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Recent SOLDS Recent ProducedSOLDS Over

Produced Over $20 Million in 2014 to Date $20 Million in 2014 to Date

1260 Stanhope Ct | Southlake UNDER CONTRACT 1260 Stanhope Ct | Southlake Listed forCONTRACT $995,000 UNDER

Southlake | SOLD | $2,000,000 Listed for $995,000

405 Mesa Ranch Court | Southlake

1310 Casa Bella Ct | Westlake | UNDER CONTRACT | Listed| for $1,849,000 PENDING $1,249,380 1310 Casa Bella Ct | Westlake | UNDER CONTRACT | Listed for $1,849,000

3000 BurneyPark | Southlake | $4,995,000 2112 Cheyenne Ln | Southlake | $1,255,000 2112 Cheyenne Park Ln | Southlake | $1,255,000

620 SouthviewTrail, Trail,Southlake Southlake | Buyer 620 Southview | Buyer 565 Baverton Lane, Fortworth | | Contract 565 Baverton Lane, Fortworth Contract Pending| | Buyer Buyer 620 Southview Trail, Southlake | Buyer Pending 1780Baverton Terra Drive, Westlake 1780 Terra Bella Bella Drive, Westlake |Buyer Buyerand andSeller Seller| Buyer 565 Lane, Fortworth ||Contract Pending 3429 Hanover Street, University Park| Buyer | Seller 3429 Hanover | Seller 1780 Terra BellaStreet, Drive,University Westlake Park and Seller 3513 Matador Ranch Road, Southlake | Buyer and Seller 3513 Matador Ranch Road, Southlake |Seller Buyer and Seller 3429 Hanover Street, University Park | 2106 Falcon Pass, Westlake | Buyer 2106 Falcon Pass, Westlake | Buyer 3513 Matador Ranch Road, Southlake 9732 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | Seller| Buyer and Seller 9732 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth 2106 Falcon Pass, Westlake | Seller Buyer| Seller 1209 Wellington Drive, Keller| 1209 Wellington Keller| 722 Portofino Place,Drive, Southlake | Seller Buyer 9732 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | Seller 200 King RanchPlace, Road, Southlake Seller 722 Portofino Southlake | Buyer 1209 Wellington Drive, Keller| |Seller 505 King Ranch Road, Southlake || Buyer Buyer 200 King Ranch Road, Southlake | Sellerand Seller 722 Portofino Place, Southlake 13748 Ranch Horse Run, Fort Worth |Seller Sellerand Seller 505 200 King Ranch Road, Southlake | Buyer 1836 Laurel Valley Drive, Keller | Buyer 13748 Ranch Horse Run, Fort Worth | Seller 505 Road, Southlake | Buyer and Seller 2208King Alisa Ranch Lane, Trophy Club | Buyer 1836 Laurel Valley Drive, Keller | Buyer 13748 Ranch Horse Run, Fort Worth | Seller 2810 Waverly Drive, Trophy Club | Buyer 2208 Alisa Lane, Trophy Club | Buyer 1836 Laurel Valley Drive, Keller ||Buyer 6901 Sir Spencer Court, Colleyville Seller 2810 Waverly Drive, Trophy | Buyer 304 King Ranch Road, Southlake | Buyer 2208 Alisa Lane, Trophy ClubClub | Buyer 2000 Estes ParkDrive, Drive, Southlake | |Seller 6901 Sir Spencer Court, Colleyville | Seller 2810 Waverly Trophy Club Buyer 1400King Tippler Drive,Road, Arlington | Seller| Buyer 304 Ranch Southlake 6901 Sir Spencer Court, Colleyville | Seller 9645 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | Seller Seller 2000 EstesRanch Park Drive, 304 King Road, Southlake | Buyer 1017 Whittington Place, Southlake| Seller | Seller 1400 Tippler Drive, Arlington 2000 EstesBella Park Drive, Southlake | Seller 1655 Terra Drive, Westlake | Seller 9645 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | Seller 1400 Tippler Drive, Arlington | Seller 1635 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | Seller 1017 Whittington Place, Southlake Seller 9645 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | |Seller 646 Castle Rock Drive, Southlake | Buyer 1655 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | Seller 1741 Woodhill Court, Bedford | Seller 1017 Whittington Place, Southlake | Seller 1801 Lantana Court, Southlake | Seller 1635 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | Seller 1655 9653Castle Ben Lane, Worth |||Seller Seller 646 Rock Southlake Buyer 1635 TerraHogan Bella Drive, Drive,Fort Westlake 3316 Chadwell Drive, Farmers Branch | Seller 1741 Woodhill | Seller 646 Castle RockCourt, Drive,Bedford Southlake | Buyer 2561 Waterway Drive, Grand Prairie | Seller 1801 Lantana Court, Seller 1741 Woodhill Court,Southlake Bedford | |Seller 1212 Westwood Drive, Keller | Buyer 9653 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort Worth | Seller Pending | Buyer 1801 Lantana Court, Southlake | 14500 Seventeen Lakes, Roanoke | Seller Contract 12256 Indian Creek, Fort Worth | Contract 9653 Ben Hogan Lane, Fort | Seller Pending | Seller 8965 Riscky Trail, Fort Worth |Worth Buyer 3316 Chadwell Drive, Farmers Branch | Seller 309 Rawhide Keller |Worth Contract Pending | Buyer | Seller 12256 IndianPath, Creek, Fort | Contract Pending 824 Orleans Drive,Drive, Southlake | Prairie Contract 2561 Waterway Drive, Grand | Seller 3316 Chadwell Farmers Branch |Pending Seller | Buyer 3608 Sunrise Ranch Road,Grand Southlake | |Contract 1212 Westwood Drive, Keller | Buyer 2561 Waterway Drive, Prairie Seller Pending | Seller 1695 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | Seller 14500 SeventeenDrive, Lakes,Keller Roanoke | Contract Pending | Buyer 1212 Westwood | Buyer 1517 Golf ClubTrail, Drive, Argyle | | Contract Pending | Buyer 8965 Riscky Fort Worth Buyer 14500 Seventeen Lakes, Roanoke | Contract Pending 2125 Silver Sage Court, Keller | Contract Pending | Buyer| Buyer 309 Rawhide Path, Keller | Contract Pending | Buyer 8965 Riscky Trail, Fort Worth | Buyer 1575 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | Buyer and Seller 824 Southlake | Contract Pending | Buyer 309 Rawhide Path, KellerSouthlake | Contract |Pending Buyer 1016Orleans DiamondDrive, Boulevard, | Pending Contract | Seller 3608 SunriseDrive, Ranch Road, 824 Southlake Pending 3017Orleans Veranda Vista, Fort WorthSouthlake || Contract Contract| Contract Pending Pending || Buyer Buyer | Seller 4921 Broiles Court, Keller | Southlake Buyer | Seller 1695 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake 3608 Sunrise Ranch Road, | Contract Pending | Seller 1260 Stanhope Court | Argyle Contract Pending | Seller | Buyer 1517 Golf Club Drive, | Contract 1695 Terra Bella Drive, Westlake | SellerPending 1310 Casa Bella Court, Southlake | Contract Pending| Buyer | Seller 1517 Golf Club Drive, Argyle | Contract Pending

405 Mesa Ranch Road, Southlake | Contract Pending | Seller

405 Mesa Ranch Ct | Southlake | $1,249,380 505 Private Road 2892 | Sunset, TX | $2,995,000 405 Mesa Ranch Ct | Southlake | $1,249,380


Hall Music

PRODUCTIONS

LOVE MUSIC? TAKE LESSONS. REGISTER NOW FOR FALL LESSONS (817) 703-3205 // HallMusicProductions.com


VOL. 1 / ISSUE 11 / SEPTEMBER 2014

IN THIS ISSUE OF SOUTHLAKE ARTS

26 Leonardo’s 7 Principles

10 Events Calendar

34 Upcycled Art

FILM

14 Get on Up PHOTOGRAPHY

16 A Small World ARTS CHAT

20 Arts Chat with Mitch Hagy 6

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VISUAL ART

08 Publisher’s Letter

southlake ARTS

VISUAL ART

VISUAL ART

36 100 years of Chanel DANCE

38 Lovett + More

VISUAL ART

41 Talley Dunn FOOD

43 Dallas Chocolate Festival FOOD

47 The Italian Sub FOOD

48 Southlake Arts Beer Picks


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

The Masters

When we first started this magazine, education and the elevation of culture were the driving forces behind all of our activity. We first touched on this with Tchaikovsky last December and have been waiting for a relevant time to bring another master to be featured. With the arrival of Leonardo Da Vinci’s horse to Southlake, we thought what better time to feature Leonardo’s Seven Principles for creative thought!

With the passing of the master of modern dance Bruce Wood, his company presses on. For those of you who are dancers and fans of dance, be sure to catch BWDP’s Lovett + More, performed with live music in conjunction with the DSO! There are two noteworthy exhibitions this month worth visiting. First, The Giddens Gallery in Grapevine has a wonderful new exhibit entitled Upcycled Art. It is a collection of local artists that use non-standard mediums for expression! Included in the exhibition is Cynthia Medavich’s Chanel series. Be sure to stop by on Main Street Grapevine to have a look! Secondly, the Talley Dunn Gallery in Dallas has an exhibition from Sonny Burt and Robert Butler. Burt & Butler were patrons of the arts for years in DFW. They’d buy pieces from $75 to $75,000, whatever interested them. With their passing they have bequeathed their entire collection to Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing Arts. All proceeds from the sale of the work goes to the school. Photography has a showing as well this month! Bruce Rosenstiel brings us his “Water Drops” series and Mitch Hagy shows us how the arts and sports can work together. As always, have a look at the calendar. There is a lot to do this month! Enjoy the issue.

David Hall

David@SouthlakeArts.com

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EVENTS CALENDAR MUSIC LET’S DANCE! : DSO September 5th-7th ATT PAC FWSO: STAR WARS & BEYOND September 5th-7th Bass Hall ARETHA FRANKLIN September 6th ATT PAC ME & MY MONKEY September 11th Austin Street Plaza FWSO: BEETHOVEN’S TRIPLE CONCERTO September 12th-14th Bass Hall CONCERT IN THE PARK ACOUSTIC SHADE September 13th BOWLING FOR SOUP September 13th Grapevine DSO GALA September 13th ATT PAC LITTLE MIX September 16th Verizon NASHER ‘TIL MIDNIGHT: GOODNIGHT NED September 19th Nasher Sculpture Center

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YOUSSOU N’DOUR IN CONCERT September 19th ATT PAC DSO MAHLER 9 September 19th-21st ATT PAC LUKE BRYAN September 20th Gexa Energy Pavilion EMPTY POCKETS September 25th Austin Street Plaza HILARY HAHN PERFORMS BEETHOVEN September 25th-28th ATT PAC TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS September 26th-October 19th American Airlines Center CHRIS THILE & EDGAR MEYER September 26th Bass Hall JETHRO TULL September 23rd ATT PAC

EMMANUEL AX October 2nd-5th ATT PAC KATY PERRY + TEEGAN & SARA October 2nd, 3rd American Airlines Center JAZZ IN THE ATRIUM Thursdays Dallas Museum of Art

DANCE AVANT CHAMBER BALLET September 6th Meyerson Symphony Center MOMIX September 12th-13th ATT PAC BRUCE WOOD DANCE PROJECT September 13th & 14th Lovett + More SPECTRUM DANCE COMPANY

September 29th ATT PAC

THEATRE

THE PIANO GUYS September 25th ATT PAC

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF September 5th-14th Lyric Stage

CLIBURN : BEATRICE RANA, PIANO September 30th Bass Hall

ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW September 11th - October 19th Wyly

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS October 3rd-5th Zilker Park

NICE WORK IF YOU CAN GET IT September 16th-21st Bass Hall

DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER RAPUNZEL! RAPUNZEL! September 19th THE SOUND OF MUSIC September 20th-28th Casa Manana DETROIT Premiers September 27th Kitchen Dog Theater

FILM KEN BURNS September 4th Winspear

ART SHEN WEI June 18th - September 29th Crow Collection THOMAS HEATHERWICK September 13th Nasher Sculpture Center PROVOCATIONS: THE ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN OF HEATHERWICK STUDIO Premiers September 13th URBAN THEATER: NEW YORK ART IN THE 1980S September 21st - January 4th The Modern SATURATED: DYEDECORATED CLOTHS FROM NORTH & WEST AFRICA Through October 12th Dallas Museum of Art


SEEING AND BELIEVING: KRISHNA IN THE ART OF B. G. SHARMA Through Jan 19th Crow Collection BENITO HUERTA: AXIS MUNDI V.2 Through Feb 1st Amon Carter Museum MEET ME AT THE TRINITY: PHOTOGRAPHS BY TERRY EVANS Through March 15th Amon Carter Museum

KIDS THE WORLD’S LARGEST DINOSAURS Through September 1st Perot FOOD TRUCKS Daily Klyde Warren Park

LITERATURE WORDSPACE TRIBUTE TO ALAN LOMAX September 16th-21st Half Price Books NW Hwy JAVON AT DALLAS POETRY SLAM September 19th Heroes Sports Bar & Grill

MERRITT TIERCE September 25th Wild Detectives

FOOD DALLAS CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL September 13th Addison Conference Center

SPECIAL EVENTS SOUTHLAKE OKTOBERFEST October 3rd-5th GRAPEFEST September 11th-13th ROANOKE FARMER'S MARKET Saturdays Austin Street Plaza TEXAS STATE FAIR September 26th-October 19th Fair Park FALL BLOCK PARTY September 19th Dallas Arts District

SOUTHLAKE ARTS

ISA GENZKEN: RETROSPECTIVE Through 2015 Dallas Museum of Art

SOUTHLAKE ARTS CREATIVE TEAM Publisher & Creative Director

DAVID HALL Senior Art Consultant

LAMBERTO™ Graphic Designer

NICK SCHAIDER Copy Editor

WENDY O’HEARN Writers

DAVID HALL BARBARA MILHIZER RICH ROMERO BLAIR CROCE Columnist

LAMBERTO™ Advertising

STACIE CLARK TIMOTHY SMITH Advertising Designer

JESIKA COOK Photography

BRIAN GUILLIAUX BRUCE ROSENSTIEL CAROLYN TALUJA JESIKA COOK CONTACT INFO 630 E. Southlake Blvd. #61 Southlake, TX 76092 (817) 703-3205

SOUTHLAKEARTS.com

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LOCAL EVENTS

LOCAL LISTING UPCOMING LIVE LOCAL MUSIC

TOLBERT’S

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9/3

Big Mike

9/4

KHYI 95.3 The Range

9/5

Burning Sky Band

9/6

Texas Flood/Buddy Whittington

9/7

Buddy Whittington Band

9/11

Gunplugged and friends

BURGER SHACK

MAIN STREET BISTRO

9/12

4 Way

9/4

Phil Johnson

9/4

Sam Baker

9/13

Party Monkeys

9/5

Sam Baker

9/5

Dylan Bishop and Matt Parrott

9/17

Buick 6

9/6

Nick McCord

9/6

Phil Johnson

9/18

Chris Watson Band

9/11

Phil Johnson

9/11

Emma Hinkley

9/19

Cold as Ice

9/12

Claire Hebert

9/12

Dylan Bishop and Matt Parrott

9/20

Swan Song

9/13

Grant Bloom

9/13

Nick McCord

9/21

Buddy Whittington Band

9/18

Phil Johnson

9/18

Emma Hinkley

9/23

Holt and Stockslager

9/19

Dylan Bishop and Matt Parrott

9/24

Big Mike

9/20

Claire Hebert

9/20

Nick McCord

9/25

Texas Flood Does Hendrix

9/25

Phil Johnson

9/25

Sam Baker

9/26

Band on the Run

9/26

Nick McCord

9/26

Dylan Bishop and Matt Parrott

9/27

Thunder Road

9/27

Grant Bloom

9/27

Claire Hebert

9/28

Buddy Whittington Band

SEP 2014

southlake ARTS


Melanie B. Kinchen, M.D. P.A Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon Yale University Bachelors of Psychology Harvard Medical School M.D. John Hopkins Hospital, MD Orthopaedic Surgery Residency John Hopkins Hospital, MD Kostuik Spine & Deformity Dr. Kinchen is specially trained in deformity and minimally invasive spinal surgery. Her colleagues recognize her as an advocate for a conservative approach to treatment. She partners with her patients to inform them of all their options so they can make an educated decision.

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FILM

story by Blair Croce

JAMES BROWN PRODUCED GROUNDBREAKING, FUNKY TUNES as “The Godfather of Soul,” and his musical formulations still resonate in the rhythms of today. He refused to relinquish his efforts as an artist until his music contained enough soul to strike a chord in everyone that heard it. Now, eight years after his death, his hard work made its way to the big screen. The new biopic on Brown, Get on Up, flaunts his one-of-a-kind talent and confidence like Mr. Brown would himself. The film, directed by The Help’s Tate Taylor, focuses on his life between 1939 and 1993 but, more importantly, on the music that catapulted him into stardom. Get on Up fluctuates throughout James Brown’s life hitting the steps to his success and a handful of personal moments that gave viewers a glimpse into the soul behind the man on stage. The film’s beginning scenes introduce Brown (Chadwick Boseman) in his older days as a disgruntled man, but bits of his unpleasant childhood explain his wild nature as the film unfolds. Taylor devotes much focus to Brown’s friendship with fellow musician Bobby Byrd (Nelsan Ellis) after the two met during Brown’s first prison sentence as a teen. However, intimate scenes with Brown only supplemented Get on Up’s purpose. Much of the film centers on Brown performing his many funk songs that swept the nation. Boseman shined in famous numbers such as “I Got You (I Feel Good)," “Cold Sweat,” and “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World.” In reality, this film spotlights more on the music and not the Get on Up impressed in particular scenes due to multiple outstanding performances and intelligent direction. Whether commanding the stage in a sapphire blue suit or strutting onto his private plane in headto-toe fur, Boseman embodied the incomparable swagger of Brown and dazzled in the musical minutes. Viola Davis brought heartbreaking vulnerability to Brown’s otherwise insensitive mother. Smaller yet solid supporting performances from Octavia Spencer as Aunt Honey and Brandon Smith as Little Richard incorporated a comedic effect and a revitalizing energy to the film. Taylor’s refined directing added fluidity and an ease to the movie that redeemed its longer running time. The film was a joy ride from start to finish but almost to a fault. In his day, James Brown appeared in the tabloids quite a bit but not just for his musical gifts. Get on Up sugarcoats the rougher times in his life instead of appropriating them to delve deeper into the emotion that gave Brown his infamous edge. Attempts to highlight bits of his personal life in the film crumbled in comparison to other biopics. For example, the raw emotional moments in Johnny Cash’s biopic Walk the Line (2005) rivaled the musical performances that wowed a wide spectrum of viewers. However, the music transcended the emotion in Get on Up, which made it more enjoyable as opposed to an accurate portrayal of his life. Though the film wavered from an

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honest representation of his personal life, Get on Up provided an interesting look into James Brown’s career as an artist, and his journey to becoming a music icon. A leading actor makes or breaks a biopic, and Boseman deserves the ultimate praise for his performance as Brown. Although Get on Up called for more precarious moves off the stage, the film captured the inspiring soul of the legend on stage, and I’m not sure Mr. Brown himself would have wanted it any other way.


arts league e t events in th at the best ar f el rs u x le yo p re ro Pictu orth Met allas/Fort W Apex of the D

Theater

Art

APEX

September 7, 3-4:30 pm

nce Music Da

Presents the 2014 - 2015 Series December 7, 7:30 pm

March 17, 7:00 pm

A celebration of Arts in Sports with Suzuki Music Institute of Dallas Southlake Town Hall Southlake, TX

Schola Cantorum White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

Fort Worth Opera Whites Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

October 30, 6:00 pm

December 18, 7:30 pm

April 24-26

Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra Brass White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

Art in the Square - Emerging Artists Southlake Town Square Southlake, TX

January 18, 7:30 pm

April 27, 7:30 pm

Art and Freedom White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

November 2, 3:00 pm Wyeth String Quartet White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

November 20, 7:30 pm

Avant Chamber Ballet White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

Dallas Symphony Orchestra Whites Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

February 21, 7:00 pm Jazz Festival featuring the University of North Texas one o’clock Lab Band Whites Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX

February 22, 5-6:30 pm

Apex-arts.org

Strokes of Art in the Square Gallery opening with Azura Winds Southlake Town Hall Southlake, TX

The TCU Frog Corps and the Vocal Majority TCU's Ed Landreth Auditorium Fort Worth, TX

May 21 5:30 –zoo 6:30 pm—concert Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra Family Concert White’s Chapel Methodist Church Southlake, TX


PHOTOGRAPHY

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by Bruce Rosenstiel

ikipedia defines macro photography as “extreme close-up photography, usually of very small subjects, in which the size of the subject in the photograph is greater than life size.” Specialized lenses, extension tubes, magnifying filters, and other equipment enable focus from a very close distance. But professional accouterments aren’t essential. Excellent results can be obtained from any lens combination, including those of many pointand-shoot cameras, that yields a reproduction ratio greater than 1:1. A number of other tools and techniques can improve the outcome: a sturdy tripod, remote shutter, and one or more flash units. The most important, however, are keen eyes, patience, and perseverance. I became interested in the small world when I first looked at a bird through binoculars and realized that I had never really seen a bird before. I had to check a field guide to verify that an American Robin really did have an eye-ring, throat stripes, and white under the tail. My macro photography journey started with flowers and their pollinators, which are still some of my favorite subjects. Water drops have intrigued me for a number of years. I had photographed them several times with mixed results but didn’t know how to get better images. A fortuitous combination of events led to an epiphany. At a recent Bob Jones Nature Center Camera Club meeting, one of the members brought a homemade light box with supports for a water source, and another member provided information on flash speeds and a link to a water drop video. I was inspired to learn more and try again. southlake ARTS

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PHOTOGRAPHY

The key to photographing water drops successfully is controlling the process. I knew I needed a repeatable process that I could evaluate after each shoot and adjust prior to the next. Though electronic drip systems with selectable drop rates and an electronic or infrared beam to trigger the shutter are available, I wanted to build my own setup, with odds and ends from the hardware store, that would still yield reliable results. There is a consistent pattern to a falling drop: the initial splash and crown, the compression, the tower, the tower collapse, and the dissipation. By playing with the variables of drop rate, drop size, and clarity, depth, and volume of the water in the catch basin, and the patterns and colors of the background, a tremendous variety of images can be captured. On every shoot, I know that I will catch each element of the fall sequence, but altering one or more of the variables always yields surprising and unpredictable images. To see more, explore the water drop galleries on my website, www.SMALLWORLDPHOTOS.net. If you’re interested in instruction, contact me directly for private lessons or enroll in my small group classes through Bob Jones Nature Center or Grapevine Parks and Recreation Department.

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ARTS CHAT

MITCH HAGY OF FOTOSPORT IS IN THE business of making surreal composite photographs for athletes that want a creative commemoration of their moments in sports. Originally from Indiana, Mitch moved here to Denton in the offseason of open-wheel formula racing. The plan originally was to get a business degree to make money to go racing! Picking up photoshop skills over his years consulting in the area, eventually Mitch found himself hired to do a photoshoot for Colleyville Heritage. Having a different background than most photographers, Mitch approached the large photoshoot utilizing technology. Instead of using rafter shots and waiting for everyone to be posing at the right time. Mitch shot them individually and created a composite. Fotosport opened in 2011 and has grown since then. High School football coaches love the approach because they can shoot 300 football players in just over two hours with two other photographers and green screens. “I didn’t like the group photo approach, because there was always a shadow or someone was blinking,” Mitch says. “By shooting them individually we are able to make a much more polished final product.” Fotosport has since grown into doing the photography and programs for Colleyville Heritage, Decatur, Sherman, Lamar, LD Bell, Westlake Academy and, more recently, Southlake Volleyball and LaCrosse. On the horizon, Fotosport is developing an app for parents at their kids’ games. They’ll typically have two photographers at the game with high-tech photography equipment. With this app, the photographers can send those action shots right to the parent’s phone!

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ARTS CHAT

10 QUESTIONS FOR MITCH Who is your favorite photographer? Joel Grimes from Phoenix, Arizona.

Canon or Nikon? Canon all day long.

What’s your favorite lens? My 70-200 f2.8. For all our sports we use the 400mm f2.8.

If you weren’t a photographer what would you be? Racing cars, Formula Renault

What is your favorite food? Italian.

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Favorite Italian restaurant in town? Armend’s.

What is your favorite aspect of photography? For me, it’s how can I take an image and make it into something iconic. Transforming images into something that tells a story. Photojournalism.

What is your favorite iconic sports photograph? It’s a black-and-white photo of Jimmie Clark, a racer, before he was killed racing. He had just finished his race and has oil all around his face. It’s an image of fearlessness. There is a serenity in his eyes.

If you could have a meal with anyone, whom would it be with? Jesus.

If you were stranded on a desert island, what three items would you bring? My Bible, iPhone and a hat.


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VISUAL ARTS


LEONA RD O’ S S EV E N PR I NCI PLE S

A

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WO U L D N ’ T

E AT

M E AT.

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ANIMALS

TO O

MU C H TO E AT A NYTH I N G TH AT H A D O N C E B E E N A L IVE . N O R C O U L D H E S TA N D TH E S I G H T O F C AG E D B I R D S . I F HE

SAW

A

MAN

SELLING

BIRDS,

HE

WO U L D

B UY

TH E M

A L L . TH E N H E WO U L D O P E N TH E C AG E S A N D WATC H TH E

B I R D S FLY AWAY. WH AT A FL U R RY TH EY M A D E ! H OW D I D TH EY D O I T ? A L L H I S L I FE L E O N A R D O TR I E D TO D I S C OVE R TH E I R S E C R ET O F FLYI N G S O H E C O U L D M A K E A FLYI N G M AC H I N E H I M S E L F. -excerpt from ‘Leonardo’s Horse’ by Jean Fritz

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L E O N A R D O ’ S S EV E N P R I N C I P L E S

VISUAL ARTS

A

nyone who watched the young Leonardo wander the countryside around his home in Vinci might have guessed that he would be an artist. He stopped to examine everything. He looked at the landscape as if he were memorizing it. So it was no surprise when his father took him as a young teenager to Florence to study art. People noticed that Leonardo was different He dressed differently. While other young men wore long togas, Leonardo wore short, rosecolored velvet togas. He wrote differently. Backwards. From the right side of the paper to the left. A person would have to use a mirror to read his writing.

On the Cover The cover horse was created by Andrea del Verrocchio (whose last name means true eye). Verrocchio was Leonardo’s instructor in Florence and worked closely with him on several famous paintings, one being the Baptism of Christ, now in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, painted in 1474–75. In this work, Verrocchio was assisted by Leonardo, then a youth and a member of his workshop, who painted the angel on the left and part of the background above. According to Vasari, Andrea resolved never to touch the brush again because Leonardo, his pupil, had far surpassed him. The entire world has been changed by Leonardo da Vinci’s genius and creativity. This fall, the Hines Development company (developers of Carillon) bring Leonardo’s “Horse That Never Was” to Southlake. Carillon’s horse is from the same original design that Leonardo created 500 years ago and stands 8 feet tall. “Oh, it’s a replica?” you might say. Yes, it’s a replica. In fact, all of Leonardo’s horses are replicas. His original clay model that he created for the duke of Sforza was destroyed by war (with the French) and Leonardo didn’t ever quite find the time to finish it. He died on May 2, 1519. Legend has it that he never ceased mourning his lost horse (Michelangelo, a rival taunted him about it). It wasn’t until Charles C. Dent began resurrecting the project and getting countless people involved that Leonardo’s horses were finally completed in 1999. The first horse was gifted to Milan.

Milan Horse Height: 24 feet Weight : 15 tons including armature Construction: Engineered to withstand wind shear and earthquakes Materials: Sculpture made of silicon bronze, alloy #872; armature of stainless steel, type 304; pedestal of Carrara marble. Sculptor of Record: Nina Akamu Since the unveiling of the Milan horse, additional horses have been created - 8-foot and 12-foot versions, one in Grand Rapids, MI; Vinci, Italy; Allentown, PA; and now, in Southlake, TX. Collaboration was a virtue that Leonardo seemed to embrace. Many of his greatest works are the result of Leonardo listening, learning and sharing the process with his peers, such as the Vitruvian Man (with Giacomo Andrea de Ferrara, a Renaissance architect, expert on Vitruvius, and close friend of his), The Last Supper (Leonardo couldn’t find the face wicked enough for Judas, so he let someone else finish the painting), The Horse (Verrocchio helped design the proportions for the horse and it took a modern day company to complete it), even arguably the Mona Lisa (restored after it was vandalized at the Louvre and, in case you were wondering, currently valued at one billion dollars). Throughout his studies, Leonardo developed seven principles that led him through his creative process of discovery. Outlined in further detail in the book How to think like Leonardo by Michael Gelb, these are Leonardo’s 7 principles. southlake ARTS

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L E O N A R D O ’ S S EV E N P R I N C I P L E S

` CURIOSITA CURIOSITY Leonardo was the man who wanted to know everything. Like the toddler who asks “Why?”, Leonardo would ask why and continue to ask. He had to know everything! Leonardo’s notebooks demonstrate his curiosità. He would keep track of his thoughts and ideas in his journal where he examined Linear Perspective, Light & Shading, Perspective, Color, Proportion, Architecture, Zoology, Astronomy, Geography, Naval Warfare, Music, Humour and sketches. Ask yourself and others your own questions and never stop learning.

DIMOSTRAZIONE DEMONSTRATION Theories weren’t good enough for Leonardo; they had to be tested! He had a commitment to test knowledge through experience, persistence, and a willingness to learn from mistakes. One famous mistake from Leonardo’s life was his helicopter. Da Vinci’s helicopter measured more than 15 feet in diameter and was made from reed, linen and wire. It was to be powered by four men standing on a central platform turning cranks, with enough rotation it would lift off the ground, unfortunately it was too heavy to take flight. Leonardo made mistakes, but he never gave up. Neither should we. Ask yourself what you would do differently if you had no fear of making mistakes. Then, live accordingly.

SENSAZIONE SENSATION Sensazione is the continual refinement of the senses, especially sight, as the means to enliven experience. Sharpen all of your senses. Leonardo called the 5 senses the “ministers of the soul”. He would train and refine his senses daily. 500 years ago in Tuscany, Leonardo said, ‘The average person looks without seeing, hears without listening, talks without thinking, touches without feeling, eats without tasting and breathes in without awareness of aroma or fragrance.” This is especially important today to overcome the numbing effect of the internet and technology, to simply bring awareness to the beauty of the simple things in life that are out in the open but often overlooked.

FIX YOUR COURSE TO A STAR AND YOU CAN NAVIGATE THROUGH ANY STORM - Leonardo Da Vinci

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L E O N A R D O ’ S S EV E N P R I N C I P L E S

SFUMATO

CONNESSIONE

UNCERTAINTY

CONNECTION

Sfumato: literally meaning “going up in smoke” without lines or borders, formless, a willingness to embrace ambiguity, paradox, and uncertainty. Embrace the unknown. Sfumato is a technique that Leonardo applied to the Mona Lisa with her half smile. Is she smiling or frowning? Vacations to get away from your work are also a form of sfumato. When working on The Last Supper, he spent days painting from dawn to dusk. Then without warning, he would disappear for a day (the prior who contracted him was not amused). In his notebook he writes, “it is well that you should often leave off work and take a little relaxation because when you come back you are a better judge.”

Everything is connected. Leonardo was the first environmentalist: he saw the world as a living system. He had a recognition of and appreciation for the interconnectedness of all things and phenomena. Da vinci writes, “Mountains are made by the currents of rivers. Mountains are destroyed by the currents of rivers.” Leonardo loved to connect different elements into new patterns. As a child, he would gather an assortment of creatures and borrow their features to sketch terrifying monsters! As an adult, he took a live lizard and crafted a horn, beard and wings for it. He kept it in a special box and would use it to make his friends flee with fear. Many of the best ideas in the world came about from playful imaginary combinations. The serious (left brain) gives you the drive while the playful (right brain) allows you to make unprecedented original connections.

ARTE/SCIENZA ARTS & SCIENCE Arte/Scienza: keeping logic and creativity in balance; art and science, logic and imagination; in contemporary terms, balancing the left and right sides of your brain. Leonardo certainly kept these in balance, considering that a master painter/sculptor also created the helicopter, hovercraft, robot and war machines. In his journal he writes, “Those who become enamoured of the art, without having previously applied the diligent study of the scientific part of it, may be compared to mariners who put to sea in a ship without rudder or compass and therefore cannot be certain of arriving at the wished-for port”.

CORPORALITA HEALTH & WELLNESS Corporalita: balancing of the body and the mind; the cultivation of grace, ambidexterity, fitness, and poise. Leonardo implores us, “Take Care of yourself!”. Some of his tips for healthy living from 500 years ago were: -Beware of anger and avoid grievous moods. -Rest your head and keep your mind cheerful. -Exercise moderately. -Shun wantonness and pay attention to your diet. -Eat only when you want and sip light. -Eat simple foods, chew your food and sit up straight! (poise)

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What is

UPCYCLED FINE ART? UpCycling in Fine Art, refers to using unwanted or normally discarded refuge to create an art object, which makes the material UpCycled to be of greater value. “I enjoy taking what has been discarded and allowing it to be developed into a piece of beauty,” said Scott Brown. Brown, one of 26 fine artists at Giddens Gallery of Fine Art in Grapevine, is part of a trend occurring in fine art. In Brown’s case, gears from a local transmission shop, metal droppings from a local steel mill, and wood scraps from industrial construction are used to create UpCycled coffee tables, sofa tables, end tables and pedestals. Fetching as much as $4,000, Brown’s original creations get a “Wow!” response from visitors to the Grapevine, Texas Gallery. Although gallery owners, John and Cherie Giddens, boast conventional fine art paintings as well as sculptures and collages, 6 of their resident artists participate in UpCycling. Another of these unique artists, Jay Garrison sculpts whimsical trains, cars, hot air balloons and airplanes from finds at garage sales, rummage sales, and flea markets. “Most people have fun trying to identify the parts used in my assemblages,” said Garrison. Cynthia Medanich creates “Fashion Trash” collages from haute couture fashion house packaging, while Kristi Zatyko fashions mixedmedia art from what she calls “found” objects collected on hikes, visits to garage sales or any other source; there is really nothing that she sees that escapes her consideration. “All life is a collage,” said Zatyko.

Take wood sculptor Jerome Weilmuenster, for example. He carves his creations from trees that have that have already been felled. “Before a sculpture is started, I carefully consider the shape, texture, and color hues of the wood grain. The wood will let me know if it wants to be a bowl, a desk accessory or simply a conversation piece,” said Weilmuenster.

catches my eye and that usually tells me what I can make out of it,” said Sarmiento.

Manuel Sarmiento, a metal sculptor agrees. The found objects in metal scrap yards speak to him as well. “I’ll walk the yard and see what

http://GIDDENSGALLERY.com/

The UpCycle artists at Giddens Gallery of Fine Art have the unique talent of visualizing items that others see as rejects, discards or trash as something much greater when used in creating a unique and beautiful work of art.

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VISUAL ART

“Success is often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable” – Coco Chanel In celebration of 100 years of the house Chanel, Southlake, TX, visual artist Cynthia Medanich celebrates this fall season with the announcement of her new series of five works for Historic Downtown Grapevine’s Gallery Night (Oct. 4th, 2014).

to an open garage, able to capture the animal and took it to the veterinarian. After a few days to heal, the pair flew off never to return. Cynthia felt the swans seemed symbolic to honor the memory of Kennedy and complement the Chanel logo.

This year, she was inspired to “upcycle” her collection of Chanel packaging to fabricate four collages and one painting dedicated to the House of Chanel. The designers use the best quality papers for their packaging intended for the trash. “There can be sentimental reasons for ladies to keep the gift wrap, empty perfume bottle or packaging of products long gone, so why not incorporate them into art? I love manipulating these materials by cutting, pasting, painting over or goldleafing them into a one-of-a-kind art piece”, said Cynthia. Her artwork is about illustrating a bit of that sentimental story through collage.

Cynthia’s interest in art started while working as a mechanical and geological draftsman. Going from drawing for manufacturing to visual art was a natural leap for her. Cynthia has been painting as a full-time occupation for 25 years. Her patronage is steadily growing and she now has her works in patron’s homes in Texas, Belize, Puerto Rico and Germany.

The piece titled “1967 Jacqueline” shows a small black-and-white image of Jacqueline Kennedy wearing a Chanel suit, yet it is the color photograph of two black swans that become the focal point of the piece. Cynthia took the photograph of the swan pair as they visited her neighborhood lake one summer. One had a fish hook caught in its throat. Neighbors worked together by setting a trail of Cheerios

She invites you to attend Historic Downtown Grapevine’s Gallery Night sponsored by GADA (Grapevine Art Dealers Association), Saturday, October 4th, 2014 from 5:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. at Giddens Gallery of Fine Art on 624 S. Main St. Cynthia Medanich welcomes any questions you may have about her works or your wish to commission her to use your own collection of “upcycle fashion trash” into a one-of-a-kind “upcycled” unique piece of art. To view and learn about all her work for this showing, please visit, http://GIDDENSGALLERY.com/productcategory/cynthia-medanich/ Cynthia Medanich www.CYNTHIAMEDANICH.com

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DANCE

LOVETT + MORE DALLAS, Texas—Bruce Wood Dance Project celebrates Bruce Wood’s work with a grand retrospective of his most luminary dances and features special guest Dallas Chamber Symphony for the performance of Piazzolla de Prisa at the Dallas City Performance Hall on Saturday, September 13 at 8:00 pm and Sunday, September 14 at 2:00 pm. Tickets are available August 15 at brucewoodance. org or through the Dallas Winds Box Office at 214–428–2263. Reserve tickets are $25– $45; Patron tickets are $100. Discounts are available for groups of 10 or more. $15 Student Rush tickets are on sale 60 minutes prior to showtime at the box office. A conversation with the artists immediately follows the shows. BWDP introduces Acting Artistic Director Kimi Nikaidoh. Under her leadership, BWDP offers a special program that sustains Wood’s aesthetic and maverick spirit. Premiered in 1998, Being was Wood’s fifth work and exemplifies his remarkable understanding of classical structure and musical form. Set to J.S. Bach’s Concerto for Two Violins in D Minor, this dance is an ode to classicism with its fast-paced, grounded, and sweeping spatial patterns: contrapuntal movement images; all working together to achieve a harmonious, symmetrical elegance. “Being was a very deliberate attempt to make a ballet that would be so strong structurally . . . [it] would always work,” said Wood.

BWDP is delighted to present a rare dance and music opportunity. Wood was engaged in conversations with the Dallas Chamber Symphony earlier this year about Piazzolla de Prisa. Made possible by a special financial gift, BWDP has invited Dallas Chamber Symphony to play Astor Piazzolla’s score. This large-scale collaboration is a first for modern dance and chamber music in the region, and it is representative of BWDP’s commitment to stimulating and invigorating the arts. DCS comprises a 36-piece orchestra and features a string section of 21 violinists. Artistic Director/Conductor Richard McKay says, “I admired [Bruce’s] artistry and innovative spirit... Bringing dance and live music together is always an ambitious endeavor—one that requires tremendous leadership and commitment from not only the artists who create but also the community and patrons.” Culminating the program is an acclaimed audience favorite and one of Wood’s most requested dances––Lovett!. Premiered in 2000, this signature work expresses Wood’s experiences working on ranches, raising horses, roping cattle, and riding in rodeos. This quintessentially Texas production leaves audiences tapping their toes and smiling from ear to ear. BWDP has engaged seasoned veteran and BWDP founding member Kimi Nikaidoh to lead BWDP forward. Wood and Nikaidoh shared history together dating

back to 2000 when she joined Bruce Wood Dance Company as an 18-year-old dancer. Nikaidoh went on to work with Complexions Contemporary Ballet from 2005 to 2008. She currently is completing a neuroscience and behavior major at Columbia University. She also choreographs and freelances. Nikaidoh and Wood were colleagues and close friends. “Dancing for Bruce Wood was an obvious choice for me because of my belief in the extraordinarily high quality of his work. Now it is my honor to begin collaborating with dancers, designers, and producers who share in that belief to revive his invaluable ballets,” says Nikaidoh. Over the past four years, Wood created two evening-long dance/theater productions and seven new works, revived eight works from his acclaimed repertoire, and created several small dances for community outreach events. Through his repertoire of 80 works, Wood has had a major impact on thousands of dance enthusiasts and dancers. BWDP is grateful for the support of its dedicated patrons and sponsors, including Heritage Auctions (HA. com); TACA—Performing for the Arts; Danny Curry; Read and Steve Gendler; James and Gayle Halperin Foundation; Ellen Kendrick Creative, Inc.; Brian Guilliaux Photography.

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FINE & DECORATIVE ARTS INCLUDING THE GENTLEMAN COLLECTOR SEPTEMBER 13 | DALLAS | LIVE & ONLINE

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MARK KOSTABI Shelter from the Blood, 1988 Oil on canvas 68 x 22 inches Estimate: $5,000-$7,000


VISUAL ARTS Joseph Glasco, Untitled, 1993, acrylic and collage on canvas, 84 x 60 1/2 inches.

Talley Dunn Gallery is pleased to announce a tribute exhibition featuring artwork from the collection of Sonny Burt and Robert Butler, which will open with a reception on Saturday, August 23rd from 6:00 to 8:00 PM. The exhibition will be on view in the main gallery through Saturday, October 18th. Together more than forty years, Sonny Burt and Robert Butler supported Dallas’ arts community with a generous spirit throughout the 80s, 90s and early 2000s. Beginning with the purchase of a work on paper modestly titled “Head” by Alexander Calder in 1951 for $75.00, Burt and Butler built a collection of approximately 550 artworks created by more than 300 different artists. Highlights include strong pieces by internationally recognized artists such as Christo, Jenny Holzer, and Julian Schnabel, and the collectors enjoyed living with the pieces as much as sharing them with friends and the many guests to their home. Even with these signature artworks, the majority of their collection celebrates the efforts of Texas artists, both recognized and unknown. Burt and Butler bought artwork not only from galleries across the state, but they also loved to purchase pieces from the artists’ co-op space, 500X, experimental spaces and directly from studios. Instead of focusing on how much a work would appreciate in value over time, Burt and Butler acquired artwork that they both loved, often with a great sense of humor and playful spirit. In many cases, they bought pieces from the artists’ first gallery exhibitions and hosted the post-opening events at their unique home. Over the years, southlake ARTS

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VISUAL ARTS Burt and Butler became lifelong friends with many artists and continued to buy artwork in depth to complement their collection. With Butler’s passing in 2007 and Burt’s death last fall, the arts community has been saddened at such a big loss, and the gallery’s exhibition is organized to celebrate their patronage of the artists and arts community that they cherished. All of the artwork in the exhibition is available for purchase, and proceeds from their estate will be donated to benefit the Booker T. Washington School for Visual and Performing Arts. As Talley Dunn wrote earlier this year about the couple, “Sonny and Bob showed me how collectors could support artists and an art community. For just a few hundred dollars to thousands of dollars, a purchase of art could be just the encouragement an artist might need to continue on their path. They shared with me the fun and love that they had with art and the friendships that they made. I learned what collecting could be, and they taught me how to be supportive of artists. They opened my eyes to the potential of collecting and being an art dealer.” While the gallery exhibition cannot include all of the collection due to limitations of space, the show includes artwork by John Alexander, The Art Guys, Scott Barber, David Bates, Michael Ray Charles, Bill Davenport, Patrick Faulhaber, Joseph Glasco, Billy Hassell, Rachel Hecker, Tracy Hicks, Luis Jimenez, Matt Magee, Pam Nelson, Trish Nickell, Aaron Parazette, John Pomara, Linda Ridgway, Marcos Rosales, Rusty Scruby, Isaac Smith, Julie Speed, James Surls, David Szafranski, and Mel Ziegler, among many others. Talley Dunn Gallery is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 am until 5:00 pm and by appointment. Please contact Beth Taylor at the gallery (214/521-9898) or via e-mail at beth@talleydunn.com for additional information and visuals of the exhibition.

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FOOD


story by Rich Romero

FOOD

NO MATTER HOW HEALTH-CONSCIOUS society is these days, sometimes people just want a piece of good old-fashioned chocolate to take the sting off the 9-to-5 grind. Sander Wolf understands the public’s call to go “coo coo for cocoa” and is eager to present the event to the public with the fifth annual Dallas Chocolate Festival.

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only sampling chocolate but having the opportunity to shake the hands that craft the treats that make the nation happy. “You are meeting the actual artisans that make the chocolate...it’s small business at its best,” Wolf said.

This year’s event is Saturday, September 13th at the Addison Conference Centre with doors opening to the public at 11 a.m.

Some of the confirmed chocolatiers for the festival are Tejas Chocolate; Dude, Sweet Chocolate; Cacao Atlanta; and Amano Artisan Chocolate.

According to Wolf, the founder of the annual event, 2014 will showcase more than 30 national chocolate artisans for guests to enjoy.

Of course, that list is only a small sample of the wall-to-wall richness that this festival will offer those who attend.

Wolf said that the event would be something special and personal for both attendees and hosts. He loves the idea of guests not

According to Wolf, the event will be held at three different times throughout the day, and after the event, for the remainder of the day,

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guests can have the chance to participate in several chocolate courses. For between 75 and 125 dollars per course, guests can get their hands dirty with chocolate and get an even deeper understanding of the production of their guilty pleasure. Wolf said this experience would be intimate and space is limited. Each course will hold between 25 and 30 people. These courses are in addition to the main event’s cost of 25 dollars. Wolf said he expects a crowd of 600 or more, so visit www.DALLASCHOCOLATE.org to purchase tickets and find out more information on the festival.


DRAMA-FREE FINANCIAL ADVICE SINCE 1868. Frost is proud to support the arts in Southlake. And we’d be proud to help you along your financial journey too.

frostbank.com (817) 420-5336

MEMBER FDIC


First Friday real women * real talk * real life

Equipping women with resources to positively navigate life’s challenges

free even ts for w ome n!

•Fall 2014 Speakers•

Events start at 11am, Harkins Theatre in Southlake

Sept. 5 Valorie Burton

Why Not You? Authentic Confidence

Lisa Rose Oct. 3

Hearing God’s Voice & His Plan For You

Nov. 7 Kay Wyma

Taming Entitlement in our Kids & Ourselves

Debbie Stuart Dec. 5

Contentment—(At Christmas? Yeah, Like That’s Gonna Happen)

www.fiFirstFridayWomen.com


Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, one of the most iconic and popular sandwiches was introduced to America. At an Italian grocery in Massachusetts, an immigrant was making sandwiches for workers in his community to take to work. The “sub” got its name because the shape of the bread resembled the shape of the boat being built not far from the grocery. It was a simple sandwich of cold cuts, cheeses, some lettuce and tomato, with some olive oil and oregano - a hearty meal for any dock hand.

FOOD

As popularity of the sandwich spread so did the ingredients and the name of the sandwich. From Philadelphia to Rhode Island, the sub took on names such as hoagie, zeppelin, torpedo, and grinder. All subs generally contain the same fillings: cheese, bologna, salami, ham, lettuce, tomato, onion, olive oil, vinegar, and oregano. Just as there are a variety of names, there are also variations of the ingredients which make them all the same yet different. Even the way the sub is put together makes the sandwich special to the area where it originated. At Weinberger’s, we start by toasting a split 12" hoagie roll with an aioli. Right away, a layer of smoked provolone cheese is put on the bread for a base. To the cheese, we add a peppery Italian mortadella, followed by a naturally cured Genoa salami, and then a simple boiled ham. Now comes the “taste”. To give a bit of bite, [we add] chopped banana peppers mixed with red pepper chunks. Adding a little mayonnaise with the vinegar from the peppers creates a sauce to emphasize the flavor of the savory meats and cheeses. The lettuce is shredded for sweetness, topped with slivered red onion; finely diced fresh red tomatoes marinated in crushed garlic in oil provides dimension. To tie it all together: extra virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar, then a dash of oregano to top it off, to give it that real Italian flavor. Definitely one of the most popular sandwiches ever created. Totally satisfying. Enjoy, Dan Weinberger southlake ARTS

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BEER/WINE/CHEESE

KWAK AMBER ALE Since its beginning in 1791, Bosteels Brewery (Brouwerij Bosteels) in Buggenhout, Belgium has been a family-run operation now in its seventh generation. With great pride, they brew three beers: Tripel Karmeliet, DeuS, and Pauwel Kwak, an amber ale with 8.4% abv. According to legend, Pauwel Kwak was a brewer and inn owner in the late 1700s who solved a very important problem: coachmen were not allowed to leave their coaches to get a drink with their passengers. Kwak invented a special glass that could be hung on the coach, allowing the driver to enjoy his beer. Today, Kwak beer is served in its distinctive glass (as is the norm with Belgian beers) held upright in a wooden stand.

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Southlake Arts - September 2014  

Southlake Arts Magazine September 2014

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