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fall

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distinctlynorthwest

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EMBRACING HISTORY AT WHEAT BROTHERS FARMS WANDER & BREATHE

Botanical garden goodness

AUTUMN ADVENTURE Hike through a historic vineyard

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PUBLISHER & CEO Steven Saslow ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER & VP OF SALES Gail Whiting EDITOR Jenna Benton ASSISTANT EDITOR Alisha Vosburg GRAPHIC DESIGN Jaren Hobson SALES SUPERVISOR Laura Perkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jenna Benton Cheyla Breedlove Jami Ronda Erin Maxson Alisha Vosburg CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Wade Photos GypsyJane Photography Danny Hall Bell Photography Photography by Lahna Marie Wildlife Images Adam Marland Dave Low Ryan Vosburg

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ur Fall 2019 edition was so much fun to put together. We gathered stories from across Southern Oregon, highlighting activities and businesses and the wonderful, hard working people who make it all happen. Fall is my favorite time of year in the Pacific Northwest, and I hope this edition entices you to explore and celebrate everything our region has to offer. Over the next few editions, we will be introducing you to some of our team here at Distinctly Northwest. I wanted to start with Jaren Hobson, our graphic designer, for our first spotlight. When I came on board as editor, I wanted to refresh our branding and our look. I had a few ideas about how to do that, but Jaren took my vision and made it even better. I’m not a designer, but I can recognize talent when I see it. This guy has a gift for integrating the latest trends with our specific PNW style, and I’m so grateful he’s on our team. If you’re enjoying our design, you can find out more about Jaren on social media. Until next time! @jennabentonwriter

Distinctly Northwest Magazine is published by the Rosebud Media Advertising Department 111 N. Fir Street, Medford, OR 97501 GENERAL INFORMATION: 541.776.4422 To advertise in this magazine, contact Laura Perkins 541.776.4447 • lperkins@rosebudmedia.com Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher

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Jaren Hobson Graphic Designer


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BOTANICAL BLISS

Explore a hidden oasis in Medford

Wine and wildflowers along the Rogue

100 YEARS OF BOUNTY / feature Downtown Medford's historic farmhouse

20  LOCAL SUPERHEROES

26  WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

On a mission to invlove, educate, and inspire

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Taking a leap of faith in a single bound

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10  DRINK IT IN

30  SPACE TO CREATE & CONNECT See what all the buzz is about

ON THE COVER: Cheyla Breedlove snuggles her son Gibson on the porch of their chicken coop. The pair run a farmstand and a lemonade stand in the heart of downtown Medford. Photo by BELL PHOTOGRAPHY

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BY JENNA BENTON PHOTOS BY WADE PHOTOS

Decades of Devotion

Italio Gardens fills approximately 2 acres of the total 6.3 acres fronting Table Rock Road, a busy thoroughfare connecting the Northgate Shopping Center and the new Costco business district in Central Point. This two acre parcel (one of three) contains the majority of the intensely planted botanical garden landscape with three water features, including a 5000 gallon Andreatta Waterscapes koi pond and waterfall surrounded by 100 tons of granite boulders. A 40 year old redwood tree grove contains all three of the redwood species of the world. The number of rare plants and trees are astonishing, and around every corner there seems to be an old chair or bench to rest and take it all in.

Make no mistake, this neighborhood and our little corner house is everything I described. But across the street, there is no tidy row of houses. Instead, a wall of every shade of green reaches to the sky, and behind the wall there is a hidden paradise. This place that simply announces itself with a

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Looking back, I had no idea how grateful I would become for this house and this street, and how wrong I was about the first impression of this little Northwest Medford neighborhood that’s nestled between I-5 and the Southern Oregon Humane Society. (On quiet nights we can sometimes hear dogs barking, and I think about the lovable dog we adopted from there years ago.)

I’ve walked past that sign and down the little driveway into Italio Gardens many times, and the experience never fails to catch my breath. The further in you go, the bigger the space becomes. There are dozens of winding, overgrown paths that beckon you to wander deeper. Towering trees and fragrances abound, and it’s difficult not to stop every few steps to feel the peace and breathe in the oxygen that hovers beneath a canopy of glowing green.

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sign reading “Italio Gardens” is easy to miss. How could something so extraordinary be in the middle of such an ordinary neighborhood?

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hen I moved into the little house on Cummings Lane in Medford, I was grateful. I was grateful for a tidy little Southern Oregon neighborhood and rows of new houses, with clean sidewalks and families playing basketball in their driveways. I felt responsible and grown up moving in there, as if we had checked all the boxes and settled in for a comfortable stretch in a light and bright house. I envisioned holidays and long summer nights on the patio under the stars. After years of renting, we embraced ownership, moved in, and breathed a sigh of relief.

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Baldassare Mineo

Peeking from all of this lush greenery is a 4-bedroom, 3-bath home originally built in 1946. Its 2,400 square feet boasts a finished basement, an upstairs suite, and a spacious covered patio. Every room in this quaint, well maintained house has a story to tell, from the lavishly baroque living area that features an Italian porcelain chandelier, to the knotty pine-covered walls upstairs. Guests of the upstairs suite are treated to a skylight that opens to the stars. Wander further on the property, and you’ll find a 70-foot long quonset greenhouse, a large fiberglass roofed garden structure and a separate two-car garage that looks like a garden cottage from the outside. A patio with tables is situated perfectly to accommodate small groups for gathering. It’s like walking into a dream, but the most remarkable thing about this property isn’t the

plants, wildlife, or the house. It’s actually the man who carefully curated this little slice of Heaven. Baldassare Mineo is the conductor of this orchestral feast for the senses. Handsome and charming, he is quick to educate visitors about anything that grows on his land. He is familiar with every living thing in the space and shares his knowledge with a twinkle in his eye. He really is as wonderful as he sounds. What I have appreciated most about my neighbor is his generosity. He has spent decades cultivating and loving this place. He opens his gardens up to the public every Saturday morning and offers his tours to Master Gardeners, photographers, garden clubs, senior groups, and any number of artists, writers, and horticulturists who want to learn or simply meander.

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Icons Art

For many years Baldassare operated a successful nursery on the property. He published a book, made a television appearance on Martha Stewart, and has had many articles written about him and by him over the last 40 years. In a season when he has begun to consider retirement, his concern is for the life he has created on this property, and the idea that perhaps there is someone who could carry on the magic that flows from it. For now, he is searching for a horticulturist to handle propagation and sales of some of the plants, but eventually he would love to find a new owner to settle in and make this treasure their own. As for me, I continue to be grateful. I’m grateful for beauty, for things that grow, and for a man who generously serves his Pacific Northwest community by providing a beautiful place just to be. 


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BY JENNA BENTON PHOTOS BY GYPSYJANE PHOTOGRAPHY & DANNY HALL

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Family Heritage and Farming Excellence

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el Rio Vineyards. Say the name to any Southern Oregonian, and it brings to mind rows of perfectlyspaced trellises laden with vines, nostalgic red barns, and high-quality wine that has helped define this region of the Pacific Northwest. Once a vast orchard, the stunning vineyard is nestled along the scenic Rogue River, a perfect setting and climate for growing exceptional grapes. Founded on the discovery of gold and the burgeoning railroad in the late 19th century, the town of Gold Hill is home to this sprawling, historic gem. I visited Del Rio Vineyards in late summer, where I not only enjoyed my time in the historic tasting room, but also scored two free bouquets of zinnias at their “flower it forward” on the east side of the property. Guests are invited to cut their own bouquets free of charge, as long as they take one for a friend. It was a lovely day, and the sun shone over the tops of the barns while I wandered among the rows of dazzling, buzzing beauty. I was captivated by the refreshing and invigorating retreat Rob and Jolee Wallace have created here, and it is obvious that it’s about more than exceptional wine.

Huckleberry, Jolee & Rob Wallace Photo by GypsyJane Photography

@delriovineyards

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@gypsyjanephotography @dannyhall11

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“Our region provides an incredible amount of beauty, and Del Rio Vineyards is one small contribution to that,” says Lindsey Zagar, Marketing Manager of Del Rio Vineyards. “Hospitality is at the core of our tasting room experience, and we love to see our guests connecting with each other and enjoying themselves.” It’s a delight to wander the tasting room, formerly the historic Rock Point Stage Hotel, built in 1864. Guests enjoy the warm hospitality from friendly and knowledgeable staff and can sample wines while shopping for interesting gifts and trinkets. With a glass of wine in hand, visitors can also head out to the picnic area and pick up a game of corn hole or relax under towering trees at the foot of lush rolling hills. In summer, the back lawn is a gathering place for concerts and events under the stars. In the fall, Del Rio offers hikes through the vineyards, which are particularly stunning when the leaves begin to change. During the month of October, Del Rio Vineyards donate a portion of their sales from Rose Jolee, a semi-sparkling early muscat, to Asante Womens’ Imaging to benefit women in Ashland, Medford, and Grants Pass with breast cancer education and mammograms. With just one visit to Del Rio Vineyards, it’s clear to see this company values their community. They have created a place where neighbors and friends can come together over a glass of wine and celebrate moments big and small. “We love to welcome new and old friends in a relaxed, down-to-earth atmosphere,” says Lindsey. In addition to valuing the local community, Lindsey explains the vital role the Del Rio crew plays in the distinction and innovation of the brand. “I think the high quality and diversity of our team defines us and sets us apart.”

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Consequently, Del Rio boasts an international winemaking team, including their head winemaker, JeanMichel Jussiaume from the Loire Valley in France, and their assistant, Aurelien Labrosse from Burgundy. Cellar hands hail from Napa and Mexico. Over 300,000 vines produce 13 diverse selections of grape varietals. The rocky south-facing slopes of the vineyard drain well and provide excellent terrain for producing premium wine grapes.

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Drink Pink Purchase 6 bottles of Rose Jolee for $60* (value at $90) in October. Del Rio will donate $5 for each 6 bottles sold in October to Asante Imaging in Ashland, Medford & Grants Pass to provide mammograms and Breast Cancer education. *Offer available online or in our tasting room

Visit our Historic Tasting Room Open Daily 11am to 5pm 52 N. River Road, Gold Hill EXIT 43 on I-5 | (541) 855-2062

“We have grown tremendously in the last 20 years thanks to our exceptional employees and lovely wine,” says Lindsey. “For our owners, Rob and Jolee Wallace, this is about more than business. It’s also about caring for our community and creating a company that cares for its employees and their families.” Like many vineyards in Oregon, Del Rio Vineyards show no signs of slowing down. Their wine can

currently be found in 17 states, as well as Japan. From the view of the vineyard to the bounty in the glass, their Pacific Northwest values embrace exploration, opportunity, and approachability. Whether you call Southern Oregon home or you’re just passing through, Del Rio is one stop that will make you want to kick back and stay a while. 


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WHEAT BROTHERS FARMS

Little Farm in the City

BY CHEYLA BREEDLOVE

PHOTOS BY BELL PHOTOGRAPHY

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Wheat Brothers Farms sits in the middle of downtown Medford, Oregon. The house is approximately 1,100 square feet. Six-inch shiplap exposure siding and steep roof pitches give it a lovely farmhouse stance. What I find intoxicating about our home is its rich family history of the Earharts (yes, as in Amelia Earhart). The history lingers in the air, and you can catch wind of it in the heartiness of the soil in spring. This old wheat farm was turning forth a large amount of wheat at the turn of the century—157 acres of it, to be precise. I’ve filled our house and property with vintage items, little reminders of simpler times.

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n January of 2013 I found a quaint little farmhouse nestled in the heart of the Rogue Valley. This little 1910 farmhouse was reminiscent of my childhood, and when I walked through the 14-foot laurel hedges, it felt like I was in a scene from Little Women. The arch of the branches welcomed me into the quiet presence of this little plot of land, a secret garden that was full of history and romance.

Cheyla Breedlove When I was a little girl, I loved being in the midst of all the beautiful antiques that surrounded me in my momma’s home. I grew up listening to the stories of an older generation, and it captured my heart in ways I’m still unearthing. I believe my love for vintage and older things took root when I was young, and it reflects in big and small ways here at Wheat Brothers Farms.

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I grew up on a farm. Being lazy was not an option, and with each new sunrise I got up and cared for our animals, which included beautiful quarter horses, cows, emus, chickens, and one feisty hog. Mowing our acreage and learning how to drive on a John Deer tractor were the cornerstones of growing up a country girl, at least for me. There was a time I thought becoming a city girl would have its perks, so I gave it a whirl. It didn’t take me long to realize it didn’t quite fit. One night I ended up on a giant log on the shores of Lake Roesiger in Washington, fishing. My girlfriends were off enjoying cocktails in finely-pressed clothing at a local swanky night club. I knew then I missed being home, and city life was certainly not for me. It was time to go back to my roots. I entered this ole’ farmhouse and I knew within moments I was at home.

@wheatbrothersfarms

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Living downtown has its perks too. My children love being close to a corner market and the library, and of course in summertime, the music from an ice cream truck parades around the block every evening. Smells of culinary delights from Medford’s downtown restaurants and food pods offer a woven tapestry of choices on any given night of the week. Today, our little roadside farmstand offers the colorful bounty of the season. Fresh berries and local honey abound, and of course most folks come by for our homemade seasonal pies from early May until October. Fall is a beautiful time to visit us. Our sweet and tender little farmhouse sits in the midst of commerce and community, and I couldn’t be prouder to carry on the traditions of days gone by. The covered porch is the heart of our home, and from its strong and steady pillars, it has become a place where I can sit and watch our boys climb a tree that was planted over 100 years ago. I’ve been told that when you’re here, you can’t help but slow down a bit. I do believe that is true. My hope is that you find yourself stopping by our little farmstand sometime for a visit, and that you find yourself breathing in the beauty and enjoying the little bit of Northwest history and hospitality we have to offer. 


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BY JAMI RONDA

PHOTOS BY PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAHNA MARIE

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Art in the Heart of Medford

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hen I began dreaming of Rogue City Comics in 2014, I still had a home full of teenagers with busy schedules, a husband regularly traveling for work, and zero buy-in from anyone. The timing was off, but our business had its name and remained tucked away, like a dormant seed. Steven was still collecting comics when we got married 27 years ago. I would accompany him to pick up his subscriptions at Beyond Comics. Two of the world’s top 5 ranked comic book publishers are headquartered in Portland. He had to take a break from collecting to instead buy diapers and formula for our quadruplet babies, the first to be born in the Rogue Valley. Back then, we had no idea that Oregon would become a hub in the comic book industry. In the fall of 2018, the dream sprouted, poking through the logic of a very routine, financially secure life as empty nesters. Non-reading loved ones contemplated an intervention as we put the plan in motion and decided we’d give up guaranteed paychecks, health insurance, and a perfectly-running company car. The financial risk was (and remains) real, but those things seemed insignificant to the thrill of seeing our destiny so clearly. It’s not unlike the rosy anticipation of one’s first child, the clueless wonder of the dream vs. the gritty imperfection of real life. Entrepreneurs are gutsy.

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Jami & Steve Ronda

Some retirement savings, hours of planning, and physical work were funneled into the historic space that fell into our laps over lunch with a friend. We did most of the work ourselves with the help of Steven’s dad, a retired contractor, and a few friends. All that could be purchased locally was, as we were seeing more clearly how online shopping can decimate small businesses. We’ve experienced a leak that totaled our kitchen, vehicle repairs, and a medical emergency less than 18 months into the dream but feel nothing but gratitude when we unlock the doors to Rogue City every morning. We love our hometown and want to help create a city culture we never want to leave. continued on 23


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@roguecitycomics

@lahnamariephotography

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Why comics, and why would we give up all the security of a corporate job at the age of 49, right as the human body begins rebelling in earnest? The simple answer is that we were kids who loved reading comics, and if ever there was ever a time we needed opportunities to unplug, it’s now. With all our hearts we believe comics are an underestimated, undervalued, and misunderstood art form. Our desire is to elevate the medium and share the magic with new readers. Steven bought Sergeant Rock comics at grocery stores or gas stations; you could find them everywhere back then. I usually couldn’t afford comics, so I read whatever my best friend’s family had. Lunch at their house meant “eat and read,” no talking. It was magical and still one of my best memories from childhood. I remember being swept away to adventurous places and just feeling happy. We’d love to find

a way in the next year to get a comic book into the hands of every student at Title 1 schools. Studies have shown comic books help build reading skills and a lifelong love for reading; for us, it’s true. Steven and I weren’t avid readers as children but read comics and later evolved into the serious bookworms we are today. Every genre you can think of—even biography—has representation in the comic. Many classic novels have also been adapted into graphic novels. In an age when people may experience withdrawals without a phone in their hands, we believe time spent unplugged is more important than ever. Too much screen time is being proven to hinder development in children. The Journal of American Medicine recently published a study showing that time spent on social media increases depression in teens. Sitting down with a real book can feed the soul. Comics really are for

everyone and can add joy to life. When life is too busy to dig into a novel, we can grab a comic, and enjoy a clever story and great art in just 20 minutes. Medford was so ready for a destination for comic lovers, and our location in the historical Davis Building, built in 1906 and number 20 on the Historic Walking Tour of downtown Medford, is so charming. It served as our city’s first center of communications for telephone and telegraph service. It’s serendipity because it’s still a place for connecting people. A single issue requires a team of artists, inkers, colorists, letterers, and writers, and a diverse multitude of readers are connected via that comic. Humanity can never have enough of that kind of collaboration. Words are powerful. If a picture is truly worth a thousand words, then I hereby nominate comic books for the Nobel Peace Prize for the countless ways they bring people together. 

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BY ERIN MAXSON PHOTOS BY WILDLIFE IMAGES, ADAM MARLAND & DAVE LOW

An Extraordinary Rehabilitation Center

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One by one, creatures of all kinds arrived. Some had broken wings, others were found alone, and a few were literally what the cat dragged in. Siddon, seeing a need that no one else could fill, took them all. Soon so many animals were being rehabilitated that Siddon’s focus changed, and Wildlife Images Rehabilitation & Education center was founded with the mission of saving wildlife through involvement, education, and inspiration. He recognized that rehabilitating wildlife for release did more than just help animals; it helped people.

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Mornings are magical at Wildlife Images. Mornings are also busy. With 100 resident Animal Ambassadors and up to 200 wild patients in the clinic at any given time, there are a lot of mouths to feed. The non-profit, established in 1981 by J. David Siddon, is nestled just outside of Merlin, a renowned white

water rafting hub, along the Rogue River. The wildlife rehabilitation center grew organically when Siddon moved his family from California to Southern Oregon in the mid 1970’s. The family business of training animals for film and television moved with them. It wasn’t long until word reached nearby Grants Pass that a man in the woods was “good with animals.”

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he sun creeps over the hills and light filters through the pines, stretching its rays to the Rogue River. As it does, the animals at Wildlife Images awaken. Brown bears roll from side to side, heaving their great bodies on to all fours. The small pack of wolf ambassadors stretch before lifting their heads to join in an eerily beautiful call. Across the park, a great horned owl hoo-hoos as she settles into her perch after keeping watch overnight. The nearby eagles, hawks, vultures, falcons, buzzards and wading birds all spread their wingspans of up to 6 feet, basking in the sun and greeting the day.

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@wildlifeimagesrehabed @etmaxson @weownthemoment

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As a working rehabilitation clinic, Wildlife Images cares for native wild animals from across Southern Oregon. Each year the number of patients admitted to the clinic grows. By the end of 2018, the clinic treated a total of 1,098 patients. Songbirds and small mammals like raccoons and skunks dominate the list of patients. Owls heal from head trauma and eye injuries after being hit by cars. Hawks and eagles learn to fly again after wing fractures. Orphaned foxes practice pouncing and climbing. Tiny bats, weighing as little as a sugar cube, are fed every two hours, day and night. Otters, bobcats, marmots, flying squirrels, osprey and ringtail cats are welcome challenges for the Animal Care Team.

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Some animals stay just a couple of days, others for nearly a year as they grow or heal. When ready, the patients are cleared for release back into the wild. Locations are carefully chosen to

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set patients up for success in the wild. Often, Wildlife Images members, and occasionally the public, are invited to attend the release. People hear about the animal’s recovery, learn about conservation efforts and enjoy the patient’s return to the wild. Witnesses share joy and awe, often shedding a tear or two. Education is a vital part of Wildlife Images’ mission. Each year, 5,000 kids visit on school field trips, hundreds of youth attend Camp EEK during the summer, and families meet Animal Ambassadors at community events and outreach programs. The largest educational component is the park itself, home to the animals who need permanent care. As visitors arrive at Wildlife Images, they are greeted by flowering plants, shrubs, and trees all leading them into the park. Guests visit resident Animal Ambassadors on self-guided tours. Roughly 100 animals

which cannot survive in the wild without human care have sanctuary at Wildlife Images. Most of the animals are native to the northwest. A few found homes at the park from illegal situations or were confiscated from poor living conditions. A new enclosure, rebuilt after damaging winter snowfall, is home to wading birds and one very smart corvid. Onyx, a resident raven, will often greet guests at the viewing window. Educational docents share stories that highlight the species’ incredible intelligence and also point out the unique nesting behaviors of the two female sacred African ibis. Across the park, surrounded by carnivores, visitors learn of Wildlife Images’ educational mission. Four wolf ambassadors demonstrate the true nature of the often villainized apex predator. Brady, the cougar, helps teach families about habitat destruction due to urban sprawl. The grizzly bears

further highlight the impact humans have had on wildlife in the northwest. Grizzly bears were once native to Oregon, making their home along the Siskiyous, and beyond. The last documented grizzly bear was shot in 1931. In the nearly nine decades since, the bears have not returned. The detrimental impacts humans have had and continue to have on wildlife is why Wildlife Images exists. That’s why, for nearly 40 years, staff and interns work long hours caring for injured and orphaned wildlife. It’s why volunteers advocate on behalf of animals who don’t have a voice but who were here long before any of us. At dusk when the light retreats, the great horned owl wakes up for her night-watch just in time to hoot a goodbye to the staff. The bears climb into their dens, the wolf ambassadors curl up, and the birds close their eyes until the sun returns. The day may end, but the mission does not. 

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A Culture of Coworking in Grants Pass

BY ALISHA VOSBURG PHOTOS BY RYAN VOSBURG

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magine your dream workspace: a mecca of modern furniture, including a sleek desk and oversized computer monitor, containing every professional gadget necessary to work better and faster, with walls graced by cool and eclectic artwork, and most importantly…a free coffee bar. For many of us who are self-employed and work from home, it’s just a dream. Brace yourself. The dream is real, and it’s called The Hivve. The brainchild of business partners Trever Yarrish and DeWayne Lumpkin, The Hivve is the perfect namesake for this Northwest co-working space and venue. Both men own other local businesses separately, and their partnership in The Hivve has the Rogue Valley buzzing. Although urban Oregonians are familiar with co-working, this brilliant concept is new to Southern Oregon. Basically, you rent a space designed to meet your work needs. Need to call clients in a quiet place? No problem. Need a conference room with a projector for an important meeting? Done. Need a desk to call your own? Easy peasy. “In big cities, they’re everywhere,” Trever says. “The biggest one on the West Coast is called WeWork, and they’re

Trever Yarrish

international. They’re huge.” He’s not exaggerating. In fact, as of June 2019, The Wall Street Journal reported WeWork to be valued at 20 billion dollars. “It’s a very popular concept,” says Trever. “We don’t get WeWork in rural communities like Grants Pass, so the question is, is there a need? And is there a viable and thriving enough business community to support having a coworking space in a community like ours that is underserved? I wanted to test that out. But I also really understand the community. It’s a place that I love.”

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@thehivve

@vosburgdesigns @alishavos

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Born and raised locally, Trever dreamed of creating something that was truly an experience and would enhance the lives of his neighbors in positive ways. He spent 11 years as the Marketing Director for Dutch Bros, which perfected his ability to embed a culture of fantastic user experience into The Hivve. This innovative space has been perfectly tailored to serve Southern Oregon.

2020 Outback Onyx XT Shown

…and they let me have it for a song!

In addition to being a revolutionary coworking space, Trever and DeWayne have also found another way to open their doors and serve their community. With its spacious ceilings and an inviting loft, The Hivve is a perfect spot to host weddings, birthday parties, musical performances, craft workshops, and holiday parties. “I didn’t want a showpiece or eye candy,” Trevor smiles. “I wanted to create a space I actually wanted to come to every day, a space that’s useful and a great resource, that makes people look forward to being here.”

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I’m Michele, and I’m a singer, an actress, and a nurse. How do I accomplish all three? My new Subaru, of course! I’ll sing the praises of my new Outback on the stage, at the office, or on the road.

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The Hivve truly is situated in the hub of downtown. Although there are countless options for food, coffee, and shopping within walking distance, the multipurpose space includes a café where coworkers can get lunch and a media lab to record podcasts and vlogs. They also offer a network of sound engineers as well as a turnkey system (you just have to bring a memory card).

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“Just look around. It’s a beautiful building, and it has so much heritage,” says Trever. “This was the JC Penney building when I was a kid, and the location is impossible to beat. If somebody put a dot in the middle of a map of Grants Pass, it would literally be right here.”

It’s the one car that does it all… like me!

Mission accomplished, sir.  3103 Biddle Road • Medford, OR • 541-245-2000

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Think you know Rogue Valley Manor?

Think again.

What does living at Rogue Valley Manor mean? It means 668 acres’ worth of living space, diverse dining options, and an array of services and amenities so extensive you have to see it to believe it. Life Plan Community a cut above the rest.

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Distinctly Northwest | Fall 2019 Edition  

September 8, 2019

Distinctly Northwest | Fall 2019 Edition  

September 8, 2019

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