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GOBBLER OR GOBLIN? CHASING A DREAM BAYING AT THE MOON!

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PG..................ARTICLE.......................................................AUTHOR 8.............................................................................................................. TWRA News 10....................... Baying at the Moon: Coon Hunting ............................... Shawn Todd 18....................... Just Like on the Discovery Channel.............................. Walt Wilkerson 20....................... Gobbler or Goblin? You Decide..................................... Garry Mason 22....................... Retriever Training: Second Training Season................. H. Joe King 24....................... Women in the Outdoors: Wild Cooking.......................... Terry Wilkerson 26....................... Bethel Bass Busters...................................................... 30....................... In Pursuit of a Dream: Fyrne Lake................................. Kevin Griffith 36....................... Papaw, Fiction............................................................... Rob Somerville 40....................... Hot Products 42....................... Where to Eat 44....................... Trophy Room

On the Cover Zack Parker is shown here with his 9 pound 11 ounce monster, largemouth bass that anchored the win for him and his partner Matt Roberts at the Carhartt Bass Masters Collegiate Southern Regional Champions. - Photo by Garry Mason Southern Traditions Outdoors Magazine, LLC

Owners - Eddie Anderson Rob Somerville Kevin Griffith Stacey Lemons Publisher - Eddie Anderson Editor - Rob Somerville

Magazine Design - Kalli Lipke Advertising Sales Rob Somerville - Managing Partner Distribution Johnathan Anderson

Field Staff Editors Garry Mason Walter Wilkerson Terry Wilkerson Steve McCadams Kelley Powers

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Eddie Brunswick Larry Self John Sloan Richard Simms John Meacham Buck Gardner

Scott Marcin Ed Lankford Drew Brooks John Latham John Roberts

Advertising Information:

Southern Traditions Outdoors | Rob Somerville (731) 446-8052 stomag1@gmail.com DISCLAIMER - Neither the authors nor Southern Traditions Outdoors Magazine LLC assume any responsibility or liability for any actions by readers who utilize any information contained within. Readers are advised that the use of any and all information contained within Southern Traditions Outdoors is at their own risk.

Southern Traditions Outdoors Magazine Mission Statement: Southern Traditions Outdoors Magazine vows to put forth a publication to promote the outdoors lifestyle in a positive manner. We will strive to encourage veteran and novice outdoorsmen, women, kids, and the physically challenged to participate in the outdoors in a safe and ethical manner. Our publication will bring positive attention to the wondrous beauty of the world of Nature in the mid-south.

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013


From the Desk of Rob Somerville A Hunter’s Plea I try to address an important matter in my editor’s letter each issue. Today, I want to open all able-bodied outdoor enthusiasts’ eyes to a situation that really needs your help. Below is an article I received from one of my best friends and a true role model in my life. His name is Eddie Brunswick and he has been a paraplegic for over half his adult life. Unfortunately, our print date came after the deadline for TWRA rule changes to be suggested and implemented, but our wheelchair sportsmen still need your involvement now. So, after you read this plea from Eddie, please … please … don’t sit back and take it for granted that someone else will come to the aid of the physically challenged who want to hunt and fish. Please … get involved!

Rob Somerville STO Editor

As I write this article, I am sure that like most people you are beginning to put the 2012-2013 hunting season behind you, as you begin to look forward to the upcoming fishing season. Even though this may seem a natural and seasonal change to make, there is one thing to remember concerning upcoming hunting seasons. Now is the time when the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is soliciting input on the hunting regulations for the upcoming 2013-2014 and beyond hunting seasons. It is in regard to these upcoming hunting seasons that I would like to solicit your help, in trying to get TWRA to make a change in their hunting regulations, as it involves wheelchair bound hunters. I am proposing that one of this country’s finest wildlife agencies step up to the plate and set a precedent, by making a change to the “Juvenile Hunts” or “Youth Hunts” that our state offers to its young sportsmen. My proposal would see it changed from a youth only hunt and renamed and structured in such a way, as to open it up to wheelchair bound sportsmen as well. It would be as simple as changing the season title for each of the youth seasons to read “Youth and Wheelchair Bound” season or hunts. I am not suggesting that we take anything away from our young sportsmen, as I am a supporter of promoting and encouraging youth in the outdoors. I am, however, also an advocate of promoting the outdoors and hunting to those individuals who are unable to get around without the use of a wheelchair. Whether it be from a disease, an accident, service to our country or for whatever other reason they may be wheelchair bound, each and everyone of them deserve an opportunity to participate in hunting and have every advantage we can give them towards being successful in that venture. To minimize the amount of effort that would be required of TWRA’s enforcement division in this change, it could be stated that those individuals on record in Nashville, as being wheelchair bound, could participate in hunts during the Youth-Only hunting seasons. This would not require any extra work or enforcement issues that would be involved with trying to establish separate and specific wheelchair bound only hunting seasons. A database is already in existence, due to the establishment of the wheelchair bound waterfowl hunting zones across the state. The creation of this additional hunting opportunity for wheelchair bound hunters is just the next logical step in the process of promoting Tennessee and our wonderful outdoor opportunities regardless of an individual’s mobility impairments. I encourage you to contact TWRA in support of this effort upon conclusion of reading this article. You can contact them via regular mail at: 2013-14 Hunting Season Comments, TWRA, Wildlife Management Division, PO Box 40747, Nashville, TN 37204. Comments and suggestions can also be made via email at twra.comment@ tn.gov. Please include “Hunting Season Comments” on the subject line of your emailed submissions. If you are still unsure as to just how important this needed change might be, then I would ask able-bodied people to do one thing for me. The next time you go out hunting or scouting for the upcoming season, instead of riding your ATV, get off of it and PUSH it! As harsh as it may sound, it will give you some insight and realization into what an individual in a wheelchair has to endure when they attempt to get out go hunting. Whether they are pushing themselves, or an able-bodied person with them is doing the pushing for them, the end result is the same. It becomes such a burden to get there. When you add to that the fact they are also competing head to head with able-bodied hunters during the regular season, it causes too many of them to not want to even attempt it again. So, please help to turn this oversight around and prove why the Volunteer State is filled with caring people and is such a great place to hunt, fish and live. If you email your response please cc it to the magazines email address (stomag1@gmail.com) as well, so I can create a list of support to use in this effort. Thank you for your time and support in this matter. Eddie Brunswick

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TWRA NEWS From the Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency

DEER HARVEST TOTALS PASS 176,600 FOR 2012-13 NASHVILLE --- More than 176,600 deer were harvested in Tennessee during the recently completed 2012-13 season as data continues to be gathered by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. The statewide season concluded Jan. 6 and the youth hunt followed on Jan. 1213. This year’s harvest tops last year’s total of 167,821. The harvest numbers range from the start of archery season on Sept. 22, 2012 through the final youth hunt. Giles County leads the way with 5,500 deer harvested, slightly ahead of Henry County at 5,496, which had a strong finish down the stretch to move into second place past Fayette County, which had a harvest of 5,433. Rounding out the top 13 counties are Hardeman 4,851, Lincoln 4,638, Maury 4,003, Montgomery 3,873, Franklin 3,867, Hardin 3,687, Weakley

3,664, Carroll 3,652, and Madison 3,529. More than 1,000 deer were harvested in 70 of the state’s 95 counties. Polk County, in the southeastern corner of the state, had the lowest county harvest total with 209. The harvest totals can be viewed on the TWRA website (www.tnwildlife.org) and is located in the “For Hunters” section. CHARLIE DANIELS LENDS HIS TIME, TALENTS TO HELP TWRA IN PROMOTING OUTDOORS ACTIVITES Award-winning musician and entertainer Charlie Daniels has donated his time and talents to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency by providing a series of announcements. Charlie recently spent the day with the TWRA video production crew. He graciously agreed to help promote topics such as boating safety, the importance of taking your kids outdoors to hunt and fish, and the benefits of purchas-

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tion and Education. “I couldn’t have said it any better than when Charlie ad-libbed in one of the TV spots, “’We live in Tennessee, It don’t get any better than this.’” Charlie has been active in music since the 1950s and nationally known for his contributions to county and southern rock music. He celebrated his fifth anniversary of induction into the Grand Ole Opry in January.

Charlie Daniels recorded a series of Public Service Announcements for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency at his Wilson County recording studio. From right, TWRA Information and Education Chief Don King, TWRA Media Producer/Directors Jason Harmon and Todd Maszaros, and TWRA volunteer Katie King.

ing licenses to support all wildlife in Tennessee. The spots have begun airing on Nashville television stations Fox 17 and WUXP 30 during Southeastern Conference basketball telecasts. The audio will be used to create radio Public Service Announcements that will be aired statewide. Other outlets will air spots as the year progresses. Charlie was recruited by Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission member James Stroud. He has worked with Charlie as his record producer and has remained a long-time friend. “We are thrilled to have Charlie Daniels help promote the fabulous wildlife and fishing opportunities we have here in our state,” according to Don King, TWRA Chief of Informa-

YOUTH QUAIL HUNT SCHEDULED FOR MARCH 2ND IN LYNNVILLE A quail hunt for youth ages 10 through 16 has been scheduled for Saturday, March 2 near the Giles County community of Lynnville. The hunt is sponsored by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, Music City Quail Forever, and the Young Sportsman Foundation. Participants must be ages 10-16, hunter safety certified and have the appropriate licenses. If a participant does not have an adult to accompany her/him, mentors will be available to take participants on the hunt. In addition, individuals at least 18 years old are invited to serve as a mentor. The hunt provides a great opportunity to experience hunting quail with working dogs. The hunt will begin at 8 a.m. and concludes with a noon lunch. A door prize will be given to one of the participants. To obtain an application, visit the TWRA website at www. tnwildlife.org For assistance or further information to participate or be a mentor contact Music City Quail Forever members Dale P. Bradley at (615) 390-8117 or Tony Phillips at (615) 406-3384.

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Baying at the Moon: Coon Hunting By Shawn Todd

H

ello, to all of the readers of “Southern Tradition Outdoors Magazine.” My name is Shawn Todd. After I invited Rob Somerville on a coon hunt that we were taking several kids on, he asked me to write a series of articles about this southern outdoor heritage that is at the risk of becoming an extinct sport. That sport is coon hunting. This has been a southern tradition for centuries. It has been in existence ever since a hound treed the ringtail animal for the hide and the meat was used to keep the wolf from the door. So I hope the articles that I write will be informative, enjoyable and may encourage some of the readers of “Southern Tradition Outdoors” to try the sport, especially today’s youth. Getting My First Taste The first coon hunt I went on was in 1982 at the tender age of twelve. The hunt was in the Tatumville area of Dyer, Tennessee. I went with a man that became a second father to me. His name was Jere Blalock and his sons became the brothers I never had. We had grade {average skilled} dogs at the time and after about about an hour of hunting, we treed {dogs located a coon} in a dozer pile. We never got the game that night, but I was hooked by 10

the adrenaline rush of this new adventure and my life has never been the same. I went hunting many a weekend with Mr. Blalock and his sons and after about twenty hunts I finally got to shoot my first coon. Things have changed since then. Technology has made it so you don’t have to stay out till 3:00 in the morning to find your dogs. Now, you can pin point where they are located.

Also, with the electric collar and a little work and training, the dogs will come back when you say “here.” Maybe, the good ole days really weren’t the “good ole days” after all. Three Decades Later Fast forward to 31 years later and here I am taking the young kids of today, just as Jere had taken me and his sons. It’s January of this year,

after a slight freezing rain and sleet and we are at Reelfoot Lake with three young men - Kirk Palmer (19), Jere Palmer (15) and John Parker (20), all three from Lake County in Tennessee. Two grizzled veterans - Joe Lewis (67), from Gates and Rocky Elmes, (70), from Minnesota joined me and Rob Somerville. On this night we had two Redbones named Siscontinued on page 12

Pictured here {from left to right} are Shawn Todd, Jacob Headley and Kirk Palmer along with dogs Heidi and Sissy, as they pose in front of their harvested coon lying on the reed bale behind them. - Photo by Rob Somerville

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Baying at the Moon Continued

Shawn Todd and his Walker Hound named Heidi, are pictured here preparing to do what they love best...taking some kids coon hunting. - Photo by Rob Somerville

Veteran coon hunter, Joe Lewis takes the time to show brothers Kirk and Jere Palmer, how to use a GPS to track hounds. Minnesota native, Rocky Elmes is in background. - Photo by Rob Somerville

sy and Jud and my Walker named Heidi. We released the hounds into the night. Soon, the quiet night was shattered by the sound of hound music in the air and within 20 minutes they located and treed. According to the Garmin {GPS system} the dogs were about 1000 yards inside the woods. Some of the guys were not equipped to go into the overflow of water from the lake, so Joe and I went in where the dogs treed. As luck would have it and as is often the case, it was an empty den tree with a huge hole on the side of it. We walked back out with no game. Joe and Rocky decided to go back to

corner of Reelfoot Lake, in knee deep water, another den tree. This night our game bag will remain empty. Round Two Four days later we decided to hunt some private land and this time it was me, Rob

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Gates, Tennessee to try their luck. The rest of the group opted to try Champy’s Pocket on Reelfoot Lake. That’s Why They Call It Hunting and Not Shooting This is the second release

“It looked like two Tasmanian Devils fighting a tornado as the fight was on!” of the night. This time it is just two dogs; Sissy and Heidi. The two females strike {scent a coon} within minutes and the chase is on. In twenty minutes we are looking at our Garmin, it says they are eight hundred yards in. This time they are in the

Somerville, Kirk Palmer and Jacob Headley (18) of Dyersburg. That night we had Sissy and Heidi. We released the hounds and in a matter of mere minutes the silence of the frigid night was shattered by the music of the hounds. The chase was on and with-

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

in 20 minutes we heard the locating and the treeing vocalizations of the hounds. We headed out to the dogs, with Kirk and Jacob being younger and faster and getting there before Rob and me. As you older hunters know, with youth comes both enthusiasm and inexperience. So, needless to say Kirk, in his excitement, stepped off in a ditch and went clear up to his chest, filling up both legs of his waders with freezing cold water. As we arrived at the tree, the coon jumped down. It looked like two Tasmanian Devils fighting a tornado as the fight was on! After ten minutes, the battle was over. Final score was Hounds – 1,


Shawn Todd and Kirk Palmer getting splashed with water by their eager dogs - Heidi and Sissy, as they turn them loose on the trail. - Photo by Rob Somerville

Coons – 0. With our game bag full we leave to hunt another night. Summary In conclusion, there are many aspects to coon hunting and coon hunters. Some pursue the masked bandits for competition, some for pleasure hunting and many for both. It is exciting and unique. Hearing the hounds baying at the moon, as they chase these masked bandits through woods and swamps, fills a veteran cooner’s heart and soul. We will explore more of these aspects in later columns. As I mentioned in the first paragraph of this article, I hope this series on coon hunting will be informative, entertaining and may

encourage some newbies to try it. As you can tell, I try to get the youth involved in the sport. Like all other hunting, the youth is where the future is. So, if you get a chance to do so, please take a kid or a young adult along to participate in any kind of hunting. I would also like to congratulate Matthew “Coon Dawg” Craddock and his Walker hound - One Good Looking Chic, for placing 9th in the Grand American Coon Hunting Competition and being the high scoring Walker female at the UKC Winter Classic. Here’s to full moon nights and hound music! Shawn Todd

This Redbone Hound named Jud, seems to be imploring the cameraman to let him out of his kennel, so he can get on the scent of a masked bandit. - Photo by Rob Somerville

The author’s Walker Hound - Heidi, is shown here a little bloodied, but victorious after tangling with a big female coon. - Photo by Rob Somerville

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Just Like on the Discovery Channel By Walter Wilkerson

This robin is shown feeding her always hungry hatchlings a nice, juicy worm. - STO File Photo

I

was in my taxidermy shop the other day and a couple guys came in, one with his son. The young boy was looking out the rear door of my shop into my back yard and said, “Look Dad, those squirrels are fighting.” We all went to the door and I asked him, “Do you know why they are fighting?” 18

He answered, “No.” I told him that this time of year squirrels are very territorial and they were fighting over a female. As we watched, the squirrels ran up and down, then around and around the tree. I told him to look at that squirrel in the top of the tree, explaining that she was the female and

that the big male was fighting all the other male squirrels for her. They really put on a show for that little feller, and then two or three ran down the tree and across the yard with that big male chasing behind them. And the female squirrel was just waiting in the tree for her mate to return. He said in amaze-

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

ment, “I have never seen that before.” I asked him if he ever watched Animal Planet or the Discovery Channel. He answered that he had. I then asked him if he realized that we have our own Animal Planet in our back yards. He looked at me confused, like what are you talking about?


I told him that for creatures like birds, bugs, frogs and snakes, it’s a survival show everyday. They either eat or get eaten, and kill or will be killed. They are just trying to survive for a chance to reproduce their species. Nobody fixes their supper or makes their beds for them. They have to fend for themselves. In Mother Nature’s creatures, you have meat eaters and you have vegetarians just like us humans. Some birds, like the robin, only eat worms and bugs, while the redbird only eats seeds and berries. Most mating in nature occurs during the spring and usually, on any given day, you can see God’s beautiful creatures going through the mating rituals to secure their place in this world and to reproduce for the future generations of their species. These creatures have to survive. There are no free hand outs for them. It was a great feeling to see that little boy so interested in nature. We need to take the time to show and tell our younger generation what we have lived and learned. This will keep our kids more grounded and in tune with nature. The next time you are out and see a robin pulling a worm from the lawn, or a hawk dive down to a field for a mouse, or that long line of ants marching, just think about it. This is the true Outdoor Channel, in REAL HIGH DEFINITION and enjoy what God blessed us with. Walt “Keeping the Tradition Alive” Wilkerson

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Gobbler or

Goblin? You Decide. By Garry Mason

Garry Mason with a nice gobbler. - Photo courtesy of Garry Mason

T

he day started as did most. The sun was just peaking over the horizon, birds were starting to awaken and a big owl was hooting behind me. The sound of his call was heard by others, as well as me. I knew it would not be long before the magnificent creature that I was hunting this particular morning would be awakened by the sounds echoing throughout the hardwood bottom in which I stood. Sure enough, I soon realized I was right. The vocalization that a wild turkey gobbler makes, when he announces his wake up call to the world below, trum-

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peted through the woods‌ The Gobble. It is a sound that no Turkey hunter will ever forget. Schooled by the Masters Looking back on my first wild turkey hunt, I realize one thing for sure. There was absolutely no other sound that could compare to a big boss gobbler, blasting out his morning wake-up call, early in the morning. Almost every animal in the woods nearby will stop and listen, as this thunderous sound bursts through trees and rattles the leaves. I remember the very first time that I heard that sound shake the beautiful,

Tennessee timberlands that I hunt. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency had trapped several wild turkeys and turned them loose on the property near my home, which was owned at the time by Westvaco Timber Company. Just across the Copper-springs road, sat the Gin Creek Wildlife management area, right next to the property in which the turkeys had been released. A couple of years had passed since the release of the birds and I knew very little about Turkey hunting, but I could not wait to hit the woods on opening day. I had

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

two really good friends up in Cadiz, Kentucky named Harold Knight and David Hale and I picked their brain about this sport at every opportunity. Harold and David had hunted on the Land Between the Lakes wildlife area for many years and were right in the thick of the wild turkey hunting community. Between the two of them, they had logged more time in the turkey woods than anyone else I knew, so it was very exciting to be able to get advice and knowledge from these two future Legends of the Outdoors National Hall of Fame members.


Scouting had provided me with little turkey hunting information. However, I had found a lot of turkey scratchings in the leaves on the hillsides, where the birds had hunted for acorns and bugs. After talking to Harold and David, my confidence level was very high, as I slipped into the WMA area on that very first morning. After all, I had been coached by two of the best in the business. How could I fail? Smiling to myself as I hit the woods, I remember thinking that if I can just hear a bird gobble, then this should be an easy hunt. Have any of you ever made that mistake? Yep, I didn’t think that I was the only one. The Boogeyman Not long after walking into the woods, I found a big tree to sit down under and made myself comfortable as possible. Then it happened. I was just about to close my

eyes, while listening to the woods wake up around me, when all of a sudden shock waves pounded down from the limbs above me. A big Tennessee long beard announced his presence to the world right in the middle of my daydream about turkey hunting. I remember jumping straight up off the ground, scared clean out of my skin. I thought that the boogie man had flown up in that tree and had waited on me to get there that morning, so he could send me to my maker after he finished me off. That ole tom must have thought the same thing, because he flew down off that limb and hit the ground with an eruption that woke up sleeping dogs, two counties over. Running just as fast as he could, to get away from the big hulking form down on the ground {which was me}, his reaction had been almost as comical

as mine. Looking back on it now, I am sure that had the whole episode been filmed by some amateur camera man, it would have earned many dollars while being shown on one of our now famous reality shows. I never did get another chance at that old bird and it was years later before I got my first long beard. I also never figured The author’s grandson, Conner Mason, is out which one of shown holding a nice long beard he harvested. - Photo courtesy of Garry Mason us was scared more that mornthem, but that first gobble ing, me or the gobbler above that I hear every year still me. I will tell you one thing makes the hair stand up on for sure, I have learned plen- the back of my neck. I hope ty about these magnificent that it does the same for you. birds over the thirty some Good hunting. odd years that I have hunted

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Retriever Training: Part 4 in the Series

Second Training Season

By Joe H. King Jr.

The first duck hunt, with your new retriever, is now under your belt. This past duck season was very slow for most duck hunters. I hope your first-year dog got to make several retrieves. As we discussed before duck season, your gun dog needed to know his place in the duck blind, dog box and at the front of the boat or dog stand, as well as how to exit and return to these areas. I am sure that for many of your hunts, a small number of hunters with a louder duck load were used. There were probably several hand signal refusals noted from over anxious pups. Also, you have those young dogs that dreaded cold water, causing some refusal problems. With this being said, make a list of what went wrong and start training now to solve the problems you encountered. Remember the importance of time, patience and repetition! Obedience is a Must! If obedience is an issue, work on the command in the field, duck blind or boat. Your dog is older now and more mature. Repetition, with the maturity your hunting companion needs to be held to, is a higher standard. Saying sit, stay, and heel all the time does not cut it. Work for the “one time told” command and do not move until commanded again. Working on exiting or entering of your duck blind, boat or dog stand should be done with several sessions throughout the year, so that your pup will be comfortable and used to the situation.

Brrr! The next scenario is the cold water retrieve. If there were issues of this nature, start practicing now, during the milder days of February and March. Watch the air temperature, hoping the water temp has warmed up some. Cold water spooks some young pups and first year dogs. To fix this problem, work with single retrieves (using a dead duck saved from duck season or a training dummy) to work with the puppy. It is important for you to show excitement when your pup makes a retrieve, so the dog will know that is what you want. Three to four retrieves each session is enough, while retrieving in cold water. If the frigid water is still an issue, back off and wait until spring and warmer water is available. The excitement of the retrieve, the dogs maturity and warmer water, will start building the foundations for success during next duck season. Fixing “Gun-Shy” Dogs Your gun dog, during its second season of training, needs shotgun training with poppers or live shotgun rounds during its retrieval training sessions. This will keep it from being “gun-shy.” You need to get three or four of your dog training or hunting buddies to help with this one. Start from far away, with the shotgun blast and throwing of a dummy or dead duck, then let your dog make the retrieve. Your goal is to move slowly back, toward your dog, to get the retriever gradually used to the sound and the shotgun blast not scaring him. Watch your dog’s reaction to the gun blast and only move closer when you see the dog is comfortable with the close sound. The situations we have discussed will get you going in the second training season. Mark training and more advanced hand signal training will be discussed in other issues this spring. If you have more questions about what was discussed, feel free to contact me at thunderridgeretrievers@ yahoo.com or call me at 731-676-7776.

Joe H. King, Jr. Thunder Ridge Retrievers

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SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013


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Wild in the Kitchen I hope you enjoyed my wild game recipes in the last issue of STO Magazine. As I said last issue, cooking is one of my favorite pastimes to do indoors. We eat a lot of wild meat, duck, deer and fish. There is a sense of accomplishment in cleaning, preparing and cooking fresh meat that you have killed or caught. I would love to share some of my favorite recipes with you. Here are a few more of my family’s favorite tips, marinades and recipes, as well as some interesting and fun duck, catfish and turkey facts.

JALAPENO DUCK BREAST INGREDIENTS: • 12 oz. thin cut bacon. • 6 duck breasts, each cut in quarters. • Garlic Pepper {or seasoning of your choice}. • Six small jalape no peppers. • Wild rice

FRIED WILD TURKEY STRIPS INGREDIENTS: • One turkey breast. • Allegro marinade • Flour. • Vegetable or peanut oil. • Salt and pepper. DIRECTIONS: • Cut turkey breast into strips, crossway from the grain. • Marinade breast strips in Allegro and refrigerate for 4 to 6 hrs. • Pat strips dry with paper towels. • Roll strips in flour. • Deep fry until golden brown WILD TURKEY FUN FACTS: • The turkey was Benjamin Franklin’s choice for the National Bird of the United States. • Wild turkeys typically forage on forest floors, but can also be found in grasslands and swamps. They feed on nuts, seeds, fruits, insects and salamanders. • Only male turkeys display the ruffled feathers, fanlike tail, bare head, and bright beard commonly associated with these birds. They also gobble with a distinctive sound that can be heard a mile away. • Females lay 4 to 17 eggs, and feed their chicks after they hatch, but only for a few days. Young turkeys quickly learn to fend for themselves, as part of mother/ child flocks that can include dozens of animals. Males take no role in the care of young turkeys. 24

DIRECTIONS: • Season duck breasts to taste with your favorite seasoning (mine is garlic pepper). • Cut the small jalapenos in half (remove seeds if you want a milder taste). • Take one ¼ duck breast and one ½ jalapeno. Wrap each with bacon, placing them on a baking sheet or grill. • Cook until bacon is crisp. • Serve with wild rice. DUCK FUN FACTS: • Mallards are able to take flight from the water almost vertically. • With one strong swoosh of their wings; the duck’s body is lifted clear out of the water. They quickly go into full flight. • Mallards can rise “straight up” 30 to 36 feet, if it’s necessary to clear tree tops. • Once the duck is in flight they can reach speeds of up to 70 feet per second • Mallards usually have the longest migration route of any duck, extending from late summer to early winter. They usually begin their migration back to the breeding grounds in March and April. • Female ducks show a strong tendency to breed near the place they were hatched, or near a previous breeding site. • Most male ducks never breed in the same area twice. • Male ducks are known as drakes. • Female ducks are known as hens.

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013


GRILLED CATFISH (GEORGE FOREMAN GRILL STYLE) INGREDIENTS: • Catfish fillets. • Onion slices. • Italian dressing or roasted red pepper dressing. • One package of Spanish rice. • Non-stick cooking oil. • George Foreman grill.

DIRECTIONS: • Spray griddle of grill with non-stick oil. Place fillets on hot griddle • Add one tablespoon of dressing to top of fish. • Place onion slice on top. • Close grill. • Grill 8 to 10 minutes (depending on size of fillet) or until fish flakes with a fork. • Serve with Spanish rice.

CATFISH FUN FACTS: • During the 19th century, giant blue catfish weighing from 125 to 200 pounds were reportedly caught on a regular basis. In his book “Steamboating: 65 Years on Missouri’s Rivers,” Capt. William Heckman described a 315-pound blue cat, caught just after the Civil War. • The catfish has over 27,000 taste buds. • The candiru, a small, South American catfish is the only vertebrate parasite of people. It has been known to enter the urethras of bathers and swimming animals. • The walking catfish, moves across land from one body of water to another. It uses its pectoral fins like legs and has a modified gill chamber to get oxygen from the air. • The largest confirmed record in the U.S. was a blue catfish, weighing 150 pounds in 1879. The largest known blue caught in Tennessee was a 130-pounder, fished from the Fort Loudon Reservoir in 1976. • The big blue catfish, in the Aquarium’s Nickajack Lake exhibit, weighs more than 90 pounds. • A female blue catfish can produce as many as 100,000 eggs at a time. • The electric catfish, native to Africa, is capable of generating up to 350 volts. • The glass catfish is mostly transparent and often seen in home aquariums. Catfish are also included in aquariums as scavengers, to help keep the tank clean.

I love cooking for my family and friends, but not everyone likes wild meat. I can honestly say I have never tried to serve wild meat without telling everyone what it actually is. I wouldn’t want it done to me, so that’s just always been one of my rules. But, any of these recipes you could pass off as beef or chicken and wild game is the healthiest meat you can eat; free of steroids and growth chemicals. The key to making it absolutely delicious, is to let your meat soak to get all the blood out and marinade it to make it tender. If you have any questions about any of these recipes please don’t hesitate to call. Hunting is hard work and the results are very rewarding, but you have to know how to cook what you’re hunting. I hope you will try these recipes and enjoy them! Happy Hunting Everyone! Terry “Living Life Outdoors’’ Wilkerson

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Bethel Bass Busters

Jeff Brooks of the Florida High School Anglers Association, helps Matt Roberts and Zack Parker hold part of their record breaking catch at the Carhartt Bass Masters Southern Regional Championship. - Photo by Garry Mason

B

ethel Bass Repeats as Carhartt Bass Masters Collegiate Southern Regional Champions Tavares, Florida (January 5) –In a record-shattering performance, Bethel Bass team members Zach Parker and Matthew Roberts netted 25.1 pounds on day two of competition to lead their squad to victory in the Carhartt College Series South Regional on the Harris Chain in Tavares, Florida. In addition, the historic victory earned Bethel its

26

second-consecutive Carhartt Bass Masters Collegiate Series Southern Regional Championship. Bethel set the all-time oneday and two-day heavyweight records at 29.2 pounds and 54.3 pounds, respectively, for the Carhartt College Series and dominated competition by a 9.9 pound margin. In addition, Parker-Roberts dayone, weight-topping catch yielded the pair the tournament’s Bass Pro Nitro Big Bag Award. Bethel’s Myles Palmer,

Dalton Wilson and others added stellar performances. Succeeding across the board, the Bass Cats qualified three teams for nationals. A total of 79 boats representing five states participated in the event. The Bethel team now holds all three of the world records for the largest weights in Collegiate Bass fishing. The most weight in a two day team competition twenty fish two boat limit at 84 pounds 4 ounces. ( 2012 Southern Collegiate Cham-

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

pionship. Lake Guntersville AL) The most weight in a collegiate event single day five fish limit at 29 pounds 2 ounces (2013 Carhartt Bass Masters Southern Regional Harris Chain of lakes, Travares FL) The most weight in a two day tournament ten fish limit at 54 pounds 3 ounces. (2013 Carhartt Bass Masters Southern Regional Harris Chain of lakes, Travares FL) Bethel Coach Garry Mason was pleased and proud of his


entire team. “I am so proud of all these young people. Zach and Matthew were just amazing, and to break the alltime records is just phenomenal. I am also thankful and appreciative of the hard work provided by assistant coach Kenny Louden. It takes a total team effort to win consistently at this level, and that’s what we have.” He continued, “This year’s 54.3 pound total smashed last year’s record catch of 48.11 pounds set by Bethel Wildcat’s Cody Ross and Dewey Swims.” Smiling, he said, “Bethel has become one of the power house teams in college bass fishing in America The success of our team hinges on continually recruiting the best young fisherman throughout the United States. We are winning competitions consistently with different individuals and teams everywhere we go. For a little town like McKenzie, Tennessee to provide national strength like this is truly incredible. Our team has helped to put Bethel University on the national stage.” . Because of our continued success and ever-growing place in the national sports spotlight, we are having tremendous success in recruiting top-notch fishing prospects like senior Matthew Roberts from Iowa and junior Zach Parker from

Jackson. When these topshelf recruits come to Bethel, they turn around and teach our other anglers The Bethel Bass Cats went into this season ranked sixth in the nation because we won two of the three tournaments that we competed in (the previous year). The Bethel University Bass Team has defeated major college fishing programs like Auburn, LSU, Alabama, Ole Miss and Tennessee. We don’t just compete with the big boys-we beat them. The Bethel team had six of the ten kids from the Southern Collegiate ranks that were named to the AllAmerican team via player vote in 2012. That kind of success and respect comes from recruiting the best players and partnering effectively with the most powerful high school fishing programs in America.”

We c u r r e n t l y h a v e 3 2 members on our squad. That number will increase to 40 next year. We have an exceptionally strong class of student-athletes from top to bottom. Many of our team members maintain 4.0 or near 4.0 GPA’s. They are very strong academically and athletically. Winners want to be part of a winning program. They want to come to Bethel University.” Mason said that Bethel’s growing national exposure has drawn the attention of top professional anglers such as Bill Dance, Roland Martin, Jimmy Houston, Shaw Grigsby and others. The New York Times did a page and a half write-up on our program. We have been featured on numerous national television shows and in sporting magazines. Exposure of that magnitude is

priceless.. The publicity generated alone is well worth the dollars that have been spent by Bethel to build the Bass Fishing program.” Leaning forward, he added, “The Bethel Bass Fishing Team is not a flash-in-thepan. We aren’t going to win events one year and then suddenly just disappear off the map. We are constantly adding top recruits and strengthening ourselves for the future. We will be a force to be reckoned with on the national level for many, many years to come.” Mason said that the College Series South Region win over the weekend marked the first of nine tournaments that Bethel Bass will compete in this season. Bethel University Wildcats are now ranked number two in the nation just 23 points behind Auburn University.

FEB - MARCH 2013 | SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS

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This is just one of the many lakes the author checked out, by inflatable kayak, while pursuing his dream property. - Photo courtesy of Kevin Griffith

In Pursuit of a Dream, Fyrne Lake By Kevin Griffith

W

hile sitting in my office located amidst the middle of the sprawl, crowds and traffic of the Tampa Bay area in Florida, I would dream…. dream of open spaces, walking in the woods, hearing the sounds 30

of wildlife and feeling the breeze upon my face. I even visualized casting my fishing line out into private waters, where I wouldn’t have to dodge ski boats or jet skiers. I really didn’t spend ALL my time dreaming at my desk.

I actually love my work. In fact, I own my own company that I spent the first 25 years of my career building into a very successful distribution business. But after 25 years, I was ready to get out of my office and start exploring oth-

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

er areas of life. I’m a country boy at heart. My family is originally from southern Indiana, where both sets of my grandparents had farms. I was approaching the continued on page 32


Pictured is an aerial picture of Fyrne Lake. - Photo courtesy of Kevin Griffith

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In Pursuit of a Dream Continued

Shown is a view from the dam of Fyrne Lake, looking north. - Photo courtesy of Kevin Griffith

age of three when my parents moved to Florida. But, we still returned to Indiana to visit family every summer. Many of my fond childhood memories resulted from those visits: helping with the farm chores, exploring the woods and fishing in the many ponds and creeks. I loved it! That love carried through to my adulthood. I continued fishing as an adult and I even camped occasionally, but I lived in Florida and that was truly my home. It is where I went to school, began my career in business, married and had children. The trajectory of my life seemed to have been set. Years went by and life was good. How-

ever, my roots were tugging at the strings of my heart. And this tug grew stronger as the crowds, noise, traffic and crime of the city grew in quantity and intensity. This tug seemed to be momentarily quenched whenever I

ing similar experiences. She missed the change of seasons from her early childhood which was divided between South Carolina and Connecticut. Diana had many fond memories of playing in the snow and watching the

was hoping to find something within an hour’s drive from my work, with the dream of possibly living there and commuting. That wasn’t going to happen. Our area of Florida was just too developed. The property was going to have to be two to three hours away in order to have a chance of getting close to my part of our dream. However, restricting our search to Florida would not satisfy Diana’s desire to have a change of seasons. Eventually Diana convinced me to expand the range of our search to a day’s drive. We drew an arc from North Carolina, across Tennessee and into Arkansas. Keeping with Diana’s desire

“However, my roots were tugging at the strings of my heart. “

32

was on the water or in the woods. I then started dreaming. What if we had a place with water and woods to escape to for weekends and vacations? What if we located in an area where we could eventually retire? My wife, Diana, was hav-

amazing seasonal renewal of the landscape around her. Diana also liked quiet! She dreamed of being in a cabin in the woods, curled up with a good book, in front of a warm fire. So we started dreaming and brainstorming together. I

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013


for a change of season, we concentrated our search at the outer limits of the arc. We really didn’t know how much land we wanted. What we did know was that we wanted a lake and woods. I first checked out the internet for an idea of what might be available. I called on several properties and discussed our vision with their respective realtors. Most recommended other potential properties. Within a few months I had identified a handful of highly potential locations to check out. Our next step was to start making scouting trips. Diana and I would take weekend trips to walk the various properties and

explore their woods. Later, while Diana would checkout the nearby towns, I would paddle around the lake in an inflatable kayak that I had packed in our bags. After looking over each property, my vision (not necessarily

I also noticed that we kept encountering fences as we walked the land. That bugged me. If I was going to eventually move here to spend the rest of my life, I was going to need enough land to keep my interest. The question re-

on 10 acres in the woods.” We were already looking at properties of over 100 acres. There seemed to be multiple challenges before me in this quest… not to mention the ballooning potential price tag of my ever expanding vision. As we searched, we discovered several very cool properties that caught our interest. These included a 200 acre, mostly wooded farm with a 30 acre lake and an old farm house that had four awesome {stone} fish camp cabins with fireplaces, a 400 acre farm with a series of 3 lakes with a 1920’s vintage two-story house that formerly housed a speakeasy during prohibition and a 170 acre wooded prop-

“Kevin, all I really want is a cabin on 10 acres in the woods.” Diana’s) was expanding. The lakes we were checking out didn’t take very long to digest. Usually, one afternoon’s visit would satisfy my curiosity. It seemed like I was just going around in a circle. I was getting bored. I was going to need more water!

mained just how much land and how much water? The most important question was how do I get Diana on board with a larger purchase? Diana was into simplicity. She defined her original vision with this sentence, “Kevin, all I really want is a cabin

continued on next page

FEB - MARCH 2013 | SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS

33


In Pursuit of a Dream Continued erty with two spring fed lakes filled with crystal clear water and abundant fish. Each location had its own appeal and challenges. The most intriguing of these three was the 200 acre parcel with the old fish camp. As I walked past the 4 cabins down to the shoreline of the lake, an ancient dream was awakened within me. Twenty years prior to that I had been staying at a fish camp on the Withlacoochee River in Florida. I vividly remembered being outside at night, between our cabin and the shoreline, looking up at a hoot owl and reflecting on the day’s adventures. As the owl called out, I dreamed about how cool it would be to own and operate my own fish camp. What an amazing fantasy that was to consider! That dream eventually faded into the recesses of my mind, only to be reawakened on that day in Tennessee. Diana and I did make an offer on that property, but in the end, the owner really only wanted to sell the lake and part of the land… not the part that included the old homestead and fish camp cabins. 34

In reality, by the time the deal had fallen through, my vision had expanded further. I spent enough time on the 30 acre lake that I knew I

enough land in which to get lost. I translated that into 100 acres of water and 1000 acres of woods. After much discussion

Kevin and Diana Griffith. - Photo courtesy of Kevin Griffith

would soon get my fill. With the lake in the middle of the acreage, there was, on aver-

with Diana, we renewed our search, utilizing the new definition and quickly discov-

“It was perfect.” age, only a few hundred feet from the water’s edge to the property’s boundary. So I let my dreams soar further, without limitations to come up with a definition of paradise. I visualized enough water to not get bored with and

ered that there were very few privately held, undeveloped properties with that much private water. I only found two in our search range that fit our expanded description and luckily, we ended up with the best out of the two.

SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013

The property was located just 10 minutes outside of Dyersburg, Tennessee and it consisted of a 110 acre lake surrounded by 1385 acres, over a 1000 of which was woode d . I T WA S PERFECT! As soon as my wife and I walked down to the shoreline, I turned to her and mouthed, “This is it!” We had found paradise. Three months of negotiations later, the property (and the debt) was ours. We noticed the shape of the lake resembled a fern leaf and that reminded me of my summers of fishing with my grandmother, Fyrne, on her Indiana farm. So we named the lake and farm in honor of her. Today, the property is more than I could ever have imagined when we started our search 11 years ago. Oh… Diana did get her cabin on 10 acres in the woods. It’s just being embraced by my ever expanding dream. Editor’s Note: This article is the first in a series, which will chronicle Kevin and Diana’s continued quest of developing Fyrne Lake into their dream home.


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w a p a P Rob y B n o i t c i F

lle i v r e Som

t was a Saturday morning and that meant there was no school! I was anxious to begin a day of doing nothing but playing the new video games I had gotten for Christmas, when the phone rang. It was my grandma and papaw calling from their farm in the country. They wanted my mom and me to come out and visit for the weekend. This was the first weekend my mom would be off of work in a long, long time. She had been working two jobs ever since my dad had gotten sick and died last year. I didn’t want to go, but I knew my mom missed her folks. I took one more look at my new video games as we headed out the door. What was I going to do at the farm? My only company would be two old people and papaw’s old hound dog, which never seemed to get up off of the porch. After what seemed like forever, due to the fact that I had to listen to my mom sing along to her “Golden Oldies” radio station, we finally arrived at the farm. Grandma and papaw were sitting on the porch in their rocking chairs, with grandma rocking and crocheting a blanket on her lap and papaw squinting into the sun. They rose in unison at the sight of our car. Grandma rushed over, greeting us with excited hugs and kisses. The old man just nodded and stoically accepted a kiss on the cheek from my mom. For minutes the old man’s eyes met mine. Then he looked me over carefully from head to toe. He nodded, sighed and said, “Reckon we better fatten up this city boy. He looks kinda skinny and pale.” As we ate lunch, I studied my papaw. He had skin like leather from the sun and wind and although he was thin, his veins and muscles stood out on his arms like steel cords from hard work. While the women were doing dishes, my grandpa and me sat in the family room. I stood

I

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looking out the window at the snow falling and he silently smoked his old corn cob pipe in front of the fireplace. He studied me for a while and finally asked, “I guess you’re bored without all of your city toys, aren’t you?” I just shrugged, not wanting to hurt his feelings. He pulled on his old wool coat, grabbed a 20-gauge shotgun and some shells out of the gun rack and said, “Come with me.” To my amazement, when we stepped out on the porch and the old hound dog saw papaw with his gun, it began to jump up and down and run in circles like a puppy. Papaw smiled at me and said, “Old Jake kind of saves up his energy until he knows we are going hunting.” We walked over the back pasture, which was covered with about two inches of fresh snow, and eased along the edge of a huge woods. The old man looked down at me and said, “Now I know this isn’t Nintendo, but you might just have a lot of fun and learn something too, because you are in Mother Nature’s classroom now.” We walked a little ways, with gramps moving slowly, with him listening and watching carefully while I just followed along. Suddenly, he stopped and knelt down in the snow, waving at me to come over. He pointed down at some marks in the snow and said, “These are rabbit tracks. They have been feeding over in that clover field. The smaller tracks were made by hill rabbits and this bigger set was made by a swamp rabbit.” Jake was watching gramps with his tail wagging like a flag on a windy day. Papaw hollered, “Hunt ‘em up Jake” and the old dog took off like a bullet with his nose on the ground. We just leaned against an old oak tree that papaw told me was here before the Civil War was even fought and waited. In a few seconds we heard Old Jake, who I had never even heard bark, howling like a coyote. I wanted to run over and see what was wrong, but papaw held my arm. He said, “Jake found us a rabbit, and he’ll run him in a circle back at us directly.” He handed me the shotgun, showed me how to put a shell in the chamber and where the safety was. He said, “Lead that old rabbit by about two feet, as it is running, and make sure the dog is in the clear. Leave the safety on until you’re ready to shoot.” No sooner were these words out of his mouth that Old Jake’s baying got closer. I got the gun ready and saw the rabbit, streaking along the ground, about 15 feet in front of Jake. I thumbed off the safety, led the rabbit by two feet and pulled the trigger. The rabbit rolled head over heels for about five feet and came to a stop. Old Jake gathered him up and brought him to us. My heart was beating like a big drum. Papaw knelt down, took my hand in his big callused one, smiled and said, “Not bad for a city boy.” We shot four more rabbits that day, and granny deep-fried them for supper. I guess it was the best meal I ever ate. After that day, me and mom made it a point to visit her parents as often as possible.

The Regional Leader in Bait Sales and Sport Fish Stocking!

Five hundred acres of water in 50 ponds of all sizes as far as one can see. GreenWater is an integral part of this huge aquaculture complex and it’s future. The number one product, in volume is baitfish, or minnows. But, the number one product, by far, in public interest is game fish. Healthy Bass, Bluegill, Hybrid Bluegill, Catfish, and Tilapia are available for private pond stocking.

315 Salem Church Rd. - Milan, TN - 38358 731-662-7449 greenh2o@usit.net www.greenwaterfishfarm.com Now that I am older, I realized that these trips were part of a healing experience for my mom and a learning process for me. My papaw taught me a lifetime of knowledge about the outdoors in a few short summers. But, most of all he taught me to listen and learn when elderly people talk, and that I didn’t have to have a video game to entertain me when I had God’s glorious world of Nature to enjoy. Thanks Papaw.

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BUCKETS

NEIGHBORHOOD PUB & GRUB “A Great Place to Eat and Hang Out” Code Blue Pizza washed down with a cold draught beer. Or dig in to a mound of our Super Cajun Nachos, enough to feed you and five of your friends. Peel-N-Eat shrimp, buffalo wings tossed in your favorite sauce, salads, seafood, juicy strip steak, tasty half pound burgers and oven toasted grinders help round out our extensive menu ... something for everyone, even the kids!

BAR! ELED INKS! D O M D DR Y RE NEWL LASS MIXE DC S OF RS! WORL DOZEN ORTED BEE P ! C & IM SPECIALS TV’S! I T S E R M U N O E O D H RE HAPPY EN FLAT SC A DOZ GAMES! OVER

IN OUR PRIVATE DINING AREA FOR: Banquets! Birthdays! Bachelor or Bachelorette Partys! Corporate Meetings! Church Functions! Club Meetings! Retirement Partys!

2495 Lake Rd Dyersburg, Tennessee 731-287-3420 Book your holiday

of party now at one nt ie en nv co our two, ! ns tio loca

BUCKETS

NEIGHBORHOOD PUB & GRUB “A Great Place to Eat and Hang Out”

Karoake with Chris Chaos on Thursdays 8 p.m.-11 p.m.

Buckets Neighborhood Pub and Grub is a locally owned, family oriented sports pub where the regulars are greeted by name and jerseys representing local and state teams adorn the walls. The Bucket’s servers bop around to the beat of 70’s and 80’s rock as they serve up such treats as our famous all meat Code Blue Pizza washed down with a cold draught beer. Or dig in to a mound

Every Tuesday acoustic music by Tyler Thornton 8 p.m.-11p.m.

friends. Peel-N-Eat shrimp, buffalo wings tossed in your favorite sauce, salads, seafood, juicy strip steak, tasty half pound burgers and oven toasted grinders help round out our extensive menu ... something for everyone, even the kids! With our full bar, Buckets is also a great place to kick back with your friends while you watch your favorite sports on one of our 21 TV’s. “Buckets is the place to go after a day enjoying Reelfoot Lake”

Rob Somerville

1700 W. Reelfoot Ave. - Union City, TN - 38261

731-885-6646

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SOUTHERN TRADITIONS OUTDOORS | FEB - MARCH 2013


While you’re huting or fishing on Reelfoot Lake, stop by and see Johanna and her crew for a quick, delicious meal. Or, beat the heat with our “World Famous” ice cream. Dine-in or eat outside on our Patio!! Home Owned and operated

OPEN EVERY DAY!

Atlas Signs & Graphics Brian Poe 408 West Market St., Dyersburg, TN

HWY 78 - Tiptonville

Less than 5 min from Reelfoot Lake

“Something Different”

SOLLIS SEAMLESS GUTTERS • • • • • •

731-253-6311

J & P Machine Repair Jim and Preston Seratt

25 Beautiful Exterior Colors! 5” & 6” Gutters! Affordable Leaf Guard Systems! Aluminum Seamless Gutters! Free Estimates! Bonded & Insured!

SPECIALIZING IN DIESEL, AUTO AND FARM EQUIPMENT, TRUCK FLEET CARE AND PARTS DEPARTMENT

OWNER: MIKE SOLLIS 6560 LENOX NAUVOO RD - DYERSBURG, TN - 38024

731-676-9865

“ FOR ALL YOUR HEAVY DUTY SERVICE & PARTS NEEDS”

2008 Forrest St. Ext. - Dyersburg, TN. - 38024 731-285-4888

REELFOOT LAKE BASS CLUB •

285-0565

www.whiteandassociates.net

220 N. Main

Suite G100, Dyersburg

Home • Auto • Life • Health • Business • Farm ●NOT A DEPOSIT ●NOT FDIC INSURED ●NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY (Except for Federal Crop Insurance or Federal Flood Insurance) ●NOT BANK GUARANTEED ●INVESTMENTS MAY LOSE VALUE

ANNUAL BUDDY BASS TOURNAMENT: KIRBY POCKET - MAR. 30TH •

BIG FISH TOURNAMENT: KIRBY POCKET - MAY 11TH CONTACT GORDON FOX:

731-885-5541

STAFFORD’S FISH MARKET

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS! 305 S. MAIN ST. - DYERSBURG, TN 731-287-0879 FRESH FISH AT & THE BEST PRICE! 103 N. MAIN ST. - RIPLEY, TN CATFISH: 731-635-2080 STEAKS - $2.50 LB. FILLETS- $3.00 LB. OPEN 10 AM TO 6 PM BUFFALO: MON. THROUGH SAT. $1.80 LB. OWNER JERRY STAFFORD

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THE 2013 POLARIS RANGER EV CAMO

A quieter machine for turkey hunting or for stealthy trips to the deer stand, the RANGER EV never needs gas, requires very little maintenance, and works harder and rides smoother than any other electric vehicle in its class. True AWD keeps you moving, automatically engaging all four wheels when you need more forward traction and then reverting back to 2WD when you don’t. When in 2WD, the VersaTrac Turf Mode switch unlocks the rear differential for easier, tighter turns that won’t tear up your grass. It’s the hardest-working, smoothest-riding electric Side x Side. Operates cleanly and quietly with a 30-hp/48V AC electric motor. Alternating Current (AC) is more efficient and extends range. Its rear dump box has 500 lb. capacity, with gas assist dumping operation and features the exclusive Lock & Ride cargo system that accommodates any of many hard working accessories that can go on and off in seconds. To test drive this awesome machine, or any of OuterLimit Powersports extensive lineup of recreational vehicles, you can visit them at 470 US Highway North in Dyersburg, Tennessee. They can be reached by phone at 731-285-2060 or go to their website at www.outerlimitpowersports.com. - Rob

RAM TRUCKS DECLARES 2013 AS “THE YEAR OF THE FARMERS”

Dodge Ram trucks have always been a favorite choice for outdoor enthusiasts. They are also loved by farmers for their durability, workload and dependability. Any of the millions of football fans who watched the Super Bowl this year, were probably blown away by the RAM truck commercial, featuring the late Paul Harvey’s commentary that profiled the true backbone of our great country...American farmers. Help Ram help the next generation of farmers in support of the FFA. From healthy food to reliable American jobs, farming is a vital part of the American way of life. So, for every view of their “Farmer” video {accessed at www.ramtrucks.com} the Ram brand will make a donation to Future Farmers of America. To test drive a Ram truck, visit our friends at Herman Jenkins Motors. They are located at 2030 W. Reelfoot Avenue, in Union City, Tennessee. You can call them at 731-885-2811 or visit them at HermanJenkins.com.

- Rob Somerville

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2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER The most innovative SUV ever!

The 2013 Nissan Pathfinder is the top of the line for any family that loves the outdoor lifestyle. It has received a 5-star rating from the government, for side-impact safety and has is also rated “Best in Class” as a passenger vehicle, with seven premium seats! With the Nissan Pathfinder you can drive with total confidence. It’s all about traction. No other SUV in this class gives you the choice of 2WD, 4WD, and Auto Modes. Turn the All-Mode 4x4 Dial, located just behind the gearshift, to lock into 4WD on rough terrain and in varying weather. Turn it again to switch into 2WD for better mileage. The intuitive Auto Mode senses slippery roads or rough terrain and will automatically adjust power to each wheel. When things smooth out, it switches back to 2WD. This vehicle has it all; including awesome looks, great comfort and the ability to drive efficiently and safely in any conditions. To test drive the new Pathfinder, visit our friends at Rick Hill Nissan. Their dealership is located at 2700 Parr Avenue in Dyersburg, Tennessee. You can call them at {800} 571-4394 or visit them online at rickhillnissan.com. - Rob

2013 CHEVROLET “BLACK DIAMOND” AVALANCHE

Celebrating 12 Years of Verified Versatility, “Black Diamonds” have been long known as the most challenging and rewarding of downhill runs for skiers. Being a pickup known for appealing to those with a zeal for adventure, it’s only fitting that the last run of Avalanche is named after such a feat. It’s the vehicle that can transform from an SUV into a pickup truck, quicker than you can plan your next destination. With the split-folding rear bench seat down and the Midgate® lowered, you’ve got the capability of a full-size pickup truck with the comfortable interior of an upscale SUV. From everyday travels to chasing adventure, the 2013 Black Diamond Avalanche is there to let you take it all on. This SUV is not only perfect for all outdoorsmen, it also doubles as the ultimate family car for use whether you are shopping, vacationing or carpooling. It is destined to be a prime collectors vehicle as well, as this is the last year Chevrolet will manufacture it. To test drive the 2013 Avalanche, or any of the awesome lineup of Chevrolet cars and trucks, visit our good friends at Terry Petty Motors. They are located at 524 E. Reelfoot Avenue in Union City, Tennessee. You can call them at 731-885-8150 or visit them on line at TerryPetty.com. - Rob Somerville

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Where to Eat RECOMMENDED RESTAURANTS BY REELFOOT LAKE!

Bucket’s Neighborhood Pub & Grub

Two Convenient Locations! Union City Dyersburg 1700 Reelfoot Avenue 2495 Lake Road Union City, TN Dyersburg, TN 731-885-6646 731-287-3420 After a long day of fishing at Reelfoot Lake, you are ready for an ice cold drink, a great meal and some Southern Hospitality at its finest. There is no better place to go ... then one of the two conveniently located Bucket’s Neighborhood Pub & Grub Restaurants! The service is fast and friendly and you can eat your meal and enjoy a cocktail, iced-cold beer or sweet tea in the main restaurant, at the bar or on the patio outside. They offer a private party/conference room, have an arcade area for the kids, Happy Hour, Trivia Night, Karaoke and live music, with both locations being less than a half hour from Reelfoot Lake! Watch your favorite sports team on one of the over one dozen, flat screen TV sets, with your friends, as you enjoy an appetizer tray and a cold brew. My favorite entrees include their New York Strip plate, their Italian Beef Grinder sandwich and their world famous pizza. As far as their appetizers, their Fried Dill Pickles and Onion Straw platters are to die for! Miss Sherry and her staff are truly customer oriented and will make you feel right at home. The only problem that I have with Bucket’s Pub & Grub is that upon leaving, my pant waist seems to shrink a size or two! - Rob Somerville

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Where to Eat RECOMMENDED RESTAURANTS BY REELFOOT LAKE! DAIRY QUEEN GRILL & CHILL - DYERSBURG 396 Highway 51 Bypass W. - Dyersburg, TN 38024 731-882-1931 If you are looking for a quick snack, a hot & hearty meal, a chocolate dipped cone, some chili/cheese fries, or an ice cream cake for a special occasion, you can’t beat our friends at the Dairy Queen Grill & Chill in Dyersburg, Tennessee. It is one of my favorite fast food restaurants in the world! My personal recommendations include the Mushroom Swiss Burger Meal, the Oreo Mint Blizzard and their Chili Cheese Hotdogs. In addition, their french fries beat the other fast food chains - hands down! So, grab the kids and treat the family to some awesome food ... and don’t forget to bring your appetite! -Rob Somerville

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Scott Rumer’s caught this nice bass just off the boat ramp at Fyrne Lake, just outside Dyersburg, Tennessee. The fish struck on a green and white spinner bait near the boat ramp, as a storm was approaching on April 22nd, 2012. - Photo courtesy of Fyrne Lake

Tom Hall, of Dyersburg, Tennessee caught this 2 lb. - 16” crappie at Fyrne Lake on March 9th, 2012 using minnows. - Photo courtesy of Fyrne Lake.

Joe Tidwell Jr. harvested this awesome 15-point buck, in Dyer County, Tennessee on Dec. 27th, 2012. It’s rack had a very unique configuration; sporting three main beams. - Photo submitted by Jenny Tidwell

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Brittaney Tidwell Lowery shot this nice 8-point buck in Dyer County, Tennessee while hunting with her dad Joe Tidwell Jr. - Photo sumbmitted by Jenny Tidwell

These nice ducks were brought down by Caleb Page, Peyton Turner, Brett Jackson, Brett Hampton and Adam Tucker. The boys shot them at Harmon’s Creek in Benton County, Tennessee on December 10th, 2012. - Photo courtesy of Kankford’s Taxidermy

Justin Mann and his black lab pose with his nice buck, which he harvested in Carroll County, Tennessee on November 6th, 2012. - Photo courtesy of Lankford’s Taxidermy.

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Tom Hall of Dyersburg, Tennessee caught this 6 lb. largemouth bass on a Rapala jerk bait under an overhanging tree near the shore at Fyrne Lake on July 14th, 2012. - Photo courtesy of Fyrne Lake

This monster buck was taken by Tim Mann on Nov.5th 2012 in Carroll County, Tennessee. - Photo courtesy of Lankford’s Taxidermy

Hollie Adcock poses with her six and a half year old buck that had a 22 inch wide spread and scored 155 Boone and Crockett points. - Photo Courtesy of Outerlimit Powersports

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Southern Traditions Outdoors February - March 2013