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Fernandina’s ocean beach is a great place to spend a day. After all, the town is named Fernandina Beach. If a stroll is all you want, then restaurants, bars, boutiques, bookstores, museums, even a midtown lemon tree, all beckon within a few blocks of the marina.

dominant red, but their wearers were kind of quiet as Georgia built a 20-0 lead. Although the game finished on a more competitive note, the red shirts were jubilant at the end. Following the game, I made my way to my favorite eatery, the Marina Restaurant, located in the old customs house across from the marina. There I would enjoy a glass of wine, Marina’s signature fried chicken, and plan tomorrow’s day. Fernandina Beach and Amelia Island on which it sits offer much to visiting cruisers, and there is something for everybody. If a stroll is all you want, then restaurants, bars, boutiques, bookstores, museums, even a midtown lemon tree, all beckon within a few blocks. If you need more action, sport fishing, kayaking, biking, Jet Ski and nature boat tours are all available, and most operate year around. A day at the beach is always nice spring through fall—and on many winter days. You can even take a carriage ride. The area is also

home to a community theater and a number of special events and festivals. Shrimp, gardens, historic inns, art, books, film, cars, wine, and all kinds of music—all have festivals or special event days of their own. It is also home to the country’s largest petanque (pay-tonk) tournament, and the locals play every Saturday morning. Visitors are very welcome, so bring your balls and participate! Regardless of when you visit, it’s hard to miss something special going on. There is a lot to do here, but, you just can’t do it all in one trip. I guess that’s why I’ve been coming to Fernandina for 27 years! If you plan to visit, the following contact information may be helpful: Fernandina Harbor Municipal Marina: Dockmaster Kevin Little - (904) 310-3300 http://www.ameliaisland.com http://fhmarina.com http://www.fbfl.us http://ameliaislandinns.com Captain Fred Braman, USN (ret), and his wife Louise live in Fleming Island, FL, and sail their Catalina 30, Rhombus, in Florida and Georgia waters, the Bahamas, and the St. Johns River. He is the author of Too Old Not to Go, Voyage of Rhombus a Single-Hander’s Tale, available at Amazon. News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS January 2014

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