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FALL 2013 UPDATE Highlights in this Issue: TAKING SHAPE A special message from President Gresham

FAITH AND SCIENCE IN HARMONY Dr. Nancy Halliday

A LEGACY OF TEACHING BUILT ON A LOVE OF STUDENTS Dr. Robert Judd DR. LOREN GRESHAM, PRESIDENT, SOUTHERN NAZARENE UNIVERSITY

JANET FISCHER, LEAD ARCHITECT, TROY RHODES & CO.

STAN LINGO, LINGO CONSTRUCTION SERVICES


Many generous, visionary supporters of SNU, about 100 in number, made early financial commitments before the Campaign was announced publicly in January of 2012, providing a solid financial foundation for the building. Since then, and much like the building itself, the financial support for this project has taken shape in ways that excite our campus community. Now, over 300 individuals, corporations and foundations have made financial commitments with $985,534 pledged and $5,312,484 in cash. While the financial support for the Campaign for the Sciences is taking shape, and is vitally important in achieving our goal, our highest aspiration and mission is to see students transformed by the Christ-centered education they receive at SNU. Providing the best possible facilities and equipment for instruction by a high caliber faculty allows them to be shaped into graduates who are prepared to be not conformed to the world, but distinguished from their surroundings by the way their lives took shape at SNU.

TAKING SHAPE

Greetings from Dr. Loren Gresham The steel is going up on the new J.D. & Mary West Science Laboratory on the campus of Southern Nazarene University, and the structure that was once a flat, one-dimensional image on architectural plans, is now taking shape right before our eyes. You can watch the progress on our website at www.snu.edu/cfts. Construction of the laboratory, which is Phase I of the Campaign for the Sciences at SNU, will take approximately one year. Before this project could begin, the financial support had to take shape with a strategically timed plan and measured steps in readying the university for this significant investment in this much-needed facility.

As you read this update, I believe you will be encouraged by the Campaign progress and stories about those whose lives have been impacted by their education in the sciences at SNU. But, most of all, I hope you will see the immediacy of the need and prayerfully consider an investment in the Campaign for the Sciences at SNU. At the opening of this academic year, I read Colossians, Chapter 2 to our faculty and staff. May the words of the Apostle Paul be a clear description of how we live out our faith at SNU: “My counsel for you is simple and straightforward: Just go ahead with what you’ve been given. You received Christ Jesus, the Master; now live him. You’re deeply rooted in him. You’re well constructed upon him. You know your way around the faith. Now do what you’ve been taught. School’s out; quit studying the subject and start living it! And let your living spill over into thanksgiving.” (Col. 2: 6,7 Message) Sincerely,

Loren P. Gresham, PhD.

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QUICK FACT: Southern Nazarene University’s fall enrollment of 2,266 reflects the highest in the University’s 115-year history.


BIOLOGY STUDENT FINDS COMMUNITY OF SUPPORT Amanda Six, Senior

For Amanda Six, her freshman year at SNU was not what she expected it to be. That year, Amanda’s father passed away, challenging not only her family back home, but Amanda herself. She had to face this along with her busy school schedule. Amanda says she could not have made it through the year without the help and support she received from the SNU community. “Most freshmen come to college not thinking unexpected things will happen, but the professors were very supportive of me during my freshmen year,” she says. “IT WAS GREAT HAVING A SUPPORT SYSTEM AWAY FROM HOME HERE AT SNU. THAT HELPED ME OVERCOME THE LOSS OF MY FATHER.” Amanda, class of 2014, came to SNU with a love of nature and biology and a desire to learn more about them. Coming out of high school Amanda felt held back in terms of what she could have learned due to limitations of science equipment and facilities. SNU offered a chance to break those limitations with hands on experience working with animal specimens and cadavers in her labs. Amanda wants future SNU students to have that same experience and excitement when they first come to SNU and see the state-of-theart equipment that will result from the Campaign for the Sciences. “HAVING A NEW SCIENCE BUILDING WITH UPDATED TECHNOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT WILL HELP STUDENTS LEARN ALL THEY NEED TO SUCCEED,” she explains. Amanda, a Native American, has applied to physicians’ assistant school at OU Medical Center to work towards her goal of becoming a physician’s assistant in the Muskogee Creek Nation, which is underserved in healthcare. “That community is like home to me,” adds Amanda. “I understand them. I know them and I know that sometimes they have trouble getting access to healthcare and that’s where my heart is.” As she enters her final semester of college, Amanda is looking back on the growth and education she experienced here at SNU. But as she is looking back, she is also looking forward to her future and the chance to give back to the SNU scientific community that has come to mean so much to her.

“YOU HAVE A PERSONAL CONNECTION

To watch a video and read more about Amanda, go to snu.edu/cfts

WITH THE PROFESSORS AND NOT JUST ON AN ACADEMIC LEVEL.” QUICK FACT: SNU is the only private university in the Midwest to offer an undergraduate degree in network engineering with preparation for Cisco and Microsoft Certifications.

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STUDENT ATHLETE FINDS SUCCESS PURSUING HIS GOALS Brennan DiChiara, Senior As a student athlete, it can be difficult to balance both your studies and practice in your sport, but with the help of dedicated professors at SNU Brennan DiChiara, senior, has made it work. When visiting SNU Brennan was concerned that being able to achieve his goal of becoming an actuary might be challenged, but he says his fears were calmed after meeting with professors. Brennan says that one of the professors that was instrumental in helping him achieve his educational goal was Dr. Nick Zoller, who went the extra mile in helping him become an actuary and even helping him get his first internship with American Fidelity Assurance. Brennan is also extremely thankful for the spiritual leadership Dr. Zoller offered as well. “HE STARTS OUT EVERY CLASS WITH A DEVOTIONAL AND BEFORE WE TAKE A TEST, HE’LL PRAY FOR US THAT WE NOT ONLY DO WELL, BUT ALSO PRAYS THAT HE WILL BE FAIR IN GRADING THE TEST,” adds Brennan. “He’s been super helpful throughout my

“SNU IMMEDIATELY FELT LIKE HOME TO

whole time here.”

ME AND I FELT LIKE THE PROFESSORS

DiChiara is extremely grateful his professors are willing to work with him and his schedule

COULD WORK WITH ME.”

as he plays wide receiver for the SNU football team and tries to balance study and sports. “One of the things I have loved about being here is how willing the teachers are to work with you,” he says. “They’ve been 100 percent supportive and even come to the games to cheer for me. If they see you’re trying, they are there to help in any way they can.” Brennan is grateful for the numerous alumni and friends of SNU that have supported his education through various scholarships. “IT’S INSPIRED ME TO GIVE BACK,” he says. “I’ve been able to benefit from people giving to SNU and that’s something I want to do because of how much I’ve appreciated it. I don’t want anyone to not be able to go to school because of finances.” Brennan will be finishing his degree at Southern Nazarene University this December and admits that he will miss the relationships he has formed with peers and mentors as he moves into his next stage of life. To watch a video and read more about Brennan, go to snu.edu/cfts

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QUICK FACT: Brennan accepted a job offer from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas as Actuarial Assistant on the Client Analytics Team.


SNU LEGACY BONDS MOTHER & DAUGHTER Alumni, Ruth Patterson & Stephanie Waterhouse Legacy is an important part of SNU, and Ruth Patterson and Stephanie Waterhouse are a shining example of how legacy shapes and benefits both individuals and SNU as a whole. Ruth Patterson came to SNU in 1969 from a small town in Kansas with a desire to become a medical technologist. During her time at SNU, Ruth had many influential professors, including Dr. Leo Finkenbinder, whose passion for ecology was inspiring. “I had microbiology under him and almost changed my mind about being a Medical Technician (MT). Micro is my favorite area in the lab now,” Ruth says. “Dr. Finkenbinder wanted to see his students graduate and pursue their dreams.” After graduating in 1973, Ruth went on to train at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Wichita, Kansas and became a registered MT for 40 years. Ruth’s legacy continued when she and her husband encouraged their daughter Stephanie to consider SNU when she decided to pursue a degree in medicine. “SNU HAS A VERY HIGH ACCEPTANCE RATE FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL ADMISSION AND HARRY AND I KNEW SHE WOULD GET WHAT SHE NEEDED TO SUCCEED,” recalls Ruth. “We are thankful SNU has strived for excellence all through the years.” While her mother’s opinion did help influence her, Stephanie says that her first visit to the campus was a key factor in her choice to attend SNU. After she met with Dr. Nancy Halliday and other science faculty members, she could tell that they were genuinely invested in helping her achieve her professional goals. After graduating from SNU in 2009, Stephanie went on to earn her Master’s in physiology and biophysics from Georgetown University and then graduated from medical school at Texas Tech University in May 2013. She now lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, where she is in residency at the University of Virginia. A common bond Ruth and Stephanie share in their legacy is the strengthening of their faith by seeing how God is at work in the sciences. Both Ruth and Stephanie are confident that the Campaign for the Sciences will help to cement future legacies of scientists and physicians that will attend SNU, thanks to the state-of-the-art facilities that the Campaign will provide. Stephanie believes that investing in the CFTS will result in the shaping of many more

“DR. FINKENBINDER WANTED TO SEE

Christian researchers, physicians and scientists.

HIS STUDENTS GRADUATE AND PURSUE

For the entire story, go to snu.edu/cfts

THEIR DREAMS.” QUICK FACT: For over 20 years, all math education majors passed the state certification exam on first try.

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SHAPING THE FUTURE OF SCIENCE EDUCATION AT SNU Now that construction is underway on the 25,891 square foot J.D. & Mary West Laboratory, much is required for completion of all phases of the Campaign for the Sciences. Although many have committed to making this building project a reality by their financial support, your investment will ensure that graduates continue to be equipped to provide medical care to the underserved, conduct significant scientific research, steward and preserve our natural

VIEW A LIVE 24/7 PHOTO STREAM OF CONSTRUCTION @ SNU.EDU/CFTS

resources, provide quality science education in our public schools, and, moreover, positively impact the quality of life for untold persons near and far, for generations to come. If you believe in the future of Southern Nazarene University’s science division and its ability to educate future generations of scientific world changers, consider giving to the Campaign for the Sciences today!

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HOW CAN WE SECURE THE FUTURE OF THE SCIENCES AT SNU?

∙ ∙ ∙

Mail your gift or pledge using the enclosed card OR give securely online at www.snu.edu/giving

Two–story laboratory addition south of the existing Beaver Science Building

Pray for SNU’s Faculty and Students – and for those who will teach and learn in this new facility

25,891 square feet base building

for years to come.

Five biology laboratories

Identify prospective students and encourage them to visit SNU!

Three chemistry laboratories Two research laboratories

Naming Opportunities for the Campaign for the Sciences are still available. Please contact the Office of University Advancement at 405-491-6311 or e-mail tbrant@snu.edu for any

Laboratory support spaces

additional information.

Five offices and ancillary support spaces Six student gathering areas

PHASES II & III Completion of second floor Elevator and stair connection to W. Don Beaver Science Building Renovation of W. Don Beaver Science Building

DISSECTION OF GIVING TOTAL CASH & PLEDGES: $6,298,018 Alumni 41.24% Trustee & 4.02% Foundation Boards Friends 18% Corporate Support 10.6% Trusts & Estates 4.49%

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PHASE I (IN-PROGRESS)

Support the Campaign for the Sciences today!

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A CATALYST IN TURNING SCIENTIFIC DREAMS INTO REALITY Dr. Ted Bader, Alumnus The Catalysts, a group of SNU alumni founded in 1977 to provide science student scholarships, assist in faculty research projects, and travel to professional meetings proved instrumental in the success of one of SNU’s most prestigious scientific accomplishments: the Quetzal Education Research Center in Costa Rica. In 1995 Dr. Ted Bader, a 1967 graduate of and current president of the Catalysts, was contacted by Dr. Leo Finkenbinder, SNU faculty member, asking him to come to Costa Rica and help raise money for the research center. From 1986 to 1995 the Catalysts had given thousands of dollars to support to Dr. Finkenbinder in his trips to Costa Rica, which ultimately led to the creation of QERC. Dr. Finkenbinder had been working to stabilize the ecology of the Quetzal valley, and 1995 was a crucial year for the project since time had come to begin building the research center, which could not be completed without funding of the initial amount of $15,000.

“I HAVE NEVER FELT IN MY LIFE SUCH A

Dr. Bader recalled the hospitality of the Quetzal valley people helped open his heart to the project and how he turned to God in prayer to ask Him to direct the next steps

STRONG LEADING FROM THE LORD...THE

of the project.

VOICE WAS ALMOST AUDIBLE.”

“ONE MORNING DURING MY STAY, I STOOD ON THE BLUFF OVERLOOKING THE RIO DE SAVEGRE, AT A SPOT ABOUT 15 YARDS NORTHEAST OF THE CURRENT TWO STORY BUILDING, TO ASK THE LORD IF I SHOULD ATTEMPT TO RAISE MONEY FOR THIS PROJECT,” Bader recalls. “I have never felt in my life such a strong leading from the Lord to do so. The voice was almost audible.” Bader responded to God’s call by donating a royalty check he had just received from his medical book, in addition, he contacted Olan Moore, who was the first student body president in 1922, and challenged him to match his amount. Moore enthusiastically responded and soon a building was constructed and, in just over six months $100,000 was raised for further funding. Dr. Bader’s passion for supporting the sciences continues to this day as he and the Catalysts turn their attention to the Campaign for the Sciences. He stated that it is important for alumni and university supporters to become actively involved in the Campaign so that SNU can continue to train some of the finest scientific and medical minds for a needy world. For the entire story, go to snu.edu/cfts

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QUICK FACT: SNU’s Quetzal Education Research Center (QERC) had 8 students attend for classes and research this past spring.


FAITH AND SCIENCE IN HARMONY Dr. Nancy Halliday, Professor Emeritus

Dr. Nancy Halliday is a person of harmony. From her early career as a symphonic musician, through her teaching at SNU, to her current position as an associate professor in the Department of Cell Biology at the OU College of Medicine, Dr. Halliday has become well versed in both musical harmony as well as the harmony between faith and science. Halliday, a 1988 graduate of SNU, first went to college to become a classical musician, and after graduating from the Eastman School of Music in 1979, began her career as a symphony musician, which eventually brought her to Oklahoma City. A physician who knew of her interest in medicine recommended she contact SNU. After visiting the campus and meeting with faculty member Dr. Gene Heasley, Halliday decided it was the place for her, and while at SNU changed her focus from being a healthcare provider to teaching. She proceeded to graduate with her B.S. in Biology in 198 and her Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the OU College of Medicine in 1994. “I love being part of the academic and personal journeys students take to reach their

“I LOVE BEING PART OF THE ACADEMIC

dreams,” adds Dr. Halliday. “I feel called to serve by equipping the saints as they prepare

AND PERSONAL JOURNEYS STUDENTS

to serve God. I find myself in Christ when I lose myself in the service of others.”

TAKE TO REACH THEIR DREAMS.”

The fact that Dr. Halliday is so experienced in higher education is one of the driving factors behind her support for the Campaign for the Sciences. She said that a key aspect force of a successful program is very much linked to the faculty and students within the program. And as such she urges those who have directly benefited from their educationat SNU to get involved in the Campaign for the Sciences. “SNU hires great faculty, but great faculty can become even more effective if they have excellent facilities and equipment,” Dr. Halliday says. “IN ADDITION, HAVING UP-TO-DATE AND STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITIES SIGNIFICANTLY IMPACTS THE ABILITY OF SNU TO RECRUIT TOP STUDENTS INTO THE SCIENCE PROGRAMS.” Even though she has moved on from the SNU campus, Dr. Halliday is still very much invested in the Campaign for the Sciences and excited about the new students it will bring to SNU, as well as and the opportunities it will make available to them to further understand the harmony between faith and science. For the entire story, go to snu.edu/cfts

DR. HALLIDAY INSTRUCTS SNU ALUMNI, AMY MADDEN & MARY SIEMS (FIRST-YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS)

QUICK FACT: 75% of high achieving high school science students invited to Science Scholars Weekend made SNU their college of choice.

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A LEGACY OF TEACHING BUILT ON A LOVE OF STUDENTS Dr. Robert Judd, Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Judd taught and invested in the lives of SNU students for 30 years. During that time, his care and compassion touched many students and faculty in a way that changed them and in the process left behind a shining legacy. Dr. Judd spent a portion of his younger years living on farms in Ohio, where his father always stressed the importance of education and learning. He remembers when his father accepted Christ into his life and how it changed not only his father, but also the life of his family. After Dr. Judd married, he and his wife bought and moved into a small trailer where they lived while attending Olivet Nazarene University. His days at Olivet were not easy, he recalls. It was challenging trying to balance a job, a full course load, and marriage. “I worked all night and took 22 hours one semester. I don’t recommend it,” he laughs. “I regretted it because I had two courses I didn’t do well in.” Inspired by the launch of the Sputnik satellite and the space race, Dr. Judd went back to school to obtain his Master’s degree, which then led him to teach at Huntington University in Indiana. While there, a 1968 visit from Dr. Willis Snowbarger, who was a representative for higher education in the Church of the Nazarene, led Judd to Bethany, Oklahoma where he stayed until he retired in 1998. When Dr. Judd first began teaching biology at SNU, both he and the W. Don Beaver Science Hall were new. He entered at a time when exciting things were happening for the sciences on the SNU campus. and he taught alongside two other new professors, Dr. Sharon Young and Dr. Leo Finkenbinder, and life-long friendships were forged. “WE HAD A GREAT STAFF IN THAT BUILDING,” HE SAYS. “IT WAS A WONDERFUL RELATIONSHIP. TO THIS DAY I CANNOT RECALL EVER HAVING A SQUABBLE IN OUR DEPARTMENT.” Dr. Judd said he loved his job at SNU and the bonds that he made with his students, many of whom he still keeps in contact with today. “I loved when students would come into my office and flop down in the chair next to me and tell me they were not sure what to do next,” recalls Dr. Judd. “They would talk about their concerns, challenges and their course

Drs. Finkenbinder, Young, and Judd in 1992

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QUICK FACT: Seven SNU science graduates entered the Physician Assistant (PA) program at the OU Health Sciences Center, this Fall.


work. There was nothing better than that.�

age. Despite missing teaching, Dr. Judd said he is enjoying his retirement, good

Currently, Dr. Judd is retired and still living in Bethany, which shows his deep love for Betheny

healtIBOEHSBOEDIJMESFO

and Oklahoma.

Dr. Judd had the pleasure of experiencing the W. Don Beaver Science Hall when it

“I HAD THE BEST JOB ANYBODY EVER HAD,� Dr. Judd says. “I really

was new and is equally excited that the Campaign for the Sciences marks a new

didn’t want it to end, but at the same time I also felt it was time.�

beginning for future generations of students at SNU.

He explained that the integration of computer technology in the classroom paired with the changing nature of his field was what prompted his retirement. He decided that it was time to leave and let someone younger take over his role in the dawning of the new information

For the entire story, go to snu.edu/cfts

Dr. Judd in front of J.D. & Mary West Laboratory constuction site.

QUICK FACT: 533 students pursuing degrees within the College of Natural, Social, and Health Sciences take a majority of their courses in the current W. Don Beaver Science Building.

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OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 6729 NW 39th Expwy, Bethany, OK 73008

snu.edu/cfts


SNU Campaign for the Sciences Fall 2013 Update