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SPRING

2020

EDITION

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DISTINCTLYNORTHWEST

.COM / FREE /

SPRINGING TO ACTION A PA R T N E R S H I P T O S AV E O U R B E E S

WORLD’S BEST CHEESE

Celebrating a Local Cheesemaker

OVER EASY

Cooking Up Perfection

A PROJECT CAFE

Inspiring Creativity in Jacksonville


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D I S T I N C T LY

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PUBLISHER & CEO Steven Saslow DIRECTOR OF SALES Bill Krumpeck EDITOR Jenna Benton ASSISTANT EDITOR Alisha Vosburg GRAPHIC DESIGN Paul Bunch SALES SUPERVISOR Laura Perkins CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jenna Benton Anna Elkins Sarah Red-Laird Alisha Vosburg CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Steven Addington The Bee Girl Organization H. Sterling Cross David Gibb Favoreat Lahna Marie Photography Rogue Creamery Beryl Striewski. Wade Photos

Distinctly Northwest Magazine is published by the Rosebud Media Advertising Department 111 N. Fir Street, Medford, OR 97501 GENERAL INFORMATION: 541.776.4422 To advertise in this magazine, contact Laura Perkins 541.776.4447 • lperkins@rosebudmedia.com Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher

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pring is upon us, and the entire Rogue Valley is bursting with the sights and sounds of a brand new season. Our team put together another great issue for our spring edition, and when we were finished we realized there was a wonderful theme woven through each story. Community. Whether they are building, influencing, or contributing to community, each story featured on these pages inspired us to keep working hard to highlight and celebrate our region. I’m so grateful to be part of Distinctly Northwest Magazine. I’ve been showcasing some of our team members over the last few issues, and it’s my delight to introduce you to our Assistant Editor, Alisha Vosburg. She is a teacher, a writer, and an exceptional editor. Alisha is an invaluable resource, and her commitment to excellence is unmatched. We are lucky to have her. She wrote two of our stories this time around, and I love the way she digs in and connects with her subjects. May this issue inspire you to lean into this new season and lean into the community around you. Thank you for reading, and please go support the businesses we highlight in our little magazine. We can’t do what we do around here without them. Until next time,

@jennabentonwriter

Alisha Vosburg Assistant Editor


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THE BEST OF THE BEST Cheese Champion of the World

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BEE GIRL AND ODOT / feat ure

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HOME & GARDEN BLISS

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THE RIGHT STUFF

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CREATIVE CAFE

A Bed & Breakfast in Central Point

An Unlikely Partnership

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A Little Shop With Heart

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ENGLISH COTTAGE LOVE

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Culinary Delight in Medford

A Jacksonville Delight

ON THE COVER: Sarah Red-Laird, founder and Executive Director of the Bee Girl Organization, and her dog Sadie enjoy a sunny day with their beloved bees. Photography by The Bee Girl Organization

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ALISHA VOSBURG STEVEN ADDINGTON, H. STERLING CROSS, DAVID GIBB, FAVOREAT, ROGUE CREAMERY, AND BERYL STRIEWSKI.

ROGUE CREAMERY

Easy to Love, Hard to Define

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David Gremmels Wait. There’s an art and science in cheesemaking? There certainly is. It’s called “affinage” and is the careful process of aging cheese. One reason Rogue River Blue Cheese is celebrated as “World’s Best” is due to this vigilant practice which, in tandem with the cave environment, is a series of ritualized procedures to develop flavor and texture. Such “cave management” is what sets Rogue Creamery apart. The cheese wheels are hand turned daily or weekly for the duration of the aging process (up to a year in the case of Rogue River Blue). It’s important to note that this process isn’t dictated by a timer--there is no calendar deadline to signify it’s ready to sell. The cheese is ready when the team determines it looks right, smells right, feels right and tastes

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Once upon a time, I visited a magical place where award-winning cheese is made from milk acquired between the autumn equinox and winter solstice, when cooler temperatures and rain bring renewed growth to the grass and cows’ milk is most rich and flavorful. A place so devoted to their craft all elements of it are lovingly controlled; from the grazing pastures along the banks of the Rogue River, to the temperature and humidity-controlled caves in which cheese is meticulously aged. There are so many vital and astonishing facets of the Rogue Creamery story I don’t know where to begin. I should probably start with what lured me into the Central Point cheese shop in the first place—the recently earned title of “World’s Best Cheese.” Won in Bergamo, Italy back in October, I knew they beat out 3,800 other cheeses from 42 different countries. So engaged was Southern Oregon by the victory, it was well-covered by local media outlets, and I became more and more curious how this little store front became the face of world-renowned cheese. The answer, I learned, was a combination of prolific history (the creamery opened in 1933), commitment to a sustainable and organic product (they are USDA Certified Organic), the willingness of every employee to go above and beyond, and the depth of passion for the art and science of cheesemaking.

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efinition of Rogue Creamery: a proper noun for which there are no words to adequately describe.

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right. This team of hard-working people is what David Gremmels, President of Rogue Creamery, says he is most proud of, not the award. “The Rogue River Blue that we created to capture this title of world champion is a cheese that is truly touched by nearly everyone at Rogue Creamery,” he states. In fact, so many hands are involved in making it, it’s no wonder he seems more Proud Papa and less Commander-in-Chief. The “It Takes a Village '' motto is brought to a whole new level here as this special cheese goes through so many steps to achieve its final glory you forget just how many people are involved. Starting with the Cheese Master (apprentices go through a seven stage process to earn this title) who make the initial cheese curds that will be painstakingly drained and “knit” together into a wheel, and ending with the friendly shop clerk who rings up your order, there are countless folks in between who make Rogue River Blue Cheese absolutely

live up to the hype. Gremmels reminds us, “It really does take many talented individuals'' and explains, “From hand-picking the organic Syrah grape leaves, to macerating them in a locally-made pear spirit, to creating the cheese with milk sourced from our Grants Pass dairy, to hand-wrapping each wheel in the pear-soaked leaves at our facility in Central Point, there are a host of talented local people on our team who are involved in the process from start to finish.” It’s obvious Rogue River Blue is created from a passion and vision to encapsulate the flavors of Southern Oregon and offer the consumer a taste experience unlike any other. “If you close your eyes as you taste it, you can taste the landscape of the Rogue Valley and truly envision it” Gremmels says. I did taste it (multiple times) and I couldn’t agree more. When he describes the essence of his famed cheese, it’s not unlike a vintner describing wine, “The wonderful nut flavors come

through that are reflective of Oregon hazelnuts, and those wonderful Himalayan blackberry notes and huckleberry notes combine with local pears, and of course the flavorful grasses come through…” I’d be lying if I said the “World’s Best Cheese” isn’t incredible and doesn’t melt in your mouth. But the thing I’ll take away most from my interaction with David Gremmels is his complete and utter devotion to the community. In a matter of minutes, you recognize his sincerity. What he wants people to know most about Rogue Creamery is that, “We are a company truly devoted to making a difference and having a positive impact in all that we do, and we do that with cheese, using cheese as a force of good.” It’s safe to say I still can’t nail down an accurate definition of the awesomeness that is Rogue Creamery,w but I do know one thing: any place that uses cheese as a force of good is a winner in my book, award or no award. 


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ALISHA VOSBURG LAHNA MARIE PHOTOGRAPHY

HUMMINGBIRD ESTATE

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A Whole Lot of Wow

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know the wow factor is subjective, but WOW. Do yourself a favor and get here as soon as possible. As you pass beneath the sprawling treelined drive, surrounded by vineyards, you feel yourself pressing into the steering wheel, trying to get a peek of what lies ahead. And when you finally catch that first glimpse of the estate, be prepared for WOW. The English Cottage-Style home is 7,700 square feet of pure awe. Renovated to its original 1920’s grandeur, the home sits on 47 wooded acres and is quite a spectacle. A tranquil, delightful spectacle. And you haven’t even seen the view yet. Cue the jaw-drop. Once you step foot on the hill-side patio that runs the entire length of the house, and see the sweeping, majestic view of snow-covered Mount McLoughlin, it’s all over. You will never want to leave. Though on the National Register of Historic Places (built in 1926), this old gal had new life breathed into her by owners Ed and Susan Walk. Their daughter Kristina Alvarez, General Manager of Hummingbird Estate, describes the transformation as her dad’s “newfound retirement career.” She sheds light on Ed’s evolution from Midwest farmer to Pacific

Northwest bed and breakfast operator. “Dad is a long-time farmer from Illinois. Mom is a retired teacher. My parents started visiting us, and they really enjoyed the climate here. It got to the point where my sister took care of the hog farm, corn and grain back home so they could come out more.” She jokes, “They’re snowbirds. Only instead of going to Florida for the winter, they come to Oregon.” But the truth is Ed’s not one to relax much in retirement and needed something to do. Kristina says that’s where Hummingbird came in. “Dad likes to work outside and always needs a project. They bought this place, and he never stopped working.” Her parents did most of the outside work themselves. Ed did the landscaping, and he and Susan both tackled the trimming (the entire back of the property was overgrown with blackberry bushes). Along with a friend from her teaching years, Susan did much of the decorating. Their son-in-law, Kristina’s husband Tim, owns a restoration construction business, and he brought in foreman Dave Krause, who specializes in restoration. Together, they transformed the property inside and out to the showpiece it is today. continued on page 12

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get away for a night. Who can blame them with this in their backyard? Luxury suites? Tasting room? Event venue? Check. It’s all here, and it’s accessible and welcoming. Kristina made me think twice about something she said. “Our wines are drinkable.” At first, I thought this had a negative connotation. Then she explained, “The way you say it makes a big difference. I want to have a wine that doesn’t scare people off. For the 21-year-old who says, ‘I want to try this.’ For the mother who’s like, ‘I need an afternoon break’ or for the wine enthusiast. That’s our goal. That everyone can enjoy our wines.” As a non-wine connoisseur,

I find her perspective inclusive and refreshing. There are no wine snobs running the show here; but rather, a gracious and hospitable approach is taken to their wine brand and to the bed and breakfast itself. I leave you, dear reader, with an invitation. Once a month, Hummingbird Estate hosts tours (you can find their event calendar online), and I encourage you to go and see this lovely gem for yourself. Hidden from the main road, I like to imagine the moment the property comes into your line of sight. In my mind’s eye, here’s what happens: your mouth opens, your eyes widen, and you exclaim, “WOW. Just wow.” 

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Kristina admits besides craving something to work on, her dad’s purpose is good old-fashioned Midwest hospitality. Their shared goal is that “Hummingbird will always be a welcoming place. Above everything else.” She envisions guests sitting quietly with a good book and glass of wine, but beckons, “Come sit, even if you don’t drink wine. We’ve got other drinks. Come and relax.” She doesn’t have to ask me twice. Ed adds, “We have the best wine and the best view,” and it seals the deal. If my own reaction is anything to judge public opinion by, the moment guests see the stunning view is the real estate equivalent of a mic drop. Kristina estimates one third of their guests are locals just wanting to

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SARAH RED-LAIRD THE BEE GIRL ORGANIZATION

BEE GIRL AND ODOT

The fairy shrimp are almost invisible to the naked eye, but on a sunny day they cast tiny shadows on the bottom of the pool. The desert parsley is a striking,

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ODOT manages 196 acres of vernal pool habitat (seasonal wetlands) for the purposes of habitat restoration and species mitigation. Vernal pools are locally significant because they support three state and federally protected plant and macro-invertebrate species: vernal pool fairy shrimp, Cook’s desert parsley and large-flowered wooly meadowfoam.

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regon Department of Transportation” (ODOT) likely conjures up images of workers in fluorescent vests and hard hats standing amid orange cones, ushering you through highway construction projects. What you don’t associate with ODOT is acres of pristine, intact wetland habitat, giving homes to millions of flowers and thousands of bees. However, this is exactly what ODOT is stewarding near the base of the Table Rocks in Central Point, Oregon. If you live in Southern Oregon, your own backyard is home to one of the most creative and progressive restoration projects in the nation.

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Teaming Up for Stewardship and Sustainability

Sarah Red-Laird

sensitive yellow flower. The meadowfoam smells like marshmallows and grows close to the ground, filling in empty space the drying pools leave behind in spring. ODOT began restoration of the pools in 2011. Completed in 2019, approximately 190 acres have been restored. Starting in 2016, ODOT partnered with the Bee Girl organization (BGO) to monitor bees at the site as an indicator for restoration success. continued on page 18

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You may still be asking yourself, “What do hardhats and bees have in common?”

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Every time a sensitive wetland area is removed to build a road, straighten a curve, etc., it must be replaced or “mitigated.” This is Oregon state law. Restoring an acre here and there wasn’t doing much good, as invasive grasses can reenvelop a small project site in no time. In order to address this, ODOT purchased a 200-acre ranch to work on as a “conservation bank.” For example, if five acres are filled in to add a passing lane to a highway, then five acres are dug out to recreate wetlands at the vernal pool site. With a mitigation bank, the wetland is restored up front, and ODOT earns credits which it uses to replace wetlands that will be filled by future projects. Like a monetary bank account, the wetland account has a credit balance. When all the credits are used, the site will be donated to a land management organization to manage in perpetuity (conservation speak for forever).

Our bees are in trouble and many pollinators are in decline due to habitat loss, disease, climate change, and pesticide use. Restoring habitat is vital to conservation. Pollinators need refuges filled with pesticide-free, diverse flowers. Approximately 86% of plants need pollinators, so winged wonders like bees and butterflies are responsible for pollinating the berries and fruits in our wildlands that feed birds, bears, and everything in between. Environmental stewardship and sustainability are two of ODOT’s core values, with pollinator habitats being a priority. BGO focuses primarily on education and pollinator habitat conservation. BGO began collaborating with ODOT in 2016 to monitor bee abundance and diversity, observe which flowers are most attractive to bees, and observe dynamics between honey bees, solitary bees, and bumble bees. Annually tracking this data provides information to ODOT project managers on the restoration’s continued on page 20


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success. If diversity and abundance of pollinators continually increases on the restored vernal pool site compared to the “control” sites, the project is successful. The species data being collected is highly valuable to the bee conservation community, as little is known of pollinators in vernal pool systems. BGO also provides data-based planting recommendations to maximize pollinator habitat and health in future vernal pool restorations and similar projects.

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For example, after our discovery of how important large flowered blue-eyed Mary, Collinsia grandiflora, was to newly emerged queen bumble bees, ODOT adjusted their management schedule to allow the flower to finish blooming before mowing. Another highlight has been education on the importance of bees and wetlands. One of BGO's primary focuses is youth education through our “Kids and Bees” project, so collaborating on a program for ODOT’s “Take Your Kid to Work Day” was a must. Paul Benton, ODOT Wetland Specialist, has organized a vernal pool exploration program for ODOT workers and their kids for the last three years. The kids usually arrive uneasy around the bee covered landscape, but within minutes they become passionate tiny entomologists. In 2019 one particularly excited kiddo caught the project’s first Bombus griseocollis, Brown-belted Bumble Bee. Our vernal pools are wondrous, essential habitats in the Pacific Northwest. They provide space for flowers, homes for wildlife, healthy food for pollinators, and perhaps even inspiration for the next generation of biologists. 

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JENNA BENTON LAHNA MARIE PHOTOGRAPHY

BUMBLE WREN

& D I S T I N C T LY

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A Collection of Favorite Things

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ake one step into Bumble & Wren, and you’re compelled to stop and take a deep breath. Located at 231 East Main Street in Medford, the store has been a welcomed addition to the unique shopping experience in the downtown area. High ceilings and rustic brick walls welcome you into the bright space, and tables of treasures beckon you to explore. Named loosely on the word humble and a play on Cindi’s granddaughter’s middle name, Bumble & Wren opened their garden, home and outdoor store with thankfulness and excitement. “I don’t have one favorite thing here,” says Cindi Poling Hickey, owner of Bumble & Wren. “This place is more like a collection of my favorite things.” Looking around, you can sense her statement is true. Fermob furniture from France graces the space, and towards the back of the store you can feel Cindi’s love of all things garden. Air plants, house plants, indoor and outdoor planters and bird baths are mixed with gardening tools and aprons. It’s a garden lover’s

Cindi Poling Hickey paradise. She even stocks everything you need to design your own terrarium. Combined with home decor, books, cards and precious gift ideas, Cindi’s inventory pairs perfectly with the atmosphere she has curated here. Situated on historic East Main Street in Medford, Cindi is proud to forge a new chapter in the old building, while also honoring its history. continued on page 24

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“We are very fortunate to have purchased the building and feel a responsibility to be good stewards and take care of it,” says Cindi. “John Nuich did some amazing remodel work in the 1970’s, which brought back its old charm.” Cindi also discovered that one of her ski buddies from 30 years ago did the stucco work on the exterior in 1978. “I love how life connects us,” she smiles.

One important detail that Bumble & Wren customers love is the shop dog, Myah. Many people already knew Myah from hanging out at Blue Door Garden Store in Jacksonville. She is a seven year old chocolate lab who takes her job as a shop dog very seriously. Cindi adopted Myah when she was almost two years old, after she was rescued by Cindi’s stepson from a stressful environment. “Actually, sometimes I think she rescued

us,” says Cindi. “Myah loves coming to work. In fact, she “talks” quite a bit when I’m driving to the store to express her enthusiasm!” As the owner of Bumble & Wren, Cindi clearly shares Myah’s enthusiasm. She has combined friendship with a love of gardening and home decor, and the pairing couldn’t be more inspiring. “We have enjoyed opening our doors in downtown Medford. We love it here,” says Cindi. “The community has welcomed us with open arms, and the business support we’ve received has been very encouraging. I am truly humbled and grateful.” 

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In fact, Cindi believes deeply in connection, especially when it involves the customers who wander into her shop. She says she has developed some wonderful friendships

during this journey and deeply cherishes them. She also loves it when customers share their inspiration and suggestions, and she uses that information to improve and grow.

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Everything you need for Spring!

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Where Taste Meets Integrity D I S T I N C T LY

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ay the name “Over Easy” out loud anywhere in Southern Oregon, and locals might just start involuntarily rubbing their bellies. (Trust me, I would know.) If you’ve been to Over Easy, you know exactly what I’m talking about.

“We worked hard and built up a crazy following,” says Braden. “But then in 2018 the building we were using sold, and we weren’t sure what to do. We thought about moving to Bend.” Braden’s crazy following included a couple of faithful customers who couldn’t imagine their weekends

Braden & Stephanie Hitt without Over Easy’s eclectic, delicious fare. They eventually offered to fully fund Braden’s dream in the form of a business loan, and a new adventure began.

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Over Easy’s success is no accident. Braden learned by going to school, cooking at locations around the country, and he also spent time teaching others. The evidence of his hard-won skill and integrity is in every plate that comes out of his kitchen. The veteran chef and and his wife and business partner, Stephanie Hitt, originally launched as a weekend pop-up in Downtown Market right around the corner from their new location, where the pair faithfully served up exceptional brunch offerings on Saturdays and Sundays for four years.

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This exceptional little breakfast and lunch restaurant is tucked away at 21 North Bartlett street, right along Medford’s charming Middleford Alley, and has been a favorite of the brunch crowds since 2014. Turning out their own innovative spin on classic breakfast creations, Chef and owner Braden Hitt plays around with flavors and fearlessly reimagines sweet and savory offerings. That’s not to say he doesn’t also offer a perfectly prepared plate of bacon and eggs; there’s something for every palate. The small menu rotates every few weeks or so, and patrons are also treated to a variety of wine and cocktails.

A retail space opened up around the corner, but in order to turn it into a restaurant, it had to be completely gutted. Even the concrete in the floor had to be cut to make room for new plumbing. The new space was in a historic building, so navigating Medford’s permitting and inspections to maintain the historic designation of the property caused some delays, but in the end it all came together in a beautiful way. Stephanie and Braden knew they had gathered a great group of people around them over the years, but they had no idea the extent their community would come together to see Over Easy open its own doors. continued on page 28

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“Not surprisingly, we both fell in love with the space,” says Braden. “But what surprised us was the humbling experience during the building process. It felt like Medford showed up for us. Our customers and neighbors showed up to paint and clean and do plumbing. They rallied around us and genuinely wanted us to succeed.” Fans of Over Easy didn’t just show up to help during the construction process. They also showed up ready to eat on day one.

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“On opening day we posted an announcement on social media, flipped our sign and just opened the door,” smiles Braden. “We hadn’t served one plate out of the new kitchen yet, but we ended up serving 165 people that first morning. I get teary eyed thinking about it. We were doing something that meant something to people.”

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The smiling patrons who crowd into Over Easy to wait for a table on any given morning are proof that Braden and Stephanie’s hard work and vision are paying off. Guests are treated to an exceptional menu and a bright, energetic space that includes checkerboard floors and a large Sputnik lamp. The entire space is the perfect blend of old school diner and mid-century modern nostalgia, and it’s a good example of what many of us here in Southern Oregon love most about small businesses. When someone puts their heart and soul into something, and then shares it with their neighbors, good things happen. “We’re making a go of it. It’s important that we continue to revitalize downtown Medford,” says Braden. “At the end of the day, it takes all of us working together to create a strong sense of community.” 


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Come Visit our Historic Tasting Room Open Daily 11am to 5pm 52 N River Road, Gold Hill,OR EXIT 43 on I-5 || 541.855.2062

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ANNA ELKINS (@ARTWORDSPIRIT) WADE PHOTOS

THE MINERS’ BAZAAR

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Jacksonville’s Project Café + Bar + Boutique

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hen you open the door of The Miners’ Bazaar, you’ll hear a bell tinkle. The next sound you’ll likely hear is owner Rosie Taylor welcoming you. You’ve just entered Jacksonville’s project café. Here, you are invited to “Create + Sip + Explore + Socialize.” You might want to sit at the handmade wooden bar in the front room, order a cappuccino, and start sketching in a communal journal. You might sign up for a workshop and meet new friends while felting. You might meet old friends in one of the rooms brimming with makers’ supplies and kits, enjoying an afternoon of printmaking while savoring the house red—or any of the other regional “giggle water” or comfort food options on the menu. People often ask Rosie what a project café is. She says, “I offer a daily menu of projects you can choose from—painting, printmaking, fiber arts, jewelry. You don’t have to wait for a workshop or class. And you can make or not make.” She adds, “It usually makes someone smile either way.” Rosie has traveled and lived in many places, but she returned to Jacksonville

Rosie Taylor to open The Miners’ Bazaar because she loves how northwest culture invites experimentation and offers something for everyone—traits she built into her café. Whether you want to sit outside around the fire pit while it’s snowing, on the front porch rocking chair watching the world go by, or cozied up inside and creating on a rainy day, there is something for everyone. Rosie says, “The fact that this is a small, creative town lends itself toward this kind of space. We have so many talented artists, musicians, and writers here.” continued on page 32

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The renovations revealed plenty of history and a few surprises, from nineteenth-century wallpaper to a “telephone graveyard” in the backyard. The story of those telephones is lost to history, but the story of the house lives on. In fact, Rosie is continually adding

to and changing the story—it will never reach “The End.” When she first opened, the house’s narrative focused on Jacksonville’s mining history. In fact, there was a mine entrance somewhere on the property, though it is completely filled in now. With mining history in mind, Rosie had given all the rooms mining-related names. The front room was the “Bazaar,” the second room the “Gold Room,” etc. But a year into operations, that concept and those names faded as the house began to write a different story. Moving forward, Rosie plans to give each room a different intention—like a different chapter in a book. Every person who enters gets to be a character, and they get to make and tell their own stories.

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Rosie often refers to the 235 E. California Street building as “the crooked little house.” She laughs, “Because it’s genuinely crooked!” When she bought the 151-year old building, she had many renovations to make. She is grateful for her family and friends who helped remove walls, refinish floors, and build the custom wooden bar in the front room. She added personal touches; the end piece of the bar counter came from the wood fireplace mantle in her childhood home.

@wadephotosmfr

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When you walk through Rosie’s front door, you don’t just enter a café or shop, you enter a three-dimensional storybook. And you get to be one of its characters. In fact, Rosie is preparing to turn her current office into The Curiosity Cabinet. It will be a room filled with materials and miniature things to make shadow boxes or pocket museums. You will be able to enter and create your own story by selecting your own little treasures—whether stones or buttons or anything in between. But you can also just pop into this magical place, pull a stool up to that front bar counter, open the communal journal, and discover that everyone who walks in that door is, indeed part of the story. “Once upon a time…” begins again each time you enter The Miners’ Bazaar. 


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Black Bird Shopping Center

The 2016 Black Bird $5K Fishing Derby is Saturday, June 25!!

Our Annual Black Bird Parking Lot Sale Begins Thursday, June 2!!

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The Black Bird has been a Rogue Valley tradition for over 50 years - since 1965! Locally owned and operated, we remain The Black Bird has been a Roguestore. Valley tradition Southern Oregon’s largest family-owned sporting goods for over 50 years - since 1965! Locally owned Since 1998 The Black Bird has sponsored the $5,000 Fishing and operated, we remain Southern Oregon’s family-owned sporting goods store. Derby, a unique and fun family event with largest something for everyone! Since 1998 The Black Bird has sponsored the $5,000 Fishing Derby, a unique and fun family event with something for everyone! Operating under special use permit with the Umpqua National Forest

The 2020 Black 23RD ANNUAL Bird $5K Fishing Derby is Saturday, June 27!! Our Annual Black Bird Parking Lot Sale Begins Thursday, May 28!!

1810 W. Main Street • Medford

OPEN 8 OPEN 8 DAYS A A DAYS Open Mon-Sat 9am - 7pm n-Sat 9am - 7pm • Sunday 10:00am - 6:00pm WEEK! Sunday 9:30am - 6:00pm WEEK!

Main Street • Medford • 541-779-5431 541-779-5431

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Cover Your Entire Family For $88/year or less* *Membership Prices May Vary for Ashland and Josephine County. MF-00122396

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In an emergency, the last thing you want to worry about is the cost..

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Become a member at

mercyflights.com or call 541-858-2600 FOR EMERGENCIES CALL

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Thank you for participating in the 2019/2020 Southern Oregon Brew Pass!

For more information and to purchase your pass, visit: 36 MF-00124158

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Distinctly Northwest Spring 2020  

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March 22, 2020

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