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JUNE 2020 | VOL. 13 — ISSUE 6

Transforming

PANTRY STAPLES Find a new use for old standbys

Step up walking routines Go next level

Give the perfect foot massage Step-by-step tips

Should you throw it out? From expired foods to decluttering

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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JUNE 2020

on the COVER from the

EDITOR As I write this, Oregon is tentatively reopening, and many of us are enthusiastically headed to trails, campgrounds, waterways and parks. However, many of our family members and neighbors are more vulnerable in this pandemic period. Personally, I have three friends who are immunosuppressed due to transplants—one is only 14 years old. So, let’s all continue to do our part with masks, hand-washing and social distancing. I invite you to visit our newly updated website, www.oregonhealthyliving.com, for health information from Rogue Valley experts.

crose@rosebudmedia.com

CONTENT FITNESS

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13

dating

True or false?

Nuts Pastas Oatmeal Powdered milk Quinoa and grains Vinegars Photography by Tessa DeLine

COVER STORY

HEALTH

Keep Calm and Toss or Keep? Men’s Health Walk on: Understanding food Facts: Amp up your walking routine

Beans (both canned and dried) Bouillon cubes Brown rice Canned tomatoes Canned tuna or salmon Chicken/beef/vegetable stock Coconut oil/olive oil Corn meal Dried fruits Dried garlic Dried onions Honey

vol. 13 – issue 6

FOOD

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When stocking your pantry for everyday use or emergencies, focus on versatile, nutritious ingredients, recommends Tessa DeLine. Some good items to keep stocked include:

HEALTH

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PETS

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Blood in the Bowl: Kitty Cuisine: Signs of bladder cancer

Feline nutrition

FOOD

NATURAL

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Making use of what you have

DESIGN & PRODUCTION — Paul Bunch

CEO & PUBLISHER — Steven Saslow

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS — Aaron Cooper Micah Leigh Sarah Lemon Cheryl Rose Rebecca Scott

SALES SUPERVISOR — Laura Perkins

Oregon Healthy Living Magazine is published by the Rosebud Media Advertising Department 111 N. Fir St., Medford, OR 97501. | General information: 541.776.4422 | Submissions and feedback: crose@rosebudmedia.com

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

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Pantry-friendly Fit at Home: Foot massage how-tos Recipes: 4 exercises Sole Time:

EDITOR — Cheryl P. Rose DIRECTOR OF SALES — Bill Krumpeck

FITNESS


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Get the

Most from Walking Form and consistency show results STORY BY AARON COOPER

◆ Fitness ◆ Transportation ◆ Physical rehab ◆ Stress management

T

hese are all good reasons to get out and take a walk. And there are many more. The health benefits of walking have been recognized for decades. Walking is easy for most of us to do, doesn’t cost anything, and provides a good outlet for combating cabin fever during these times of social distancing.

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FITNESS


FITNESS

Perhaps you’ve already made walking a part of your routine. But are you walking the right way? Kelly Martin of Medford is a physical therapist who is devoted to coaching others to use proper walking technique. “I am ridiculously passionate about walking,” says Martin. It became her primary form of rehab after suffering a debilitating injury. “I injured my back 11 years ago, and the way I rehabbed was through walking and breathing.” Martin champions the belief that combining proper walking form and breathing technique can produce a healing result. The way Martin describes these proper techniques can sound complicated. “Each step requires the coordinated action of some 200 muscles, activating eight chains of movement, all in a split second,” she says. Fortunately, most people do those movements naturally, even subconsciously.

But beginning in young adulthood, Martin says the pelvis can get out of alignment, causing the body to develop asymmetrically and robbing us of our youthful, efficient walking form. “And when there’s stress or injury, the asymmetry becomes exaggerated, and then you start having pain.”

For efficient walking, some practice is required Martin helps athletes and everyday folks alike rehabilitate injuries and regain mobility and stamina through simply practicing walking. She says practicing just a few easy habits will promote alignment and efficient movement. These include keeping the abdominal muscles engaged, but not tight; breathing in a way that rotates and moves the ribs; swinging the arms so they help propel your body weight forward; and keeping your eyes

glued to the horizon rather than on the ground, to support your spatial orientation as you move in three planes (forward, side-to-side and vertically). Her top recommendation for practicing proper form is walking uphill. “It activates the glutes, arms and deep breathing, and keeps the heels planted so you can use your glutes and hamstrings to pull yourself forward.” Practicing these habits may give walkers a lot to think about, but Martin emphasizes that they’re easy to learn and master. And once you get these down, there are more advanced techniques to learn. Outdoor fitness coach Michelle Wimberly of Medford first became interested in walking as a teen when she realized it was useful for combating depression and regulating her mood. As a trainer, she began adding walking to her clients’ routines “to do something that I love

and share with other people.” Today, Wimberly coaches walking and hiking to clients ranging from runners training for an upcoming race to those who just want to participate in everyday activities. “Evidence shows that at least 20 continued on page 6

“If you’re experiencing pain or stress, walking helps you focus and process those things.”

Michelle Wimberly Outdoor fitness trainer, Medford

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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FITNESS

continued from page 5

minutes of hiking helps the brain process stress,” she says, adding that hiking outdoors fits today’s social distancing guidelines. “But it has to be at a moderate pace. I always use the talk test, asking clients questions to gauge how hard they’re breathing.” Wimberly adds that for neurological reasons, 20 minutes of moderate walking is the best for stress relief. But stress relief is only part of the goal, she says. “After 20 minutes, I usually have clients do some uphill lunges to build their strength and stamina.” Because walking is frequently used as a workout warmup, Wimberly emphasizes it in her training. “People walk to lose weight and for rehab, and walking helps bring

things into focus. If you’re experiencing pain or stress, it helps you focus and process those things.”

Steps for more advanced walkers Once Martin’s clients master the initial habits of efficient walking, she has them add more challenging concepts. These include leading with the chest facing the front foot; planting the heel and pulling forward to activate the hamstrings; using the big toe to activate the groin and inner thigh muscles; and using the arch of the foot to activate the glutes. These are all things that the brain does effortlessly, but they need to happen in a correct sequence for true efficiency.

And, of course, pelvic alignment remains the key. During the coronavirus shutdown, Martin is having clients check their own pelvic alignment from home, and sending videos for her to analyze. Despite social distancing, she can still provide coaching, therapy and guidance virtually.

Getting started: The first step is the most important Martin, who walks daily, says avoiding walking is bad for one’s health. “We’re spending so much time sitting now, and that’s bad for your immune system and emotional health.” She says that walking movement stimulates the immune

system, hormonal activity and the intestines, all of which are beneficial. But beyond those health benefits, much of her coaching helps runners rehabbing injuries. “You can’t run again until you walk,” she says. “Efficient walking is the template for efficient running.” Wimberly says getting started is easy when you begin with short distances. “It’s pretty much the same as with any other endurance sport,” she says. “Just do a little bit every day, and keep building up from there.” And despite the complexity of her coaching, Martin reminds walkers to not think about it too much. “You just have to take that first step.” ■

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020


FITNESS COUNTING YOUR STEPS? Step counters often strive for 10,000 steps a day, which is roughly equivalent to 5 miles. Calorie expenditure for walking is about 100 per mile. Walking 5.5 miles a week can reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke by more than 30%.

34 5 12 KELLY MARTIN’S SIX HABITS FOR EFFICIENT WALKING Whether you’re walking to get in shape or for rehab, you’ll want to pay close attention to incorporating these six habits into your walking form:

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1. Swing the arms to shift body weight forward.

2. Wear heel-hugging shoes, which help the feet better communicate with the brain.

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4. Breathe in a way that rotates and moves the ribs.

5. Engage the abdominal muscles.

6. Focus on uphill walking, which naturally aligns the skeleton.

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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FOOD

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Food package dates don’t indicate a deadline for consumption STORY BY SARAH LEMON

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

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FOOD

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ins of dried rice and beans, towers of canned fruits and vegetables and pound after pound of flour and sugar.

An overstocked pantry may be the visible reminder of the new coronavirus, long after panic-driven purchasing has subsided. There’s no need to panic over the timeline for consuming dry goods, even the contents of jars, cans and boxes past their package dates. Anyone in a cash crunch for groceries can be confident that “expired” foods are still safe to consume. “The quality of the food is still really good,” says Chris Bosse, food bank supervisor for ACCESS, which distributed 5.2 million pounds of food last year within Jackson County. Shelf-stable foods last so long, in fact, that ACCESS distributes items to the public for three years past dates indicated on packaging, says Bosse. The main criteria for pantry goods is that cans exhibit no visible rust, swelling or deep dents on the sides, he says. Dents on a can’s rim — the weakest point — also are suspect. Plastic bags and cardboard boxes should be free of holes or tears. And jar lids should be secure. “Make sure the seals are intact,” says Bosse. Contrary to notions that food dating implies some sort of safeguard, most dates indicate peak quality and serve to inform grocers’ inventories. Excepting infant formula, dates are not indicators of food safety and aren’t even required by federal law, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “That doesn’t really apply to you, the consumer,” says Mahlea Rasmussen, education coordinator for Ashland Food Co-op. Confusion likely stems from inconsistent use of terminology continued on page 10

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FOOD continued from page 9

among food products and their manufacturers. Shoppers are accustomed to seeing several phrases stamped on food packages but struggle to discern the differences. And shoppers who can’t reference labels for items purchased from bulk bins may resort to a wild guess. “That is a common concern for people,” says Rasmussen. The most common qualifiers for food dates are: “best by,” “best before,” “sell by,” “use by,” “freeze by” and small variations on each. None of them should be interpreted as expiration dates. However, any shelf-stable item produced five years ago or longer is questionable, says Bosse. “The nutritional value will start to taper off.” While actual spoilage is unlikely in intact canned goods, perishable foods’ freshness is more closely tied to package dates and consumers’ own observations. The USDA tasks the public with evaluating food products before consumption for signs they may have spoiled. “When in doubt, throw it out,” says Bosse. Even fresh foods, he says, have a window past their package dates in which the foods likely are safe to eat. Eggs two weeks past the carton date and week-old milk routinely are distributed by ACCESS. Many cheeses last even longer and usually can hold up to consumers’ “visual inspection,” says Bosse. Fermented dairy foods, such as yogurt and sour cream, can be fresh for weeks past their package dates, says Rasmussen. Frozen foods 90 days past package dates meet ACCESS standards. While frozen meats degrade more quickly, frozen fruits and vegetables last for months and months, says Bosse, adding that frozen foods shouldn’t be thawed and then refrozen. Proper storage goes a long way toward extending the shelf life of both preserved and fresh foods, say Bosse and Rasmussen. Dry goods, cans and jars should be kept in a cool, dry place. Receptacles used to store bulk foods should be clean and dry, says Rasmussen, explaining that air-drying containers after washing is preferable because towels can introduce bacteria. Properly stored, dried beans last two to three years and dried grains about a year, she says. continued on page 11

DATES DECODED “Best if Used By/Before” indicates when a product will be of best flavor or quality. It is not a purchasing or safety date. “Sell By” tells the store how long to display the product for sale for inventory management. It is not a safety date. “Use By” is the last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality. It is not a safety date, except when used on infant formula. “Freeze By” indicates when a product should be frozen to maintain peak quality. It is not a purchasing or safety date. Source: U.S Department of Agriculture

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020


FOOD Although there’s a perception that grains should be stored in the refrigerator, that’s not necessary, particularly if they’re replenished often, says Rasmussen. If whole grains start to smell soapy, their natural oils may be going rancid, affecting flavor, she says. Odor often is the best indicator of food spoilage, she adds. Once foods are removed from their packaging, cooked or combined with other ingredients, the clock to consume them starts ticking. Follow food-service protocol for eating leftover, cooked foods within a week, says Rasmussen, who also recommends organizing the fridge to facilitate timely consumption. She keeps ready-to-eat foods on a high shelf, safe from other foods dripping onto them. And when serving out of food packages, don’t use the same utensil for several items, which hastens spoilage and can even contaminate foods with germs, says Rasmussen. That means no double-dipping between tubs of salsa and sour cream or jars of peanut butter and jelly. And definitely no licking the spoon in between. “Make sure each container has its own spoon or utensils.” ■

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HEALTH

Men’s Health Quiz

Does father know best when it comes to his health?

W

BY MARGARET BATTISTELLI GARDNER AND CHERYL ROSE

hether they’ll admit it or not, men need regular health screenings just as much as women do. Dr. Eric Webb, a general practitioner with Providence Medical Group-Ashland, suggests a baseline physical for men at age 30-35 – weight, cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugars. If all is well, physicals don’t even have to be an annual thing. However, at age 50, men should have a more comprehensive exam, including a baseline colonoscopy, and start checking in with their doctors at least once a year. Take the quiz! TRUE or FALSE?

TRUE or FALSE?

Adult men only need about five hours of sleep a night.

Frequent urination for men may be annoying but isn’t a health problem.

False. Adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep per 24 hours. Men who sleep seven to eight hours a night have about 60% less risk of fatal heart attack than those who sleep five hours or less.

False. Without pain, frequent urination can be a symptom of diabetes. Frequency and pain with urination can be a symptom of kidney stones, urinary tract infections or prostate problems.

TRUE or FALSE?

TRUE or FALSE?

Optimal blood pressure for an adult male is 120/80.

Inactive men are 60% more likely to suffer from depression than those who are active.

True. Guidelines changed in 2017, redefining high blood pressure as readings above 130/80. Family history plays a large part in blood pressure levels, but generally, eating well, reducing stress and getting regular exercise are important factors too, Webb says.

True. For activity levels, Webb says the recommendation is for men to aim for moderate-intensity aerobic exercise 30 minutes a day, five days a week or high-intensity aerobic activity 20 minutes a day, three days week. And if you aren’t

including weight-bearing exercises a few times a week, your routine isn’t complete.

TRUE or FALSE? A spare tire around the middle is OK if not very overweight. False. It turns out that your body shape may also play a role in heart disease. For men, it’s important to have a waistline of 37 inches or less after age 40.

TRUE or FALSE? A man with cholesterol under 200 and blood pressure within guidelines has no risk of heart disease. False. Sorry, but there’s no single risk factor for heart disease. While approximately 80% of heart disease is preventable through lifestyle (diet, exercise, not smoking), and

management of high blood pressure and cholesterol, it’s still possible to develop heart disease even if you’re taking great care of yourself. Webb says you can calculate your risk of developing heart disease with the calculator from the American College of Cardiology at http://tools. acc.org/ASCVD-Risk-Estimator-Plus.

TRUE or FALSE? Only 30% of a man’s overall health is determined by his genetics. The majority (70%) of overall health is controllable through lifestyle. True. Start where you are and take steps to respect your health by quitting smoking, drinking alcohol conservatively, eating for good nutrition and getting physical activity. ■

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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Never ignore blood in urine

HEALTH STORY BY CHERYL ROSE

Early testing can catch bladder cancer

M

any of the symptoms of bladder cancer are nonspecific, often leading people to confuse these warning signs (burning with urination, urinary urgency) with bladder infections or prostate problems, according to Dr. Shammai Rockove, head urologist at the Center for Men’s and Women’s Urology in Gresham. A telltale symptom of bladder cancer is finding blood in the urine, either clearly visible in the toilet or under the microscope from a physician-ordered test.

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HEALTH continued from page 14

“The good news is that most bladder cancers found in the early stages are curable,” Rockove said. “Even more advanced cases are now being successfully treated.” Though both genders can develop bladder cancer, it is a disease that significantly affects more men than women, Rockove reported. According to the American Cancer Society, 61,000 men a year in the U.S. receive a diagnosis of bladder cancer and 17,000 men a year die from it. “So often the response to the diagnosis is, ‘I never even heard of it,’” Rockove said. “This lack of public awareness can lead to delays in diagnosis. Though there can be other reasons, never ignore blood in your urine. Also, if you have discomforting sensations with the urination process and an obvious source of this can’t be identified, you must see a urologist for proper testing.” The best test for bladder cancer is a cystoscopy, which involves looking into the bladder with a thin scope, Rockove said. “For most people, this is very well-tolerated in the office with some local numbing gel,” he said. “When necessary, this test can be done with full anesthesia.” For prevention of bladder cancer, Rockove recom-

mends hydration and avoiding exposure to known toxins. “Hydration is important,” he said. “The urine gets diluted and passes out of the body faster. The quicker it leaves the body, the less interaction it has with the bladder.” Urine plays an important role in ridding the body of toxins, even ones that enter the body by breathing. These inhaled toxins, Rockove noted, have a strong link to bladder cancer. “By far, cigarette smoking is the main cause of bladder cancer,” he said. “Toxins from inhaled cigarette or other smoke, fumes from diesel fuel or chemicals exit the body through the urine. When these toxins sit in the bladder, they can irritate and inflame the tissue, potentially leading to cancer.” To prevent inhaling toxins, the most important decision is not to smoke, Rockove emphasized. In other aspects of life, attention to safety can make a big difference. “Make sure the areas you work in that have potential toxic fumes, for instance your home shop and garage, are properly ventilated and that you wear proper breathing filter apparatus when working in these areas” he said. “They may be a nuisance, but they are for your safety.” ■

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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PETS

Nutrition for

Kitties How to choose the right cat food

STORY BY REBECCA SCOTT

Y

ou know that look. With a sidelong glance and flick of his tail, your cat sniffs his food, turns up his nose and saunters away. You wonder why your cat is so fussy, but then your thoughts turn to worry. Is he sick or on the wrong diet? Choosing the right cat food can feel overwhelming. Fortunately, local pet experts share how to choose the correct food for your cat, what to look for regarding ingredients and nutrients as well as debunk common myths.

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PETS

Content of cat food choices There are many philosophies surrounding different types of cat food, but it’s important to understand the biology of your cat so you know how to feed it throughout its entire life, explains Vickie Pagan, co-owner of Nature’s Pet Market in Medford and Ashland. “Cats are obligated to eat meat because their bodies don’t produce essential amino acids as other carnivores do,” she says, adding a cat’s body is not set up to process a lot of dry matter. In the wild, cats get moisture from their kill, and the only time they need water is if they can’t get it from their prey, she explains. In the late 1950s and 1960s, Pagan says the creation of dry cat food revealed more about how cats process food. “Many cats started dying, and researchers realized it was because of a taurine deficiency, an amino acid found in meat,” she explains. When picking the right cat food, pet owners should look for key terms on the packaging, according to Dr. Nile McGhie, a veterinarian with Bear Creek Animal Clinic in Ashland. “You want to see the phrase ‘complete and continued on page 18

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PETS

balanced’ on the package, because it means the product is intended to be the cat’s entire diet, without needing any other foods,” she says. For a pet food product to meet the standards of “complete and balanced,” she explains it must either meet the nutritional standards set by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (through formulation or chemical analysis) or it must be proven adequate by going through a feeding test. A food labeled “complete and balanced for all life stages” is appropriate for kittens as well as adult cats, she adds.

Finicky felines a myth? Often, pet parents believe their cat is “fussy” about its food and what it will eat. “About 80% of cats are picky, and the remainder will eat anything,” according to Pagan. McGhie agrees. “I think this is true and false,” she says. A cat can be fussy, but pickiness may also be a symptom of another problem, she explains. “If your cat has been a good eater and is suddenly picky, that’s concerning, and you should go to the vet.” continued on page 20

HOMEMADE OR RAW FOOD FOR KITTIES Cats thrive on a raw diet, which is a carefully compounded formula of raw meat, organ meat and bone, says Vickie Pagan, co-owner of Nature’s Pet Market. However, it is important to do your research when deciding what to feed your cat. Dr. Nile McGhie, a veterinarian with Bear Creek Animal Clinic in Ashland, advises talking to a veterinary nutritionist before embracing a specific type

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

of food or diet, especially if you’re considering making your cat’s food. “Many people think they should make their cat’s food and that commercial food is bad. It’s good they take nutrition seriously, but home-cooked diets have to be complete and balanced, and it’s not as simple as it sounds,” she says. She recommends you connect with a veterinary nutritionist to get recipes specific to your cat’s needs.


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PETS

continued from page 18

A proper diet Cat owners also sometimes struggle with how much to feed their cat. Aim for a golf ball-sized portion per serving of wet or dry food, says McGhie. Additionally, she advises going slowly if you’re changing foods in order to avoid stomach problems. “You can also use toys where the cat has to work for their food, which helps reduce stress eating.” Feeding our cats is one of the ways we bond with them, says McGhie. She advises pet parents to talk to a vet or other expert for guidance if they have questions on what to feed their cat and how often. Pagan agrees. “When you understand the tenets of proper nutrition and how to choose the right food for your cat, you can help support them through a healthy diet.” ■

WHAT IS TAURINE? Cats need protein, according to Pagan and McGhie; however, they need specific amino acids found in protein. For example, cats require a certain amount of the amino acid taurine in their diet. Taurine is found in animal tissue, specifically in the heart and liver. Plants do not have taurine, so cats don’t eat many greens or grains. Without adequate taurine, cats are more likely to develop a heart disease called dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Cats are unique in their protein requirements, but like other mammals, they may benefit from consuming carbohydrates, roughage, vitamins and minerals.

“If your cat has been a good eater and is suddenly picky, that’s concerning, and you should go to the vet.”

Dr. Nile McGhie a veterinarian with Bear Creek Animal Clinic in Ashland.

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020


NATURAL ALTERNATIVES

Happy

Feet

Father’s Day gift dilemma? Pamper Dad with a foot massage. STORY BY MICAH LEIGH

D

ad probably has enough neckties and barbecue grill equipment, so this year why not treat him to a foot massage in the comfort of his own home? No fancy equipment is necessary. All you need is a towel, a large bowl or basin, perhaps a salt scrub and some lotion.

JUNE 2020 | OREGON HEALTHY LIVING

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NATURAL continued from page 21

JoAnn Lewis, a licensed massage therapist at Family Education Center in Ashland, says that good touch cleanses and feeds our bodies. “There are benefits to both the giver and the receiver when giving a massage,” she says. “The giver gets a small exercise workout and the receiver feels relaxed, pampered and cared for.” What more could Dad ask for on his special day?

Step 1: Soak After making sure Dad is comfortable, prepare a bowl of warm water with Epsom salts and lavender essential oil and soak the feet for 10-15 minutes, says Lewis.

Step 2: Scrub Robin Wessels, a nail technician at White Lotus Spa in Medford, starts with a salt scrub on the entire foot, ankle and calf. “There are many salt scrub products on the market, or you can make your own with sea salt and warm oil,” she says. “Any oil will do. You can use cooking oil, baby oil, coconut oil, whatever you have on hand. This is usually the favorite part of the massage for a man. Make sure you are gentle with the salt scrub. If the pressure is too harsh, it can cause a rash.” Wessels says to start with slow circular movements around the foot, ankle and up the calf. “The salt scrub works to remove dead skin cells and increase circulation.”

Step 3: Massage and lotion Wipe off the salt scrub with a warm, wet cloth and switch to a good lotion. “Distribute the lotion evenly in both hands,” Wessels says. “With firm pressure, continue with circular move-

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Adult Day Care Engaging activities, live entertainment, field trips, two amazing Medford Grants Pass meals with snacks and 3737 S. Pacific Hwy 1150 NE 9th St a caring well-trained Medford, OR 97501 Grants Pass, OR 97526 staff with access to a (541) 535-5497 (541) 535-5497 licensed nurse.

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2240 Terrel Dr. Medford, OR 97501

(541) 816-4310

541.770.2020

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MEDFORD • GRANTS PASS • ROSEBURG

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

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One to one care in an intimate setting, delicious home cooked meals, fun activities and caring staff around the clock.

(541)535-5497 | www.northridgecenter.com 3737 South Pacific Highway, Medford, Oregon 97501


NATURAL ments up the knee toward the heart. I like to repeat each set of movements three times.” Lewis starts the massage with a few light squeezes all over the foot. “Go slowly, but with enough pressure to avoid tickling,” she says. “Massage each foot for up to 30 minutes. The way to do that without getting tired is to use your body weight instead of muscle. Lean into it instead of pushing.” Getting the right pressure is important, says Lewis. “Follow your instincts and watch his face. If you aren’t sure, just ask him if the pressure is OK. Keep checking in. He should make you aware of any injured areas to avoid. This is all about what he wants and needs and can enjoy.” Wessels warns to be cautious around varicose veins as extreme pressure can cause a rupture. “Rub the heel and bottom of the foot with firm pressure,” says Wessels. “Use both thumbs to work the ball of the foot. Massage each toe separately. With the flat of your hand, stroke the top of the foot from the toes to the ankle. Take the time to find the sore spots and gently work them out. It is a great kindness to rub someone’s feet.” ■

“It is a great kindness to rub someone’s feet.”

Robin Wessels

REFLEXOLOGY AND FEET

White Lotus Spa, Medford

If you are looking for a therapeutic massage versus a relaxation massage, reflexology addresses many health concerns. Reflexology in traditional Chinese medicine addresses the qi or vital energy in each person. According to www. verywellhealth.com, when a person feels stressed, the qi is blocked, which causes imbalances. While a foot massage may feel the same, a reflexologist will work on areas to promote a healing response to corresponding organs. For instance, the tips of the toes reflect the head. The heart and chest are around the ball of the foot. Low back and intestines are toward the heel. “We have six times the nerve endings in our hands and feet than anywhere else in our body. All nerve endings go back to all parts of the body,” says JoAnn Lewis, a licensed massage therapist at Family Education Center in Ashland. “Reflexology relaxes the entire body by relaxing the nervous system. Our reflexology classes will resume when possible and will include our regular monthly ‘Happy Hands and Feet’ class.”

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Raiding

FOOD

the pantry

Getting by on what you’ve got RECIPES AND PHOTOS BY TESSA DELINE

E

arlier this spring, there were some uncomfortable days when a run on the supply chain left us all wondering if we would have enough toilet paper and other staples. If you overstocked, you may be wondering how you can use what you’ve bought. If you found yourself short, you may be looking into how to avoid a similar situation. Either way, these recipes demonstrate that you can find uses for items in the pantry. None of these recipes call for fresh or refrigerated items but do utilize dehydrated produce.

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INDIAN SPICE This easy-to-make, Indian-inspired soup is vegan-friendly, fiber rich and tastes amazing served with a slice of warm naan bread.

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Split Pea Soup

I N G R E D I E N T S

D I R E C T I O N S

1 pound split peas (picked over, rinsed and drained) ½ cup dried carrots, diced ½ cup dried celery, chopped ¼ cup dried onion, chopped 1 tablespoon dried garlic, chopped 2 teaspoon curry powder (or to taste) 1 teaspoon ground ginger 3 bay leaves 8 cups vegetable stock (or more as needed) Salt and pepper to taste

In a 5-quart Dutch oven on medium heat, add all ingredients and simmer gently with the lid on, stirring occasionally to prevent the bottom of the pot burning. Cook until desired tenderness, about 45 minutes. Taste and correct your seasonings.

T I P Dehydrating vegetables

Rehydrating legumes and beans

Look for our article on dehydrating produce in next month’s issue! Though there is a slight nutrient loss, dehydrated vegetables and fruits can last five years or more if safely stored.

With the exception of split peas, lentils and black eyed peas, dried beans and legumes require soaking in water for several hours or a pressure cooker.

S E R V I N G S 8 continued on page 26

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FOOD

This homemade granola is easy to make and a great topper for yogurt or as a snack. It’s high in fiber, vegetarian-friendly and gluten-free. Making your own granola is easier than you might think and cheaper than store bought. If you don’t have dried cranberries, try raisins, dried currants, dried chopped cherries or even nuts. If you don’t have a silicone liner for your baking sheet, just lightly grease it with coconut oil to prevent the granola from sticking to the sheet.

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HONEY CRANBERRY I N G R E D I E N T S 4 cups rolled oats (not instant or quick cooking) 1 cup dried cranberries 2/3 cup honey 1/3 cup coconut oil 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1½ tablespoon flaxseed 1½ tablespoon chia seed ½ teaspoon fine salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

S E R V I N G S About 30 ounces

Granola

D I R E C T I O N S Preheat oven to 350 F. In a medium- to large-sized bowl, add the oatmeal and cranberries. In another bowl, mix together the honey, coconut oil, cinnamon, flaxseed, chia seed, salt and vanilla extract. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients. Mix well until oatmeal is thoroughly coated. Use a silicone spatula to help place granola mixture in a single layer on a large baking sheet with silicone liner. Bake for 10 minutes, then stir. Bake approximately another 10 minutes or until light golden brown in color. Remove from heat and let cool. Granola will crisp once it has cooled. Store in an airtight container until ready for use.

T I P Flaxseed These little powerhouses are packed with nutrients, but whole flaxseed has a tough outer shell that prevents the body from fully digesting and absorbing all the benefits. If you have whole flaxseed, grind it with a blender, food processor, coffee grinder or mortar and pestle before adding to the recipe.


FOOD

R Who would have thought you can make a freshtasting salsa similar to what you would find in a Mexican restaurant that’s made out of canned tomatoes and other pantry ingredients? It’s hard to tell that you used reconstituted lime juice out of a bottle rather than fresh-picked.■

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RESTAURANT-STYLE

Salsa

I N G R E D I E N T S

D I R E C T I O N S

1 28-ounce can of whole or chopped tomatoes 2 tablespoons dried onion, chopped 2 teaspoons dried garlic, chopped 1 tablespoon dried cilantro 2 teaspoon lime juice (reconstituted) 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sugar (optional) ½ teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon dried chili powder

Rehydrate the dried chopped onion and dried chopped garlic by adding 3 tablespoons of water and letting the mixture sit in a small bowl for about 15 minutes. Drain. Add all ingredients to a food processor and blend to desired thickness. Taste and correct your seasonings. Add more lime juice if desired. Store covered in an airtight container in your refrigerator. Serve it on eggs, taco salads, burritos, or simply dip with corn chips.

T I P Want some heat? Feel free to spice up this mild version with dried ground jalapeno or other red pepper of your choice.

Salsa varieties Salsa is the perfect condiment for using canned produce and dry beans to create new varieties. Try canned or jarred peaches, pineapple or mangoes, or add corn, black beans or black-eyed peas.

S E R V I N G S About 30 ounces

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30-day Declutter Challenge Illustrations by Paul Bunch

A

fter spending a lot of time in your living space recently, you may be ready to take on this decluttering challenge. Organizing and purging your home has multiple health benefits, such as reducing dust particles, but the biggest reason is mental health. Successfully decluttering a space can give you a feeling of accomplishment and momentum, while reducing stress and anxiety. The only rule to this challenge is no backsies – don’t shift stuff from one spot to another. Find a designated spot for items or pass them on!

1

Under the kitchen sink

2

Junk drawer

Contain, organize and pitch.

6

Shoes & coats

3

Kitchen drawers

Pantry Organize and sort for easy access.

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Fridge(s) & Freezer(s)

Pitch leftovers and expired.

Designate a space, store seasonal.

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Bedroom nightstand

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Medicine cabinet

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Kitchen countertops Clear off all but most used items.

Use dividers or containers to sort.

Organize with small containers.

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Bookshelves

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Kitchen cabinets Organize for easy reach and donate unused or extra supplies.

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Linen closet

Haven’t worn it or it doesn’t fit? Make space by reducing.

Roll linens if easier than folding.

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Photos & memorabilia

Check expirations and dispose appropriately.

Bedroom closet

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Laundry room/space

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Toy boxes & storage

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Incoming paper

Make an inbox, sort and toss. Set an on-going date to sort and shred.

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Cleaning supplies

Set up buckets for upstairs/downstairs, laundry/garage, etc.

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Bedroom drawers & chests

Toss single socks and tired underwear.

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Playroom or extra room Enlist kids to help organize.

Use bins or containers for sorting. Consolidate and containerize.

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Home office/desk

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Bathroom countertops

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Craft/hobby /party supplies

Pet supplies

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Interior of car(s)

Consolidate and containerize. Pitch trash, wipe down and vacuum.

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

Kids’ closets Donate clothes that don’t fit.

Remove all but essentials.

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Attic, basement or shed OK, this could be a big project - may need a separate calendar!

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Garage

Create designated spaces and containers for sports equipment, gardening tools, holiday storage, etc.

Filing & shredding

Ongoing – set a monthly date.

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Backpacks & purses Ongoing – set a weekly date to empty.


Your Health Can’t Wait. Whether you’re staying in to work from home or getting up at dawn to stock the shelves, you need someone looking out for you too. If it’s an emergency or just a bother, chest pains or toe pains, we’re here. You can call, virtual visit or walk in when needed. We’re here to care for you

See your care options at Providence.org/ORsafecare

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FITNESS

Sweat, Smile, Repeat Exercise with household equipment STORY BY CHERYL ROSE

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANGELA YOUNG

tarting a fitness routine can be hard, but we know that excuses don’t burn calories. Personal fitness trainer Autumn Nelson of Superior Athletic Club in Medford demonstrates some moves you can do at home that don’t require any special fitness equipment.

Bulgarian Split Squat Use a stable surface, such as a low bench, step or chair. Put one foot back with toes on the chair. Hop your front foot forward a bit. Use your core and glutes to lower the elevated knee down with control, using the front leg to support your weight and the back leg for balance. Return to stance and repeat.

continued on page 31

First Visit by their

Pamela J. Ortiz, DDS, PC Kimberly L. Heeter, DDS DIPLOMATES OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY We’re open! Please call the office for updates to our schedule CALL TODAY 541-773-2625

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OREGON HEALTHY LIVING | JUNE 2020

Monday - Thursday 8AM to 5PM • Friday 8AM to 1PM • www.grins4kidz.com

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First Birthday!


FITNESS Step Up

Russian Twist

Use a stable surface, such as a low bench, step, stool or chair. Step up on the surface, keeping your weight in the heel of the foot on the step. Return to start, slow and controlled. Great for balance, core, glutes and the entire leg!

Sit on the floor and bring your legs out straight. Twist your torso from side to side without moving yourlegs. To take it up a notch, use books that you have around your house. Start with them in a pile on oneside of you. Pick one up, twist and place it on the other side of you. For the more advanced, lean back slightly, so your torso and legs form a V-like shape, engaging your core. Balancing here, lift and hold your legs aloft while twisting.

Side Lunge Step out with one foot to the side. While keeping one leg straight, drop your hips down and back in a squat using the other leg. Make sure your bent knee aligns with the foot, not overextended. Push down through the heel to standing position. Repeat with the opposite leg. To create glide, use kitchen towels on hard floors or paper plates on carpet. Keeping your foot on the towel while pushing it out into a side lunge adds resistance for both the inner and outer thighs as well as making you engage your core more.

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800 N. Haskell St. Central Point, OR 541.630.3038 pearvalleysl.com Assisted Living & Memory Care

live & play here

261 Loto St. Eagle Point, OR 541.830.0355 lakelandsl.com

Independent & Assisted Living

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Profile for Rosebud Media

Oregon Healthy Living June 2020  

6/7/2020

Oregon Healthy Living June 2020  

6/7/2020

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