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VOL. 3 / ISSUE 3 / JANUARY 2016

IN THIS ISSUE OF SOUTHLAKE ARTS

06 Publisher’s Letter 10 Events Calendar COMMUNITY

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13 Art Gallery Open in Town Square! FINE ART

18 Caillebotte & Castiglione FINE ART

21 Jackson Pollock: Blind Spots SCIENCE

24 Creatures of Light 13

HISTORY

27 Stories, Stories Everywhere DESIGN

29 Designing the Texas Almanac PHOTOGRAPHY

32 Beautiful City This month’s cover features a fantastic painting by Lamberto™ for the cover of the Texas Almanac. See more on page 29.

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

We always strive to promote the exhibits that our world-class museums bring through. This month, we have a handful of exhibits for you to go see! These are wonderful weekend trips to take your kids to, soak up some culture and get out of the bubble for an afternoon. At the Kimbell, we have the Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte and the Italian draftsman Castiglione. At the DMA there is an edgy Pop art exhibit and a wonderful presentation of Jackson Pollock. Pollock was referred to as “the most significant artist of our time since Picasso” - Peggy Guggenheim. Be sure not to miss the Bioluminescent creatures of light exhibit at the Perot! Those of you with young children will love visiting the Perot and enjoying the food trucks at Klyde Warren Park.

In this issue we have our very own Lamberto™ who did the cover for Texas Almanac this year, the Blue Pomegranate has opened in Town Square, and Apex has several events in January and February. Be sure to mark your calendars! Enjoy the issue.

David Hall David@SouthlakeArts.com


The Arts provide a vital economic engine for Texas, and help ensure

A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE FOR STUDENTS.

The Arts generate $5.1 BILLION for our state’s economy now & prepare students to be key contributors to our economy in the future. Students who complete more arts classes have up to 15% HIGHER

PASS RATES on standardized tests than students with fewer arts classes.

The Arts contribute nearly

$320 MILLION in state

sales tax revenue annually.

At-risk high school students who complete more than one art class are

HALF AS LIKELY to drop out.

GIUSEPPE PENONE

BEING THE RIVER, REPEATING THE FOREST

80% OF TEXAS VOTERS

support increased funding for The Arts in schools.

SEPTEMBER 19 / JANUARY 10

Texas Cultural Trust

INVEST IN THE ARTS. THE ARTS PERFORM. Learn more at txculturaltrust.org/investinthearts

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Official Car

Giuseppe Penone: Being the River, Repeating the Forest is organized by the Nasher Sculpture Center and supported by Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger. Additional support provided by Texas Commission on the Arts. TCT-001-Push-Card-Back-DEVr1.indd 1

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EVENTS CALENDAR MUSIC FWSO: BEETHOVEN’S EROICA Bass Hall January 1st-10th FWSO: POKEMON SYMPHONY Bass Hall January 2nd DSO: CIRQUE DU SYMPHONY Winspear Opera House January 2nd-3rd DSO: VIVALDI FOUR SEASONS Orchestra Hall January 7th DSO: CLASSIC BROADWAY! Orchestra Hall January 8th-10th PAT GREEN Billy Bob’s January 9th MOTOWN THE MUSICAL Bass Hall January 13th-17th MACKLEMORE Winstar January 15th TOOL Verizon Theater January 17th FWSO: A NIGHT AT THE OSCARS Bass Hall January 22nd-24th SARAH JAFFE Dan’s Silverleaf January 23rd & 24th

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JANET JACKSON American Airlines Center January 24th

GEORGE THOROGOOD Majestic Theater March 1st

DSO: GERSHWIN Winspear Opera House January 24th-27th

DSO: BACH & BEYOND Winspear Opera House March 3rd-6th

LYNARD SKYNARD Winstar January 29th

EXPERIENCE HENDRIX FESTIVAL Verizon Theater March 3rd-27th

BRANFORD MARSALIS Dallas City Performance Hall February 4th THE KILLDARES The Kessler February 5th JOSHUA BELL Bass Hall February 6th TURNPIKE TROUBADOURS Billy Bob’s February 6th DSO: WEST SIDE STORY Winspear Opera House February 12th-14th HILLSONG UNITED American Airlines Center February 19th DSO: TCHAIKOVSKY CONCERTO 1 Winspear Opera House February 25th-28th DIANA ROSS Winstar February 26th APEX JAZZ FESTIVAL White’s Chapel February 27th

RIHANNA American Airlines Center March 6th GARY CLARK, JR House of Blues March 6th JOE SATRIANI Majestic Theater March 9th DSO: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES Winspear Opera House March 11th-13th HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL Majestic Theater April 2nd THE FUNKY KNUCKLES Sundown at Granada Every Monday OPEN MIC The Burger Shack Tuesdays JAZZ IN THE ATRIUM Dallas Museum of Art Thursday’s 6-8pm

ART TREASURES FROM THE HOUSE OF ALBA Meadows Museum Through January 3rd GIUSEPPE PENONE: BEING THE RIVER, REPEATING THE FOREST Nasher Sculpture Center Through January 10th KEHINDE WILEY: A NEW REPUBLIC The Modern Through January 10th INTERNATIONAL POP Dallas Museum of Art Through January 17th TIME & ETERNITY: BIRESWAR SEN The Crow Collection January 23rd - April 24th GLENN KAINO The Modern January 30th - April 17th SPIRIT & MATTER: ISLAMIC ART Dallas Museum of Art Through July 31st POLAR OBSESSION Irving Arts Center Through January 31st ALEX ISRAEL Nasher Sculpture Center Through January 31st JOYCE PENSATO The Modern Through January 31st


CHALET DALLAS Nasher Sculpture Center Through February 7th

BENEVOLENCE & WISDOM The Crow Collection Through August 16th

GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE: THE PAINTER’S EYE The Kimbell Museum of Art Through February 14th

TEXAS FOLK ART Amon Carter Through September 19th

NS HARSHA Dallas Museum of Art Through February 14th CASTIGLIONE: LOST GENIUS The Kimbell Art Museum Through February 14th APEX: THE STROKES OF ART IN THE SQUARE Town Hall February 21st TALES FROM THE AMERICAN WEST Amon Carter Through February 21st BLIND SPOTS: JACKSON POLLOCK Dallas Museum of Art Through March 20th ALEXANDER GORLIZKI: VARIABLE DIMENSIONS The Crow Collection Through March 20th BLACK SHEEP FEMINISM Dallas Contemporary Through March 20th FUNDAMENTAL & SUPERFLUOUS The Crow Collection Through August 16th

KIDS APEX: PETER & THE WOLF White’s Chapel January 17th SCHOOL HOUSE ROCK Casa Mañana February 5th-21st SALZBURG MARIONETTE THEATER Bass Hall February 7th SESAME STREET LIVE Verizon Theater February 19th-26th CREATURES OF LIGHTS Perot Museum Through February DALLAS OPERA: ROSSINI & COMPANY Winspear Opera House Through March 13th CRITTER KINGDOM Fort Worth Museum of Science Ongoing AMAZING ANIMALS Perot Museum Ongoing TARGET FIRST SATURDAYS Nasher Sculpture Center First Saturdays

COMMUNITY APEX: MARQ DEBUT The Marq January 23rd FORT WORTH OPERA IN SOUTHLAKE White’s Chapel March 10th FOOD TRUCKS & LIVE MUSIC Grapevine Craft Brewery Weekends

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SOUTHLAKE ARTS CREATIVE TEAM Publisher & Creative Director

DAVID HALL Senior Art Consultant

LAMBERTO™ Graphic Designer

NICK SCHAIDER Copy Editor

WENDY O’HEARN

TITAS: BODYTRAFFIC Winspear Opera House January 22nd

Writers

TITAS: CLOUD GATE Winspear Opera House February 5th

Columnist

BLUE MAN GROUP Bass Hall February 19th-21st TITAS: MR. & MME. REVE Dallas City Performance Hall March 18th-19th

FOOD WINE & CHOCOLATE TASTING Messina Hof Winery 1st Wednesday of the Month WINE & CHEESE Messina Hof Winery 2nd Wednesday of the Month FOOD TRUCKS Klyde Warren Park Daily

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CONTACT INFO 630 E. Southlake Blvd. #61 Southlake, TX 76092 (817) 703-3205

SOUTHLAKEARTS.com

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COMMUNITY

ART GALLERY OPEN IN TOWN SQUARE!

The BLUE POMEGRANATE GALLERY has opened in Town Square displaying American Handmade Fine Art and Gifts for us to behold! Blue Pomegranate curates a unique brand of uplifting original artwork from American artists, with an emphasis on local art (I’ve heard whispers of who will be displayed there, you’ll have to go see for yourself!). Blue Pomegranate represents more than 100 local and national artists, sculptors and jewelers. Go discover their unique American handmade fine art, fine crafts, sculpture, jewelry, ornaments, wearables, garden art and gifts! Blue Pomegranate Gallery was founded in 2001 by two Nebraska artists. In 2009, one

of those artists, Sondra Gerber, became sole owner and began to focus on quality, American handmade, original artwork and gifts that are created in the artists’ studios, with an emphasis on local and regional art. Over the past 15 years, Blue Pomegranate has continued to grow in notoriety, quality and sales in Omaha, Nebraska, where Gerber and her husband, Jason, call home. The Gerbers are excited to share their dream and vision of American handmade Fine Art and Gifts with Texas! Gallery Hours are Monday through Saturday from 10:00am to 7:00pm and Sunday from 12:00pm to 5:00pm.

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Gustave Caillebotte - The Floor Scrapers, 1875 Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione - The Nativity with Angels, c. 1655

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Caillebotte & Castiglione A master Impressionist and master draftsman on loan at the Kimbell. Can you pronounce their names? By now you’ve probably seen the ad for the Kimbell where they interview folks and have them try to pronounce Caillebotte’s name! Until February you have the opportunity to go see both exhibits of Gustave Caillebotte (1848-1894) & Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione (on loan from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II mind you). Both are wonderful exhibits to go visit!

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FINE ART

Clockwise from top left - Roses, Garden at Petit Gennevilliers, 1886; Prairie in Yerres, 1875; The House Painters, 1877; A Boating Party, 1877–78.

Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione - Circe with the Companions of Odysseus Transformed into Animals, c. 1650

GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE

CASTIGLIONE: LOST GENIUS

“Although Caillebotte’s (pronounced Ky-Bot) name may be unfamiliar to many, his works are among the most recognizable in the Impressionist movement,” commented Eric M. Lee, director of the Kimbell Art Museum. This exhibition intimately explores the multifaceted genius that is Caillebotte. The lovers of Impressionism who come to this show will never, ever, forget who Caillebotte is.”

Despite his impetuous, unpredictable behavior, which ultimately thwarted his ambitions, Castiglione was arguably the most innovative and technically brilliant Italian draftsman of his time. The British Royal Collection holds the finest surviving group of his work, and this exhibition aims to reinstate the 17th-century master as one of the greatest graphic artists of the Baroque.

Caillebotte’s aesthetic speaks directly to modern urbanites, particularly “Castiglione was a remarkably original draftsman whose virtuoso works in the large-scale paintings of city streets that record the radically on paper will captivate our visitors,” commented Eric M. Lee, director renovated Paris of the 1860s & 1870s. The exhibit explores the of the Kimbell Art Museum. “We are honored to display these inquisitive, experimental, almost fearless vision that inspired extraordinary drawings and prints by this forgotten master from the Caillebotte’s masterworks. More than 50 of his strongest paintings unparalleled holdings of the Royal Collection.” Born in Genoa, Italy, illustrate the fertile period from 1875 to 1885 when he was most closely Castiglione built his early reputation on his depictions of charming allied with the Impressionists. pastoral scenes. His career led him to Rome, Florence, Naples, Venice and finally Mantua, bringing him into contact with the works of artists “Unlike his friends Monet, Degas, and Renoir, Caillebotte is hard to see from all over Europe such as Poussin and Rembrandt. From them, he in American museums,” said exhibition co-curator George T.M. absorbed a variety of styles and motifs that he adapted into his own Shackelford, the Kimbell’s deputy director. “There’s nowhere you can go distinct manner. and see more than a couple of his paintings at a time. So the opportunity to see so many of his greatest works at once - and more than 60% of However much of what is known about him comes not from his artworks, the works we’re showing come from private collectors -is one that’s but from the court papers documenting his acts of violence, possibly not to be missed. It’s unlikely to happen again for another generation.” even murder (GASP!). His violent and erratic character ultimately drove away his patrons and cost him an enduring place in art history.

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Jackson Pollock, n.d. Photograph by Hans Namuth. Courtesy Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona. © 1991 Hans Namuth Estate

FINE ART

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART TO PRESENT

Jackson Pollock: Blind Spots The Dallas Museum of Art presents what experts have deemed a “once in a lifetime” exhibition, organized by the DMA’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Gavin Delahunty: the largest survey of Jackson Pollock’s black paintings ever assembled. On view at the DMA through March 20, 2016, the exhibition will receive its sole US presentation in Dallas, with more than 70 works, including paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints. southlake ARTS

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FINE ART DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART TO PRESENT

The exhibition will first introduce audiences to Pollock’s work via a selection of his classic drip paintings made between 1947 and 1950, including Number 2, 1950, a work from the Harvard Art Museums’ collection that has not traveled in over 20 years. These works will serve to contextualize the radical departure represented by the black paintings, a series of black enamel paintings that Pollock created between 1951 and 1953. An unprecedented 31 black paintings will be included in the DMA presentation, nearly double the next largest survey of these works (which was presented at the Museum of Modern Art in 1967). “While several of Jackson Pollock’s contemporaries combined black and white, his black paintings were exceptional in their absolute merging of color and surface, which went over and above what Pollock himself had previously achieved; this is a crucial difference for many contemporary artists revisiting Pollock’s work today,” said Delahunty. “Through a comprehensive display of more than 70 works, the exhibition offers the opportunity to address ‘blind spots’ in the current understanding of the artist’s practice, offering a new perspective on his lasting contributions to post-war and contemporary art. “As one of the first American museums to acquire Pollock’s work, it only is fitting that the DMA should present this definitive exhibition of the black paintings, engaging a new generation of audiences with this important and under-examined aspect of the artist’s practice,” Delahunty concluded.

Clockwise from top left - Untitled, c. 1949–50, Painted terracotta; Echo: Number 25, 1951, 1951, Enamel on canvas; Untitled, 1951, Ink on Japanese paper

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Jackson Pollock, 1950. Photograph by Hans Namuth. Courtesy Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona. © 1991 Hans Namuth Estate

Jackson Pollock: Blind Spots


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ART


SCIENCE

EXPLORE EARTH’S EXTRAORDINARY LUMINOUS LIFE FORMS IN

CREATURES OF LIGHT: NATURE’S BIOLUMINESCENCE

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From replicas of flickering fireflies and glowing mushrooms to vampire squid and alien-like deep-sea fish, visitors will learn how and why nature’s fascinating light-emitting creatures are able to survive and thrive. Twinkling isn’t just for the stars. From glowing mushrooms and larvae to vampire squid and fluorescent corals, Earth is full of fascinating organisms that radiate light. Bioluminescence – the ability to generate light through a chemical reaction – is one of nature’s most beautiful phenomena that a variety of creatures use to fight for survival. Through Feb. 21st, Creatures of Light: Nature’s Bioluminescence will take visitors on a mesmerizing stroll through the world of living light at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. “Bioluminescence is one of the most brilliant and confounding mysteries of the natural world,” said Colleen Walker, the Eugene McDermott Chief Executive Officer of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. “The Creatures of Light exhibition gives visitors a

fascinating look at the unique ways creatures use light adaptions to survive in the world’s darkest ecosystems, from the deepest oceans to the blackest skies.” Creatures of Light explores Earth’s extraordinary organisms that produce light, from the flickering fireflies found in backyards around the world to the glowing deep-sea fish and other fantastic creatures that illuminate the perpetually dark depths of the oceans. Guests will move through a series of re-created environments to explore extraordinary bioluminescent organisms. The exhibition includes six immersive environment s, from re - created Nor th American forests filled with fireflies and glowing jack-o-lantern mushrooms, to the inside of a simulated mysterious New Zealand cave, where glowworms drop sticky “fishing lines”– bioluminescent gnat larvae – from the ceiling to trap prey. Guests also can experience the sparkling sea of Mosquito Bay on Puerto Rico’s Vieques Island, home to high concentrations of microscopic dinoflagellates

that create a glowing halo around anything that moves through the water. Visitors can explore the sunless, pitch-black deep ocean, which comprises the vast majority of the planet’s habitable space and discover how its creatures use light to travel, hunt, mate and even fight off predators. The ability to glow is much more common in the ocean, where up to 90 percent of animals at depths below 2,300 feet are bioluminescent and where scientists continue to discover bizarre new light-emitting species. Like the crystal jelly, whose glow led to a revolution in cell biology, these deep-ocean animals may hold important clues to essential questions. Creatures of Light also points out that marine habitats are increasingly threatened by pollution, overfishing and global climate change. Many organisms are in danger of disappearing, some even before they have been discovered and studied. The exhibition includes a theater of underwater footage revealing the diversity of animals that marine southlake ARTS

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SCIENCE

CREATURES OF LIGHT: NATURE’S BIOLUMINESCENCE biologists have captured on camera, including a jellyfish that lights up like a flashing pinwheel when threatened and a viperfish whose fangs are so long they don’t fit inside its head. Large-scale models of a diverse array of deep-sea creatures bring to life dramatic interactions between bioluminescent predators and prey. Examples include a female anglerfish with her own built-in fishing rod, and a modified fin spine topped with a lure that pulses with bacterial light and attracts prey to her gaping jaws; and a vampire squid that waves bioluminescent arm tips to confuse its attacker long enough for it to get away. To enhance the enlightening experience, guests can decode a firefly’s language of light with a “talk to fireflies” hands-on interactive, explore the neon shades of fluorescent coral and fishes found in the Bloody Bay Wall, and even view live flashlight fish. Throughout the exhibition, iPads featuring videos, photographs and more will deepen the experience and teach guests about the diversity of bioluminescence.

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HISTORY

Stories, Stories Everywhere. by Anita Robeson and Connie Cooley

The Southlake Historical Society invites you to tell a story about life in Southlake. It doesn’t have to be long or monumental. Read on for details. But first, a story:

Lance Hight, John King, Matt Lafavers, Keith Fuller, and Tim Bock were Carroll football players in the 1980s. While researching the book “Southlake Carroll Dragon Football,” we met to talk football. But they couldn’t resist telling me what Southlake was like when they were teens. Fellow football player Tim Burgess had deep roots in the area. His grandfather used to be the trash man in Southlake, LaFavers recalled. “He drove around in an old 1950 Chevrolet pickup pulling a trailer that was the converted bed of another truck,” Bock added. In the bed of the converted trailer, Mr. Burgess would stand a 55-gallon drum that he used for collecting and sometimes burning the trash. It was not uncommon to see his truck go by with the drum ablaze. Mr. Burgess, thought by the group to have been in his late 80s, didn’t equivocate when it came to politics. If someone’s politics didn’t agree with his, the story goes, he took things into his own hands. Hight remembers: “My dad said that we had a political sign in our yard for somebody that Mr. Burgess didn’t like. So he just quit picking up our trash.” Read more stories on our website, www.southlakehistory.org; click Tell Us Your Story at the top right of the page. Add your story about life in Southlake. Southlake Arts Magazine will reprint some of the stories throughout the year.

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SouthlakeArts.com


DESIGN

DESIGNING THE TEXAS ALMANAC The design of a book cover, on top of the book itself, is a job that requires vision, planning, styling, typography, execution, and final preparation for production. It’s a job for someone with extensive experience, dedication, and strict discipline in every aspect of publishing. It’s a job that in most publishing companies would be done by a team of designers, art directors, writers, editors, and graphic artists. In the right atmosphere, that is what it takes to create a great book, especially a historic book — with much time and effort involved from a staff of professionals. However, in some cases, a book as complex as the Texas Almanac does not come with the luxury of a full staff. The message I would like to deliver is that as a journalist myself, I have seen the Texas Almanac develop and be transformed from a black-andwhite book into a well-respected historical and visually stunning book. And it’s all Texan! Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor of the Texas Almanac, is for the most part responsible for every phase of this extraordinary book, which was first published in 1857 and gives incredible information about “all things Texan.” In its November issue, Texas Monthly covered the new edition — the Texas Almanac 2016–2017 — and in its headline called it the “Google of Texas,” a monumental compliment. Elizabeth, who also happens to be my wife, really surprises me, in many ways, as to the extent of her knowledge in publishing. Not

only is she the final editor for content, she also has taken on the roles of designer, art director, photo researcher, stylist, writer, and content manager of this 752-page book, executed entirely in color, a decision she made in 2004. Elizabeth now offices in our Southlake home and has an office in Austin, as well, where the Texas State Historical Association now resides, after having been on the University of North Texas campus for more than 6 years. After moving her office to Southlake, I had the opportunity to see her perform her mammoth job right on deadline for the new edition. You see, I have had the privilege of creating the art for the covers of two editions — this new edition and the Texas Almanac 2012–2013, which showcased Willie Nelson. Both art pieces were paintings created on canvas. The new edition has a wine and food theme, which the cover needed to reflect. When the

decision was made that I would be illustrating the cover, Elizabeth began to dream about the vision. She drew a simple pencil sketch, about which, even today, we both chuckle over the accuracy of the sketch to the final cover design. As an illustration director and senior illustrator for many powerful newspapers and publishing companies, I am used to working with sketches that are the “germ” of an idea. Without sketches, I can get the impression of an idea verbally, but a sketch always helps. Elizabeth, who at the time also had the job of setting up her office at home, including connecting to email, a remote server, a printer and scanner, etc., went through the process of styling a photo shoot for the Almanac’s cover in our dining room, using the right plate, fork, spoon, knife, and napkin from her arsenal of tableware. I photographed the setting and, from her sketch, knew exactly what she was envisioning. southlake ARTS

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DESIGN

The book has just been released, and already it’s getting great reviews everywhere it’s seen. The book, which contains entertaining feature articles, along with much historical, geographical, and statistical information, is revised and completely re-designed every two years, the time necessary to acquire all this information. Not only does this edition included feature articles on Lone Star Cuisine and Texas Wine Country, Elizabeth also wrote a compelling article about Assault, the King Ranch thoroughbred who suffered a near-fatal hoof injury as a foal but went on to win the 1946 Triple Crown — the only Texas horse to achieve such a feat! But writing a feature article is only a small part of her job. I have actually been caught saying that Elizabeth’s job is like “rocket science” to me, and I consider myself a not-so-ignorant human being. Seriously, her job is incredibly complex. I still remember when she was hired as editor for the Texas Almanac in 2002. She was chosen from a field of more than 100 candidates, and then-editor, Mary Ramos, exclaimed that she was absolutely the “benchmark” for the position. She had years of experience in the newspaper and book publishing worlds, along with a keen artistic sense and creative drive to make things appealing. She keeps pushing the envelope and even as this new book is being touted as the most beautiful, colorful, and best of all, she is already dreaming of how to top this one with the next. In the evening when we are strolling through the park, her eyes are constantly looking at the sky, the placement of the planets, and the scheduling of their placement. I, personally, have always been fascinated with astronomy because during my childhood, my father and I would lie on the hood of his car in the evening and watch the constellations, stars, and planets. It was an experience I will never forget. And now, as I do the same thing with my wife, she explains these nightly occurrences with a

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more educated eye and point of view, which amazes me to no end. You see, one of her jobs as Almanac editor is to calculate a two-year astronomical calendar for each edition. I wish my father could listen to her observations now, as he would have been just as fascinated. If you have ever listened to StarDate on the radio, well, I get that first hand, only better, and things make more sense to me now. Elizabeth puts the Texas Almanac together to be a constant educational resource for students, academics, business people, travelers, and the media, who often depend on the content she gathers to accurately develop their stories. With the help of an associate editor, Robert Plocheck, the Texas Almanac has been transformed from a black-and-white publication in 2004 into a piece of art. Every page is engaging, and although inmates in prison don’t have access to this great book (because of map detail and accuracy, the

Almanac is banned as “escape paraphernalia”), everyone who has bought a copy of this book realizes it’s a keeper. Some of my associates and friends are now trying to put together the entire collection — as far as they can go! This practice of collaborating with Elizabeth to create the Almanac’s cover has given me a glimpse into the publishing world again, and I appreciate the complexity involved in creating such a great reference book of information about Texas. So, enjoy and use the Texas Almanac as you travel throughout our state, finding new paths to your destinations and seeing the state from a different perspective. Enjoy the book, which, through every edition Elizabeth has created, turned into a work of art and love. The late hours of work and all the sweat and tears and effort have proven to be worth it. Happy New Year to everyone! Lamberto™


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STICKS OUT by Nelly Cuanalo

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Southlake Arts - January 2016  

Southlake Arts Magazine January 2016 Issue

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