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southworld Southside High School 4100 Gary St. Ft. Smith, AR 72903 Vol. 50 Issue 1

10.5.12

>> what’s inside? Legacy series premieres as school celebrates 50 years. Uncover Johnny Reb’s story.

pg. 6

Fall sports hit late-season stride. Volleyball remains undefeated. Golf & tennis complete seasons this week.

pg. 10

>> what’s online? “Learning about a new culture and studying in a new country is a challenge but I’m enjoying it,” junior Sophie Cho said.

>>

scene setter drama prepares for fall shows

Zinnia Smith photo by Blake Hanson

For more drama coverage:


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10.5.12

NOW

dogs d gs deter drug activity photos submitted by FSPD

K9 Teams Officer Kasper and Kane Corporal Watkins and Kilo Officer Boyd and Vigo Officer Elliott and Chico

> by Kayla Wilson

By the time the third period bell chimed, the word was out. Walking through the upstairs South hall, a pack of policemen and a German Shepherd caught the attention of students sitting in their homeroom classes. Drug dogs became reality. For the first time, Fort Smith public secondary schools enacted a drug dog policy, permitting police searches of students’ lockers and cars for illegal substances. “The School Board enacted the use of the drug dogs. This was something the Fort Smith Police Department had offered to the school district as a deterrent to students bringing drugs on campus. The superintendent, school board members, and the police personnel were involved in making the decision,” principal Wayne Haver said. A police department K-9 unit consisting of four dogs will search randomly throughout the year. Acting as head of the department, Sergeant Brian Rice oversees the operation. “We buy the dogs in Louisiana, but they’re actually trained in

CAMPUS NOTES Oct. 5 | @ SHS Oct. 6 | @ SHS Homecoming Parade

Oct. 24 | @ 3 PM Softall Tryouts

SHS SAT Test

Oct. 27

Dixie Belle Clinic

Europe for about a year. I’m a certified trainer now, so I instruct each individual handler for an additional month so the dogs can get comfortable with them,” Rice said. School personnel attended a professional development workshop during the summer where they learned about how the drug dogs are trained and maintained. They also watched a simulated search take place at a student’s locker. “It was a really cool experience. If the dog finds something, all he does is sit right in front of the locker. He won’t move. He doesn’t bark or attack, he just sits until he gets his reward. The handler throws a piece of PVC pipe and the dog gets to chew on it for a while. That’s all he gets,” math instructor Dana Goins said. Requested directly by schools or the district security officer, searches will be performed randomly; however, the dogs have some restrictions on campus. “The dogs will search the lockers and the parking lots. They won’t go into classrooms and are not allowed in the hallways during passing periods. I think they will search at

Oct. 7 | @ SHS

National Honor Society Induction

Oct. 27 ACT Test

least three or four times a semester,” Haver said. Each dog is purchased at $14,000 and is cared for by their individual handler. The money for the initial cost to buy, the vet bills and even the dog food is either donated by the public or funded from confiscated property that is sold. “The dogs are trained in finding several different drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, heroin, & methamphetamines. They’re great at what they do,” Rice said. With the dogs visiting for the first time on Sept. 12, students and faculty are still adapting to these searches. According to Officer Love, the dogs alerted while searching the north and south hallways, as well as rows of the West parking lot. Due to pending charges, officials cannot reveal further information. “This policy is not designed to get students in trouble. If students don’t bring drugs to school, they can’t get in trouble. Hopefully, the knowledge that there will be random drug dog searches of lockers and parking lots will cause students to keep drugs away from Southside,” Haver said.

Oct. 17 | @ SHS PSAT/NMSQT

Nov. 4 Daylight Time Savings Ends

Oct. 20 | @ Dover All-Region Choir Auditions

Nov. 6 Election Day


10.5.12

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4

VIEWPOINT

BIG DAY

Becca Risley

education integrates technology

EVERY DAY

Apparently, the time has come to answer the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Princess or Justin Bieber’s wife don’t seem to satisfy parents and teachers anymore. The cuteness factor has faded. Creating productive members of society and providing financial security for years to come seems to be their newfound intention. The issues seem to surface when my lack of planning is revealed. A Top Five list of college’s, plans for possible careers, or even the desire to plan my Pinterest wedding are not on any of my to-do lists. Realizing that most people obtain saddened complacency by their 30 birthday, achieving goals and dreams quickly becomes the focus. Embarking on a country-wide road trip, going sky diving, being homeless for a summer, and plenty of other ideas captivate my mind on a continuous basis, most of which can’t be checked off while trapped inside a classroom. These experiences would make great college essays, but “lack academic importance” as teachers and parents have clearly pointed out. Refusing to surrender to this monotonous cycle of life— school, graduation, work, getting married, having kids, repeat—the concept of a higher education, while not dismissed, gradually slips into the back of my mind. I don’t want to become another statistic. Instead of stressing over future plans, my focus remains in the present. Because graduation is still a year away, pretending to be Justin Bieber’s wife for awhile longer can’t hurt.

Once a violation in Fort Smith Public Schools, personal electronics integrated into the classroom. Previously, students met harsh punishments if their cell phone was noticed in class. The introduction of the new Bring Your Own Device policy, or BYOD, allows students to use personal electronics for educational purposes. Thankfully, the school district is moving out of the Stone Age. District advisor Vance Gregory is responsible for putting together the district wide policy. With its initial release, BYOD received no opposition due to the loose structure of its composition. The Southside Student Handbook states that “digital devices such as smart phones, electronic notebooks, or laptops may be used in a classroom if the teacher has granted permission for their use under the Internet Acceptable Use Policy, District Handbook, Section XII.” Allowing teachers to decide how personal devices are used makes the policy all the more flexible. As an unexpected side effect, the policy is clearing seats in SDC and reducing the number of lunch detentions. Assistant principal Travis Biggs has noticed a decline in cell phone violations since the adoption of the policy. He believes it is because teachers are trusting students to use their cell phones for the right reasons. Although the BYOD policy is in effect, the old cell phone policy still frowns on non-teacher approved use of digital devices or cell phones. However flexible the policy may SOUTHWORLD

staff

Adviser: SUSAN COLYER Editors: CARTER MILLIGAN, BECCA RISLEY Assistant Editor: AMBROSIA JOHNSON Photo Editor: BLAKE HANSON Business Manager: NICOLE HARPER Layout Editor/Webmaster: RIMA BHAKTA

Reporters: LAUREN HUMPHREY, ANDREA JOHNSON, ZELANA MOBLEY, LUCIA ORTIZ, VANESSA SICKLES, COLBY WHITFIELD, KAYLA WILSON, AMBER BALDWIN, WYATT BENJAMIN, ANNE CUNNIINGHAM, NICHOLAS KHODAYARI, TAYLOR ENSLOW, Photographers: BLAKE HANSON, KIRBY BLAND, ALEXIS HUNTER Printer: CALVERT-MCBRIDE 3811 PLANTERS ROAD FORT SMITH, AR 72908 479.646.8311 Ex. 218

be, the administration still questions how to incorporate the policy into classrooms. Having a laptop or tablet makes taking notes easier; some students type faster than they write. Blogs and file sharing are already used in classes such as English, journalism, and business law. BYOD is a great step in tech integration in schools, but it is not perfect. Teachers and students complain about poor Wi-Fi in the classroom. Students divert to 3G coverage on their phones; however, this is against policy because the school cannot monitor students’ activity on their personal wireless networks. Teachers and administrators will not be able to stop students from using their data plans, some automatically divert to 3G data coverage if the Wi-Fi is unusable. While unfair to student’s who are not financially able to participate in BYOD, the use of digital devices in the classroom isn’t required. If a student cannot complete an assignment due to lack of technology, it is recommended that they speak to a teacher or administrator. Computers are available in computer labs and libraries. With the introduction of BYOD, students are taking their learning experiences out of the classroom and into the real world of file sharing, blogging, and graphic design. Although it has its kinks, the policy is a positive step into the future of education. Editorial Policy: ANY USIGNED EDITORIAL RELFECTS THE OPINION OF THE STAFF AS A WHOLE AND NOT ANY INDIVIDUAL STAFF MEMBER. STAFF MEMBER SIGNED OPINION PIECES ARE INDICATIVE OF THE OPINION AUTHOR. Letter To The Editor Policy: THE SOUTHWORLD ACCEPTS ALL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FOR ANY COMMENT OR ANY COMPLAINT. ONLY THOSE LETTERS THAT ARE CONSIDERED RELEVANT AND ENGAGING WILL BE PUBLISHED. Advertisement Policy:

THE SOUTHWORLD HAS THE RIGHT TO REJECT OR EDIT ANY ADVERTISEMENT THAT IS DEEMED OBJECTIONABLE BASED ON THE OPINION OF THE STAFF. ADVERTISMENTS SHOULD REFRAIN FROM ATTACKING COMPETITORS AND SHOULD BE SOLELY BASED UPON THE MERITS OF THE ADVERTISER. Obituary Policy: SHOULD A DEATH AT THE SCHOOL OCCUR AN IMAGE OF THE DECEASED AS WELL AS A BRIEF DEATH NOTICE WILL BE RUN. Correction Policy: IN THE EVENT OF A MISTAKE

10.5.12

HALL TALK

“It’s a really good system, but my teachers don’t trust us,” sophomore Palo Garcia said.

“It’s a good idea because we use our phones in class anyways,” junior Jessica Womack said.

“Instead of scheduling library times, you can bring your own laptop or iPad,” junior Briana Gant said. MERITING CORRECTION THE SOUTHWORLD WILL ISSUE A CORRECTION IN THE NEXT PUBLICATION. WRITTEN NOTIFICATION OF THE MISTAKE MUST BE DELIVERED TO ROOM 125 AT LEAST TWO WEEKS BEFORE THE NEXT DEADLINE. Awards/Membership: THE SOUTHWORLD IS A MEMBER OF THE QUILL AND SCROLL SOCIETY, NSPA, JEA, CSPA, ASPA, AND SIPA. THE SOUTHWORLD HAS RECEIVED NUMEROUS AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE, PACEMAKER, AND ALL-ARKANSAS


10.5.12

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6

LIFE

> by Taylor Enslow

“Of all the memories I have at Southside, I clearly remember the Rebel man most of all,” 1994 graduate Heather

Laister said.

Walking through the front doors of the school, a former student notices an old wooden statue. The student is surprised that old Johnny Reb has remained standing, proud and true. Perhaps he is more weathered, more beaten than their last encounter, but he is still standing, still enduring. Originally planned as an art project by former students Kevil Weaver, Jerry Floyd, Clarence Fell, and Greg Whitsett, the Rebel Man was never supposed to be such a significant figure. The former students crafted Rebel Man, aka: Johnny Reb, out of a large tree trunk they found by the Arkansas River. As a wood carver, Weaver’s father

statue synonymous with provided the students with professional assistance. The trunk was too wide to start the project inside, so they did most of the work in the school courtyard before moving the statue inside to begin finishing the Rebel Man. “The statue has been in the main hall since 1977 when it was finished, and there are no immediate plans to move it,” principal Wayne Haver said. Former students have not forgotten about the iconic figure of the school. Class reunions take their picture with the Rebel Man, and former students still include the statue in their high school memories. “Of all the memories I have at Southside, from

dancin I clear friends say, ‘H have c he rem said. Rebe trauma 36 of t As one school and it’


FIRST YEAR

FACTS

CONSTRUCTION STARTED IN FEBRUARY

1962

936

AND COMPLETED IN AUGUST

STUDENTS (7-10 GRADE) ENROLLED IN FIRST OPERATING YEAR GLEE CLUB CONSISTED OF

73

GIRL MEMBERS AND

28

BOY MEMBERS

school

1963

$1,200,000 TO CONSTRUCT THE ORIGINAL BUILDING

JOHNNY DANIELS

WAS THE FIRST STUDENT COUNCIL PRESIDENT

39

FACULTY MEMBERS

photo illustration by Alexis Beas

ng with the Belles to walking at graduation, rly remember the Rebel Man most of all. My s and I would walk into school every day and Here’s Johnny’. It seems like of all the things that changed about the school since I last went there, mained the same,” 1994 graduate Heather Laister

el Man has endured state championships, atic losses, and the deserted halls of summer for the 50 years that the school has been in existence. e of few things that have remained constant at the l, Johnny Reb is synonymous with both Southside ’s memories.

VICTOR STEWART WAS THE FIRST PRINCIPAL

A SUBSTITUE FOR HOMECOMING WAS HELD THE FIRST YEAR CALLED REBEL DAY. DANA SHARP WAS CROWNED MISS REBEL. REBELS BEAT THE MUSKOGEE GREENIES

19-13


8

CULTURE

chic styles

10.5.12

$51.50 metallic top

retails for $17.80 resale for $6.00

leather ruffle purse retails for $79.00 resale for $15.00

gap boyfriend jeans

retails for $69.95 resale for $10.50

black riding boots retails for $79.95 resale for $20.00

rhinestone bird necklace

retails for $43.99 resale for $10.50

$36

pink boxy top

retails for $29.00 resale for $4.50

forever 21 cardigan retails for $24.80 resale for $6.00

studded leather heels

retails for $149.99 resale for $15.00

>>

Photos by Kirby Bland

Styles found at:

Emi-Lee’s On The Avenue

Upscale Resale Shop 315 Garrison Avenue 479-452-5488

“It’s the same clothes you can get anywhere else for lower prices, same cute clothes for less,” junior Hunter Martin said.


10.5.12

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We’ve got your colors, Southside!

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10

ACTION

FROM THE BLEACHERS

10.5.12

undefeated

Carter Milligan

Team rivalries provide the foundation for a sports fan base. One school exists in every conference that most teams aim to beat. Perhaps the school is a cross-town rival, or maybe the school continuously wins championships. Maybe, just maybe, the other team thinks they are too good to lose. With the recent change of conference, the time has come for the school to find a new rival. Who better to select than 5A champion Greenwood? In addition to being ranked 261 in the national ranked high school football teams, Greenwood previously won five state titles in the past eight years. Greenwood recently beat the school’s cross-town rival Northside 56 to 20. All but one school that has played Greenwood this season has gone under the mercy rule. Once the mercy rule takes effect, the clock only stops for penalties, injuries, timeouts, and change of possession. The Bulldogs have built up a mountain of successes. The higher the climb, the longer and harder the fall. Northside will always be a friendly cross-town rivalry, but the focus should be pointed at Greenwood. The last meeting on the field between Southside seniors and Greenwood seniors was 2009 and resulted in a devastating loss for both Fort Smith junior high teams. There would be no greater pleasure than being the first to interrupt the Bulldogs undefeated season. Games and seasons come and go, but rivalries never die.

Tina Nguyen

Taylor Hamilton, Sarita Stegall

Sarah Moore photos by Blake Hanson

Confederettes currently stand with a 7-0 season, having gained new players and using new rotations. They are one of the only teams left undefeated. “I think we have the potential to do really well this year and hopefully that means better than last year,” varsity volleyball player Drew Jones said. Sophomores Sarita Stegall, Mackenzie King and juniors Jamie Tipton and Breanne Waller join the varsity team this season. “Trust is important; we spent a lot of time together and got to know each other. We are having a good season so far because we can really connect on the court,” Stegall said. The first conference game was Aug. 30. Varsity played best three out of five, winning all three sets 25-4 against Little Rock Parkview.

“Because we moved conferences, it is hard to say who exactly our biggest competition will be this year. No matter what team we play, we’ll still come out and play our best,” junior varsity volleyball player Tina Nguyen said. Even though Southside’s conference is 7A central, old rivals will continue to bring competition because every two years the Arkansas Atheletic Assoicaion will realign conferences based on the school’s student enrollment. Before the season began, the ladies practiced this summer in order to get ready for new conference play. They practiced every day in the morning, and participated in summer league where they practiced with other local high schools. “Before summer practice

started, some of us played for our club team which lasted from November to July, so we’ve pretty much been playing all year round,” Nguyen said. Club ball, like the Fort Smith Junior Olympic volleyball team, travel during the schools off season and play in tournaments in surrounding states. It is illegal for club volleyball to play during the school volleyball season because it is a conflict of interest. “I think that J.O helps a lot with school volleyball. We have been playing all year so we never get the chance to lose the skills we have been building. I think because of how hard we have worked, it will pay off and we will all perform better,” Nguyen said. Volleyball will end with a state tournament in November.

ladies take control of conference standings > by Erin Coffman

CROSS COUNTRY “Tim Glover and Colin Browning are right now the two best runners. Tim will finish in the top ten in most meets, and Colin will finish in the top twenty. Both work very hard and it is paying off for them their senior years,” coach Brooks Witherspoon said.

REMAINING MEETS 10.6 10.13 10.20 10.27 11.10

Greenwood Fayetteville Cancer Challenge (Ft Smith) ABF Fun Run (Ft Smith) State Meet (Hot Springs)


10.5.12

ACTION

GOLF

TENNIS

11

teams advance to state > by Jacob Elmore

Dalton Frost photo by Blake Hanson

a swing for state

> by Becca Risley

After beginning the season mid-July, golfers were ready to get matches in a new conference underway. Throughout the season, matches were played at home and away against Fayetteville, Alma, and Van Buren. Out of the 11 matches held, five were won, qualifying the boys for a chance at a state title. “We have a goofy team so the bus rides are always a good time,” senior Paige McCain said. At press time, the boys team were competing in Conway for the championship. Those who qualify will proceed onto the second day of matches and the State Champion will be announced following the final hole. “I’m pretty pumped to play and get out of school,” junior Dalton Frost said.

SPORTS NOTES Oct. 5 | @ 7 PM Football Homecoming

Sam Haraway photo by Blake Hanson

Last week, tennis teams played in North Little Rock on Sept. 25, winning all of their matches. “Being in a new conference we don’t know what every opponent brings to the table, but our key matchup in conference will be against Little Rock Central, we have heard a lot of good things about their team.,” head tennis coach Stephanie Wright said. Led by junior Lindsy Pearce, winning the first championship of the new conference became the team’s goal.

“Our team is very strong and we’re all just fun to be around and that makes it more relaxing when we go out on the court,” Pearce said. The upcoming conference game to watch will be against Little Rock Central. At press time, both teams were competing in the conference tournament in North Little Rock. If members or doubles teams qualify, they will advance to the state tournament in October. “I’m very pumped to play because I think our team is going to accomplish great things,” Pearce said.

FOOTBALL

WHO TO WATCH FOR ACCORDING TO THE COACHES

photos by Kirby Bland

TIGHT END

CORNERBACK

S A F E T Y

JOHN

CLAYTON

GARRETT

HUNTON

PANKEY

WOLFE

> Great blocker > Catches

> Understands

>

>

>

everything that comes his way Good leader according to coach Justin Key

>

plays and that the team is “one unit” Team player according to coach Keith Fimple

Oct. 9 | @ Conway Oct. 12 | @ SHS Volleyball Varsity Football vs. Conway

> One of the > >

leading tacklers Getting some interest from several colleges according to coach Brooks Witherspoon

Oct. 16 | @ Russellville Volleyball


12

CAPTURE

3

SENIORS QUALIFIED FOR NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS

Rachel Davis << <<

“It means a lot to be recognized academically after 13 years of hard work. Kids get recognized for sports and arts, but being a Merit Scholar opens many doors.”

Landon Hunter <<

10.5.12

ACADEMICS

IGNITING CREATVITY photos by Blake Hanson

> Chemistry junior

Caitlin Goldtrap heats her glass rod over the Bunsen burner in science teacher Aaron Kareus’ lab.

> AP Psycholgy student Kaitlin Jones constructs a Play-Doh brain to dissect in lab. “I had the students dress up as surgeons and construct a model of a human brain using Play-Doh. I refer to it as Dr. Frankstein’s brain surgery,” teacher Mark Minnick said. > Practicing

“It’s a big honor, being recognized for all my hard work. Of course it helps with scholarships.

Sami Sexton <<

“It’s what I was aiming for when I took the PSAT, so it’s awesome to get something I’ve wanted for so long.”

during first period band, senior Reyna Rodriguez performs “Arabian Night.”

Southworld's Oct. 5 Issue  

Southworld's first edition in 2012-2013 school year

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