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Senior School Curriculum Guide 2013-14


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vision Statement

A community where every spirit soars.

Mission Statement Southridge develops well-rounded students with a deep sense of personal integrity who have the moral character, love of learning and self-confidence to realize their full potential in a post-secondary environment and in society at large. Each student is encouraged and challenged to become someone who:

• is a life-long learner • has study, critical thinking and communication skills • is a creative and independent thinker • has a positive attitude • seeks their passion • believes in the values of truth, tolerance, respect and compassion • understands the sacrifice and rewards of community service • has an appreciation of, and desire for, life-long physical activity and fitness • appreciates the Arts, and their contribution to a richer life • can work effectively as part of a team

In summary, someone who makes a difference in the world! OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES As members of the Southridge community, each of us has both the privilege and responsibility to choose how we influence our community and the world.

• Shaping our relationships are the values of truth, tolerance, respect and compassion. • We act, knowing our children are watching. • Our behaviour influences all; every member is a role model for everyone in the school community and society.

We commit to the power of community. At the foundation is the trust born of knowing that our values are shared and lived.

• The students, parents, teachers, staff, alumni and alumni parents and grandparents create a supportive, safe and loving environment through their positive, caring relationships. • By providing a light-hearted place of serious purpose, one where our students can take risks in finding their potential, they find joy. • With commitment to our shared vision and highest aspirations, we have the power to make a positive difference in the world.

Contribution is at the heart of what we inherit and what we pass on.

• “Every spirit soaring” is made possible by the contributions – the passionate and compassionate selflessness – of everyone, from a small kindness to investing one’s life in the greater good. • Membership in the Southridge community has always called us to shift our emphasis to “we” from “me.”

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SENIOR SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE


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Table of Contents Senior School Educational Program Model

1

Senior School Educational Program

2

Graduation Requirements

2

Southridge School Academic Program

3

Academic Program Overview

4

English

5

Social Studies

5

Mathematics

6

Science

7

Modern Languages

8

Arts

9

Applied Skills

10

Physical Education

11

Health, Career Education and Planning

12

Advanced Placement

12

Outdoor Education

12

The Southridge Service Program

13

Leadership Experience Week

13

Student Services – Learning Resource

13

Overview for Grades 8 to 10

14

Overview for Grades 11 and 12

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Grade 8 Program

15

Grade 9 Program

18

Grade 10 Program

21

Grade 11 Program

24

Grade 12 Program

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Senior School Educational Program Model

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SENIOR SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE


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Senior School Educational Program As a university preparatory day school, Southridge provides a stimulating, diverse academic grade 8-12 program with an enriched curriculum well beyond BC Ministry of Education guidelines.

enriched by the judicious use of technology. In many of our classrooms students are seated in small groups or gathered around a large table, explaining a point, seeking clarification from the teacher or their peers, offering an opinion, challenging an assumption, asking a key question – we encourage students to become active participants in their own learning.

This challenging program of studies is designed to prepare students for post secondary school courses of study, while allowing them to pursue their individual passions and abilities. A full range of academic electives is introduced in Grade 11. Students select individual programs according to their strengths and preferences and are guided in their decisions by the University Guidance Counsellors and the Senior School Academic Program Director. The Southridge academic program covers all prerequisites for studies in the arts, sciences, engineering, business and foreign languages at universities in Canada, the United States, and Europe. We also offer Advanced Placement (College Board) courses and examinations in several disciplines through which students earn university level course credits that are recognized at schools around the world.

While we strongly focus on building a sound knowledge base for our students, we are equally committed to nurturing the development of students who are engaged with each other and the world around them; students who are thoughtful, compassionate citizens. The development of sound character and personal integrity is central to our educational mandate, as it is in all areas of school life. Sound character and integrity guide the useful application of knowledge in contributing to community, which is one of Southridge’s guiding principles. Students who come to Southridge are quick to embrace the stimulating atmosphere generated by a comprehensive educational program in which academics, participation in the arts and athletics, service learning, outdoor education and experiential learning are all essential components of a carefully crafted program. Our hope is to inspire each student towards academic excellence, personal fulfilment, and compassion for others. Our expectation is that all our graduates will go on to post-secondary institutions and will thrive there.

We believe that a student’s attitude to his or her studies is also a vital component of academic success and we foster independence and an innovative, creative approach in our students. We believe that critical thinking and problem solving; communication and collaboration are essential skills that will enable our students to fully realise their potential in the dynamic and constantly changing environment of the 21st century. To this end we foster a student-centred, discussion based model of education, which is further

Graduation Requirements In order to graduate every student in the Graduation Program has to pass certain basic courses, such as English, Mathematics and Science. The table below is an overview of graduation requirements:

REQUIRED COURSES: Subject Area Planning 10 English 10 English 11 English 12 a Mathematics 10 a Mathematics 11 or 12 a Fine Arts and/or Applied Arts 10, 11 or 12 Social Studies 10 a Social Studies 11 or 12 Science 10 a Science 11 or 12 Physical Education 10

• 48 credits from required courses • 28 credits from elective courses, and • 4 credits from Graduation Transitions

Graduation requirements are introduced in Planning 10.

Additional GRAD Requirements

• Grade 10 Provincial Exams in English, Science and Mathematics • Grade 11 Social Studies Provincial Exam • Grade 12 English Provincial Exam

Minimum Credits 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 48 credits

ELECTIVE COURSES: Students must earn at least 28 elective credits Additional Grade 10-12 credits*

28 credits

GRADUATION TRANSITIONS: Students must earn 4 credits for Graduation Transitions

OVERALL TOTAL: *Of the 80 credits for graduation, 16 must be at the Grade 12 level, including a Grade 12 English course.

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4 credits

80 credits


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Southridge School Academic Program Graduation

Academic Subjects: English

Social Studies

Mathematics

Science

8

9

10

4

4

4

4

EN 10

4

4

Programme 11

4 AP EN

4

SS 11 AP HI AP HG

4

4

4

4

FMP 10

4

4

SC 10

4 (Must be Foundations Math 11 or Pre-Calculus Math 11* for University entrance)

BI, CH, PH - choose 1 minimum usually 2 BI 12

French

4

4

4

4

EN 12 AP ELC HI 12 AP HI AP HG EC 12 AP EC PREC 12 FOM12 CALC 12 AP CALC AB AP CALC BC BI 12 CH 12 AP CHE PH 12 AP PHY FR 12 AP FLA

Spanish can replace French [One language needed for university entrance]

[One Arts subject required by Southridge School]

Elective Subjects: Spanish Band Jazz studies Art Media Arts Drama

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SP 11 IMCB 11 IMJB 11 AF 11 VAMT 11 TPA 11

4 4 4

Elective Block Choose two subjects All subjects offered

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Elective Block Choose two subjects All subjects offered DRG 10/DRR 10

IMCB 12 IMJB 12 AF 12 VAMT 12 TPA 12

Other Required Subjects: Information & Communication Technology Physical Education Guidance

CDL 8 HCE 8

ICTS 11

HCE 9

Planning 10

ICTP 12

Planning 10*

PE 12 4

Portfolio 12 (Grad Transitions Plan)

Notes: 4 Subject required by Southridge School

• Grade 10, 11 and 12 courses examinable by the Ministry in bold type • Shaded area show courses required for graduation or university entrance • Some other subjects are offered through independent study * Southridge requires students to take a grade 11 language, can be either French or Spanish. Students may take both French and Spanish. * Planning 10 is taken over two years.

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Academic Program Overview


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English The central purpose of our comprehensive English program is to develop skills of expression, both written and oral, and to promote listening and understanding. As students move through this program, their learning will be differentiated, primarily through their encounters with texts that become increasingly complex and sophisticated, as well as assignments that challenge them to develop these qualities in their own writing. In every grade, students will write in various forms and read works that share common themes, although they represent diverse voices and experiences. In Grade 10 and Grade 12, an additional focus is placed on preparation for the English 10 and English 12 Provincial Examinations.

from spoken word poets to ancient texts, and to create opportunities for expression, from blogs to electronic presentations and discussions. We also use the Accelerated Reader Program to foster a love of reading in our students. To promote the power of speech, the English Department also hosts two popular events on the Southridge calendar – Debating in December and Public Speaking Day in March. Finally, students are prepared who are interested in pursuing Advanced Placement courses have the option of studying, English 11/AP Language and Composition or AP Literature.

Throughout the English program, the learning process is also enriched by our use of technology to bring the works of authors into our classrooms,

English 8

t English 9

t English 10

t English 11

t

English 12

t

English 11: AP Language and Composition

t

t AP English Literature and Composition

Social Studies The Social Studies department teaches students about the world they live in. A multidisciplinary approach is used to draw from the social sciences and humanities to study human interactions and natural and social environments. Students are encouraged to become thoughtful, responsible, active citizens who are able to consider multiple perspectives and to make reasoned judgements. Student-centred learning is encouraged through current events, group discussions and Harkness related methodology.

Students are frequently given the opportunity to work on research projects with peers, often on topics of their own interest. This opportunity to construct their own knowledge base is often integrated with technology, through the use of the internet, PowerPoint, and other web-based programs. Students in each grade will further develop their writing skills by completing a documented research essay.

Social Studies 8

t Social Studies 9

t Social Studies 10

t Social Studies 11

AP Human Geography

t

t

History 12

AP European History

t Economics 12

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AP Microeconomics


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Mathematics The Ministry of Education has three mathematics “pathways”: “Apprenticeship and Workplace Mathematics”, “Foundations of Mathematics”, and “Pre-Calculus Mathematics”. The goals of all three pathways are to provide prerequisite attitudes, knowledge, skills and understandings for specific post-secondary programs or direct entry into the work force. All three pathways provide students with mathematical understandings and criticalthinking skills. When choosing a pathway, students should consider their interests, both current and future.

Students, parents and educators are encouraged to research the admission requirements for post-secondary programs of study as they vary by institution and by year. Please Note: Southridge School only offers courses in the “Foundations of “Mathematics” and “Pre-Calculus Mathematics” pathways as these are the courses required for entrance to university programs.

Mathematics 8

t Mathematics 9

t Foundations and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 10

t

t

Foundations of Mathematics 11

Pre-Calculus 11

t

t

Foundations of Mathematics 12

Pre-Calculus 12

t

Calculus 12

AP Calculus AB

AP Calculus BC

Accelerated Program Selected students in Grade 8 will have an opportunity to accelerate their high school mathematics learning. This program will allow students to complete Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 course by the end of their Grade 11 year and allow them more flexibility in choosing their Grade 12 course options.

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Sciences Science at Southridge is an interactive experience. Students enjoy the benefits of laboratories custom designed for each subject area. This allows for specialized equipment and specimen collections. Through the process of experimentation, students learn to hypothesize, design procedures, think critically, communicate effectively, and analyze results. Specialty teachers make these experiences more exciting by teaching the course components which fall into their area of expertise.

ditional AP topics or by expanding a given topic to challenge problem solving and critical thinking skills. The science faculty has formulated an engaging and challenging program to capture the interest and imagination of students so they will see the value of science in their everyday life and acquire the knowledge and skills for a successful university experience.

Southridge groups Science 8,9 and 10 into four courses of study: biology, chemistry, physics and earth science. Enrichment occurs by teaching ad-

Science 8

t Science 9

t Science 10

t

Biology Biology 11 11H

t

t

t t

t

t

Biology 11 Chemistry 11H Physics Physics Chemistry 11 Chemistry 11 Chemistry 11H 11 11

t

t

t

t

t

AP Chemistry Biology 12 Chemistry 12

t

t

Physics 12

AP Physics

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Modern Languages The modern languages department uses the communicative-experiential approach to develop the knowledge, skills and attitude required to communicate effectively. Students gain insights and appreciation of the language by being exposed to customs, short stories, arts and contemporary cultures. Students gain self-confidence through communicating real-life experiences and by developing critical thinking skills.

Accelerated Program After completing French 9, strong and motivated students will be able to join an accelerated program that will allow them to complete French 12 in Grade 11. The French 10 class will cover French 10 and 11 and the Grade 11 class will follow the French 12 curriculum.

French Program French 8

t French 9

t

t

French 10

French 10 Honours (French 10 and 11)

t

t

French 11

French 11 Honours (French 12)

t

t

French 12

AP French Language and Culture

Spanish Program Spanish 9

t Spanish 10

t Spanish 11/12

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Arts The Arts faculty has designed programs and experiences to encourage participation by all students. Those who possess a unique visual, musical, or dramatic talent are given the careful direction and the exciting production

MUSIC

and performance opportunities they seek. All students are taught skills and approaches that assist them to overcome their uncertainties and boost their confidence and ability in the arts.

ART MEDIA ARTS

DRAMA

Band 8

t

t

Band 9

Jazz Studies 9

t

t

Band 10

Jazz Studies 10

Art 8, Drama 8, Media Arts 8 (students in Grade 8 take one term of each of above)

t

t

Art 9 Media Arts 9

t

t

t

Band 11

Art 11

t

t

Band 12

Art 12

t Drama 10 General

Drama 10 Performance

t t Media Arts 11 Theatre Performance 11

t

t

Media Arts 12 Theatre Performance 12

9

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Drama 9

t

Art 10 Media Arts 10

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Applied Skills as the ability to obtain and share knowledge through investigation, study, instruction, and transmission of information by means of digital media technology. Since technology is undergoing constant and rapid change, the ICTliterate person will possess the skills and abilities to learn and operate current technology, and adapt to new technologies developed to electronically gather, process, evaluate, synthesize, and share data with others. In ICTP 12, the focus is on computer programming. The benefits of learning how to program a computer involve learning about processes; about how one is doing what one is doing. In programming, the process of creating a product is often as important as the finished product. A byproduct of learning to program is the development of creative problem solving, troubleshooting, and analytical thinking skills. These are skills in high demand in many areas of academics and research, as well as in industry.

Information Communication Technology The study of information and communications technology (ICT) is increasingly important. Technological skills are becoming mandatory in the workplace and are a prerequisite for functioning in the modern world. Students today require the ability to reason and communicate, to solve problems, and to understand and use ICT for a variety of purposes. Students also need opportunities to develop the skills required for e-learning so they are better prepared to pursue future learning opportunities. Students in Grades 10 or 11 may take ICTS 11, which focuses on information technology literacy, media development, internet security, and introductory programming. Students in Grades 11 or 12 may take ICTP 12, which primarily focuses on learning computer programming. In the ICTS 11 course, literacy in the area of information and communications technology is defined

t ICT: Computer Information Systems 11

t ICT: Computer Information Programing 12

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Physical Education There is considerable emphasis placed on developing and maintaining each individual’s level of physical fitness. As students reach the senior grades there is an increased focus on such topics as nutritional programs and training principles. These students will also be exposed to a variety of lifetime sports and leisure activities.

In an effort to promote a healthy lifestyle, the senior P.E. program combines progressive skill development with personal fitness enhancement and evaluation. Throughout Grades 8-10, the students focus on skill building in a variety of individual and team sports, primarily those sports which are a part of the school’s competitive athletic program.

Boys

Fall Season

Winter Season

Summer Season

Soccer

Basketball

Rugby

Swimming

Recreational Sports

Golf

Recreational Sports

Tennis

Recreational Sports

Fall Season

Winter Season

Summer Season

Field Hockey

Basketball

Tennis

Volleyball

Recreational Sports

Soccer

Swimming

Golf

Recreational Sports

Recreational Sports

Girls

The Recreational Sports option is available to all students who are not on competitive teams.

Recreational Sports

Spinning

Badminton

Weightlifting

Running

Floor Hockey

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Health, Career Education and Planning Health and Career Education is offered twice per cycle to students in Grades 8 and 9. The aim of HCE is to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will assist them in making informed decisions related to their health, their education and their future careers. HCE 8 and 9 builds on HCE K - 7 and provides a foundation for Planning 10.

The focus in Grade 11 (the second half of planning 10) at Southridge School is on university exploration planning and related topics, as well as career exploration and meeting Graduation Transitions Program requirements. In Grade 12, students focus on decision making, applying to, transition to and seeking funding for university.

The provincially prescribed learning outcomes for HCE 8 and 9 are grouped under two broad organizers:

At Southridge, these outcomes are addressed throughout Grades 8-12 with emphasis on particular skills and issues in varying degrees to meet the needs and concerns of the different age groups. Overall, the goal of the high school program is to create healthy individuals who have the self-knowledge, attitudes and skills to succeed at their desired post-secondary institutions and beyond.

• Education and Careers • Health

Southridge adds a study skills component to the Grade 8 curriculum. Planning 10 is a four credit course taught once per cycle throughout Grades 10 and 11. The aim of Planning 10 is to enable students to become selfdirected individuals who set goals, make thoughtful decisions, and take responsibility for pursuing their goals throughout life.

Health and Career Education 8

t Health and Career Education 9

t

The provincially prescribed learning outcomes for Planning 10 are grouped under four broad organizers:

Planning 10 (Taken in Grade 10 and 11)

• Graduation Transition Program • Education and Careers • Health • Financial Literacy

t Portfolio 12 (Graduation Transitions Plan)

Advanced Placement

Outdoor Education

For students seeking an enriching and challenging academic experience, the Advanced Placement (AP) program is an excellent choice. AP offers motivated students an exciting opportunity to pursue university-level studies in the high school setting. Through AP, students gain knowledge, academic skills and personal confidence. AP is intellectually demanding, but well within the capacity of Southridge students. Success in the AP program may lead to advanced standing, course credit, or both, on entry to university. The Advanced Placement program is fully recognized by the Ministry of Education of British Columbia and is an integral part of the BC graduation program.

Outdoor Education is an important part of a Southridge student’s experience. While participating in the Outdoor Education (OE) program in the Senior School, students strengthen their appreciation for and understanding of the natural environment of British Columbia. Students also develop the skills and attitudes that support good character development. Leadership, teamwork and interpersonal skills are developed during OE trips as students are challenged, comfort levels are extended and confidence is built.

Our current AP courses are as follows: AP Calculus (AB & BC), AP Chemistry, AP Economics, AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition, AP European History, AP French Language, AP Human Geography, AP Physics. Course descriptions are included within the curriculum guide.

Many different opportunities await Southridge students. All Grade 8 and 9 students travel to Strathcona Park Lodge Outdoor Education Centre on Vancouver Island for five days each fall. In addition, the OE programme runs different trips throughout the year that challenge students at different levels and allows students to develop their skills throughout their time at Southridge. Most recently, these trips have included hiking, canoeing, snowshoeing, ocean-kayaking and cycling, ranging in length from a one-day experience to a four-day expedition. It also facilitates some environmental stewardship opportunities such as microchip tagging sturgeon, releasing salmon smolt and shore line cleanups. Southridge strives to provide students with a well-rounded education. Outdoor Education is an integral part of this education.

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The Southridge Service Program Guiding Principles

Student Services - Learning Resource

At Southridge, service means… • Actively interacting with our local community through initiatives that engage all of our students in hands-on service activities • Providing students with opportunities to act globally, as well as locally, to become responsible global citizens • Developing long-term, rich relationships with local, national and international service organizations • Empowering students to develop leadership skills by facilitating student-generated and organized activities • Integrating service initiatives into the curriculum, when it is appropriate to do so • Recognizing that providing service for others often changes the way that we think about ourselves and the world in which we live, students will be provided with opportunities for meaningful reflection as well as opportunities to share their experiences with others.

Southridge Senior School provides academic and testing accommodations for students in Grades 8 through 12. The Learning Resource teacher evaluates, develops and implements services for individual students to decrease the barriers to education that a student might experience as a result of the a language-based disability, a math disability, or deficits in memory and processing skills.

Service Opportunities More specifically, all Southridge students are involved in service work and service-learning through advisor group activities (such as soup kitchen visits, Christmas hampers for Guildford teen moms, Hoops for Heart, Terry Fox Run), school-related activities (such as TREK, Gala, Country Fair), or integration in the curriculum. Part of this integration is the Grade 10 service week, where students participate in workshops and local service work to learn more about global and local service issues. In addition, students can take their own initiative through out-of-school activities (with Semiahmoo House or Peace Arch Hospital, for example) on their own or in small groups. The student-run Service Club meets regularly to plan and carry out diverse service activities and opportunities. Finally, we have a growing international service program that gives students the opportunity to connect with developing world communities in locations such as Ecuador, Kenya, Guatemala and India. Service involvement is one of the strongest defining characteristics of the Southridge student.

At the Senior School the Learning Resource teacher provides academic testing accommodations for students who have a Psycho-Educational Assessment. Through the development of an Individualized Educational Plan or a Student Support Plan, a student may be eligible for some of the following accommodations: • Scribes • Alternative Print Formats (e.g., E-Text, Readers, or taped versions) • Extended time • Adaptive equipment (e.g., computer) • Rooms with reduced distraction • Additional time to complete exams and in-class assignments • Word processor, spell check, grammar check • Calculator and/or formula sheet

Leadership Experience Week Each October, all senior school students are immersed in the real world so that they come to a better understanding of who they are and what their contribution to the world can be. It is expected that all students attend and fully participate in this week as an integral part of our educational program here at Southridge. Specifically, each grade explores a different theme in a different format: Grade 8 – Identity: through challenging themselves at Strathcona Park Lodge, students further enhance their personal character, focus on selfleadership and develop their grade identity. Grade 9 – Cooperation: by focusing on specific small group challenges at Strathcona Park Lodge, students build peer leadership skills, teamwork, and further develop grade cohesion.

Grade 10 – Service: students learn the leadership skills that enable them to move beyond themselves to helping others in their local community. The skills are actively taught at the school, and then students volunteer with an organization of their choosing. Grade 11 – Leadership I: Exploration - students explore future options at a Career Day and develop valuable skills, notably those of restorative justice, to prepare them for making a contribution after secondary school. Grade 12 – Leadership II: Legacy – students reflect on contributions made during their school years, look forward to university life, and prepare to assume leadership in our school community in the present. This is achieved through a Career Day, university tours, and an off-campus Grad Retreat.

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Overview For Grades 8 to 10 In Grades 8 through 10, students are required to take a range of mandatory academic classes. As a graduation requirement, all students write provincial examinations in Mathematics 10, Science 10 and English 10, and these examinations represent 20% of their final course marks. Southridge has established a very strong record in successfully preparing students for these examinations. The use of technology is fully integrated into our curriculum and all students in Grade 8 at Southridge are equipped with their own personal laptop computer. This tool is used to facilitate and expand opportunities for collaboration, exploration and inquiry; authentic assessment and evaluation, and to facilitate our ability to meet the diverse learning needs of our students. Students also use this technology as a means of organization and communication beyond the classroom. Throughout these years the approach to learning is one of critical thinking and inquiry. We seek to develop students who question assumptions, offer creative solutions, advocate respectfully for themselves, and who are able to collaborate and communicate well with others. We also take care to support students in these grades in acquiring the awareness and knowledge to understand where their own particular passions and interests lie – and to make informed decisions about pursuing them. The wide-ranging curriculum in Grades 8 through 10 prepares the students to choose those subjects which are of greatest interest to them in their Grade 11 and 12 years and beyond. In Grades 9 and 10 the choice of electives is limited to two. In Grades 8, 9, and 10, science, math, English, French and/or Spanish, social studies, physical education and health and career education are mandatory. Health and career education provides students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes that will assist them in making informed decisions related to their health, their education and their careers. Electives are offered in the fine arts, including band, art, media arts and drama.

Overview For Grades 11 and 12

cial Scholarship Program has been revised. Graduation Program Examinations Scholarships will be awarded based on students’ performance on the Graduation Program Exams: English 10, Mathematics 10, Science 10, Social Studies 11 and English 12. For students graduating on or after September 1, 2011, the following rules apply:

• Students must achieve at least a “B” (73% or above) final mark (provincial exam and school mark combined) in one of the Language Arts 12, or English 12 First Peoples). • Students must achieve at least one “A” (86% or higher) and three “B”s (73% or higher) on four of their best provincial exams (can include the Language Arts 12 provincial exam). • AP and most IB scores will no longer count towards scholarship.

University Planning, which occurs once per cycle, is also a mandatory requirement of the Grade 12 program and is instrumental in helping students select and narrow their focus to the university programs that best fit their academic interests and personal preferences. Students select their course of studies with the guidance of our University Counselor. The strength of our university-planning program is evidenced by our students’ high success rates in gaining admittance to the institutions and programs of their choice. For students seeking an enriching and challenging academic experience, Advanced Placement (AP) courses can be an excellent choice. AP offers motivated students the opportunity to pursue university-level studies in the high school setting. Through AP, students gain knowledge, academic skills and personal confidence. AP is intellectually demanding and success in the AP program can lead to advanced standing, course credit or better preparation for university courses on entry to university. We currently offer the following Advanced Placement courses: AP Calculus (BC), AP Calculus (AB) Chemistry, AP Microeconomics, AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition, AP European History, AP French Language and Culture, AP Human Geography, and AP Physics (B).

Southridge’s enriched, rigorous, university oriented academic curriculum enables students to work successfully towards achieving excellent examination results and fully prepares them for a diverse range of post secondary opportunities and entrance to prestigious universities in Canada, the UK and the US. A full range of academic electives is introduced in Grade 11 and every student must write the mandatory Social Studies 11 examination, which represents 20% of their final mark in the course. English 12 is also a mandatory graduation requirement and all students must write the Provincial examination, which is worth 40% of their final mark. The current requirements for Provincial scholarships are detailed below: As a result of the cancellation of optional provincial examinations, the Provin-

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Grade 8 Program


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English 8

Biology 8

Students work on developing competency in a variety of writing styles: narration, description, exposition and persuasion. There is a clear emphasis on the importance of grammar as it arises in students’ work and on the development of a structured, cohesive writing style. Students are required to submit an essay to the Commonwealth Essay Competition and are encouraged to pursue a number of creative writing opportunities, submitting both poetry and prose to external writing contests. In the first term Grade 8 students also debate a variety of topics and learn the rudiments of cross–examination debate style in order to develop the skills of analysis and argumentation. Individual persuasive speeches are an integral part of the curriculum in the second term and the Southridge School Speech Day provides a showcase for the best individual performances. At least two novels are taught and independent reading, facilitated by the Accelerated Reader program, is strongly encouraged. The study of poetry, non-fiction texts and short stories are also linked thematically to the novel studies. The integrated use of technology allows for the breadth of student choice in independent reading, helps engage student interest, and aids in the structural and stylistic development of student writing. The study of one Shakespearean play (Romeo and Juliet), including the dramatic interpretation of selected scenes, completes the Grade 8 curriculum.

In Biology 8, students will explore the nature of living things. Modeling cell components and microscope studies will help students grasp the concept of cell organization. Students will discover the relationships between cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. Human body systems are explored where heart and eye dissections play a key role in their investigations.

Chemistry 8 In Chemistry 8, students will perform and design their own experiments using the scientific method and use models to explain how systems operate. Students will learn about kinetic molecular theory, density, pressure, temperature and force in fluids.

Earth Science 8 In Earth Science 8, students will learn about water systems on Earth. They will discover the significance of salinity and temperature in the world’s oceans, how water and ice shape the landscape, factors that affect productivity and species distribution in aquatic environments.

Social Studies 8 Geography; the Middle Ages in Western Europe; the Renaissance; Reformation and Enlightenment; and Asian societies from 300-1650 are the main topics of study in the Grade 8 program. Students spend a month learning about latitude/longitude, scale, symbols, directions, bearings, etc. before tackling the unit on medieval Europe. Students are often fascinated by the social, political and economic life of this era. They also learn about the impact of religions on western and eastern civilizations, the nature of feudal society and the growth of strong monarchies in England and France. Chivalric knights, the extraordinary experiences of individuals like Joan of Arc, the devastation caused by plagues and the devotion of Crusaders to their cause are just a few examples of topics that students enjoy.

Mathematics 8 The focus of Mathematics 8 is on the development of basic skills needed for the advanced study of mathematics in Grades 10 - 12. Topics in this course include integer operations, square roots, the Pythagorean Theorem, operations with fractions, rate, ratio, percent, patterns, relations, graphing, basic algebra, solving equations, surface area and volume of prisms, geometry, data analysis and probability. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. All students in Mathematics 8 also write the Canadian Mathematics “Gauss” Contest in May.

Physics 8 In Physics 8, students will learn about optics. Through demonstrations and hands-on- activities, students will discover properties of visible light, behaviour of waves, and electromagnetic radiation, as well as mirrors, lenses and optical instruments. Laptops will be used to investigate online simulations, take notes and participate in physics discussions. The course concentrates on a conceptual understanding of physics, with limited mathematical usage.

French 8 The beginning of the course consists of thorough review of very basic verbs and adjectives to integrate students from a variety of backgrounds. Students then work through the ministry recommended Ça marche 1 program learning additional basic grammar and completing communicative activities relevant to their experience. Students are exposed to themes of interest such as family, friends, food and celebrations, and traveling.

Calculator Needed: scientific calculator (TI-30X IIS series) recommended

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Music 8

Career and Health Education 8

All students in Grade 8 play in the concert band. Among other things, the major focus of each term is a public performance. In Term One, students prepare for An Evening in December (two nights the first week of December); during Term Two, we woodshed three selections to play at BandFest, at UVic (overnight to Victoria in early March); Term Three culminates in Café Concerto (May). Attendance at each of these events is expected. Because students enter the Senior School with differing levels of skills on the band instruments, they are placed in a group appropriate to their level of experience: Beginning Players, who are just starting their journey; Experienced Players, usually with one year under their belt; and More Experienced Players, who can read music and have some facility on their instrument. In each group, the focus is on developing skills on a one of the brass, woodwind or percussion instruments, gaining understanding of various musical forms and genres, appreciating one’s role within a musical ensemble, and performing with stylistic accuracy and musicality. Students in the Experienced Group spend additional time on the fundamentals, learning the concert repertoire, and test preparation. Those in the More Experienced Group receive additional, more challenging repertoire and also play in the “All Comers Jazz Ensemble”. As such, the latter are welcome to join the other school jazz bands and vocal ensembles at the Jazz Retreat, an amazing three-day event in late October. In addition, students are given short exploration sessions into the world of guitar and vocals, which will better allow them to decide on the options available to them in the art’s electives in Grade 9 and beyond.

Explorations in the Arts 8 The Fine Arts program for Grade 8 students involves one term of each of the following: Drama, Visual Art, and Media Arts. Students are given an overview of the respective disciplines in order to give them a well-rounded artistic experience as well as a base from which to choose higher level courses in one or more of the explored fields.

The Health Career Education course is divided into five broad categories and covers several sub-categories within each major category. The main categories are: Learning Learning about learning; personal learning style; study strategies

Healthy Relationships Media analysis and impact on relationships, identifying healthy and unhealthy relationships, assertive communication and boundary setting, mediation training

Healthy Living Sexuality and decision making; nutrition and substance misuse prevention

Safety and Injury Prevention safeteen program, internet safety, sports injury prevention

Career Education interest and possible career paths

Character Development and Leadership 8 The course is designed to help students emphasize, develop and explore issues related to ethics, character, leadership, team building and school engagement. All students will actively participate in various classroom and physical activities designed to assist in their development as engaged Southridge Senior School students and leaders in the school.

Physical Education 8 Physical Education 8 involves a variety of movement activities in individual, dual and group settings. The focus is on developing a functional level of fitness, as well as skill development and social responsibility. Skill development in the main Southridge interscholastic sports is emphasized. These include basketball, volleyball, soccer, rugby and field hockey. The concepts of teamwork and fair play are also emphasized. This course leads to Physical Education 9.

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Grade 9 Program


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English 9

Chemistry 9

The emphasis in Grade 9 is on the writing process and the importance of planning, editing and rewriting. Grammar is addressed more individually as problems in writing arise and become evident. Students continue to take part in the Commonwealth Essay Competition, in debating and in public speaking. The scope of speaking activities broadens and students are taught the refinements of after-dinner speaking, persuasive speaking, and dramatic interpretation. At least two novels are taught and the critical examination of short fiction and poetry is linked to an exploration of common themes in the works. The integrated use of technology remains a cornerstone of our instruction, as does our emphasis on wide reading, facilitated by the continued use of the Accelerated Reader program. Students expand their vocabulary of literary terminology and hone their skills in a wide range of writing assignments both creative and analytical. The study of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream completes the Grade 9 curriculum.

Chemistry 9 continues to develop the concepts of matter and energy that were introduced in Grade 8. However, these topics will be expanded further to include the chemistry of the families in the periodic table, atomic theory and the naming of chemical compounds. Laboratory experiments, demonstrations and class activities will be used to develop these concepts. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to improve their skills in observing and designing experimental procedures.

Social Studies 9

Physics 9

Grade 9 Social Studies examines the theme of revolutionary change and the fight for democratic rights in society. Through a study of the English Civil War and the American and French Revolutions, students learn how new ideas led to a drastic change in governmental structure and also a rise in nationalism. The Industrial Revolution in England provides an opportunity to study the effect of dramatic technological changes on society. The last third of the course examines the development of Early Canada and includes a study of geographic regions and of First Nations groups in North America.

Physics 9 begins with an introduction to electricity. Within this unit, students are introduced to electrostatics, studying the properties of static electricity and electrical charge. The unit then moves on to electrical circuits where students are introduced to the fundamentals of voltage, current and resistance in series and parallel circuits. The electricity unit concludes with a study of power and energy providing the students with an insight as to how we generate, distribute, consume and pay for our electricity in the province of British Columbia.

Mathematics 9

French 9

Mathematics 9 continues the development of basic skills needed for the advanced study of mathematics in Grades 10 - 12. Topics in this course include square roots, surface area, powers, exponent laws, rational numbers, linear relations, polynomials, linear equations and inequalities, similarity, transformations, circle geometry, probability and statistics. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. All students in Mathematics 9 also write the Canadian Mathematics “Pascal” Contest in February.

Students develop their speaking, reading and writing skills as they learn how to express themselves in the present, future and past tenses. They read short authentic documents and simplified prose, practicing their reading comprehension skills and developing some cultural awareness. Themes in Express 9e are of student interest and relevant to their lives. Students discuss travel, art, adolescent life, Canada and volunteer work.

Calculator Needed: scientific calculator (TI-30X IIS series recommended)

Biology 9 Understanding reproduction is the key focus of the Biology 9 program. Students discover DNA, Mitosis, AND Meiosis through visuals, models, lab activities and simulations. Students debate and discuss topics on bioethics and reproductive technology. These topics challenge students to confront the dilemmas of modern biology and society.

Earth Science 9 In Earth Science 9, students will learn about space exploration. They will discover how a variety of technologies have advanced the understanding of the universe, the major components of the solar system, astronomical phenomena and the implications of space travel.

Spanish 9 This is an introductory Spanish course which focuses on the four fundamental skills of second language learning – listening, speaking, reading and writing. The beginning of the course introduces students to basic greetings, time telling, colours, family, shopping and description of friends. Throughout the course, students will be expected to express their likes, dislikes and preferences orally as well as in writing. Basic grammatical structures like the present tense and adjectives are taught through themes such as “School”, “Pastimes” and “Family”.

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Media Arts 9 The Media Arts 9 class continues to build on knowledge already acquired from the Grade 8 year. Students work with a wide variety of new techniques and technologies with the goal of building foundation filmmaking and visual narrative skills. An emphasis is placed on both composition and story structure as students use technology to design and create works in film, graphic novel, and photography. Students work with professional equipment, learning to operate cameras manually, work as production teams, and manipulate their work with post-production software. Opportunities are given to examine and discuss historical and influential films and related works.

Drama 9 In an environment that encourages the individual to take risks, students in Drama 9 are encouraged to explore and challenge their personal comfort zones. Students partake in collective and individual exercises based upon the fundamental elements of drama: confidence, cooperation, concentration and control. The year of study is rigorous and challenging: student devised work is the focus of the year. Units of study may include: Improvisation, The Elements of Drama, Stage Fighting, Greek Theatre, Musical Theatre, Contemporary Play Study for Performance, and live theatre excursions. Student performances are complemented with explorations of theatre history, journal reflection, classic and contemporary play analysis and play reviews.

Explorations in Art 9 Building on the knowledge, skills and processes of the Foundations Year, Grade 9 students continue with skill and personal image development as they explore and investigate a variety of familiar and new techniques, materials, processes and concepts. When possible, students are encouraged to interpret assignments based on their personal knowledge and skills. Individual goal setting and intrinsic motivation to artistically develop is emphasized. Sound studio practices and refinement of skills is a focus for Explorations in Art.

Music 9 Two courses are available for students in music at the Grade 9 level: Concert Band 9 and Jazz Studies 9. In Band 9, students will also perform in either the Grade 9 Jazz Band or small ensembles for part of the time. The Junior Choir is a co-curricular option, at lunchtime.

Each April, the Grade 9 Concert Band attends a British Columbia Music Festival, where they perform and attend clinics, performances and workshops. Attendance at the following performances is mandatory: An Evening in December (December) and CafĂŠ Concerto (May).

Jazz Studies 9 This course is for students who desire to improvise. In it, students study the giants of jazz, listen to the finest recordings and live concerts available, and begin to unravel the complexities of the harmonies that underlie the music. The lion’s portion of the course, however, is devoted to actually improvising, that is, composing and performing a melody at the same time! Students begin by utilizing scale tones and chord tones over Major 7 and Minor 7 chords, and progress to playing the 12-bar blues and some of the more basic 32-bar AABA song forms. N. B. This course must be taken concurrently with Band 9. Except with permission, it may not be taken in isolation.

Physical Education 9 Physical Education 9 further refines and develops the skills in Physical Education 8. This program integrates the units to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that allow students to incorporate physical activity into a regular routine. Additional units of study to the main school sports include cross country running, field lacrosse and softball. This course leads to Physical Education 10.

Career and Health Education 9 Students continue to explore a deeper understanding of the Health curriculum organizers from HCE 8: Healthy Living, Healthy Relationships, Safety & Injury Prevention and Substance Misuse Prevention. In addition, the students partake in the Youth and Philanthropy Initiative, designed to give them the skills to assess and problem solve community needs, while encouraging them to participate in the development of their community. Students work on research and presentation skills, as well as professional communication skills, finally endorsing a charitable organization with the goal of winning a grant for the charity. HCE 9 students are also introduced to the Grade 10 course requirements.

Band 9 The Concert Band continues to be the principal means by which students are challenged to improve their technical and musical skills. As the difficulty of music increases, students are required to be more independent players. In addition, they are expected to be able to perform in a greater variety of genres with idiosyncratic stylistic appropriateness. Increased musical literacy, the development of a more mature tone and improvement in overall musicianship are the primary foci.

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Grade 10 Program


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English 10

Biology 10

The emphasis in Grade 10 is on the development of personal ‘voice’ in writing and the understanding of the ‘audience’ for whom one is writing. The importance of grammatical and stylistic control in individual writing is further underscored and students continue to take part in the Commonwealth essay competition, in debating and in public speaking. At least two novels are taught and the critical examination of non-fiction, short stories and poetry is linked to an exploration of common themes in the works. A critical appraisal of media texts is also undertaken. The integrated use of technology remains a cornerstone of our instruction and the majority of students will write the English 10 provincial examination on the computer in an electronic format. Past examination papers and timed in-class writing assignments are increasingly used to practice and improve test -taking skills. Students are encouraged to continue to read widely, but are directed to titles that offer more thought provoking and challenging reading in terms of content and style. They must read at least three titles independently, which are chosen from a departmentally approved list of contemporary and classic titles. Macbeth is the chosen Shakespearean text for Grade 10 students.

Biology 10 offers students an opportunity to ‘zoom out’ and look at the big world around them. Topics covered include biomes, ecosystems, and populations. While learning this, students explore numerous relationships between the living and non-living world as well as between and within a species. Learning about both natural and human influenced changes on earth offers a great platform for discussions on environmental issues.

Social Studies 10 Social Studies 10 begins with a study of the five main themes of geography and then moves on to the establishment of British authority in Canada. Students will understand the evolving nature of early government and the factors that led to Confederation. The opening of the West is examined in detail to understand the importance of fur trading companies in western development. Other topics include the Riel rebellions, the creation of the North West Mounted Police, treaty negotiations and the building of the CPR. In addition, students might examine a unit on the legal system in Canada, which will also include a field trip to watch some criminal cases at the Surrey Provincial Court House. The final part of the year is an investigation of British Columbia’s history and economy.

Foundations and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 10

Chemistry 10 Chemistry 10 provides students with a great opportunity to experiment. Concepts that are studied are supported with lab experiences. Topics that are covered are: atomic theory, ionic and molecular compounds, naming of compounds, acids and bases, organic chemistry, types of chemical reactions and balancing chemical reactions.

Earth Science 10 In Earth Science 10, students will learn about energy transfer in natural systems. They will discover the characteristics and sources of thermal energy, the effects of thermal energy within the atmosphere, and possible causes of climate change and its impact on natural systems. In addition, students will study plate tectonics; they will analyse the processes and features of plate tectonics and demonstrate knowledge that supports plate tectonic theory.

Physics 10 In Physics 10, students will learn about motion. The course covers concepts of distance, displacement, time and velocity. The students are exposed to a variety of real life applications of motion and conclude this unit by studying acceleration, and understanding the affects of acceleration due to gravity. In addition, students will learn about nuclear reactions and radioactivity.

French 10

In this course, students study surface area, volume, trigonometry, linear measurement, units of measure (including conversions), exponents, irrational numbers, polynomials, factoring, relations, and linear functions. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. Students will write a provincial examination worth 20% of their final mark. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator

Students learn how to talk about and describe events in the past, adding another form of past tense to their repertoire. They will also learn how to avoid repetitions by using object pronouns, and how to construct conditional sentences. The themes discussed in this course Express 10e include employment, humour, legends and social issues.

Accelerated French 10 By the end of this course students will gain credit for French 10 and French 11. They learn to talk about and describe events, adding the imperfect to their repertoire. They also study the subjunctive, the conditional, conditional sentences, relative pronouns, and object pronouns. The themes discussed in this course include employment, physical and emotional well being, humour, legends and socials issues. More advanced oral and written communication will be expected of students in this course.

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grounding in the technical aspects of playing a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument.

Spanish 10 This course is the continuation of Spanish 9. Structures and skills previously introduced will be reinforced and expanded upon. Students will learn the past and the future tense as well as some object pronouns. They will be expected to study more advanced reading materials including some Latin American and Spanish legends and authentic documents from magazines and from the Internet. More emphasis will be placed on learning how to write short paragraphs expressing opinions and preferences and relating personal events in the present, past and future. They will also be expected to further develop their oral skills.

Visual Art 10 At this level, students are challenged to create in a range of visual styles including realistic representations, innovative and stylized works and abstract art. As students become more independent and comfortable with materials, they are expected to complete and present finished works of original art. Personal motivation to extend and refine skills is not only the focus at this level but also a requirement for continued studies in the senior years. Students are encouraged and directed to see the studio as a place to work outside of scheduled classroom lessons.

Drama 10: General Drama 10 students have the foundations to further increase their knowledge of theatre history and improve their performance skills in this highly creative and challenging program. Theatre styles from the twentieth century are the basis of the student devised work. Units of study may include: Improvisation, Commedia dell’Arte, Mask Studies, Musical Theatre, Audition Skills, Contemporary Play Study for Performance, and live theatre excursions. The emphasis is on perfecting performance skills; however, journal reflection, classic and contemporary play analysis and play reviews formulate the theory portion of this course.

Drama 10: Performance This introductory performance course requires a high level of motivation, enthusiasm, and interest in the dramatic arts. Participation in the major school production of the year is expected. Students enrolling in this course should not apply for a student exchange in the second term as this will conflict with performance dates. This course allows students to begin to explore a variety of dramatic forms and theatre styles to expand and further their learning as they specialize in areas of interest (performance or production). Units of study may include: Improvisation, Physical Theatre, Voice Production, Musical Theatre, Mask Studies, and One Act Plays in performance. The emphasis is on improving performance skills; however, character analysis and reflection, classic and contemporary play analysis, and play reviews comprise the theory portion of this course.

Music: Concert Band 10 Grade 10 students form the first of three grades that comprise the most significant performing ensemble at Southridge School, the Senior Concert Band. In addition to each of the Music Department concerts, this group performs at all major school events, such as the Remembrance Day service and Graduation. A high level of musical literacy is expected, as is a strong

Off-timetable, students may challenge themselves vocally or instrumentally in the choir, the senior vocal ensemble (auditioned) and either the Intermediate or Senior Jazz Ensemble.

Music: Jazz Studies 10 This course follows Jazz Studies 9. Students begin improvising in the relatively familiar blues vein, and then explore Modal Jazz, while they appreciate the significance of Miles Davis Quintet’s watershed recording “Kind of Blue.” Following this, they attempt to wrap their minds around more complex changes in a variety of styles and at increasingly demanding tempi. During Term II, their major project is the study of one “Jazz Great’s” life and music. They listen to, emulate and transcribe an improvised solo by a master musician on their instrument. N. B. This course must be taken concurrently with Band 10. Except with permission, it may not be taken in isolation.

Media Arts 10 Students in Grade 10 apply their visual storytelling techniques to increasingly sophisticated projects. Areas of study largely focus on further developing the artistic and technical skill-set necessary to create professional-grade film projects. The specifics of manual camera operations for moving pictures, shot and sequence design, directing technique, and cinematography are all examined in detail through the creation of very short, high-quality film projects. Post-production skills continue to be developed. Influential works and the master techniques they embody continue to be examined. Additional topics in the course include portrait photography and sound design.

Physical Education 10 Physical Education 10 further refines and develops the skills and strategies introduced in Physical Education 9. This program integrates the units to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that allow students to incorporate physical activity into a regular routine. There is an increased emphasis on free play and understanding of game strategy, while continuing to develop foundational skills. This course completes the mandatory requirement for Secondary Physical Education. Southridge requires students to take PE in Grade 11.

Planning 10 The aim of Planning 10 is to enable students to develop the skills necessary to become self-directed individuals who set goals, make thoughtful decisions and take responsibility for pursuing their goals throughout life. As part of the new Graduation Program, Grade 10/11 students must complete the Planning 10 curriculum in order to satisfy graduation requirements. Planning 10 is a four-credit course which is pivotal for students as it is the gateway to the graduation years. It consists of four main organizers: the Graduation Program, Education & Careers, Health and Finances. In the Grade 11 year, students focus on career exploration and post-secondary planning topics. Southridge delivers this class, once per cycle, over the course of two years – Grades 10 and 11.

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Grade 11 Program


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English 11

Foundations of Mathematics 11

The Grade 11 curriculum represents the start of a two year program, which builds on the course work and approaches established in the earlier grades, but which seeks to prepare students for the more rigorous demands of post secondary education, and for success in provincial and advanced placement examinations. Students are encouraged to think critically about their reading, to engage in questioning the text, and to effectively articulate their own responses and ideas. At least two novels and/or a modern play are taught and the critical examination of non-fiction, short stories and poetry is linked to an exploration of common themes in the works. Increasing emphasis is placed on the skills of literary analysis and the demands of the literary essay. However, entry in the Commonwealth Essay Competition and other creative writing contests continues, allowing students the opportunity to demonstrate the increasing sophistication, organization and range of their writing. Independent reading is strongly promoted and the students are required to read at least three novels from our contemporary and classic reading lists over the course of the year. Public speaking and debating remain integral components of this course, and technology is used to enrich the classroom environment, aiding in the development of writing, research, and presentation skills. The study of Shakespeare’s Othello completes the Grade 11 curriculum.

The “Foundations of Mathematics” program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical calculus. Topics include proportional reasoning, 2D and 3D objects, volume, surface area, trigonometry, reasoning, analysis of puzzles and games, statistics, normal distributions, confidence intervals, systems of linear inequalities in two variables and quadratic functions. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum.

English 11: Advanced Placement Language and Composition English 11 Adavanced Placement (AP) offers Grade 11 students an opportunity to explore the craft of writing by analyzing the use of rhetoric in a wide variety of literary and non-fiction texts. It is an academically rigorous course, which encourages students to consider language as a persuasive tool and to think deeply about the dynamic relationship that exists between writer, context, audience and argument. Students who register for this course will write the AP English Language and Composition examination in May. In addition, this course will cover all the learning outcomes for English 11 and will allow students who meet the challenge requirements (a mark of 90% in the course and a final examination mark of 86% or higher) to take the Grade 12 English provincial examination in June. Students must consult with their English teacher and the Senior School Academic Director before registering for this demanding course.

Social Studies 11 Social Studies 11 is a provincially examinable course that studies Canada in the 20th century. The Canadian system of government and the electoral system are studied and are complemented with a visit to the provincial legislature in Victoria. The theme of Canada’s emergence as a country on the international stage is examined through its participation in the world wars and in the post war era. Additional issues of Canadian identity in the 20th century including French-English relations, the emergence of aboriginal and women’s rights, peacekeeping and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms are also examined. Other issues such as human rights and environmental concerns in Canada and the world are investigated during the year.

Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator

Pre-Calculus 11 The “Pre-Calculus” program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of theoretical calculus. Topics include sequences and series, trigonometry, quadratic functions and equations, rational and radical expressions and equations, absolute value and reciprocal functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and linear and quadratic inequalities. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator

Biology 11 How are living things similar? How are they different? Where is a particular organism’s place in the history of living things? How does this organism interact with the living and non-living parts of the world? These are the questions Biology 11 students seek answers to as they observe and study organisms from all five kingdoms of life; Monera, Animalia, Plantae, Fungi and Protista. Students observe, dissect and study the features of a wide variety of organisms. In addition, excursions to Bamfield, Vancouver Aquarium and local beaches enhance student understanding of marine animals and ecology. Research and lab experiments teach students practical skills of observation and analysis. By the end of Biology 11, students will have a wide range of experience and knowledge of organisms and their places in our world. Biology 11 has many parallels with first year university biology classes and as such, is excellent preparation for a university science program.

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Biology 11 Honours

Physics 11 Honours

This course is the first year of the two-year Biology AP program. The AP topics that are covered, diverge from the regular Biology 11 curriculum, and are covered in much greater depth of understanding.  This coupled with the regular Provincial Biology 11 content makes for a very fast pace and intensive course, and for that reason a minimum 86% in Science 10 is mandatory.  The emphasis of this course is on enduring conceptual understandings, using inquiry base learning to support the concepts.  Students will develop scientific literacy, reading primary literature and analysing case studies. There is a strong lab component with an emphasis on science practices such as lab design, collecting and analysing data, making predictions, applying mathematical routines, and connecting concepts across domains.  Topics covered include evolution, the diversity of life, and ecological interactions in the environment.

Beginning in 2013, the advanced placement physics program is a twocourse, two-year program which begins in Grade 11. AP Physics 1 is the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers include one- and two-dimensional Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introduces electric circuits. AP Physics 2, taken in Grade 12, completes the equivalent of a first-year college course.

Chemistry 11 Chemistry 11 is challenging, enjoyable, and requires hard work. This course involves problem solving that requires a good set of math skills. Students will learn to design procedures and conduct labs to solve problems. They will also learn to develop theories by interpreting data. A highlight of the course is the participation in the National Crystal Growing Competition. Topics include measurement and communication, atoms, molecules and ions, mole concept, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, atomic theory, solution chemistry and organic chemistry.

French 11 Students interact in French to situations drawn from real life. They learn how to express themselves using a variety of vocabulary, expressions, phrases and verb tenses. The future tense and the conditional are added to their repertoire. There is a strong emphasis on reading and listening to a variety of creative works, particularly short fiction and magazine articles. In Voyages, the themes to which students are exposed are ethnic foods, childhood memories, advertising, stress and cultural festivals.

Spanish 11/12

This course is the first year of the two-year Chemistry AP program. It is geared for independent learners who thrive in a fast-paced environment. Students must have at least an 86% in Math 10 and in Science 10 to be eligible for this course and must have the permission of the Curriculum Leader. The course encompasses the entire provincial Chemistry 11 curriculum and additional topics. All topics are covered to the AP level of understanding. Students who do not wish to continue in the AP program will have met all the learning outcomes to take Chemistry 12 next year instead of Chemistry 12 AP.

Students will be challenged to learn various linguistic elements of the Spanish language through various themes and readings. In the first part of this course, emphasis is placed on review of the present and past tenses and the acquisition of the future and conditional tenses through a combination of readings and themes like outdoor activities and traveling. In the latter part of the course students will read a variety of short stories, newspaper and magazine articles as well as literary excerpts. They are expected to discuss the readings both orally and in writing using varied vocabulary and sentence structures. They will broaden their skills relating events, situations or experiences and exchanging opinions and preferences. They will also fine tune their composition writing skills. Through legends and other cultural texts they will gain knowledge of some of the customs and cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students will learn the present and past perfects as well as the subjunctive in the second half of the course.

Physics 11

Art Foundations 11

Physics 11 begins with kinematics, the study of motion, and dynamics, the study of force. They are examined with an emphasis on using mathematics to quantitatively describe what goes on in the world around us. A similar approach is applied to the study of work, energy and power. During the second half of the year, a variety of physics topics are studied. Wave properties and their application to light are examined, followed by a study of geometrical optics. The section on nuclear physics includes models of the atom, radioactive decay and fission and fusion. The course concludes with a brief study of Einstein’s Theory of Special Relativity.

Applying and extending technical and aesthetic foundations learned in earlier grades, this level requires students to design and complete artwork that shows practised and confident use of materials and processes, as they work through more complex concepts in image development. A development of personal style or signature with respect to original and personally meaningful images is highly encouraged at this level. Many students going on to the next grade level are beginning to build portfolios that may be used for postsecondary admission. This course is the pre-requisite for Art Foundation 12.

Chemistry 11 Honours

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Media Arts 11

Computer Information Systems 11

The goal of Media Arts 11 is to ultimately create professional-grade products that have the potential to impact a wide audience. Areas of study moving towards this goal include developing advanced skills in directing, cinematography, and production design. Students in this course have access and choice between an increasingly advanced selection of equipment. Influential works continue to be examined for their thematic and technical insight. Additional topics include abstract photography and visual effects.

Theatre Performance 11 Theatre Performance 11 allows students to explore a variety of dramatic forms and theatre styles from the twentieth century to expand and further their learning, as they specialize in areas of interest (performance or production). A high level of motivation, enthusiasm, skill and interest in the dramatic arts is required to achieve success in this course. Participation in the major school production of the year is expected. Units of study may include: Improvisation, Physical Theatre, Voice Production, Musical Theatre, Mask Studies, and One Act Plays for Performance. The emphasis is on improving performance skills; however, character analysis and reflection, acting methodologies, classic and contemporary play analysis, and play reviews comprise the theory portion of this course. Students enrolling in this course should not apply for a student exchange in the second term as this will conflict with performance dates.

Instrumental Music: Concert Band 11 Grade 11 students form the second of three grades that comprise the most significant performing ensemble at Southridge School, the Senior Concert Band. In addition to each of the Music Department concerts, this group performs at all major school events, such as the Remembrance Day service and Graduation. A high level of musical literacy is expected, as is a strong grounding in the technical aspects of playing a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument. Grade 11 students are expected to play a leadership role in their various sections: flutes, clarinets, saxophones, etc.

Students will use a variety of types of software to solve problems. Programming in Visual Basic is introduced and students will write their own simple Windows programs. These programming concepts will be built upon in IT 12 and are a major asset to those going on to pursue a career in computerrelated fields. Students will learn how to use the Internet as an effective research tool, how to recognize Internet marketing scams and avoid them, and will learn about electronic communications issues such as email chain letters and how to avoid “spam”, as well as network security issues (viruses, privacy and cryptography). Adobe Photoshop, to a basic level of proficiency, is used for creating or modifying graphical image files, and students learn how to create animated gifs for use on web pages using Adobe Fireworks. A unit about computer networks will give a fundamental understanding of local and wide area networks, and students will continue to develop their understanding of computer systems and the relationship between hardware and software.

Planning 10 The aim of Planning 10 is to enable students to develop the skills necessary to become self-directed individuals who set goals, make thoughtful decisions and take responsibility for pursuing their goals throughout life. As part of the new Graduation Program, Grade 10/11 students must complete the Planning 10 curriculum in order to satisfy graduation requirements. Planning 10 is a four-credit course which is pivotal for students as it is the gateway to the graduation years. It consists of four main organizers: the Graduation Program, Education & Careers, Health and Finances. In the Grade 11 year, students focus on career exploration and post-secondary planning topics. Southridge delivers this class, once per cycle, over the course of two years – Grades 10 and 11.

Off-timetable, students may challenge themselves vocally or instrumentally in the choir, the senior vocal ensemble (auditioned) and either the Intermediate or Senior Jazz Ensemble.

Physical Education 11 The Physical Education 11 program focuses on promoting a healthy lifestyle with a lifelong interest in fitness and sport. The course emphasizes analyzing and improving physical competence, maintaining personal fitness and developing effective leadership skills. There is an introduction to lifelong leisure activities such as bowling, golf and cycling.

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Grade 12 Program


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English 12: Writing

English 12 In English 12 students continue the refinement of their writing styles, and are encouraged to develop a critical, questioning, and analytical approach to their study of the chosen texts. In-class writing prompts focus on grammatical accuracy, stylistic fluency, and clear, concise analysis in preparation for the provincial examination in June. Students also continue to participate in public speaking and debating. At least two novels and/or a modern play are taught and the critical examination of non-fiction, short stories and poetry is linked to an exploration of common themes in the works. Entry in the Commonwealth Essay Competition and other creative writing contests continues, allowing students the opportunity to demonstrate the increasing sophistication, organization and range of their writing. Independent reading is strongly promoted and the students are required to read at least three novels from our contemporary and classic reading lists over the course of the year. Technology is used to enrich the classroom environment, aiding in the development of writing, research, and presentation skills. The study of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, King Lear or Hamlet, completes the Grade 12 curriculum.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition In this course, students are engaged in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Students are expected to work independently and their reading should be both wide and deep. They are expected to have a detailed knowledge of at least six novels and/or plays in order to meet the challenge of the AP examination in May. Works from several genres and time periods are studied; the approach is one of collaborative discussion, critical reasoning and informed dialogue. In class, timed writing assignments and challenging multiple choice comprehension questions form part of the preparation for the AP examination. The course material draws largely from English and American literature and includes some celebrated masterpieces. We begin with Beowulf and the warrior culture of the Anglo-Saxon times, delve into the Renaissance and Enlightenment periods, luxuriate in the emotional landscape of the Romantic era, and finish in the Twentieth Century when language and literature were brutally changed by the First World War and its aftermath. In addition, students read a selection of contemporary fiction and write personal responses to a wide variety of Canadian and American poetry. Some suggested novels for independent reading for this course include: Alias Grace, Atonement, Awakening, Beloved, Catch 22, The Great Gatsby, The Grapes of Wrath, The Heart of Darkness, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Joy Luck Club, The Kite Runner, The Poisonwood Bible, A Prayer for Owen Meany, Snow Falling on Cedars, The English Patient, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Farewell to Arms, My Antonia, One of Ours, The Color Purple, The Portrait of a Lady, The Scarlett Letter, The Shipping News, The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, The Stone Angel. Our primary texts will be Adventures in Enlgish Literature (Athena Edition), The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood and Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

English 12, with a writing focus, enables students to prepare for the English 12 Provincial Examination while they focus on their development as creative writers. In this course, students are given a unique opportunity to indulge in personal exploration as they complete a series of creative writing projects. Taught around the Harkness Table, the foundation for this course is laid in the first term when students delve into the art of writing personal narratives through the discussion of published and performed texts, writing exercises and workshops.  As the year unfolds, students will be challenged to build on this foundation by working on more complex projects.  The purpose of these projects is to provide students with meaningful opportunities to explore the creative process by formulating original ideas that they will develop by writing slam poetry, fantasy, poetry, short stories and scripts. This course will also include: independent reading assignments, a review of literary terms, and analytical writing units.

History 12 History 12 builds on the knowledge, skills and understanding that students have acquired through the K - 11 Social Studies curriculum. Students in History 12 concentrate on global events that have occurred between 1919 and 1991. First, students investigate the results of World War I and the growing strength of communist ideology. Secondly, they learn about the prosperity of the 1920s, the hardships of the Great Depression and the rise of communism and fascism in Europe. Thirdly, students explore the seeds of World War II and the horror inflicted on humanity by men such as Mussolini and Hitler. In addition to learning the facts about the war, students discover various political systems and the effects of technology on warfare. The post-war era (1945-1963) is the focus of the fourth unit. The tensions between democratic and communist countries during this era in history will be studied in detail. The social changes of the ’60s, conflicts in Asia and the Middle East and the implications of computer technology are topics that fill the final unit of the year. History 12 students, besides acquiring knowledge of past events, further develop research and historical writing skills that they have been learning throughout their years in Social Studies.

Advanced Placement European History AP European History is a survey course that examines modern European History from 1450 to the present. It is an exciting and challenging course for motivated students who want to learn about the events and ideas that have contributed to the basis of western society. Events and movements are explored through three themes: intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history. In addition students develop their ability to express their historical understanding in writing. A firm grounding in the strengths and weaknesses of modern Europe will prepare students to study history at the post-secondary level.

Advanced Placement Human Geography This is a full year AP Human Geography course designed to achieve a college introductory level human geography credit. The course follows the recommended units of study as outlined in the College Board AP Human Geography course description, to help students use spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine the world in which we live. Topics such as population, migration, cities, religion, agricultures, politics and economic development will be investigated.

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idea spirit voice ACT

Economics 12

Limits, derivatives, summation and integrals are examined closely and applied to the mathematical functions studied in the Pre-Calculus 11 and 12.

Economics 12 is an introductory economics course with three main purposes: one, to increase the students’ understanding of economic principles; two, to gain knowledge of the structure and operation of the Canadian economic system; three, to gain the competencies required to study economics successfully at the university level. The course is essentially divided into two sections, Microeconomics - the study of the economic actions of individuals and groups of individuals and Macroeconomics - the study of the economy as a whole. Current events are also an important part of the course and where relevant examples are used to illustrate concepts the students are studying in class.

Students planning to study mathematics at university are strongly encouraged to study calculus while in high school. There are three options of calculus available for students to choose from.

Advanced Placement Microeconomics The AP course in Microeconomics is for students interested in college- or university-level work in microeconomics and/or gaining advanced post-secondary standing. Microeconomics is a branch of economics that studies the behaviour of how individual modern households and firms make decisions to allocate limited resources. In this course you will examine how these decisions and behaviours affect the supply and demand for goods and services, which determines prices, and how prices, in turn, determine the production and availability of goods and services. Major topics include the nature of functions of product markets, factor markets and efficiency, equity, and the role of government.

Foundations of Mathematics 12 The “Foundations of Mathematics” program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of theoretical calculus. Topics include financial mathematics, logic, probability, permutations, combinations and polynomial, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator

Calculus 12 This course is a provincially based calculus course with outcomes prescribed by the Ministry of Education. Topics studied include advanced functions and number operations, limits, the derivative, differentiation techniques, logarithmic, exponential and inverse trigonometric functions, applications of the derivative, integration, area under a curve, solving first order differential equations, and the history of calculus. Students cover topics similar to those in AP Calculus AB (outlined below), but at a slower pace and in less depth. There is no provincial or other external examination for this course. Evaluation is based entirely on in-school assessments. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator Prerequisite: “B” standing or better in Pre-Calculus 11 Co-Requisite: Pre-Calculus 12

Advanced Placement Calculus (AB) AP Calculus 12 AB is a university level. Topics studied include limits, continuity, the derivative, exponential, logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions, integration, area between curves, differential equations, slope fields, and applications of differentiation and integration. This course has an external examination in May that is marked on a five point scale. Students scoring a “4” or “5” on this examination can usually obtain advanced placement in their mathematics studies at university. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator Prerequisite: “B” standing of better in Pre-Calculus 11 Co-Requisite: Pre-Calculus 12

Advanced Placement Calculus (BC)

Pre-Calculus Mathematics 12 The “Pre-Calculus Mathematics” program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of theoretical calculus. Topics include transformations, trigonometry, logarithms, polynomial, rational, radical, inverse and exponential functions, permutations, combinations and the binomial theorem. Problem solving is a major focus of the course and is integrated throughout the curriculum. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator

AP Calculus 12 BC is a rigorous university level course designed for the most capable mathematics students. AP Calculus BC contains all of the topics in AP Calculus AB, plus 40% more content. These topics include series, tests for convergence, Maclaurin and Taylor polynomials and approximations, improper integrals, l’Hopital’s rule, calculus of parametric, polar and vector functions, Euler’s Method and advanced integration techniques. This course has an external examination in May that is marked on a five point scale. Students scoring a “4” or “5” on this examination can usually obtain advanced placement in their mathematics studies at university. Calculator Needed: TI-83 series, TI-84+ or TI-84+ silver graphing calculator Prerequisite: Completion of Pre-Calculus 12 with an “A” standing or permission of the Mathematics Department

Calculus Calculus is the study of change and embraces a truly fascinating set of topics ranging from rates of change and optimization to applications of mathematical modelling with physical, social and economic situations.

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idea spirit voice ACT

Biology 12 In Biology 12 students focus on human biology. Major topics of cell biology, biochemistry and body systems provide students with a solid understanding of human anatomy and physiology. Students can extract DNA, perform urine analysis, perform enzyme catalysis and dissect a cow’s heart and foetal pig. These key lab experiences will give students a practical understanding of the scientific process, and the human body. Since the curriculum of Biology 12 is distinct from Biology 11, Biology 11 is not required as a pre-requisite for Biology 12. If a student wants to take Biology 12 in their Grade 11 year, they must have 86% or better in science 10 to be prepared for the rigor of the course.

Chemistry 12 Students who wish to pursue a career in science must be excellent researchers, problem solvers and communicators. The Chemistry 12 curriculum will help students fulfill all three of these requirements. Topics covered are kinetics, equilibrium, solubility, acids and bases and electrochemistry. Students will learn the use of technologies specific to investigative procedures. They will also learn how to represent and interpret information in graphs. Chemistry 12 is a challenging course that requires good math skills.

Advanced Placement Chemistry This course prepares students to write the College Board’s AP Chemistry exam. Students who have successfully completed the Chemistry 11AP course are eligible to continue with Chemistry 12AP. The pace of this course is rigorous, as the AP exam is in May. The topics covered include: kinetics, equilibrium, solubility, acids and bases, electrochemistry and thermodynamics. Students will also learn how to represent and interpret information in graphs. They will design procedures and conduct experiments to solve problems and interpret data to make plausible theories.

Physics 12 The first half of Physics 12 once again examines kinematics, dynamics and associated topics such as work, energy and power. In addition, circular motion, torque and equilibrium are studied. The approach is mathematically rigorous, involving two-dimensional vector analysis of situations. The second half of the year concentrates on electricity and magnetism. After a mathematical study of electrostatics, electric circuits are examined and analysed. The study of electromagnetism and electromagnetic induction conclude the course.

Advanced Placement Physics (B course)

Physics includes approximately twice as much content as the B.C. Physics 12 curriculum, with half of it matching that taught in Physics 12, AP Physics students are enrolled in Physics 12 concurrently with AP Physics in order to cover the material common to both courses. In addition, the course includes the study of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, waves and sound, geometrical and physical optics, atomic and nuclear physics, simple harmonic motion and capacitors.

French 12 Students will further develop and apply their full repertoire of languagelearning strategies to assist in comprehension and expression. They will research, analyze and use relevant information from several sources on chosen topics to complete authentic tasks. A particular emphasis is placed on spoken and written communication skills. The students are expected to interact in French effectively and with some spontaneity in situations drawn from real life. They will view, listen to, read and fully understand a variety of creative works including some short fiction and some French films and will be exposed to particular themes of interest and relevance to their experience.

AP French Language and Culture In this course students review and refine all previously learnt grammatical structures while building up their vocabulary to communicate orally and in writing. A variety of themes such as Family and Community, Science and Technology, Beauty and Aesthetics and Contemporary Life will be discussed. Students will read newspaper, magazine, and internet articles, as well as French fiction from around the francophone world. The reading component will include The Miser by Molière as well as a contemporary novel. Students will listen to and watch French news, podcasts and movies and write personal and persuasive essays drawing information from two to three sources. They will also practice composing a formal email response. Oral interpersonal and presentational communication and the study of francophone culture are other important components. This course will be conducted entirely in French, and culminates with the French Language and Culture AP exam.

Art Foundations 12 Students at this level are directed to produce work that reflects personal goals and interests in image-making. Conceptual and thematic investigations and in-depth studies are directed to meet individual student needs. The goal is for students to master various materials, processes and concepts that challenge an interest them. Students are expected to build a portfolio of work that is a reflection of a mature, motivated and skilled visual artist. It is an expectation in this course that students are intrinsically motivated to artistically develop and that they are able to approach this course in advanced and sophisticated manner to produce work of the utmost quality. Art Foundations 11 is a pre-requisite for this course.

Advanced Placement Physics gives the ambitious physics student a more complete foundation in the science of physics than Physics 12. Since AP

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idea spirit voice ACT

Instrumental Music: Concert Band 12

ICT: Computer Programming 12

Grade 12 students form the third of three grades that comprise the most significant performing ensemble at Southridge School, the Senior Concert Band. In addition to each of the Music Department concerts, this group performs at all major school events, such as the Remembrance Day service and Graduation. A high level of musical literacy is expected, as is a strong grounding in the technical aspects of playing a woodwind, brass or percussion instrument. Grade 12 students are expected to play a leadership role in their various sections and to exemplify model technique and expert musicianship.

This course provides the foundations for students interested in entering computer science courses at post secondary institutions. As well, students interested in pursuing a career in math, engineering, physics and computers would be encouraged to take this course. You will be learning to write code for all sorts of applications. The primary language covered is Java. This course is intended to allow students to become skilled problem solvers and critical thinkers. Students will learn to apply the principles of effective programming to analyze and solve problems. They will become critical and principled creators of solutions in information technology. Successful course participants will become members of a collaborative culture. Course work will require them to become skilled readers and writers of documentation associated with programming, as well as to write compiler-ready procedures and methods and to debug programming errors including logic errors.

Off-timetable, students may challenge themselves vocally or instrumentally in the choir, the senior vocal ensemble (auditioned) and either the Intermediate or Senior Jazz Ensemble.

Media Arts 12 Media Arts 12 is an advanced course. Drawing upon and developing their existing skill set, students are able to work independently, or as independent production units, and select between multiple types of projects and genres according to their interest. While the majority of the course is independent work, students are also given opportunities to examine career paths in Media Arts. Students who wish to take the course who have not taken Media Arts 11 need to obtain permission from the instructor.

Theatre Performance 12 Theatre Studies 12 further allows students to explore a variety of dramatic forms and theatre styles from the twentieth century to expand and enrich their learning, as they specialize in areas of interest (performance or production). Â Students at this level are expected to provide leadership roles in class and in the major school production. A high level of motivation, enthusiasm, skill and interest in the dramatic arts is required to achieve success in this course. Participation in the major school production of the year is expected. Units of study may include: Improvisation, Physical Theatre, Voice Production, Musical Theatre, Mask Studies, and One Act Plays for Performance. The emphasis is on refining performance skills; however, character analysis and reflection, classic and contemporary play analysis, and play reviews comprise the theory portion of this course. There will be a particular focus on specific acting methodologies. Students enrolling in this course should not apply for a student exchange in the second term as this will conflict with performance dates.

Physical Education 12 Physical Education 12 provides opportunities for students to experience a variety of recreational pursuits, career interests and activities toward healthy living. Students may design an individual fitness and nutrition plan, and will explore the recreational infrastructure of their community. They may also complete professional certification in coaching, officiating or first aid.

Graduation Transitions Grade 12 students make decisions about and complete applications for post-secondary programs. They research the financial details of these choices, update their resumes and complete scholarship applications. Each student is assigned a post-secondary academic counsellor. They continue to play a major leadership role in the school while actively employing their time-management and goal-setting skills.

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Southridge Senior School Curriculum Guide