”

GOODBYE TIGER As Stephen Cummings said, “Pubs open and shut every week.” But they are the fabric of our scene,

58 • For more opinion go to themusic.com.au/blog

and should be celebrated. Another venue quietly closed before Christmas. It didn’t generate any headlines and there was no marching in the streets. Its glory days were long gone. But the Station Hotel in Prahran played a significant role in the Melbourne music story. The Greville Street venue had two distinct phases, in the ’70s and ’90s. Richard Clapton actually eulogised the Station’s passing on his classic 1977 album, Goodbye Tiger. “Geez,” he sang in the title-track, “the bands don’t seem to play ’round here no more/Saturday night just isn’t the same/Wish everything was back the way it used to be before… Nobody’s gonna take the stage tonight/But I’ll sit here anyway and sigh.” Richard later revealed the song was about the Station. “The Station Hotel is where all my most worthwhile bands from Australia came out,” Richard told author Debbie Kruger. “The Dingoes, Spectrum, Daddy Cool… Goodbye Tiger is about the end of an era, what we feared was going to be the end of Australian music. To us, the closure of the Station was symbolic of the closure of a really important chapter in Australian music.” The Station was where Mark Evans got the bass gig in AC/DC (even though he’d been banned from the pub after being part of a barroom brawl the week before). “The punters at the Station were known to be a discerning bunch musically,” he wrote in his 2011 book, Dirty Deeds. “It was an interesting crosssection of hippies, drunks and curious music fans.” Chisel, Skyhooks, Mondo Rock, Jo Jo Zep & The Falcons and Australian Crawl all played at the Station. The Dingoes bass player John Bois documented the days in his recent book, The Dingoes’ Lament. “Derelicts and dole dependents normally peopled

the Station,” he wrote, “as well as besotted bon vivants who claimed it was a haven of mateship, a place where men could be men, out of earshot of nagging women. But to the untrained eye, it looked more like a place of banishment. Nevertheless, on Saturday it was transformed into a subcultural temple. The gods of that subculture were The Dingoes.” The band were keen to do a farewell gig at the Station last year, but the venue wasn’t interested. Howzat! got to see Dingoes guitarist Chris Stockley at the Station when the venue was resurrected in the ’90s. Chris would pop up with Steve Hoy’s band, who did a wonderful Saturday afternoon residency. And on 13 March, 1992, Howzat! was at the Station for the live debut of Horsehead, who became our all-time favourite band. The record company bio for their debut album told the tale: “Capacity of the venue – 200. Actual audience on the night – five, including bar staff. Vibe: Awesome!!” In the ’90s, there were many reasons to visit Greville Street, including the Station, the Continental, Greville Records and the Greville St Bookstore. Only Warwick Brown’s record store survives. The Station is, of course, being turned into high-rise apartments. Like we need more of them.

KEAYS FOR LIFE

The legendary Jim Keays released Howzat!’s favourite 2012 album, Dirty, Dirty. The record shows that when it comes to rock, Jim, 66, has lost none of his power. Sadly, Jim is also battling a cancer called multiple myeloma, and he’s spent most of the summer in hospital. But some good news – Jim posted this Facebook message last week: “Well, it’s nearly seven weeks since I went into hospital, but at last I’m home. The stem-cell transplant procedure was extremely gruelling and has left me unable to walk or eat at the moment, but over the coming weeks this will improve. But, most importantly, I’M ALIVE!” Jim is hoping to be back on stage mid-year.

CHART WATCH Birds Of Tokyo spend a second week in the top five. Lanterns BIRDS OF TOKYO (number four) Best Night JUSTICE CREW (20) Holdin On FLUME (25) What You’ve Done To Me SAMANTHA JADE (27) HyperParadise (Flume Remix) HERMITUDE (38, debut) Get Along GUY SEBASTIAN (40) Flume becomes the first Aussie act to have a number one album in 2013, jumping from 16 to one. Flume FLUME (number one) Armageddon GUY SEBASTIAN (13) The Sapphires SOUNDTRACK (16) The Story So Far KEITH URBAN (19) Lonerism TAME IMPALA (21) The Rubens THE RUBENS (23) All For You COLD CHISEL (24) It’s On THE WOLFE BROTHERS (34)

HOWZAT! PLAYLIST 125 JIM KEAYS Into My Garden LAUREN BRUCE Broken Heart Attack BEKI COLADA Beside You MARK SEYMOUR Beach SAN CISCO


59


TOUR GUIDE BARRY MORGAN: February 8 Spiegeltent

THIS WEEK INTERNATIONAL THEE OH SEES: February 6 Barwon Club (Geelong) DEAR TIME’S WASTE: February 6 Toff In Town EL-P: February 6 Corner Hotel OH, SLEEPER: February 6 Karova Lounge (Ballarat); 7 Evelyn Hotel; 9 Pelly Bar (Frankston);10 OLP (Ringwood) THE MEN: February 6 Northcote Social Club YEASAYER: February 6 Hi-Fi JULIA HOLTER: February 6 Toff In Town CELTIC THUNDER: February 7 Geelong Arena; 9 Hisense Arena GIN BLOSSOMS: February 7 Hi-Fi MS MR: February 7 Northcote Social Club NINA FERRO: February 7 Spiegeltent EDU IMBERNON: February 8 Brown Alley DESCENDENTS: February 9 Festival Hall ULTRAMAGNETIC MCS: February 9 Espy THE HOLLIES: February 9 Hamer Hall DEER TICK, TWO GALLANTS: February 9, 10 Northcote Social Club STARS: February 10 Corner Hotel DIRTY BEACHES: February 10 Tote BARRY GIBB: February 12 Rod Laver Arena

NATIONAL DEAD CAN DANCE: February 6 Palais Theatre THE PRESETS: February 6, 7 Palace DAN WEBB: February 7 Workers Club BARRY MORGAN: February 7, 8 Club Spiegel RUBY BOOTS: February 8 Baha Taco (Rye); 9 Workers Club CLUBFEET: February 8 Star Bar (Bendigo); 9 Ding Dong Lounge LISA MITCHELL, GEORGIA FAIR: February 8 Melbourne Zoo MY DISCO: February 8 Corner Hotel BARRY MORGAN: February 8 Spiegeltent STRANGERS: February 8 Workers Club DAY RAVIES: February 8 Gasometer; 9 Grace Darling PAUL GREENE & THE OTHER COLOURS: February 8 Baha Tacos (Rye); 9 Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine); 10 Toff In Town VAN SHE: February 8 Garden Party (Southbank); 9 Eureka Hotel (Geelong) NINA FERRO: February 8 Prince Maximilian Hotel MILES & SIMONE: February 9 Spiegeltent KERSER: February 9 Hi-Fi (2 shows) BABBA: February 9 Melbourne Zoo BERTIE BLACKMAN: February 9 Espy BLANK REALM: February 9 Gasometer Hotel SNEAKY SOUND SYSTEM: February 10 MCG LITTLE BASTARD: February 10 Labour In Vain TINA ARENA: February 12 Hamer Hall COLIN HAY: February 12 Performing Arts Centre (Hamilton)

FESTIVALS ST KILDA FESTIVAL: February 2–10 St Kilda

UPCOMING INTERNATIONAL MACKELMORE & RYAN LEWIS: February 13 Palace; 16 Corner Hotel DAVID HASSELHOFF: February 14 Corner Hotel I AM GIANT: February 14 Ding Dong

CONVERGE: February 15 Billboard SWANS: February 15 Corner Hotel GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR: February 15 Forum Theatre BLAWAN, MARCELL DETTMAN: February 15 Brown Alley TJR: February 15 Royal Melbourne Hotel JENS LEKMAN: February 15 Garden Party Southbank CLIFF RICHARD: February 15, 16, 18, 19 Hamer Hall JOANNE SHAW TAYLOR: February 15 Ruby’s Lounge (Belgrave); 16 Bruthen Blues & Arts Festival; 17 Northcote Social Club DONAVON FRANKENREITER: February 15 Woolshed Pub (Docklands) and Prince Of Wales; 16 Portsea Hotel and Westernport Hotel (San Remo); 17 Lorne Hotel and Torquay Hotel LEO SAYER: February 16 Melbourne Zoo RINGO STARR: February 16 Festival Hall FATHER JOHN MISTY: February 17 Hi-Fi PICTUREPLANE: February 17 Liberty Social CAROLE KING: February 18 Plenary EINSTÜRZENDE NEUBAUTEN: February 19 Palace CIVIL CIVIC: February 19 Tote DR FEELGOOD: February 20 Caravan Club; 21 Corner Hotel NORAH JONES: February 21 Plenary MAC MILLER: February 21 Palace TEX NAPALM, DIMI NERO: February 21 Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine); 22 Tote; 23 Lyrebird Lounge (Elsternwick); 24 Labour In Vain; March 1 Prince; 2 Public Bar; 3 Cherry Bar JOSE JAMES: February 22 Hi-Fi HUXLEY: February 22 Prince DAVID MORALES: February 22 Red Bennies HOW TO DRESS WELL: February 22 Corner Hotel MY BLOODY VALENTINE: February 22 Palace MIGUEL MIGS: February 23 New Guernica MOTION CITY SOUNDTRACK: February 25 Hi-Fi PERIPHERY, CROSSFAITH: February 25 Espy Gershwin Room KYUSS LIVES: February 26 Palace OF MICE & MEN: February 26 Hi-Fi GALLOWS: February 6 Corner DRAGONFORCE, THE SWORD: February 25 Billboard BLINK-182: February 26 Sidney Myer Music Bowl MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE: February 26 Billboard THE WEDDING PRESENT: February 26, 27 Northcote Social Club LINKIN PARK: February 27 Rod Laver Arena SIX FEET UNDER, SYLOSIS: February 27 Corner SICK OF IT ALL, MADBALL: February 27 Espy GARBAGE: February 27 Forum Theatre TOMAHAWK: February 27 Billboard SLEEPING WITH SIRENS: February 27 Hi-Fi FLOGGING MOLLY, THE LAWRENCE ARMS, LUCERO: February 27 Palace SUM 41: February 28 Palace SOUL II SOUL: February 28 Trak Lounge BRING ME THE HORIZON: February 28 Billboard DUFF MCKAGAN’S LOADED, DANKO JONES: February 28 Espy CYPRESS HILL: February 28 Forum Theatre PUSCIFER: February 28 Palais THE TALLEST MAN ON EARTH: February 28 Recital Centre BLOOD ON THE DANCE FLOOR: February 28 Arrow On Swanston ANTHRAX: February 28 Hi-Fi DEEP PURPLE, JOURNEY: March 1 Rod Laver Arena PHRONESIS: March 1 Melbourne Recital Centre MANO LE TOUGH: March 1 Revolver SLAUGHTERHOUSE: March 1 Palace ILLAPU: March 2 Dallas Brooks Hall AGORIA: March 2 Brown Alley DEERHOOF: March 3 Schoolhouse Studios ED SHEERAN: March 4, 5, 6 Festival Hall KISS, MÖTLEY CRÜE: March 5, 6 Etihad Stadium FUN: March 5 Palace THE OFFSPRING: March 6 Palace ANTIBALAS: March 6 Corner Hotel ZOË KEATING: March 6 Spiegeltent CAT POWER: March 7 Forum Theatre THE STONE ROSES: March 7 Festival Hall ARLO GUTHRIE: March 7 National Theatre TONY JOE WHITE: March 7 Caravan Music Club (Oakleigh); 8 Thornbury Theatre; 9 Theatre Royal (Castlemaine); 10 Substation (Newport) DINOSAUR JR: March 7 Corner Hotel; 8 Espy LONDON KLEZMER QUARTET: March 7 Melbourne Recital Centre; 24 Spiegeltent; 25 Melba Hall PURITY RING: March 8 Corner Hotel ROSS MCHENRY FUTURE ENSEMBLE: March 7 Toff RICKIE LEE JONES: March 7 Athenaeum Theatre GEORGE CLINTON & PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC: March 9 Billboard MXPX: March 9 Forest Edge Festival (Neerim East); 10 Corner Hotel

60 • To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags

PRESENTS YEASAYER: February 6 Hi-Fi MS MR: February 7 Northcote Social Club STRANGERS: February 8 Workers Club THEM BRUINS: February 8 Purple Sneakers RUBY BOOTS: February 8 Baha Tacos (Rye); 9 Workers Club GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR: February 15 Forum FATHER JOHN MISTY: Februray 17 Hi-Fi PAUL KELLY & NEIL FINN: February 16, 18, 19, 20, March 4, 5 Palais; March 2 A Day On The Green, All Saints Winery (Rutherglen) EINSTÜRZENDE NEUBAUTEN, MICK HARVEY: February 19 Palace SOJA: April 6 Prince Bandroom CAT POWER: March 7 Forum DINOSAUR JR: March 7 Corner Hotel THE STONE ROSES: March 7 Festival Hall PORT FAIRY FOLK FESTIVAL (featuring Arlo Guthrie, Gurrumul, Glen Hansard): March 8-11 Port Fairy TORO Y MOI: March 9 Corner Hotel FUTURE MUSIC FESTIVAL: (featuring The Stone Roses, The Prodigy, Steve Aoki): March 10 Flemington Racecourse JON SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION: March 15 Espy; 16 Corner Hotel THIS WILL DESTROY YOU: March 21, 22 Northcote Social Club GRINSPOON: March 22 Hi-Fi; April 24 Bended Elbow (Geelong); 25 Pier Live (Frankston); 26 Inferno (Traralgon); 27 Ferntree Gully Hotel ROBERT CRAY, TAJ MAHAL, SHUGGIE OTIS: March 24 Hamer Hall BONNIE RAITT, MAVIS STAPLES: March 27 State Theatre IGGY & THE STOOGES, BEASTS OF BOURBON: March 27 Festival Hall THE RESIGNATORS: March 22 the Loft (Warrnambool); 23 Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine); 28 Workers Club; 29 Pow (Werribee) BLUESFEST: (featuring Ben Harper, Iggy & The Stooges, Wilco): March 28-April 1 Tyagarah Tea Tree Farm (Byron Bay) ROGER HODGSON: March 28 Palais BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: April 3 Hamer Hall TEGAN & SARA: May 2 Palais THE KOOKS: May 3 Palais GROOVIN’ THE MOO: May 4 Prince Of Wales Showgrounds (Bendigo) THE HAPPY MONDAYS: May 5 Palace SOMETHING FOR KATE: May 10 Ferntree Gully Hotel; 11 Pier Live (Frankston); 24 Theatre Royal (Castlemaine); June 14 Forum

WED 06 Kill Ya Darlins, Citrus Jam Bar Open Xani Kolac, The Twoks Bennetts Lane Open Mic, Brodie Brunswick Hotel Rebecca Barnard, Billy Miller Caravan Music Club My Dynamite Cherry Bar Dizzy’s Big Band Dizzy’s Jazz Club Pretty Dulcie, Spear Brittany Elephant & Wheelbarrow, St Kilda All We Need, Bricks, + More Gertrude’s Brown Couch The Men, White Walls, Nun Northcote Social Club The Presets, Light Year, Parachute Youth Palace Theatre Dead Can Dance, David Kuckhermann Palais Theatre Ella Hooper Pure Pop Courtyard Candice Monique & the Optics Republica

Harry Hookey Retreat Hotel Front Bar Vulgargrad, Made For Chickens By Robots Spotted Mallard - Brunswick Brooklyn’s Finest, Baberaham Lincoln, Ryan Coffey St Kilda Bowls Club EL-P, + Guests The Corner Hotel Tash Sultana, Emilee South The Drunken Poet Kyle Rodda The Empress Humans As Animals, Scaramouche, Backyard Funk, London Cries The Espy, Lounge Bar Animaux, Farrow, The Red Lights The Evelyn Yeasayer, Montero The Hi-Fi The Laughing Leaves, The Infants, Huck West The Old Bar The Bowers Duo The Standard Hotel Julia Holter, The Orbweavers, Dear Time’s Waste, DJ King Sim The Toff In Town The Ocean Party, Autoportraits, Tim Richmond, Magic Hands The Tote

Second Hand Heart The Vineyard Dan Murphy & his Bottles of Confidence, Meth Leppard, Shiny Joe Ryan The Workers Club

THU 07 Clayton Doley Trio 303 The Staffords, Kashmere Club, The Plains Bar Open Open Mic Barleycorn Hotel Ruby Boots, Grizzly Jim Lawrie, Roscoe James Irwin Beav’s Bar, Geelong Right Mind, Kissing Booth, Riot Dance Party, The Shadow League Bendigo Hotel The End Bennetts Lane Luna Ghost, Street Fangs, Trash Fairies, Cowgirl Caviar Brunswick Hotel Vince Peach, Pierre Baroni Cherry Bar British India DJs, Carlos Turner, Massive Wieners (DJ Set) Ding Dong Lounge Gianni Turcio Quartet Dizzy’s Jazz Club Del Barrio First Floor To The Airship, Oscar Mike, The Contortionists Handbook Gertrude’s Brown Couch The Sunsleepers, Skyways & Highways Grace Darling Cellar Bar Roxy Lavish & The Suicide Cult, Rusty Douglas, Smoky Marigold Great Britain Hotel Bella Jabara & The Mellows, James Southwell Band, The Woodys John Curtin Hotel Nice Boy Tom Lomond Hotel Anastaszia Ward, Anna Feery Loop Ms Mr, YesYou Northcote Social Club

Dirty Chapters, Dixon Cider, Liquor Snatch, Spew n Guts Reverence Hotel, Footscray Aviar, The Pitys, Witness To Treason Revolver Upstairs The Harlots, Major Tom & The Atoms Spotted Mallard - Brunswick Open Mic The Drunken Poet The Winter Migration, Pensive Penguin, Super XX Man The Empress St Kilda Festival, The Pretty Littles, The Corsairs, The Red Lights, + More The Esplanade Oh Sleeper, For All Eternity, Storm The Sky, Pretty Little Liars, Emerson The Evelyn Bear The Mammoth, Cat Or Pillar, Lunaire, Nathan Wilson, Tom Mahoney The Old Bar Alex Aronston The Thornbury Local Ryan Francesconi, Mirabaipeart, + Special Guests The Toff In Town Prequel, Edd Fisher, Principal Blackman The Toff In Town (Carriage Room) Extrafoxx, Yuko Kuno, Bryan, Heart Flew The Tote Dan Webb, Bobby Flynn, Kylie Auldist The Workers Club Anna’s Go Go Academy Victoria Hotel Emilee South Wesley Anne, Front Bar Mustered Courage, The Davidson Brothers Wesley Anne Band Room Brothers Hand Mirror, Madam Acne & The Screw-Ups, Moonsign, Giz Medium, + More Yah Yah’s

YEASAYER: February 6 Hi-Fi

Fire Behaving As Air, Ecstatic Sound Circle Northcote Uniting Church John Flanagan & The Begin Agains Open Studio The Presets, Light Year, Parachute Youth Palace Theatre James Sherlock Trio Paris Cat Jazz Club Hunter, Messed Up, + More Public Bar The Sideshow Brides Pure Pop Courtyard Luke Legs & the Midnight Specials Readings, St Kilda The Stillsons, Sean McMahon’s Western Union Retreat Hotel

FRI 08 Roshambos, Pensive Penguin, The Havelocks, Melissa Main & Band 303 Ruby Boots, Paul Greene & The Other Colours Baha Tacos The Dub Captains, Keshie Bar Open 4tress, Let Them Eat Cake, Mel Calia, Sarah Eida, The Garden of Eida Barleycorn Hotel Chris Wilson, Geoff Achison Basement Discs Outright, Cavalcade, + More Bendigo Hotel Kruse & Nuernberg Brown Alley


Lady Saigo, Space Ghost, Qlayface Brunswick Hotel Chris Wilson & Sarah Carrol, Dave Steel & Tiffany Eckhardt, Jeff Raglus & Vicki Gaye Caravan Music Club Pretty City, Ross de Chene Hurricanes, + Special Guests Cherry Bar Spencer P Jones Cherry Bar, Arvo Show Alyce Platt Claypots Boyred, Motion Picture Dancing Dog Café Young Mavericks, Bad News Toilet Ding Dong Lounge Doug de Vries, Diana Clarke, Rory Clark Trio Dizzy’s Jazz Club The Go Set, Brighter at Night, the spinset Elephant & Wheelbarrow, St Kilda Blunt Paper Massive, Mattricks and the Book of Kin, + More Felix Bar Stronic, Group 120, Azzura, + More First Floor The Swellers, MK Delta, Salad Days Gertrude’s Brown Couch Ausmuteants, Nun, + More Grace Darling Hotel Heavy Beach, The Spinning Rooms, Map Ends, Small Black Lambs John Curtin Hotel Leez Lido Kates Party Club - Bayswater Ska Vendors Lomond Hotel Lisa Mitchell, Georgia Fair Melbourne Zoo The Chameleons, The Modern Age Musicland - Fawkner FLAP!, Mikelangelo & the Tin Star, Mrs Mildstyle Northcote Social Club Paul Winter Open Studio Noria Letts Quintet Paris Cat Jazz Club Johnny Gibson & The Hangovers, Duncan Graham & His Co-Accused Penny Black Sime Nugent Post Office Hotel Reminisce Melbourne Prince Bandroom Nina Ferro Prince Maximilian Dancing Heals Prince Public Bar

Foxtrot, Del Lago, Max Goes To Hollywood, Too Soon Public Bar I, A Man Pure Pop Courtyard Flying Engine String Band Railway Hotel, North Fitzroy Brunswick Massive Crew Rainbow Hotel Nick Saxon, Austin Busch Retreat Hotel DJ Dave The Scot Retreat Hotel (late) Christian Vance, Claire Morgan, Craig McWhinney, Mike Callander Revolver Upstairs Kids Without Bikes, Fifth Friend, Nebraskatak, The Black Alleys Revolver Upstairs (early) Clampdown Rochester Castle Hotel The Pilgrims Ruby’s Lounge LA Bastard, The ReChords, Cherrywood Spotted Mallard - Brunswick The Vendettas, Fierce Mild, Mimi Velevska St Kilda Bowls Club House of Shaolins The B.East Zaporozhets The Bridge Hotel My Disco, HTRK, New War, Standish/ Carlyon, Crumbs, + More The Corner Hotel Dan Bourke & Friends The Drunken Poet Adam Eaton, Lieutenant Jam The Empress Lucy’s Crown, Uncle Rudey, Deadly Are The Naked, + More The Espy, Basement Anna Salen, Riot in Toytown, Tabula Rasa, Thick Line Thin Line, + More The Espy, Gershwin Room Wolf & Cub, I, A Man, Atolls, The Verlins The Espy, Lounge Bar Pludo, Asian Envy, Midi Widow The Evelyn Songs, Gold Tango, Day Ravies, Velcro The Gasometer Hotel Orpheus, Catacombs, Create/Destroy, Eternal Rest The Gasometer Hotel (Upstairs) Rocking Horse, The Baby Dolls, Barbara Blaze, Bruce Milne The LuWow Forbidden Temple

Deep Fried Dirt, Twenty Seven Winters, The Villenettes, Chev Rise, DJ Drawfour The Old Bar Harry Hookey, + Band The Thornbury Local Poprocks at the Toff The Toff In Town Warped, Midget, Dacios, Uptown Ace The Tote Strangers, The Dead Love, The Sinking Teeth The Workers Club Liz Bradley Veludo

Russell Morris + Band Caravan Music Club The April Tree, Brooke Taylor, Jess Palmer Chandelier Room Desecrator, Metal Storm, Join The Amish Cherry Bar Drew’s Dirty Dozen Colonial Hotel Clubfeet, Collarbones, Chela Ding Dong Lounge Kieran, Pinball + More Ding Dong Lounge (Late) Joe Chindamo Dizzy’s Jazz Club

DAY RAVIES: February 8 Gasometer; 9 Grace Darling

Into The Woods, Running Away With the Circus, Bella Roscoe Victoria Hotel Broni Wesley Anne, Front Bar Alicia Adkins, Lachlan Bryan, Les Thomas, Bill Jackson Wesley Anne. Band Room Euphoriacs, Ivy St, Spermaids Yah Yah’s

SAT 09 Jayne Lane, Crooks & Queens, Rashi 303 Nick Saxon Baha Tacos Lamine Sonko & The African Intelligence, Salt Lake City Bar Open Raindogs, Michael Waugh, Selecta Barleycorn Hotel Grouse Party, MZ Rizk, Blew Vein, Ann Ominous Bendigo Hotel Eyal & The Skeleton Crew Bennetts Lane The Groovetones Blarney Stone Pub Beef!, The You Yangs, Auranix, Berlin Sirens Brunswick Hotel Waterline, Neatly Folded Goat, Temple Of Tunes Brunswick Hotel (Afternoon)

Decendents, Bouncing Souls, Bodyjar, Game Over Festival Hall DNA feat Joshua Tavares, Roxy Wi Fi, The Knock Out Drops, + More First Floor Raw Brit, Mick Pealing Flying Saucer Club Bnash, 1823, Paul Reid Gertrude’s Brown Couch Gangbusters Grace Darling Cellar Bar Day Ravies, The Ocean Party, Jonny Telafone, + More Grace Darling Hotel The Breadmakers, The Gimmies Great Britain Hotel Jed Rowe Grind ‘n’ Groove Bar The Drunken Poachers Labour In Vain Peter Holmes & The Ramshackle Band, Whisky Babies Lomond Hotel The F100’s, The Detonators Lucky 13 Garage BABBA Melbourne Zoo Event Horizons, Avalerion, Echo’s Witness, Myridian Musicland - Fawkner Deer Tick, Two Gallants, + Special Guests Northcote Social Club

TOUR GUIDE NATIONAL

JULIA HOLTER: February 6 Toff In Town

TINA ARENA: February 13 Hamer Hall COLIN HAY: February 13 Light House Theatre (Warrnambool); 15 Frankston Arts Centre; 16 Athenaeum Theatre; 19 Capital Theatre (Bendigo); 20 River Links Performing Arts (Shepparton) SARAH BLASKO: February 14 Hamer Hall IN HEARTS WAKE: February 14 Commercial Hotel (South Morang); 15 Ferntree Gully Hotel PETE MURRAY: February 14 Spirit Bar & Lounge (Traralgon); 15 Forge Theatre (Bairnsdale); 16 Wool Exchange (Geelong); 17 Riverboats Music Festival (Echuca); March 7 Commercial Hotel (South Morang); 8 Theatre Royal (Castlemaine); 9 Ferntree Gully Hotel; 10 Pier Hotel (Frankston); 14 Regent Multiplex (Ballarat); 15 Corner Hotel BLACKCHORDS: February 15 Ding Dong BOOM CRASH OPERA: February 15 Espy SOMETHING WITH NUMBERS: February 15 Northcote Social Club FEELINGS: February 15 Workers Club MELBOURNE SKA ORCHESTRA, MIGHTY DUKE & THE LORDS: February 15 Melbourne Zoo ELEPHANT: February 15 Public Bar; 16 Lyrebird Lounge DANIEL MERRIWEATHER: February 16 Corner Hotel BABY ET LULU: February 16 Spiegeltent THE MAVIS’S: February 16 Yah Yah’s NEIL FINN & PAUL KELLY: February 16, 18, 19, 20, March 4, 5 Palais Theatre; 2 March All Saints Winery ABBY DOBSON AND LARA GOODRIDGE: February 16 Spiegeltent LITTLE BASTARD: February 17, 24 Labour In Vain CRIME & THE CITY SOLUTION: February 18 Hi-Fi AT LAST – THE ETTA JAMES STORY: February 19 – March 3 Athenaeum Theatre TREVOR ASHLEY: February 19 Spiegeltent JULIA STONE: February 20 St Michael’s Church AMY DICKSON: February 25 Sidney Myer Music Bowl SALLY WHITWELL: February 20 Spiegeltent THE TOWNHOUSES: February 21 Gasometer HERMITUDE: February 21 Corner Hotel LINES: February 21 Yah Yah’s; 22 Yarra Hotel (Geelong); 23 Espy STONEFIELD, OWL EYES: February 22 Melbourne Zoo THE TOOT TOOT TOOTS: February 22 Spiegeltent PAPER ARMS: February 22 Bendigo Hotel FORCES: February 22 Liberty Social VAUDEVILLE SMASH: February 22 Espy CRISIS ALERT: February 22 Gasometer Hotel; 23 Reverence Hotel; 24 The Place ROSS MCLENNAN: February 23 Spiegeltent GUNG HO: February 23 Workers Club THE SMITH STREET BAND: February 23 Reverence Hotel; 24 Phoenix Youth Centre; 28 Karova Lounge (Ballarat); March 2 the Loft (Warrnambool); 3 Barwon Club (Geelong) BENNY WALKER: February 24 Moonee Valley Festival; March 9 Moomba Festival; 16 Mordialloc By The Bay TEX PERKINS & THE DARK HORSES: February 26, 27 Spiegeltent DRAPHT: February 26 La Trobe Uni (Bendigo); 27 La Trobe Uni (Bundoora); 28 Wool Exchange (Geelong); March 2 Saloon (Traralgon)

BIRDS OF TOKYO: February 27 University Of Ballarat; 28 Pier Live (Frankston); March 1 Kay St (Traralgon); 2 Forum Theatre MERLYN QUAIFE: February 27 Spiegeltent THE KITS: February 28 Old Bar TIM ROGERS, THE BAMBOOS: March 1 Melbourne Zoo LOON LAKE: March 1 Corner Hotel NINA FERRO: March 1 Prince Maximilian Hotel THE BAMBOOS, TIM ROGERS, ELECTRIC EMPIRE: March 1 Melbourne Zoo LIOR, GIAN SLATER & INVENIO: March 1 Spiegeltent DEBORAH CONWAY, WILLY ZYGIER: March 1 Wesley Anne; 2 Caravan Club; 3 Potato Shed (Geelong); 28 Lighthouse Theatre (Warrnambool); 30 Bridge Hotel (Castlemaine); 31 Flying Saucer Club THE TIGER & ME: March 1 Riverside Live (Southbank); 15 Elsternwick Hotel; April 12, 13 Workers Club URTHBOY: March 2 Corner Hotel THE DEMON PARADE: March 2 Workers Club RENÉE GEYER: March 2 Spiegeltent NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: March 2 Sidney Myer Music Bowl SODASTREAM: March 2, 3 Northcote Social Club THE DEMON PARADE: March 2 Workers Club JULIA & THE DEEP SEA SIRENS: March 3 Workers Club JOSEPH TAWADROS: March 6 Spiegeltent CHRISTA HUGHES: March 7 Spiegeltent BORED NOTHING, BEARHUG, POPSTRANGERS: March 7 Goodgod Small Club; 9 Phoenix Canberra HUSKY, DIE ROTEN PUNKTE: March 8 Melbourne Zoo HIGH TENSION: March 8 Old Bar TIMOMATIC, BONNIE ANDERSON: March 9 Melbourne Zoo THE PIGS: March 9 Spiegeltent THE ANGELS 100%: March 9 Palms NINE SONS OF DAN: March 9 Phoenix Youth Centre THE SYNCOPATORS: March 10 Spiegeltent POPSTRANGERS, BORED NOTHING: March 10 Gasometer THE CORRESPONDENTS: March 13 Spiegeltent JOE CHINDAMO & ZOE BLACK: March 13 Spiegeltent THE SUNNY COWGIRLS: March 13 Hallam Hotel; 14 Commercial Hotel (South Morang); 15 Gateway Hotel (Corio); 21 Italian-Australian Club (Morwell) MORIARTY: March 14 Spiegeltent THE MCMENAMINS: March 14 Toff

To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags • 61


Swing Train, Gianni Marinucci, Samantha Morley Paris Cat Jazz Club Large No 12s Penny Black Oh Sleeper, For All Eternity, Storm The Sky Pier Live Alex Watts & the Foreign Tongue, Gorsha Post Office Hotel Poison Apple Prince Bandroom River Of Snakes, Blood Relatives Public Bar Monique Brumby Pure Pop Courtyard Fats Wah Wah Rainbow Hotel Waz E James Retreat Hotel DJ Fanta Pants Retreat Hotel (late) Ian Archibald, Lot 56 Retreat Hotel Front Bar Waz E James Retreat Hotel Front Bar The Lowriders Retreat Hotel, Afternoon Show God God Dammit Dammit, Debacle, Agonhymn, Clagg, Dead, + More Reverence Hotel, Footscray Judge Pino & the Ruling Motions, The Perfections, DJ Mohair Slim Revolver Upstairs Black Night Crash Rochester Castle Hotel Relentless, Free World, Thorns, Warbrain Royal Melbourne Hotel

Tom Rule, Rich Yeah Ruby’s Lounge Rory McLeod, Shackelton Spotted Mallard - Brunswick 88 MPH St Andrew’s Hotel Wayne Jury St Andrew’s Hotel, Afternoon Tin Pan Orange St Kilda RSL House of Lights The B.East Paul Greene & The Other Colours, Carterrollins The Bridge Hotel Ras Jahknow, Rasta Unity, Stick Mareebo, Pupa Dalton, + More The Corner Hotel The Stetson Family The Drunken Poet Wakefield Mini-Festival The Empress (afternoon) White Widdow, Sunset Riot, Dead City Ruins, Voodoocain The Espy, Gershwin Room Ultramagnetic MCs, One Sixth, The Aphilliates, + More The Espy, Lounge Bar Massive, The Wells, The Charge, Altamira The Evelyn Blank Realm, Angel Eyes, White Hex, Steady Hell The Gasometer Hotel Fabels, Shade Of March, The Golden Breed, The Vorstand Circus The Gasometer Hotel (Upstairs)

Kerser The Hi-Fi (2 sets) Cookin’ on 3 Burners, Angent Lynch, + More The LuWow Forbidden Temple Leon Thomas, Ali Barter The Old Bar Samara Williams The Thornbury Local Yeo, Francolin, Dot. Ya The Toff In Town Warped, Dynamo, Sure Fire Midnights, BMX Rays The Tote Rayon Moon, Mesa Cosa The Tote, Front Bar Ruby Boots, Grizzly Jim Lawrie, Roscoe James Irwin The Workers Club Chris Wilson Union Hotel Brunswick The Blackeyed Susans Union Hotel Brunswick, Arvo Show Marc Hannaford Uptown Jazz Cafe Lone Tyger, Peter Ewing Victoria Hotel Ol’ Timey Bluegrass Jam Victoria Hotel (afternoon) David Bramble Wesley Anne. Band Room Dark Fair, The Antoinettes, The Villenettes Yah Yah’s The Best of Bon Scott, 33rd Anniversary Tribute Yarraville Club

SUN 10 Stephen Bowtell Band 303

Darebin Songwriters Guild 303, Arvo Show Michael Ozone, + Guests Bar Open Nai Palm Bar Open (Early) Shanakee Bay Hotel 10 Past 6, Japan For + More Bendigo Hotel Tony Gould Bennetts Lane The Garden of Eida, Dear Stalker, Cat Jump Road Brunswick Hotel Jude Perl Band, Hanna Acfield, Erik Parker Chandelier Room Three Kings, Max Crawdaddy Cherry Bar, Arvo Show Drew’s Dirty Dozen Colonial Hotel Basque In The Sun Fairfield Amphitheatre The Detonators Ferntree Gully Hotel Leez Lido Gertrude’s Brown Couch Mike Hanes Trio Great Britain Hotel Little Bastard Labour In Vain Ken Maher, Tony Hargreaves Lomond Hotel Floyd Thursby Lomond Hotel (Afternoon) Mark Seymour, Charles Jenkins Lui Bar - Melbourne Jam Sundays Musicland - Fawkner Deer Tick, Two Gallants + Special Guests Northcote Social Club

Hue Blanes, Lady Bird Open Studio Sideshow Brides Penny Black Moonee Valley Drifters Post Office Hotel St Kilda Festival - Special Event Prince Bandroom Large No 12’s Prince of Wales - St Kilda Angry Seas Public Bar Georgia Fields Pure Pop Courtyard The Pheasant Pluckers Rainbow Hotel (afternoon) Aurora Jane, Sam Lohs Retreat Hotel Heather Stewart Retreat Hotel, Beergarden Donnie Dureau, Jamie Hay, Andrew McDonald Reverence Hotel, Footscray Bicep Revolver Upstairs Open Mic Rose Hotel Woodward & Rough Some Velvet Morning, Clifton Hill The Wikimen Spotted Mallard (Afternoon) - Brunswick Spectrum St Andrew’s Hotel, Afternoon St Kilda Festival, Mistress Mondays, Singles, Agility, + More St Kilda Bowls Club Stars, + Guests The Corner Hotel Van & Cal Walker The Drunken Poet

Raised By Eagles The Drunken Poet, Arvo Show Casey Dean The Empress (afternoon) St Kilda Festival, Tzu, Dune Rats, Kingswood, + More The Espy The Seven Ups, Echo Drama The Evelyn The Seven Ups, Echo Drama, + More The Evelyn (afternoon) Anonymeye, Simon J Karis, Five Islands, Von Einem The Gasometer Hotel Black Jesus Experience The Horn Chris Russell’s Chicken Walk, Cherrywood, Coral Lee & the Silver Scream, Link Meanie The Old Bar David Garnham, The Reasons to Live Duo The Standard Hotel The Gallant Trees, Fujiyama Mamas, Open Decks The Thornbury Local Paul Greene & The Other Colours, Carterrollins, Jed Rowe The Toff In Town Dirty Beaches The Tote Luke Matthews The Wharf Hotel Nick & Liesl, Evan & Mischa, Lucy Wise The Workers Club (afternoon) Tess McKenna & the Shapiros Union Club Hotel

Remco Keijzer Quartet Uptown Jazz Café St Kilda Festival Veludo Peter Bibby, Emlyn Johnson Victoria Hotel (afternoon) Nick Saxon & The Elusive Few Wesley Anne, Front Bar Dan & Amy, Georgie Darvidis Wesley Anne. Band Room The In The Out, Nervous, The Midnight Scavengers Yah Yah’s

MON 11 Luke Sweeting Sextet, Josh Kelly Trio 303 Allan Browne Trio Bennetts Lane Cherry Jam Cherry Bar Divina Providencia Felix Bar LA, Free Time, Early Woman Northcote Social Club Jed Rowe, Chris Lichti, Suzie Stapleton Old Bar Harry Howard & the NDE, Easy Dada Public Bar Duvz, S-Tea, Dr Chank The Espy, Lounge Bar Private Life, Tully On Tully, Windsor Thieves, + More The Evelyn Jed Rowe, Suzie Stapleton, Chris Lichti The Old Bar Danny Bhoy The Toff In Town Wild Nothing The Tote

Paul Williamson Quartet Uptown Jazz Café

TUE 12 Cine - Cult 303 Make it Up Club Bar Open Christopher Hale Bennetts Lane The Pension, Bricks, Trash Fairies, + More Brunswick Hotel Massive Cherry Bar Al Kennedy Collective Dizzy’s Jazz Club Tina Arena, Anthony Callea Hamer Hall Hellhound Brown Labour In Vain Irish Session Lomond Hotel Let The Cat Out Open Studio Extrafoxx, Full Ugly, Mole House Public Bar Jonathan Harding, Dan Parsons Retreat Hotel Front Bar Barry Gibb Rod Laver Arena Slugger & the Stone The Espy, Lounge Bar El Moth, Old Medicine, Matt Kelly The Evelyn Tim Richmond, James Fahey, Matt Malone The Old Bar Tim Richmond, James Fahey, Matt Malone The Old Bar Lowtide, Glaciers The Toff In Town

“Live At The Lomond” NICE BOY TOM

THU 7TH 8.30PM

(Alt country rock n’ folk)

SKA VENDORS

FRI 8TH 9:30PM

(Deep ska grooves)

PETER HOLMES & RAMSHAKLE BAND

SAT 9TH 9:30PM

(CD LAUNCH) PLUS WHISKY BABIES (Cross-country roots)

SUN 10TH 5:30PM

FLOYD THURSBY

(Enigmatic & urbane !)

SUN 10TH 9:00PM

KEN MAHER & TONY HARGREAVES (Acoustic roots)

TUES 12TH 8:00PM

IRISH SESSION (Acoustic diddley-diddley)

 ALL GIGS   FREE  ~ EXCELLENT RESTAURANT AND BAR MEALS

62 • To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags


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64


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I studied at The Billy Hydes Drumcraft Academy and Obtained a Diploma in Drumming. Mob:0402663469

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Michael

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GUITARIST Looking to join an established gigging Psych/Garage/Blues Rock band. Influences; Black Angels, BRMC, Dead Weather, Tame Impala, Pond etc. Gear; SG & Tele, AC30, analog pedals. Listen here; glenn_johnson

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Rhythm Guitar, Keys, Backup Vox needed! Kilby’s the name. Melbourne based. Our sound is light/dark indie rock. Listen here: triplejunearthed.com/Kilby. Email here: kilbytheband@gmail.com - Must have dedication/good gear/love for music!

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65


BEHIND THE LINES NOW IT’S E-GROVE STUDIOS Having now introduced their E-Mastering service, artists recording at The Grove Studios on Mangrove Road in Somersby on the NSW Central Coast can not only track in their Studios 1 or 2, but also E-Mix and E-Master in Studio 3 and walk away with the finished product. Among those utilising the facility over the past month or so are singer, songwriter and guitarist Alex Bowen, the bands St Leonards and Bleeding Gasoline, and producer Paul McKercher. In fact, straight after supporting Primal Scream on their latest Australian tour, The Delta Riggs headed into The Grove Studios to cut their self-produced debut album live. For details and bookings, email info@thegrovedstudios.com.

SOUND BYTES NYC-based, indie-pop duo MS MR aka Lizzy Plapinger and Max Hershenow recorded their debut album, Second Hand Rapture, at Hershenow’s home studio in Brooklyn, NY over the course of 2011, Hershenow producing with additional production and mixing by Tom Elmhirst. German extreme metal act Neaera recorded their new album, Ours Is The Storm, due March on Metal Blade Records, with their former guitarist producer Alexander Dietz, now with Heaven Shall Burn, at his Chemical Burn Studio. He also mixed the album, the mastering handled by Tue Madsen at Antfarm Studio. Great name for a studio this – Annoying Sound Factory. It was there, in their own studio in the town of Örebro, and in SoinaSound Recording, where they did the lead guitar parts with engineers Simon and Mike Wead, that Swedish doom metal five-piece Memory Garden recorded their new album, Doomain, the album then mixed and mastered by Dan Swanö at Unisound. While in Los Angeles towards the end of last year, Australian producer Tony Buchan (Tim Finn, Andy Bull, Kid Confucius) produced an EP for Australian singer-songwriter Anabelle Kay, and mixed a track for Bob Evans at Paramount Studios. ARIA Award-winning producer Robert F Cranny (Sarah Blasko, Ben Salter) recorded and produced the debut EP, Where The Ocean Starts, by Sydney singer and songwriting partner Katie Whyte, at Oceanic Studio with studio owner Jim Moginie engineering, the EP then mixed and mastered by David Trumpmanis. Recorded at Sydney’s Albert’s Studios, Hungry Kids of Hungary found a kindred spirit in producer Wayne Connelly (The Vines, You Am I, Silverchair, Josh Pyke) when recording their forthcoming second album, You’re A Shadow.

VOICES CARRY Melbourne-based singer and former contestant on TV’s The Voice Jimmy Cupples tells Muso’s Greg Phillips he is getting by just fine with a little help from his friends and a new single. here’s something about the use of analogies in conversation that gives away a lot about the people who use them. Melbourne-based rockin’ vocalist and former contestant on the TV show, The Voice, Jimmy Cupples was comparing his vocal cords to a car’s gear box and telling me if it was used in the wrong way, you could lose it all. Later in the interview he suggested that some contestants on The Voice just weren’t up to it vocally, and such an injustice was plainly obvious to those who know their singing, “just as a panel beater knows a good paint job,” he said. Funnily enough, Jimmy was chatting to me from a car yard checking out a possible purchase for his wife. As I suspected, a quick flick through his Facebook likes and it’s no surprise to see he’s a fan of car restoration and vintage cars. I mention all this because the analogy of hot rod cars and Jimmy’s voice is ever so apt. Like the great rock singers before him, such as Robert Plant, Paul Rodgers, Steve Marriot and our own Jimmy Barnes, in full motion, Jimmy’s voice purrs like an engine.

T

Although Cupples has spent 15 years in the music business, singing Brit rock in cover bands and making a living doing corporate gigs, it wasn’t until his appearance on The Voice that he began to receive the attention that his voice deserved. Jimmy’s parents were both singers but did it hard, working day jobs as well. It was a lifestyle, Jimmy wanted to avoid. “I thought I really want to do the music but I don’t want to do a day job and a night job. So I work really, really hard on just the music. It’s a juggling match; you have to put the money away when you get it and try to survive. I have four kids and my wife hasn’t had to work a job for fifteen years, so I have been lucky... but at the expense of having no time with my family because I take every single gig that comes. A few years before The Voice happened, I was

getting into the corporate thing, weddings, and that’s where I discovered I was making a lot more money and working a lot less harder. Coming off The Voice, I’d have to say the money has doubled from what I was asking myself before. I guess they know me from The Voice and it kind of makes it okay for them to pay more money. It’s a funny thing; it’s a kind of perception.” For a vocalist with a great industry reputation, entering a TV talent show like The Voice was always going to be a gamble. “It was a bit scary because I had a good name as a singer and frontman and thought I could blow it by going on this show,” Cupples admits. “They can be pretty harsh on you. A lot of really good singers were dismissed. It didn’t work out for them but I really needed to do it because I was getting sick of the same circle. I thought maybe I could just get my voice out there to the world. I do love extreme rock singing and I have a big vocal range. When they asked me to sing Woman, the Wolfmother song, I thought great, I’ll do it like a Led Zeppelin or Whitesnake type thing and that might go around the world one day. When it got to around 200,000 plays, I thought this is going viral. You just don’t know. Now I think it is up around 500,000. I was the oldest singer on the show by six years. I don’t drink or smoke and have always kept myself really fit, and I think time is on my side if I look after myself. I hold onto the hope that someone, somewhere will hear that, who is already an established band. Putting a band together and trying to break the market is very hard. Time will tell I guess.” Late last year Cupples released a single, Searching For The Sun, on iTunes, recorded and produced by Melbourne-based musician and friend Marcel Yammouni. “Marcel kind of kicked me up the butt a little bit. I probably did go on a bit of a downer after The Voice. The corporate work was coming in but artistically… Marcel said, ‘you really need to come to the studio, let’s get this song out.’ So God bless him, he recorded it all, produced it all, we got a lyricist in. I walked in there and just sang and went crazy on it.” Cupples has no shortage of friends in the industry willing him on to chase his dreams. Nick Kanaris, General Manager of JB Hi Fi’s instrument division has been a huge

IN THE STUDIO

Birds Of Tokyo consciously reinvented their approach to songwriting in a new Sydney studio space as well as spending time together in a remote French farmhouse. They then went to Los Angeles to record with both a new producer, Dave Cooley (Silversun Pickups) and a new mixer, Tony Hoffer (M83, Beck, The Kooks, Belle & Sebastian).

Recorded in Warrnambool, The 80 Aces called in Steven Schram (The Vasco Era, Little Red, Ground Components) to record and produce their new EP, Dollars. Working on three tracks at a time over four three-day sessions at Rancom Street Studios in Botany, Sydney four-piece He She have been recording a debut album with Choirboys frontman Mark Gable producing and inhouse man, Ted Howard engineering and mixing.

WHO: Jimmy Cupples WHEN & WHERE: Jimmy Cupples performs as part of Whole Lotta Love, Friday 10 May at Palais

to see their musical brains explode and watch their raw un-jaded ideas become more crafted songs.

YOU, the band, need to work on the magic. It takes time and effort to record and usually takes longer than you expect. Do you have any advice for young or inexperienced artists who are heading into the studio? Pre-production! Work out each song’s tempo and agree on it. Write the key of each song. If you are recording five songs, you dont want to have them all in the same key and tempo. Make sure you all know the songs and your parts. Know the solo. You would be surprised how many bands arrive underprepared then waste hours learning their parts.

Winner of the Victorian Indigenous Performing Arts Award for Best New Talent 2012, Benny Walker recorded his second album, Sinner And Saints, at Yikesville Studios with ARIA Award-winning producer Shane O’Mara (Tim Rogers, Lisa Miller, The Audreys).

Adelaide four-piece Lowrider recorded their new album, Black Stones, over the past year at Red Bull Studios in Los Angeles and Chapel Lane Studios in Adelaide with the band’s drummer, Paul Bartlett, producing.

Jimmy had been using the tried and true Shure Beta 58 microphone for most of his career but has recently changed over to a Samson. “I noticed when I was doing the high songs, like things by Led Zeppelin, that the Samson mic really cut through on the high notes and had a clearer sound. You don’t have to push it as much. You don’t have to sing brighter. It’s not an expensive microphone but it’s definitely a thumbs up.” Cupples has also acquired a couple of electric guitars as a result of his TV fame. “I have a great guitar from ESP. I plug that in and do my riffs on it and use a bit of distortion. It really helps to write those riffy rock songs. I also got a really nice guitar off Cort, a Les Paul lookalike.” However, it’s his father’s old acoustic guitar that he enjoys most. “I use my dad’s 1974 Maton. It’s a beautiful guitar. I got Maton to restore it for me. Cost me a grand but it was well worth it. It’s got number six off the conveyor belt on it. It inspires me to write.”

Biggest studio no no for a band? To turn up and expect magic to happen and the engineer to make you sound like your famous favourite band when you can’t play, have bad gear and only one hour to record.

Melbourne-based indie rock collective, Neighbourhood Youth, recorded their debut EP, Holiday, at Face Studios in their hometown with producers Greg Rietwyk and Aaron Barnard, the EP then mastered by Joe Lambert (Dirty Projectors, Animal Collective).

Melbourne four-piece World’s End Press finished recording tracks for their debut LP earlier this year at Rockfield Studios in Wales and Massive Attack Studios in Bristol, where they worked with Tim Goldsworthy (DFA, Mo Wax, The Rapture).

supporter too, organising instore appearances and hooking Jimmy up with gear endorsement deals.

DAMIEN YOUNG-PONY MUSIC, VICTORIA

use most... Pro Tools. This gets used on all sessions. The bit of gear that I could not do without? Our rooms, they sound fantastic.

What are your main tools of the trade at Pony Music? Our main tools of trade are our staff. We have lots of great gear, but our staff is what really makes the difference. My favourite bits of gear that we use on most sessions include our vintage valve mic collection (U47s, KM 54, 56, 74 etc) Telefunken and Universal Audio mic pres and various Neve bits and bobs.

What song/album best represents your work? I have recorded many styles - pop, rock, metal, blues etc. I really enjoy the acoustic, rock pop stuff. LIVE, real musicians playing together as a band. It still happens. I’d say the most recent project I’m happy with is an upcoming Leo Sayer single that I played bass on. We added live bass and drums to a mostly DJ-based track to give it some life and bop.

What’s a piece of gear you couldn’t do without? Seriously, it’s my ears and experience. I can record with almost anything gear-wise and get a great result. The piece of gear that I

66 • To check out the mags online go to themusic.com.au/mags

Favourite session you’ve worked on? I have lots of stories but I prefer the really young bands. The first time they have ever recorded, or been properly recorded. I love being able to educate the band and watch them grow over the recording

Any words of wisdom for those wishing to become a producer or engineer? Don’t give up. Buy some gear, volunteer somewhere and start recording NOW. Keep doing it, record and mix lots. Do live work as well as studio and play an instrument. I do live shows, studio work and play bass. I know what it’s like to work with a great engineer. I know what it’s like when the engineer is a smartarse and you just want to smack them. I also know how great it is to work with brilliant and talented artists who make me feel welcome and like I am part of the same team. When it’s good, it’s great. When it’s bad, there’s always tomorrow. Current project? I’m recording a second album for Little Feet Music with Rachel Parkinson and Mark Kennedy. This is a children’s album and is great fun. All real people playing live; nothing is programmed. The songs are fun and well written, the performances are real and it sounds great. ponymusic.com.au


Inpress Issue 1260  

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