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SOUTHWINDS News & Views for Southern Sailors

Sail to Cuba Part III Surviving Hurricane Matthew On Board Scrimshaw with Jim Brown

December 2016 For Sailors — Free…It’s Priceless


Visit us on the docks at the St Pete Boat Show Dec.1-4

Windswept Yacht Sales

1995 Sundeer 60 Recent Circumnavition. Fast and comfortable. Genset, Radar, enclosed pilothouse, extensive sail inventory, air cond., diesel heater, 6' Draft, intracoastal friendly, GPS, SSB, AIS and all the cruising gear. REDUCED $372,900.

2003 52' Midnight Lace MY Command Bridge in the style of the Rum Runners of the 20s. Twin Cats, twin helm, absolutely loaded and in immaculate condition. One of Tom Fexas' last builds. A must see! REDUCED $549,900.

SOLD

2012 37' Delphia Yachts 37.2 High quality performance cruiser from Europe. Thinking of Hunter, Beneteau, Jeanneau? Then you've got to take a look at Delphia. Air, autopilot, good electronics, Volvo diesel, all professionally maintained. Priced to sell. $124,900.

36' 1998 Sabre 362 One of the cleanest 362s we’ve seen. Like new sails, low-hour diesel, GPS, autopilot, radar, shoal draft, gorgeous cherry interior. Refrigeration/freezer, gorgeous awlgrip black. Priced to sell; $119,900.

SOME OF OUR CURRENT LISTINGS 72’ 1986 Cooper Maple Leaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SOLD 60' 1995 Sundeer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $372,900 52' 2003 Midnight Lace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $549,900 47' 2004 Leopard Catamaran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $249,900 47' 1986 Wauquiez Centurion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$119,900 46' 1979 Durbeck Ketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$109,900 44' 1991 Tollycraft Aft Cockpit Motor Yacht . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$109,900 41' 1984 41.1 Bristol Center Cockpit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $99,900 40' 1986 Cape Dory Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UNDER CONTRACT 39' 2005 Beneteau 393 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $79,900 38' 1987 Marine Trader Sundeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call for Price 38’ 1979 Cabo Rico 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$64,900 38' 1982 Sabre sail Penobscot, Maine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD

38' 1986 Island Packet Cutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Call for Price 37’ 2012 Delphia 37.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $124,990 37' 1980 Tartan 37 Centerboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $42,500 36' 1998 Sabre 362 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD 36' 2005 Prout Esprit Catamaran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD 36' 1999 Sabre 362 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SOLD 36' 1987 Marine Trader Sundeck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .REDUCED $49,900 36' 2010 Southerly Centerboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$325,000 35' 1972 Pearson 35 Sloop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$34,000 35' 1985 Cal 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$37,900 34' 1984 Sabre 34, Rockland, ME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$45,000 26' 1984 Morris Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$36,000 22' 1988 Luzier Catboat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30,000

Exclusive Dealers for Precision Sailboats, designed by Jim Taylor Specializing in “hands on” personalized attention throughout the entire sales process. We offer a full range of consulting services to our clients ranging from strategic planning to preparing a boat for sale, to full analysis and search for a suitable vessel for a buyer. We provide information and advice about the advantages of various design features and construction methods offered by different yacht builders. We help guide you through the survey and sea trial process. We help to arrange dockage, insurance, financing and virtually any other aspect of boat ownership required. Whether you are interested in Sailing Yachts or Motor Yachts, call us to learn how Windswept Yacht Sales will fulfill your boating dream in a pleasant, uncomplicated and hassle free way with a level of attention to detail that buyers and sellers will find refreshing.

You can see details and photos of all our listings at www.windsweptyachtsales.com We get boats sold. Call for a no-cost market evaluation of your current boat. Visit our website for tips to sell your boat and to learn what our customers are saying about us.

On the S/V Windswept, Marina Jack, Sarasota, FL Toll Free 1-888-235-1890 Gregg Knighton | 941-730-6096 | GreggWYS@gmail.com Greg Smith (Maine) 207-701-1052 GregSWYS@yahoo.com Alan Pressman | 941-350-1559 | AlanPWYS@gmail.com | skype: alan.pressman Joe Hamilton (Miami, Ft. Lauderdale) 727-612-5502 | JoeHWYS@gmail.com

Toll Free: 888-235-1890 Email us at AlanPWYS@gmail.com www.windsweptyachtsales.com Home of the Florida Sabre Sailboat Owners Association-FLSSOA

News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS

December 2016 87


Culham Custom Sailing Yacht 100, 2009

Manta MK IV 42, 2007

Leopard 39 Catamaran, 2011

Thailand, Luxury Cruising, 5 Staterooms Shalimar FL, Excellent Condition ASKING

$3,300,000

ASKING

Manta Endeavor Catamaran 42, 2001

St. Pete, Charter Price Incentives

$359,000

Ta Chiao 47 Center Cockpit, 1982

Palmetto, Long-range Cruiser, Twin Volvos Punta Gorda, Bluewater Cruiser ASKING

$259,900

ASKING

$299,000

Hunter 36, 2010

St. Pete, Classic Lines, Bluewater Cruiser

$275,000

ASKING

Island Packet Cat 35, 1993

St. Pete, Lightly Used, Charter Incentives Punta Gorda, Twin Yanmar 27hp Diesel

$225,000

Hunter 27, 2013

PDQ Capella Catamaran 36, 1992

ASKING

SeaStar 46, 1982

ASKING

$112,000

Azimut 68E, 2007

ASKING

$105,000

Symbol Pilothouse 58’, 2000

SOLD St. Augustine, Twin Yamaha 10hp ASKING

St. Pete, Great Boat for New Sailors

$99,900

ASKING

$65,000

Viking 58 Convertible, 1994

Back Cove 37 Express, 2015

Ft Myers, Twin MAN 1360HP Diesels ASKING

$1,150,000

Cruise Line 54’, 2002

Punta Gorda, Meticulous, ++Accessories Punta Gorda, Twin 1200hp MAN Diesels St. Pete, Dual MTU Mercedes 600hp ASKING

$514,900

ASKING

Silverton 392 SideWalk, 2001

Compton 33, 2006

Cape Haze, Elegant, Well Designed ASKING

$319,000

ASKING

$299,900

Carver Yachts 404, 43’, 1999

Osprey FL, Twin CAT 3126 Diesels 385hp Ft Myers, Twin Cummins 370ph

$195,000

ASKING

$119,900

ASKING

$99,500

Cape Coral, Twin Cummins 635hp ASKING

$549,000

Monk 36 Trawler, 2007

Punta Gorda, Low Hours, Cummins 230HP ASKING

$220,000

Mediterranean 38 Express, 1999

St. Pete, Twin Yanmar 350hp, Sport Fish ASKING

$69,999

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The St. Petersburg Yacht Club announces The 49th Annual Regata del Sol al Sol

SPECIAL DISCOUNT for Habana Race Participants For information, go to Jonathan Miguel Lopez Aguirre REGATA DEL SOL AL SOL/SPYC WEBSITE Poster Winner for 2017 Important Dates and Information Registration & Seminars—Thursday, April 27. Race Start, Friday 1000 April 28, 2017. For Entry Fee Schedule, See Notice of Race now posted at www.spyc.org. Click sailing, regattas. Scroll down to Regata del Sol al Sol, or go to www.regatadelsolalsol.org. We have a new look! Final entry deadline is Monday, April 10, 2017. No entries after this date. Check out our new Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/RegataDelSolAlSol Kick-Off Party Friday, February 24, 2017 6:30 PM Competitor-Sponsor-Regatta Committee Reservations required by Wednesday, February 22, 2017. No Reservations after this date. Send reservation to epennin09@earthlink.net. See Schedule of events for more information.

Some Things You Will Need to Accomplish 1. Prepare your vessel - Check out requirements In the Notice of Race 2. Apply for Temporary Importation Permit – Online at https://www.banjercito.com.mx/registroVehiculos/ 3. Have your Crew get their Boater Reporting Numbers at https://svrs.cbp.dhs.gov/Default.aspx 4. Make Sure Everyone’s Passports are up to date!

Sponsors

chairman@regatadelsolalsol.org or 727-992-3344 4

December 2016

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ccepted A s n I e d Tra at Sales o B W E On N

St. Simons Island, GA Serving Georgia, the Carolinas, North Florida

Visit our NEW website: dunbaryachts.com

BOAT SALES | BROKERAGE | SERVICE CENTER | SHIP STORE | ELECTRONICS Region’s Oldest Catalina Dealer

Models on display & available for demo

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Is this YOUR BROKER? Most Brokers only reach out to active buyers by using traditional methods, such as listing on only the major boat websites or print advertising. We do EVERYTHING he does … AND MUCH, MUCH MORE! We also reach out to: • Regional & National BOAT SHOW visitors • BOATERS using our SERVICE CENTER and SHIPS STORE • Our Raymarine, Garmin, Fusion and ELECTRONICS customers • Our CHARTER & SAILING SCHOOL customers • TOURISTS visiting the popular GOLDEN ISLES Tourist Area & Morningstar Marina • LOCAL YACHT CLUBS

ALL OF THESE THINGS WIDEN OUR POOL OF POTENTIAL BUYERS FREE bi-weekly maintenance checks on all brokerage boats on our docks! ALL BOATS CLEANED and checked before every viewing. Enquiries answered 7 days a week

www.DunbarYachts.com 912.638.8573 News & Views for Southern Sailors

Sales@DunbarYachts.com 800.282.1411 SOUTHWINDS

5


SOUTHWINDS NEWS & VIEWS

FOR

SOUTHERN SAILORS

10

Editorial: So – You Want to Sail to Cuba By Steve Morrell

14

Southern Regional Monthly Weather & Water Temperatures

15

Calendar — Upcoming Events in the Southeast (Non-Race)

21

Racing News: National Regattas in the Southeast, News Race Instruction

26

Short Tacks: Sailing News from Around the South and the World of Sailing

31

New Product: Ship Balm

38

St. Petersburg Boat Show and Seminar Schedule

40

Marineland Revisited By Fred Braman

44

Southern Race Report

49

Books to Read: Anchoring – A Ground Tackler’s Apprentice

50

Cuba – Crossing to Cuba; Part III of III By Fred Braman

56

Carolina Sailing: Charleston Community Sailing – After 17 Years, Bigger is Definitely Better By Dan Dickison

58

Surviving Hurricane Matthew By David Smedley

62

Riding out Hurricane Matthew By Thomas Peterson

63

No Time for Breakfast in Sandy Key – Sailing with Jim Brown on Scrimshaw By Bruce L. Matlack

68

Radio-Controlled Lasers – North American Championship By Dave Ellis

69

Racing Calendar

86

Sinking in a Regatta By Laura Petruska

25 32 42 72 76 84 85

Southern Sailing Schools Section Marine Marketplace Southern Marinas and Boatyards Boat Brokerage Section Classifieds Alphabetical Index of Advertisers Advertisers’ List by Category

Sailing to Cuba Part III. Page 50. Photo by Fred Braman.

Surviving Hurricane Matthew. Page 58. Photo by David Smedley. COVER PHOTO: Taylor Brunsvold and crew in a Falcon F-16 at the Buzzelli Multihull Regatta in Sarasota, FL, Oct. 21-23. Story page 44. Photo by Barry Millbourn.

Each issue of SOUTHWINDS (and back issues since 5/03) is available online at www.southwindsmagazine.com 6

December 2016

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News & Views For Southern Sailors SOUTHWINDS Media, Inc. PO Box 14456, Bradenton, FL 34280-4456 941-795-8704 866-372-7245 941-866-7597 Fax

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On the Okeechobee Waterway Inland Hurricane Boat Storage Your Do-it-Yourself Work Yard

Volume 24 Number 12 December 2016 Copyright 2016, Southwinds Media, Inc. Founded in 1993 Doran Cushing, Publisher 11/1993-6/2002 ___________________________________________________________________

Publisher/Editor 7/2002–Present Steve Morrell

editor@southwindsmagazine.com

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FOR ALL DISPLAY ADVERTISING

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AS HURRICANE PROOF AS YOU CAN GET

FOR PAID EVENTS, CLASSIFIEDS, REGATTA ADS AND ONLINE BUSINESS DIRECTORY ADVERTISING: Steve Morrell

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24-HOUR, 7 DAYS A WEEK WORK YARD ACCESSIBILITY • Owner-operated by boaters for boaters • 8’ deep channel off the Waterway in freshwater section (for engine flush) • 40-ton lift — boats up to 16’ 6” beam • Crane Service • Auto/RV/Trailer Storage • Hot Showers!

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11 Miles West of Lake Okeechobee on the Okeechobee Waterway Stuart

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Sun Publications of Florida

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Artwork Rebecca Burg 863-583-1202 ext 355

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charlie Clifton Julie B. Connerley Dave Ellis Kim Kaminski Bruce L. Matlack Laura Petruska David Smedley Thomas Peterson

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS/ART Bixby Propulsion Fred Braman Rebecca Burg (& Artwork) Charleston Community Sailing Julie B. Connerley Vincent Curutchet / DPPI Dan Dickison Marni Rothschild Durlach Dave Ellis Hanse Yachts Bruce Johnson Kim Kaminski Amy Linton Bruce L. Matlack Barry Millbourn David Smedley Strictly Sail Miami Thomas Peterson David R. Wiggin EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS: ARTICLES & PHOTOGRAPHY: SOUTHWINDS encourages readers, writers, photographers, cartoonists, jokers, magicians, philosophers and whoever else is out there, including sailors, to send in their material. Just make it about the water world and generally about sailing and about sailing in the South, the Bahamas or the Caribbean, or general sailing interest, or sailboats, or sailing. SOUTHWINDS welcomes contributions in writing and photography, stories about sailing, racing, cruising, maintenance and other technical articles and other sailing-related topics. Please submit all articles electronically by e-mail (mailed-in discs also accepted), and with photographs, if possible. We also accept photographs alone, for cover shots, racing, cruising and just funny entertaining shots. Take or scan them at high resolution, or mail to us to scan. Call with questions.

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December 2016

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News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS December 2016

9


FROM THE HELM

STEVE MORRELL,

EDITOR

So – You Want to Sail to Cuba SOUTHWINDS has printed numerous articles on sailing to Cuba since President Obama relaxed the rules on visiting it in November 2014. First was the Havana Challenge from Key West in May of 2015, which included a race of Hobie 16s to Cuba (who’da thunk that?). Several other regattas followed in the last two years. Next, we’ve reported on private boats going on their own—all with permission from the U.S.—and easily granted. In this issue is Fred Braman’s part III of his three-part series. Fred recently told me that one of his crew has already returned on another boat and is there as I write this. In the next few months, we have another story coming about a delivery captain who stopped at a port in Cuba on his way to deliver a boat to South America. He applied for and received permission from the U.S. Government. All went well and he was well-treated. After a few days, he continued on. More and more, Americans are going on their own boats. They still must apply, although application appears to be more and more a process of registering to go, rather than seeking permission. As it should be. We should not have to seek permission to go to another country without fear of reprisal from our own. This is a free country, right? But there are expenses beyond the norm that need to be taken into account. Read Fred Braman’s first part where he discusses the preparations and requirements for his trip (October issue, in Back Issues at www.southwindsmagazine.com). Some of the restrictions are by the Cuban

government if you travel by boat. Americans sailing to Cuba are currently only allowed to go to Havana, Varadero and Cayo Levisa (Fred went to all three), although other areas could open up by the time you read this. Plus Fred and others have been restricted to a 14-day period. This too could change. The Tampa Bay Times published an article in October about going to Cuba and all the additional expenses and problems in doing so. The Times article talks about flying to Cuba (since flights from Tampa to Cuba were to start on Dec. 12), but it gives one a good idea of the costs and concerns one must deal with if going, like health insurance, credit cards used, who is allowed to go, currency (you must exchange dollars for Cuban currency, but there is a charge), internet, cell phones—even how many cigars you can bring back (go to www.TambaBay.com and search for “costs of travel to Cuba”). With a new president, this could all change and restrictions could be back in place, although Trump indicated a couple times during his campaign that he thought opening Cuba was a good idea. But as recently as September, he stated that he would reverse what Obama has done with opening Cuba. So you might want to think of going before Jan. 20. If you do sail there, we are interested in hearing your story, so contact me about writing an article, or even just a letter to the editor about your experience (editor@SouthwindsMagazine.com).

Going to the US Sailing National Sailing Programs Symposium in February? Article Wanted SOUTHWINDS is looking for someone to write an article about the symposium. Payment. Contact Steve Morrell, editor@SouthwindsMagazine.com.

Contribute to Southwinds – Articles and Photos Wanted - contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com Sailing Experiences: Stories and photos about experiences in places you’ve cruised; anchorages, marinas, or passages made throughout the Southern waters, the Bahamas and the Caribbean.

Our Waterways: Information about the waters we sail in: disappearing marinas, boatyards and slips; mooring fields, anchoring rights, waterway access, etc.

Boat Reviews: Review your boat. See the ad on page 43 on reviewing your boat

Maintenance and Technical Articles: Repairs, emergency repairs, modifications, additions, etc.

Charter Stories: Have an interesting Charter story? In our Southern waters, or perhaps in the Bahamas or the Caribbean?

Individuals in the Sailing Industry: Interesting stories about the world of sailors out there, young, old, and some that are no longer with us but have contributed to the sport or were just true lovers of sailing.

Write About Your Yacht Club or Sailing Association: Tell us about your club, its history, facilities, major events, etc. Youth Sailing: Write about a local youth sailing organization or sailing camp

Fun and Unusual Stories: Got an interesting story? Unusual, funny, tearjerkers, learning experiences, etc. Cover Photos: SOUTHWINDS is always looking for nice cover shots, which

are always paid for. They need to be a high-resolution vertical shot, but For more information, to discuss ideas, payment and requirements, contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com. we sometimes crop horizontal photos for vertical use. Bahamas and the Caribbean: Trips, passages, anchor- and click on Writer/Photo Guidelines. Go to experiences, www.southwindsmagazine.com, ages, provisioning and other stories of interest. 10

December 2016

SOUTHWINDS

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34th Annual Event

LETTERS “Freedom of the press is limited to those who own one.” A.J. Liebling

In its continuing endeavor to share its press, SOUTHWINDS

Bradenton Yacht Club

Annual Fall Kickoff Regatta 2016 The Regatta Committee and Competitors wish to extend our thanks to this year’s sponsors

invites readers to write in with experiences & opinions. Email your letters to editor@southwindsmagazine.com

CRUISERS NOT WELCOME IN MARCO ISLAND I’m sorry to report that Marco Island has taken yet another step toward proving that they are the most cruiserunfriendly port in southwest Florida. Many years ago, their town council passed an antianchoring ordinance that took years to get rid of. In a trial, in which Claiborne Young and the maritime lawyer who drafted the state’s anchoring rules testified, the law was found to be unconstitutional on a whole list of grounds and was tossed out. More recently, the management of the Esplanade, the condo-shopping mall and marina in Smokehouse Bay made it clear to “those people” who had the audacity to anchor there that they were unwelcome, even though there was an agreement made with the town when the development was built that they would provide dinghy dockage for vessels in the bay. They continued to provide it—in as chintzy a way possible. You can dock your dinghy there for $10, but you must be back and take it out by 6pm or the access to it will be locked up. This means that if you want to go into town for dinner, you’d better be a real “early bird.” Just last week, we cruised to Marco and anchored in Factory Bay, a little farther up the river. We had always been welcomed there when it was the Marco River Marina. They charged a reasonable $5 a day for dinghies, and you got back when you got back. Now that it’s the Rose Marina, there’s a new sign. The dinghy dockage is still five bucks, but they too have added the “you-have-to-be-out by 6pm” rule. Upon questioning, some of their staff about it, the reply was, “Well, we’ve had problems with it.” The one remaining place to land in Marco is at the Winn-Dixie store on the other side of the Boulevard. You can get there through Smokehouse Bay and under the bridge to the right of the Esplanade. Take the first left under the bridge. There is also a nice public park right next to that bridge, but it is clearly marked with “No Mooring” signs. All it would take to suggest that cruisers were welcome would be to simply take down those signs and replace them with “Mooring for Dinghies of Anchored Vessels.” A single section of floating dock tied to that wall would really be a welcome sign. Given Marco’s history, I’m not holding my breath. Jay Light s/v Alborada Fort Myers Beach, FL Jay, Sorry to hear that. It sounds like it’s the opposite of where you are from, Fort Myers Beach, which advertises their mooring field in SOUTHWINDS and has a Cruisers Appreciation Day ever year in early spring. I’m hoping that other places you cruise to are friend-

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December 2016

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lier. Let us know about the towns that welcome cruisers when you find them. We will gladly pass the word along. Editor REPLACING INTERIOR VINYL COVERING I read with interest the article by Jeff Sherman on the replacement of his foam-backed vinyl liner in his V-berth in the October issue. He did a wonderful job. One product that would have been very useful to him or any of your do-ityourself readers is craft paper, also called builder's paper. It is a heavy-duty brown paper that comes in 18-inch and 36inch wide rolls. It is thick enough that it can be used to make templates, easily molded into any corner or around portholes to get exact curves and angles. Once the pattern is cut out, it can be tweaked to make a perfect fit.  If you make a mistake, you simply discard it and start with another piece.  After attaining the perfect pattern, the expensive material can be confidently cut without waste. The builder's paper is available at Home Depot for about $12 a roll and will last for many projects. Carol Elwood Dunedin, FL COMPLIMENTS FOR THE CUBA AND STUART WOODS’ ARTICLES IN OCTOBER Although I enjoy all of your issues, the October issue contained two articles which were special to me. I grew up in Varadero Beach pre- and post-Castro. Fred Braman's article was one of the best articles I have read. Varadero beach was—although I am not sure today—the greatest beach in the world with bleached white sand and crystal clear water. Lovely read and accurate. Of the hundreds of nautical and adventure books I have read, Stuart Woods’ book, Blue Water Green Skipper, is one of the best. I was fortunate to obtain a signed copy when he visited and gave a wonderful presentation a few years ago; a remarkable man. I also have tucked away in my email box a gracious note from him after I emailed him and thanked him for the signature and his time speaking to us. So thanks for a great publication and great stories. John I Gabilondo s/v Daphne John, Fred Braman has written three good articles on his trip to Cuba. Part III is in this issue, where he goes to his final stop, Havana, before returning home to Florida. Fred put a note at the end of his articles that he will gladly help anyone who has questions about going to Cuba and will come to speak about the trip and his Cuba visit—as long as it’s not too far from his home in northeast Florida. He will be speaking about his trip when he gives a seminar on it at the St. Petersburg Power and Sailboat Show, Dec. 14. He has received so many inquiries to come speak that he joked about hiring a secretary to take care of his schedule. Editor

E-mail your letters to: editor@southwindsmagazine.com News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS December 2016

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Southeast Air & Water Temperatures, Prevailing Winds & Gulf Stream Currents – December For live buoy water and weather data, go to the National Data Buoy Center at www.ndbc.noaa.gov

WIND ROSES: Each wind rose shows the strength and direction of the prevailing winds in the area and month. These have been recorded over a long period of time. In general, the lengths of the arrows indicate how often the winds came from that direction. The longer the arrow, the more often the winds came from that direction. When the arrow is too long to be printed in a practical manner, a number is indicated.

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The number in the center of the circle shows the percentage of the time that the winds were calm. The lengths of the arrows plus the calms number in the center add up to 100 percent. The number of feathers on the arrow indicates the strength of the wind on the Beaufort scale (one feather is Force 1, etc.). Wind Roses are taken from Pilot Charts.

www.southwindsmagazine.com


CALENDAR

Upcoming Events in the Southeast (Non-Race) Go to the Racing Calendar for regattas, local races and racing news • Educational/Training • Boat Shows • Seafood Festivals & Nautical Flea Markets • Sailboat & Trawler Rendezvous • Other Events

LISTING YOUR EVENT To have your event listed, contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com. Email us the information by the 1st of the month preceding publication. Contact us if a little later (it most likely will get in, but not certain). We will print your public event the month of the event and the month before. Rendezvous we print for three months. Events must be free, very low cost, or not for profit. For profit events can be listed for a small fee.

EDUCATIONAL/TRAINING U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary organizations throughout the country hold hundreds of regular boating courses on the various subjects. To find a course near you, go to www. cgaux.org/boatinged/class_finder. North Carolina Maritime Museum, Beaufort, NC Ongoing adult sailing programs. Family Sailing. Ongoing traditional boat building classes. www.ncmm-friends.org, maritime@ncmail.net, 252-728-7317. Boating Safety Courses— Required in Florida and Other Southern States Anyone in Florida born after Jan. 1, 1988, must take a boating safety course in order to operate a boat of 10 hp or more. Other states require safety education if born after a certain date. To see the laws in each state, go to www.aboutboatingsafely.com. The course named “About Boating Safely” and “America’s Boating Course (ABC)” both satisfy the requirements. They are marked below with two asterisks (**): **Jacksonville, FL. Ongoing Mike Christnacht. 904-502-9154. mchristnacht@comcast.net.

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www.uscgajaxbeach.com/pe.htm. Classes at Captain’s Club, 13363 Beach Blvd. $25 including materials. **New Port Richey, FL. Ongoing. New Port Richey USCGAUX Flotilla 11-06 First Saturday of the month. 9am to 5pm. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Communications Building, 3920 Marine Parkway, New Port Richey, FL (in Gulf Harbors Yacht Club Parking Lot). Register at BoaterEducation.info Race Management Instruction in the Southeast: See the Racing News Section, following this section. US SAILING INSTRUCTOR AND COACH COURSES IN THE SOUTHEAST (NC, SC, GA, FL, AL, MS, LA, TX) Go to the website for courses that might have been scheduled after our press date. For more on course schedules, locations, contact information, course descriptions and prerequisites, go to www.ussailing. org/education/teach-sailing. No courses scheduled in the southeast U.S. as of press date. Check the website, since courses are often added late. For learning-to-sail and powerboat handling courses, go to www.ussailing.org/education.

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Small Boat Instructor Level 1, Jensen Beach, FL, Dec. 28-31 US Sailing Center of Martin County. Contact Alan Jenkinson alan@usscmc.org. Instructor Joseph Mello Small Boat Instructor Level 1, Jacksonville, FL, Dec. 31-Jan. 1 Florida Yacht Club. Contac Jodi Weinbecker at sailing@thefyc.org. Instructor Jane Milliman.

BOAT SHOWS (Some boat shows listed are all powerboats)

39th Annual St. Petersburg Boat Show and Strictly Sail, FL, Dec. 1-4 SOUTHWINDS will have a booth (#117- halfway into the sail tent on the right) at the show, distributing extra copies of the magazine, answering questions and taking names. Go to page 38 for more information and show seminars schedule.

62nd Houston International Boat Show, Jan. 6-15 Powerboats. Fri. 1-8, Sat. 11-8, Sunday, 11-8, Mon.-Tues. 11-8, Wed.-Th. 1-8, Fri. 1-9, Sat. 11-9, Sun. 11-5. NRG Center, Houston. 713-526-6361 www.houstonboatshows.com.

55th Atlanta Boat Show, Jan. 12-15 Thurs.-Fri. 11am-9pm. Saturday, 10am-9pm. Sunday, 10am-

Quality Boats for Sale Custom 2011 Shannon 53 HPS Many unique changes especially made for this knowledgeable sailboat owner. Ohana is a luxury ketch that draws a mere 4 ft. 9 in. and sails or powers (TWIN YANMAR ENGINES) at a comfortable 9 to 10 knots. This ketch rig yacht includes Leisure Furl hydraulic main boom, a Leisure Furl standard offshore mizzen boom, Doyle sails, and Nautical Structures davit system. Must be seen to appreciate. Price to sell at $1,550,000. Historic 25’ Norwegian Launch Salty Dog Classic antique launch was owned by American cartoonist Wally Bishop. Salty Dog was built in Grimstaad, Norway, in 1956 and rebuilt by the Sailor’s Wharf Yacht Yard between 2000 – 2006 as a show boat. New Magic Tilt aluminum trailer with duel brakes. It is a classic one-of-akind that would be a great boat for cruising rivers and lakes. Reduced to $29,500. Cleanest Hunter 450 on the Market This single-owner 1999 Hunter had $83,000 spent for refurbishing and updating. Owner had open heart surgery and had to sell. Great for living aboard and cruising. Most popular Hunter made. Price just dropped to $149,500.

Sailor‘s Wharf Yacht Yard, St Petersburg, FL Call Jopie Helsen 727.439.5460 jopie@sailorswharf.com 16

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6pm. Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. NMMA. www.atlantaboatshow.com.

16th Annual Charlotte County Boat Show, Port Charlotte, FL, Jan. 12-15 Charlotte County Fairgrounds. 10-6pm Thurs-Sat. 10-5pm Sunday. 954-570-7785 www.swfmia.com/charlotte-county-boat-show

43rd Stuart Boat Show, Stuart, FL, Jan. 13-15 10am-6pm. till 5pm Sunday. Waterway Marina, Apex Marine. Stuart harbor, Half Mile off State Road 707. $12, $10 senior citizens, $6 children 10 and under, infants free. www.stuartboatshow.com

Austin Boat Show, Jan. 19-22 Thurs. 4-9pm, Fri. 12-9pm, Sat. 10-9pm, Sun. 10-5pm. Austin Convention Center. www.austinboatshow.com

Charleston Boat Show, Charleston, SC, Jan. 27-29 Fri. 12-6pm, Sat. 10-6pm, Sun. 11-5pm. Charleston Convention Center, Charleston, SC. 864-250-9713. www.thecharlestonboatshow.com

SEAFOOD FESTIVALS 11th Annual Port Salerno Seafood Festival, Port Salerno, FL, Jan. 28 Live music, arts and crafts vendors, a kid’s fun zone, mermaids, pirates and seafood. Adults $10, $5 in advance, children 12 and under free. 10am to 8pm. Food served until 7. Port Salerno Docks. www.portsalernoseafoodfestival.org.

NAUTICAL FLEA MARKETS 13th Annual Big Pine Key Nautical Flea Market, Florida Keys, Jan. 14-15 Typically drawing nearly 200 vendors, this event held on the wooded grounds of the Lower Keys Chamber of Commerce, Mile Marker 31 Oceanside on Big Pine Key. Besides nautical items, there will be arts and crafts, food, and live music. 8am to 2pm.

SAILBOAT/TRAWLER RENDEZVOUS Promote and List Your Boat Rendezvous SOUTHWINDS will list your Rendezvous for three months (other events are listed for only two months)—to give boaters lots of time to think about and plan their attending the event. This is for rendezvous held in the Southeast U.S. or Bahamas. Send information to editor@southwindsmagazine.com. www.southwindsmagazine.com


May 10-13, 2017 Tampa Bay, Sarasota & Naples Starts This is a SBYA and Naples-Marco Island Boat of the Year Race For additional information, go to:

www.boneislandregatta.com

3rd Annual Key West to Cuba May 15-20, 2017 “Also open to anyone who wants to rally from Key West to Cuba only!”

News & Views for Southern Sailors

or contact:

TAMPA OR SARASOTA START Alice Petrat 941-232-3635 or gap4737@aol.com NAPLES START Jerry jwatkins@superiorsurplus.com

SOUTHWINDS December 2016

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OTHER EVENTS Marine Dealer Conference & Expo, Orlando, FL, Dec. 5-8 Sponsored by the Marine Retailers Association of the Americas, this annual event holds workshops, seminars, speakers, exhibits and other related events for members of the marine industry. Orange County Convention Center in Orlando. www.marinedealerconference.com.

Electric & Hybrid Marine World Expo Florida, Tampa, FL, Jan. 16-18 This event is solely dedicated to showcasing the very latest and next-generation electric and hybrid marine propulsion systems, technologies and solutions, both new and for repowering. Exhibitors come from all over the world. The event is held in the West Hall at the Tampa Convention Center. The expo is organized by the publisher of Electric & Hybrid Marine Technology International, the world’s only publication dedicated to these emerging electric and hybrid propulsion technologies. In effect, this world expo will bring the pages of the magazine to life. To read the latest issue, go to www.ukipme.com/mag_electric_marine.htm. Register online. Entry is Free. There will two expos held in 2017: Tampa and in The Netherlands in June.

The 8th Annual St. Petersburg Classic Regatta (formerly the Good Old Boat Regatta), Jan. 28 More than Just a Regatta—A Benefit for “Meals on Wheels”

This regatta is organized by the St. Petersburg Sailing Association and co-hosted by the St. Petersburg Yacht Club, which serves as the event base. The SPYC is providing free dockage, along with being the locale for the exceptional dock parties and the awards dinner banquet. The St. Petersburg Classic Regatta is designed to showcase older classic boats; boats must be at least 20 years old to enter (built before 1996). Boats come from all over to participate in this event which is known more for its fun, camaraderie and generosity than the sailboat race, which is always a spirited event. The regatta is a fundraiser for Meals on Wheels, which provides nutritious, hot meals to low income elderly folks who would otherwise go without. Last year the regatta raised over $20,000 for Meals on Wheels. The regatta slogan, “Keels for Meals on Wheels” highlights the importance of good nutrition to provide a solid foundation for healthy seniors. Meals on Wheels was started in St. Petersburg in 1968 and has grown to be a national program. For 50 years, they have provided health and wellness programs to seniors to help them remain in their homes—where they want to be. Classes include Spinnaker, Non-Spinnaker, True Cruising, One-Design and a Fun class. The True Cruising division is always the largest class. Special awards are given for most beautiful boat, oldest boat, oldest skipper and a

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The 7th Annual Classic Regatta in January 2016.

9AM UNTIL 4 PM

News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS December 2016

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variety of other categories. The most prestigious award is the Good Neighbor Trophy awarded to the boat that makes the largest donation to Meals on Wheels. The NOR, online registration, entry form, contacts and additional information are online at www.stpetersburgclassicregatta.com. race.committee.chair@spsa.us

Wrecker’s Cup “Race,” Key West, January 22, February 26, March 26, April 30 This race is sponsored by the Schooner Wharf Bar on the waterfront in downtown Key West. This Sunday afternoon race commemorates the race to a wreck that signified the old days when Key West’s main business was wreck salvage. Boats race seven miles out to Sand Key from the Key West waterfront and back. The race has five classes: Classic, Schooner, Multihull, Monohull over 30 feet and Monohull under 30 feet. Locals and visitors are invited and welcome. It is known as the “anything-but-serious race.” First boat back wins. No protests allowed. Sailing/boating rules and rules of seamanship always apply. Four races are held over four months. The race is videotaped and the awards ceremony after the race at the bar serves a BBQ dinner while guests watch the race on TV. Beer drinking is very common. The first race is always the Sunday (Jan. 22) at the end of Key West Race Week. The following three months, the race is the last Sunday in the month. There is a captain’s meeting the day before the race at the bar at 7pm, where “captains and crew contemplate strategy while reviewing course and race rules.” Race awards, booty, music and barbecue are after the race at the bar at 7pm. www.schoonerwharf.com.

The IMBC is the leading marina and boatyard conference. It is geared specifically to marina and boatyard owners, operators, managers, dock masters, harbormasters, boat builders and repairers, and industry consultants. IMBC is where dedicated marine professionals gather to exchange information, talk about the future of the industry, explore new methods and techniques, receive updates on revised standards and established rules, and discover new products. The conference is produced by the Association of Marina Industries (AMI). Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center. 401682-7334. www.MarinaAssociation.org/imbc.

National Sailing Programs Symposium, Austin, TX, Feb. 16-18 National Conference Annual Meeting, Feb. 14-15 US Sailing’s NSPS 2017 will be held in February at the Sheraton Austin. Early Bird registration ended Sept. 15, but registration at the door ($350) continues through the beginning of the show, although rates are lower for all those registering earlier. Standard ($300) and Group ($275) registration ends Dec. 31, Late Registration ends Feb. 12. Registration for the Annual Conference ends Feb. 12. For more information and to register, go to http://nsps.ussailing.org. (SOUTHWINDS is looking for a writer who is attending the symposium to do a write-up and take photos. Payment.) Contact Steve Morrell at editor@SouthwindsMagazine.com, or 941-795-8704.

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RACE NEWS Racing News, Instruction, Southern Sailors, and National and International Regattas in the South

NEWS Vendée Globe Started Nov. 6 The 8th Edition of the Solo Race Around the World Fleet at start of the Véndee Globe in Les Sables d’Olonne, France, on Nov. 6. Photo by Vincent Curutchet / DPPI.

On Nov. 6, more than 300,000 excited spectators and thousands of boats watched as 20 French skippers and nine from various other countries departed from the port of Les Sables d’Olonne on the Atlantic coast of France for another Vendee Globe race around the world. The Vendée Globe, called the “Mount Everest of the Seas,” was created in 1989 by Frenchman Philippe Jeantot and quickly became the ultimate sailboat ocean-racing event. The race is a solo, non-stop, around-the-world unassisted race that is organized over four years. In 1989 13 boats set out and 10 made it all the way, four months later. It is known as the longest competitive sports event in the world—and definitely one of the hardest. The boats race 22,000 miles from west to east, leaving France and heading south to go around the tip of Africa towards the east. Over the years, in seven races, only 71 of 138 boats completed the course. It has claimed three lives. This year, there are 20 French skippers and nine from various countries. They will all be working to beat the record set in the last Vendée Globe in 2013 by the youngest

49th Regata del Sol al Sol from St. Petersburg, FL, to Isla Mujeres, Mexico, April 28, 2017 Entrants are already signing up for this annual race, which has a 50-boat limit. Skippers who entered their vessel in the St. Petersburg-Habana Race, and did not receive a refund of any kind, will receive a $450 discount upon entering the Regata del Sol al Sol. Deadline to obtain this discount is February 28, 2017. Chairperson Elizabeth (Beth) Pennington can be contacted at Chairperson@regatadelsolalsol.org, or through the website at www.regatadelsolalsol.org, or go to www.spyc.org. There will be seminars and final registration on April 27, 2017. Many pre-race and after-race activities are set that all are invited to, including crew and any others interested in attending. Anyone interested in joining in the fun on the island, but not necessarily wanting to sail, can fly to News & Views for Southern Sailors

skipper to ever win, Francois Gabart, aged 29, who finished in 78 days and 2 hours. But this year changes to some of the boats have inspired many to finish much faster. The boats are raced in 60-foot, ocean-racing Imocas, and seven of them have been outfitted with hydrofoiling daggerboards, which lift the boats out of the water to travel at sustained speeds 24 knots faster than the conventional designs. But other similar boats that introduced hydrofoils to ocean racing last year had many equipment failures—in fact most did. Changes have been made on the new boats from lessons learned from that earlier race, but hydrofoils in ocean racing are still new to the sport and still in the testing stage. For more on the Vendée Globe and to follow the race, go to http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en.

Cancun. Then, it is a short taxi ride and ferry ride to Isla Mujeres. In order to keep track of the boats and others coming to the island, people can get their regatta hotel reservations and ground transportation through the website using the reservation information tabs on the right side of the home page. There is a secure website page for online entries, or mail the entry in (address available on the website). You can also check out the Facebook page. Special awards will be given to the top vessels that competed in the St. Petersburg-Habana Race and the Regata del Sol al Sol. More information on these awards will be announced in the future.

RACE INSTRUCTION IN THE SOUTHEAST To list your race instruction courses (free listings for non-profit groups. A $25 fee to for-profit groups): editor@southwindsmagazine.com SOUTHWINDS December 2016

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RACE NEWS For US SAILING Courses: Information, prerequisites, and enrollment online available at www.ussailing.org/ race-officials/find-a-seminar. US SAILING One Day Race Management Seminar, Corpus Christi, TX, Dec. 3 Corpus Christi Yacht Club. Contact Todd Hunter at todda hunterjr@yahoo.com. Instructor James Tichenor, Shannon Bush, Billy Richnow, Mark Foster.

UPCOMING NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REGATTAS IN THE SOUTHEAST 2016 Melges 24 World Championship, Miami, FL, Nov. 26-Dec. 3 Hosted by the Miami Yacht Club, this event is expecting over 500 sailors and more than 100 boats from over 20 countries. www.melges24worlds.com, www.miamiyachtclub.com

Wave Class Race Week and 19th Annual Wave National Championships, Islamorada, FL, Dec. 1-4 This event is sponsored by Catamaran Sailor Magazine and OnlineMarineStore.com. Islander Resort in Islamorada, Florida Keys. www.catsailor.com/waves/wave_nationals.html. www.Catsailor.com

Melges 20 Winter Series, South Florida, December 9-11, February 3-5, March 3-5 The Melges 20 Winter Series is three events held annually

MS TX

AL

GA

LA

FL

Tradewinds Midwinter Open Cat Nationals/NAMSA NAs, Islamorada, Florida Keys, Jan. 14-16 Three days of racing (if racers can only make it for two days they will get scored their average for the missing day). This is the biggest event of the winter. Carlton Tucker Memorial Award to Winner of the Largest Class. Also the following: F18 Midwinters, F16 Midwinters, Wave Midwinters, NAMSA North Americans. Contact rick@catsailor.com, 305-451-3287. For preregistration, go to www.catsailor. com/registration. For Notice of Race, go to www.catsailor.com/Tradewinds.html.

30th Quantum Key West Race Week 2016, Jan. 15-20 Key West Race Week is under new management for the second year with the Storm Trysail Club taking over that position from Premiere Racing, which ran it for many years. The Waterfront Brewery in the historic Seaport and Bight will be the new host this year for all shoreside activities. There will be one day of registration followed by five days of inshore racing and short offshore courses. www.KeyWestRaceWeek.com

FIND A BUSINESS – LIST YOURS!

NC

SC

for the large fleet of Melges 20s that campaign in Southern states and the Caribbean each winter. All events are held at the Coconut Grove Sailing Club. Event 1 is Dec. 9-11. Event 2, the Miami Winter Regatta, will be Feb. 3-5. Event 3 is the Melges Rocks Regatta on March 3-5. After Event 3, Melges 20 racing moves to Charleston Race Week. In between, many of the sailors will also campaign in Melges 32s, including Key West Race Week.

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US SAILING’s ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami Returns in 2017, Jan. 22-28 US Sailing’s premier event—the 28th running of Sailing World Cup Miami—is set to return to Miami FL for toplevel Olympic and Paralympic class racing. The event is the only North American regatta to be included in World Sailing’s 2016-17 Sailing World Cup series. The regatta is a mainstay on the winter circuit for sailors campaigning for the next Olympic and Paralympic Games. Competitors in the Olympic and Paralympic events will have five days of fleet racing from Monday, Jan. 22 to Friday, Jan. 27. Medal races across the 10 Olympic events will bring the regatta to a close on Saturday, Jan. 28 where medals will be awarded to the top three boats. Regatta headquarters will be located at the US Sailing Center Miami, a U.S. Olympic Training Site, in Coconut Grove, Miami, FL. Additional hosts for the event include the City of Miami’s Regatta Park, Coconut Grove Sailing Club and Shake-A-Leg Miami. These sailing organizations host classes onshore, as well as help run the on-the-water racing. The Coral Reef Yacht Club hosts the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. Event winners in each Olympic event from Sailing World Cup Miami will qualify for the 2017 Grand Final, while the best placed ‘home continent’ sailor will also qualify. The regatta is especially important as a ranking regatta for sailors hoping to qualify for the US Sailing Team Sperry, which annually distinguishes the top U.S. sailors in each Olympic and Paralympic class. http://miami.ussailing.org/2017-event/

9th Conch Republic Cup, Key West Cuba Race Week, Jan. 22-Feb. 3 The Conch Republic Cup race is scheduled to depart from Key West on Jan. 24 and return by Feb. 3. Events will begin with registration at the Race Village in Key West on Jan. 22. On Jan. 23, registration will continue, with a skipper’s meeting and welcome party at 5pm. The race to Cuba starts on Jan. 24 and will go to Varadero, a 110-mile run, where there will be a welcome reception on Jan. 25. Boats will depart on Jan. 26 for a 100mile race to Havana, where there will be a reception on Jan. 27, with a lay day the following day. On Jan. 29, there will be a triangle race off Havana and a parade along the Malecon, followed by an awards party at Hemingway International Yacht Club. Two more lay days will follow on Jan. 30-Feb. 1. On Feb. 2, at 5pm, there will be a return 90mile race to Key West with an awards party and dinner on Feb. 3. Winner of the Conch Republic Cup will be the boat that has the best overall performance in all four races. For more information and registration, go to www.ConchRepublicCup.org (go to the “Participant” tab). Registration must be done by Dec. 15.

News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS December 2016

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SOUTHWINDS

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ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES 2016-2017 Why spend All Your Money Advertising in an Expensive National Magazine when you can target southern sailors for a fraction of the cost? (and northern sailors who come south, too)

2016- 2017 SOUTHERN BOATING SEASON Advertising in SOUTHWINDS is this winter’s BEST OPPORTUNITY TO REACH SAILORS From October through April, thousands of sailors come south to enjoy the warm winter sailing season. They bring their boat down the ICW, sail down the coast, travel down to where they store their boat off season, charter—or rent a day sailer— or come down to learn to sail— BUT THEY DO COME SOUTH.

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THE MIAMI FEBRUARY BOAT SHOW ISSUE Largest Distribution of the Year (Deadline Jan.4)

Also our BIGGEST ANNUAL ISSUE, because we distribute an extra 2000 copies at the show, Feb. 16-20

Contact an Advertising Representative Today Steve Morrell editor@SouthwindsMagazine.com

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941-870-3422

OUR ONLINE SOUTHEAST U.S. SAILING BUSINESS DIRECTORY List your business in the Directory – SouthEastSailing.com Contact Steve Morrell

editor@SouthwindsMagazine.com

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SOUTHERN SAILING SCHOOLS N. Carolina • S. Carolina • Georgia • Florida • Alabama • Mississippi • Louisiana • Texas Learn to Sail on Anna Maria Island On the south side of Tampa Bay

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Liveaboard cruising courses – 3 days to 3 weeks Earn ASA Certifications in: • Basic Sailing • Coastal Cruising • Bareboat Chartering • Coastal Navigation and more!

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800-282-1411 sales@dunbaryachts.com www.dunbaryachts.com News & Views for Southern Sailors

SERVING THE SOUTHEAST U.S. Find Local Products & Services for Sailors Whether you need a marine store, a boatyard, or your bottom cleaned – find local businesses by name, category, keyword or map

SOME OF THE 50 CATEGORIES: Maintenance • Rigging • Sails • Canvas Air Conditioning • Outboard Repair • Mechanics

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NEWS FROM AROUND THE SOUTH AND THE WORLD OF SAILING Send us news, including business press releases, to editor@southwindsmagazine.com. We need to receive them by the 1st of the month preceding publication. Contact us if later (it most likely will get in, but not certain).

Okeechobee Water Level Goes Up about Nine Inches Since September As of press date in early October, Lake Okeechobee was at 15.93 feet above sea level. This makes the navigational depth for Route 1, which crosses the lake, 9.87 feet, and the navigational depth for Route 2, which goes around the southern coast of the lake, 8.07 feet. Bridge clearance at Myakka was at 50.63 feet. For those interested in seeing the daily height of the lake, navigation route depths and bridge clearance, go to http://w3.saj.usace.army.mil/h2o/currentLL.shtml (copy this address exactly as it is here with upper and lower cases). This link is also available on our website, www.southwindsmagazine.com. See the left column.

Hanse Yachts Introduces Unique Rudder Drive In October Hanse Yachts of Germany introduced a unique propeller system that is attached to the rudder, giving sailboats directional control similar to that of an outboard that allows the prop direction to turn with the rudder. Called the 315 e-motion rudder drive it was developed along with Jefa (Danish rudder specialists) and electric outboard company Torqeedo. The unit has a 4kw (8hp equivalent) Torqeedo electric motor, eliminating the diesel engine and weighs 100kg (45 pounds) less than a diesel engine. It uses a folding prop that is integrated into the rudder. The rudder has a range of 100 degrees, giving the boat incredible maneuverability. Another advantage is there is no hole in the hull for a propeller, reducing hull drag. It was introduced at the Hamburg boat show in October on the Hanse 315.

P roven H urricane P rotection Proven Hurricane Protection Stainless Steel Clamps & Piling Extension Brackets

TideSlides work on Existing Piles, Do NOT need to line up with Cleat

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The Hanse 315 e-Motion Rudder Drive. It will move the Hanse 315 at 4.5 knots for 30 miles. Maximum speed of the unit is 6.1 knots, which is about the same as a conventional diesel engine. The system is currently only available on the Hanse 315, but plans for larger units on larger boats are in the works. View the new drive system on a Hanse 315 in operation at YouTube. Search for “emotion rudder drive.”

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News & Views for Southern Sailors

SOUTHWINDS

December 2016

27


Motorize You, Your Kayak Rudder, or Paddleboard with a Bixby Propulsion System

The Bixby Propulsion system.

If you don’t have a 31-foot sailboat, you can attach a Bixby Propulsion System to a kayak, any kayak rudder or paddleboard—or even propel you through the water while diving. Go to www.bixby.com.

Florida Yacht Brokers Association Renamed “International Yacht Brokers Association” In November, the Florida Yacht Brokers Association renamed itself to be called the International Yacht Brokers Association (IYBA). The old website address (www. fyba.org) will go to the same website as the new one: www.iyba.yachts. After reviewing their list of member brokers, the organization realized that their members were operating around the globe and that a name change was in order. The FYBA—now the IYBA—was formed in 1987 and has 1350 individual members representing more than 400 businesses. Its members are responsible for 20 percent of all international yacht sales, as well as 50 percent of all U.S. domestic yacht sales and 80 percent of all yacht sales transactions in the state of Florida. Each member is required to abide by a code of ethics to protect the public against fraud, misrepresentation, or unethical practices in the yacht brokerage profession. Each member is to endeavor to eliminate any practices, which could be damaging to the public or the dignity and integrity of the yacht brokerage profession. For more information, please visit www.iyba.yachts.

Training Sailors Since 1989

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Boating Industry and Sailboat Statistics Boating Industry magazine reported recently on some interesting statistics about boats in recent years. The magazine seems to be reporting on mainly powerboats, but it does report on sailboats, just not with a lot of details. But—in reality, the reports reflect the dominance of powerboats over sailboats: • 12.1 million boats were registered in 2015, up slightly from 2014. An additional 3.6 million boats are estimated to be undocumented (not all boats must be registered, and some just don’t register their boats). That’s a total of 15.7 million. The trend is down since 2010, when the total number of boats was just over 16.2 million. • 50 percent are outboard boats, 10 percent are sailboats. The rest includes PWCs, sterndrives, inboards and miscellaneous others. • Florida continues to be the leading state in sales by dollars of boats, trailers, motors and accessories with about $2.6 billion, outspending second-place Texas by almost twice as much. Spending is up about 6.9 percent from 2014 to 2015. • The average owner’s age for all boats is 51.4 years, up a bit from 47.7 in 2005. Sailboat ownership is a bit higher at 57.1 years compared to 54.7 in 2005. • Boat Trader, which lists boats both in print and online,

reported that in 2011, about 90 percent used a desktop computer to view boats, and about 5 percent used tablets and 5 percent mobile phones. A downward trend of use by desktops continued annually until 2015, when about 50 percent used a desktop, while an upward trend was established for mobile devices with about 30 percent tablets and 20 percent mobile phones by 2015. • Revenue from new boat sales totaled 8.6 billion in 2015 up 4.8 percent since 2014. In new sailboats, sales decreased from 2015 to 2014. • New boat sales and used boat sales both increased for the fifth year in a row up through 2015. An interesting factor is the average age of brokerage boats sold is the highest for sailboats, which is no surprise, since there are a lot of used sailboats out there that are easily many decades old and still in great condition. Not so much for powerboats. The average age of a sailboat sold was 29 years old in 2015, up from 22 years old in 2005. The statistics for non-sail covers a wide range of boat types: average age of a runabout is 22; a fishing boat, 24; a ski boat, 15. The average age for all boats (including sail) is 20 years. From 2005 through 2015, there is an upward trend in all categories of people keeping their boats longer. The average number of days to sell a brokerage power boat is about 250 days; for a sailboat, it’s about 300 days.

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SOUTHWINDS

December 2016

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Miami Strictly Sail Boat Show Exhibitor Tent Returns To Dockside Location In 2017 The NMMA announced recently that the Strictly Sail Boat Show exhibitors’ tent will again be located next to the docks for the February 2017 show. This is great news for the exhibitors who were unhappy when the SkyRise Miami tower construction forced the tent to be moved away from the Strictly Sail traditional dockside location to a location next to Biscayne Blvd. in 2015. The Bayside location is also one of the major departure points for the water taxi service that connects to the main Miami Boat Show location on Virginia Key, making it convenient for visitors to see both the sail show and the main boat show. The Bayside location is also one of the major departure points for the water taxi service that connects to the main Miami Boat Show location on Virginia Key, making it convenient for visitors to see both the sail show and the main boat show. Exhibitors can sign up for a booth at the show by going to the exhibitor’s page at www.StrictlySailMiami.com/exhibitors of the show’s website. For more information about the show—for visitors—go to www.StrictlySailMiami.com. 

BoatUS Reports Little Damage and Loss of Boats from Hurricane Matthew The BoatUS Catastrophe Team arranges for the salvage of a 51-foot sailboat in St. Augustine, FL in October. The vessel broke free from St. Augustine Marina during Hurricane Matthew and was safely refloated. Photo by David R. Wiggin. BoatUS reports that while there are some localized areas of dock destruction and boat losses, damage to recreational boats as a result of Hurricane Matthew has not been widespread. “Damage turned out to be less than anticipated because the storm’s wall stayed offshore, but I’d also like to think boaters played a part as well in reducing damage,” said BoatUS Vice President of Public Affairs Scott Croft. “They had plenty of early warning to prepare.” 30

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SHIP BALM

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101 Ways to Protect Boat Stuff, Your Crew and the Environment SHIP BALM™ is a natural lanolin-based lubricant and waterproof protectant with hundreds of marine uses. It protects metal from rust and other corrosion by weather and salt. It is especially effective on metal-to-metal contact, such as screws in masts, zippers and snaps, and turnbuckles. It is a custom blend of USP-grade anhydrous lanolin and beeswax, plus a hint of natural scent. It has 0% fish oil or petroleum additives that stain or stink. Brian Toss writes in Complete Rigger’s Apprentice that lanolin is “stupefying effective.” Rod Stephens (Sparkman & Stevens) uses “anhydrous lanolin for all heavy on-deck and rigging lubricating jobs. … It’s the only lubricant I know that will stay on for even two or three years in salt water conditions.” Lanolin also protects and lubricates rubber parts plus restores and waterproofs both vinyl and leather. These softening properties are why it’s an ingredient of baby, skin and shaving products. They make SHIP BALM™ ideal for protecting skin—everything from lip balm to barrier cream before fiberglassing projects. A little bit goes an extraordinarily long way. Since Lanolin is extracted from shorn sheep’s wool, it is natural, renewable and biodegradable. SHIP BALM™ is custom blended by Seaworthy Goods. The screw-top 3oz aluminum tin is $10.99 plus shipping. Could be a great gift for the holidays. Seaworthy Goods of Florida also produces PortVisor™ rain shields, PanelVisor™ engine panels and more. www.SeaworthyGoods.com. 941.448.9173

DREAM BIG. TRAVEL FAR. Let Alpenglow Light Your Way! High Quality – Efficient Lighting Legendary Customer Service Since 1988

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LED Overhead Lights in 2 Sizes SOUTHWINDS

December 2016

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BOATYARDS/MARINAS To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email editor@southwindsmagazine.com

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888-609-2827 www.windrider.com 32

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CAPT. RICK MEYER (727) 424-8966 US Sailing & Powerboat Instructor Instruction • Deliveries YOUR BOAT OR MINE 100-ton Master saltyknots@gmail.com www.captainrickmeyer.com

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Business Directory SERVING THE SOUTHEAST U.S. Find Local Products & Services for Sailors Whether you need a marine store, a boatyard, or your bottom cleaned – find local businesses by name, category, keyword or map SOME OF THE 50 CATEGORIES: Maintenance • Rigging • Sails Air Conditioning • Outboard Repair Canvas • Mechanics List Your Business FREE listings available

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RIGGING

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CLASSIFIED ADS IN SOUTHWINDS $50 for a 3-month ad with photo • $25 for text ad only editor@southwindsmagazine.com News & Views for Southern Sailors

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ce DS w – tran N n t I e h THW sho r rig t at SOU e boat on you rst ten t i s Vi at th 17 – the fi 1 into th # Boo alfway ut h abo

The 39th St. Petersburg Power & Sailboat Show DEC. 1-4 Mahaffey Theater Yacht Basin and Albert Whitted Park 400 First St. South, St. Petersburg A few blocks south of downtown St. Petersburg (Mahaffey Theater is located next to the Dali Museum on the waterfront)

Directions: Take Interstate 275 into St. Petersburg. Exit on Interstate 175Exit 22 and continue to its end at the traffic light. Proceed forward four traffic lights. The fourth light is First Street. Turn left on First Street. The Mahaffey Theater and the show grounds will be on your right-hand side. Plenty of on-site parking is available at the municipal parking garages and airport surrounding show grounds. The parking fee is $5. Visitors can also ride the Downtown Looper Trolley with convenient stops on First Street alongside the Mahaffey Theater. Visit www.loopertrolley.com for schedules. Visitors can also come by boat and dock for free at the show’s “Come by Boat Dock” Event Website: www.showmanagement.com

Thurs. Dec. 1 — 10am-6pm Fri. Dec. 2 — 10am-6pm Sat. Dec. 3 — 10am-7pm Sun. Dec. 4 — 10am-5pm Adults $16; Children 15 and under free admission Veterans and Active Duty Military Free (with proof of service)

DISCOVER SAILING Discover Sailing will be offering free sailboat rides all day until closing at the show docks starting at 10am each day. The rides are provided by Sailing Florida Charters of St. Petersburg. Sail America and Sailing Florida Charters will also be offering, for a fee, several clinics each day on the following topics (taught by ASA instructors): ASA INTRO – TEST THE WATERS Interested in sailing but don’t know where to start? This two-hour introductory class is for you! ANCHORING It has been a long day of sailing, and now the anchor is down. Time for some rest; but the wind is picking up and you’re having trouble falling asleep. Questions...“Did I choose the right anchoring technique?”

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General Show Information The St. Petersburg Boat Show and Strictly Sail merged in 2008 to create one large show for both power and sail. This will be Show Management’s 38th year putting on this show. In-the-water sailboat displays will have dockage for 50plus boats. Brokerage sailboats will also be on display. This is in addition to the many on-land sailboat displays. Also there will be over 200 in-water powerboats and more on land. Over 200 exhibitors will be in the main tent, and the tent that visitors walk through to enter the show is devoted to sailing exhibitors, although many exhibitors have both sail and power boaters as customers. Many exhibitors in the main tent serve both sail and power, also. There will be a large section for outside exhibitors showing both sailing products and services and trailered sailboats. This is in addition to the many trailered powerboats on display outside. Sailing seminars (see schedule on facing page), run by Sail America, will be held in tents at the show site. The seminar schedule will be available at the Show Management website, www.showmanagement.com. There will also be an authors’ area outside. For kids, there will be free fishing clinics on Saturday and Sunday at 12 noon and 2:00 pm. Cruising Outpost, presented by Bob Bitchin, will be hosting the 16th “Cruiser’s Party” at the show on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 7 p.m. It is held on the Gosling’s & Budweiser Floating Bridge.

DOCKING This two-hour clinic will enable you to control your vessel in close quarters maneuvering, instead of the other way around. It is one of the few classes that you will use every time you depart or arrive at a dock CATAMARAN SAILING Are you getting ready for your next charter vacation? Are you curious as to why so many sailors and charter companies are choosing multihulls? What are the main differences between CAT and monohull sailing? CATAMARAN SAILING IN STYLE This program is the same catamaran program as above, but offered at the end of the day, Friday and Saturday, and includes wine and cheese to enhance the sailing experience

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SEMINAR SCHEDULE Also available online at www.showmanagement.com — St. Petersburg Boat Show special events page. Check with the website, in case some seminars require registration. Seminars held in tents A, B, C and D. Seminars are presented by Sail America with Cruising Outpost and Harken as Co-sponsors. * = Seminar or Workshop requires a fee be paid to attend. THURSDAY 10:30 AM A 10:30 AM B 10:30 AM C 10:30 AM D

Randy Deering Capt. Jack Dusendschon Rick Rhodes Chris Kreitlein

11:45 AM 11:45 AM 11:45 AM 11:45 AM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM

A B C D A B C D A B C D

3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM

A B C D

4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM

A B C D

A Beginner’s Guide to Planning a Cruise You Too Can Be a Cruising Catamaran Sailor Exploring Florida’s Big Bend Coast Celestial Navigation: How to Observe the Sun at Local Apparent Noon Lee Chesneau Introduction to the at Sea-level Surface Pressure Chart Libby Carnahan Sea Level Rise in Tampa Bay Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine The Five-Step Plan to Your Dream Scott Smith What’s in Your Toolbox? Peggie Hall Boat Odors Are NOT All In Your Head Libby Carnahan Florida Seafood at Your Fingertips! Randy Deering Cruising Florida’s Suncoast Capt. Jack Dusendschon You Too Can Be a Cruising Catamaran Sailor Lee Chesneau Introduction to the 500 Mb Chart Rick Rhodes Cruising Inland Rivers Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine Take the Drama Out of Your Dream Bob Williams Offshore Energy Management / Designing a Sustainable Lifestyle Bill Cullen The Top 25 Handy Things to Have Aboard While Cruising Captains Katie Smith & Jessie Zevalkink Katie and Jessie’s Excellent Loop Adventure Scott Smith Practical Boat Selection Chris Kreitlein Celestial Navigation: How to Observe the Sun at Local Apparent Noon Lee Chesneau Wind and Wave Concepts and Charts Bill Cullen Cooking Aboard and Abroad Bob Williams Wind and Solar Systems / Plugging into the Atmosphere Peggie Hall Flush with Success

FRIDAY 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 10:30 AM 11:45 AM 11:45 AM 11:45 AM 11:45 AM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:00 PM 1-4:00 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM 2:15 PM

A B C D A B C D A B C D A B C

Lee Chesneau Rick Rhodes Capt. Phil Thompson Pam Wall Chris Parker Scott Smith Chris Kreitlein Travis Blain Lee Chesneau Bill Cullen Bob Williams Pam Wall Fred Braman Capt. Michael Zornes Scott Smith

Introduction to the At Sea-level Surface Pressure Chart Exploring Florida’s Big Bend Coast Cruising Cuba Cool Products No One Knows About Weather Analysis and Forecast Resources Do It Yourself Boat Projects Star Light Star Bright – A Guide to Celestial Navigation Short Handed Sail Handling Introduction to the 500 Mb Chart Cruising the Exumas and Bahamas Out Islands Wind and Solar Systems / Plugging into the Atmosphere Outfitting for Blue Water Cruising* Sailing to Cuba Alone and Legally Preparing You and Your Boat for a Gulfstream Crossing What’s in Your Toolbox?

News & Views for Southern Sailors

3:30 PM 3:30 PM 3:30 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM 4:45 PM

A B C A B C

Lee Chesneau Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine Bill Cullen Randy Deering Capt. Jack Dusendschon Bob Williams

4:45 PM

D Peggie Hall

Wind and Wave Concepts and Charts Five Things You Need to Know Before You Buy a Boat First Time Cruising the Bahamas Cruising Florida’s Suncoast You Too Can Be a Cruising Catamaran Sailor Offshore Energy Management / Designing a Sustainable Lifestyle Boat Odors Are NOT All In Your Head

SATURDAY 10:15 AM-1:15PM D Pam Wall 10:30 AM A Lee Chesneau 10:30 AM B Bill Cullen 10:30 AM C Capt. Phil Thompson 11:45 AM A Rick Peterson 11:45 AM B Chris Parker 11:45 AM C Randy Deering 1:00 PM A Bill Cullen 1:00 PM B Bob Williams 1:00 PM C 1:30-4:30 PM 2:15 PM A 2:15 PM B 2:15 PM

C

3:30 PM A 3:30 PM B 3:30 PM C 4:45 PM A 4:45 PM B 4:45 PM C 4:45-6:45 PM

Cruising the Abacos in the Bahamas* Introduction to the At Sea-level Surface Pressure Chart The Top 25 Handy Things to Have Aboard While Cruising Cruising Cuba The Very Best of Sailing Europe from Norway to Greece Cuba Weather A Beginner’s Guide to Planning a Cruise Panama Canal Transit – Make it your Adventure Refrigeration for Sustainable Cruising / Designing for Optimum Efficiency Rick Rhodes Exploring Florida’s Big Bend Coast D Lee Chesneau At Sea-Level Surface Pressure Workshop * Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine Take the Drama Out of Your Dream Chris Kreitlein Celestial Navigation: How to Observe the Sun at Local Apparent Noon Captains Katie Smith & Jessie Zevalkink Katie and Jessie’s Excellent Loop Adventure Capt. Michael Zornes Preparing You and Your Boat for a Gulfstream Crossing Fred Braman Sailing to Cuba Alone and Legally Bob Bitchin & Jody Lipkin How to keep a Starboard Attitude While Cruising Capt. Phil Thompson Cruising Cuba Scott Smith What’s in Your Toolbox? Travis Blain Short Handed Sail Handling D Bill Cullen Building Your Cruising Confidence – You’ve Got This! *

SUNDAY 10:30 AM A Fred Braman 10:30 AM B Pam Wall 10:30 AM C Rick Peterson 10:30 AM-1:30PM D Lee Chesneau 11:30 AM A Capt. Jack Dusendschon 11:45 AM B Bill Cullen 11:45 AM C Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine 1:00 PM A Scott Smith 1:00 PM B Rick Peterson 1:00 PM C Jeff Grossman & Jean Levine 1:45 -4:45 PM D Lee Chesneau

Cruise the Great Northeast -NE Florida, That Is Hurricane Preparation The Very Best of Sailing Europe from Norway to Greece The 500 Mb Chart Workshop * You Too Can Be a Cruising Catamaran Sailor Cruising the Exumas and Bahamas Out Islands Choosing a Catamaran for Cruising Practical Boat Selection The Very Best of Sailing Europe from Norway to Greece Couples Cruising from Florida to the Caribbean Understanding Weather and Cruise Decision Making Workshop* 2:15 PM A Peggie Hall Flush with Success 2:15 PM B Travis Blain Short Handed Sail Handling 2:15 PM C Scott Smith Do It Yourself Boat Projects 3:30 PM A Chris Kreitlein Star Light Star Bright – A Guide to Celestial Navigation 3:30 PM B Bill Cullen Panama Canal Transit – Make It Your Adventure 3:30 PM C Peggie Hall Boat Odors Are Not All In Your Head * = Seminar or workshop requires a fee be paid to attend

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Marineland Revisited It’s even better than I thought!!! By Fred Braman Marineland lies just off the ICW, 18 miles south of St. Augustine.

I

’ve written about this unique little town on Florida’s east coast before, but I didn’t do it justice. It’s even better than I thought. Just ask David and Nancy Sill aboard Via Bella, two of several cruisers who stopped, stayed, and attended the University of Florida’s Florida Master Naturalist Program course offered at the University of Florida’s Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience. I attended also, and although I cruise to Marineland often, this time, I’m sorry to admit, I drove each class day from my nearby Fleming Island home. At first glance, Marineland looks like an ordinary bulge in the AICW, and waterway cruisers often pass it by to get

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to the more prominent St. Augustine, only 18 miles north. Some years back, I finally stopped and discovered what a rich place it is. Ripple Effect Ecotours, Marineland Dolphin Adventure, Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve, and the Whitney Laboratory—all occupy the space adjacent to a terrific marina. I can’t repeat all of Marineland’s delights in this writing, but, if you are one of many cruisers who have passed it by, check out my article on Marineland in the May 2016 issue of SOUTHWINDS and have a look (go to www.SouthwindsMagazine.com and click on Back Issues). UF’s Florida Master Naturalist Program includes three courses taught at locations throughout the state that offer a good backdrop for the course material at hand. The Marineland location is a perfect classroom for the Coastal Systems course. Situated in a National Estuarine Research Reserve, it encompasses over 40,000 acres of ocean, beaches, salt and freshwater marsh, mangrove tidal wetlands, marine hammock and pine flat-woods, oyster beds, tidal lagoons, critical habitat and offshore seas spanning St. Johns and Flagler counties. Upland Systems and Freshwater Systems are the other two modules of the Master Naturalist Program curriculum. Completion of all three earns designation as a UF Florida Master Naturalist. At Marineland, Whitney partners with Ripple Effect Ecotours, which provides course instructors and the kayaks needed for one of the many field trips. The marina is open all year, and Ripple Effect will design the perfect eco adventure for any group. Just ask. (www.rippleeffectecotours.com) Each class started at a respectful 9am and continued for a full day. Our instructor was Danny Lippi, a Florida Master Naturalist Program Instructor and the lead guide at Ripple Effect Ecotours. Over six class days, training included classroom instruction, field trips and practical experience in the ecology, habitats, vegetation, wildlife and conservation issues that are specific to Florida ecosystems. In addition, the program addressed the role of society in conservation, the development of naturalist interpretation skills and discussed environmental ethics. Class time was about equally divided between the classroom and instruction provided during field trips, which included visits to Marineland Dolphin Adventure, a dune habitat, and Washington Oaks State Park. While we loved it all, the biggest hits were field trips to the Invertebrate Wet-Lab at Whitney’s Center for Marine www.southwindsmagazine.com


Class instructor Danny Lippi leads a morning discussion on coastal uplands. He would follow-up later that afternoon with a hands-on demonstration during the daily field trip.

Micklers poses with some new Whitney friends before release. From left to right: Nancy Condron, founder of the Sea Turtle Turtle Hospital; Jessica Long, Director of Development; Catherine Eastman, Sea Turtle Program Coordinator; Brooke Burkhalter, marine veterinarian and daughter Kacie, Chief Sign Maker’ Dr. Mark Martindale, Director of the UF Whitney Laboratory; Peggy Cook, beach walker and Micklers’ finder. Deep into the Reserve, Danny instructs his charges on identifying types of mangroves.

Studies and a Ripple Effect led kayak trip to the Princess Place Preserve. The Whitney visit coincided with the release of “Micklers,” a Green Turtle teenager found in distress on a Florida beach and nursed back to health in Whitney’s Turtle Hospital. The kayak trip was especially great for watching an incredible array of birds: A bald eagle, brown and white pelicans, lesser yellow legs, great blue heron, great and snowy egrets, spotted sand piper, turkey vulture, wood stork, Cooper’s hawk, belted king fisher, tree swallow, osprey, double crested cormorant, common loon, and a red breasted merganser, all made appearances! Of course we needed Danny to help us figure all that out! The course ended too soon. Each of us participated in an end-of-course project and made group presentations on the final day; ours was about turtles. The awarding of diplomas was followed, of course, by a graduation party! We all made new friends, added fond memories, and learned a lot about the environment around us. David and Nancy, probably like Micklers, soon made plans to head farther south. We also discovered yet another good reason to visit this terrific and unique little town—by any means of travel. The cruising life does introduce you to new and exciting opportunities—as long as you take the time to stop and “smell the mangroves!” Capt. Fred Braman, USN (ret) and his wife Louise live in Fleming Island, FL. Fred writes about his experiences cruising his Catalina 30, Rhombus. Many thanks to Ripple Effect Ecotours’ Danny Lippi, Whitney’s Catherine Eastman and my classmates, for their help with this article. News & Views for Southern Sailors

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RACE REPORT 29th Annual Lost Bay Regatta, Josephine, AL, Oct. 1 By Kim Kaminski The annual Lost Bay Regatta is hosted every year by the Point Yacht Club in Josephine, AL. This year, 40 boats gathered to compete in this annual “Rite of Fall.” Nineteen spinnaker and 21 non-spinnaker boats hailing from various ports along the Gulf Coast stretching from Fort Walton Beach, FL, to Mobile, AL, battled their way across the waters of Perdido Bay to earn the unique handmade pottery trophies and perpetual awards provided by the Point Yacht Club. PRO for the event was Cathy Cromartie, a member of the Fairhope Yacht Club—who is also the current GYA (Gulf Yachting Association) commodore—set up the courses for the two divisions: a double triangle with a windward/leeward finish for the Spinnaker division and a double triangle for the Non-Spinnaker division. The winds were light out of the northeast and gradually shifted to the south throughout the day. The competition was engaging with several close finishes and close encounters throughout the seven different racing classes. In the Non-spinnaker Class F, three boats—all with the same handicap rating—battled to the finish with only five seconds separating second-place winner skipper Fred Locke from the Navy Yacht Club on his boat Lockeness from third-

The winner of the Paul Schreck Trophy at the 2016 Lost Bay Regatta hosted by the Point Yacht Club was awarded to Zane Yoder and crew aboard FNG Eelsnot hailing from the Mobile Yacht Club. This Overall Spinnaker winner also earned the top award at last year’s racing event. Photo by Kim Kaminski.

FNG Eelsnot, and crew, winners of the Paul Schreck Trophy at the Lost Bay Regatta. Photo by Kim Kaminski.

place winner skipper Neil Rowell from the Point Yacht Club on his boat Reverie, who was closely followed by only 28 seconds by skipper Grant Brummett from KoKoMo Beach Yacht Club on his boat Kokomo. 44

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In the Spinnaker Class B, another close battle occurred between two Mobile Yacht Club members: Troy Cruthirds aboard Madness and Don Faircloth aboard Moonglade. Both boats had the same handicap rating and battled for second and third place with only 55 seconds between them. Last year’s Overall Spinnaker winner, Zane Yoder from the Mobile Yacht Club—who won aboard his boat Cherry Baby—entered this year’s race with a new boat, a Melges 24 named FNG Eelsnot. Zane and his crew not only took first place aboard his new boat in the Spinnaker Class A but also won the Overall Spinnaker Trophy, the Paul Schreck Trophy, presented by Point Yacht Club’s Commodore Connie Fuqua and Fleet Captain Hank Jordan. Other fleet winners include Kelly MacLeod from the Pensacola Beach Yacht Club aboard Able Mable, who won in the Non-Spinnaker Class G, and Mike Weirszalowski from the Fairhope Yacht Club aboard his boat Miss Grace in Nonspinnaker Class E, who won the Perpetual Overall NonSpinnaker Trophy, the Paul Meuller Memorial Trophy. Other class winners include: Kirk Newkirk, from Pensacola Beach Yacht Club, won Spinnaker Class B aboard Richard Parker; Tony Nichols, from the Navy Yacht Club, won Spinnaker Class C aboard Phoenix; Jo Hood won NonSpinnaker Class D aboard Cannonball; and Charlie Payne won Non-Spinnaker Class F aboard Wave Dancer.

WFORC, Pensacola, FL, Oct. 13-16 West Florida Ocean Racing Circuit Participation Increasing By Julie B. Connerley It’s always good news when one hears the expression “our numbers are up.” And for the 42nd Annual West Florida Ocean Racing Circuit (WFORC), held October 13-16, that meant good competition was expected for this Gulf Yachting Association (GYA) Offshore Council-sanctioned event. This year counted 25 entries, up almost 39 percent over 2015’s 18 competitors. Hosted annually at Pensacola Yacht Club, the six-race series never fails to offer fierce competition, handsome trophies, great southern hospitality and unpredictable racing conditions. “With the GYA interclub competition boat transitioning from a Flying Scot to the Viper 640,” said PYC’s John

Start of the fifth race, Class C. Twenty-five boats sailed in the 42nd Lost Bay Regatta in Pensacola, FL. Photo by Julie B. Connerley.

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RACE REPORT Proudly displaying the WFORC 2016 Riddle Cup are winners, from Left, John Marshall, skipper Josh Deupree, Banc Marshall, PYC Commodore Alan McMillan, and John Schedeck. Not pictured, Julian Bingham. Photo by Julie B. Connerley.

Matthews, PRO for the regatta, “more clubs are getting as much racing time as possible with their new club boats. We had six enter WFORC.” Typically, WFORC offers three PHRF classes and a onedesign class (if five or more register). However, one-design competitors requested that they be allowed to compete in the PHRF class in order to be eligible for the prestigious Dr. Lindsay Riddle Trophy. This award is given to the boat winning the most competitive class as determined by the lowest corrected time differential between first and third place per race. Ever mindful of the racing community’s penchant for wanting to “tweak” things, the race committee (R/C) departed from the long-established format for the coveted Riddle Trophy. The change resulted with six Class A boats; 10 Class B boats; and nine in Class C. Based on feedback, the R/C also elected to include a distance race Saturday. That meant that five races would need to be completed on the other two days in order to allow competitors one throw-out. Friday’s weather was beautiful, “but the winds were marginally low at best,” said PRO Matthews. Race one was abandoned after Class A had started, but before Classes B

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and C could begin. Race two was abandoned after all three classes had started. While the R/C continued to closely measure the winds, the course was shortened. “The sea breeze finally made its appearance,” continued Matthews. “With winds approaching 7 to 8 knots and maintaining velocity and direction, racing resumed.” Two races were completed. After Saturday’s 19.26nm Sea Buoy race in the Gulf of Mexico, the R/C was able to conduct two races Sunday, providing the customary throw-out. In a departure from recent years when the majority of overall PHRF winners have been Pensacola bay area sailors, 2016s overall winners included just one local winner: David Dunbar, owner of Tryptonite, a Trip 33. Dunbar and crew earned, for the second consecutive year, the Commodore Ronald F. Richards Memorial Trophy. This perpetual trophy is presented to Class A’s overall winner on corrected time. Josh Deupree of Mobile Yacht Club sailed his Melges 24, Hippy Chick, to the winners circle in Class B with a total of 11 points. Breaking their 15-point tie for second and third place, respectively, were Brian Harrison, Ft. Walton Yacht Club, racing his Viper, Rebel, and New Orleans Yacht Club’s Glen Tongius on his Melges 24, Kryptonite. Deupree, a first-time boat owner, with “just five or six” WFORCs under his stern, won the coveted Riddle Trophy. Deupree credited his crew, John Marshall, Banc Marshall (no relation), John Schedeck and Julian Bingham for making it happen. It was a hard-earned celebration. “On the first race,” said Deupree, “while under spinnaker, Banc went overboard.” Luckily he caught the lifeline and hung on long enough for Marshall and Schedeck to pull him back onboard. “On Sunday,” he continued, “during race two, we had a comfortable lead headed to the weather mark when the backstay parted.” Because he was the tallest, Deupree had to turn the helm over to someone else to effect a jury-rig on the backstay. They kept their heads—and the Melges—in the game, finishing third. Veteran Gulf Coast competitor Zane Yoder, Mobile YC, raced his Melges 24, FNG eelsnot, placing fifth. Congratulating Deupree on Facebook, Yoder said, “I can’t remember the last fifth I’ve taken in a regatta. Thank you all for delivering it to me...you had to hold your boat together—and still rocked the house!” For complete regatta results, visit www.pensacolayachtclub.org or regattanetwork.com. www.southwindsmagazine.com


2016 Bob Buzzelli Mutihull Regatta, Sarasota, FL, Oct. 21-23 By Charlie Clifton Forty-four multihulls sailed in the Buzzelli Multihull Regatta. Shown here are four Corsairs. Photo by Barry Millbourn. Cover: Taylor Brunsvold and crew in a Falcon F-16. Photo by Barry Millbourn.

Sarasota provided a gusty, shifty easterly for 44 multihulls assembled for three days of racing. The Sailing Squadron set a long distance race in the Gulf on Friday. Saturday and Sunday races were run on three courses in the bay. The annual regatta has grown from the Stiletto National Championship to an all-inclusive multihull event honoring the memory of the late Bob Buzzelli. The long distance race foretold the outcome of the Stiletto National Championship. Travis Yates’ double-handed crew on Indigo eked out a close victory over Bill Johnsen’s Sunspot. These two boats were neck and neck throughout the regatta, until Indigo pulled off three straight bullets at the end of the nine-race series. Bob Buzzelli’s nephew, Charlie Barmonde, came in third on Clockwork, the only other boat to win a race. The eight-boat PHRF Multihull class consisted of a variety of Corsairs. Kathryn Garlick’s Evolution and Tom Reese’s Flight Simulator traded places throughout the series. They went into the last race with Evolution holding a onepoint lead. They were together on the last run when Flight Simulator tagged Evolution, forcing a penalty turn. That put Flight Simulator in the lead for the race and the series. Larry Geller on Third Tri 2 posted two bullets to come in third. The Rochester Yacht Club (NY) crew on Panic Button was very fast and won the Sailmaker’s Appreciation Award by shredding two mainsails in two days. The blustery conditions proved to be very challenging for the smaller boats. No boat finished every race in the seven-boat Weta Class. Only two boats managed to finish five of the six races. Knox Rodgers of Lake Lanier Sailing Club (GA) won every one of the five races he sailed. Deborah Wilusz from SSS put together a string of seconds and thirds to clinch second place in the regatta. About half the fleet managed to complete races in the nine-boat Windrider Class. Jim Rodenkirk traded firsts and seconds with Rob and Linda Powell of the San Francisco Yacht Club (CA) throughout the series. Rodenkirk won three of the last four races to top the class by two points. The predominantly Gulfport Yacht Club Hobie 16 fleet also managed to complete about half their races. Phil and Jason Sanchez of GYC (FL), the only two skippers to finish every race, ended up tied at the end. Phil’s string of four aces in the last four races won him the tie breaker. The seven-boat Brunsvold Fleet…I mean Portsmouth Fleet, consisting of F-16s and F-18s, completed about half their races. SSS brothers Anderson and Mark Brunsvold accounted for all the first and second places until the last race. Sister Taylor Brunsvold then placed between them to force a tie, broken in favor of Anderson. Stiletto builder Ron Nichols won the Buzzelli Trophy, awarded for service in the spirit of the Class. News & Views for Southern Sailors

Anna Millbourn and crew flip their Falcon F-16 in windy conditions in the Buzzelli Multihull Regatta in Sarasota, FL. Photo by Barry Millbourn.

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RACE REPORT Florida Regional Sunfish Championship, Tampa, FL, Nov. 5-6 By Paula Shur Winners of the Florida Regional Sunfish Championship. From the left are: Youth champion Abby Hayward, Andy Hayward, Dave Dunn, Gail Heausler, Jeff Linton, Jeff Olson and championship winner David Mendelblatt. Photo by Amy Linton.

David Mendelblatt won the 2016 Florida Regional Sunfish Championship at Davis Island Yacht Club. This win qualifies him for the 2017 Sunfish Worlds in New Jersey, August 27-Sept. 1, 2017. Thirteen year old Abby Hayward, Davis Island Yacht Club, won first place Junior sailor. Regatta Chairman Lynne Randall and her crew hosted a weekend of competitive, family-friendly fun for 36 racers. PRO Eric Robbins and his skilled race committee adjusted to the changing wind direction and velocity. Saturday’s four races were sailed in a

REVIEW YOUR BOAT SOUTHWINDS is looking for sailors who like to write to review their sailboat — whether it is new or old, large or small. It can include the following: Year, model, make, designer, boat name Specifications: LOA, LWL, beam, draft, sail plan (square footage), displacement Sailing performance Comfort above and below deck Cruiser and/or Racer Is it a good liveaboard? Modifications you have made or would like General boat impression Quality of construction Photos Essential (contact us for photo specs) We have found that our readers love reviews by those who own the boats — comments are more personal and real All articles must be sent via email or on disc For more information and if interested, contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com or call (941) 795-8704

Rita Root, one of the five first timers who sailed in the Florida Regional Sunfish Championship. Photo by Bruce Johnson.

shifty northeast breeze with a few “knock-you-out-of-theboat” gusts. Most of the 19 women set a Jens rig. Saturday night, Jeff Linton and Jeff Olson shared their “Tips from the Top” with the fleet, which included using the Sunfish’s 14-foot boom to hold a spot on the starting line. Sunday’s three races were held in a lighter northeast breeze with less intense gusts. The top four finishers have all won national Sunfish championships. In September, Gail Heausler won the 2016 Women’s North American Championship and Abby Hayward won the Top Winner Youth Sailor. Randall also presented the “unofficial” awards. Top couple award went to Wendy Reuss and Christopher Stocke of St. Petersburg Yacht Club. Top family award went to Andy Hayward and his daughter Abby Hayward of Davis Island Yacht Club. “From being greeted by world champions to sailing 45minute courses in gusts up to 20, it was both a humbling and thrilling experience. Loved it! I’ll be back!” stated Rita Root, one of the five regatta first-timers. Randall thanked Gail Heausler and Bonnie Sevier for arranging boats and housing. She also thanked the dolly volunteers who assisted with bringing boats up the new beach ramp. Results (top five): 1, David Mendelblatt, St. Petersburg YC; 2, Jeff Linton, Davis Island YC; 3, Jeff Olson, Sarasota Sailing Squadron; 4, Gail Heausler, Davis Island YC; 5, Dave Dunn, Halifax Sailing Association.

(If you hate your boat, we aren’t interested — you must at least like it)

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BOOKS TO READ

Anchoring A Ground Tackler’s Apprentice — Basics and Beyond By Rudy and Jill Sechez; Review by Steve Morrell

Sailors say, “fair winds and following seas,” and riggers, “big blocks and fair leads” but for those who anchor, its “long scopes and hefty gear.”

T

hat’s how this book’s authors begin their preface to this book on anchoring. Having survived seven hurricanes, and numerous tropical storms and gales on wooden boats they built (two of them over time), authors Rudy and Jill Sechez put this book together to help newcomers—and those with limited anchoring knowledge—learn the art and practice of anchoring. They go on to state in the preface that the book is “not intended to be a complete treatise on anchoring”—that the basic principles of anchoring are covered in the appendix and in suggested readings at the end of the book. They ascertain that there are many gaps in many of the existing books and that their book is meant to help fill those gaps and should be a “necessary companion volume” to the others. They also go on to say that they have added many ‘helpful hints, tips, concepts, and suggestions that some would consider ‘unconventional.’ ” The authors emphasize an important point that anchoring is not just about a line and an anchor attached to your boat—it is a complex system that goes from the boat to the attachment to the boat, to the chain, rope, anchor and all the attachments in between that all must work together, depending on each other. After a discussion on general anchoring, they go into chapters on loads that anchors and boats go through with different winds, then they discuss ground tackle—chain and rope—heavily, which includes numerous tables in the back of the book giving details on different rope and chain sizes and types. Next they go through what you would expect in a book on the subject: chapters on anchors, sea beds, scope, chafe, deploying and retrieving anchors, and tandem anchoring. Chapters on connections between the different parts of ground tackle, like swivels and bridles are also included. These are only a few of the items discussed, as they continue covering subjects, many of which I never heard of, although I am no expert, but I have anchored a boat hundreds of times. The book talks about kellets, multiple anchors (circular anchoring, Bahamian moor, hammerlock moor, etc.), scowing, kedging, drudging, springing...and more. They even include how to throw a rope and anchoring etiquette (near other boats). A glossary at the end is very helpful. After going through this book, it is one I will hold onto for a while. Although it’s been a bit since I’ve had a big boat, this book will be worthwhile as I am sure my anchoring days are not over. Anyone new to boating will find this book essential as an introduction that will take them a long ways into cruising. And anyone who has just sailed locally and thinking of venturing out to more unknown territory will find this book equally useful.

News & Views for Southern Sailors

A real advantage of this book—and maybe its best feature—is that it is not so big that you will be overwhelmed with too much information. In a small 9-inch by 6-inch format, it’s about 160 pages in 14 chapters with another 40 pages of tables, miscellaneous subjects and the glossary. At the end of the preface, the authors suggest adopting an anchoring “mantra.” Their suggestion is: “anchoring is not a speed sport, nor is it for the lazy....anchoring is not a speed sport, nor is for the lazy...anchoring is not a speed sport nor is it for the lazy...etc, etc, etc. So true, so true. If you expect to learn anchoring quickly and easily, it might be best to stay on land. As the book says, quoting R. D. Culler, “Experience begins, the moment you start.” Anchoring, A Ground Tackler’s Apprentice is available at WaterwayGuide.com and Amazon.com.

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Rhombus’ Cuban Adventure Part III: Marina Hemingway, Havana, and Return By Fred Braman

We decided on an overnighter to Marina Hemingway to ensure a daytime arrival.

W

e loved Cayo Levisa, but we eagerly looked forward to our last stop, Marina Hemingway and nearby Old Havana. Who can visit Cuba without seeing Morro Castle, the great Havana architecture, and the classic old cars? I’d also keep an eye out for my wife’s first ride—a ‘57 Chevy! Our overnight cruise of about 61 NM found seas of 1-3 feet, but very confused with a weak wind on the nose. We decided on an overnighter to ensure a daytime arrival. On this trip, we got no help from the mainsail in moderating the boat’s wallowing motion. Under iron genny, we went further offshore than on the trip in, hoping to catch bit of the easting Gulf Stream while avoiding the westing counter current closer to shore. We had calculated that our departure time would result in a mid-morning arrival at Marina Hemingway. Wrong! In spite of the conditions, we made great time and even had to slow the boat and wait 90 minutes until sunrise for a daytime entry into the marina’s well-marked channel. It was a great ending to an otherwise miserable transit! We were first in line at the Customs dock, where it was confirmed that I was indeed missing a form, as the very understanding Guardia Fronteria official had insisted in Cayo Levisa. Marina Hemingway is a port-of-entry, so customs just issued the missing form. We fueled up and were ready for the final overnighter, back to Marathon, several days off. We had lots to explore before then. At the fuel dock, we received our assignment in Canal 1. The marina consists of four long canals, all wide enough to turn around in and with good depths for even large boats. We were met by a host of marina dock workers there to assist, including the dock master and an electrician, whose job was to hook up our electrical power. Tips are welcome, and we accommodated everyone who helped. We also hired Santos to wash the boat, and Rhombus has never been so clean, including the inside of hatch covers, and with a special cleaner, he took years off the dinghy! Santos spent hours on the project and asked for $20; we gave $30. The main attraction of Marina Hemingway is its proximity to Old Havana, a taxi ride away. We certainly would experience Havana, however, the marina itself is great fun and a terrific spot to visit. Canal 1 was a good choice for my crew as the best and perpetually lively outside bar was at its landward end. Also nearby were boat conveniences; various shops including grocery and libation stores, a couple of big hotels (where you can get Wifi), and several restaurants, including Chinese, which we loved. Also, of course, a cigar store! Small towns in walking distance outside the marina

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Absent a big sea blowing in from the north, the approach and entry into Marina Hemingway is as straight forward as it gets. Mooring is side-to in protected canals.

gate added to the area’s charm. Jaiminita, one of the small towns, had an artist favorite son named Fuster, who— over a lifetime—covered his town in mosaics. After relaxing a few days, we contracted for a ride to Havana—$35. Alejandro dropped us off at the main taxi exchange near hotel row in Havana. We found a hotel as it became obvious we weren’t going to quickly find our first choice, a “Casa Particular,”—a private home in Cuba that rents out rooms. We enjoyed the Hotel Ingleterra. It was in the center of everything and offered the best (though poor by U.S. standards) internet service. We finally got off a few Facebook posts, emails, and even a Wifi telephone call to my wife Louise. First up was a bus tour of the city and its very striking architecture, although most of it is badly in need Classic cars are many in Havana. They congregate in central locations like this park below our hotel balcony, hoping to snare passing tourists. They are hopeful that new U.S. travel policies will result in more customers.

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Rhombus was clean and happy along Canal 1! My Cuban courtesy flag flaps in the breeze.

of a facelift. We had a nice time in Havana, touring by foot mostly and enjoying the local restaurants in the evening. Although the classic cars were inviting, in Havana our normal mode of transportation was the yellow motorcycle taxi. Lots of fun! Crew Frank met Vladimir in the park across from the hotel. Vlad is a photographer who accompanies clients on their Havana tours in classic cars and presents them with a postcard of the experience. Vladimir’s birth name was Frank, but his father became an ardent Cuban communist after the revolution, so he changed Frank’s name as a boy. We contracted with Felix, driver of our classic car—a purple ‘51 Pontiac convertible—along with Vlad for the next day. We planned to tour Havana, visit the Hemingway Villa, see his famous fishing boat, and return to Marina Hemingway on the way home. It turned out to be a great day, but, the old Pontiac broke down on the way home! After only a half hour delay, we were collected in a ‘54 Ford! No extra charge. The service providers were “class acts” also! We had a wonderful few days in Havana, spending our last day mostly eating. We started with lunch at the original

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“Sloppy Joe’s.” It became the model for the popular Key West restaurant and watering hole. Dinner was later at Cafe de Los Artistes, recommended by our hotel bartender. The owner was his personal friend, and when we arrived, they were expecting us and had a table ready. Other cruisers were in attendance, and we had good food and a great time! The next day, Vlad, Felix and the ’51 Pontiac were all waiting in the square. We took a brief tour of the city and then headed for our main visit target—the Hemingway Villa in the hills overlooking Havana. Entry into the villa buildings isn’t allowed, but doors and windows are set up for visual access and we spent an hour roaming the villa grounds. It’s no wonder that Hemingway enjoyed the peace and beauty of this place and found it a great spot to work. After the villa tour, we soon found ourselves back at Marina Hemingway, taking two classic cars to complete the voyage, and were ready to enjoy our last few days in Cuba. While we waited for crossing weather, we enjoyed again our new friends at the Canal 1 bar, finally decided on the last of the cigars and rum to purchase, visited the local restaurants we’d missed on the way in, and prepared Rhombus for the return voyage. The captain also decimated crew Trevor at the marina bowling alley! Reluctantly, we turned our attention to our return trip to Marathon. Fourteen days were not enough, but, that’s what we were allowed, and we planned to comply. As it turned out, we were delayed in our return by the same number of www.southwindsmagazine.com


Our “ride” for the main tour day, or at least most of it, was a purple 1951 Pontiac convertible!

days we were delayed at the start, so we were good with the program. We finally got a forecast to our liking: ESE winds, 10-15 knots and seas less than three feet. On our last evening we had dinner with new friends Bart Blankenship, his Mom Lucille, and friends Sam and Caitlyn at Pollo Frito a La Cabana. Very nice evening. On the way to dinner, as we walked through the small town, we each sought out kids and gave away the last of Bart’s baseballs, part of his “People-to-People” program. What a hoot that brought only smiles! The following day was a glorious one to end our Cuban adventure. Bart and friends on Revival got underway just before us, under sail only. We both cleared out of Customs who took individual photos of each of us. No fuss, though they did look at the boats to check for others onboard. Underway, it was a little bouncy to start, especially when we reached the Gulf Stream. Wind was NE rather than the forecast ESE, but not too strong, so the wind/current opposition problem was not as bad as it would have been with stronger winds. We were able to get the main up and that helped control the boat’s motion. It quieted a bit, and we got a knot assist from the Stream as our angle to Marathon was about 042. Our passage was pretty fast and we made the 120 NM in 24 hours, leaving Cuban waters in the early afternoon and entering U.S. waters the next morning. We docked at Marathon Marina and cleared customs over the phone. I made the call with all my Cuba approval papers arrayed in front of me only to find that there were virtually no questions. Nothing about CG3300 approval, cigars, Cuban rum, or anything. The only

Havana is renowned for its very striking architecture, although much of it is in need of a facelift, and a lot of renovation is underway.

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The Captain and crew Frank pause for a look at Hemingway’s front door.

issue was that the passport I used to get my LBO* card many years prior had expired and was replaced with a new one. The LBO file is supposed to be updated with the new passport information, a requirement that I have since found is unknown to virtually everyone. Customs cleared me in anyway, but gave me 24 hours to get to a customs official and show him my new passport. Fat chance! Customs in Marathon was closed for the long holiday weekend, plus an extra day. I looked for a customs official all the way home and finally found one, in Jacksonville! Cuba was a grand adventure, one of the most memorable of my near half century cruising life! From the swank resorts of Varadero and classic cars of Havana, to a quiet anchorage at an off-shore Cuban island in between, I don’t think we could have done better with our first itinerary and a 14day visit limitation. If you missed parts I and II of my story, go to www.Southwindsmagazine.com, then Back Issues and read the October and November 2016 issues. I flew my Cuban courtesy flag all the way home. It attracted a lot of attention as I made my way the length of Florida’s AICW and gave several informal talks on Cuba. If you have any questions, I am happy to share this trip with you. Just drop me a line or give me a call. Cuba— you can go too! Capt. Fred Braman, USN (ret), and his wife Louise live in Fleming Island, FL. He is available to talk about the Cuba trip to yacht and sailing clubs in the general southeastern United States area. Contact Capt. Braman at fredbraman@hotmail.com, or 904-866-6862. *LBO refers to the Local Boater Option which is a program—called the Small Vessel Reporting System (SVRS)—run by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that allows U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents to return to the U.S. by phone instead of reporting in person, although CBP can still inspect the vessel and passengers if they so choose. https://svrs.cbp.dhs.gov/Default.aspx. Captain and crew and Hemingway’s famous fishing boat, Pilar.

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Revival – A Cuban Sojourn Even little boats can get there! By Fred Braman

H

ey Sailors, how about loading up your half century old, 26-foot coastal cruiser designed for inshore weekenders and head off across the Gulf Stream to Cuba? Sorry, you don’t have an engine, except for the 2hp Honda for your dinghy that you keep tucked away in a locker for safe keeping until you need it. Crew? Certainly. Eighty-two year old Mom is first mate, and just to make it cozy, you bring along a couple of friends to keep you company and help with lines and “the big oar!” Too much room you say for only four people? Why not stuff Caitlin Erwin, Mom (Lucille Blankenship), Sam Eakle, and Capt. Bart. your V-berth with baseballs, bats, and gloves to give away, mostly to Cuban girls! Not everybody’s cruise, but this describes my friend Bart Blankenship, who I met in Marina Hemingway during our trip to Cuba this past spring. We all shared a dinner, but, only after we gave away a backpack full of baseballs! All kinds of folks show up at Marina Hemingway, none more interesting than Bart. Of course, Mom is a special case too! Bart is a 22-year veteran as an Outward Bound instructor and is coauthor of Earth Knack Stone Age Skills for the 21st Century. He’s climbed El Capitan six times, Half Dome, and the North Face of Grand Teton. Sailing to Cuba was easy. Together and with great enthusiasm, Revival and crew set sail from their Tampa Bay Florida home (Palmetto), crossed Florida Bay to Key West, and—when the weather was right (especially the wind)—headed to Cuba’s Marina Hemingway. Rhombus and Bart’s Revival, a Carl Albergdesigned Pearson Ariel—a 25-foot 7-inch sloop with a modified full keel built by Pearson Yachts of With a sculling oar, Capt. Bart gets underway from Marina Hemingway, headBristol, Rhode Island—were Marina Hemingway ed for the Customs Dock. We would bid farewell an hour later, as Rhombus canal-mates and my crew of three quickly became headed to Marathon and Bart’s Revival to Key West. friends with Bart’s crew. They were hard to miss, with hammocks hanging from canal-side trees to garner a bit more in-port room. American cruisers who visit Cuba legally do so under the current rules (SOUTHWINDS October 2016). Although Bart is a journalist, author, and documentary film producer, he had an interest in girls playing baseball and crafted a perfect people-to-people program he called “Throw Like a Girl!” He acted on this interest with a load of baseball gear that he gave away, enlisting the aid of fellow cruisers. I was pleased to be a part of it! Bart has returned to Cuba, and at last contact, he and Mom were headed off for a short trip somewhere in the Keys! For a sneak peek of Bart taking Mom to Cuba, go to YouTube and search for “Take your mom sailing” to find Bart’s video called “Why You Should Take Your Mom Sailing to Cuba.” (Courtesy of Bart Blankenship)

News & Views for Southern Sailors

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CAROLINA SAILING

After 17 Years, Bigger is Definitely Better It’s officially the off-season, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t a lot going on at Charleston Community Sailing. By Dan Dickison

CCS’s small facility is tucked into a remote corner of Charleston’s City Marina. Photo courtesy Charleston Community Sailing.

O

yster roasts are a longstanding tradition in the Carolina Lowcountry. In fact, burning open fires to cook and eat tasty mollusks is a practice that dates back to well before the colonial era. According to some sources, oyster roasts have been happening in this region for nearly 4,000 years. The Indian shell mounds in various locations along this coastal region attest to this belief. These days, oyster roasts have become part of the seasonal rhythm of life here. But it’s not just the culinary appeal of these gatherings that makes them special. Oyster roasts bring together a wide spectrum of residents, often for a worthy cause. That was the case last month when Charleston Community Sailing orchestrated its 10th annual oyster roast (Nov. 20 at the James Island Yacht Club). This isn’t just the organization’s principal fundraising event each year; it’s also an occasion that aggregates the movers and shakers within the local sailing community. They come with different club and organizational affiliations, but everyone attends for a single purpose—to support one of the area’s most successful and impactful initiatives. Charleston Community Sailing (CCS was last featured in these pages in the January 2012 edition) has been in existence for 17 years. Throughout that time, this nonprofit’s mission has always been to make sailing more accessible to the public. Though the initial focus was to provide ways for younger sailors and would-be sailors to get out on the water, the organization’s programming has evolved to include a number of activities for adults. A perfect example of that is Women on the Water. According to Jessica Koenig, the organization’s executive director for the past 10 years and a pivotal part of CCS’s aforementioned success and impact, that particular program was spawned unexpectedly. “About two years ago, I was giving a private lesson to one of the moms whose kids enroll in our programs,” she explains. “We decided to meet weekly, and that’s when it hit me that we had the opportunity to broaden the scope and see if other women might want to participate. It turns out, a good many were interested. So, we started Women on the Water.” WOW, as the program is referred to, provides a comfortable, supportive environment not only to teach sailing,

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CCS Executive Director Jessica Koenig. Photo courtesy Marni Rothschild Durlach.

but also to empower women and help them gain confidence on the water. “Often,” says Koenig, “you’ll find that women’s spouses or partners aren’t the best people to introduce them to the sport, so our focus is on getting these women wholly comfortable with the boats and the water, and their own skill levels. And the program goes well beyond instruction. We have women from 21 to those in their 70s, and they support one another in ways that foster a genuine camaraderie. It’s something we all enjoy on and off the water, and often it leads to lasting friendships. And,” she adds, “that program has been so successful, we used it as model for a similar once-a-week session that we’ve dubbed Girls on the Water for high-schoolaged girls. We ran that for the first time this fall and it was fully subscribed.” CCS’s other adult programs include SUP classes and paddleboard yoga sessions. Koenig says that investing in a flotilla of paddleboards has brought in some participants who’ve stuck around and gotten into sailing as well. And soon, CCS will be integrating two recently donated J/24s into its offerings for adults. But the overwhelming majority of the programming www.southwindsmagazine.com


Youngsters compete at a recent high school regatta hosted by Charleston Community Sailing. Photo courtesy Sammy Hodges.

Participants in the Women on the Water program. Program Director Jessica Koenig is third from left, kneeling. Photo courtesy Charleston Community Sailing.

that CCS conducts from its base at Charleston City Marina is for younger sailors or would-be sailors. That begins with a range of instructional classes for youngsters ages 5 through 15. On top of that, CCS staff also conduct specialized programs, including Buddy Sail (which pairs kids from the local Boys and Girls Club with competent teens for an afternoon of sailing); STEM Education (which uses sailing

as an educational platform for middle schoolers, in both the classroom and on the water); Open Sail (one night a week in Optis and Open Bics); and Saturday Sails, (open to all kids who have completed one of the organization’s instructional courses). And, if any child or adult can’t afford the class fees, the organization has full or partial scholarships available on an application basis. “We’ve always been committed to facilitating access to the water for everyone,” says Koenig. Perhaps the most visible activity taking place at CSS is high school sailing. Nearly every weekday afternoon, as commuters stream out of peninsular Charleston, CCS’s fleet of Club 420s are out on the nearby waters of the Ashley River. Eight out of the nine local high school sailing teams use the organization’s facility and boats, including its coach boats. A total of 10 teams are based here, including a middle school team and a collegiate team. (On the day that SOUTHWINDS visited with Koenig, three of those teams were out on the water practicing in the late afternoon light.) In addition to all this, CCS is home to the South Carolina Special Olympics Sailing Team, whose member athletes compete in events throughout the Southeast. Koenig is deservedly proud of all this activity. “This is our 17th year,” she says, “and my 10th year of running the organization. We’ve accomplished a lot over that span of time. We’ve increased the size of our fleets, added Optis, paddleboards and Open Bics and set a standard for quality that is second to none. All of our instructors are US Sailingcertified and trained in first aid and CPR. We’re constantly evolving and expanding our programs so that we can keep our participants challenged and enjoying the sport. One of the things that I’m most excited about at the moment is a new plan we’ve initiated to establish an endowment. This will be an important development for the stability of our organization and its capacity to continue serving the broader community.” All in all, that’s definitely worth going to the trouble of shucking a few tasty bivalves. For more information about Charleston Community Sailing, log on to www.charlestoncommunitysailing.org.

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Calixta, my Bayfield 36, during the storm. Notice the power pedestal is half underwater.

Surviving Hurricane Matthew By David Smedley

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urricane Matthew was clawing its way up the Florida coast towards our marina at Palm Coast, which lies just 18 miles south of St. Augustine. We were directly in its path. Everyone feared it was a Category 4â&#x20AC;&#x201D;with 140mile-an-hour projected winds and a storm surge estimated at 8 to 11 feet. Our marina has concrete fixed docks and many old half-eaten-through wooden pilings. Folks were scurrying around double-tying lines to cleats and removing sails, solar panels, biminis and dodgers. Flagler County was under evacuation orders and the Hammock Dunes Bridge over the Intracoastal to the barrier island and the coast was closed, and police and National Guardsmen were manning the barricades. Palm Coast sits directly on the ICW at mile marker 803. Even though we tied our dock lines loosely to accommodate a huge storm surge, if it got that bad, our boats would be floating way over the pilings, with no way to get down to the underwater docks to adjust anything. Almost everyone

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Some unthinking soul had tied his dock line behind a fire water hose station. The force of the wind pulled his boat sideways and snapped the fire hose line. You can see the geyser of water spraying all over and landing directly into the cockpit of the sailboat next to it. It sunk.

fled for higher ground, and some ran as far as Atlanta and Pensacola. Only the few foolhardy and brave were staying to protect our floating homes. There were five of us. Our plan was not to stay on the boat but huddle in the protected corner outside the marina office in our foul weather gear and watch and wait. The

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One of the best things I love about cruising and marina life is the camaraderie of the people. Everyone looks out for everyone else. There are community potlucks, and people are quick to reach out and offer a hand. It’s a true brotherhood of the sea.

electric power grid went down first. Cell phones provided updates as the hurricane began slamming Daytona Beach; Matthew was at our doorstep. The winds were howling and halyard lines shrieking. All of us had been working non-stop since early Wednesday preparing for the worst. It was now midnight Thursday, and our docks were under three feet of water. I was dead beat tired. We had had an offer to go down the road and crash in a friend’s vacant rental house, but after seeing the water already halfway up to its backdoor, no one thought it was a good option. We tried sleeping in cars, but the blasts of 100 mph wind gusts were shaking the cars, and my little lightweight Ford Escort felt like it could go airborne and become a flying kite at any minute. The last resort was to go into the marina exercise room on the second floor. It has two banks of windows, but had survived over 35 years of storms, so that was my best option. My only fear was the windows blowing in and being diced and

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sliced by flying glass as I slept. The only spare piece of floor space was the treadmill, so I unrolled my sleeping bag and settled down for an uneasy bit of rest. I awoke at 4am, still tired and sore from my stiff-plastic treadmill pillow. The eye of the hurricane was just down the coast off Daytona Beach and coming right at us. I had some saltine crackers and oysters in the car, so breakfast was served—of course washed down by beer. Even in foul weather gear we were soaked. The docks were now several feet under water and the surge was steadily climbing higher. By the dawn’s early light, we could see several problems. One boat elected to only tie down its jib sail. The winds had proven too much and it was slowly unraveling and shredding. There was nothing we could do. The boat was at the farthest dock and water on the dock was now chest deep. Oh well, goodbye sail. Even worse was the boat next to mine. The spring line was tied too tight and the boat was heeled over less than two feet from broaching and water pouring into the cockpit. We watched it rock and dip down with every gusty blast. It was an Island Packet 38, so its cleats were strong. The dock cleat was set in solid concrete. Something had to give to save the boat. No one was swimming out there to save it. Luckily the inch-thick dock line chafed through and the boat popped upright at the last moment. Updated cell-phone weather now showed the eye of the storm just offshore directly east of us. We were getting the full force of hurricane winds; time to run to the cars again. I positioned mine behind a heavy truck and van. They were my blockers from any flying debris or me becoming a kite. Even so, the car still lifted and shuttered a few times. All day we alternately huddled in cars or climbed out to see the storm surge rising. Oh crap! Another problem! Some unthinking soul had tied his dock line behind a fire water hose station. The force of the wind pulled his boat sideways and snapped the fire hose line. A10-foot geyser of water three inches www.southwindsmagazine.com


thick was spraying all over the dock, but worse; the water was landing directly into the cockpit of the sailboat next to it. The boat was filling with fresh water. No one could fight the wind nor swim out to save it. It sunk. It lay there on the bottom, mast pointing at a crazy angle to the sky. Our first casualty. Night was coming on. The eye of the storm was now past us and ripping up St. Augustine. Storm surge there had flooded its old town streets and devastation had set in. I considered my options. I was soaking wet, hungry and needed to sleep. My boat, a Bayfield 36, had a bed, a propane stove to cook hot food and coffee, dry clothes. Did I say—a bed? I eyed the storm surge. Hmmm—only chest deep. Winds were down to maybe only 70mph with gusts every few minutes. I was going. I walked out onto the only dry land of an adjacent field, climbed a cyclone fence and swam out to the boat. I grabbed the toe rail and pulled myself up and aboard. Yahoo! I was back on the boat. I checked the lines. Damn glad I did. All the pilings on the port side had broken off. I had only one piling left and one thin line holding the boat from being washed up onto the dock and into the field. I re-rigged the lines fast. On the starboard side, a piling on the finger dock had broken off, leaving an eight-inch, 3/4-inch bolt sticking out just inches away from the hull. If the boat went down onto that, it was all over. I couldn’t pull the boat to port. There were no pilings left there. Best I could do was lasso an underwater cleat on the slip next to mine and winch it tight. Good thing I’m a Texan. It still took a good fifteen minutes of

News & Views for Southern Sailors

throwing rope to hook up. The cleat, being three feet underwater, didn’t help. Okay the boat is as safe as can be. I opened up the companionway and climbed inside. I was damn glad to be “home.” I changed into dry clothes, turned on the propane, lit the stove and brewed a pot of hot coffee, added a huge dollop of Jack Daniels and started cooking dinner. The Hurricane could howl and screech all it wanted outside. I was not leaving. Besides, it was moving away. I was confident the worst was over. After a great dinner of crab and lobster and more Jack Daniels, I climbed into a comfortable bed and slept till daylight. When I woke, the storm surge over the dock was only 18 inches deep. Wreckage and debris covered the docks. Pilings, fenders, gas and diesel jugs, and broken branches were in a jumbled pile. Further down the docks, the broken geyser of water was still spraying relentlessly into the sunken sailboat now on the bottom. The wind was now out of the west and only about 20 knots with some higher gusts coming sporadically. I jumped off the boat onto a mud covered dock and walked slowly to the marina office where a few souls were huddled and grimly eying the damages. All the electricity and water was off. All except for the fire main water geyser still spraying hundreds of gallons a minute onto the sunken sailboat. Someone had lost a hard top bimini. It was floating in the water. Marina personnel had arrived. Work crews were organized and branches and trash hauled out in dock carts to the dumpsters. They were all soon overflowing. By evening the place was looking better. After four failures, we finally were able to cap the water geyser and everyone gazed sorrowfully at the sunken vessel. We had no electricity, but we did have a big community propane grill. The local Publix had opened and a foraging party came back with hamburger and chicken, rum and whiskey. It was a grand survival party. Good food, warm liquor and everyone telling the story of how they survived Hurricane Matthew. One of the best things I love about cruising and marina life is the camaraderie of the people. Everyone looks out for everyone else. You can live in a housing development for 10 years and maybe know two neighbors. Everyone is in their cocoon, locked in little boxes. Not so in a marina. You know all the faces and the names that go with them. If someone needs help you pitch in. There are community potlucks, and people are quick to reach out and offer a hand. It’s a true brotherhood of the sea. I’m lucky to be a part of it. I hope you are lucky too.

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Riding out Hurricane Matthew By Thomas Peterson

I

rode out this storm onboard Cloud, my 1968 Seafarer 35 Bahama sloop, in 12 feet of water 600 yards south of the Pineda causeway in the Indian river (ICW) at Melbourne, FL. Having had a week or so of watching weather forecasts, the realization that a real storm was in my future was solid in my mind. Wishful thinking was not going to stop it. The questions start: Where? When? What do I need? What do I have? The nature of a hurricane eye and the change of wind direction should not be overlooked. The spot that seems protected at the start may well be the worst place to be in the later times of the storm. A 180-degree wind shift will happen, and the closer the eye is from your location, the faster the shift can happen. I saw boats cast off and leave anchors to fight storm winds because they were too close to shore and the wind shift had them 75 yards from shore—dragging on a silty bottom. Some lessons were learned that night. Where to go? Do I run? Getting 75 miles from the eye is a good plan. BUT...the Matthew storm was hugging the Florida east coast. Only a guess whether it was passing left or right of me. I have seen total disasters in small mini harbors with too many poorly anchored boats fouling other boats. No real place to run. Pick your spot. Your boat is not aerodynamic. A boat lifting its bow 45-plus degrees and a wave hitting the broad bottom of your anchored boat at 60-plus mph slaps your boat with a force that breaks chains and tears stuff up fast. I dropped and pulled my anchor (windlass) several times until no muck. Finally, I found a hard clayish bottom. Anchors. This is the tricky part. “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link.” First: Don’t trust “no name” China parts in these storms. Buy top quality shackles and safety wire them. I went with a tandem anchor set on 150 feet of 3/8 chain; A plow (20kg) in front of a Bruce claw (33kg), used with a double-bridle snubber. Safety wire the snubber hooks to the

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chain. If a wave throws the hook off, the bang of solid chain will scare you quick. This setup will let the boat take the 180-degree wind shift. But a back up is needed, as anything can happen. The problem with a V anchor set up is a wind shift will cross the anchor lines and start the chafe factor. It can be extreme; Bolt heads or anything on the bow can cut the line. I kept my number two anchor line (44kg Bruce) tied with 150 feet of slack. The number one anchor had to fail completely before the second anchor would take over. A third anchor was at the ready, but tied at the cockpit. I had number two and number three lines looped on the front Samson cleats, but the line ends were led to the winches in the cockpit and bowline-knot attached. The bridle lines were attached the same. Hard-tie lines to cleats. I took everything off the outside of the boat. I attached buoys to the anchors. Before the storm, I took motion sickness meds. I don’t get sick...right...it is a rough ride. Forest Gump, Lt. Dan. The storm scene—a washing machine, riding in a teacup. You come to a place in the storm where you can do little or nothing. You must trust your equipment and your prep. And you will want it to stop... I will have a motorcycle helmet onboard for my next hurricane. Rain feels like BBs in the face. I hated that.

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Cloud, a 1968 Seafarer 35 Bahama sloop in calmer times.

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Scrimshaw at the docks at sunset before leaving for La Belle.

No Time for Breakfast in Sandy Key Sailing with Jim Brown on Scrimshaw By Bruce L. Matlack

“B

ruce, I have some good news and I have some bad news,” Jim Brown says. “The good news is we’re not bouncing. The bad news is we’ve dragged anchor and we’re hard aground.” Jim’s voice is just inches above my face. He’s awakened me from a deep sleep aboard my newly purchased trimaran, Scrimshaw, a multihull Jim designed and built for himself and his family in 1972. Three years ago, Jim sold her to a dreamer who never sailed her. Now, I’ve bought Scrimshaw to prevent her from languishing in a Homestead, Florida marina any longer. I want to save this famous firstof-her-kind, wooden Searunner 31. I’m taking her on a maiden voyage from Homestead to the Belle Hatchie Marina—a.k.a. “Wayne’s World”—in La Belle by way of the Florida Bay. Jim and I are sailing with good friend Joe Murphy. Jim is 82, Joe is 69 and I’ll soon be 72. Jim hovers just above me. Severely sight-impaired, he’s simply trying to see me. “Well okay,” I say, still half-asleep. “Let’s make breakfast.” In the aft cabin, I hear Joe shout, “What? Breakfast?” Hearing us discuss our grounding, Joe immediately turns on the radio for the weather and tide forecast. High tide is in 45 minutes. Joe yells, “Let’s get cracking—we’ve only got 45 minutes to get this boat off the hard before the tide turns against us.” The previous evening, with sunlight fading, Sandy Key was the nearest island we could tuck behind for some shelNews & Views for Southern Sailors

ter from the forecasted midnight frontal passage. But at 2am, pee time for three old men, the boat had swung 180 degrees. Now it’s morning and with a fresh northerly wind, we’ve tripped the anchor free and are hard

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aground. We’ve dragged 800 feet from original hook set and I’m not sure we aren’t still dragging. Joe is right. This is no time for breakfast! We try the motor at full speed and we’re not budging. The outboard’s cooling system is sucking muddy water, making me, the new owner, cringe. “I think we’re better trying to sail her off with all three of us on the leeward float,” Jim says. “Or maybe the three of us could jump in the water and push her off.” Just then I look in the water to see an eight-foot shark in a feeding frenzy. “You can’t see this Jim, but there’s a shark 20 feet from us,” I say. “Also, one foot in is one foot gone in this up-tothe-knee muck.” I remember trying to push my little Windrider 17 free when I was sailing these waters solo from Anna Maria to Key West three years ago. (Go to February 2010 issue at Back Issues at www.southwindsmagazine.com.) We get the mainsail up okay, but as we begin to set the Genoa, the unattended furling line lets loose off the winch. “Damn”, we’d forgotten to keep good tension on the furling line in our rush to set. The sail goes out rapidly. Uncontrolled, the furler line wraps itself in knots around everything: the stanchion, the drum and anything in between. So we have all the sail rolled out, rising wind and now, no way to reduce sail. The sail is flogging and the sheets are wrapping around the dinghy, which I absentmindedly stored right side up. The jib sheets are flogging us and wrapping around the dinghy seat. The next thing I know, I’m watching the dinghy go up in the air towards the

spreader 20 feet overhead. As the dinghy rises, I grab one of the sheets to tether it from swinging and going any higher. At the same time, I’m attempting to steer with the tiller with my other hand. Unbeknownst to me, the tiller is not attached to anything! The lazy sheet line hits Joe smack in the face. Murphy’s Law is virtual reality aboard Scrimshaw today, I think. “Joe, you okay?” Joe grabs his head, stunned a moment. “I’m okay,” he says and goes back to work. We sheet the genoa and main in and attempt to motor and sail off but the boat radically bears away, spinning around on the hard. That’s not what’s supposed to happen. The centerboard is all the way up. Jim put the kick-up rudder blade down. I’m in the center cockpit attempting to steer her to a beam reach back out to the waterway, but she doesn’t answer and I’m totally confused. Now, the wind is whipping the sheet lines dangerously and the genoa is flogging wildly. I pressure the main to get power aft to head her back up and away from an accidental jibe situation. Instead of just easing her back up to a beam reach to attempt a sail-off as I’m expecting, she pivots all the way into a rapid tack. But she only pivots. She doesn’t go anywhere, even with the 8-horse Honda outboard running full blast, straight ahead. We’re just going in a circle, jibing and tacking uncontrollably. Now we have a real mess on our hands. The genoa is not usable and sheeting the mainsail in has driven us into an unwanted tack, but the dinghy is again resting on deck. Years of muscle memory in windsurfing return to me as

REVIEW YOUR BOAT SOUTHWINDS is looking for sailors who like to write to review their sailboat — whether it is new or old, large or small. It can include the following: Year, model, make, designer, boat name Specifications: LOA, LWL, beam, draft, sail plan (square footage), displacement Sailing performance Comfort above and below deck Cruiser and/or Racer Is it a good liveaboard? Modifications you have made or would like General boat impression Quality of construction Photos Essential (contact us for photo specs) We have found that our readers love reviews by those who own the boats — comments are more personal and real All articles must be sent via email or on disc For more information and if interested, contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com or call (941) 795-8704

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Jim, on the left on Scrimshaw; and crew Joe on the dock.

I try to simply use sail power to steer with both sails to control the boat. But it’s as if my windsurf board has lost its skeg! I’m just pivoting on a mound of muck, unable to sail off in any direction. I’m controlling the power of the main, and I want my crew to give me some sail power forward of the mast to bear away, even if done with only hand-held sheets at the clew, which they try to do in near 20-mph winds. Since I cannot tilt the mast fore ‘n aft, as on a sailboard, to steer, I am trying to vary sail power on either side of the fixed mast, first aft of the mast with the main, and then forward of the mast with the genoa, trying in vain to wiggle us off what appears to be a pinnacle-shaped mound of muck. No luck—still going in circles. My mind floods with visions of being pushed dangerously deeper and deeper inshore with the remaining rising tide onto the numerous shoals that await us as clearly evident on the chart. Soon, I think, we’ll be so far in that even my new TowBoatUS towing policy will be money wasted. “Let the jib go!” I call. Still, I can’t control the rudder as she attempts to tack again and my brain just isn’t getting it! We should be moving off now, I think. What’s wrong? I begin to doubt my skills in handling a boat of this size aground. Jim and Joe have now pulled up our anchor full of

muck and grass—a hairy mass the size of three basketballs—onto the deck. All of a sudden, it looks like we’re getting a lucky break. Can it be? A fishing skiff is coming straight for us out of absolutely nowhere, and I’m waving my arms at them like crazy, thinking if we could just get a towline on the bow to stabilize her into the wind. “We don’t tow!” one of the fishermen yells, speeding by us on their merry way. “Throw your anchor out!” The other shouts as they zoom away. “I can’t help spinning the boat!” I holler forward to the crew. Just then I realize we’re drifting sideways! We’re not aground anymore! Joe and Jim haven’t noticed yet. They’re still up on the bow trying to get the tangled and knotted lines squared away and free the mud ball on the anchor. But we‘re free, and I run forward from my tiller station, yelling, “Get out of my way!” I grab the anchor, clearing off the last bit of grassy goop and toss it out. It grabs and holds! Hooray! This stops the boat from drifting sideways, bringing her head to wind. We can get out of here; we’re free of the muck! I exclaim to myself.

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Scrimshaw on the Okeechobee Waterway leaving Fort Myers.

Now, we’re holding. We can get organized and head to sea. Meanwhile, Joe is collapsed on the cabin top, totally exhausted. Is he having a heart attack? Joe’s been working the whole time finding the bitter end of the furling line and untying knot after knot. He really saved our asses while Jim

and I were panicked by the predicament with the giant Genoa flogging about on a mission of self-destruction. But, the good news—we are free and heading into the wind and holding our own in the highest wind yet! The sail hasn’t shred itself. We furl the big sail up finally. And

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Jim Brown and Bruce Matlack.

Joe’s okay too! Now we can bear away to safety at sea as we raise anchor, ease the mainsail out and try to motor out. We are moving forward, but I still cannot steer her head away from the wind! At this moment it hits me and I yell, “The rudder’s not down!” It’s been up the whole time! That’s why I haven’t been able to steer us off or control the heading on the mound of muck! So we lock it in the full down position and off we sail. Unbeknownst to me, Jim had mistakenly thought the giant kick-up rudder was all the way down earlier, when in fact he locked it all the way up. Unable to see with his failing eyes, he’d relied on his hands and gotten a false reading. The two opposite control lines are next to each other. From my center cockpit steering station, the rudder isn’t in my sightline. A seeing person could have easily made the same mistake, but Jim beats himself up about it because he created the boat. The whole episode probably took half an hour. During that time, I thought: I’ve just bought this boat to save it, and I’m going to lose it here today. I was worrying that even with towing insurance it would take a helicopter to boatlift us. We extradited ourselves just in the nick of time before the tide changed against us. Only a great stroke of luck saved us from disaster. We were in deep water—contrary to what the chart says. Unbelievable luck, but we will take it! Suddenly we are in a channel of some five feet of water where there should be only two! The tide is now high, and we are skating free of Murphy’s Law once again. Now beating north for Naples, my thoughts turn to breakfast. Jim Brown is the creator of the Searunner Trimaran series, the

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Author Bruce Matlack is restoring Scrimshaw under Jim Brown’s direction. Bruce is the first national and world champion of windsurfing, having been one of the first 20 to “Do it Standing Up,” as the old bumper stickers claimed in the ‘70s. You can view nine videos that Jim Brown shot about Scrimshaw by going to YouTube and searching for “Jim Brown Scrimshaw.”

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author of several books on multihulls, and the originator of the web site www.Outrig.org, a website to preserve multihull facts and lore. He also designed the Windrider polyethylene trimarans.

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Radio-Controlled Laser North Americans, St. Petersburg, FL, Oct. 22-23 By Dave Ellis

R

adio-controlled sailing has increased in popularity worldwide. Fleets often include excellent sailors who are getting up in age who still enjoy bending the wind and the good company of other sailors. One of the most popular of the many classes of radiocontrolled sailing craft is the RC Laser. It is a scale model of the Olympic Laser, being 41 inches long. Like the original Laser, there are a choice of rigs, A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D, used depending on the wind speed. Courses are the usual windward-leeward, but the fellow competitors are standing or sitting right next to each other on shore. The RC Laser North Americans were held this year by the brand new Tampa Bay Area fleet, led by long-time sailing leader Steve Lippincott. Freedom Lake in Pinellas Park is large enough but has the disadvantage of trees on one side. The wind, however, cooperated in direction for excellent racing. Launching the boats with a long bulb keel was by a Lippincott creation fashioned of PVC pipe that slid the boats, bow first, zipping out into the lake. A floating dock facilitated retrieving. Fourteen boats came from the eastern U.S. and the Bahamas. Half the fleet was local to the area. Saturday consisted of 22 races, each having seven boats. Sunday the fleet was divided evenly into Gold and Silver fleets for 11 races for each. Jim Kaighin, a regular on the RC Laser scene nationwide, ran away with the title. There were two throw-out races. He used one when his battery died, the other for an uncharacteristic finish in one heat. Otherwise he scored a total of 28 points in 20 counted races, low point scoring. It was not the boat. There is nothing allowed to be done to modify these boats. Even sanding or polishing the hull or foils is not allowed. Everything must be supplied from the builder. He just sailed the boat consistently very well. In the Gold Fleet, Jon Luscomb of Jupiter, FL, was second, and Calvin Obara of the local Tampa Bay fleet third. In the Silver Fleet, the top three were: Steve Hopkins of Lafollette, TN; Henry DeWolf from Palm City, FL; and Rick Sylvester of the local fleet. Steve Lippincott had a terrible regatta. The organizer who races seldom does well. For regular sailing, the following Wednesday he was on top of his game again. Many volunteers made this a premier event: Steve Lippincott did all of the organizing and inviting. His wife Lynn did the most important job of feeding us. Son Steve Lippincott Jr. manned the paddle board to set and move marks. Teresa Ray Gay figured out who was sailing in the next heat and did the scoring with the able help of Jamie and Kristal. Dave Ellis worked hard to keep up with the many wind shifts as the Race Director. 68

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Radio-controlled Lasers racing on Freedom Lake in St. Petersburg. These lasers are 41 inches long.

Steve Lippincottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s launching device, made of PVC, enabled bulbkeeled boats to be easily launched.

Contestants and trophies at the North American Championship. www.southwindsmagazine.com


RACE CALENDAR LISTING YOUR RACE To list a race or regatta, with or without a description, email editor@southwindsmagazine.com. We limit the descriptions to about 50 words (that includes the title. Longer descriptions listed for a small fee, starting at $20—contact editor.) Races with descriptions are up to the discretion of the editor. We intend them to be the more major races. Send the information. DO NOT just send a link. NOTE ON REGIONAL RACE CALENDARS Regattas and Club Racing—Open to Everyone Wanting to Race Since race schedules and venues change, contact the sponsoring organization to confirm. Websites are listed. Many clubs have regular club races year around open to everyone and new crew is generally invited and sought. Contact the club for dates and information. Note: In the below calendars: YC = Yacht Club; SC = Sailing Club; SA = Sailing Association. Yacht Clubs Listed Below/Yacht Club Directory Clubs listed below are the clubs that have regattas listed this month or next month. For a complete list of clubs in the Southeast, go to www.SouthwindsMagazine.com and go to the club directory. To add your club or edit the listing, create an account on the online directory. You can then add additional information about your club: Location, regattas, club racing, cruising, activities, general information, etc.

Upcoming Major Regattas

15th Annual Kettle Cup Regatta, Lake Monroe Sailing Association, Sanford, FL, Dec. 3-4 A benefit for the Salvation Army. Expected classes are Multihull, Catalina 22, Force 5, San Juan 21, Sunfish, Flying Scot, Buccaneer, Mutineer and Portsmouth. www.flalmsa.org. Clubs with regattas listed this month (go to clubs for local club racing schedules): FYC: Florida YC, www.theFloridaYachtClub.org LESC: Lake Eustis YC, www.lescfl.com LMSA: Lake Monroe SA, www.flalmsa.org MYC: Melbourne YC, www.MelbourneYachtClub.com RCJ: Rudder Club of Jacksonville, www.RudderClub.com DECEMBER (*see “Major Upcoming Regattas” this section) 3-4 Kettle Cup. LMSA* 10 2nd Annual Splash Velago Regatta. LESC 10 Gator Bowl Regatta. RCJ 17 Single Hand Regatta. FYC

For Racing News, Race Training and National and International Regattas in the South, see “Racing News” section, page 21

JANUARY 1 Hangover Regatta. RCJ 1 Hangover Regatta. MYC

Race Calendar

Upcoming Major Regattas

Charleston Ocean Racing Association (CORA) organizes many of the regattas in the Charleston, SC, area. www.charlestonoceanracing.org.

60th Annual Wirth M. Munroe Fort Lauderdale to Palm Beach Race, Sailfish Club, Palm Beach, Dec. 2

Lake Lanier, GA: http://aiscracing.com/aiscracing/LARC/LakeSchedule.php South Atlantic Yacht Racing Assoc. This is the main site for racing in the region. Go to this site for clubs and their websites. www.sayra-sailing.com. DECEMBER 3

Thistle Pig-n-Rum. Thistles. Lake Lanier SC, Lake Lanier, GA, www.llsc.com

This race begins at the Lauderdale Yacht Club and finishes just outside the Lake Worth inlet in Palm Beach. www.sailfishclub.com.

Junior Olympic Sailing Festival, US SAILING Center, Martin County, FL, Dec. 3-4 Green Fleet, Optis, 420s, Windsurfers. www.usscmc.org.

January Calendar Not Completed as of press date

News & Views for Southern Sailors

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RACE CALENDAR 42nd Fort Lauderdale to Key West Race, Jan. 11 A 160-nautical-mile sprint down the Florida Keys. This will start at Port Everglades on Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 1300 hours, and will run along the Florida Keys to Key West. Boats are expected to begin finishing the race throughout the day of Jan. 13. Fleets include IRC, PHRF, Multihull and One-Design. The race is sponsored by Lauderdale Yacht Club and the Storm Trysail Club and hosted by the SORC race management group. A skippers meeting and cocktail party takes place January 10 at Lauderdale Yacht Club, race headquarters. Awards are scheduled for January 13 in Key West and hosted by Kelly’s Caribbean Bar & Grill. For more information and online registration, go to www.keywestrace.org. Entry deadline is Jan. 6. Race Calendar Regional Sailing Organizations: US PHRF of Southeast Florida. www.phrfsef.com BBYRA Biscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association. www.bbyra.net Clubs with regattas listed this month (go to clubs for local club racing schedules): BBYC Biscayne Bay YC. www.biscaynebayyachtclub.com CGSC Coconut Grove Sailing Club, www.cgsc.org CRYC Coral Reef YC, www.coralreefyachtclub.org SORC Southern Ocean Racing Conference. www.sorcsailing.org USSA US Sailing. www.ussailing.org DECEMBER (*see “Major Upcoming Regattas” this section) 2 Wirth Munroe* 3-4 Junior Olympic Sailing Festival* 10 Fall Harvest Regatta. MYC 29-31 Orange Bowl Regata. CRYC JANUARY (*see “Major Upcoming Regattas” this section) 5-8 Star Mid-Winters. CRYC 6-7 29er Mid-Winters East. USSA 7-8 Etchells Sid Doren Regatta. BBYC 7 BBYRA OD #5 8 BBYRA ORC #5 11-13 Ft. Lauderdale to Key West Race. SORC* 14-16 470 & 1420 North American Championship. CGSC 14-16 Pre-ISAF Mid-Winters. BBYRA 22-27 ISAF Sailing World Cup Miami. BBYRA 28 ISAF Race Week Medal Races. BBYRA

The race is always scheduled for the second weekend in December and draws top world-class sailors from around the country and world. The race is sponsored by Catamaran Sailor, www.Catsailor.com/registration.

Wrecker’s Cup Race, Key West, January, February, March, April A different type of race for all sailors. See Calendar section, page 15, “Other Events,” for more information. Race Calendar Key West Community Sailing Center (formerly Key West Sailing Club). Every Saturday – Open house at the Center. 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Friday evenings happy hour open house at 5pm. 305-2925993. www.keywestsailingcenter.com. Sailboat Lane off Palm Avenue in Key West. Non-members welcome. Small-boat Wednesday night racing during Daylight Savings season. Smallboat Sunday racing year around at 1 p.m. Boat ramp available. Race in the seaplane basin near the mooring field. Dinner and drinks afterward. Upper Keys Sailing Club (UKSC), Key Largo. www.upperkeyssailingclub.com. Go to the Club website for regular club racing open to all. DECEMBER (*see “Major Upcoming Regattas” this section) (** See Racing News page 21) 1-4 Hobie Wave Nationals. ** 9-13 Key Largo Steeplechase* JANUARY (** See Racing News page 21) 13-15 Buccaneer & Mutineer Regatta. UKSC 14-16 Tradewinds Midwinter Open Cat Nationals** 15-20 Key West Race Week** 21 Winter #3 Portsmouth. UKSC 22 Winter #3 PHRF. UKSC 27-29 Moth Racing. UKSC

Upcoming Major Regattas

Keelboat Regatta, Davis Island Yacht Club, Dec. 3 Major Upcoming Regattas (See Racing News page 21 for more on national racing events in the Keys)

32nd Annual Key Largo Steeplechase, Key Largo, FL, Dec. 9-13

A one-day event with buoy races for spinnaker and a distance course for others. All spinnaker boats under 30 feet on the buoy course are competing for the Frank Selph Memorial Trophy. Frank was an avid MORC supporter and this trophy is awarded in his honor. This event is both a DIYC and Suncoast BOTY event. 

A 110-mile trek around Key Largo for beach catamarans. 70

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Commodore’s Cup Regatta, Davis Island Yacht Club, Jan. 14 In honor of all DIYC Commodores, this two-day regatta kicks off the spring schedule with intense racing for two days. The best always come out to set the tone for the second half of the season.  Expect great competition and fun shoreside entertainment Saturday night. This event is both a DIYC and Suncoast BOTY event.  

34th Annual Golden Conch Regatta, Platinum Point Yacht Club, Punta Gorda, FL, Jan. 14-15 This two-day race series will be conducted outside the Burnt Store Marina entrance on Charlotte Harbor. There will be two separate racecourses with five races for Spinnaker and Multihull fleets; three races for cruising fleets. This regatta qualifies for Charlotte Harbor Boat of the Year (CHBOTY). Expected are 30-35 boats in five classes offered. Both buoy and windward-leeward races will be conducted. A mandatory skippers meeting will be held on Saturday morning along with a complimentary continental breakfast. A barbecue social is planned after the Saturday races. The awards ceremony with light lunch will be held on Sunday after racing. More details, NOR, and Entry Form at www.ppycbsm.org.

St. Petersburg Classic Regatta, St. Petersburg, FL, Jan. 21

St. Petersburg Ocean Racing Circuit: (SPORC) Charlotte Harbor/Ft. Myers area: (CHBOTY) Sarasota Bay (Sarasota to Venice): (SBYABOTY) Naples/Marco Island: (N/MBOTY) Southwest Florida Boat of the Year (Naples to Marco Island): (SWFLBOTY) Caloosahatchee Region Boat of the Year: (CLRBOTY) DECEMBER (*see “Major Upcoming Regattas” this section) 2-4 America’s Disabled. SPYC 3 Ted Irwin Memorial Sail-a-thon. CYC 3 Keelboat Regatta. DIYC* 10 Commodore’s Cup. SSS 10 Commodore’s Cup. CMCS (CLRBOTY) 10 Offshore Regatta. NYC (SWFLBOTY) 31 New Year’s Fun Pursuit Race. SPSA JANUARY 1 Hang Over Bowl. DIYC 7 Sunfish DIYC 7 New Year’s Cup. GCSC 7-8 Snipes’ Gaspar & Windmills SPYC 7-8 J/70 Event #2 DIYC 12 Full Moon. DIYC 13-14 Golden Conch. PPYC* 14 Clearwater Championship. CYC 14-15 Commodore’s Cup. DIYC (SCBOTY) (DIBOTY) 20-22 Master Driver Team Racing. SPYC 21 Chili Cook-Off Regatta. CMCS 21 First Gulf Race. DBC 21 St. Petersburg Classic Regatta SPSA (See Calendar, Other Events, page 15) 27-28 Windjammer to Venice & Return. SSS/NYC. (SBYABOTY)

For more information, see Calendar Section, page 15 “Other Events.” West Florida Race Calendar The organizing authority for racing and boat ratings in West Florida is West Florida PHRF at www.westfloridaphrf.org. For regatta schedules and Boat of the Year schedules, go to the West Florida Yacht Racing Association at www.wfyra.org. Clubs with regattas listed this month (go to clubs for local club racing schedules): CMCS: Caloosahatchee Marching & Chowder Society, www.cmcs-sail.org CYC: Clearwater YC, www.ClearwaterYachtClub.org DBC: Dunedin Boat Club, www.DunedinBoatClub.org DIYC: Davis Island YC, www.diyc.org MIYC: Marco Island YC, www.marcoislandyachtclub.net NSYC: Naples Sailing & YC, www.theNSYC.com NYC: Naples YC, www.NaplesYC.org PPYC: Platinum Point YC, www.ppycbsm.com SPSA: St. Petersburg SA, www.spsa.us SPYC: St. Petersburg YC, www.spyc.org SSS: Sarasota Sailing Squadron, www.sarasotasailingsquadron.org Boat of the Year Races (BOTY) For complete details and regatta changes, go to www.wfyra.org and click on the regional associations in Southwest Florida pertaining to each area below: Tampa Bay/Suncoast (also known as West Florida BOTY: (SCBOTY) Davis Island YC Boat of the Year: (DIBOTY) Gulf Racing Boat of the Year (Clearwater/Dunedin area): (GULFBOTY) News & Views for Southern Sailors

Race Calendar Gulf Yachting Association. www.gya.org Galveston Bay Cruising Association. www.byca.org Clubs with regattas listed this month FYC: Fairhope YC, Fairhope, AL, www.Fairhopeyachtclub.com HYC: Houston YC, Houston, TX, www.Houstonyachtclub.com PBYC: Pensacola Beach YC, Pensacola Beach, FL, www.PensacolaBeach-YC.org PYC: Pensacola YC, Pensacola, FL, www.PensacolaYachtClub.org SYC: Southern YC, New Orleans, LA, www.SouthernYachtClub.org DECEMBER 3 Double-handed Race. HYC 3-4 Sugar Bowl Regatta. SYC 3-4 Sugar Bowl Race of Champions (One-Design). SYC 10 Santa Claus Regatta. PYC 31-1 Sugar Bowl Regatta (IC). SYC JANUARY 1 Hangover Regatta. PBYC 1 Revognah Regatta. HYC 6-8 GYA Winter Meeting. PYC 21 Frostbite Regatta. PBYC (tentative date)

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Beneteau 50 1998 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$199,900 Columbia 50 1968 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$93,000 Gulfstar 50 Sailmaster 1984 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$126,500 CAL 48 1967 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$110,000 Beneteau Oceanis 48 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$425,000 Beneteau 473 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$215,000 Morgan 462 1981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$84,900 Sea Master 46 1982 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$103,000 Jeanneau 44DS 360 Docking 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$275,000 Gulfstar 44 1982 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65,000 Beneteau 411 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Two to Choose from starting at $75,000 Beneteau Oceanis 41 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$239,000 Morgan Out Island 41 1979 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$57,900 Beneteau First 40.7 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$95,000 Beneteau 400 1996 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$62,000 C&C 40 1981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,000 Catalina 400 MKII 2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$191,500 Tartan 40 K/C 1986 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $113,000 Bavaria 40 Center Cockpit 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$110,000 Beneteau 40 Center Cockpit 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$123,500 Beneteau 393 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$109,900 Beneteau 381 1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$67,000 Beneteau 373 w/Genset . . . . . . . . .Two to Choose from starting at $116,000 X-Yachts X-37 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$145,000 Tartan 3700 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$138,000 Jeanneau 37 SO 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,000 Beneteau First 36s7 1996 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$68,000 Beneteau Oceanis 35 w/Genset 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$215,000 Catalina 350 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$118,000 Beneteau Oceanis 35 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$155,750 Beneteau 343 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75,000 Beneteau 34 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$114,500 Hans Christian 33 1981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$95,000 Pearson 31-2 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Two to Choose from starting at $28,000 J/Boats J/92 1993 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$35,900 Seaward 26RK 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$62,000 J/Boats J/80 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$30,000 J/Boats J/70 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,500 Beneteau First 22 2016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CALL FOR PACKAGE

Oceanis 35 Centerboard Option 3’ 9” to 7’7’’ draft

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News & Views for Southern Sailors

Beneteau First (20’ to 35’)

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2016 2000 1999 2001 1989 2009 2010 2005 2004 2006 2008 1990 2008 2004 2001 2008 2000 2006 2003 2009 2002 1993 2012 2003 2002 2016 2015 1997 1991

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1939 2007 2000 1988 2008 1966 1978 2004 1979 1988 1973 1975 1975 1974 1994 1974 1982 1990 2003

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Bali, Indonesia Vanuatu Tarpon Springs St. Augustine Ft. Lauderdale St. Augustine Cruising Bahamas Palm Coast Lighthouse Point BVI St. Augustine Marco Island St. Lucia Puerto Rico Bahamas Fort Pierce Melbourne St. Augustine Ft. Pierce Jacksonville St. Augustine Titusville St. Augustine Salinas, Puertp Rico Clearwater South Africa Dania Beach Jacksonville Beach Cape Coral

SAIL

$240,000 Argentina $1,595,000 St. Maarten $179,000Daytona/St Mary Georgia $440,000 St. Augustine $392,000 Not for Sale in US $722,500 Panama $219,500 Bradenton $589,000 Punta Gorda $229,900 Fort Lauderdale $199,000 Fort Lauderdale $164,900 Ft Lauderdale $145,000 Lancaster, VA $140,000 Port Canaveral $ 94,900 Ft. Pierce $265,000 Vuda Point, Fiji $237,500 Jupiter $149,000 San Carlos, Mexico $ 66,000 Slidell, LA $149,000 Green Cove Springs

Andre Tom Bill Tom Kirk Tom Tom Tom Clark Tom Tom Mike Kevin Joe H Tom Clark Clark Tom Cal Cal Tom Kevin Melanie Harry Tony Clark Clark Tom Mike Kirk Bob Jim Melanie Clark Joe Joe Calvin Clark Kirk Tom S Melanie Kevin Melanie Melanie Cal Harry Mike M Tom

50’ 49’ 49’ 49’ 48’ 47’ 47’ 46’ 46’ 46’ 46’ 46’ 46’ 45’ 45’ 45’ 45’ 45’ 45’ 45’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 44’ 43’ 43’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 42’ 41’ 41’ 41’ 41’ 41’ 41’ 41’ 40’ 40’

Beneteau Oceanis Kauffman Cutter Jeanneau DS 49 Jeanneau DS Bavaria Vagabond Formosa Island Packet Hunter 466 Morgan 462 Island Packet Hylas CC Fisher Motorsailer Beneteau 45F5 Morgan Starrett&Jenks Morgan Nelson Morgan/Starrat Morgan Catalina Morgan 452 Hunter Cutter Rig Hylas CC Sloop Morgan CC Beneteau Oceanis CSY Pilothouse CSY Walkover Stamas Ketch Bavaria Bruce Roberts Bruce Roberts Mauritis C&C Landfall Formosa Sea Tiger Pearson Lancer Motorsailer Whitby CC Beneteau Beneteau First Slocum Cutter Brewer Catalina MRK I Tayana Vencouver CC Contest Hunter 420 Morgan Catalina Morgan Classic CC Beneteau Gulfstar Hunter Deck Salon Morgan Out Island Morgan O/I Bayfield Island Packet

2012 1986 2005 2006 1999 1984 1981 2006 2002 1984 2006 1998 1977 1992 1977 1983 1988 1995 1978 2000 1987 1988 1993 1978 1978 1983 1994 1985 1984 1984 1975 1981 1981 1980 1983 1983 1986 1984 1989 1981 1983 2000 1989 1987 2001 1973 2007 1973 1978 1983 1998

36’ Fountaine Pajot Mahe Evolution 2012. UPGRADED 30 HP Volvo’s, NEW genset, 2-85 watt solar panels, Raychart software, elect windlass, Magma grill, UPGRADED! $269,000, Melanie 305-807-4096

$289,900 $159,000 $219,000 $199,000 $100,000 $185,000 $215,000 $330,000 $149,999 $ 44,900 $360,000 $324,900 $149,000 $ 76,500 $ 77,000 $ 54,500 $125,000 $158,000 $ 68,999 $150,000 $149,900 $ 96,500 $ 88,900 $219,500 $ 45,000 $ 35,000 $ 79,900 $ 28,000 $ 59,000 $ 64,000 $ 55,000 $ 52,000 $115,000 $ 65,000 $ 65,000 $ 65,000 $140,000 $105,000 $ 92,000 $ 75,000 $132,000 $143,900 $ 62,500 $ 69,900 $100,000 $ 55,500 $164,878 $ 49,900 $ 70,000 $ 45,000 $195,000

Quepos, Costa Rica Green Cove Springs West Palm Beach Ft. Lauderdale Tampa Lantana Punta Gorda North Palm Beach Sarasota Pensacola North Palm Beach Cape Coral Ft. Lauderdale Bradenton Satellite Beach Punta Gorda Punta Gorda Ft. Lauderdale Vero Beach Cocoa Ft. Lauderdale Clearwater Naples St. Petersburg Antigua & Barbada Fort Pierce Pensacola Green Cove Springs Alva Cape Coral St. Petersburg Indiantown Luperon, Dominican Green Cove Springs Green Cove Springs Melbourne Melbourne Clearwater Ft Myers Beach Port Charlotte Panama City Bradenton Marco Island PuntaGorda Dominican Republic Cruising Brunswick, GA Riviera Beach Green Cove Springs Tierra Verde Melbourne

Clark Kevin Cal Cal Bill T Cal Bill T Cal Kevin Ralph Cal Leo Kirk Mark Kevin Calvin Joe Andre Harry Kevin Kirk Harry Mike Joe Joe Kirk Kevin B Melanie Mike Mark Melanie Melanie Harry Melanie Harry Kevin Kevin Bill T Mike Harry KevinB Mark Mike Melanie TomS Melanie Melanie Harry Joe Bill T Kevin

40’ 40’ 40’ 39’ 39’ 39’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 38’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 37’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 36’ 35’ 35’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 34’ 33’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 32’ 31’ 31’ 31’ 31’ 30’ 29’ 27’ 27’ 27’ 24’

Island Packet Migrator Block Island C&C 37/40+ Beneteau Gulfstar Sailmaster Grand Soleil C&C Landfall Chiappini Schooner Beneteau 381 Hunter Hunter Legend Harlinger Jactbouw Whitby Alberg MKII Gulfstar Gulfstar Pacific Seacraft Atlantic Clipper Ketch Allied Princess schooner Beneteau 361 Columbia Catalina MKII Westerly Corsair Pearson Sloop Catalina 350 Southern Cross Sabre MKI Catalina Catalina Hunter Hunter 336 Hunter Catalina Tall Rig Aloha 10.4 Sloop Morgan Beneteau Oceanis Catalina 320 Catalina Pearson 323 Hunter 326 Downeast Island Packet Allmand Hunter Pacific Seacraft Southern Cross Skipper Sloop Island Packet Island Packet C&C Pacific Seacraft Dana Pacific Seacraft Dana

Edwards Yacht Sales Quality Listings, Professional Brokers Brett Harris • Clearwater • 727-449-8222 Tom Morton • St. Augustine • 904-377-9446 Bill Mellon • St. Petersburg • 727-421-4848 Tom Sheehy • Dunedin • 727-742-2772 Clark Jelley • West Palm Beach • 561-676-8445 Mark Newton • Tampa • 813-523-1717 Wendy Young • Punta Gorda • 941-916-0660 Kevin Welsh • Melbourne • 321-693-1642 Kirk Muter • Ft. Lauderdale • 954-649-4679 Jane Burnett • Clearwater Beach • 813-917-0911

Joe Hanko • Ft. Myers • 239-789-7510 Doug Jenkins • Bradenton • 941-504-0790 Leo Thibault • Punta Gorda • 941-504-6754 Joe Weber • Bradenton • 941-224-9661 Jim Pietszak • Daytona Beach • 386-898-2729 Tom Hayes • Bradenton • 818-516-5742 Calvin Cornish • Punta Gorda • 941-830-1047 Bill Tarleton • Clearwater • 727-234-5818 Kevin Barber • Pensacola • 850-982-0983 Mike Macchi • Alabama • 251-414-6311

www.EdwardsYachtSales.com • 727-449-8222 • 74

December 2016

SOUTHWINDS

FAX

32’ Island Packet 1998. Yanmar 27hp 650 hrs, Cutter rig w/in-mast furling mainsail, roller furling headsail & staysail, 48’1” bridge clearance, AC/heat, fully equipped galley, Safe & Comfortable! $99,900, Calvin 941-916-0660 1999 1987 1994 2004 1981 1989 1984 1990 2001 2001 1991 1980 1980 1977 1976 1991 1974 1978 2002 1968 2001 1987 1979 2003 1985 1984 1990 2001 1986 1996 1984 1988 1984 1974 1997 2001 2002 1981 2002 1976 1998 1983 1986 1979 1976 2007 1996 1986 1978 2002 1987

$197,000 Carribean $139,000 Amelia Island, FL $ 76,500 Marco Island $124,000 West Palm Beach $ 79,000 St. Augustine $ 70,000 Caracas, Venezuela $ 15,000 West Palm Beach $ 55,000 Miami $ 77,500 Osprey $ 78,500 Ft. Myers $ 59,999 Englewood $ 74,900 Brunswick, GA $ 40,000 Tapachula, Mexico $ 29,900 Marathon $ 50,000 Charlotte Harbor $139,000 Enroute Sarasote $ 22,000 Carriacou, Grenada $ 35,000 Marathon $ 97,000 Grenada $ 29,500 Salinas, Puerto Rico $ 94,000 Punta Gorda $ 50,000 Bocas Del Toro $ 49,900 Merritt Island $ 93,000 Merritt Island $ 47,300 St. Petersburg $ 45,900 Pensacola $ 46,500 Cape Coral $ 79,000 North Palm Beach $ 32,000 Indian Harbour Beach $ 44,900 Punta Gorda $ 32,000 Indian Harbor Beach $ 36,000 Punta Gorda $ 25,000 Titusville $ 22,000 Green Cove Springs $ 59,000 Cape Coral $ 67,900 Harbour Beach $ 64,000 Port Canaveral $ 29,900 Cape Coral $ 45,000 Tarpon Springs $ 29,995 Naples $ 99,900 Punta Gorda $ 15,000 Riviera Beach $ 25,000 Pensacola $ 45,000 SW FL $ 25,000 Green Cove Springs $ 39,900 Melbourne $ 72,500 Apalachicola $ 49,900 Indiantown $ 6,500 Green Cove Springs $ 69,000 Melbourne $ 44,900 Black Rock

BOAT FROM

Harry Melanie Mike C Cal Tom Kevin Cal Clark Scott Tom O Tom O Melanie Joe Clark Harry Doug Kirk Tom S Joe Harry Leo Harry Kevin Kevin Tom O Kevin B Mike Cal Kevin Tom O Kevin Calvin Kirk Joe Mike Kevin Kevin Andre Bill T Mike Calvin Cal Ralph Leo Melanie Kevin Clark Melanie Melanie Kevin Clark

LOANS 4.9%

Todd Mullikin • South Carolina • 843-367-1986 André Heiligers • Ft. Lauderdale • 305-986-6435 Melanie Neale • St. Augustine • 305-807-4096 Herb Sternberg • Miami • 954-815-0107 Harry Schell • Venice • 412-692-0639 Bob Cook • Naples • 239-877-4094 Mike Conley • Fort Myers • 239-287-7213 Tom Olive • Punta Gorda • 256-710-4419 Cal Landau • West Palm Beach • 561-312-0010

727-461-9379 • Yachts@EdwardsYachtSales.com www.southwindsmagazine.com


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64 Mason 64 1995...................................................$350,000 57 Southerly 2011 ................................................$1,195,000 57 Southerly 2010 ................................................$1,475,000 53 Amel Super Maramu 2001 .................................$229,000 52 Island Packet 485 2003 ......................................$379,000 50 Trintella Ron Holland 2005 ...............................$549,000 47 Southerly 47 2014 .......................................................UC 47 Beneteau 473 ’06.............................2 from .......$234,900 47 Caliber LRC 2008 ..............................................$495,000 46 Hunter 466 2003 ................................................$189,000 46 Moody 2000 .......................................................$279,000 46 Island Packet 465 2008 ......................................$479,000 46 Island Packet 460 2009 ......................................$549,900 46 Beneteau Oceanis 461 2000...............................$144,900 45 Bristol 45.5 1980................................................$124,900

S EE O UR W EBSITE

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45 Southerly 135 2012 ............................................$735,000 45 Southerly 135 2006 ............................................$399,000 45 Island Packet 445 ’06, ’07...............2 from .......$364,000 45 Island Packet 1997 .............................................$219,000 44 Island Packet SP Cruiser MKII 2015 .................$595,000 44 Island Packet 440 2006 ......................................$379,900 44 Island Packet 1993 .............................................$164,900 43 C&C Landfall 1983..............................................$99,900 43 Shannon 43 2000................................................$335,000 42 Whitby 42 Ketch 1976 .........................................$94,900 42 Alpha Catamaran 2014.......................................$424,500 42 Trintella Ron Holland 2000 ...............................$199,000 42 Jeanneau 42DS 2007..........................................$199,000 42 Island Packet 420 2001 ......................................$295,500 42 Catalina MKII 2008 ...........................................$189,900

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42 Southerly RST ’07, ’10 ..................2 from .......$359,000 41 IP SP Cruiser MKI 2010 ....................................$369,000 40 Block Island 40 1997 .........................................$165,000 40 Maestro 2006 .....................................................$264,900 40 Island Packet 1994 ......................................................UC 40 Island Packet 1996 .............................................$174,900 38 Caliber Long Range 1989 ..................................$129,900 37 Island Packet 370 ’05, ’06, ’08 .......4 from ......$239,000 37 Nauticat 2002 .....................................................$209,000 37 Island Packet 1995 ..........................2 from .......$134,900 37 Southerly 115 MK IV 2006................................$184,500 36 Island Packet Estero 2010..................................$249,000 35 Island Packet 1989 ..........................2 from .........$99,900 35 Island Packet Cat ’93, ’94 ...............2 from........$111,000 27-32 Island Packet ..............................3 from .........$37,500

F OR A LL O UR L ISTINGS

MD 410-639-2777

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SOUTHWINDS

December 2016

75


CLASSIFIED ADS Ads Starting at 3 Months for $25. FREE ADS — Privately owned gear up to $200 and FREE boats (limitations apply) E-mail ads to the editor, asking to place the ad, and give your name. Free ads sent to us without politely asking to place the ad and/or without a name, will not be run. For questions, contact editor@southwindsmagazine.com or 941-795-8704 PRICES: • These prices apply to boats, real estate, gear,

dockage. All others, see Business Ads. • Text up to 30 words with horizontal photo: $50 for 3 months; 40 words @ $60; 50 words @ $65; 60 words@ $70. • Text only ads up to 30 words: $25 for 3 months; 40 words at $35; 50 words at $40; 60 words at $45. Contact us for more words. • Add $15 to above prices for vertical photo. • All ads go on our website classifieds page on the first of the month of publication at no additional cost. Add $10 to place the ad early on the website. • The last month your ad will run will be at the end of the ad: (12/16) means December 2016. • Add $5 typing charge if ads mailed in or dictated over the phone. • Add $5 to scan a mailed-in photo. DEADLINES: Deadlines change monthly, but 1st of the month always works. Go online for exact dates. Go to the Classifieds page, then click on Place an Ad. www.southwindsmagazine.com

AD RENEWAL: 5th of the month preceding publication, possibly later (contact us). Take $5 off text ads, $10 with photo, to renew ads another 3 mos. BUSINESS ADS: Except for real estate and dockage, prices above do not include business services or business products for sale. Business ads are $20/month up to 30 words. $35/month for 30-word ad with photo/graphic. Display ads start at $38/month for a 2-inch ad in black and white with a 12-month agreement. Add 20% for color. Contact editor@ southwindsmagazine.com, or 941-795-8704. BOAT BROKERAGE ADS: • For a 30-word ad with horizontal photo: $20/month for new ad, $15/month to pick up existing ad. No charge for changes in price, phone number or mistakes. • All ads go on our website classifieds page on the first of the month of publication at no additional cost. Add $10 to place the ad early on the website. Unless you are a regular monthly advertiser,

credit card must be on file. TO PLACE AND PAY FOR AN AD: 1. Internet through PayPal at www.southwindsmagazine.com. Applies only to $25 and $50 ads. (All others contact the editor) Put your ad text in the subject line at the end when you process the Paypal payment, or e-mail it to: editor@southwindsmagazine.com. E-mail ALL photos as separate jpeg attachments to editor. 2. E-mail, phone, credit card or check. E-mail text, and how you intend to pay for the ad to editor@southwindsmagazine.com. E-mail photo as a jpeg attachment. Call with credit card number 941-795-8704, or mail a check (below). 3. Mail your ad in. Southwinds, PO Box 14456, Bradenton, FL 34280, with check or credit card number (with name, expiration, address). Enclose a SASE if photo wanted back. 4. We will pick up your ad. Send airline ticket, paid hotel reservations and car rental/taxi (or pick us up at the airport) and we will come pick up your ad. Call for more info.

We advise you to list the boat type first followed by the length. For example: Catalina 30. Your boat is more likely to be found by Internet search engines in this format. Boats & Dinghies Boat Gear & Supplies Businesss for Sale

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Real Estate for Sale or Rent Slips for Rent/Sale Too Late to Classify

BOATS & DINGHIES

_________________________________________

19’ Flying Scot, 1995 – Hull 5026. 2013 Custom low boy trailer excellent racing condition. Racing main, jib &spinnaker. Tactic compass. Hull is stiff and centerboard is fair and shimmed. New deck cover. Race ready. $10,347. Call Paul at Masthead Enterprises, 800-783-6953 or 727-327-5361. www.mastheadsailinggear.com

BROKERS: Advertise Your Boats for Sale. Text & Photo Ads: $50 for 3-months. Text only ads: $25 for 3 months 76

December 2016

SOUTHWINDS

Wharram Tiki 21 Catamaran. Solid but needs full bottom sanding and paint. No trailer but has 4-wheel Cat Trax beach cart. Wharram wing sail. 6hp Tohatsu. Solar with separate battery and 6-breaker electrical system in each hull. LED nav lights. Power outlets inside and on deck. Safety net/tramps: 2 fore and 1 aft. $7,000 OBO. Florida Keys. Read a review on another Tiki 21 in Back Issues, Nov. 2016, at www.southwindsmagazine.com. 305-664-0190 (voice mail only, no texts), or svforeveryoung@hotmail.com (2/17)

1971 “MKII” Westerly Pageant 23’. Complete re-fit. Custom trailer, stern arch and mast tabernacle. Addition of Ipe wood bowsprit to carry larger headsail. Keels shortened, re-shaped and faired. New boom and standing rigging. Custom OB motor well, 12K BTU AC and full electronics pkg. Call or email Rob at 888-2708823, $49,950. rob@wrightyachtsales.com. www.wrightyachtsales.com

ADVERTISE HERE STEVE MORRELL editor@ southwindsmagazine.com 941-795-8704 www.southwindsmagazine.com

S2 7.9 1984. Race ready. Tohatsu 4-stroke 6HP. Includes Blade, Dacron 135; Mylar 145, 2 Mylar 155, racing main, Dacron full batten main. New bottom paint, refurbished keel and rudder. Reconditioned trailer included. Pensacola, FL. $11,000 OBO. 850.293.4031 jjjbean@aol.com,. (2/17) www.southwindsmagazine.com


CLASSIFIED ADS

Historic 25’ Norwegian Launch Salty Dog. Built in Norway in 1956; rebuilt by the Sailor’s Wharf Yacht Yard as a show boat. New aluminum trailer. Great for cruising rivers and lakes. Reduced to $29,500. Sailor’s Wharf Yacht Yard, St. Petersburg. jopie@SailorsWharf.com. 727-439-5460

Island Packet Yachts 26-52’. Considering a New or Brokerage Island Packet? Or looking to sell the one you have? Our team of brokers have over 186 years of experience selling Island Packets. Whatever the model—we know them all well. Contact S&J Yachts 843284-8756. www.sjyachts.com

CORSAIR F28R, 1999. #52. Carbon wing mast & sprit. Dry-stored at home on custom trailer. Immaculate and ready to launch. 12K$ refurb 2009. South Florida. $61,900. Bill @786-236-0662, Polaris2530@gmail.com (2/17)

28’ C&C 1976 offshore Cruiser (EnglishTrapper Yachts). Diesel 2YM15, less than 10 hours. New rigging and Furlex system. Two sets of sails—cruising/storm. Good condition; lots of additional equipment. Suffered stroke and wants home for go-anywhere sloop. $15,000 or best offer. Call 813-649-1811. Tampa Bay, FL. (12/16)

News & Views for Southern Sailors

30’ Albin Ballad, 1977. 10hp rebuilt Volvo Penta, Swedish world cruiser, 47% ballast. 4 sails, tiller with autopilot, new dodger, new dinghy, outboard. $15,000. Stewart Marine 305-815-2607. www.marinesource.com

Baba 30 Hull 64 Freshwater vessel. New Harken Roller Furling and Headsail, Engine Removed and Repower to begin. Motivated Seller $29,900 OBO (pre-repower). Pics at http://tinyurl.com/Baba30. Contact austinsalley@live.com. Austin (803) 397-9448. (2/17)

Steel cutter, Alan Pape design, 31 feet, 5.3foot draft, professionally built 1987. 33HP Vetus diesel, wheel steering, 3-burner stove, oven. $19,000. Contact: loadmasterart@comcast.net (1/17)

Fales Seeker 32’ 1974. Willard-design full displacement rare classic trawler with upper and lower helm stations. Fiberglass lapstreak rounded stern trawler with 50 hp Perkins 4108. Quality upgrades and impeccably maintained. Berthed on Lake Hartwell, GA. Seeking $52,500. Email mertland@gmail.com for pics and info. (2/17)

Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS: editor@southwindsmagazine.com

1967 Tavana 33 Glander. Rock solid liveaboard, built for the Keys and Bahamas. Yawlrigged, wood masts and spars, fiberglass hull, pilot house, 6' 3" headroom, 10’ 1” beam, 3 ft. draft, tiller steering. $18,000. 315-383-4623. (12/16)

33’ Marlow Hunter 2013. One of easiest boats to sail with one of the best layouts. In-mast furling, shoal draft , A/C. Asking $148,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina in St Pete. Contact Joe Zammataro, CPYB, 727-5272800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com

34ft 1986 Catalina, $37,500. Above average condition, New Motor—184 hours. New Upgrades include: AC, new cushions inside and out, new glass in dodger, and more. Key West. Contact Gary Cannon. 907-3013836. GaryCannon@floridayacht.com

34’ Gemini 105Mc Catamaran, 2008. Queensize bed in Captain’s cabin, 2 doubles aft and dinette converts. Air, gens, radar, autopilot, 110v/propane refrigerator, dinghy and outboard, 18” draft, 14’ beam, 27hp. Westerbeke. $120,000. Stewart Marine, Miami. 305-8152607. www.marinesource.com

SOUTHWINDS

December 2016

77


CLASSIFIED ADS

35’ Beneteau Oceanis 35 2015. FULLY LOADED, Sellers moving up to larger Beneteau. Genset, AC, In-Mast, E. Windlass, Shoal, Full electronics & Canvas. $215,000. 800-826-2807. Pics and specs at www.MurrayYachtSales.com

35’ Beneteau 350 Oceanis 1991. New Yanmar diesel 2012. Great layout. Asking $54,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina, St. Petersburg, FL. Contact Jamie Birch 317-7508664, Jamie@PreferredYachts.com.

35’ Catalina 350 2004. Owner buying larger boat and priced this to sell. Low hours, in-mast furling, solar, A/C, davits and new dinghy. Asking only $98,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina in St. Pete. Contact Joe Zammataro, CPYB, (727) 527-2800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com,PreferredYachts.com

35’ Sparkman & Stephen, 1939. Rebuilt in 1980. 7 sails, Aries, 25hp Yanmar diesel, same owners for 50 years! New varnish, including spars. New bottom job. Reduced Reduced $20,000. 305-815-2607. Stewart Marine, Miami, www.marinesource.com

1976 35’ Fuji — $38,900 – Michael Martin – 440-781-8201– michael@curtisstokes.net – www.curtisstokes.ne

35’ Victory Catamaran. Built by Endeavour, High Quality, One Owner boat. Three Staterooms, Fits in regular Slip. Asking $149,900. Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center in St Petersburg. Joe Zammataro. 727-527-2800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com, www.PreferredYachts.com

Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS

36’ Columbia 1970. Ready to cruise! Solar panels, autopilot, chart plotter, new standing rigging, roller furling, Yanmar 30hp, 3-burner Force 10, fridge. Bob 202-288-3490, $23,500 obo. More info www.sailblogs.com/member/moonbreeze (1/17)

Come see our NEW Catalina’s we have in stock now on St. Simons Island, GA – Catalina 275 and Catalina 315! Call us today to schedule a test sail! 912-638-8573. Catalina 425 coming December! Call NOW to book showing for this new Catalina edition! www.dunbaryachts.com

Southerly Yachts 36-57’ Shoal Draft Freedom & Deep Draft Performance at the tip of your fingers!! Blue water boats with a push-button swing keel. No other keel compares. Go where others cannot! From $199,000 to $1,495,000. Contact S&J Yachts 410-6392777. www.sjyachts.com

1995 36’ Catalina MK II - $65,000 – Curtis Stokes – 954-684-0218 – curtis@curtisstokes.net – www.curtisstokes.net

36’ Pearson 367 1982. Cutter rig, full electronics, solar panels, many updates. $39,900. Contact Gary Cannon. 907-301-3836. GaryCannon@floridayacht.com

36’ Columbia 1970. Ready to cruise! Solar panels, autopilot, chart plotter, new standing rigging, roller furling, Yanmar 30hp, 3-burner Force 10, fridge. Bob 202-288-3490, $23,500 obo. More info www.sailblogs.com/member/moonbreeze (1/17)

Classified info — page 76

www.southwindsmagazine.com 78

December 2016

SOUTHWINDS

www.southwindsmagazine.com


CLASSIFIED ADS

1980 Tartan 37 Sparkman Stevens. Budget cruising on a true classic. Shoal draft, air condition, refrig, autopilot,solar, dinghy davits, GPS, VHF, Inverter, large battery bank. REDUCED ONLY $42,900. Alan 941-350-1559. alanpwys@gmail.com. Details at www.windsweptyachtsales.com

37' Tartan 3700 2001. Air Conditioning, Stack Pack, Bimini, Shoal Keel, North Sails, Ultra Leather cushions, Blue Hull. $143,000. 800-826-2807. Pics & Specs at www.MurrayYachtSales.com

Caliber 38 Long Range 1989. Beautifully maintained and upgraded. Increased tankage. New standing & running rigging. New electronics. New dodger & bimini, New davits. Dinghy, life raft. Ready to take you away this winter! $129,900. Contact S&J Yachts (843) 284-8756. www.sjyachts.com

Cabo Rico 38 1993. Exquisite joinery in this cruising edition of the well respected Cabo Rico 38. No teak decks. Bow thruster, genset, solars, wind generator, 2300 hours. Always maintained to the highest! $174,900. Contact Michele S&J Yachts 410-708-4416 www.sjyachts.com

News & Views for Southern Sailors

1979 CAL 39 MKII. Location: Miami. 5’6” draft, encapsulated fin keel, large cockpit, roomy cabin. Solid boat $20,000. Needs new bottom paint and cosmetic TLC. Carlos 561213-9038. Carlosproacarlos@yahoo.com. (2/17)

39’ Fountaine Pajot Lipari 41, 2010. Refit last Spring; Air, gen, watermaker, underwater lights. Sleeps 10. Twin Volvo 30hp diesels with easy deck access. $259,000. Call 305815-2607, Stewart Marine, Miami. www.marinesource.com

Vagabond 39 Pilothouse Cutter. Full keel. Well-equipped. Plasteak decks. Perkins 4-108. $45,000. 757-870-3265. (2/17)

2005 39’ Beneteau 393. Diesel, Air conditioner, Fridge, GPS, autopilot, 3 staterooms, 2 heads, all the cruising gear. Reduced $79,900. Alan 941-350-1559, AlanPWYS@gmail.com, www.windsweptyachtsales.com

$50 – 3 mo. Ad & Photo 941-795-8704

40’ Caliber LRC 2004. Long Range Cruiser, Original Owner, Pristine, Everything you want in a cruising sailboat capable of a circumnavigation. Asking $234,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina in St. Pete. Contact Joe Zammataro, CPYB, 727-527-2800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com PreferredYachts.com

40’ Beneteau 40 Center Cockpit 2002. Generator, Bow Thruster, Air Conditioning, InMast Furling, Canvas, Electronics. Clean & In Turn Key Condition. $123,500. 800-8262807. Pics/specs: www.MurrayYachtSales.com

2015 Marlow Hunter 40. With Warranty. Fully Loaded with Blue Hull, Gen, A/C, Inmast Main, 2-Cabin, Davits, Stern rail love seats. Turn Key ready for survey. $210k. Call Capt. Richard Fachtmann. 727-4UR-CAPT, or R@Yachtmann.com

40’ Island Packet 1996. One of the best cruising boats ever built. Loads of custom features and upgrades. Asking $179,900. Contact Joe Zammataro, CPYB, 727-527-2800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com

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CLASSIFIED ADS

Island Packet 40 – A very popular cruising boat that is safe, comfortable and has tremendous storage. 1996 asking $174,900 & 1994 asking $152,500. Call Matt for details. S&J Yachts, 843-284-8756, www.sjyachts.com

Delphia Yachts 31’–53’. A high-quality Performance Cruiser at production boat prices. Semi-custom yachts built for you w/many options including shoal or deep keel options. Built in Poland, Europe’s 3rd largest boat builder. Call S&J Yachts 843-284-8756. www.sjyachts.com

1984 41’ Bristol 41.1 Center Cockpit Cutter Rig, replaced Yanmar diesel, centerboard, radar, autopilot, GPS, AIS, AGM, awesome aft stateroom. Reduced $99,900. Alan 941-3501559, alanpwys@gmail.com www.windswept yachtsales.com

41’ Hunter Deck Salon 2007. Yanmar 54hp, 3 cabins, NEW bimini, dodgerm & Eisenglass, Full Raymarine Electronics w/ ST7000 autopilot, elect windlass, Bose entertainment system, MUST SEE! $164,878, Call Melanie @ 305-807-4096, www.SailboatsinFlorida.com, Edwards Yacht Sales

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42’ 2015 REFIT CUSTOM 90 Endeavour 42. Cleopatra - MINT Refit including: Generator, A/C, Bow-Thruster, In-Mast Main, Custom Aft Stern Rail Seats, Enclosure Canvas, All New Custom Interior. A MUST SEE @ The St. Pete Show! Call 727-999-4716 CaptZ@Yachtmann.com.

42’ Tatoosh. Bob Perry blue water cruiser built by Tashing. Just completed two-year cruise and ready to go again. A rare gem and a must see. Asking $119,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina, St Petersburg. Joe Zammataro 727-527-2800 Joe@Preferred Yachts.com, www.PreferredYachts.com

J/42’ JBoat 1996. One of the best performance cruisers ever built. New fully batten main, carbon mast, A/C. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center. Contact Jamie Birch 317-750-8664. Jamie@PreferredYachts.com.

Proven Bluewater 1988 44CC Morgan Sloop. READY to go at a Rock Bottom price. This “must-see,” well-kept, completely equipped cruiser is BUY of the month for a price of $90,000. AIS, stern arch, genset, new Autohelm, great anchoring gear, wind gen, radar & much more. Owner 727-4666444 (2/17)

420 Island Packet 2002. Lowest Price on the market - Two Boat Owner. All new upgrade electronics - Reduced to $224,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center, St. Petersburg. Contact Joe Zammataro. 727527-2800 Joe@PreferredYachts.com

2001 Catalina 42 MKII – New Listing! Listed at $144,900, she is a 2001, two-cabin, centerline version with wing keel. She is loaded with cruising equipment and ready to take her new owners comfortably and safely wherever the wind takes them. This vessel has been constantly upgraded and maintained. 912638-8573 www.dunbaryachts.com

44' Gallart Motor Sailor, 1982. With Twin 65 hp Volvo Diesel Straight Drives, Diesel Generator, 3 Cabins, 2 Heads, 2 Helm Stations, GPS, Radar, SSB, Solar, VHF, Stereo, TV, Dinghy w/OB, RF Main, RF Jib. Needs some TLC. $59,900. At our docks in Cortez, FL. Call George 941-792-9100

44’ Morgan CC 1988. Yanmar 44hp, Facnor Furling Systems mainsail furling, 2013 Mack 145% genoa, 5.8 KW genset 1240 hrs, Centerline Queen owner’s berth, 2013 Garmin 740S, easy single handling, EXCELLENT CONDITION! $96,500, Call Harry @ 412-692-0639, www.SailboatsinFlorida.com, Edwards Yacht Sales www.southwindsmagazine.com


CLASSIFIEDS ADS

Island Packet 445 2006. Clean, very well equipped & priced right! Easy to handle. Lots of equipment; A/C, 8kw generator, solar panels, wind generator, watermaker, bow thruster… $364,000. Contact Matt at S&J Yachts, 843-284-8756. www.sjyachts.com

45’ Morgan Nelson Marek 1983. Yanmar 51hp, 14 winches, all lines lead aft to CP, 2 AC/heat units, 6KW genset 600 hrs, 2015 paint & waxed, full size bimini, Comfortable Bluewater Yacht! $59,700, Call Calvin @ 941830-1047, www.SailboatsinFlorida.com, Edwards Yacht Sales

46’ Beneteau 461. Low Hours on Engine & Generator. Inmast Furling, Elect Winch. Two Staterooms. Asking only $124,900. Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center St Petersburg. Joe Zammataro. 727-527-2800. Joe@PreferredYachts.com, www.PreferredYachts.com

2014 Beneteau 45 Oceanis. Loaded with Low Hrs, Gen, A/C, ready for survey & Never Chartered. $330k Call Capt. James Fachtmann. 954-SEA-LUCK or J@Yachtmann.com

Cleanest Hunter 450 on the Market. 1999. Single-owner. $83,000 spent for refurbishing and updating. Owner’s health forces sale. Great for living aboard and cruising. Most popular Hunter made. Price just dropped to $149,500. Sailor’s Wharf Yacht Yard, St. Petersburg. jopie@SailorsWharf.com. 727439-5460

1981 Morgan Classic, 46 ft. center cockpit ketch. Major upgrades/refitting since 2009. AC, Genset. Hull/deck integrity excellent with no detectable delamination or blisters. Located Charleston, SC. Contact for specifics: agstwind@gmail.com. (12/16)

45’ Jeanneau 45DS 2008. 75hp Yanmar, Gen Set, Air, RF, Bow Thruster, FullRayMarine electronics, Davits, Life Raft, Windlass, Two Staterooms, Two Heads, Duel Helms, Spacious Cockpit, Bottom Paint 2015, Bimini, Dodger, Yard-maintained. At our docks. $224,000. George Carter, GSYS, 941-7929100 for appointment

2008 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 45 DS. One owner, three-cabin layout! Some of her many features are large battery bank, ample battery charging, furling sails, dinghy davits, bow thruster, windlass, electric secondary winch, great canvas package, up-to-date electronics, and dinghy with motor. $245,000. 800-2821411 www.dunbaryachts.com

News & Views for Southern Sailors

Southerly 135 (45’) 2006. High performing blue water yacht with a DRAFT from 2’ 9” to 9’ 9” at the push of a button!! Many recent upgrades: hull just painted, new canvas, cushions, A/C etc. $419,000. Contact Matt S&J Yachts, 843-284-8756 www.sjyachts.com

1979 46’ Brewer - $99,000 - Barbara Burke 904-310-5110 - barbara@curtisstokes.net www.curtisstokes.net

Island Packet 465 2008. The newest 465 you can get! One of a kind opportunity for an almost new yacht! Extremely pampered: Hinckley maintained, covered & stored inside a heated building. Hardly used. Only 51 engine & 4 generator hrs. $479,000. Contact S&J Yachts 843-284-8756. www.sjyachts.com

47’ Leopard Catamaran 2004. 4 stateroom, 4 head, generator, air, watermaker, hardtop, solar panels, ultrasonic antifouling system. Proven passagemaker, ready to cruise again. Reduced $249,900. Windswept Yacht Sales, Alan 941-350-1559, www.windsweptyachtsales.com, alanpwys@gmail.com SOUTHWINDS

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CLASSIFIEDS ADS

1986 Wauquiez 47 Centurion. Proven bluewater classic cutter. Schaeffer Mainsail furler. Generator, SSB, VHF, air condition, diesel heater, Twin autopilots, Twin GPS, Radar. 2 staterooms, 2 heads. $119,900. Alan 941350-1559. alanpwys@gmail.com. Details at www.windsweptyachtsales.com. ON DISPLAY AT THE ST PETE BOAT SHOW, DEC 1-4

Beneteau 473 2006 Never Chartered. Very clean, exceptionally well maintained. Only 649 engine hrs. Recent NEW equipment/upgrades: Electronics, Westerbeke Genset, Cockpit enclosure, Custom cockpit & interior cushions. $249,900. Contact S&J Yachts (843) 2848756. www.sjyachts.com

47’ Beneteau 473 2006. Genset, Air Conditioning, In-mast Furling, Davits, Full Canvas, Full Electronics, 2 Cabin/2 Head, Refrig/Freezer, Shoal Draft. $215,000, 800826-2807. Pics & Specs at www.MurrayYachtSales.com

47’ Dufour Nautitech Catamaran 1995. With lots of new updated equipment, including new Twin 55hp Volvo Diesels, Refrig and Freezer, Generator, Chartplotter, Washer/Dryer, Watermaker, Windlass, 4 State Rooms w/en-suite head and showers. Spacious Catamaran capable of extended passages. www.GrandSlam YachtSales.com. Offered at $279,000. Call George Carter 941-792-9100.

1985 Hans Christian 48T. Listed at $259,000. This is a beautiful, spacious yacht. She has a rebuilt engine with only 570 hours. Fully loaded with so many great features, including rebuilt generator, solar panels, fully battened mainsail and tons more. She is turn-key, ready to go sailing! Call today 800-282-1411, or sales@dunbaryachts.com, St. Simons Island, GA

49’ Hunter 2008. Here is a steal! Best Price, Best Equipped one on the Market. Rare Cutter Rig, Loads of Extra Features. 3 cabin, Custom Sails. Try $249,900. Located at the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center at the Harborage Marina, St. Petersburg, FL. Joe Zammataro 727-527-2800

50’ Bruce Roberts Custom Built Schooner 1982. 2016 Mechanical & Cosmetic REFIT! Isuzu 130hp diesel, 8kw northern lights gen, NEW batteries, 30” MaxProp, NEW watermaker, NEW Garmin, & MORE UPGRADES! $149,000, Call Harry 412-692-0639, www. SailboatsinFlorida.com, Edwards Yacht Sales

Custom 2011 Shannon 53 HPS. Luxury ketch—draws 4’9”. Twin Yanmar diesels powers at 9-10 knots. Leisure Furl hydraulic main and mizzen boom, Doyle sails, Nautical Structures davits. $1,550,000. Sailor’s Wharf Yacht Yard, St. Petersburg. 727-439-5460 jopie@SailorsWharf.com.

2010 Jeanneau 53 Flagship Yacht. Pristine Condition, Low Hrs, Fully Loaded Center line Queen AFT, 2-3 conv. Cabin + Capt Cabin Option. Gen, A/C, In-Mast Main. Bimini/ Dodger/Connector. Tons of gear stays with the Yacht!!! Never chartered, Ready to Sail, Ready to Sell. $340k. Call Capt. Richard Fachtmann. 727-4UR-CAPT or R@Yachtmann.com

BROKERS: 1987 47’ Bristol - $204,500 – Barbara Burke 904-310-5110 – barbara@curtisstokes.net – www.curtisstokes.net

Advertise Your Boats for Sale. Text & Photo Ads: $50 for 3-months.

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56' Fountaine Pajot Custom Catamaran. Illness Forces Sale. $1.4 million renovations and Upgrades. 5 Cabins, 5 heads. Spectacular African Mahogany Interior. Ready to Go. Asking only $499,900. Located At the Preferred Yachts Brokerage Display Center. Contact Joe Zammataro 727-527-2800 Joe@PreferredYachts.com. www.southwindsmagazine.com


CLASSIFIEDS ADS BOAT GEAR & SUPPLIES

_________________________________________

— FREE ADS — Free ads in boat gear for all gear under $200 per item. Privately owned items only. NO photos. Editor@southwindsmagazine.com. (941-795-8704)

______ FREE collection of PassageMaker Magazines from 1998 to the present. Pick them up at my home in Apollo Beach, FL. Great reading for the trawler folks and sailors who want to cross over to the dark side! Roger, flotronix@yahoo.com (2/17) _________________________________________ LAVA HD 2850 Remote-controlled HDTV Antenna. $55. UHF-VHF (FREE) Receivable HDTV Antenna. $50. 24-foot extension ladder. Boatyard or rigging use. $80. 772-2854858 (12/16) _________________________________________ Wanted: Lewmar ST16 Winch. 941-792-9100

SPINNAKER POLE, offshore type, aluminum, 4.5” diameter x 21’ 2” length with piston end fitting and socket inboard $900. Call Jopie Helsen, 727-439-5460, or email jopie@sailorswharf.com _________________________________________

CREW WANTED

_________________________________________ Sailing to Cuba in December. Two normal, fun men sailing a Bayfield 32 to Havana from Punta Gorda, Florida, have private forward berth available for gregarious, educated, selfsufficient young lady. An unforgettable adventure of a lifetime. Opportunity knocks only once. Some sailing experience might be beneficial for the petite, sane leader on a bridge-building mission to Cuba. Bob 512-945-3086 (12-16)

ENGINES FOR SALE

_________________________________________ Perkins 4.108 Re-manufactured Long Blocks. $5,995 plus your rebuildable core engine, or $500 core charge. Plus shipping from Pensacola, FL. bshmarine@yahoo.com

HELP WANTED

_________________________________________ Sailboat CAPTAINS needed in Miami. P/T day charter operation in Miami, FL. Must have a USCG 50Gt MASTER license or better. Sailboat experience required. Part-time only. More online at www.MiamiSailing. net/careers. (12/16) _________________________________________

Subscribe $24/year • 3rd Class $30/year • 1st Class www.southwindsmagazine.com News & Views for Southern Sailors

Yacht Sales Person Needed Preferred Yachts, located at the beautiful Harborage Marina in St Petersburg, has an opportunity for an experienced full time yacht broker or we will train you. We are a unique boutique yacht brokerage with a large brokerage display center that attracts buyers and sellers from around the world. Preferred Yachts is one of only 50 Certified Professional Yacht Brokerages in the US and hold to the highest standards of professionalism, knowledge and integrity. With 38 years experience, we know how to help you be successful and our clients to achieve their dreams. For more details, Contact Joe Zammataro, CPYB Call: 727-5272800 or Write Joe@PreferredYachts.com _________________________________________ Edwards Yacht Sales is expanding! Several openings for yacht brokers in Florida. Looking for experienced broker or will train the right individual. Must have boating background and be a salesman. Aggressive advertising program. Come join the EYS team! Call in confidence, Roy Edwards 727-449-8222 www.EdwardsYachtSales.com Yachts@ EdwardsYachtSales.com _________________________________________ Yacht Sales. Curtis Stokes & Assoc., Inc. has opportunities throughout Florida for experienced brokers or new salespeople. Applicant must be ethical, hard-working and have a boating background. Training available. Inquiries confidential. 954-684-0218, info@curtisstokes.net. _________________________________________ Doyle Sails Gulf Coast, St. Petersburg, FL. Seeking Outside salespeople to sell sails in the Gulf Coast region. Take your sailing hobby, make extra cash, or turn it into a career. Doyle Gulf Coast is the second largest Doyle production sail loft in the U.S. We are seeking outside salespeople to sell sails in our region which includes the entire Southeast. The position involves being able to measure a boat, price sails (we will assist with quoting), install, and follow up with customer. Please contact robert @ islandnautical.com, or call 727-800-3115.

P_________________________________________ ROPERTY FOR RENT OR SALE

Fort Lauderdale Ocean Access Canal Home. Dock Your Boat in Your Own Back Yard In the Boater’s Lauderdale Isles, Riverland Community. 65 feet of Water Frontage, Brand New Dock, Deep Water Ocean Access, no Fixed Bridges, Charming 2/2 with Pool. 1,940 sq ft on 7,150 sq ft lot. Ingeborg Roy 954295-0090. ingeborgr@intercoastalrealty.co See CLASSIFIEDS continued on page 85

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SINKING continued from page 86 now, pretty much all of us have cell phones. The winds clocked to over 30 that day, and there was a lot of damage to boats. I made history that day since it seemed that since not many people went out due to the high winds, they had nothing better to do than listen to the saga taking place on the cleared channel 16. Thankfully, there are more women owning boats these days, but I got pretty well known around Clear Lake, since I was one of a handful of women who owned their own boat. Oh well, it makes for a good story.

ONLINE SAILING

Business Directory SERVING THE SOUTHEAST U.S. ONLINE SAILING Find Local Products & Business Directory Services for Sailors SERVING THE Whether you need a marine SOUTHEAST U.S. store, a boatyard, or your bottom cleaned – Find Local Products & find local businesses by name, Services for Sailors Whether you need a marine category, keyword or mapstore, a boatyard, or your bottom cleaned – find local businesses by name, SOME OF THE category, keyword or map

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ADVERTISERS INDEX TELL THEM YOU SAW IT IN SOUTHWINDS! SOUTHWINDS provides these lists as a courtesy and asks our readers to support our advertisers. The lists includes all display advertising. Absolute Tank Cleaning...........................32 Adams Marine Seminars ..........................63 Advanced Sails ........................................36 Alpen Glow .............................................31 American Rope & Tar .........................33,44 Anchorage Marina...................................43 Annapolis Hybrid Marine.........................65 Astus Trimarans .......................................32 Atlantic Sail Traders .................................36 Bacon Sails ..............................................36 Beaver Flags ............................................33 Beta Marine.............................................66 Bimini Bay Sailboat Rentals.................25,39 Bloxygen .................................................34 Bluewater Sailing School ....................25,28 BoatNames.net........................................32 Boats Express ..........................................33 Bone Island Regatta.................................21 Borel .......................................................34 Bradenton Yacht Club .............................12 Cajun Trading Rigging ............................36 Cape Coral Yacht Basin ...........................43 Capt Marti’s Books/Seminars ...................33 Capt. Rick Meyer.....................................33 Captain Anderson ...................................33 Captain’s License.....................................33 Catamaran Boatyard ..........................32,43 Chafe Pro ................................................55 Charleston Race Week ...............................9 C-Head Compost Toilets..........................34 Clearwater Municipal Marina ..................42 Conch Republic Cup ...............................17 Coolnet Hammocks.................................34 CopperCoat ............................................49 CPT Autopilot..........................................83 Crawford Awnings...................................34 Cruising Guide to Cuba...........................33 Cruising Solutions ...................................59 Cuba Cruising Guide...............................33 Curtis Stokes Yacht Brokerage ...................2 Dockside Radio........................................53 DoctorLED...............................................60 Dunbar Sales .............................................5 Dunbar Sales Sailing School ....................25 Dwyer mast.............................................83 East Coast Sailboats.................................29 Edwards Yacht Sales ................................74 EisenShine ...............................................32 Fair Winds Boat Repairs ...........................35 Flying Scot ..............................................32 Foss Foam Rudders..................................46 Froli Sleep ...............................................34 Ft. Myers Mooring Field ..........................58 Garhauer .................................................11 Glades Boat Storage .............................8,43 Gulfport City Marina ...............................61 Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack..........................27 Hospice Cup Regatta...............................23 Indiantown Marina..................................43 Intercoastal Realty ...................................39 Irish Sail Lady ..........................................36 Island Nautical ........................................19 J Prop ......................................................22 Key Lime Sailing ......................................35 Keys Rigging ...........................................36 Knot Just Sails..........................................15 KnotStick.................................................34

Laser .......................................................27 Mack Sails ...............................................66 Madeira Beach Municipal Marina ............18 Maptech .................................................57 Martek Davits ..........................................65 Masthead Enterprises .........................37,75 Mastmate ...............................................34 Miami Mooring Field...............................51 Mobile Marine Services ...........................32 Morgan Invasion .....................................23 Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau ..................73 National Sail Supply ................................37 New Bern Grand Marina .........................43 Nickle Atlantic .........................................34 No Wear Guard.......................................53 Northstar Yacht Delivery .........................33 Optimist..................................................27 Outland Hatch Covers.............................35 Panama City Marina................................42 Panel Visor ..............................................35 Pasadena Marina .....................................42 Pier One Yacht Sales..................................3 Portland Pudgy .......................................54 Precision..................................................27 Preferred Yacht Brokerage .......................72 Regatta del Sol al Sol.................................4 Rigging Only...........................................36 Rubicon Bowsprits...................................35 S&J Yacht Brokers....................................75 Safe Cove Boatyard & Storage ................41 Sail Cleaners............................................37 Sail Harbor Marina ..................................43 Sail Repair ...............................................37 Sailing Services...................................36,40 Sailors Wharf ...........................................16 Schurr Sails..............................................45 Sea School ..............................................61 SeaTech...................................................83 Seaworthy Goods ....................................64 Second Wind Sails ...................................37 Ship Balm................................................15 Simple Sailing School ..............................25 Source Mobile Marine .............................32 St. Petersburg Boat Show........................42 Strictly Sail Miami Boat Show....................7 Sunfish ....................................................27 Sunrise Sails, Plus ....................................36 Tackle Shack............................................27 Teak Guard..............................................59 Teak Hut.............................................20,35 Tide Slide ................................................26 Tiki Water Sports .....................................35 Tohatsu Outboards..................................35 Topaz Boats.............................................29 Twin Dolphin Marina ..............................42 UK Sailmakers..........................................37 Ullman sails ........................................32,37 US Spars..................................................45 Vacu Wash...............................................37 Weems and Plath ....................................50 White Water Marine ................................35 Wichard ..................................................13 Winchbit .................................................47 Windrider ................................................32 Windswept Yacht Sales ............................87 Yachtmann Yacht Brokers ..............72,75,88 Zarcor .....................................................14

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CLASSIFIEDS

ADVERTISER’S CATEGORIES TELL THEM YOU SAW IT IN SOUTHWINDS! SOUTHWINDS provides these lists as a courtesy and asks our readers to support our advertisers. The lists includes all display advertising. SAILBOATS – NEW AND BROKERAGE Astus Trimarans ..........................................32 Curtis Stokes Yacht Brokerage ......................2 Dunbar Sales..............................................25 East Coast Sailboats....................................29 Edwards Yacht Sales ...................................74 Flying Scot .................................................32 Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack ............................27 Laser ..........................................................27 Masthead Yacht Sales/Catalina ..............37,75 Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau .....................73 Optimist.....................................................27 Pier One Yacht Sales.....................................3 Portland Pudgy ..........................................54 Precision ....................................................27 Preferred Yacht Brokerage ..........................72 S&J Yacht Brokers......................................75 Sunfish .......................................................27 Tackle Shack/Hobie/Sunfish, St. Petersburg 27 Topaz Boats................................................29 Windswept Yacht Sales...............................87 Yachtmann Yacht Brokers .................72,75,88 GEAR, HARDWARE, ACCESSORIES, CLOTHING Alpen Glow ................................................31 Annapolis Hybrid Marine............................65 Beaver Flags ...............................................33 Bloxygen....................................................34 Borel ..........................................................34 Cajun Trading Rigging ...............................36 Chafe Pro...................................................55 C-Head Compost Toilets ............................34 Coolnet Hammocks....................................34 CopperCoat ...............................................49 CPT Autopilot ............................................83 Cruising Solutions ......................................59 DoctorLED .................................................60 Foss Foam Rudders ....................................46 Froli Sleep ..................................................34 Garhauer....................................................11 Island Nautical ...........................................19 J Prop.........................................................22 Knot Just Sails ............................................15 KnotStick....................................................34 Martek Davits.............................................65 Masthead Enterprises ............................37,75 Mastmate Mast Climber.............................34 Nickle Atlantic............................................34 No Wear Guard..........................................53 Outland Hatch Covers................................35 Seaworthy Goods.............................15,35,64 Ship Balm ..................................................15 Tackle Shack/Hobie/Sunfish, Precision ........27 Teak Guard ................................................59 Teak Hut ...............................................20,35 Tide Slide ...................................................26 Weems and Plath .......................................50 White Water Marine ...................................35 Wichard .....................................................13 Winchbit ....................................................47 Zarcor ........................................................14 SAILS (NEW & USED), RIGGING, SPARS, RIGGING SERVICES, CANVAS Advanced Sails ...........................................36 Atlantic Sail Traders ....................................36 Bacon Sails .................................................36 Cajun Trading Rigging ...............................36 Crawford Awnings .....................................34 Dwyer Mast/spars, hardware, rigging ........83 Keys Rigging ..............................................36 Mack Sails ..................................................66 Masthead/Used Sails and Service ..........37,75 National Sail Supply, new&used online ......37 Rigging Only .............................................36 Rubicon Bowsprits......................................35 Sail Repair ..................................................37 News & Views for Southern Sailors

Sailing Services......................................36,40 Schurr Sails, Pensacola FL...........................45 Second Wind Sails......................................37 Sunrise Sails, Plus ......................................36 The Sail Cleaners........................................37 UK Sailmakers ............................................37 Ullman Sails ..........................................32,37 US Spars ....................................................45 Vacu Wash .................................................37 SAILING SCHOOLS, CAPTAIN’S LICENSE INSTRUCTION, YACHT CLUBS Adams Marine Seminars.............................63 Bimini Bay Sailing School ......................25,39 Bluewater sailing school ........................25,28 Captain’s License Class ...............................33 Dunbar Sales Sailing School .......................25 Sea School/Captain’s License ....................51 Simple Sailing ............................................25 MARINE ENGINES AND ACCESSORIES Beta Marine ...............................................66 Tiki Water Sports ........................................35 Tohatsu Outboards ....................................35 MARINAS, MOORING FIELDS, BOAT YARDS Anchorage Marina .....................................43 Cape Coral Yacht Basin ..............................43 Catamaran Boatyard .............................32,43 Clearwater Municipal Marina .....................42 Ft. Myers Mooring Field .............................58 Glades Boat Storage................................8,43 Gulfport City Marina ..................................61 Indiantown Marina.....................................43 Madeira Beach Municipal Marina...............18 Miami Mooring Field..................................51 New Bern Grand Marina ............................43 Panama City Marina...................................42 Pasadena Marina........................................42 Safe Cove Boatyard & Storage ...................41 Sail Harbor Marina .....................................43 Sailors Wharf..............................................16 Twin Dolphin Marina .................................42 CHARTERS, RENTALS, FRACTIONAL Bimini Bay Sailboat Rentals....................25,39 Key Lime Sailing.........................................35 MARINE SERVICES, INSURANCE, TOWING, YACHT TRANSPORT, BOAT LETTERING, REAL ESTATE, ETC. Absolute Tank Cleaning..............................32 BoatNames.net ..........................................32 Boats Express .............................................33 EisenShine..................................................32 Fair Winds Boat Repairs/Sales .....................35 Intercoastal Realty ......................................39 Source Mobile Marine ................................32 CAPTAIN SERVICES Capt. Rick Meyer........................................33 Captain Anderson ......................................33 Northstar Yacht Delivery ............................33 MARINE ELECTRONICS Dockside Radio ..........................................53 Sea Tech/Navigation/Communication ........83 SAILING WEB SITES, VIDEOS, BOOKS, GUIDES Maptech ....................................................57 BoatNames.net ..........................................32 Capt Marti’s Books/Seminars......................33 Cuba Cruising Guide..................................33 REGATTAS, BOAT SHOWS, FLEA MARKETS, YACHT CLUBS Conch Republic Cup ..................................17 Bone Island Regatta ...................................21 Bradenton Yacht Club ................................12 Charleston Race Week..................................9 Hospice Cup Regatta..................................23 Morgan Invasion ........................................23 Strictly Sail Miami Boat Show.......................7 Regatta del Sol al Sol ...................................4

Charming Old-Florida canal-front bungalow. 2 BR 1.5 Bath bright, renovated home flows nicely between bedrooms, living room, kitchen, dining area, sunroom, lanai. Unobstructed sailboat access to Sarasota Bay. 80-foot seawall with electric and water. Community park, clubhouse, playground, ma-rina, 25-meter pool. $334,900. Bradenton, FL. Search MLS# O5430602 in Google for more information. Contact 941204-8836. (1/17)

SLIPS FOR RENT/SALE

________________________________________

DOCK SPACE off SARASOTA BAY!! Slips start at $117 a month on 6-month lease. Sheltered Marina accommodates up to 28’ sail or power boats. Boat ramp. Utilities included. Call Office: 941-755-1912. (1/17a)

TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY

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30' Nonsuch Classic 1982. 4 ft draft, refrigeration, LPG stove, custom hard dinghy, Mercury 3.3 HP, 27 HP Westerbeke diesel, New Tides Fast Track. Clearwater area. $36,000. Captain Kirk 727-586-5990 (2/17)

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Sinking in a Regatta By Laura Petruska

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he year is about 1994 or 95, the place is Clearlake, TX, and the regatta is the “No-Rules Regatta.” It’s just a fun regatta for cruisers who usually don’t race. You go around the rig, round marker 2 and then head home.  We had to figure out my PHRF—whatever that meant—and that established the line up.  My boat did not actually have a PHRF. It was heavy displacement, strictly cruiser— 24.5 feet of Pacific Seacraft, PS 25. I’d recently bought her and learned to sail her. I was set. A guy I’d recently started dating, but who had no experience sailing, was coming along. My little PS 25 started the race, and at the gun,  off shot Sola! Okay, everything is relevant. She didn’t exactly shoot off, but because of her displacement and ballast, I was able to keep jib, main and cutter all fully rigged in 25-knots of wind, and we pulled well ahead of the fleet. I rounded the rig and headed to the marker when my date asked if I was supposed to have water in the boat. I, not so patiently and in somewhat of a panic, explained that we are on the water, but the water does not go in the boat. I asked him to take the rudder. He popped another beer (I’m not a drinker), came up and relieved me. I went down to see what happened. Yup, about one foot of water and it was rising. Where the heck was it coming from?  I ran around closing every thru-hull and checked the head but couldn’t figure it out. I grabbed a bucket, gave the order to start bailing, and I took the helm. The water slowed as I took the helm (my first clue). We continued sailing, he bailing, and the water slowed. I radioed in an “all alert” to any shipyard that could take me; I’d need a haul. No answer of course, it was Sunday. Just as I was in my second panic mode, the Coast Guard in Galveston comes on and asked if I’m calling a Mayday. “No, I exclaim. I never said even pan pan. Who the heck is this?”  Identifying

themselves, I was exasperated and told them I had better things to do than waste my time not getting to a ship yard. The boat was sailing, albeit when my date was at the helm, Sola would take on more water. After giving them all the information they wanted about nine times, I found I

couldn’t give orders, steer and sail at the same time. We could probably make a shoal where I could beach the boat safely in about three feet of water. The Coast Guard was persistent. They would not get off the radio (I since found out that that is protocol when a boat is taking on water. Exasperated no help was on the way, I told the Coasties I was switching channels. They came right back and insisted I stay on 16, as they cleared the channel for my emergency. I shot back that it was not an emergency...I

was sailing in less than six feet of water and have a 25-foot mast. Sola would not sink! I took the helm once again, and the water let up. My date bailed, I sailed …but where? I started heading for the shoal. Just then, a voice—other than the Coastie, who by this time had my measurements as well as possible name of first born they asked me so many questions—asked if I wouldn’t mind if he telephoned (this is pre-cell phones) some shipyards and see who could take me. My guardian angel. “Yes,” I screamed into the radio. “Yes, yes, yes.”  Soon after my angel called, one of the local shipyards said they would have a sling but could I take the sails down and motor on in. “No,” I told them, since I had all the thru-hulls closed and didn’t know where the water was coming in from. Just then the Coast Guard Auxiliary pulled up alongside of me in a skiff and asked if they could help out. They were all sailors and could get me in the sling under sail. Finally, a sane voice. The Coasties came on and tried to clear 16 from all my guardian angels. I, unfortunately, lost it on the Coasties and told them some not-such-nice things, turned to channel 68 and proceeded to slide safely into a shipyard sling under sail. My date (needless to say, this was not a match in heaven) asked if this meant we would not continue the race and popped another beer. Turns out my dolphin striker on the bow stem sheared off a 5/8 pin and that is where the water was pouring in. When the boat was under my steering, we took on less water because we went faster, so the boat had enough lift that the water entry slowed. Lessons learned: Don’t take a heavy drinker, inexperienced date on board. Don’t not know what to do about the Coast Guard. But at least See SINKING continued on page 84

GOT A SAILING STORY? If you have a story about an incident that happened that was a real learning experience, or a funny story, or a weird or unusual story that you’d like to tell, send it to editor@southwindsmagazine.com. Keep them short—around 800-1000 words or less, maybe a little more. Photos nice, but not required. We pay for these stories. 86 December 2016

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Southwinds December 2016  

A free, printed sailing magazine reporting on sailing in the southeast U.S: Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Missi...

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