Page 1

issue 156

guiding and Inspiring travel by bike for sport, recreation and transportation since 1994

MAGAZINE

Crystal Cove!

an overnight trip, a BATventure, an experiential guide

ALSO

in search of dirt

CuyaGuna: Julian, California gear patrol

CABDA: Behind the Curtain asphalt, please

B.Y.O. Ute Route: Cedar City, Utah calendar

Rides, Tours, Events, Races last page

SDMBA: Goals for 2019 and more

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CONTENTS 17

06 Legal Cycling Potholes to Trails II Rights Against Public Entities Richard L. Duquette

Est. 1994

Issue

156

LatE Winter 2019

09

08 ask the coach BICYCLIST Stretch Sequence II Continuing the Series Rick Schultz

09 Gear Patrol

Behind the Curtain Evaluating Gear at CABDA West BICYCLIST Team

10 Destinations

Local State Park in Newport Beach Crystal Cove State Park Chris Reynolds

12 Batventure

Bicyclist Adventure Team Challenge The Overnight (Case study: La Habra to Newport) Chris Reynolds

Photo by Chris Reynolds

12

17 IN SEARCH OF DIRT A Panoramic Adventure in Julian Cuyamaca Rancho State Park James Murren

18 Asphalt, Please The Plan: BYO Ute A Do-it-yourself Tour John Woodson

23 Last Page

SDMBA Ongoing Trail Projects A description of the trail projects Kelley O'Toole

Regulars Photo courtesy James Murren

www.BICYCLIST.xyz

04 Prologue 05 Reader's rides 07 community Feed (new!) 20 event calendar

Photo by Chris Reynolds

Cover

Ignacio Oseguera leads the morning roll-out after an overnight at the Moro Flats primitive campground tucked in the coastal wilderness in the Crystal Cove State Park. The more than 2000 acres of park contain miles of double-track, fire road and single-track trails, with four campgrounds offering an escape and destination within reach. See page 12 for the dispatch. Photo by Chris Reynolds

Issue 156 | 3


Br oad Inve s tiga tion o f Challeng ing Your s el f, C ycling L i f e s t y le and In s pir ing S u s t ainable Tran s por t a tion

Prologue

Late Winter 2019

F MAGAZINE EDITORIAL

Chris Reynolds | Managing Director chris@bicyclist.xyz Kelley O’Toole | Managing Editor kelley@bicyclist.xyz

COLUMN CONTRIBUTORS

Carl Lawton | carl@bicyclist.xyz James Murren | james@bicyclist.xyz Rick Schultz | coach@bicyclist.xyz John Woodson | john@bicyclist.xyz

ISSUE CONTRIBUTORS

Richard Duquette, Marc Olivier Jodoin, Jonny Morshis, Ignacio Oseguera, Thom Parks, Mario Parra, Victor Prestinary

ILLUSTRATIONS & DESIGN Christopher Massaad Erik Scott

ADVERTISING, SPONSORSHIP AND DISTRIBUTION Chris Reynolds | Advertising chris@bicyclist.xyz

Chris Vopinek | Delivery & Distribution cvopinek@bicyclist.xyz

SOCIAL MEDIA

Luis Suarez | luis@bicyclist.xyz

READ/DISCUSS/FOLLOW/LIKE/SUPPORT

www.BICYCLIST.xyz www.patreon.com/bicyclist   www.reddit.com/r/bicyclist  www.bicyclist.tumblr.xyz  www.twitter.com/bicyclistxyz  www.instagram.com/bicyclist.xyz  www.facebook.com/bicyclist.xyz

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Directed and Printed in SoCal, USA Founded by Will Decker Published by Chris Reynolds Copyright © 1994-2018 All rights reserved.

issue 156 - Late Winter 2019

VITALS & DETAILS

BICYCLIST Magazine publishes stories of experience that fall under our namesake, BICYCLIST: Broad Investigation of Challenging Yourself, Cycling Lifestyle and Inspiring Sustainable Transportation. The magazine serves as an inspirational guide celebrating the arts, skills, events, and culture of the cycling life. BICYCLIST is a social enterprise promoting bicycle riding for sport, activity, and transportation. We are based in Southern California, an area that accounts for more bike shops, and active cyclists than the rest of the United States – combined. Visit us online at www.BICYCLIST.xyz. BICYCLIST Magazine is available in print and digital editions. Complimenting the magazine is our cycling podcast, The BICYCLIST Experience. We also maintain the BICYCLIST Friendly Shop Locater, and the BICYCLIST Event Calendar, the largest online calendar of cycling events, races and festivals in the United States, all available online at www.BICYCLIST.xyz. We have published a print magazine since 1994, distributing to bike shops throughout the western US and made available free to the public. We launched our online platform in 2014, and our podcast in 2015 and now reach readers and listeners in more than 72 countries. Sponsor us to share your message, www.bicyclist.xyz/sponsor. BICYCLIST Magazine is published 10 times per year. The print edition can be found at better bike shops, coffee shops and breweries throughout major metropolitan cities west of the Rockies. If you enjoy this magazine, if you would be disappointed to find out it was no longer in print, please support us on Patreon. Visit www.BICYCLIST.team to learn more.

DISCLAIMER

Although all best efforts are made to avoid the same, we reserve the right to publish unintentional mistakes and/or factual errors which may occur on an issue basis. No responsibility is assumed by the publishers for unsolicited materials/articles/letters/advertising and all submissions will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright and/or appropriate licensing purposes subject to BICYCLIST's right to edit and comment editorially. The views and opinions expressed in this magazine reflect the opinions of their respective author’s and are not necessarily those of the publisher or the editorial team. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form [print or digital] without prior consent of the publisher.

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Bicycling can be a dangerous sport and can lead to serious injury or death. Make it safer for everyone and obey all traffic laws, ride responsibly, use common sense, and wear a helmet.

irst of all, Happy New Year! This year marks the 25th year our organization has published a free magazine for the public. Since 1994, we've published and distributed a print magazine to better bike shops, breweries and coffee shops. We've run under various flags including, Orange County BICYCLIST, Southern California BICYCLIST, SoCal BICYCLIST, and our present title, BICYCLIST Magazine. For those that have been along for the ride, thank you for keeping up. For those new to the investigation, welcome! For this first issue of our new year, we are all over the map with stories of experience to motivate your goals, travels and adventures. John Woodson checks in with a dispatch from the Beehive State, as he takes us on his do-it-yourself, 3-day tour through Cedar City, Utah in Asphalt, Please. The 'sponsor yourself' event is an eligible BICYCLIST Challenge. Find out more on page 19 and learn more about the other Challenges at www.bicyclist.xyz/challenge (and the requirements to become 'Cheesecake Supreme'). Tucking in alongside our road challenges, we are opening up the BICYCLIST Challenge to include the first mountain bike entry. Taking the latest installment In Search of Dirt from James Murren on his outing to the Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, 13 miles or so south of Julian in San Diego County, James outlines a route that will challenge a variety of skills, both technical on the bike, but also off-bike including way-finding and basic outdoor survival. Of special interest to our 'SoCal locals', the piece details an area that mixes solitude, single-track, double-track, and wilderness, right here in our backyard. In 'Destinations Within Reach' we look at another State Park for this issue, Crystal Cove in Orange County- a true destination for adventure, disconnecting and seeing the best of route and trail. The more than 2000 acres are home to four campgrounds, three of which are bike-in/hike-in only. The network of trails provides a cornucopia of challenges easily accessible to the training racer or weekend warrior. We also have our experiential guide to the 'bike-overnight' on page 12- The BATVenture #001, a ride to somewhere with everything you need to sleep and eat on the road, but compacted to a 24-hour adventure. When available school, budget or work responsibilities don't allow for an expansive travel tour, a quick trip to a destination within reach is an entirely new experience when taken from the vantage point of the overnight. We hope it's a reminder and motivator for you to search out the local gems that offer easily accessed opportunities for adventure. And we made some avoidable mistakes, learn from our missteps. We have a fresh installment of Reader's Rides on the next page, see what they're getting and how you can enter. Hint: #iambicyclist. On that same page you'll also find summaries for our podcast, The BICYCLIST Experience, where I join Kelley O'Toole, and Victor Prestinary to explore, analyze and discuss the world of news through the optic of people who travel, race or explore the world by bike. Legal Cycling, and Ask the Coach have fresh installments for your consideration, and we also have a new section 'The Community Feed' where you can catch up on the headlines you may have missed across the bicyclist media landscape. Lastly, if you enjoy this magazine, or if you would be disappointed to find out it was no longer in print, please pledge your support on Patreon. In exchange, all supporters receive early release of the magazine, delivered as a digital PDF, ready for import to your favorite reading device along with full episodes of the podcast (+4 hours of additional laughs, humor and witty banter every month). Higher levels of support rewarded accordingly. Visit www.BICYCLIST.team to learn more and pledge your support of independent and free media dedicated to guiding and promoting a life traveled by bicycle.

See you on the route. Stay safe. Peace,

Chris R eynold s

- Chris Reynolds, Managing Director (@chrsrnlds)

BICYCLIST Magazine


analog/digital

reader's rides

TAG YOUR RIDE S ON INSTAGRAM #iambicyclist OR SEND BY EMAIL TO readersrides@bicyclist.xyz

A Podcast To Start (or keep) You Pedaling

Tune in to our weekly-ish podcast where the people who bring you this publication discuss the news and stories behind the scenes and across the media lanscape. Visit www.bicyclist.fm to listen and view show notes. Support the show and get the full episode feed by visiting www.bicyclist.team. #BATventure #TBEpodcast

138: The Tour Down Under gets Messy, Jess Varnish Loses the Battle But Not the War, and How to Get Americans Interested in Bike Racing 138:

An electric bike battery explodes while a 79-year-old cyclist attempts a climb famous at the Tour Down Under, Jess Varnish loses a battle, but not the war, and we discuss how to get American’s more excited about bike racing.

137: Race Meat, Carbo-loading, Riding With Cars, Warm Showers, Why It Matters Santa Ana Got A Protected Bike Lane, The 'Stigma of the Vegan Brand' 137: We cover race day carb loading, post-adventure fueling,

LuIS "OCBrakeless" @ocbrakeless Fullerton, CA

Hanging at the tracks. #poseidonbike #poseidonx #gravel #ellumbagworks #cycling #iambicyclist #cyclist #bikes #fullerton

vegan supplements, and DIY supplements on the cheap. We also discuss EF Education First team kits for 2019 and their new partnerships, and breaking down the assertions that ‘fewer Americans bike to work’.

136: 'BAT' Overnight review, Pro Cycling Teams Deal with the 'Sky, Goodbye', Virtual Racing vs. Outdoor Racing... 136: We discuss gran fondos of interest in 2019 and team

shakeups in pro cycling. We also discuss Danny Van Haute's new Pro Cycling team and the implications of electrifying anything with wheels.

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Listen at www.BICYCLIST.fm

Also available on

Apple Podcasts, Overcast Spotify, Sticher Google Play www.BICYCLIST.xyz

Alias "loba" @allltrack_grava SoCal, USA

X M A S 2 0 1 8 #pugsofinstagram #schwinnrascal #trekking #audiotechnica #iambicyclist

Selected photographers receive a B.A.T. care package including a set of #awesomesauce BICYCLIST bidons, The BICYCLIST tee-shir t, random SWAG and a permanent place in the BICYCLIST #readersrides Wall of Fame.

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Potholes to Trails II Bicyclists' Rights Against Public Entities

This article discusses the different types of government tort claims and the kinds of cases in which an injured bicyclist will be permitted to sue a public entity. By Richard L. Duquette POTHOLES

Photo by Marc Olivier Jodoin

ABOVE A dangerous condition is one that must create a substantial risk of injury, when used with due care, in a foreseeable manner. A dangerous condition is more than a trivial defect, minor or insignificant condition. For example, a sidewalk crack or lift of height of 1.5 inches may be considered trivial by law. But when conditions of the public commons have been left to attropy, litigation acts as a motivator and check against munical apathy.

T

his article discusses the different types of government tort claims and the kinds of cases in which an injured bicyclist will be permitted to sue a public entity. This installment looks specifically at the kinds of cases in which an injured bicyclist will be permitted to sue a public entity. The first such category is the "dangerous condition" cases. To recover under the dangerous condition doctrine, the bicyclist must prove: • The public entity owned or controlled the property, • The property was in a dangerous condition, • The risk of injury was reasonably foreseeable. • This last element of foreseeability means the risk was created by a government employee (it does not apply to natural conditions on unimproved land), or the public entity had actual or constructive notice of the risk. You can prove notice by witnesses, pictures, and prior complaints of the condition, so long as it is described with particularity (i.e. by GPS coordinates). You can sometimes identify prior complaints here. So what is a dangerous condition? The answer is that it must create a substantial risk of injury, when used with due care, in a foreseeable manner. A dangerous condition is more than a trivial defect, minor or insignificant condition. For example, a sidewalk crack or lift of height of 1.5 inches may be trivial by law. So, you must factor in surrounding circumstances like tree roots, drainage issues, and sight limits. You will need to hire cost-effective experts to assist you in fighting back pretrial Motions for Summary Judgment or Adjudication. Assuming you go to trial, you will need to know how much the expert will charge to prepare and testify. Never underestimate the cost of a lawsuit. Then there is the issue of securing the necessary proof. You need to collect pictures, measurements, GPS coordinates, prior similar complaints of a dangerous condition, and any other evidence you have in order to prove that the entity was on notice of a defective condition.

One particular threat to bicyclists on public roads and paths is potholes. Running into a pothole on a bicycle can not only cause major wheel and frame damage, but also often results in a rider being thrown headfirst off of their bicycle, leading to serious injuries. Because by definition potholes are found on paved roads and trails (and are not a natural condition on unimproved land), injured victims can sue the government entity responsible for maintaining the road. Contrast this with an unpaved trail on unimproved land, where the presumption is immunity. Nevertheless, they must prove, as with any defective condition, that the government entity had actual or constructive notice of the condition (Heskel v. City of San Diego, 227 Cal.App.4th 313 (2014). Proving actual notice is often difficult, but fairly straightforward. There must be a record of a complaint about the condition. These may be filed formally with the city or county responsible, where they are put in a database. Informal complaints may be found through Hawkeye Road Hazards Report and may bolster a claim of actual notice. If you can't prove that a complaint was filed with the public entity putting them on actual notice, you can argue constructive notice. Constructive notice is when the condition was in existence for a long enough time and was obvious enough that the public entity should have known of it. If a pothole is found on a public roadway that is frequently trafficked, a court will be more willing to find constructive notice than if it is not very visible or on a paved bike path that is not as frequently traveled. In fact, this is exactly what the Heskel case referenced above was about. The reason that court found a lack of constructive notice is because the dangerous condition at issue there was well off the public roadway, and unlikely to be seen. Nevertheless, the question of notice is a question of fact, not of law. On the law, what matters is that state and local governments are not immune from liability based on a dangerous condition on a paved road or path unless they provide warnings.

GOVERNMENT VEHICLES

Aside from dangerous conditions on public land, another way to successfully sue a government entity for your injuries is when you are struck by a negligently operated vehicle owned by the public entity. Liability is imposed upon a PE, is when on or its vehicles, in the course and scope of employment negligently causes injury to a bicyclist. However, police are immune when in the pursuit of a suspected criminal if there is a written policy and annual training is had for vehicle pursuits. (Distinguish police departments who merely have their officers "sign off" on pursuit training.) See California Vehicle Code §17004.7.

Examples

Here are a few examples of cases likely to result in public entity liability: Stop signs covered by vegetation, pot holes in the road, buckling sidewalks, unattended or unsafe road construction, road design, road shoulder drop offs, negligent government motorists, even police cars, transit buses and trains can be sources of liability and danger for pedestrians.▲ This article is from Richard Duquette's podcast Bicycling and the Law, episode 34 'Bicyclists' Rights Against Public Entities: Potholes to Trails' recorded on February 01, 2017.

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has been fighting for his clients since 1983. His family-owned law firm specializes in providing personal attention and quality representation to the people of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange Counties. Read his blog at www.911law.com and listen to his podcast, Bicycling and the Law, covering legal cycling topics.

6 | Issue 156

BICYCLIST Magazine


COMMUNITY FEED From Across the Media Landscape

The stories you may have missed. The news we're talking about. And the writers and headlines that have caught the attention of the BICYCLIST and the BAT. www.BICYCLIST.news ( r/BICYCLIST)

(Alex Ballinger) Sir Bradley Wiggins: ‘My son comes home from school and gets on Zwift instead of Fortnite’ (John Stroud) Ride the Rockies Event Returning to Snowmass, Roaring Fork Valley, CO [Spoiler] 2019 UCI Cyclocross World Cup Pont-Château Results: U23 Men [Spoiler] 2019 Tour Down Under Recap and Results: Stage 6 [Spoiler] 2019 UCI Cyclocross World Cup Pont-Château Results: Elite Menn [Spoiler] 2019 UCI Cyclocross World Cup Pont-Château Results: Elite Women (David Arthur) Gore C7 Partial Windstopper Pro Bib Tights+ (David Rome) Tools, Bits and Tips from the WorldTour Pits (Andrew Hood) Ewan Defends Head-Butting Sprint (Clifford Lee) Ridden and Reviewed: Wabi Thunder Steel Singlespeed Cyclocross Bike (Matt de Neef) Same Winners, Different Race: The TDU results Don’t Tell the Full Story (Ray Keener) "What's in Store for 2019?" BRAIN Talks to Retailers at CABDA West [PR] 2019 Amgen Tour of California Jerseys Revealed (Alex Bowden) US Amateur Cyclist Tests Positive for Five Banned Substances (David Kennedy) The Pros and Cons of Protein Powder for Endurance Athletes (James Vincent) Review: The Bird Aeris 145 GX Eagle is Uber-long and Uber-fast (David Arthur) Will Your next Bike Be a Gravel Bike? (Simon Smythe) Nine Tech Predictions for 2019

[PHOTOS] Rally-UHC’s California Training Camp

(Steve Casimiro) The Just About Perfect Wool Travel and Work Shirt from Architect (John Gruber) Rene Ritchie’s Review of the New Smart Battery Cases (Alex Bowden) World Naked Bike Ride London Date Announced for 2019

[WISHLIST] Leh Cycling Möbius Saddle Bag

Photo courtesy Leh Cycling

(Carmen Aiken) Dispatch From the Badlands (MTBR) Fat Bike World Championships Gearing Up (Keely Portway) Supercomputing the Future of Cycling (Robin Wilmott) Zipp 303 Firecrest 650b Tubeless Disc Wheel Review

(Degen Pener) Hollywood Jumps on E-Bike Craze: "It's Such a Brilliant Way to Commute" (Jack Luke) Daryl Impey's Scott Foil RC — Gallery (Tyler Benedict) Exclusive: Darimo T1 Loop Wraps Your Saddle in Place (Jeremy Hsu, 2018) The Strava Heat Map Shows Even Militaries Can't Keep Secrets (Paul Aston) The Evolution of the Santa Cruz V10 [PR] UnitedHealthcare joins Rally Cycling as co-title partner (John Gruber) Pentagram’s ‘Range of Possibilities’ for Slack (Tyler Benedict) Roll Massif Launches Collection of Colorado Based Sportive Rides (Daniel Boffey) Luxembourg to Become First Country to Make All Public Transport Free (Michelle Arthurs-Brennan) Rollers vs Turbo Trainers: Which is Better? [VIDEO] BC Bike Race 2018: Wrap Up (John Watson) Brooks Teases All Weather Carbon Saddles (Dave Rome) An Ode to the Humble Hex Key (Dane Cash) Rally-UHC invited to Suisse and Flèche, focused on European ‘big leagues’ (Rick Vosper) Welcome to Bike 3.0: The New Reality, Part Two

(John Watson) Why Shouldn’t the Bicycle Industry Attend Outdoor Retailer? Photo by Will Matthews

(Pat Jos) Palomar Nello Magnetic Bike Bell (Alastair Hamilton) Bookshelf: Japanese Steel (Liam Cahill) GPS Computers of the Pros – It's Not all Garmin Any More (Simon Withers) Genetic Schizo Pedals Review (Zap Espinoza) Inside The Cub House Bike Shop (Jesse White) Fat Biking Providing a Different Look for Outdoor Winters in Minnesota (Selene Yeager) 4 Ways Swearing Makes You a Better Cyclist (Carlton Reid) Why Is This Local Moving To The Netherlands? Bicycling, That's Why (David Kennedy) Chris Froome Uncertain of Giro d’Italia Title Defense (Steve Frothingham) Partial Government Shutdown Means CPSC Is Not Announcing Recalls (The Inner Ring) UCI Rankings Explained www.BICYCLIST.xyz

(Spencer Powlison) The Outer Line: McLaren Races to the Rescue? (Ted Rogers) Vision Zero is not a fad — and it’s not making our streets more deadly (Ray Maker) Wahoo CEO Details Fixes for Issues with KICKR 2018 & KICKR CORE (Tyler Benedict) BigRep 3D Prints Newest Polymer Into Airless Tire Prototypes (Gregor Brown) Riders Shoot Down Aging Andrea Tafi's Roubaix Plan (Adam Leddin) The Start Of Something Small: Velo Orange Small Wheeler [PR] UCI to Start Testing for Painkiller Tramadol at Paris-Nice (Tony Almeida) Electric Scooters and Bicycles That Drive Themselves Around Cities (Fredrick Kunkle) LA, A City Built Around Cars, Wants to Get Rid of Them with Tolls (Spencer Powlison) The Dirt: Three Things I Learned About SoCal Gravel

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JOIN US! Stretch It Out II

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STRETCHES FOR Pre/post-RIDE

We put together a series of stretches that will help warm up the body including the psoas (hip flexors), hamstrings, glutes, lower back, calves and quads. Riders should do these before and after a ride or race to improve flexibility, recovery and performance. By Rick Schultz with Amy Schultz, PT, DPT, CSCS

Adductor Stretch Option 1

Option 2

Photo: Jose Galaz

HELP INCREASE ACCESS TO YOUR TRAILS Bend your knees so that your feet are resting flat on the mat. Lift one leg and cross it over the other. Press into your quad, stretching your adductor muscle. Hold the position and then switch legs.

Bend one leg and cross over the other as you did in Option 1 except with your bottom leg extended flat on the ground. Hold the position and then switch legs.

Join now at SDMBA.com and learn how you can help.

Hamstring Stretch Start

The San Diego Mountain Biking Association is a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining and increasing sustainable trail access for mountain biking in San Diego County.

Finish

Lie flat on your back and stretch your legs out straight. Interlock your fingers behind your right knee and bend and lift your knee towards your chest.

Keeping your fingers clasped around your leg, gently extend the hamstring of the bent leg towards the sky to stretch the muscle. Hold the position and then switch legs.

Lower Back Stretch Start

Finish

Lying on your back with bent knees and feet flat on the ground, gently roll both bent knees over to one side and extend your arms in front of you with palms touching.

Extend your top arm out into a 'T' position with palms up, while keeping your shoulders on the ground. Hold the position and then switch sides.

Coach Rick Schultz specializes in coaching cyclists so that they can achieve their best. He is a certified bike fitter and author of Bike Fit 101: Your Toolset for a Great Bike Fit. Send your questions to coach@bicyclist.xyz or ask on twitter @BICYCLISTxyz #askthecoach

SOCAL LOCAL? 8 | Issue 156

Make an appointment for coaching and bike fits. Mobile services available, visit bicyclist.xyz/fit

Support BICYCLIST, buy a shirt. Order yours today at www.bicyclist.shop BICYCLIST Magazine


Behind the curtain

Inside the CABDA west industry expo Historically taking place in Chicago, the inaugural west-coast version of the industry bike show took place

at the Del Mar Racetrack in San Diego, California on January 16 and 17th of 2019. Besides the opportunity to get an overall 'feel' for the industry, the show offers a chance to learn about products that otherwise may get lost in the fire-hose of bike-related product launches. Here are some of the goods that caught our eye. Subscribe to the BICYCLIST Experience podcast for additional information on this field trip. By Chris Reynolds, @chrsrnlds SILCA is no stranger to the art and engineering of fine provisions for bike travel. Their most recent entry is the Sicuro Ti cage, a hand-formed and laser-welded water bottle carrier made in their Indianapolis factory. The cage includes a 25 year warranty, the longest we're familiar with for a bottle cage, a testament to the confidence in design and manufacturing that Silca has imbued in their new release. As more and more people find the joy of riding on rocks, gravel and trail, a bottle cage that keeps bottle ejections at bay is well worth the ticket to entry. We look forward to getting our hands on a set to see if we can shake them loose and will report back. Also included with the cage are Ti bolts, with the entire setup coming under 30 grams. If any grams shaved are worth the cost of reduction, or your bike deserves some luxury, Sicuro for the win. ($70 each, www.bicyclist.xyz/156f)

C L E V E R S T A N D A R D is an entrant into on-bike tools and accessories that bring true innovation to their designs. Known most for their 'Clever Lever ' tire levers and integrated smartlink tool, they also have a tool that integrates a chain breaker with a handle that acts as a valve-core wrench. If your chain requires a tool to repair, the Clever Standard Chain Barrel serves as a 45 gram accoutrement well worth the nominal additional weight. The entire tool stores nicely, measuring just over 1.5" and smaller than most comparable tools. Available in a multitude of colors, and fitting most multi-speed chains and some single-speed chains. Check them out, though not for 12-speed chains. ($23,

www.bicyclist.xyz/156e)

The BAT & BICYCLIST Community (r/BICYCLIST)

Interested in writing for Gear Patrol? The first step is posting a review of the last bikerelated piece of gear you purchased on the BICYCLIST Community Boards (r/BICYCLIST) powered by Reddit. (www.reddit.com/r/bicyclist). Our team moderates, curates, reviews, posts and responds to the news, ar ticles, and submissions of interest to people who travel by bike, fans of sustainable transportation, or those that may be interested in an on-line communit y unlike exis ting bike forums. e.g. Community Rule #1 No Personal Attacks or Hate Speech

www.BICYCLIST.xyz

Use the included links and BICYCLIST gets an atta'boy - NO COST TO YOU and helps us keep this magazine free!

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LEZYNE Torque Drive is a truly portable 2Nm 10Nm capacity multi-bit tool, that is feathery. It is the first torque-wrench we've come across that is small enough to truly consider for carrying onbike during tours and adventures on road and trail. As the requirements of our modern machines dictate a higher level of precision than the 'lug-nut vs. spark-plug' comparator method of yesteryear, the tool will only become more useful as time goes on. Included are all the bits you'll need and a carrying case, 190 g for the set. ($50, www.bicyclist.xyz/156a)

GREEN GURU started their work in 2005, setting out to design bags for bike travel using creative reclamation techniques for discarded outdoor gear to craft their goods. Over that time, they’ve gotten really skilled at determining utility and value for the active adventurer. A fun addition to the day-trip portage is their Tubular Insulated Can Sleeve, an excellent addition to packing refreshments for a trail-side break. ($40, www.bicyclist.xyz/156d)

CLOSE THE GAP is a Dutch company that made their debut at CABDA West with a smart, and compact accessory that helps tidy up the cockpit provisions that have become a requirement for many riders. Their products include a quarter-turn smart computer mount, an action camera mount, and the best part - a bright and crisp bell that hides well and provides great utility. They have other mounts that provide a range of accessories within hands reach. (Price TBD,

www.bicyclist.xyz/156b)

O N Y X R A C I N G P R O D U C T S have been making hubs in the midwest since 2007 and have even sent their prized hubs racing worldwide. All hubs include a 5-year warranty and a 2x lifetime upgrade program. As the 'enduro' and downhill crowd glom on noisier drag systems, it is of note the Oynx hubs are silent, offering a near drag-free ride and some peace and quiet on the trail. The hubs are ceramic bearings all around, a trend that seems to be gaining more momentum and adoption then we've seen previously. ORP offers setups for virtually every wheel and frame type on the market, with more than 2,000,000 combinations in their catalogue. They also have been a part of many special projects and some wild electric bike builds that have definitely put the hubs through their paces . ( $150-$450, www.bicyclist.xyz/156c) Issue 156 | 9


Crystal Cove SP, California

A Destination for a day of riding trails or a multi-day Tour

Rail & Trail Thanks to Poseidon Bike (www.poseidonbike.com) for sponsoring DWR. Their support allows us to bring you articles such as these.

The California State Park features a collection of trails that serve as training grounds for many local trail riders. What isn't known by many of the enthusiasts that cross the wilderness of 'El Moro' are the multiple campgrounds tucked into the trails. They are limited in provisions, no water is available, but doesn't that sort of add to the excitement of a bike-packing adventure? Words and Photos By Chris Reynolds

A

djacent the emerald beaches of Newport Coast, and tucked away within the ridge that separates the coast from the heart of South Orange County, a protected state park offers wilderness a world away from the hustle and bustle just on the other side of the jagged and wind-beaten coastal hillside. The collection of trails are popular for mountain biking, and relatively well-known as a destination in its own right. The opportunity for disconnecting and sleeping under the stars only gets more rewarding when the adventure to camp is considered. Multiple entry points exist, either from the South, along Pacific Coast Highway at the El Moro turnoff, the West via the Bomber Ridge Trail West Entrance (see page 12 for our experience) or the South-East, via Laguna Canyon Road. The Moro Campground sits at the base along PCH and offers year-around camping for those going the distance along the California Coast. For those looking for a bit more adventure, the Deer Flats, Upper Moro and Lower Moro grounds require a minimum 3 miles of trail riding to enter. With 1000 feet of vertical climbing between the base and the top, route selection is key, especially if packing bags. With the number of trails and campgrounds nestled within the 2,400 acres of wilderness, a day-trip, weekend overnight or multi-day deep dive in the Crystal Cove experience are all available and on offer. What will you come up with? â–˛

Crystal cove, California Orange County, California, USA

Nearby Parking

Moro Campground Entrance (Not Free - Supports State Park) N Pacific Coast Highway, Newport Coast, CA 92651 Coastal Peak Park (Free) 20403 E. Coastal Peak, Newport Coast, CA 92657

Local Provisions

Newport Coast Shopping Center 21181 Newport Coast Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92832 Crystal Cove Shopping Center 8086 Pacific Coast Highway, Newport Beach, CA 92657

ABOVE LEFT Choose-your-own-adventure takes new meaning in the 2,400 acre state park, nestled along the California Coast. Buffered by the sea air, the area keeps temperatures in a range that makes four seasons of exploration possible. Jonny (J Dawg) Morphis of Costa Mesa, CA makes the morning charge up Moro Ridge with the Parra brothers, and Luis 'OC Brakeless' running sweep. Read the full story on page 12. ABOVE RIGHT Moro Ridge extends the length of the preserve and the site of two of the four campgrounds in Crystal Cove. 10 | Issue 156

BICYCLIST Magazine


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QUESTIONS? MORE INFORMATION?

www.bicyclist.xyz -> search 'crystal cove' Double-Track Single-Track www.BICYCLIST.xyz

Caution - Vehicle Traffic

Hike/Bike Only

Open to Vehicle Camping Issue 156 | 11


B a t venture

001

the 24-Hour bike overnight

MORE INFORMATION AND PHOTOS?

Visit www.bicyclist.xyz and search 'batventure'

An experiential weekend experience with bikes from Poseidon provides a template for your own excursions, and compares the bike-packing vs. bike-touring semantics. Words and Photos By Chris Reynolds

A

recent lamentation from a friend who reads this magazine revolved around their lack of time for participating in any of the adventures we write about. A weekend here and there, but how could they join in on a touring excursion with only a weekend surrounded by the SoCal suburbs? After making my case for the numerous opportunities for finding adventure, even in the hustle and bustle of glitzy and modern Orange County, California, the question of equipment presented itself. How much was all this 'adventure' going to cost? At that time, I didn't have a good answer. For the mechanically inclined, a used steel frame built with a yester-year mix of mountain and road parts from the local shop offers a low cost of entry. But that’s a tall ask for my friend, someone only just getting accustomed to changing their own tires, let alone building up a bike from sourced components. Bikes have had a long deserved reputation for being costly. The amount of specific gear needed to get rolling extends beyond the machine itself. To make the dreams of your local outdoor retailer come true, you’re introducing a form of backpacking and camping into the mix, pastimes that give riding bikes a pedal for it's money in terms of money spent in the pursuit of lightweight, specialized gear. Is there any hope for the wanderluster looking to explore, but without deep pockets for provisions? How can this industry have any exception of younger people adopting the pastime when the perceived barriers to entry are so high?

Context

We previously rode and reviewed the Poseidon Triton back in issue #142, where Victor Prestinary wrote its praises and marveled at the value for price, a competent race-ready road bike priced at $600. This has been our go-to recommendation when someone asks for a good road bike for a first century, Gran Fondo or triathlon they would like to train for and participate in. Their frames are backed by a lifetime warranty and their support staff are based out of La Habra, California, clicking off their fifth year this summer. I was pleased to learn of a new bike from Poseidon looking to add to the value they initially introduced with the Triton. And to do so with money leftover for pedals and shoes, a kit, bidons and cages, a helmet and all the other random stuff you find out you'll need after you purchase a bike. Announced at Interbike 2018, the X was released at the same price point as the Triton ($600), with the latter being reduced $100. The Poseidon X pitch? A less costly adventure bike that aims to get all the important things right, while making concessions in areas thought to be less significant or of little detriment to the experience and enjoyment of turning pedals. 12 | Issue 156

Use case

Reviewing the X components and preparing for an adventure, I make a checklist. Double-track or fire-road bike-packing? Check. The stock 700c wheels accommodate up to 40mm tires, and if you drop to a 650b wheel size, the max-width increases to 1.9". Traditional bike touring? Definitely! The rear chain-stays geometry is proportioned to keep heels from slapping bags. Eyelets for front and rear racks, as well as four sets of bottle cage mounts provide a litany of accessory options. The use of Tektro mechanical disc brakes keeps things in control even on the heaviest loads, steepest grades and wettest roads. Speaking to heavy loads, 32-spoked double-walled aluminum wheels wrapped with Kenda Small Block 700x35c tires out of the gate offer a plush, get-behind-me-Satan approach to road and trail, though if you'll be primarily on asphalt, the beaded tires will slow you down ever so slightly. But if you're adventuring, you'll get there when you get there. Therein lies the most important part of touring that gets the least amount of consideration: the getting there - more specifically the gearing to get there. What makes sense unladen can be confounding when faced with steep grades, a heavy pack, and many miles to camp. In the case of the X, a Shimano Claris group wrangles the chain around a 11-32 cassette out back, and 34/46 chainrings doing the turning business in the front. Though many of the latest whips tout proprietary bottom bracket designs that promise ever better intangibles, the X goes with the old standard of 68mm BSA, a welcomed option when well-provisioned bike shops are scarce out on the road, a frequent occurrence in our world of dying retail. All of this sounded great on paper. But what looks good on a spec. sheet may not always translate in the execution. Especially when adding significant weight, dirt and the lack of mechanical sympathy that bikes on multi-day adventures typically receive. I was interested in seeing how it would fare, especially with my own previous experience of the Triton as a baseline.

Execution

The first BICYCLIST Adventure Team field trip. Or BAT trip. Maybe BATventure? With a name, and an idea, some calls were made and a trip was set. A 24-hour overnight that would challenge different aspects of the bike, and the individual. Beyond just a shakedown for a new low cost bike, it was an opportunity to introduce some strong riders and racers in their own right to an entirely different way of spending time in the saddle; touring. Or if you end up in the dirt, ‘bike-packing’. (Continuing on page 14)

ABOVE The Santa Ana River Trail provides a near 25-mile corridor bisecting Orange County. Taking it towards the coast, then south through the coastal mountains, leads to the Crystal Cove State Park, our destination for the evening. We made use of the primitive campsites available to the public, detailed on page 11. BELOW LEFT Luis Suarez rolls out the race kit for the morning, approaching the ride with a professionalism and preparation that helps to inspire the pedal pushing. The rest of the group can be seen just cresting the other on the other side of the hill, not yet feeling the 'inspiration'. BELOW RIGHT An LED bike light inserted into an empty bidon serves as the ambient lighting for the evening. While a liquid fuel MSR stove was used for meal preparation, fuel tablets offered a source of silent table-side fire, perfect for pan-warming tortillas.

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Issue 156 | 13


(Continuing from page 12) Semantics aside, the idea is simple: ride your bike with provisions to sustain the basic comforts of home on the road or trail, in this case for 24 hours, essentially the first two days of any multiday tour. Also, it would offer a stress test demanding enough to ascertain the value proposition on offer. Though it must be restated, we are considering a complete bike for what some spend on their bibs. The value proposition is strong on this one. I talked to Luis to help find willing participants who were interested in this adventure and we're capable to ride under these conditions. Luis recruited friends from his monthly club ride, the Fixed Gear Beer Crew, bringing Ignacio Oseguera, Jonny Morphis and brothers Alex and Mario Parra on board to join us on this overnight excursion. All from various backgrounds, mostly with race or daily commuting experience, few having experience mixing camping and bikes.With six demo bikes, and six riders testing them in different wants, any quality or construction issues would present themselves. The trip would also provide an instructive guide for future adventures, serving as a preparatory introduction to the overlaps of camping, bike travel and backpacking.

Motivation

Carrying your home away from home, contained on your bike, is a freeing experience. When everything you carry has to be considered for usefulness and utility, it can provoke a realization that you can not only exist outside the advertised comforts of modern life, but that you may find it a more enjoyable experience. This can be a profound realization, one that provides a security and self-reliance that is fleeting in todays lattice work of interlaced technological dependences. The longer you’re on the road, the more changed you’ll come to be upon your return home, and I've always found travel by bike accelerates this process. This dilation of time gives you a sense of being away for a long time, when in actuality, your time away was much shorter. That sense is a recognition of the mental development, a building of resourcefulness and tenacity that carries the spirit after the ride is over. Your mental strength is improving, and your sense of time distorts to accommodate this experience. This shifting sense of time becomes especially pronounced when the only goal for the day is not getting lost, getting to camp by sundown and bringing enough water for coffee in the morning. Though we managed to fail at these specific goals for this inaugural trip, our mistakes become your ‘teachable moments’. And minor setbacks aside, the trip was a resounding success.

What you'll be carrying depends on many factors, including what you'll be doing when you're not riding, the weather of the area you're in, and how close you are to civilization. This was a heavy pack with cooking provisions for six people, camera gear, and a sleeping setup to avoid the communal tent party on offer. Whatever you end up taking, keep the heaviest elements of your pack lower in your bag, separate items by their utility, and consider weight. Assume your bags may leak, even if they claim waterproofness. Safeguard the elements of your pack that -can't- get wet (e.g. spices, electronics, goose-down insulated gear etc.) with water-proof stuff sacks. This will also help organization. A stuff-sack with your softgoods (rain gear, extra kit, off-bike apparel) serves as a pillow. Sacks with compression straps are useful for sleeping bags. Whether you use a rack, as shown below, or various bags that strap to the bike, the principals are the same. If using racks, perhaps obvious, look for seat-stay and rear drop-out mounts on the bike you'll be using.

Even with panniers, I prefer basic tools separated in a seat bag. I always know where they are, the bag can be quickly shared with a fellow traveler if needed, and it insures that even on excursions with panniers left at camp, I have tools with the bike. Conveniently, the Poseidon X includes - as stock - a saddle that showcases a common seat-bag attachment interface, a feature that allows easy swapping between bikes. A useful pieces of gear that I've only been able to find directly from the companies' website, is the Click-Stand, a folding, portable kickstand that keeps bags out of the dirt. It provides a convenience I've come to appreciate, and is the most remarkedon piece of gear I've owned. Though I do have a tendency to prefer unremarkable gear while on the tour or trail, the utility of the Click-Stand gets noticed. Here, it's nestled against the 6061 alloy frame of the X, a hydro-formed design that is stiff in the pedal, but won't beat you up over the long haul.

Practicals

For the trip we all carried our own gear for the night, including food, cooking utensils, tents, sleeping bags, and various other necessities for the trip. All of us rode on the Poseidon X, courtesy of Poseidon Bikes, to get the full experience of the new model. We all used our own versions of touring gear to carry our camping supplies.

Preparations for Camping

We planned to camp at Crystal Cove State park because of the proximity to the central location of all the riders. It's also got beautiful scenic views that many locals and tourists visit (see page 11 for more details). Before we left, it was determined we'd head straight to camp, and prepare dinner when we arrived. Coffee and oatmeal in the morning alongside materials for making sandwiches. By mid afternoon, a decision was made to head to another camp, The Camp, an outdoor shopping center of sorts, with a wide variety of options for a range of diets. Located in Costa Mesa, the venue serves as a waypoint between the Santa Ana River Trail and the Newport Coast highlands. A mile or so from the trail, we enjoyed the atmosphere and false sense of accomplishment. (Continued next page) 14 | Issue 156

BICYCLIST Magazine


Filled with tasty rewards, almost like a carrot extending in front of the mule, the handlebar bag provides quick access and a place to stash a harmonica, train whistle, gummy bears, or whatever else you find useful in motivating yourself and the group. Another purpose is to sequester the valuables. If wearing a jersey with pockets, use them for food and stash your ID, credit card, and phone in the handlebar bag. Combining jersey pockets with food and valuables, while traveling over trail, is a recipe for a phone lost somewhere 'bout 10 miles back?' Especially as smart phones have inflated in size, taking advantage of the handlebar-bag allowance provided while 'on tour' is a privilege not afforded to the club-ride set. While speaking on the front-end, the handlebars were a bit narrow for the broad shoulders I bring to the party. The stock width doesn't seem proportionate to the sizing of the frame, at least for the size large I rode, but I acknowledge that my gangling arms aren't proportionate to the sizing of my body, so you may not have an issue with this. Given more time for preparation, I would have liked to take advantage of this mount point to include a more substantial handle-bar bag for my camera. Using an additional point on the other side, and at the crown of the fork, a front rack can be attached to bring items to the front. I prefer riding without a loaded front wheel, so even with such a rack I prefer a more responsive steering, especially on technical areas. This can be an issue if you're carrying a lot, and are of a larger heft, but the 32 spokes laced around aluminum double-walled rims allowed my desire for handling to win over any fear of a busted wheel.

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A third set of eyelets comes in handy, seen here carrying an MSR fuel bottle. Other uses of the eyelets adopted by the group included various accessories for carrying tools and pumps using this width of spacing for attachment. For the bikes provided on this trek, the Poseidon X, frames include three mounts on the interior, and one on the underside. Speaking on the task of creating fire, there are many options depending on the type of trip you're venturing on, your comfortability with mechanical devices and the geography of your adventure. The MSR WhisperLite Camping stove has long been the default choice for providing the heat for meals for many touring by bike. The ability to use a range of fuel types found around the world, dependability and repairability explicate this choice, and was the source of heat for meals on this trip. The price/weight/ruggedness measures up in a way that we haven't found matched. A less gear intensive option that came in handy were hexamine fuel blocks. The cheap and convenient tablets provide 2025 minutes of burn and can be found in most sporting good retailers, big box stores and even some gas stations. The silent fuel-source provided a camp-fire atmosphere, and a welcomed source of warmth for the evening. Definitely, going to pack on all future trips, even with the MSR.

Where the rubber meets the road or trail is of most importance when carrying your home on your back, or bike. Gearing that makes sense unloaded is a recipe for walking when carrying bags. Though the front triple, a common option for the touring crowd, has been left behind, the industry adoption of larger rear cassette sizes provide enough range for carrying your stuff and yourself. In the case of the Poseiden X, the bike matches a Prowheel RPL 46/34 crankset to a Microshift SpeedBottle 8-speed 11-34 cassette, directed by Shimano Claris R2000 derailleur and shifters. The component choice keeps the overall price of the bike low ($600) while providing enough dependability and repair-ability to be considered for remote tours. The ensemble is slowed down by a set of Tektro mechanical disk brakes that provide all-weather dependability, even for fullyloaded packs on the steepest of descents. This is a welcome change from the squeeze and pray I've previously experienced on loaded bikes after lengthy descents.

(Continued previous page) Beers were drank, burritos eaten and schedules missed. After everything was said and done, a 3:30 departure from the late lunch left another 15 miles of road to clear, 5 miles of grades over 6%, the final push to the hill-top campsites. Making a stop at the Newport Coast Shopping Center (see map, page 11) for some further delays of the final ascent provided us an opportunity to wave goodbye to the sun just as we reached the entrance to the State Park after the grueling trip up the 11% of a local extra credit, Ridgepark Road. As lanterns and lights clicked on, this merry band of travelers bobbled and bounded down the miles of doubletrack to our campsite for the evening located at Moro Flats. The ride continued without incident, the best conclusion for a trip that was pushing for surprises, anomalies and anything that would creep up on a longer tour. The only complaint that came up was a unanimous feeling the handlebars weren't wide enough for the frames. It's clear the landscape is shifting when that's the complaint for a $600 bike amongst demanding riders with fully loaded packs, going down rutted out double-track, and up 11% road grades. Quite impressive how far the industry has come and specifically to Poseidon, what they've been able to achieve in terms of logistical and operational efficiency, making a bike that helps open up the sport to more people. â–˛

Issue 156 | 15


A B O V E The morning light shines a view on the world as the group starts packing up before getting back on the route. B E L O W L E F T The setup on the @ocbrakeless Poseidon X focuses on the dirt and bike-packing end of the spectrum, with larger gearing and some DW Swiss wheels that shed weight relative to the stock hoops. The Banjo Brothers frame bag offers a convenient place to stash a range of on-bike provisions. B E L O W R I G H T The group ambles into the morning, each rider approaching the early miles differently. Left to right, Johnny Mophis, Mario Parra and Alex Parra, with Luis Suarez in the distance.

Poseidon x factory Specs FRAME FORK SHIFTERS BRAKES SEAT POST TIRES WHEELS HANDLEBARS BB

16 | Issue 156

Double Butted Hydro-formed Aluminum, 6061 alloy Carbon fork, Alloy Steerer Shimano Claris R2000 Tektro mechanical disc, 160mm Poseidon, alloy 27.2 *Kenda Small Block 700c x 35 32 spoke, alloy double-wall 700c Poseidon, alloy 68mm BSA, ProWheel external cup

CRANKS Prowheel RPL 46/34 Alloy Crankset DERAILLEURS Shimano FD-R2000 CASSETTE Microshift 11-34T 8 Speed Bottle SIZES S (5'3-5'6), M (5'7-5'10), XL (6'2+) WEIGHT Large, 21.23 lbs. w/ pedals PRICE $599 SITE www.poseidonbike.com *Bike can handle up to a 700c x 40 tire with clearance for mud. 650b compatible with up to a 1.9" wide tire.

BICYCLIST Magazine


in search of dirt

Soapstone, Stonewall and Lucky 5 Ranch

A Panoramic Adventure in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park Relocating the mind, body and soul in the San Diego County dirt canvas.

Words and Photos By James Murren

F

rom the East Mesa parking area by the side of Route 79 in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park , I pedal up East Mesa Fire Road in the direction of Oakzanita Peak. It’s a steady climb with a few pushes along the way before topping out, where it becomes a cruise to the single track by Granite Spring that connects Cuyamaca to the Laguna Mountains of Cleveland National Forest. A (See Map) The descent down to Indian Creek is a dirty, somewhat double track that rides like single track, meaning there’s a line of sorts to follow. At the Indian Creek trail sign, B I settle into the saddle for the long, laborious climb to Champagne Pass. At the waterfall (bone dry at this time of year) I dismount and hikea-bike up and over the rocks, and then get back on and climb some more. A crux comes up; a slightly off camber rock section that requires a bit of a power move. I clean it, elated to make it through, only to not clean another tough section a few minutes later. ‘Oh the travails of mountain biking,’ I think to myself! Atop Champagne, I stop to eat and drink. With an apple and some nuts in my stomach, I get back on the bike and take Pine Mountain Trail, C one of my favorites in this neck of the woods. I end up not seeing a single person until I get to the Sunrise Highway. It is solitary riding at its best, fueling me for the road ride from Pioneer Mail to Lucky 5. D The views of Anza-Borrego Desert State Park to my right are great for sending thoughts into the breeze to be later lost and dissipated by the dry air. Poof - gone. E At Lucky 5 I climb up the single track, twisting and turning my way to the parking area, with giant boulders the color of mountain lions plopped along the trail as I go. On through the parking area, I crank, and then it’s on to more single track connecting to La Cima. A little more gradual climbing on a slightly rocky surface describes the trail, with chaparral on both sides. I crest out and then pedal hard on the super fast and fun descent to the next trail junction. I turn right and go on around the top of the ride, where La Cima morphs into the California Riding and Hiking Trail. F Undulating, classic, cross-country riding amidst the iconic golden meadows with views of the Cuyamacas, including Stonewall Peak, keep the energy level up - along with electrolytes pulled through the hose of the hydration pack strapped to my back. At Soapstone Grade, a fire road, I turn right on the double track and pedal with ease, enjoying the afternoon in the mountains. H A left turn down Stonewall Creak Fire Road is a hoot, the dirt road providing ample room to let it rip. I Slowing a little to not miss Cold Stream, I see it and turn right on to the single track. The most-recent, purpose-built, mountain bike trail in the park is a dandy to ride. J Delight fills my bones as I pedal up and down it, wandering over to where it ends and then crossing over route 79 to connect to West Mesa trail. K More single track takes me south, in the direction of where I started three hours ago. At the technical rock garden, I take the high line and roll it with ease. Happiness. The creek crossing has a puddle to splash through, not impeding my pedal stroke at all. On and on, I go, down to where the trail spits me out on 79. A quick right, I cross the bridge, and then a quick left into the parking area where I pick off East Mesa trail. L Up the loose rocky climb, and then right and down, and then back up through more rocks, a bit of a gut punch highlights the near-end to the ride. When the trail drops down, it is fast and somewhat loose, with rocks and deep gulches here and there before it settles down. At that point, it is all about turning the cranks and clipping off the remainder of the ride, handfuls of minutes passing by as I make my way back to the car.

DETAILS

If you park at the Visitor Center, there is a parking fee. If you park along state Route 79 at any of the obvious parking areas, e.g. East Mesa, there is no fee to park. If you are not familiar with the Cleveland National Forest, it requires planning and map skills to piece this ride together, as it encompasses trails in Cuyamaca and the Lagunas. Technically, parts of the section between Lucky 5 and Soapstone that is described in the article actually falls under the boundaries of Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, though the trails are mapped on Cuyamaca documents. Check both sites above for local camping options. If coming/going from San Diego, Alpine Beer Company has legendary IPAs and plenty of food options at their restaurant. If you opt to go the tasting room and not the restaurant, walk down the sidewalk to the taco shop, order some food, and bring it to the tasting room. You can sit out back and bask in the sunshine while eating and drinking. On up Julian way, the apple-mountain-town, San Diego-weekend-getaway locale offers good 'ole home cooking in various styles, along with cider and wine tasting, rooms and breweries. ▲ You can read more from James Murren's travels on his website www.jamesmurren.com, and on www.bicyclist.xyz, search 'murren'. www.BICYCLIST.xyz

A B O V E The Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, CA provides a wide variety of single-track and double-track riding with camping, and nearby communities of Alpine and Julian to explore. Julian

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Local Recommendations

Cuyamaca Mountain State Wilderness San Diego County, USA

Food and Provisions

Alpine Beer Company | alpinebeerco.com 1347 Tavern Rd, Alpine, CA 91901

Lots of camping opportunities in this area. How about a bikepacking trip for a BYO adventure? All listed campgrounds are National or state Park Service. private also available.

Julian Cafe | juliancafe.com 2112 Main St, Julian, CA 92036

Candied Apple Cafe | cacafe-julian.com 2128 4th St., Julian, CA 92036

Coffee Hope Superfoods Lounge | hopesuperfoods.com 1140 Tavern Rd, Alpine, CA 91910

Bike Shop Alpine Ride Shop | alpinerideshop.com 2218 Alpine Blvd, Alpine, CA 91901

Scan the qr code with a modern smart phone camera to get teleported auto-magically to the digital I.S.O.D. archives. neat ! Issue 156 | 17


Y . The Plan B. O. In Search of Answers, A Build-yourown tour comes together for your next adventure, and a new challenge. By John Woodson, BAT Ride Lieutenant

D

SCan the qr code with a modern smart phone camera to get ported auto-magically to the digital 'Asphalt, Please ' archives. neat!

ouble, double toil and trouble summarizes my dilemma. My plan is to do a reconnaissance ride of the Haute Route Utah while visiting Cedar City. It is either that or accompany my wife to the Utah Shakespeare Festival, and having failed 8th grade Shakespeare, this is a no-brainer. Reaching out to Haute Route to get course details seems like a win-win-win scenario – Haute Route gets publicity, riders get a course preview, and most importantly, I won’t be bored listening to bards. But double toil and trouble is in the details, the lack of Haute Route Utah course details as my trifling request falls on deaf ears. [Afterwards, I learn Haute Route changed the event from its well-known 'Ride-Like-A-Pro' competitive gran fondo format to a recreational group ride similar to REI and Trek Travel tours.]

So I plan a Build Your Own 3-day ride, BYO Ute Route. Fortunately even a Shakespeare idiot can put together a weekend of riding in a strange town using Strava, MapMyRide, and RideWithGPS. Soon my weekend is all set: 3 stages covering 212 miles with 15,000’ of climbing. It’s Tour of Utah challenging, filled with amazing National Park views, simple logistical planning and an almost-free experience. If you’re looking for a great road trip weekend, this BYO Ute Route delivers some of the best asphalt rides in Southern Utah.

Logistics

Cedar City is home base for all three stages. Although the city is two hours from somewhere (Las Vegas or Salt Lake City), it offers a friendly small-town format with hotels, restaurants, groceries and coffee shops right on Main Street. For dinner, try the mole chicken enchiladas at Brody’s. If you need a bike shop, visit Cedar Cycle. Pre-ride caffeination is available at The Grind House and post-ride treats at Bulloch’s old fashion soda fountain. Keep in mind grocery stores sell 3.2% beer with good craft beer only available at state liquor stores. A local Hop Nosh IPA really hits the spot after stage 3. On the bike, use common sense – lots of it. These are long tough rides including steep climbs, fast descents, changing weather, and limited cell service. Make sure you and your equipment are prepared, stay hydrated and always wear sunscreen.

Photo by George Pagan III

So, I sit in Cedar City destined to be a foolish wit unless I come up with plan B, or plan B.Y.O.

STAGE 1: Right Hand Canyon Cat 1 Hill Climb, 12.8 miles (one way), 3,350’ climbing Ride up Highway 14 starting at Main and Center on a “flat” 3% section. Turn on Right Hand Canyon, cross river and start climbing into forest. Settle in for a long 4-mile 7.6% grind with some bits 11%. Final 3.8 miles provides stunning 100-mile Utah and Nevada views, plus a few challenging 14% ramps. Aspen groves and lava fields indicate the finish is near, where pavement ends. Descending back to Cedar City take a moment to stop, look straight ahead and marvel at the giant red rock amphitheater of Cedar Breaks National Monument.

STAGE 2: Panguitch Desperado Duel, 109 miles, 3,200’ climbing

Luckily, I had the opportunity to ride the Desperado Duel event for stage 2 (read my ride report in BICYCLIST #152). It is a fantastic ride and route only one-hour from Cedar City. If you can’t make the official ride in July, start at Main & Center in Panguitch, riding counter-clockwise with store stops in Bryce and Circleville. Use the scenic Red Canyon bike path to Bryce to avoid tourist/RV traffic. No water available from Bryce (mile 20) until Otter Creek State Park (61). To get back to Panguitch quicker think about the wonderful hand-made burgers, rings and shakes waiting for you at Henrie’s Drive-In.

STAGE 3: Cedar Breaks/Duck Creek Loop, 90 miles, 8,900’ climbing

Starting again at Main & Center circumnavigate Cedar Breaks National Monument on a challenging UCI ProTeam route from the Tour of Utah. Plan store stops in Parowan (mile 19), Brian Head (31) and Duck Creek (60). Head north on Main Street, taking Old Highway 91 to Parowan. Looming to the right 5000’ above is Brian Head Ski Resort. Warmup, the Brian Head beat-down is coming. 18 | Issue 156

ABOVE Wide shoulders and rumble strips keep vehicles where they should be along the two-lanes that loop through the Southern Utah plains which provide the backdrop for the B.Y.O Ute Route. The three days of riding provide a thorough survey of the area, though many trips could be spent exploring the campgrounds, back-roads and open spaces of the Beehive state. It’s a brutal 16.4-mile category 1 climb starting on Highway 143, the steepest and 2nd highest highway in Utah. I’ll skip the painful details, but compact gearing is a good idea, trust me. At the 10626’ summit continue downhill, taking FM050 to Duck Creek Village. Enjoy a theme park roller-coaster of ups and downs through pine forest and over black rock lava. Once on Highway 14 only 1500 feet of climbing remain, so it’s a piece of cake compared to the 7400’ already conquered. At the summit enjoy Zion National Park’s majestic red and white monoliths looming on the southern horizon before descending 17-miles in Cedar Canyon back to Main & Center. Congratulations! You just finished BYO Ute Route. The state liquor store is over by Home Depot… --John ▲

JOHN WOODSON lives and rides in New Mexico, a legendary character that is always

on the lookout for legendary rides. Or even less than legendary. But always a good experience. Do you organize or participate in a recurring event or club ride that qualifies? Let him know; jwoodson@bicyclist.xyz

BICYCLIST Magazine


local Recommendations

Lots of camping opportunities in this area. How about a tour or bikeBasecamp, Cedar City, UT USA packing trip to take advantage of the forest roads? All listed campgrounds are National or state Food and Provisions Bulloch's Drug Store | bullochdrug.com Park Service. private also available.

N

91 N Main St., Cedar City, UT 84720

Brody's Mexican Restaurant | brodysmexican.com 1166 S Sage Dr Suite C, Cedar City, UT, 84720

Coffee The Grind Coffee House

BYO Ute Route

19 N Main St, Cedar City, UT 84720

Bike Shop Cedar Cycle | cedarcycle.com

3335, 38 E 200 S, Cedar City, UT 84720

LOCATION Southern Utah, USA Stage 1 DIFFICULTY Intermediate+ Stage 2 DIFFICULTY Intermediate+ Stage 3 DIFFICULTY AdvancedSTART Cedar City, Utah CAUTIONS Limited Services, Shared Vehicle Roads, Extreme Weather w/ Sudden Changes Challenge Complete All 3 Stages

#156 RIDE. WIN . BE BICYCLIST FAMOUS .

The BICYCLIST Challenge is comprised of a select list of explored and accredited routes and rides that meet specific criteria, outlined previously, and online.

Complete three challenges in 365 days to receive the BICYCLIST Challenge patch. The rider with the most submitted BICYCLIST challenges in the calendar year will WIN A BIKE and be profiled in a future issue of BICYCLIST Magazine, and the BICYCLIST Experience podcast. To submit an entry, view open challenges, get more information, or if you have a route Start Here you think should be a BICYCLIST Challenge, let us know at www.bicyclist.x yz/challenge

North Bryce Campground (2 Miles south)

Start Here

Cedar Canyon Point Supreme Campground Campground

STAGE 1

90 MILES 8,900' CEDAR BREAKS/DUCK CREEK LOOP

5 Miles

Te-Ah Campground Duck Creek Campground

10 Kilometers

Spruces Campground

SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR ALL THE INFORMATION AND WATCH VIDEOS THAT EXPLAIN EVERYTHING.

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10 kilometers

STAGE 3

12.8 MILES 3,150' RIGHT HAND CANYON HILL CLIMB

Jones_Bicyclist_NOV_2018_v1.indd 2

5 Miles

INSTAGRAM

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Fits standard flat bar controls 45° sweep for natural hand positions Ample space for bags, lights, GPS’s, etc.

“This is the only bike you’ll ever need” Outside Online

Est. 2002 12/11/2018 15:15

Issue 156 | 19


GUIDE TO THE CALENDAR

We do our best to comb the wild west of cycling event websites to get the information you need to make the most of your time in the saddle. We provide this comprehensive listing, without endorsement, but we ask that you support the events that support the magazine. To submit your event, and view the full calendar with event details, visit www.BICYCLIST.events.

www.bicyclist.events

February2019 2 Saturday

Fat Bike Aspen Aspen Park & Rec MTB: Enduro, XC

Aspen

9 Saturday

Velo Love Ride Chico Velo ROAD: 40, 60, 100 miles 199 E. Hazel St.

Co

MTB

Aspen Cross Country Center ___________________________________________________________________

Chico

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Tour de Palm Springs

Palm Springs

CVSPIN ROAD: 9-100 miles Palm Canyon Drive

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

9-10 Multi

Southridge Winter Racing Series Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, Enduro Southridge Park

Fontana

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

10 Sunday

The MTB Challenge TBF Racing MTB: 6 mile course Granite Beach

Folsom Lake

16 Saturday

Camino Real Double Century Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles La Quinta Inn

NCa MTB

___________________________________________________________________

Irvine

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Super Sweetwater Grasshopper Adventure Series MIXED: 43 miles Low Gap Park

16-17 Multi

UCSD Tritonman UCSD Tri Team TRI: 750m, 21km, 5km Fiesta Island Park 

Ukiah

NCa MX

___________________________________________________________________

San Diego

SCa Tri

____________________________________________________

Victorville Road Race Crit Majestic Cycling ROAD: 6.2 mile course 18374 Phantom W

Victorville

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

17 Sunday

YHSA Bike-A-Thon Scottsdale Yeshiva High School of Arizona ROAD: 2.5-67 miles Az Mountain View Park

R

___________________________________________________________________

23 Saturday

Ride the Rancho SDMBA MTB: 15 miles Rancho Guejito

Escondido

SCa

MTB

____________________________________________________

Stagecoach Century Shadow Tour ROAD: 26-150 miles Ocotillo

Ocotillo

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Harding TT SAW Sports Productions MTB: XC, Enduro Cook's Corner

Trabuco Canyon

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

20 | Issue 156

SIGNS & SYMBOLS Date

23-24 Multi

Southridge Winter Racing Series Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, Enduro Southridge Park

24 Sunday

MTB Madness TBF Racing MTB: XC Granite Beach

Fontana

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

Folsom Lake

NCa MTB

March2019 2 Saturday

Mesquite Madness Ride Southern Utah ROAD: 35, 65, 90 miles

Mesquite

B

R

Mesquite Community Center ____________________________________________________

Mulholland Prelude

Planet Ultra ROAD: 70 miles Hampton Inn

Agoura Hills

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Southern Inyo Double Century Inyo Ultra Cyclists ROAD: 199 miles Comfort Inn

Lone Pine

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

3 Sunday

Desert Triathlon Southland Events TRI: Sprint & Olympic Lake Cahuilla

La Quinta

8-10 Multi

KOM Training Camp Planet Ultra ROAD: 40-60 miles

9 Saturday

Solvang Century, Metric and Half Bike SCOR ROAD: 51, 55, 70, 100 miles Marriott Hotel

9-10 Multi

Tour de Murrieta Stage 2 Cyclery ROAD: 4 mile course Murrieta Senior Center

SCa Tri

___________________________________________________________________

Agoura Hills

SCa

R

Hampton Inn ___________________________________________________________________

Buellton

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

Murrieta

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Southridge Winter Racing Series

Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, Enduro Southridge Park

Fontana

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

10 Sunday

MTB Showdown TBF Racing MTB: XC, 8-32 miles Granite Beach

Folsom Lake

NCa MTB

____________________________________________________

Fiesta Island Time Trials

San Diego Bicycle Club ROAD: .8 mile course Fiesta Island Rd.

San Diego

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Challenge: Baja-Ensenada Challenge Baja TRI: Team and Individual Marina of Hotel Coral

Day

Ensenada

B

Tri

___________________________________________________________________

Event Name Organizer TYPE: length

City, State

FEATURES

Location

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa NCa

Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

15-17 Multi

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND

Or Wa

Az

B

NAHBS Sacramento North American Handmade Bike Show FESTIVAL: Bike Makers & Builders NCa Sacramento Convention Center

____________________________________________________

Malibu Invitational Westlake Village Haute Route ROAD: 203 miles total SCa Four Seasons

16 Saturday

Malibu Gran Fondo Westlake Village Serious Cycling ROAD: 106, 151 kms SCa Four Seasons

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________ Saddleback Gran Fondo Irvine

Renegade Racing ROAD: 1-100 miles Irvine Valley College

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Strada Rossa VI IE Biking Alliance MIXED: 100 miles, 100 kms, 50 kms

Redlands

16-17 Multi

Malibu Complete Experience Westlake Village Serious Cycling ROAD: 35, 106, 151 kms SCa Four Seasons

17 Sunday

Superseal Olympic Triathlon Ironman TRI: Seal Sprint Silver Strand State Beach

23 Saturday

Tour of Paso Bike Ride Paso Robles Founder's Team Challenge ROAD: 26, 50 miles SCa Niner Wine Estates

SCa

MX

Wildwood Canyon State Park ___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

Coronado

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

BICYCLIST Magazine


Nogales Bicycle Classic Nogales Bicycle Classic ROAD: 40, 60, 87 miles Nogales

Bike MS: Los Angeles National MS Society ROAD: 30, 55, 100 miles

Nogales

Az

R

___________________________________________________

Pasadena

SCa

R

Rose Bowl ____________________________________________________

Solvang Double Century Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles

Solvang

Lake Sonoma MTB Grasshopper Adventure Series MTB: 25 miles

Geyserville

Bike for Bender Pioneertown Bike for Bender MTB: 25, 35, 50 miles

Pioneertown

24 Sunday

MTB Championship TBF Racing MTB: XC, 9-36 miles Granite Beach

25-30 Multi

Solvang Spring Tour Planet Ultra ROAD: Tour Hadsten House

29-31 Multi

San Dimas Stage Race SC Velo Cycling Team ROAD: 3-stages Old Town San Dimas

San Dimas

30 Saturday

Inaugural Gran Fondo Hincapie Hincapie Events LLC ROAD: 15, 50, 80 miles The Shops at Clearfork

Fort Worth

31 Sunday

Operation Ride for Red American Red Cross of Ventura ROAD: 30, 61, 99 miles Camarillo

SCa

R

Santa Ynez Valley Mariott ___________________________________________________

NCa MTB

Warm Springs Rec. Area ____________________________________________________

NCa MTB

Pioneertown Sound Stage ___________________________________________________________________

Folsom Lake

NCa MTB

___________________________________________________________________

Solvang

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

SCa

Spring Tour of St. George St. George Ride Southern Utah ROAD: 35, 75, 100 miles St. George's Town Square

6-7 Multi

Eroica California L'Eroica ROAD: 35-130 miles Cambria

7 Sunday

Campagnolo GranFondo San Diego San Diego GranFondo Cycling Tours ROAD: 21-100 miles SCa Downtown San Diego

11-14 Multi

Sea Otter Classic Festival Monterey North American Handmade Bike Show FESTIVAL: Races and Rides NCa Laguna Seca Mazda Raceway

13 Saturday

Mulholland Challenge Los Angeles Planet Ultra ROAD: 60, 90, 120 miles SCa Agoura Hills

B

R

SIGNS & SYMBOLS Date

___________________________________________________________________

Cambria

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Mulholland Challenge Double Los Angeles Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles SCa Agoura Hills

14 Sunday

Fiesta Island Time Trials San Diego Bicycle Club ROAD: .8 mile course

R

___________________________________________________________________

San Diego

SCa

R

Fiesta Island Rd. ___________________________________________________________________

Day

Event Name Organizer TYPE: length

City, State

FEATURES

Location

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa NCa

Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

Or Wa

Az

B

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND

R

___________________________________________________________________

B

R

___________________________________________________________________

Camarillo

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Tour de Cure San Diego American Diabetes Association ROAD: 12, 30, 63, 100 miles

San Diego

SCa

Del Mar Fairgrounds

R

April2019 6 Saturday

SDMBA Archipelago Ride San Diego Mountain Biking Assoc. MTB: 20, 50 miles

San Marcos

Party Pardee Metric Century Sacramento Bike Hikers ROAD: 50, 100k

Sacramento

SCa

MTB

San Elijo Park ____________________________________________________

NCa

R

Ione ____________________________________________________

Gran Fondo Las Vegas Planet Ultra ROAD: 70-100 miles

Las Vegas

Nv

R

Las Vegas Cyclery ____________________________________________________

Non Dot Gran FUNdo Non Dot Adventures MTB: 25, 50k Irvine Regional Park

Orange

SCa

MTB

____________________________________________________

Ironman 70.3 Ironman TRI: 70.3 miles Oceanside Pier

Oceanside

Tri

R

____________________________________________________

www.BICYCLIST.xyz

SUBSCRIBE & SUPPORT! Your support helps us continue to bring stories, information and features for active cyclists in SoCal and Beyond. Don't miss a single issue!

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www.bicyclist.shop Issue 156 | 21


GUIDE TO THE CALENDAR

We do our best to comb the wild west of cycling event websites to get the information you need to make the most of your time in the saddle. We provide this comprehensive listing, without endorsement, but we ask that you support the events that support the magazine. To submit your event, and view the full calendar with event details, visit www.BICYCLIST.events.

www.bicyclist.events

SIGNS & SYMBOLS Date

23-25 Multi

California Trails & Greenways 2019 California Trails Conference CLINIC: Training and Discussion Viejas Casino & Resort

26-28 Multi 27 Saturday

Alpine

Renegade Off-Road Tri & Du Renegade Race Series TRI: 20 miles Bonelli Park

CampoVelo St. Helena CampoVelo ROAD: 3 days of rides NCa Clif Family Winery

7 Tuesday

Over the Hump (First Half) Over the Hump Race Series MTB: Course Irvine Park

Wildflower Century Creston SLOBC ROAD: 45,52,64,75,97 Miles NCa Creston Community Center

11 Saturday

King Ridge Supreme Grasshopper Adventure Series MIXED: 62, 80 miles Duncan Mills

Duncan Mills

Ironman 70.3 Santa Rosa Ironman TRI: 70.3 miles Lake Sonoma

Lake Sonoma

SCa

___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Skaggs and Super Skaggs Grasshopper Adventure Series MIXED: 96 miles Warm Springs Rec. Area

Geyserville

NCa MX

___________________________________________________________________

28 Sunday

The Great Auburn Epic Race TBF Racing MTB: 25 mile course Auburn State Rec Area

Auburn

NCa MTB

____________________________________________________

Barrio Logan Grand Prix

SCa Tri Silverado

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

NCa MX

____________________________________________________

NCa Tri

____________________________________________________

Tour of Long Beach Renegade Race Series ROAD: 5, 30, 62, 100 miles

Long Beach

SCa

R

Downtown Long Beach ____________________________________________________

Rosarito Ensenada Bike Ride Extra Mile Racing ROAD: 82.5 kms

May2019

14 Tuesday

Over the Hump (First Half) Over the Hump Race Series MTB: Course Irvine Park

3-5 Multi

17-19 Multi

Haute Route Asheville Haute Route ROAD: multi-day tour Asheville, NC

18 Saturday

Pacific Electric Challenge Rancho Cucamonga Friends of the PET ROAD: 25, 50 miles SCa Central Park Center

San Diego Bicycle Club ROAD: .8 mile course Downtown Barrio Logan

Wildflower Experience Wildflower Experience TRI: Sprint and Relay Lake San Antonio Shore

San Diego

San Dimas

___________________________________________________________________

SCa

R

Bradley

NCa Tri

____________________________________________________

La Grind Gravel Stage Race La Grind MIXED: three days of racing Olpe, Kansas

4 Saturday

Fremont XC Race OC MTB MTB: 17 miles Fremont Canyon

Emporia

B

MX

___________________________________________________________________

Irvine

SCa

MTB

____________________________________________________

Oregon Coast Gravel Epic Oregon Triple Crown Series MTB: 37, 62 miles Waldport, OR

Waldport

Or MTB

____________________________________________________

Ironman 70.3 St. George Ironman TRI: 70.3 miles Sand Hollow State Park

4-5 Multi

Canyon Belgian Waffle Ride Belgian Waffle Ride MIXED: 74, 133 miles Lost Abbey Brewery

5 Sunday

Spring Sprint Triathlon & Duathlon Koz Events TRI: 3.3, 5.6, 10.2, 19.5 miles South Shores Park

Hurricane

B

Tri

___________________________________________________________________

San Marcos

SCa

MX

___________________________________________________________________

22 | Issue 156

San Diego

SCa Tri

____________________________________________________

Day

Rosarito

B

R

Rosarito Beach Hotel ___________________________________________________________________

Silverado

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

Ashville

B

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Event Name Organizer TYPE: length

City, State

FEATURES

Location

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa NCa

Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

Or Wa

Az

B

21 Tuesday

Over the Hump (First Half) Over the Hump Race Series MTB: Course Irvine Park

28 Tuesday

Over the Hump (First Half) Over the Hump Race Series MTB: Course Irvine Park

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND Silverado

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

Silverado

SCa

MTB

June2019

Heartbreak Double Palmdale Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles SCa Holiday Inn Palmdale

1 Saturday Fast Freddie Challenge Sebastapol Fast Freddie Cycle Club ROAD: 21, 54, 82 miles NCa The Barlow ____________________________________________________ Eastern Sierras Double Century Bishop Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles NCa Cielo Hotel

San Diego Century San Diego Spectrum Sports ROAD: 33, 67, 100 miles SCa Cardiff-by-the-Sea

Sasquatch Duro Oregon Triple Crown MIXED: 30, 45 miles Uptown 1st & Pine

19 Sunday

Dina LaVigna Breath of Life Triathlon Renegade Race Series TRI: Sprint and International Ventura Harbor

Heartbreak Hundred Planet Ultra ROAD: 100 miles Holiday Inn Express

Lebec

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Oakridge

Or MX

___________________________________________________________________

Ventura

SCa Tri

___________________________________________________________________

R

R

____________________________________________________

Gran Fondo Salt Lake Extra Mile Racing ROAD: 35, 65, 100 miles

Saltair

B

R

W. Saltair ____________________________________________________

Oregon Gran Fondo Oregon Triple Crown Series ROAD: 42-134 miles

Cottage Grove

Or

R

400 E. Main Street ____________________________________________________

Mojave Death Race Mojave Death Race MTB: Relay Race

Primm

Nv

MTB

Las Vegas Blvd. ___________________________________________________________________

BICYCLIST Magazine


down the trail with the San diego mountain bike association A profile of the volunteer-driven Association

We’ve included just some of the projects for 2019 that the San Diego Mountain Biking Association will be focusing on with input from their Advocacy Committee, Trail Liaisons, and Board Members. Get involved and help guide and support their work in the future.

Photo by Jose Galaz

A

leisurely ride through the trails in San Diego county may feel like a breeze, but that ride wouldn't be so easy without the hard work of trail advocacy groups who take on the legislative and laborious challenges of paving and establishing trails. Formed in 1994 by a group of friends that wanted more places to ride, San Diego Mountain Biking Association is one of the largest regional trail advocacy organizations in the US with more than 1,100 members. SDMBA is a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining and improving sustainable trail access for mountain biking in San Diego County. Since the inception of the organization, SDMBA has been working hard to be the driving force of a number of impressive accomplishments. For instance, in 2015, SDMBA received an REI grant to purchase BikeFixation bike tool stations with pumps to place at various locations around the county. The first one was installed on the north shore of Lake Hodges in the San Dieguito River Park and was an instant success. Other stations started to pop up around the county with the help of volunteers and land managers. In their Strategic Plan for 2017-2020, the Association lays out five essential goals and their actions for establishing and promoting trail use in the county, including: 1. Advocacy: Advocate for enhanced mountain biking opportunities and bike parks 2. Trails: Develop and improve trails 3. Education: Promote the sport of mountain biking through education 4. Fun: Build an engaged mountain biking community 5. Governance, Management, Finance, and Fund Development According to Susie Murphy Executive Director of SDMBA, 2018 was the year of building the capacity as an independent trail association with all membership dues and donations staying in San Diego. Now with two full time staff members and a very talented Board of Directors, SDMBA is ready to make 2019 an epic year. Following are some trail projects that the mountain biking association will be working on completing in the coming years. ▲

By Kelley O'Toole

ABOVE The Mother Miguel Trail is part of the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge, and through the efforts of the San Diego Mountain Bike Association, SDMBA, riders have gained access, with top-of-the-mountain access the goal.

partner on this grant and continues to help the Refuge with trail alignments and other technical assistance. The project objectives include creating a sustainable trail alignment that addresses the #1 | OROSCO RIDGE TRAILS PLAN public’s desire to reach the top of the mountain, while minimizing SDMBA, in cooperation with the Palomar District of the US Forest impacts to surrounding habitat and species. Service, is working to produce a concept master trails plan that will include trails for all skill levels of mountain bikers from beginner to #5 | SWEETWATER BIKE SKILLS PARK expert and downhill, and will also include many miles of multi-use In the summer of 2018, the County of San Diego approved $600,000 trails to be enjoyed by hikers, cyclists, equestrians, trail runners in the operational budget towards the Sweetwater Bike Skills Park, and other lovers of the outdoors. SDMBA continued to raise funds in thanks to the efforts of SDMBA and Supervisor Greg Cox. Plans moved 2018 for the building phase through a mixture of grants, community, forward with two public community meetings that were held in early corporate and industry support, as the Forest Service does not have 2018 to gather input from the public on this project. SDMBA has also the budget for these types of proposals. SDMBA has also signed on to been involved in preliminary talks with the City of Chula Vista for a Bike assist in the building, and ongoing maintenance of these trails with Playground which is designed with younger children in mind. A small their many skilled and passionate volunteers. pump track was also approved by the City of San Diego for installation at Pacific Highlands Ranch Park. The only public operating pump track #2 | LAGUNA MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA TRAILS PLAN currently in San Diego is at the Chula Vista Elite Athlete Training Center SDMBA has been working on the draft proposal for a new trail in Mt. as part of Chula Vista BMX operated by Tyler Brown. Open limited hours Laguna with the Descano Ranger District since 2016. This proposal’s so please check their hours of operation before visiting. main goals are to improve connectivity, reroute unsustainable section of trails, bring non-system/social trails into the system and improve #10 | BLACK MOUNTAIN / BLACK WIDOW TRAIL mountain biking opportunities within the area to offset user conflict/ In early 2010 a task force was formed to update the Black Mountain trail congestion. SDMBA has identified nearly 15 miles of trail that will Open Space Park master plan. The process would involve multiple need to be examined under the NEPA (National Environmental Policy agencies and a great amount of review. It took nearly 5 years for Act) review, but they are confident this plan will improve recreation the master plan update and was completed in 2014. The following while also further protecting sensitive resources in Mt. Laguna. The fall/winter of 2016 the trails on the East Ridge of Black Mountain projected completion and approval of this project proposal will began. Starting in December and meeting every Saturday until initiate the trail work sometime in 2019. early April, 2016, over 250 different volunteers representing all facets of the trail user community hiked with tools to the trail #4 | MOTHER MIGUEL/ROCK HOUSE REALIGNMENT/REHAB build site. By the end of the build season, another 2 ½ miles of The Mother Miguel Trail (also known as Rock House) is located single track were added, allowing better access to the East Ridge on the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge, and is managed by trail complex. Fall/Winter 2018-19 Update: SDMBA continues its the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Refuge protects a variety strong alliance with the proud team of City of San Diego rangers at of native upland and wetland habitats, and plays a critical role Black Mountain. Shovels finally hit the ground on the Black Widow in the regional effort to maintain the high biological diversity Trail on December 1, 2018. This first work day attracted almost 80 of southwestern San Diego County. SDMBA is an officially listed volunteers, many of them first timers! www.BICYCLIST.xyz

Issue 156 | 23


Profile for BICYCLIST

BICYCLIST Magazine #156  

#156 | DWR: Crystal Cove, CA, ISOD: San Diego County, The 24-Hour Overnight, SDMBA Profiled, Gear Patrol: Behind the Curtain at CADBA, Race...

BICYCLIST Magazine #156  

#156 | DWR: Crystal Cove, CA, ISOD: San Diego County, The 24-Hour Overnight, SDMBA Profiled, Gear Patrol: Behind the Curtain at CADBA, Race...