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Southern Peninsula

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Wednesday 28 October 2020

5974 9000 or email: team@mpnews.com.au www.mpnews.com.au DEVILBEND Reservoir at the centre of the Mornington Peninsula is widely known for its beauty and as a place of refuge for wildlife. It is also open to anglers like Matt Del Vecchio (inset), of Mornington who was there trying his luck during Water Week. Picture: Gary Sissons

A week to show off the ways of water DEVILBEND reservoir was the place to be during National Water Week from 19-25 October. The week – themed “Reimagining our Water Future” – aimed to inspire an awareness of the value of water. As part of the week, Mornington Peninsula Shire encouraged people to discover a waterway and also to take advantage of coastal and bushland walks. A map highlighted 30 peninsula walks, including those suited to a stroll, as well as listing more advanced and dog friendly walks. National Water Week also offered advice on how you can protect waterways: Dispose of litter responsibly, pick up after pets, don’t put anything except water down storm drains, avoid using pesticides or chemical fertilisers, use non-toxic household products, use seasafe sunscreen, manage garden waste, revegetate creek banks, never leave fishing line on the shore, and join a beach patrol. To learn more about the peninsula’s waterways, the top 10 tips for protecting our waterways and to see the waterway walks map, visit: mornpen.vic.gov.au/waterways

State money a missing link for projects MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire has officially welcomed federal government promises to increase infrastructure spending despite having no guarantee that any projects planned for the peninsula will get off the ground. Although the shire has $320 million worth of “shovel ready projects” and the federal government has offered $80m towards three of nine on the list, they all depend on the state government providing more money. None of the major projects are likely to be started unless co-funding arrangements are agreed by the state and

federal governments. Shire CEO John Baker said adding $1 billion to the $500 million local roads and community infrastructure program in the federal budget had “the potential to make a real difference to the peninsula community”. “The shire has a $320 million package of shovel ready projects ready to go,” Mr Baker said. “These projects respond to genuine needs within our community and will help soften the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. “We are keen to work with the fed-

eral member for Flinders, Greg Hunt, as well as the state government, on furthering as many of these projects as possible.” Mr Baker said the negative economic impacts of COVID-19 were forecast to be greater for the peninsula than for Australia overall, with a predicted 21 per cent fall in gross regional product – much worse than the 6.9 per cent drop forecast for Australia as a whole, he said. An estimated 5900 jobs are also forecast to be lost due to the pandemic, with a reduction in employment oppor-

tunities of 11 per cent. The shire’s package of shovel ready projects includes: Peninsula Bay Trail: $15 million, which includes the Mornington to Moorooduc trail ($6.5m), Somerville to Baxter trail ($4m), and Southern Peninsula Bay Trail ($4.5m). Community facilities: $17.825m. The Briars: $10.6 m. Pavilions: $18.5m. Road safety: $130 m. Stage 1 to start 2020/21. The total of $40 million includes roundabouts ($15m), Rye Township Plan – Point Nepean Road

($15m), Forest and Uralla Drive intersections ($10m); Mornington Peninsula Freeway/Jetty Road Overpass ($65m) and sound barriers ($25m). Recycled water: $27.3 million – for Homelessness: $2.5m for design and construction of two social housing developments in Mornington; a group home for adults with intellectual disability in Balnarring; Housing Access Point service in Hastings; Salvation Army intensive case management.. Better buses: $10 million. Technology park on a site identified by the shire at Hastings.

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Southern Peninsula News

28 October 2020


NEWS DESK

Tables being set for dining outdoors RESTAURANTS, cafes and pubs are being given the green light to extend their table service outside as Mornington Peninsula Shire – and the state government – relax rules around outdoor dining permits. Hundreds of hospitality businesses are expected to apply for free, temporary extended outdoor dining permits, in advance of next Monday’s (2 November) opening. Planning Minister Richard Wynne said venues could use open spaces, including streets, footpaths and car parks to “add to venue capacity while restrictions reduce the number of patrons allowed for indoor dining”. Businesses including restaurants, cafes, bars, hotels, function and reception centres and wineries can also avail themselves of the new “parklets”, which repurpose car parking spaces outside shop fronts.

out across the peninsula under three and sixmonth permits, the state government said the relaxed rules would extend until the state of emergency ends in 12 months. Mr Baker said affected businesses could apply for grants up to $5000 from the state government’s $87.5 million Outdoor Eating and Entertainment Package to help pay for such items as outdoor furniture, umbrellas and screens. The grants will be available to licensed and unlicensed cafes, restaurants, takeaway food businesses, pubs, taverns, bars and clubs with a payroll of less than $3 million. The shire has also received $500,000 from the state government to support outdoor dining, which it will spend on infrastructure, traffic and transport measures and waiving permit fees. Details: mornpen.vic.gov.au/outdoordining Stephen Taylor

The relaxed rules will enable food businesses to reopen and be profitable while complying with social distancing measures and space restrictions. Hospitality venues will be limited to a maximum 20 patrons indoors and 50 outdoors, both subject to density requirements. “Mornington Peninsula Shire is getting on with the process required to make outdoor dining a reality,” CEO John Baker said. “We understand this is a very stressful and uncertain time for traders and we are committed to getting the permits and infrastructure in place to make extended outdoor dining happen in a timely and safe manner. “Now that applications are open we will work will traders on what is the best option for their business and begin issuing permits so they can make decisions and simply get on with things.” While extended outdoor dining will be rolled

Award nominations FRIENDS, family members, co-workers or school companions who have gone above and beyond to make the Mornington Peninsula a better place can be nominated for a 2021 Australia Day Local Award. Nominations for the Mornington Peninsula Shire awards close Friday 6 November. Residents are urged to make an effort to recognise someone who has made a noteworthy contribution to the lives of others. Areas of outstanding contribution and community service include education, health, fundraising, charitable and voluntary services, business, sport, arts, the environment, or any area contributing to the advancement and wellbeing of those on the peninsula. Award categories include Citizen of the Year, Young Citizen and Community Event of the Year. Those interested can also nominate a Mornington Peninsula community event held in person or virtually that they have attended or helped to organise. This would go into the running for Community Event of the Year. Any individual or organisation can make a nomination, and all eligible nominees are acknowledged. Nominations, which close Friday 6 November, can be made online at mornpen.vic.gov.au/ausdayawards or call Christine Aslanidis 5950 1137 or email christine.aslanidis@mornpen.vic.gov.au

Digital fete ST JOHN’S, Flinders fete has gone digital with many of the traditional fete products available to order online. Christmas cakes, puddings, gifts and a range of other items can be bought in time for Christmas. A selection of fine art has been donated by Mornington Peninsula artists and can be bought after 1 November. Handmade goods are ready to order now. There is also a baking competition, lucky dip and a scarecrow making contest. The pet show will continue with judging in time for prizes and awards on 23 January. Money raised will go towards St John’s Church and to Anglicare Rosebud supporting the homelessness on the peninsula, Brotherhood of St Laurence, Asylum Seekers Resource Centre Dandenong, Western Port Community Support caring for the marginalised and disadvantaged. Details: stjohnsflindersfete.com.au/

Radio with pictures: On the set of radio station’s RPP’s Children First Foundation gala ball are John Shore and Amy Campion (front), Elizabeth Myers, Luke Shore and Stephen Myers (back) and Tamara Newing, who supplied the food, (centre). Picture: Yanni

Radio turns to TV to ‘rescue’ gala ball RADIO station RPP FM turned to television to hold a virtual gala ball that raised $75,000 for the Children First Foundation. Realising restrictions caused by COVID-19 would destroy its major 2020 event, foundation executive officer Elizabeth Lodge approached RPP breakfast host John Shore who arranged a TV broadcast of the big night. “We dared to dream, took a risk, and the outcome was awesome,” she said. Observing strict COVID protocols, the RPP crew of MC John Shore, co-host Amy Campion and technical producer Steve Meyers, used

RPP’s TV broadcasting ability to stream the event live to a national audience. The at-home attendees enjoyed gourmet hampers of premium Mornington Peninsula produce while being entertained, listening to speakers, and bidding at auctions on the night. “We shared the kids’ and the foundation's stories,” Mr Shore said. “We passed our target by more than $15,000, brought joy into homes across the country, and had loads of fun along the way.” The Children First Foundation has been arranging life-changing, sometimes life-saving,

surgery in Australia for disadvantaged children from developing countries since 1999. Its members believe that every child has a basic right to a healthy, happy life regardless of where they are born. Ms Lodge says the TV event might have reshaped the way the foundation fund raises in the future. “The outpouring of positive feedback and compliments has been overwhelming,” she said. “It was gutsy and it worked. Our gratitude to all at RPP is immense. [They] truly did change a child’s life with the night.”

RYE Lions Club has gone online for its annual raffle, with a first prize of a $3000 10.5 metre propelled kayak and second prize of two smaller kayaks $1800. Tickets drawn 5 December. Tickets can be bought online at raffletix.com. au/ryelionskayakraffle

Trek art online IT is easy to navigate this year’s Peninsula Artists Trail which, because of COVID-19 restrictions, has had to go online. The trail opened last Friday (23 October) and features the work of more than 20 artists. The works, which can be bought direct from the artists, are on show at peninsulastudiotrailinc.org

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Southern Peninsula

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Police patrol

With Stephen Taylor

Charges over weapons, assault A BITTERN man will face counts of affray, assault-related charges, weapons offences and criminal damage after an incident at Frankston two months ago. The 21-year-old was charged last week and remanded to appear at Frankston Magistrates Court, Wednesday 28 October. Detectives will allege three men drove to a Corlett Street house in a white van, 3pm, 15 August. The men, allegedly armed with weapons, smashed the windows of a house and vehicle, causing extensive damage, before they fought with a fourth man who was allegedly armed with a weapon. The driver of the van and the two unidentified suspects fled in the van. Detectives are appealing for witnesses to assist in identifying these two men. A 28-year-old Frankston man was charged with affray and being a prohibited person to possess firearms and has since been convicted. A 23-yearold Pakenham man was released without charge. Police have released CCTV footage and an image of two men they are yet to speak with who they believe may be able to assist with their inquiries. One is described as Caucasian, aged 19-25, medium build with a large tattoo on his right calf. He was wearing a blue hoodie with a long white t-shirt underneath, grey shorts, white shoes and a black hat. The other is aged 19-25, thin build with an olive complexion. He was wearing a grey hoodie with a white tshirt underneath, shorts, black beanie and black face-mask.

Grenade surprise A CLEANER got a fright when tidying up a West Park, Hastings property earlier this month. Going through drawers in the garage he uncovered a military hand grenade with the pin inserted making it, technically, still “alive”. Senior Constable Rob Gillson, of Hastings police, said the cleaner had been called in by the wife of a World War II veteran, aged 92, who had been moved to a nursing home. The grenade was taken to the rear of the house and police called, Sunday 11 October. Senior Constable Gillson said he notified the police bomb response crew who called in their Army equivalent. They placed the grenade in a container and took it away for detonation.

Weeding pot thieves POLICE say a trend that has emerged this year in the Rosebud area of

thieves stealing pots, ornaments, urns and statues from verandas, porches and front gardens of houses, especially holiday houses. Victims of these thefts are encouraged to report it on the police assistance line 131 444. Anyone with information on these thefts is urged to call Acting Sergeant Loughlin at the Rosebud police station, or call Crimestoppers 1800 333 000 or visit bddy.me/3kut29f Police urge anyone with these items, especially at a holiday house, to store them securely before you go back home. “Together, we can weed out these pot thieves,” they say.

Out to ease trauma OPERATION Saturn launched last week will tackle dangerous driving, including on the Mornington Peninsula. The road policing operation will run from Thursday 22 October to Sunday 8 November. Police say the state-wide operation is aimed at preventing further trauma caused by dangerous driving.

Drunk, speeding A WOMAN caught driving along the Mornington Peninsula Freeway at 147kph on a suspended licence was later found to have a blood alcohol reading of 0.176 per cent, 1am, Monday 19 October. Somerville Frontline Tactical Unit impounded the woman’s car at Mount Martha, and she will be summonsed to appear at court at a later date.

Victoria, you know fire. The 2020-21 fire season is coming and we’re about to start an important fire safety campaign. With last season’s memories so fresh, some people may find it confronting. If you have any concerns, or you or a loved one are emotionally affected by the campaign, support is available on our website, or by calling Lifeline 13 11 14.

Plan. Act. Survive. Go to vic.gov.au/knowfire Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

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Southern Peninsula News

28 October 2020


NEWS DESK

Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au FOOTY fans desperate for a slice of the action were denied their chance to watch the AFL’s first interstate Grand Final live at Dromana Drive-In on Saturday. Proprietor Paul Whitaker said he was “gutted” by the state government’s refusal to allow the live telecast which would have been even more special with fans allowed to attend from up to 25km away. In the weeks leading up to the big night it seemed the planets were aligning with both the AFL and broadcaster Channel 7 giving him the thumbs up. All that was needed was a nod from the government and the biggest event of the season would have lit up the three screens and entertained a hundred fans. It wasn’t to be. “At 6:50pm tonight (Thursday), I received the long-awaited call from the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions,” Mr Whitaker said. “We have been derailed by politics.” He said informal advice earlier in the week that Cabinet’s Crisis Council was favourably inclined towards the drive-in’s Grand Final adventure had been reversed after what he termed the “Cox Plate fiasco”. “Quite rightly, the public outcry over allowing an elite group of racehorse owners to attend a private running of the plate was overturned,” he said. “But with that the opportunity to screen the Grand Final at the drive-in was ruined. What a joke.”

Probably adding to state government unease were “misunderstandings” which saw a coronavirus positive grade 5 student attend East Preston Islamic College, resulting in two schools being closed and 800 people going into selfisolation – including 83 families. This was cold comfort to Mr Whitaker. “The drive-in is the most COVID-safe business around,” he said. “What’s more, it would have been a therapeutic outing for so many people to watch their game on Victorian soil. “We had only one week to go to [a possible] re-opening and the event would have been safe and beneficial to the community.” Mr Whitaker was refunding the 100 tickets sold late last week, with many people asking him to keep donations made to The Breast Cancer Network Australia, Entertainment Assist and Independent Cinemas Australia Charities. Reflecting on the knockback he thanked “everyone for their effort, comments and voice”. “For the politicians involved – [Nepean MP] Chris Brayne especially – thank you for staying with this until the end and having the conviction that it should go ahead.” But Mr Whitaker the screens will soon light up, with 10 schools booked for graduation celebrations and student movies, a church Christmas show, three nights of Carols by Candlelight and the Peninsula Film Festival. “Everyone loves the magic of movies on the giant silver screen,” he said. The magic missing from Saturday night at the drive-in was seeing the Richmond Tigers, 12.981 defeat the Geelong Cats 7.8-50 to win their third premiership in four years.

Horse sense for insight ligence skills in communication, connection and resilience. Gunnamatta Trail Rides has launched its Mane Insights program to teach people about themselves. “It’s not about equine therapy or horses as such, it is more about the individual,” Ms Alija said. “With the immediate and unbiased feedback that horses give us, we learn more about ourselves and what image we are projecting on others, which most often is unintentional.” Ms Alija said communication and connection were “extremely important at the best of times, but especially now it is critical to our overall mental health and wellbeing”. She said Mane Insights would work with teams from businesses and organisations, schools and groups to uncover learning outcomes, such as direction, ability to accept and adapt to change, connection, resilience, confidence, leadership, communication, how to control and regulate emotions and energy, and sensory and emotional experiences. “The experts in this program are our horses,” Ms Alija said.

KAREN Alija says horses can help people learn about themselves in much the same way that they have helped shape her new outlook on business during the coronavirus pandemic. Ms Alija, director of Gunnamatta Trail Rides, said lessons learned from horses’ survival instincts enabled her to accept the changes caused by COVID-19 and bring the family business back on track. The business virtually shut down in March but has since developed a new outlook on the way things are done. Ms Alija said businesses needed to become more resilient and flexible. “This is not an easy task, and pivot strategies need to be implemented to ensure that the business can accept and adapt to change … as individuals and teams,” she said. “With our extensive knowledge and experience with horses, we have been able to draw from their survival instincts and bridge a connection to their resilience and their ability to adapt to what they are facing.” After 50 million years of experience in adaptation and survival, she said horses had an ability to teach people some of their emotional intel-

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KAREN Alija, pictured with husband Bekim and daughter Carlie, says horses have a lot to offer. Picture: Keith Platt

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Southern Peninsula News 28 October 2020

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Police patrol

NEWS DESK

Boys plea to not write-off jumps Stephen Taylor steve@mpnews.com.au

Bogged at beach A LANGWARRIN man who finished work at Frankston, 1am, Friday 23 October, drove to Schnapper Point, Mornington, and then onto the sand. The 21-year-old did some circle work before finding his rear wheel drive Commodore could not cope and he became bogged. Revving the accelerator did not help and patrolling police found him buried up to the axles. An after-hours tow truck was called to pull him out

Speeding to court THE driver of a dual-cab ute clocked at 109kph in a 60kph zone at Balnarring, 11.15am, Friday 23 October, had a suspended Queensland licence. The ute was impounded and the driver will face court at a later date for excessive speed and unlicensed driving. Police from Somerville’s trontline tactical unit were taking part in Operation Saturn which is running until Sunday 8 November to take in both the AFL Grand Final and Melbourne Cup. It will focus on excessive speed, driver distraction, fatigue, drink/drug driving and seat belt compliance.

A GROUP of Peninsula Grammar students are determined to keep themselves active and involved in making jumps for their bikes – despite Mornington Peninsula Shire confirming their actions contravene local laws. A group of grade 5 boys has written to The News after reading about other boys building bike jumps at Mountain View park, Mount Eliza (“Bike jumps an election issue” The News 12/10/20). Fintan O’Dea, Angus Donges, Jack French and Ethan Drummond want the shire to understand their needs and let them continue making the jumps as a way of “letting off steam” and allowing them to stay active outdoors. Ethan’s mum Donna Drummond said she felt sorry for the playmates who had struggled through the COVID-19 restrictions. “There’s really nowhere safe for them to ride around except in the parks,” she said. “They were all talking about the story in the paper and just want to be active.” Here are their letters: Fintan Odea, 11: “Imagine you are in a game and you just were about to get the second checkpoint. Then you fail and go back to the first checkpoint. That is what is happening to us in COVID-19. The only thing helping us kids get back to the second checkpoint is by having fun doing jumps on our bikes it is bringing us together having fun and building stuff. While we are building, we do the jumps, so we are learning things. That is why I think we should be able to ride on bike jumps.” Angus Donges, 10: “Bike jumps are a free source of exercise and fun where kids can meet others and socialise. You can also follow COVID-19 restrictions as well. When you destroy bike jumps you are ruining hours of work

BIKE jumpers Angus Donges, Jack Mackay, Kai Mackay, Ethan Drummond, Fintan O’Dea and Bay Mackay put their pleas in writing. Picture: Gary Sissons

as well as our pleasure and enjoyment. All I am asking for is to leave us alone and don’t destroy the jumps. We have already gone through a lot and I think it’s time we all had a break from this awful and dreadful year.” Jack French: “Here are some reasons why bike jumps are actually good for you: I have been on my Xbox a lot lately and haven’t been very active. But, when I got into bike jumps, it changed my fitness and my time with my family. I’m sure some kids like me have been inside on games a little bit too much, so if they could possibly go out on some bike jumps it could change their health and fitness. What’s the point of wrecking something that changes their time with family, having fun, health, fitness and their moods?” Ethan Drummond, 11: “I think that the jumps keep us active that make their health great and you get happy and who does not like happy people and if you don't like the jumps and you

are trying to be voted councillor you will not be it because our parents will not vote you. If you will destroy them don’t.” But it appears public liability concerns may be a factor in the shire’s opposition to the children’s bike jumps. The shire’s acting director of place Jessica Wingad said: “The shire has the responsibility of managing risk to the public and on public land and so we must address this. “Some bikes and jumps are unsafe, in inappropriate locations, not built to the correct standards, including clay types, jumps distances, slopes and curves, [and] therefore risk management from an insurance and legal perspective requires that we remove them. “We urge members of the public to be respectful of shire staff as they carry out these duties.” Ms Wingad said many jumps “generally disregard other users of tracks and trails, as well as the environmental and ecological values of the site”.

LOCKDOWN PICTURES 1

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READERS again found inspiration for Lockdown Pictures while out exploring their neighbourhoods or simply staying home. Emma Hewish sent in a shot of her “collie (dog) flower” along with the assertion that “my dogs keep me sane during lockdown” (1) while Olivia Dineen reckons her groodle Royston “dreams of life out of lockdown” (2). The seal seen at Koonya Beach by Raymond McLean (3) and the emu at The Briars by Jonte Field face far fewer restrictions. Mornington pier drew the attention of Kirsten Harris (5) while Helen Dalton found that the common iris makes an interesting close up (6), as did the rose for Gladys Slade (7). Ros Stirling found some birds that are intent on bringing new life to a Leyland motor (8) and Tom Faska and Tom Falvo built a rock stack “for entertainment” at Mothers Beach, Mornington (9). Also at Mornington, Steve Howard was taking sunset shots at Linley Pont when he saw the possibilities of a silhouetted fishing boat. Readers are invited to send and share their own pictures, with a short caption, to: lockdown@mpnews.com.au

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Southern Peninsula News

28 October 2020

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Former GG urges tourist to help peninsula Brodie Cowburn brodie@mpnews.com.au FORMER Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove has urged holidaymakers to visit the Mornington Peninsula to help restart the regional tourism industry. Sir Peter estimates that he attended more than 4000 events during his five years in the job. His life’s work took him all across the globe, but this year the overseas flights have come to a sudden stop. Sir Peter says Australians should take this as a chance to explore some of the best locations the country has to offer, once it is safe to do so. “For beautiful places like the Mornington Peninsula, this year has been a great worry,” he told The News. “Australians are the greatest international travellers you’d hope to see, but now we can’t do that and spend money overseas. So I say to those travellers that where possible, spend that money at home in Australia. Be the tourist that goes to the Mornington Peninsula, spend your money there. “This is a message of exhortation to other Australians and those who have time and disposable income, it is time to help Australians.” Since retiring from the role of Governor-General last year, Sir Peter has also been working to help bushfire affected communities get back on their feet. This year he was asked to lead BizRebuild, an organisation which aims to help bushfire affected businesses. The damage done to small businesses by the bushfires was only made

worse when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Decades-old shops have been forced to shut their doors, and some will never reopen. Across Frankston, the peninsula, and beyond, small businesses have been devastated. Despite the challenges ahead, Sir Peter urged business owners to “refuse to give in”. “Businesses scale themselves on both the local population and annual visitation, and that has gone down when their backs are already to the wall,” he said. “What I observe though, is that ingenious small businesses that refuse to give in will struggle through, with the help of the wider community.” Never one to sit still, Sir Peter has been keeping as busy as expected during the pandemic. This year he has penned his second memoir You shouldn’t have joined which provides an inside look at his time as the Governor-General. “I thought back when I wrote my first book that would be the end of my public life. Then out of blue I had all these corporate experiences and became Governor-General, so there was another book in it” he said. “My time as Governor-General is the meat and drink of the book. I speak about politics, politicians, the routines of the Governor-General, kings and queens and presidents, the republic, and other essential challenges we will face in the future.” Sir Peter will talk to peninsula and Frankston library members about his memoir via Zoom at 6pm on Monday 9 November. Bookings: library. frankston.vic.gov.au or ourlibrary. mornpen.vic.gov.au

PORT Phillip Ferries last week would not say if it intends to include Mornington in its service to Melbourne. The company’s Geelong Flyer was seen cruising around Mornington, Friday 16 October, perhaps scoping the pier and harbour for a Mornington Peninsula service. Other seaside havens, such as Rosebud, Rye, Sorrento and Portsea, could also be considered. A Port Phillip Ferries’ spokesperson last week said its “long-term vision remains unaltered, that is, to introduce safe and reliable ferry travel within Port Phillip Bay and provide a totally relaxing travel experience for those seeking regular commuting and/ or leisure travel”. “We are always looking at new destinations and how locations, such as Mornington, might work with our current schedule,” the spokesperson said. “Port Phillip Ferries expects to be operating scheduled services between Docklands, Geelong and Portarlington very soon, and will continue to explore further potential new locations for our popular ferries.”

Bushfire focus EMERGENCY services spent the past week getting Victorians better prepared for fire season. Fire Action Week 19-26 October aimed to ensure members of the community are following @cfavic on social media. This will allow them to share information about getting their property ready for the upcoming fire season as well as on restrictions and bushfire preparation events. Visit vic.gov.au/fireactionweek2020

THE cover for Sir Peter Cosgrove’s memoir You shouldn’t have joined.

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Ferry pays a visit

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Southern Peninsula News 28 October 2020

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NEWS DESK

Staying on song during restrictions

LYN Ryan collects a “goodie” bag from Sue Smith at Crib Point Community House.

Time for high tea at home INSTEAD of holding its annual seniors high tea Crib Point Community House is distributing “goodie bags”, loaded with tea and coffee sachets, biscuits and cake and “some extra surprises”. Community house manager Mary Budd said the free “goodie bags” would enable seniors to “have high tea at home to share with their other half or maybe invite a friend, if COVID-19 regulations allow”. The community house also hosted a virtual high tea on Monday 12 October. “Some of our wonderful volunteers helped deliver to those that were outside the five kilometre radius,” Ms Budd said. She said 65 bags had been included with Crib DECKING T/Pine 70x22 KD ACQ ........................... $2.70mt T/Pine 90x22 KD ACQ ........................... $3.50mt T/Pine 140x22 KD ACQ ......................... $6.25mt Merbau 70x19 Random ........................ $5.25mt Merbau 90x19 Random ........................ $6.50mt Merbau 140x22 Random .................... $13.95mt

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Yara Alkund is from Kew. Herbert lists her greatest musical influences as Ella Fitzgerald, Amy Winehouse and Norah Jones, as well as more contemporary singer/ songwriters Jaala and Lianne La Harvas. While last year was “huge” for the band, this year’s COVID-19 restrictions have sent a curved ball. Herbert was accepted into the MIME mentoring program through Box Hill Institute and is also live streaming from home. “It’s hard to perform without audience connection,” she said. “During the [July easing of restrictions] we could have camera crews in, which was good, but now I’m mostly doing interviews and sort of taking a pause.” Stephen Taylor with Keith Platt

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PAGE 8

Point Community Support Group meals while others were left at shops for senior customers in Crib Point, Bittern and Balnarring. “All in all, 175 bags were enjoyed and we are still getting emails thanking us for making their day,” Ms Budd said. “We know it’s very important to take care of our mental health, especially in these trying times, but to get such wonderful feedback and know you have made someone’s day, frankly, makes our day too.” The bags were sponsored by the Hastings and District Community Bendigo Bank, Josephine’s (biscuits and cake), Crib Point Pharmacy (samples), Crib Point Cellars (seniors’ discount) and Cafe 202.

RYE-based Maddy Herbert, right, sings and writes for the neo-soul, alternative-pop and jazz-rock “project” Velvet Bloom. While Bloom members have performed together for three years Herbert, 24, also sings solo or with different variations of her band The Vito Collective’s repertoire with the project. Her debut EP in 2019, Bitter Sweet, as well as singles Isobel’s Song – Live at Box Hill, Teach Ya and DM ME received praise and airplay from Triple J and on Triple J Unearthed. Velvet Bloom also won Listen-Up Music Org’s 2019 national Songs That Heal competition. Earlier this year the band released Standards, described as an upbeat alternative-rock, soulpop track that showcases Herbert’s “raw and powerful vocals”. Velvet Bloom’s latest single, 7Hunderd25, was released late last month and has already been played on Triple J, Triple J Unearthed, 3RRRFM, PBS and was added Triple J Unearthed rotation. It has also been written up in such publications as Earmilk, Beat Magazine, Dope Cause We Said, Lennox Grove, Music Victoria and Esydia. A video by Nathaniel Nagorcka Sewart to accompany the release of 7Hunderd25 will be released on November 13. The video includes a pre-coronavirus live performance of Velvet Bloom and the Mornington Peninsula. Herbert says the band sees itself as a project “because we come in all variations, sometimes with me singing solo, in a duo or with up to a five-piece band”. “I grew up with them and they’re all my best friends.” Originally from McCrae, Herbert attended Padua College’s Rosebud and Mornington campuses, then moved to Dromana and then Rye. Her band mates are also peninsula-based: bassist Anthony Rennick is from Bittern; drummer Nic Moreton, Mount Martha; and guitarist Alex Marco, Somerville. Keyboard/vocalist

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LETTERS

Letters - 300 words maximum and including full name, address and contact number - can be sent to The News, PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or emailed to: team@mpnews.com.au

Rainy day blues

Future debt

The High Street, Hastings streetscape renewal project is nearing completion. I anticipate the mayor, councillors and other dignitaries will be lining up for the photo opportunity and the self-congratulatory article in the next Peninsula Wide shire magazine. I regularly walk my dog through the shopping area and often need to sit to rest my old arthritic legs. All the seats are not under cover and exposed to the elements making them totally useless on rainy days unless one wants to sit in the rain and get a wet bum. Some seats need to be protected from the elements so people can use them all of the time, not just in good weather. They are not there for decoration. Bill Hale, Hastings

It makes me cringe when the most ineffectual premier that this state has had the misfortune to have ever had appears daily (because he trust no one else and he is by compulsion a control freak). To have the gall to keep telling us repeatedly what to do, as if we were all still in kindergarten, and then to tell us not to lie to the authorities if we were questioned takes the cake. I believe the decision to have private security guards [at quarantine hotels] could have only come from one person, because nobody else dare authorise this debacle without the premier knowing We find that Trades Hall Council had been consulted before private security guards were installed. Why? Do the unions run this state? Why use a non-preferred contractor who is not on the government’s list of preferred contractors to do security work within this state? Why use contractors at all when it is well known that the ADF were on call 27 March and, along with police, have done a superb job in other states. I am not looking forward to the state budget because we will find the dreadful cost to all Victorians the chaos the Andrews government has incurred. Never mind, Dan’s best friend, China, has trillions to loan us. David Lines, Somerville

Regional benefits Most residents probably now know we had to go to stage 4 here - because we are in the Melbourne metro area. While that has been a current problem; it was temporary. The on-going disadvantages for we people and businesses in Mornington Peninsula Shire are even more serious. It has been a complex problem being inside the metro area. The COVID-19 crisis will eventually decline, but the Victorian government needs to use some commonsense procedures to remove the shire from Melbourne and then begin to provide funds for necessary upgrades, such as public transport, using funding earmarked for regional Victoria. Glenn Whipp, Sorrento

Levy questions If the Mornington Peninsula is part of metro Melbourne, why is my fire brigade an all-volunteer CFA unit? And why is the fire services levy on my rates the country levy, which is higher than the metro levy? Michael Capek, Mornington

Where is CFA support? An advertisement in The News on 7 October highlighted the “strengthening and support” for the CFA. The question has to be asked: where is this promised assistance? The southern peninsula CFA has not had new trucks for more than 20 years and desperately needs new equipment, upgrades and fire stations, a problem that Fire Rescue Victoria does not have. As the CFA is the major firefighting service in the state, with wonderful effort from many volunteers going back to the 1940s, they deserve better. Attempts to contact our local MP Chris Brayne have not been successful, which makes one wonder if the Andrews government knows or cares. Memories of the last catastrophic fire season seems to have been forgotten, though not by us who live in this recognised high fire risk area, or by the CFA Kay Grey, Rye

Premier position In NSW, Premier [Gladys] Berejiklian is in danger of losing her position due to an error of judgement and the heart. In Victoria, the premier is accused of a litany of significant misdemeanours over a long time, some really serious, yet he remains unchallenged and undeterred. The disastrous Andrews juggernaut rolls on. Go figure. Peter Grey, Rye

Rules of fear Those cheering on [Victorian Premier] Dan Andrew’ lockdown should examine DHHS stats for COVID-19 as of 22 October. These indicate there have been 20,329 cases, equivalent to just 0.31 per cent of the Victorian population of 6.4 million. Most cases have been confined to the northern and western suburbs of Melbourne; regional local government areas generally experienced less than three cases. The recovery rate from the virus has been 19,340 cases or 95 per cent, the majority of cases not requiring hospitalisation. Deaths of 817 would have been much lower if the hotel quarantine program has been managed effectively by the Labor government. Given these stats, the lockdown restrictions have been a massive overreaction in view of the social and economic costs incurred. COVID-19 in Victoria appears to have been more of a feardemic rather than a pandemic. We should have

Cane a help with social distancing White Cane Day (15 October) was created to highlight the important role mobility assistance devices play in helping people with low vision or blindness lead safe and independent lives. This year, our campaign celebrated the fun, fearless and adventurous spirit of our young clients and cane users who live life to the fullest, with many engaging in everything from skateboarding to gymnastics. For many people with low vision and blindness, a white cane is one of the first tools they may learn how to use as part of orientation and mobility training, and for children, a white cane is often the key to their first experiences of independence and freedom. It is a tool they will count on throughout their life. A white cane is the mobility tool of choice for the majority of Guide Dogs clients because of its practicality and the way it can give sensory feedback about the surrounding environment, but also its importance as a visual signifier to others in the community of low vision and blindness. But right now, a white cane is more than a visual symbol that someone has low vision or blindness. It is also a visual symbol that the person using the white cane can’t easily maintain a 1.5-metre distance from others. This International White Cane Day we asked the community to be aware of people using a white cane. You can help them continue to move safely, confidently and independently through any environment, by giving them 1.5-metres of space. Karen Hayes, CEO Guide Dogs Victoria learnt to live with the epidemic, not become its prisoner. Martin Newington, Aspendale

Let them stay [Flinders MP] Greg Hunt’s [federal] government is continuing its cruelty towards refugees. There are people in nearly 160 households in Melbourne who mainly came here from Nauru and Manus Island for health care. They are about to receive a letter from the government giving them three weeks’ notice that the limited income and accommodation support the government has been providing for them will be withdrawn. This will leave them with no income and no accommodation. Many of those households are families, many have ongoing health problems. The option the government gives them is to return to their countries of origin (at a time when it is so difficult to leave Australia) if they will have them or find a job. While Greg Hunt says he cares about the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown on Victorians, I would hope that he would also show the same concern for the mental and physical health of these families. Australians are better than this, we value caring for families. We are 5000 short of our humanitarian target for the last financial year and we could simply allow these families to become permanent residents and allow them to contribute to our community. Marg D’Arcy, Rye

Time for adults Analysis of the federal budget confirmed to me that the children are still running this country’s finances - lots of lollies for everyone, paid for by the tooth fairy. They have no idea in the world of how to handle our two crises. Income tax cuts for the future unemployed and loans for just anybody; buy a house you can’t afford, keep on running a bankrupt business, money for everyone until the virus goes away next year. Anthony Albanese with the Labor alternative is equally hopeless.

Australia has got itself into an awful lot of trouble by making nothing. We have been convinced that this clever country can thrive and become wealthy by mining, re-selling Chinese goods, buying houses and importing people. When the adults finally take control, they will have to get engineering, manufacturing and exporting reconstructed. It is exactly as if we have been devastated by a war and now, we have to start the huge process of rebuilding. First, we must get an abundant, reliable supply of cheap electricity. We have to forget the pipe dreams of solar power, 9am to 4pm only, nothing all night because there is no trillion-dollar battery system. Windmills run 20 per cent of the time. Adults will understand that it makes no difference whatsoever to Mother Earth if all of those millions of tonnes of coal are burnt in China or here. We must have our governments owning electricity generation and supply, a responsible national bank; partnering in large industrial and engineering developments, building visionary infrastructure, not just roads. Engineers, chemists, tradesmen, workers. Free trade agreements, Paris accords, United Nations rules, and economics professors, have all directed us to our disaster. Brian A Mitchelson, Mornington

Cut short, but not out My husband has just been to the barber. He has lost copious amounts of hair from his head and his beard, the barber’s floor looked like the contents could fill a cushion. I just hope it is not a case of Sampson and Delilah (the barber) and my husband being stripped of all his strength. Sad though it is that the Grand Final is to be played in Queensland, we ought to thank our northern neighbour for providing TV football and entertainment for so many footy-deprived Victorians. The important thing here is to rejoice that it is two Victorian teams in the Grand Final. What a feat to have achieved that in this awful pandemic era. Mary Lane, Mornington

Health before wealth Those who suggest [Premier] Dan Andrews was responsible for the 800 COVID-19 deaths in Victoria, among some other things, have to recognise that the [Prime Minister Scott Morrison] has to take responsibility for the nearly 700 COVID-19 deaths in private aged care centres in Victoria (a federal responsibility) and the $1.5 billion he took out of the aged care budget when treasurer. And who can forget his turning his back on the bushfire victims who are still homeless throughout Australia. Amnesia is also apparently running rampant in LNP ranks regarding sports rorts, Ruby Princess, [NSW Premier] Gladys Berejiklian, and aged care. The PM declares a travel bubble between New Zealand, Sydney and the Northern Territory and then allows the travellers to move into Melbourne, South Australia and the west without their travel cards and without the states knowledge, then tries to blame the states even though it’s a federal responsibility. We have a Minister for Health who states that Victoria has reached the epidemiological level for it to open up. When [Flinders MP] Greg Hunt was the environment minister he wanted to put a pool on the Rosebud foreshore. Thank heavens we didn’t have a curfew like Uganda. If you were caught outside during curfew you were beaten or shot. Hang in there people, we’ll get through this despite the haranguing of the PM, [Treasurer Josh] Frydenburg and Hunt. Health before wealth. John Cain, McCrae

Pandemic possibility What the world does not need now is another pandemic. Yet in Victoria, hundreds of thousands of chickens, turkeys and even emus are now being killed in the hope that wholesale carnage can stop or slow the spread of at least three different, extremely virulent strains of bird flu. This is not surprising – confining and killing animals for food has been linked to SARS, swine flu, bird flu, and COVID-19. You’ll never catch the flu from tofu, but when tens of thousands of birds are crammed into sheds and forced to stand in their own waste and breathe in the fumes, diseases spread and can mutate into different strains quickly. People can be co-infected with an avian and a human influenza virus. The genetic information in these viruses can then re-assort to create a new virus, against which humans have little or no immunity. If you care about animals, and your own health, do what many others are doing nowadays and choose healthy vegan meals. If everyone went vegan, these birds, each of them a personality who wanted only to enjoy life, wouldn’t have lived in misery and died in terror, and humans wouldn’t be facing yet another catastrophic virus. Mimi Bekhechi, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Southern Peninsula News

28 October 2020

PAGE 9


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28 October 2020

‘Selling with Safety.’

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100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Four figure land deal in Frankston Compiled by Cameron McCullough LAST week, Cr. W. J. Oates, J.P purchased the vacant corner allotment and the property with brick house adjoining in Bay and Wells Streets, Frankston. The price paid ran into four figures. It is gratifying to find our own people thus showing their confidence in the future of the town. The disposal of the land in question leaves but one other vacant allotment in Bay Street, suitable as a business site, for sale. *** ON Sunday last, upwards of 150 invalid soldiers from the Caulfield Military Hospital visited Frankston, and were entertained at afternoon tea in the Mechanics’ Hall. The hall was nicely decorated, and the long tables, loaded with numerous delicacies, presented an inviting appearance. A good musical programme was tendered during the afternoon, by local and visiting vocalists, whilst a recitation by little Miss Dulcie Logan evoked marked enthusiasm. Mr Buck, President of the V.M.C., in returning thanks for the hospitality extended, mentioned the fact that the V.M.C. would be making only a couple more trips before disbanding, and he hoped to arrange for a final visit to Frankston, where the ladies had done such wonderful work in entertaining the invalid soldiers. *** ATTENTION is directed the advt of Mr A. E. Rogan, Estate Agent, in today’s issue.

The Bay Estate Agency have likewise advts worthy of notice appearing today. *** THE Frankston Branch of the Victorian Protestant Federation are holding a public meeting at the Mechanics’ Institute to-night. *** A CORRESPONDENT writes: Thirty or more Frankston residents were present to see the favorite Eurythmic, win the Caulfield Cup on Saturday last, and two, at least, are said to have had a perfect day – one lucky man being suspected of winning close on £2,000, and another £700. There is a very old saying, and true, that it is better to be born lucky than rich! Just before the race, a local sport took £300 to £3 and £350 to £7 (or £650 to £10) about Antarian, which, at 50 to 1, duly won the Nursery. After that successful plunge, he backed four more winners – and then refused to buy wine for his best friends. *** DURING last week Albert Perrott, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Albert Perrott, Hastings, met with a very nasty accident. Whilst playing about the bay had his foot severely cut by a broken bottle. The gashes were deep and painful, and, the lad had to be motored to Mornington for medical treatment. Several stitches were inserted, and he is – though still confined to his bed – getting along as well as circumstances permit.

nEw homEs unIt DEvElopmEnts

*** “THE Marriage Price” featuring the gifted Elsier Ferguson – the greatest emotional actress of modern times and Arthur Standing will be screened at the Frankston Pictures on Saturday night. Billy West will also he starred in a remarkably amusing comedy. *** Frankston Police Court Monday, 18th October. Before Mr. Knight, P.M. and Captain Sherlock, J.P. R. H. Woodford, butcher, Carrum, was proceeded against, under the Public Health Act, on four charges. He pleaded not guilty and was defended by Mr Williams. Relating to the first charge of neglecting to completely wrap parcels of meat in clean white paper, Inspector Robinson deposed that he found several parcels lying ready for delivery in the shop in wrappings of newspaper. On opening the parcels he found small pieces of white paper on the inside. Witness produced three scraps, which were not more than six inches square. Defendant’s excuse is that paper was very dear. The Magistrate said the practice of putting a scrap of white paper on the scales to receive several pounds of meat and then using common newspaper as an outside wrapper was very general. If the Regulations were worth anything there should be scores of similar prosecutions.

youR DEsIgn oR ouRs

People did not walk about the street with their eyes shut. The counsel for the prosecution said that a large number of prosecutions had been proceeded with during the last few weeks. A fine of £1 was imposed. On the charge of failing to have a copy of the Board of Health regulations posted in the shop, defendant was fined 10/-. The defendant was then charged with failing to keep his sausage machine in a clean condition. Inspector Robinson produced a piece of rag which had been used in the machine to take the place of a washer on the “plunger.” This rag he found to have a sour smell and its appearance suggested that it had not been properly cleansed. The remainder of the machine was clean. The Magistrate – These cases are of common occurrence, and as the facts are advertised, the wonder to me is that the sausage trade is not killed! Defendant said the rag in question was always scalded and thoroughly cleaned before and after use. It had been clean the morning the Inspector visited the shop, but had been in the machine four or five hours. The P.M., after inspecting the rag in question, said he saw nothing very objectionable about it, and he would give defendant the benefit of the doubt and dismiss the charge. Defendant was then charged with feeding offal to swine without first boiling and cleaning same.

The Inspector said he had interviewed a boy in defendant’s employ, who said he had not been instructed by his employer not to give offal to pigs. The defendant said he had instructed the boy not to give offal to the pigs, and the boy had replied that he had always carried out the practice when working at Somerville. A fine of £2, and £2 2s costs, was imposed. George Forrest, another Carrum butcher, was charged with having failed to keep all his appliances clean. The Inspector said that defendant’s shop and cool chamber were quite clean, but the machines used in the manufacture of sausages were not kept clean. Defendant produced the mincing machine in court, and contended that the dirt found in the rim of the mincer was really oil, and did not come in contact with the meat. The cutter was in disuse, and had not been used for five months. Mr Williams said that to him the complaints seemed more like persecution than prosecution. The Magistrate said the Inspector was to be commended. A careless officer would not have detected such hidden imperfections as they had just dealt with. He was fined £2, with £2 2s costs. For not having a copy of the Regulations posted in the shop, he was fined 10s. *** FROM the pages of the Mornington Standard, 22 October 1920

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28 October 2020

PAGE 11


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18. Haul strenuously 21. Ogling, ... at 22. Destructive insects 23. Walked wearily

DOWN 1. Turned to powder 2. Rope loops 3. Excavates 4. Army vehicle 5. Feminine 6. Ox harness 10. Miniature (animal) 11. Listens to

13. Numbed 14. Acquires 16. Tinned 18. Basketball ring 19. Deciduous trees 20. Brave deed

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THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Career Advice – Trump’s Next Big Career Move By Stuart McCullough SOON it could be over. In a very short period of time, the fate of the presidency will be known. There’s no way to describe the past four years as anything other than extraordinary unless, of course, you prefer ‘cataclysmic bin-fire’. But if it turns out the world’s largest-known Oopma Loopa is suddenly out of a job this November, the question arises – what will he do next? Or, more accurately, what won’t he do? There’ll be a book, obviously. Having already published ‘The Art of the Deal’ – which he not only wrote but had translated from the original Russian, it’s inevitable he’ll write the story of the Presidency from his perspective, given that everyone who so much as delivered the milk to him has already done so. But what would a (former) President Trump call his memoir? Something punchy like ‘Donald J Trump: Witch Hunter’ or ‘Fake News v. Fake Tan’. Or, in recognition of his antipathy towards the ‘Black Lives Matters’ movement, maybe ‘Orange Is Not The New Black’. It’d possibly be the first political memoir ever to be written ALL IN CAPS. Or to have chapters only two hundred and eighty characters long. Or to feature an endorsement on the cover from the author himself. Presumably it will be something along the lines of ‘A lot of people are saying this is the greatest political memoir of all time.’ Doubtless, Kim Jong-Un will prepare the Foreword. Whether it’ll be successful or not is another matter. Sales figures, much like inauguration attendance figures, are likely to exaggerated if not wholly invented. Most former Presidents build a library as a monument to their legacy. Rather than a Presidential Library, I can see Donald Trump building a mud-wrestling arena. Or, if he does go with convention (although I have to ask, ‘why start now?’) then it could well be the first Presidential Library to filled solely with comic books. Or to offer a free taco upon entry. That’s probably a bit

PAGE 12

Southern Peninsula News

unfair – chances are that the Trump Presidential Library would be filled with books, albeit solely with remaindered copies of ‘The Art of the Deal’ and ‘Orange Is Not the New Black’. A career in stand-up comedy beckons. He’d be the kind of comic who avoids punch lines and is more ‘observational’ in nature. Personally, if he were not in a position to cause World War III, I’d find him hilarious. You can’t me tell that when you pull down on his comically-long red tie that water doesn’t come squirting out one of the buttons. Or, notwithstanding that he once paid someone else to sit his high school exams, perhaps he could pursue a career as an educator, specialising

28 October 2020

in teaching Latin, given that he so clearly understands the meaning of ‘quid pro quo’. He could voice your car’s navigation system. However, you’d end up only ever turning right, before turning right again and again. But honesty matters with on-board navigation. It’s no comfort if you back into street sign only to be told that ‘a lot of people saying that this was the greatest example of reverse parking probably since Lincoln’ even as the airbag deploys. Even when hopelessly lost, the Trump navigation system would refuse to concede. Perhaps it’s not possible to contemplate a postTrump presidency without thinking about his

BFF (or, at least, his BFF whenever Vladimir Putin is out of town and now that Geoffrey Epstein is permanently unavailable): Rudy Giuliani. I can see them pairing up as either private detectives or a country and western duo. Ideally both. They’d sing sweet, sweet harmonies together at a performance at a redneck bar (although it may not have been a redneck bar prior to their arrival) before getting a message that some mystery needed solving and the pair of them would throw their banjos in the boot of Rudy’s Ford Festiva before launching an investigation. Starsky and Hutch, Laverne and Shirley, Laurel and Hardy – Rudy and the Donald would join that elite group of crime fighters. Scouring the countryside for incriminating laptops from hell, preferably obtaining them from someone with an enormously convenient case of face-blindness, the pair would turn in stories to the New York Post, delivered in hand-written pages shoved through the night slot. Wherever there’s injustice, you’ll find Rudy and the Donald; if not perpetrating the injustice themselves, then describing those that do as ‘very good people’. He could go back to TV but I’m sure he’d be loathe to repeat himself and simply return to ‘The Apprentice’. I see advertorials in his future. There’s nothing that guy can’t sell. He’d promote ‘Remdesivir’, the experimental drug he took while suffering coronavirus as well as the steroid that made feel fit enough to compete in the Olympics notwithstanding that it would have seen him disqualified. Of course, there’s the possibility that he doesn’t lose and there will be another four years of tweets and mayhem. Nixon was in power when I was born. Perhaps it’s just as well that Twitter didn’t exist then; no one wants to read ‘I AM NOT A CROOK’ followed by a smiley face emoji. It’s been a tough year. I just want something good to happen and for life to finally get back to something that approaches normal. Here’s hoping. stuart@stuartmccullough.com


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SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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Jakupi says FV sets the trend SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FOOTBALL Victoria started a trend that looks likely to spread throughout the competitions structure of each state and territory federation. “We were the first state to link the tiers of competition – NPL and nonNPL – which allowed aspirational clubs to rise through the ranks and participate at the highest level,” FV director Sezar Jakupi said. The chair of FV’s football committee is well placed to comment given that he has overseen the review and implementation of a restructure of Victoria’s men’s, women’s, boys’ and girls’ competitions in the past few years. “NSW eventually followed suit and Queensland has just announced that it will be doing the same thing so they have replicated what we did a few years ago. “I think we have been relentless in our pursuit of better football outcomes and now our competitions are linked so if you are a club in Metro 4 and have the aspiration you have the opportunity to rise all the way to the top. “You don’t get to State 1 and then your journey ends.” Jakupi’s soccer journey started with Moreland Meadows in the 1970s. Now 55 years old having joined the FV board in 2016 the successful IT consultant has been a player, coach, administrator and zone representative. The former Dandenong Thunder chairman still turns out, pandemic restrictions permitting, as a striker for Juventus Old Boys and it is a pastime dear to his heart. “I’d be delighted if you could mention them as I’ve played there since 2003 alongside some distinguished players such as former New Zealand captain Malcolm Dunford and Joe Biskic and Bogdan Bonk.” But it seems certain that Jakupi will leave a far greater impression off the pitch where the outcomes of his football committee stewardship have a direct impact on clubs. “I believe our level of engagement with clubs during our competitions review (started in 2017) was unprecedented,” he said. “We ran dozens of sessions, dozens of workshops and it was an intensive engagement with clubs covering various items.

White-collar trio: Football Victoria director Sezar Jakupi (left) with Green Gully football operations manager Ray Mamo (centre) and club president Anthony Klotz. Picture: Mark Avellino Photography

“For example our junior NPL involving grading then a tiered system of competition was two years in the making.” That’s a reference to the 33-game junior boys’ NPL structure whereby teams are broken into regions for an 11-match grading process then placed in leagues based on grading outcomes for a 22-match home and away season. “That junior model has now been adopted by NSW, Queensland has just announced that they will be doing this and I believe that South Australia will do likewise,” Jakupi said. But FV’s revamp of junior NPL competition has not been immune to criticism especially claims that there are not enough elite players for 48 clubs to choose from. It’s a claim Jakupi has heard many times before and his response sheds light on FV’s thought process here and hints at what may lie ahead. “Okay, this is a valid concern and I think we have to be very careful but I think there are a couple of issues here. “Can we increase the number of clubs who have aspirational goals to have better coaches, accredited coaches to run a 40-week (pre-season included) program of quality coaching? “We think it would be fantastic to have more and more clubs running great youth development programs.

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brows were raised given that the withdrawal of Murray United earlier this year had resulted in an 11-team league. But before State 1 clubs think that an opportunity has opened up Jakupi explained FV’s reasoning. “That 12th spot has been reserved for Western United as mandated by FFA and while it hasn’t been formally announced my understanding is that they will take that spot in 2021.” Like many club administrators Jakupi and the FV board are bracing themselves for the full economic impact of the pandemic and Victoria’s extended lockdown. If the worst is yet to come can clubs be confident that the state’s governing body will respond appropriately? “We will not be insensitive to this situation,” Jakupi said. “Football Victoria ourselves have been financially impacted severely by not having a season and our financial capacity is obviously constrained. “We have to make sure that we are financially viable but we also need to understand the pain inflicted (on clubs) and be accommodating without affecting the integrity of competition or the rules. “I think though that there is some room to move. “Much of the economic impact on clubs remains unknown and we may

“We now have 48 clubs who have stepped up to the plate and what is wrong, for example, with raising that number to say 60 over the next couple of years? “I think too that we need to look at the word ‘elite’ which gets bandied about but let’s be realistic with 48 clubs with a squad of 20 in a junior NPL age group I don’t think we have 1000 elite players. “We may have say 50 and it is likely that most of them will be in the Victory or Melbourne City programs.” Jakupi believes that over the next couple of years there may be commonality emerge among clubs in the top tier of junior NPL competition and this could redefine the NPL concept. “From an elite perspective we may say that the real NPL elite are those clubs in that top tier and the others are aspirational clubs who want to give their players a 40-week quality program. “What we may see eventuate is a re-alignment of the NPL label so that it may not apply to all those (current) tiers of competition in fact I think that is the likelihood of what might happen.” Last week FV confirmed the senior and junior NPL structures for 2021 and when it was announced that NPL3 would be a 12-team competition eye-

have to make decisions should the impact be severe. “We will always make decisions based on the greater good. “Without pre-empting anything we are not going to be inconsiderate and that rigid that we cause a club to be seriously impacted.” In local news NPL2 outfit Langwarrin announced a raft of player re-signings last weekend. The club confirmed that 12 senior squad positions had been filled for 2021. Jamie Cumming, Luke Burgess, Damir Stoilovic, Sammy Orritt, Jaiden Madafferi, Callum Goulding, Wayne Wallace, John Maclean, Tom Youngs, George Howard, Colby Jones and James George have agreed terms. George, 20, is a midfielder and has been promoted to the senior squad after impressing during the pre-season and scoring after coming off the bench in the club’s 3-1 FFA Cup win away to Warragul United in March. “We’re very happy to see so many players demonstrate both loyalty and commitment to the club,” head coach Scott Miller said. “We aim to start pre-season in December and we all can’t wait to return.”


SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS

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Portland Sky reaches new heights HORSE RACING

By Ben Triandafillou MORNINGTON-based trainer Matt Laurie has struck Group class success with promising colt Portland Sky at The Valley on Saturday 24 October. The three-year-old son of Deep Field, who broke his maiden status on the Ballarat Synthetic track just two months ago, has quickly risen through the grades to win the $200,000 Group Three Red Anchor Stakes (1200m). Ridden by jockey Ben Melham, the exciting prospect made every post a winner at his fourth career start to win by three-quarters of a length over the Lindsay Park-trained Bella Nipotina, with the Godolphin-owned Valaquenta finishing a further length away in third. Trainer Matt Laurie said it was great to land the stakes success with a colt that had shown plenty of ability at home. “From day dot [he showed us a lot at home],” Laurie said post-race. “Even breaking him in, he just always felt like a quality horse and throughout this preparation he’s just continued to improve. I think he’s just going to keep doing that. We’ve got a really nice horse.” “We’ve drawn that low gate on the last few occasions and had to ride him a bit forward but I think he’s going to be a much better horse when he can just sit off the speed and show a good turn of foot.” Laurie had queried how Portland Sky would handle a wet track heading

Group success: Matt Laurie’s Portland Sky wins the Group Three Red Anchor Stakes at The Valley on Saturday 24 October. Picture: Supplied

into the race, and despite winning on Saturday, believes he’ll be better suited on a firmer surface. “I felt like he was a group horse and we were going to strike a wet track at some point,” he said. “I still don’t think he actually handled it to be honest but I’m very pleased obviously to get the win.”

Jockey Ben Melham was stoked with the gritty performance from the colt. “He jumped out and he led comfortably and then he got absolutely pestered for 200-300 metres and in this tough going (soft 7) today it was a good solid performance from the colt,” Melham said post-race. “[Matt’s] always had good faith in

this horse’s ability and so have I so it’s good to finally see him with a stakes result on the board.” Last year’s winner of the race, Sartorial Splendor, backed up to run in the $1.5million Group One Coolmore Stud Stakes at his next start. Laurie said Portland Sky, who is nominated for the feature sprint on Derby day, could

potentially follow the same route but is wary that his colt is still in his first preparation. “We’re very mindful it’s his first preparation and we want to be looking after him so it may not be the right thing but if he was jumping out of his skin you never know,” Laurie said.

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