Page 1

MAGAZINE PROFILE

Ptheroject S peed 2018 fastest woman on two wheels returns CHALLENGE

TAhe B ig B lue trip around lake tahoe ALSO

last page

delicious recovery asphalt, please

desperado duel-ing electric age

The Electric Folder event calendar

recreation & race

bicyclist. xyz

always free

issue 152 - early Fall 2018


CONTENTS

features

COLUMNS

The Electric Folder First look - Oyama Cx E8D Series II

Economics of Justice In a small bike injury case Richard L. Duquette

08 Electric Age 16 challenge

Est. 1994

Issue

152

early fall 2018

04 Legal Cycling 05 in practice

The Big Blue A Ride Around Lake Tahoe

View on the Street: Scooters & Mopeds Stick to the bicycle Carl Lawton

18 Profile

06 ask the coach

Project Speed Denise Mueller-Korenek Coach John Howard

The Fitter FAQ's tight Shoes, group rides, hoods Rick Schultz

10 Asphalt, Please

10

Desperado Duel-ing Riding Southern Utah, Adventure out west John Woodson

12 Gear Patrol

Back to Work by Bike Cycling to work got a lot easier Thom Parks

14 Event Profile The Arch Ride Membership Has Its perks Richard L. Duquette

15 by the book 18

Regulars 03 Prologue 05 King's Cartoon 07 analog/digital 20 event calendar

2

The Cyclist's Training Bible Joe friel's latest edition Chris Reynolds

23 Last Page Delicious Recovery Floyd's of LEadville Kelley O'Toole

16 Cover

Denise Mueller-Korenek rips across the Bonneville International Speedway in Utah during her 2016 capture of the women's paced land-speed record. Mueller-Korenek will attempt to break the overall men's record, 166.6 mph, in September. Story on Page 18 . Photo by Richard Lee | Post-Process by Erik Scott

BICYCLIST Magazine


Br oad Inve s tiga tion o f Challeng ing Your s el f, C ycling L i f e s t y le and In s pir ing S u s t ainable Tran s por t a tion

Prologue

Early Fall 2018

F MAGAZINE EDITORIAL

Chris Reynolds | Managing Director chris@bicyclist.xyz Kelley O’Toole | Managing Editor kelley@bicyclist.xyz

COLUMN CONTRIBUTORS

Carl Lawton | carl@bicyclist.xyz Rick Schultz | coach@bicyclist.xyz Rob Templin | rob@bicyclist.xyz John Woodson | john@bicyclist.xyz

ISSUE CONTRIBUTORS

Mariusz Blach, Josh Carter, Edgar Chaparro, Richard Duquette, Casey Horner, Jerry King, Richard Lee, Justin Macias, Victor Prestinary, Nathan Shipps, Thom Parks

ILLUSTRATIONS & DESIGN Christopher Massaad Erik Scott

ADVERTISING, SPONSORSHIP AND DISTRIBUTION Chris Reynolds | Advertising chris@bicyclist.xyz

Chris Vopinek | Delivery & Distribution cvopinek@bicyclist.xyz

SOCIAL MEDIA

Luis Suarez | luis@bicyclist.xyz

READ/FOLLOW/LIKE

www.BICYCLIST.xyz @BICYCLIST.xyz  /bicyclist.xyz 

SUBMISSIONS & CONTACT

Visit BICYCLIST.xyz/editorial for guidelines and submission information.

issue 152 - Early Fall 2018

VITALS & DETAILS

BICYCLIST Magazine publishes stories of experience that fall under our namesake, BICYCLIST: Broad Investigation of Challenging Yourself, Cycling Lifestyle and Inspiring Sustainable Transportation. The magazine serves as an inspirational guide celebrating the arts, skills, events, and culture of the cycling life. BICYCLIST: SoCal & Beyond is a social enterprise promoting bicycle riding for sport, activity, and transportation. We are based in Southern California, an area that accounts for more bike shops, and active cyclists than the rest of the United States – combined. Visit us online at BICYCLIST.xyz. BICYCLIST Magazine is available in print and digital editions. Complimenting the magazine is our cycling podcast, The BICYCLIST Experience. We also maintain the BICYCLIST Friendly Shop Locater, and the BICYCLIST Event Calendar, the largest online calendar of cycling events, races and festivals in the United States, all available online at BICYCLIST.xyz. We have published a print magazine since 1994, distributing to bike shops throughout the western US and made available free to the public. We launched our online platform in 2014, and our podcast in 2015 and now reach readers and listeners in more than 72 countries. Advertise with us to share your message, bicyclist.xyz/ads. Use the code "fineprint" to save an additional 20% off your placement. BICYCLIST Magazine is published 10 times per year. The print edition can be found at better bike shops, coffee shops and breweries throughout major metropolitan cities west of the Rockies. Print copy subscriptions are $20 per year for delivery to the destination of your choice in the United States. For more information, visit www.BICYCLIST.xyz/subscribe

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Although all best efforts are made to avoid the same, we reserve the right to publish unintentional mistakes and/or factual errors which may occur on an issue basis. No responsibility is assumed by the publishers for unsolicited materials/articles/letters/advertising and all submissions will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication and copyright and/or appropriate licensing purposes subject to BICYCLIST's right to edit and comment editorially.

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The views and opinions expressed in this magazine reflect the opinions of their respective author’s and are not necessarily those of the publisher or the editorial team. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in any form [print or electronic] without prior consent of the publisher. Bicycling can be a dangerous sport and can lead to serious injury or death. Make it safer for everyone and obey all traffic laws, ride responsibly, use common sense, and wear a helmet.

or issue 152 of BICYCLIST Magazine, we bring stories from all across the map to inspire, entertain and inform. The BICYCLIST Challenge for this issue is a glorious 73-mile ride around Lake Tahoe, affectionately known to locals as ‘The Big Blue’. With more than 70% of the shoreline being national forest land, the ride can either be a single day jaunt through idyllic forest that engulfs the lake, a weekend exploration of the tucked away sandy beaches dotting the shores, or even a multi-day tour with excursions into the surrounding mountain roads. There is so much to offer for both road and MTB riders, and for those coming to the area for September’s Northstar Free Ride Festival or Interbike (the industry convention to be held in Reno this year) the timing is great for a ride, with average temperatures in the high sixties. For an event a little closer to our neck of the woods, Richard Duquette brings a report on the ARCH ride, an invite-only MTB ride that takes place in April. The ride connects various "islands" of open-space preserves with received permission from the county to traverse the otherwise off-limits land tracts. To receive an invite, register with San Diego Mountain Biking Association, an organization that works to expand trail access in San Diego county. Even if you’re not from the area, they are an organization that is helping make San Diego County a known and well-respected destination for mountain biking the world over. John Woodson brings us a report from his experience riding Ride Southern Utah’s Desperado Duel heading out of Panguitch, Utah. The 109-mile loop is an inviting ride that includes incursions in Bryce Canyon National Park, a remarkable geological area that offers the red sandstone as a backdrop for the ride. Also in Utah, this September 14-16 Denise MuellerKorenek will be attempting to break the paced land-speed world record. She currently holds the women’s record set in 2016, but she is returning to break the men's record of Fred Rompelberg that has stood since 1995. The rarified air builds cooperation and Mueller-Koreken will be using the methanolpowered dragster used by Rompelberg in his record-breaking run. The feat involves being towed behind a speeding race car, driven by professional racing driver Shea Holbrook, in the salt flats of Bonneville, Utah during the annual Speed Week. For our profile of Project Speed, check out page 18. The Gear Patrol for this issue looks to solve some of the challenges faced by the daily commuter. Some great innovations have come along that make life for the daily rider a bit less challenging. There’s enough to worry about in the age of distracted drivers, and having gear that simplifies the experience is what we’re all about. Check it out on page 12. We got our hands on some of Floyd’s of Leadville Vanilla Recovery Protein and the Last Page brings a couple of recipes utilizing the new product that will put your recovery on point. I find many vanilla-flavored powders to have a chalky or bitter after-taste but I was pleasantly surprised by the true vanilla taste of this powder. The science is still inconclusive from my perspective on some of the claims made regarding CBD for recovery, but just using the compactor of vanilla whey protein powders, Floyd’s gets high marks for taste and mix-ability. Be sure to give the SoCal Recovery Smoothie a whirl after your next sun-soaked ride, page 23 for the recipe. See you on the route. Stay safe. Peace,

C hris Reynolds

- Chris Reynolds, Managing Director

3


ECONOMICS OF JUSTICE In a 'Small' Bicycle Injury Case A realistic perspective on small injury or damaged bicycle cases. By Richard L. Duquette

EXPERT ADVICE Insurance Company Hurdles

It is not unusual to see settlement offers only providing for medical bills. Attorney fees, victim pain and suffering, and reasonable reimbursement costs have taken a big hit.

I

t's common to receive phone calls seeking legal representation for "small" bicycle injury cases. My intent in this article is to give you a realistic perspective, so you can decide how to proceed in small injury or damaged bicycle cases. Looking back over thirty years of handling bicycle injury cases, I can tell you the legal playing field has tilted in favor of big insurance corporations. In the early 80's even "small" cases could be fairly settled out of court, for three times the medical bills. This gave the victims money for pain and suffering on top of attorney fees and medical costs. So, a case with $1,000.00 in medical bills would settle for $3,000.00. As the insurance industry pumped millions of dollars into tort reform by way of advertising and politics, life changed for consumers, including bicycle crash victims. Currently it's common place to see a settlement offer of only $1,000.00 on a $3,000.00 case, with an offer to pay only your medical bills. Attorney fees and victim pain and suffering have taken a big hit.

A "small" Case

Generally speaking, a small case is one where there is proof of clear liability or fault, but limited damages. I'm referring to bicycle damage or temporary injuries like a sprain, strain, whiplash, abrasions and contusions. Whereas, a large case involves serious injuries, broken bones, displaced fractures, head injuries and even death. Most serious cases require surgery, and victims often sustain permanent disability. Even small non-displaced fractures fall into the "small" case category because they are not permanent, nor do they generate a lot of medical costs or lost wages. By no means am I minimizing the trauma, fright or change of lifestyle of such an injury; including bicycle damage losses. When I first started practicing law in 1983, I typed on an IBM typewriter. With the age of computers, the insurance industry got clever and generated litigation programs to standardize the claims negotiation process. That's right, your case may now be handled by a computer called "Colossus". Allstate is famous for this. In many companies, the hands of the frontline claims adjusters are tied. Their discretion is limited. Then came the appointment of judges and politicians who developed anti-consumer laws and decisions. Such punitive laws factor into whether a lawyer will take your "small" case.

One law that has been abolished is what's known as the collateral source rule (Howell v. Hamilton Meats case). Historically when you pay for health insurance, the law for decades was pro-consumer. It rewarded citizens who invested their hard-earned money into paying premiums and obtaining healthcare. They could claim the full medical bill in court, not the HMO/PPO reduced or discounted rate. Insurance reductions or deductions per the HMO/ PPO plans were irrelevant. For example, a $100.00 medical bill was just that. Now you only get to submit $50.00 (the discounted rate) to a claims adjuster or jury. In effect, your case has been devaluated. This misleads the jury because they will never see the true correlation between the medical costs and harm. Then came new case law from the United State Supreme Court (U.S. Airways v. McCutchen case) that changed how reimbursements are paid. In many instances, your work or self-funded HMO/PPO medical plans require you pay them back at 100% for any bills they paid if you recover from a negligent motorist. So you pay premiums and your health plan only "loans" money to you by paying your bills. This is called reimbursement or subrogation. These health benefits are illusory to a degree. Luckily, I've studied this area of law for years and know most of the exceptions to the reimbursement laws. This means that the $1,000.00 offer to settle your "small" case, must be paid back to United Health Care, Kaiser, and Blue Cross etc. Which means you get a zero net settlement. To top it off, if you're Medicare qualified, that's another reimbursement maze lasting at least six months to get a final amount certain so you can negotiate a settlement. Uncle Sam is now involved in your case. Additionally, the insurance "bad faith" laws were overturned. In a third party, bad faith claim, an insurance company cannot be sued for delay or unfair business tactics. This was made famous in the Moradi-Shalal v. Fireman's Fund Ins. Co. case where it was shown they can't be sued. So, insurers have little legal incentive to act fairly. Compounding all of this is the down-turn in the economy in 2008, which has caused budget cuts in our court system. Now, the courts close at 3 p.m. Monday – Thursday and 12:00 on Friday. Courtrooms are closing and many civil cases including South Bay and El Cajon court matters, have been transferred and are now only heard in San Diego Central court. This has translated into a drop in civil filings. It's uneconomical to litigate small cases with all the delays. Access to justice is limited. There are also the normal costs of litigation that must be factored into fighting the case. Depositions, investigation; what's titled the discovery process. Hopefully, the client can weather all the system’s hurdles.

The solo road

Remember, most personal injury lawyers work on a contingency no win, no recovery basis. It’s a risky commission structure where we fund the case. Without a prompt and generous recovery, we are unable to pursue justice in the “small” cases. Understandably, the economic incentive is low in a small case which can leave the bicycle injury victim without a lawyer. Sure, you can go to small claims court without representation, but with a cap of $10k. Nevertheless, I often meet for free to help Triathlon Club of San Diego members and other bicyclists prove their cases on their own. Alternatively, as warranted, you can pay an attorney a flat reasonable one-time fee to help investigate, document, and prepare a competent settlement demand letter which empowers you to negotiate on your own with the insurance companies. If you are satisfied without having to pay out a percentage of your recovery to a lawyer, you can then settle the case. Lastly, please buy strong (500k) under/uninsured motorist coverage on your car, backed up by an underinsured/uninsured motorists umbrella rider of 2 million. If you or your loved one is seriously injured or killed, at least there will be compensation over and above payment of your medical bills and lost earnings. As you know, auto insurance will in most cases cover you on a bicycle. See my article and listen to the Podcast for "Bicyclist's Don't Skimp on Insurance." I've also listed companies and their rates along with a podcast episode entitled "Shopping for an Umbrella Policy." ▲

RICHARD L. DUQUETTE has been fighting for his clients since 1983. His family-owned law firm specializes in providing personal attention and quality representation to the people of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange Counties. Read his blog at 911law.com and listen to his podcast, Bicycling and the Law, covering legal cycling topics. 4

BICYCLIST Magazine


In Practice

VIEW ON THE STREETS: SCOOTERS & MOPEDS

Stick to the bicycle, Safety Risks and Legal Peril face alternatives By Carl Lawton

As many welcome the beginnings of the end to scooter culture in SoCal, another mode of transportation presents issues for the uninformed.

T

he situational controversy with the Bird, Lime and Skip dock-less electric scooters continues. Several cities in SoCal including Beverly Hills, Huntington Beach, Culver City and Los Angeles have now banned the scooters from being ridden altogether for six months. It appears that this is all to do with the reckless way in which they are being operated by the riders who still ride on sidewalks at high speeds (even faster going down grade) narrowly missing, or sometimes colliding with pedestrians. This is totally unacceptable to the public and also to the hierarchy of pedestrian travel, in particular. Pedestrians and these accident-prone, careless riders have ended up getting broken bones re-set, faces stitched up, and their heads and necks in plaster, a rapidly increasing occurrence displayed on local TV news and across social media. Yet the CEOs leading these scooter companies shrug off the rash of safety complaints, saying it's a great way of getting around the city for the 'first and last' mile of a daily commute. Most definitely not. How can it be if you end up in a hospital?! The leaders of these companies are seriously deluded into believing their own lies. First off the 'first and last' mile they are talking about is not happening because they are not ridden for that two-mile duration, and in practical use, not ridden much for commuting either. They are a toy, with users enthralled by the instant torque of the electric motor and their fast acceleration from a dead stop. That is the whole point for their existence for nearly all users. They are not cutting down on heavy traffic congestion when they are doing this - blasting up and down the sidewalk, scattering pedestrians in their wake, going nowhere fast. Not cool!

The Franken-Bike

There is another 2-wheeled, motor-driven, pedal bike that has never been readily accepted by the public, but remains. It's the gas-engined bike that some bike shops sell and can be made by a home mechanic with an inexpensive kit available from eBay. The trouble here is that these bikes are much faster than any e-bike as far as top speed is concerned - anything from 35mph and even up to 75mph. This is a terrible idea as the bicycle frame, wheels, tires and most important, its brakes, are simply not up to the task of regular stopping at such a high speed. The death-trap factor only increases when mounted on beach cruisers with no hand brakes, only a coast, back-pedal brake. But the main problem here is that most people are unaware that the gas-powered bicycles are defined by law as mopeds and a moped is a quasi-vehicle. Accordingly, any lawful advantage that applies to bicycles and e-bikes is not applicable to mopeds, specifically because of their higher speed. To comply with the law, you would need a Class M1 or M2 CDL, as well as insurance to ride a moped as per CVC 406(a). Then you need a moped/vehicle license plate as per CVC12804.9. Also, you would need to wear a DOT approved (not a bicycle) motorcycle helmet as per CVC 27802. After that, you need to meet muffler noise decibel standards, lighting, horn and the myriad other moped requirements - all detailed on the DMV website. Most important is that gas-powered bikes and mopeds are not allowed on sidewalks, bike lanes, bike paths, as well as trains or buses because of the fuel they carry. If speed is your thing, might as well ride a much safer motorcycle. â–˛

CARL LAWTON is an active cyclist who rides bikes and works for the Los Angeles

Department of Transportation. The overlap of these two pursuits provides a unique perspective to learn from. You can reach Carl Lawton at carl@BICYCLIST.xyz

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"I've learned one thing from trying to fix the chain on my bicycle: I'm not mechanically-inclined." Jerry King is one of the most published cartoonists in America, a U.S. Army Veteran, and a graduate of Ohio State University. Go Buckeyes!

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5


The Fitter FAQ's

Your most frequently asked questions - answered! Swollen feet, pains, cramps, hoods vs. drops, pain vs. suffering ... ready set - GO! By Rick Schultz

1. What’s with my swollen feet?

As stated before, a bike/cleat/shoe fit is needed to place your feet in the right relation to the pedals so that you will be able to engage the calf correctly. You will know when you are in the correct position when you are tightening your shoes instead of loosening them.

The two main reasons so many racers race on the hoods is because (a) lack of hamstring flexibility and (b) that is where they were fit to. To become more flexible, you can start a stretching routine and/or attend yoga classes. For the bike fit portion, I highly recommend that you discuss this with your bike fitter. Ask to be fit so that you are comfortable in the drops. From this point forward, you should always ride, train and race in the drops. To put this into context, refer to the two Giant TCR bicycles in the photos. The person who owns the bicycle pictured on the top has obviously been fitted to the hoods. The bicycle pictured on the bottom is a corrected bike fit; the red horizontal line delineates where the hoods were placed before the fit. To accomplish this, I raised and added a longer stem so that when the cyclist grabs the drops, their hands are in the exact same X, Y position as when originally on the hoods. This frame appears to be a Giant M/L, but I would recommend an XL for this cyclist because the frame is too small. Sadly, it often happens that by the time someone comes in for a bike fit, they have already purchased the wrong size frame (and are experiencing knee and back pain). This is why I like to work with bike shops who send me clients to do a bike sizing first. That way, the client is on the right-size frame to begin with, which is the most important step in the process.

2. Why am I getting Calf cramps?

4. Why am I getting knee pain after a ride?

During a normal group ride, do you loosen the straps on your cycling shoes because your “feet are swelling?” This happens to many cyclists. Talking with them on this topic, they really don’t give it a second thought and mistake foot swelling as a normal part of cycling. To fix this problem, they may loosen the BOA straps on their cleats for some relief. BOA is the latest in “shoestrings” whereby turning a ratcheting knob will increase the tension of the shoe instead of tying a shoestring or using a hook-and-loop (Velcro) fastener.

What leads to swelling?

Prior to starting a ride, cyclists will sit, have a coffee, chat a little, while all the while gravity is pulling blood flow into their feet. Then, when starting the ride, the leg muscles start engaging where they need blood to carry oxygen to help fuel their movements. Even though the cyclist is sitting on their saddle with their legs moving, gravity is still at work pulling blood into their feet. Additionally, a low-volume, tight-fitting cycling shoe may lead to even more swelling.

Enter the calf

Everyone has a set of calf muscles with 7 muscles in each calf, but the two that are most known are the gastrocnemius and soleus. The gastrocnemius is the most visible muscle and gives your calf most of its shape. Along with the gastrocnemius, the soleus forms half of the calf muscle. The purpose(s) of the calf muscles are 4-fold, (a) plantarflex your ankle, (b) help curl your toes, (c) help bend your knees and, the main purpose for this article (d) pump blood from the foot and lower leg back up and into the circulatory system. A calf that is working effectively will pump the ‘pooled’ blood from the foot back up into the heart. The term for this is called the calf muscle pump. If your feet are swelling, then your calves are probably not working effectively and it’s time to address this problem.

Have you ever been awakened in the middle of the night by a painful cramp in the calf? That sudden level 10 pain shooting through your lower leg lasting for 1-3 minutes. Nothing you do makes it go away. Ever thought why? During a bike fit interview, I always ask “do you get painful calf-cramps at night?” About 25% of my clients say yes. Turning their shoes over I can tell why. The cause of this searing pain is the mis-placement of the cleat. I spend about an hour of a 2.5-hour bike fit on adjusting the cleats and making sure they are in the absolute perfect position. It is of utmost importance for the cleats to be in the right position because the foot is the only part of your body that is mechanically locked to the bicycle. All other touch-points (glutes on the saddle and hands on the handlebars) can move, therefore, placement of the cleat is a critical component of a bike fit. To ensure that this is perfect, I have created double-check and even triple check processes during bike fits.

3. Why do most crit racers race on the hoods not the drops?

Another important question that recently came up is “why do most crit racers race on the hoods and not in the drops?” There are significantly important reasons for riding in the drops, three of the most important reasons being (a) safety, because you can’t hook bars while in the drops, (b) more solid handling and control when bumped, and (c) better aerodynamics.

Coach Rick Schultz Rick specializes in coaching cyclists so that they can achieve their best. He is a certified bike fitter and author of Bike Fit 101: Your Toolset for a Great Bike Fit. Send your questions to coach@bicyclist.xyz or ask on twitter @BICYCLISTxyz #askthecoach

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Make an appointment for coaching and bike fits. Mobile services available, visit bicyclist.xyz/fit

I can’t stress enough the importance of taking care of your knees and this can only be accomplished by a bike fit to determine the correct crank arm length. I am seeing more and more cyclists who are experiencing knee pain, begging for relief so that they can continue to ride their bicycle. I have had clients tell me that they have gone to several other fitters and if I can’t help them, they are going to give up on cycling. I have also had clients with a previous injury that have little to no ACL left that want to continue to bicycle. Usually clients coming to see me suffering with knee pain have finally gotten to the threshold point that they can’t take the pain any more. In fact, I am currently working with a 23-yearold ex-domestic pro that has tremendous knee pain. Don’t wait until you get to this point. Do yourself a favor and get a bike fit so that the fitter can help you. In most every case, I have been able to mitigate or completely rid my clients of their knee pain. For those few that still need more relief, I work with several physical therapists who can take the ball and run with it. Regardless, the clients are much happier since they are still able to enjoy the sport they love.

5. What’s the difference between pain vs suffering as applied to cycling?

The reason I bring this up is that a lot of cyclists get these confused. As a coach and personal trainer, here’s my take on this. SUFFERING: When you are pushing on the pedals so hard that your legs are starting to cramp and you are breathing so hard that your lungs feel like they are coming through your chest. When you are doing hill repeats and you heart rate is at a sustained maximum, that’s suffering. In fact, the US Navy SEALs have a saying, “When your mind says stop, your body still has 40% left.” Think about that next time you want to back off. PAIN: You never want to experience pain. Pain is when it hurts to pedal even at a low power output. For cyclists, pain is usually experienced in the joints, typically knees, and pain can be greatly reduced or negated by a crankarm length analysis. Pain will usually continue even when off the bike. If you experience pain, get off the bike and get it checked out by your doctor, physical therapist, and bike fitter.▲ BICYCLIST Magazine


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125.5:

125.5: Denise Mueller-Korenek and Coach John Howard on Her Attempt to Smash the Men’s World Speed Record

Denise Mueller-Korenek and her coach, Olympian John Howard, speak with Chris Reynolds of the BICYCLIST Experience on her attempt to smash the men’s world speed record on Sept. 14-16th, 2018 at the Bonneville International Speedway salt flats in Utah.

125:

125: Self-Supported Double Century in San Diego, 2018 TdF Thoughts, Playa Vista Downtown Goes Car-Free

Justin reports back to us on his self-supported double century ride in San Diego with friends, as well as his trip to Germany to visit the ABUS and Continental factories. We finish with some thoughts on the rest of the Tour de France, and news that Playa Vista Downtown will soon be car-free.

Photo: Jose Galaz

HELP INCREASE ACCESS TO YOUR TRAILS The San Diego Mountain Biking Association is a volunteer-driven, non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining and increasing sustainable trail access for mountain biking in San Diego County.

Join now at SDMBA.com and learn how you can help.

124: 124: A New Drivetrain Concept that Eliminates the Need for Chains, Tour de France Stages 1-8 Recap, and Reviewing the Team Bikes

CeramicSpeed releases a new drivetrain concept that eliminates the need for chains - we discuss the implications of this new component. We also review results of the 2018 Tour de France Stages 1-8, as well as the team bikes for the pro cyclists in the race.

123: Dozens of Lime Bikes scrapped 123: Road Diet Meets Resistance in Venice, Helmet Ratings and MIPS, and Cycling Summer Sounds

in AZ, reviewing the latest study on MIPS in bike helmets, how anticyclists use the Environmental Quality Act against us, our choices for favorite helmets of 2018, and all our current cycling summer soundtracks.

122:

122: When The Peloton Protests, Phil the Thrill vs. Spartacus, and Tariffs Coming to the Bike Industry

Former Pro Bernard Hinault puts his finger on the scale and calls for a TdF peloton strike, Phil Gaimon challenges Fabian Cancellara to a duel, and tariffs are making their way to the bike industry - specifically electric bikes.

On or off the bike, BICYCLIST. Listen at BICYCLIST.fm / Listen on Apple Podcasts / Get it on Google Play BICYCLIST.xyz

Order yours today at www.bicyclist.shop 7


Electric Age

The Electric Folder

Electrifying the category of folding bikes introduces new Frustrations

The folding bike has inherent benefits that make them popular additions to travel, but the electric version comes with a significant concession to consider. By Thom Parks

T

he folding bike has long held a place of utility for many cyclists. The design makes travel seamless with a fully geared bike folded into a space that can fit under a desk, in a closet, or kept in an automobile trunk. As seen throughout the other categories of bicycles, the electric version of the folding bike seems like a natural extension of the category and does provide advantages, filling in areas that folding bikes lacked. However, it has entirely removed a feature that makes a folding bike so useful: airline travel.

Considerations

The best approach to considering a new bike is riding it. We can recommend the following models, and suggest finding a local dealer who can help you select the ideal ride for your path.

The future of transportation

In many ways, the electric folding bike has the potential to entirely revolutionize how you transport yourself. The small storage allows you to possess a bike capable of carrying you and a good amount of gear over 60 miles at 20 miles an hour. At the end of the trip, the bike folds into an extremely convenient size, easily stored away until the next journey. The getting-to-work-while-sweaty problem and the base level of fitness required for nonelectric bikes, are both solved with an electric folding bike. Suburban areas with distances that may require more time in the saddle than you have to commute, are shortened with the assist that helps to bring your average speed to something that will have you to work before the boss.

So, There’s That

For many who swear by folding bikes, a significant advantage comes when traveling by plane. Folding bikes in obscured luggage typically get designated with an oversized bag fee, $20-50. This is in comparison to the bike fee that is typically more costly, $150-300. You may still be asked what is contained in your oversized luggage and airlines will still apply the bike fee, even in a smaller luggage size. But once you arrive at your destination with a folding bike, the path to pedaling is much shorter than with the un-packing and assembly required when flying with a traditional bike. While touring amongst multiple destinations, where planes will be depended on for inter-journey connections, a folding bike seems a given. However, this advantage is removed for electric versions of the folding bike. As of 2016, passengers are only allowed batteries with a maximum energy rating of 160WH. All electric folders on the market exceed this requirement, effectively removing the option of traveling by plane with the bike, unless the batteries have been removed and shipped to your final destination. This is a legitimate option and something to keep in mind as an option for traveling with your electric folder, but it adds layers of complexity that folding bikes are meant to solve.

Weights and Measures

An area that many folding bikes suffer from is a weight penalty due to the more robust frame and locking mechanism inherent to the design. On the face of it, electric folding bikes make this worse. But this is only while carrying the bike, the added weight of the folding bike design doesn’t matter while riding, as you now have the benefits of the electric assist. The convenience of storing your folded electric bike under your desk or in a corner of your office cannot be overstated. There really is no place it cannot go with you - except by plane. Unlike the example of the prohibition on traveling with electric folders, the weight penalty of the electric additions is relatively manageable. The added weight introduced in the electric folder comes down to 10 pounds. This is most likely a non-issue for lifting and shipping because the added weight cost will be offset by the reduced shipping volume. Of the electric folders we can recommend, the weights range from just over 38 pounds on the Brompton to the near 48 pounds of the Tern. To get an idea of what you’ll need to lift, consider that a full 5 gallon water jug comes in at 42 pounds.

The Final Consideration

The airline limitations imposed on electric folders may not necessarily be an issue for you. If airline travel isn't in your future, or you already have your travel bike figured out, the electric folder combines the advantages of taking up a small volume while stored with the benefits that electric assist offers the rider. The consideration left is the cost. As it is, an electric version of a bike is more expensive than the non-electric version. And a folding bike is typically more expensive than a nonfolding bike, all else being equal. The best value that we could recommend last year was the Oyama CX E8D, priced at $1,299. Oyama's latest version of the CX E8D is the Series II and only further solidifies Oyamas place as the best value for folding electric bikes. See the opposite page for more detail on the Series II. ▲

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Oyama CX E8D Series II

BATTERY 36V 367Wh MOTOR Aikema 350 W POSITION Rear-hub RANGE 25-50 Miles WEIGHT 43.2 lb PRICE $1899

Tern eLink D7i

BATTERY 36V 374Wh MOTOR Bafang 250 W POSITION Mid-motor RANGE 25-50 Miles WEIGHT 47.8 lb PRICE $2000

Brompton Electric BATTERY 36V 307Wh MOTOR Brompton 250 W POSITION Front-hub RANGE 25-50 Miles WEIGHT 38.3 lb PRICE $3300 (est.)

BICYCLIST Magazine


Electric Age

Oyama cx E8D series ii

improvements all around, still under $2k

Updates to the electric system include a motor size bump, increase in battery capacity, and the adoption of a torque sensor for speed management. By Thom Parks

BICYCLIST.fm

The Oyama CX E8D Series II brings revisions that significantly improves the ride, and further separate the value on offer with hydraulic disc brakes, a 350 watt rear-hub motor, torque sensor speed control, and a 36 V 10.2 Ah battery pack.

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e previously highlighted the Oyama CX E8D in Issue 146 and are pleased to see the release of the CX E8D Series II that further improves on what we felt was a great value for the category. The Series II bike is priced at $1899, and the premium over the CX E8D includes upgrades across the component group, and comes in a handsome matte-black color-way.

No Jerks Here

The most noticeable change is a larger 350W spec'd. motor compared with the previous 250W Aikema AKM-13 that is used in the base model. The battery has been updated to 10.2 Ah from the base models 6.2 Ah, effectively keeping the range intact at 30 miles even with the larger motor size. A very welcomed change is the implementation of a torque sensor for the speed management. The original model uses a cadence sensor to regulate and switch the motor power assist, a less refined technology that can be jerky and inconsistent, especially on hills. It outputs power when expected, a simple but surprisingly difficult achievement that is really only possible by sensing how much power the rider is outputting, not how fast the cranks are spinning. The 6061 aluminum frame stays the same, as do the double-walled aluminum rims, Shimano Altus 8-speed gearing and disc brakes. The Series II brings hydraulics actuation for the discs, an improvement of the mechanical activation on the base model, especially with the added 100 Watts of power on tap. The ride is smooth, thanks in large part to the thick Schwalbe Big Apple 2.3 tires that do a great job in smoothing out the pavement.

Specifications Frame 6061 Aluminum Fork Chromoly, rigid Groupset Shimano Altus, 1x7 Shifter Shimano Altus, 7 speed Gears 7 speeds, 14-28 tooth Battery 36 Volt – 10.2 Ah Top Speed 20 mph Motor Aikema AKM-13, 350W geared brushless rear hub Range Up to 30 miles Motor Control Torque Sensor Tires Schwalbe Big Apple, 20" x 2.3 Brakes Tektro Hydraulic Disc (Front and Rear) Origin Made in China Warranty 5 years for bike parts, 2 years for battery E-Bike Class Pedal Assist (Class 1) – 20 mph w/ no throttle Weight 43.5 lbs (including motor and battery) Folded Dimensions 33.5" x 14.5" x 27.5" Color matte black

The Pitch

The weight hasn’t changed, still pegged in the low 40 pounds. This is heavy for a folding bike, but light for an electric bike, and about average for an electric folder. Where the Oyama really shines is the price, the most significant criteria for many people. There are no alternatives under $2000 in the electric folder category, and Oyama brings not one, but two offerings. And even with the inexpensive price tag, you’re still getting a 5 year warranty on the bike and 2 years on the batteries. And since Oyama has been building folding bikes for more than 30 years, they have the reputation to back the warranty. ($1899, oyama.com) ▲ BICYCLIST.xyz

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Asphalt, please

Desperado Duel-ing

The Desperado Duel Road Ride in Panguitch, Utah The 109-mile Southern Utah ride keeps the climbing to a minimum, but maintains a fast pace in a setting with psychedelic backdrops, car-free roads, and good company. By John Woodson

Desperado Duel Road Ride

LOCATION Panguitch, Utah DISTANCE 109 miles, 3200’ | 50 & 150 mile options DIFFICULTY Intermediate - Advanced START Panguitch, 84759 HOST Ride Southern Utah Highlights Bryce Canyon National Park

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o The Duel!” The challenge is issued every year. To turn it down would mark me as a coward. Everyone meets at the chosen spot to faceoff. My legs ready, locked and loaded, thought I might be blown away. Aid stations stand ready to mend the damage if possible, while at home my family divides my possessions. The Desperado Duel bike race in Panguitch, Utah is a big 109-mile loop in Southern Utah from Panguitch > Bryce > Antimony > Circleville > Panguitch with 3200’ of climbing and drop dead gorgeous panoramic vistas in every direction, including Bryce Canyon National Park. It’s definitely my kind of ride. With a 3-2-1 countdown everyone safely rolls out towards Bryce Canyon via a paved bike path winding between tall pines and large red sandstone formations. The pace is comfortable, allowing time to enjoy a landscape packed with Technicolor pinks, magentas, oranges and reds framed in pine green with brilliant blue sky overhead. Wow! A perfect way to start the day. At the top in Bryce we turn down Johns Valley with 10,000’ peaks above and not a car in sight, just free-range cattle moseying along. A couple riders slip up the road from our group of 40, followed by a few more, and a few more which sets off alarms.

Tail gunner

Pushing hard on the pedals I join the lead riders thinking this might be a key move. Nada. It’s grupo compacto again within a few minutes. In perfect 70-degree conditions going downhill in a large pack, a moment to kill time, so I slip back to watch the big men tow the field. In back I meet Isiah from Las Vegas occupying the final position - tail gunner. He doesn’t know tail gunning is my forté. Twenty years his senior, I joke about pulling rank as we agree to share the tail gunner role. Miles and minutes click by bouncing across open range on fresh chip seal, only encountering one mini cattle stampede. In Black Canyon we rail a high-speed descent where the colorful pack strings out single file snaking through horseshoe turns at 40mph. Rolling into Antimony (halfway point) the group is down to 20 riders. With key selective parts of a long ride like The Duel usually occurring in the 2nd half, Isiah and I move up, joining the paceline work in Kingston Canyon. The pace is fast, but steady as the group works silently alongside a milk chocolate colored Sevier River. In Centerville silence is broken when a rider puts a front wheel in a pot hole, going down with a thud and the sound of expensive Chinese carbon scraping asphalt. Luckily, he is the only casualty and is none the worse for wear, showing only road rash strawberries and a bruised ego.

Go Old Guy, Go!

Continuing to push collectively into a headwind over numerous rollers we number 10 now. Everyone contributes to the pace, although fatigue is showing with small gaps on climbs, shorter pulls and sagging heads. For me it’s tightness in the legs with an intermittent twinge. 10

Golden hour in Southern Utah illuminates a multi-color tapestry, backdrop for the 109-mile Desperado Duel. LEFT The custom six-shooter medals awarded by Ride Southern Utah. MIDDLE The paceline heading into Panguitch, a town that captures that old Western feel. On auto-pilot now with the finish in sight at the far end of Panguitch Valley we pass the last aid station to a deafening roar. “Go Dad! Go Dad! Good job Isiahhhh!” Without any fans to yell “Go old guy!” I plead with my legs to hold on a little longer as my twinges now include pangs.

As long as you finish

At 3 miles to go attacks start and soon we’re a select group of 5 riders dueling to the very end. Although I don’t feel very select. With a half mile to go my legs lock and load, physically lock up and load with lactic acid. Not just twinges or pangs, we’re talking full scale involuntary spasmodic contractions painfully announcing “You’re Done. Finished. Kaput.” I try to pedal gingerly, stretch and think soft fluffy gentle thoughts. This mind-overmatter approach worked 25 years ago earning me a victory. Today I’m not so lucky. Legs won’t turn. Stretching is definitely out of the question and my body won’t fall for that whole mind-over-matter fluffy trick again. Watching Isiah and the others roll away to enjoy a celebratory sprint finish is difficult as I struggle with my painful stand-up herky-jerky pedal coast pedal technique to cross the finish line a minute behind. Soon Isiah’s kids run up to great him, his son beaming with excitement as he says “Dad I want to Do The Duel!” You couldn’t find a better event to start a lifelong love affair with cycling than the Desperado Duel, especially since kids ride free at all Ride Southern Utah events. It is truly one of the Best in The West. --John ▲

For more information on the Desperado Duel Bike Race, visit w w w.ridesouthernutah.com

Find more races and events like these at www.BICYCLIST.events

JOHN WOODSON lives and rides in New Mexico, a legendary character that is always

on the lookout for legendary rides. Or even less than legendary. But always a good experience. Do you organize or participate in a ride that qualifies? Let him know; jwoodson@bicyclist.xyz BICYCLIST Magazine


The new Jones Plus SWB Complete Bike – ready to ride

$1,799 From the same company that brought you the Jones H-Bar ™

A complete bike from Jeff Jones – ready to ride (and for every type of riding). Jeff has created a bike that performs superbly in all areas, at a very affordable price. Now more riders than ever can discover the Jones experience. Jeff has thought of everything – the Jones Complete Bike does it all, straight out the box. THREE SIZES – FOR RIDERS 5’ TO 6’6” — ON ROAD AND OFF… GREAT FOR TOURING!

RIGHT Pines, portals, vermilion rocks -- oh my! BELOW Some "hoodoos" at the Duel making their way through the sandstone outcroppings in the Bryce Canyon area the Duel passes through. Credit: Ride Southern Utah

The high-performance bicycle Jones Bikes.com JONES_SoCal_bicyclist_advert_v2.indd 4

BICYCLIST.xyz

INSTAGRAM

INSTAGRAM

Est. 2002 07/08/2018 00:25

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back to work by bike Gear to improve the ride The discipline of regularly cycling to work or school has logistical hurdles that add to

the complexity of an already challenging endeavor. Some gear from Thousand Helmets and Henty Bags help clear those hurdles and let you focus on the ride. By Chris Reynolds

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etting to work looking your best supersedes feeling your best. This may be a shock to some, but it’s the truth of the modern workplace. Commuting by bike will have you feeling your best, but post-ride, you may not be looking your best. The approach to solve this problem comes in a few flavors that fall into two categories: will you work in your cycling gear or will you change when you arrive at work. Some approach it with an electric bike that will get you to work sweat-free, others choosing a combination of routes that limit the exertion. In the other camp are the group that embrace the morning workout and change into work attire at the job. But when your work attire demands more than a crumpled pair of jeans and a tee shirt, having solutions that help you feel your best without sacrificing your professionalism are important.

Crossing over

As wild as it may seem, not everyone appreciates that you ride your bike to work. You and I know all the money you’re saving, and we can understand how much better you look, feel and perform. But your office mates don’t care. And it will come across in a way that is damaging to your success in the workplace. I get that it is motivated by a desire to share this new religious fervor you feel in your heart. Daily commuting can change a person in ways that you will be itching to scream from the mountain tops how much more engaged, and productive you now are. But refrain and contain your zealotry. A more successful approach is the 'surprise' conversion. When a co-worker sees you riding your bike while they sit in traffic, the process begins. They will remark how 'surprised' they are that you're a cyclist. They will be curious. You always come in so fresh and clean. They will begin to ask questions. Don't you live 15 miles away? They will want to know what life is like on two wheels. This is when you will let them know emphatically, how it has changed your life, but with little further explanation - keep it mysterious. The next step is to invite them on a ride. As a cycling zealot, you have a purpose-build loaner bike just for this occasion. Start converting until a majority is reached. Then go after management. Once they have been brought into the cycling family, you may actually be able to waltz into work in a Lycra speed-suit, but until then, we have some gear to keep your corporate cool.

Thousand Helmets Heritage Collection 'Stealth Black', $85 explorethousand.com

We’ve shared Thousand Helmets with our readers before, and for those not in the know, they are a great value from a Southern California company that shares the idea that cycling is about the experience, and their products are centered on improving that experience. The helmet options available for commuters are limited, especially for anyone concerned with coworker helmet ridicule. The latest color-way from Thousand solves that, Stealth Black. Safety ignored, this is the color to blend in. Along the same lines as keeping a low profile, not everyone is interested in carrying the selfproclaimed "badge" of an active cyclist, the dangling helmet snapped casually onto ones bag. Some would prefer to leave the bike gear with the bike, and a helmet that is purpose built to address this is welcomed. The design of the lid itself features an integrated visor that keeps the sun out on hot days. The shell also 7 vents to keep air moving through the plastic shell. And the shell itself meets all requirements for helmet safety including CPSC and EN1078 ratings. Padding is included and the scale tips over 460g for a size medium. All Thousand helmets features a clever pop-out in the rear of the helmet that allows for easy locking using a variety of lock styles. This may not seem like something useful, and if you aren't locking your bike up now, it isn't. But shame on you for tempting fate. Start locking up your bike! In case your helmet is stolen while using the Pop-N-Lock feature, Thousand will replace it with their theft guarantee. Another clever feature that Thousand implements across their helmet line is the magnetic buckle used to secure the nylon straps. It's a one-handed release, and super convenient. ▲ 12

TOP Thousand helmets is a favourite in the BICYCLIST stables. The lightweight and unassuming style make them a stand-out, while several clever features make them a breeze in use. The new Stealth Black color-way will be popular, and at $85 it's understandable. BOTTOM The ability to securely lock the helmet to your bike gives it a home when it's not on your head with the Pop-N-Lock insert at the rear of the helmet. Not having to carry a helmet as an accessory makes the drudgery of walking on foot more tolerable. Also useful is the magnetic clasp, a feature that once you use, will have you never wanting to go back to a mechanical clasp. Also from Thousand, the kit Courier gloves with Vegan synthetic materials, also in Stealth Black $23, BICYCLIST Magazine


Henty Bags The Wingman Backpack, $249

F

henty.cc

or the office commuter that cares about the condition of their clothing when they arrive at the workplace, Henty Bags offers the Wingman Backpack as a innovative way to solve the problem of keeping work clothes looking fresh while still being able to commute by bike. And the way the Wingman achieves this is in a word - brilliant.

ABOVE LEFT The Henty Wingman Backpack is a genius solution to a problem many professionals face - travelling with a suit. Options exist, but none are designed with wearability and weight as paramount to the design criteria. It also includes a laptop sleeve behind the straps and a hip belt to secure the load. ABOVE RIGHT The Wingman includes an 18L fold-over dry-bag, perfect for carrying accessories, shoes, liquids and foods, without worrying about spillage on your precious suit cargo. BELOW After filling up the accessory bag, it rolls inside the main suit bag, preventing creases in the suit and letting you carry all the gear you'll need for your work-train-win routine.

The Inner Tube

A key component of the Wingman is the 18L dry-bag stuff sack that is included with the backpack. The sack is entirely waterproof, and made of a thick rubberized plastic material built to last. It has attachment points for shoulder carrying the sack by itself, but the idea is to roll the main backpack around the stuff sack, creating a form to keep your outfit free of wrinkles. All of this cinches down with a couple straps. A pocket behind the straps is also available for technology storage, such as a laptop or iPad. A 15" MacBook Pro fits great.

In Practice

The Wingman includes chest and hip straps that keep it in place even when packed heavy. The shoulder straps are comfortable, and the material on the back allows for some breath-ability. The versatility of the bag is where it really shines. Having a back-mounted garment bag is really handy, both on and off the bike. You may find that it's not only convenient for taking to work, but also as a weekender bag. Again, a back-mounted garment bag is a rarity, and one that is lightweight and comfortable, even more so. â–˛

ACTIVE COMMUTER? We're always interested in knowing what

gear the daily road warrior finds useful, not so much, and everything in between. We have our favorites - what are yours? Let us know; gearpatrol@bicyclist.xyz

BICYCLIST.xyz

13


Event Profile

TheMembership Arch Ride has its perks

The annual spring time mountain bike adventure ride through the back-country of the North San Diego County is a tour through open space preserves normally closed to bicycles. The ride sells out quickly with invitations sent to SDMBA members in January - join today to support MTB trail access in SoCal.

Photo by Joshua Bonnici, courtesy SDMBA

By Richard L. Duquette

Lusardi Preserve is a jewel hidden away along the ARCH ride. The preserve contains 195 acres of land made open to hikers and mountain bikers and is one of the open space 'islands' that are connected during the 41 mile ARCH(ipelagos) ride held in April for SDMBA members and invited guests. Join by January to get your invite, sdmba.com

T

he San Diego Mountain Biking Association (SDMBA) annual membership ride, the Archipelago Ride aka “ARCH” ride, is best described as a mountain bike adventure through the backcountry of North County. Permission from the city of San Diego is granted to SDMBA to use a connection of local trails that links a chain of “open space” islands, like the Archipelago chain of Islands (SDMBA has the goal of developing safe connecting trails and preserving open space). The event is hosted in April and has the reputation of selling out fast. The year I rode was challenging in every way, mentally and physically. The ride tests your nutrition management, equipment, and even your ability to navigate a variety of terrains, including tree-covered tunnels. The ride was a little over 41 miles in length and began at La Costa Canyon High School in Carlsbad and finished at Green Flash Brewing in Mira Mesa. The ride begins with mountain switchbacks over single track trails, and a descent through Elfin forest features 6’ tall brush and passes through deep streams on single track. A rattlesnake or two has been spotted lying across the trail in previous years. Climbing through the Elfin Forest, the ride continues for about a mile onto the “Way Up” trail of switchbacks. A fast descent trails to

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the metal bridge at the south end of Lake Hodges. More switchbacks challenge you when you crest the hill and drop into Lusardi Valley, i.e. the West side of Rancho Bernardo Valley. From there, it’s a slow and steady ride across open countrysides, back up into Black Mountain Park followed by a descent past Del Mar Highlands through Penasquitos Canyon (where you’ll see those tree-lined tunnels.) There are dried-up stream beds and “cobbles” for trails, followed by a refreshing ocean breeze in Penasquitos Canyon. The last quarter of the ride is a long and pretty climb up Lopez Canyon behind the Qualcomm building, then towards the finish at “Green Flash” Brewery in Mira Mesa. It’s there, I enjoyed a well-deserved pint of “Willy Vanilly” IPA, good food and stories of the day. (Robert Leon, from the San Diego County Bike Coalition kindly parked our bikes in the valet). The people are friendly and the ride is epic. Join the San Diego Mountain Biking Association and give it a try next year. It’s for a good cause and a blast. ▲ Invitations go out to current members and donors in January. Join at sdmba.com. For membership question, email archride@sdmba.com BICYCLIST Magazine


By the book

A Guide to going faster The Cyclist's Training Bible - 5th edition

Joe Friel returns with an entirely rewritten guide to training and competition. By Chris Reynolds

T

here comes a point in your cycling progression where how fast you go will be something you will want to increase. It may be in the very beginning, I want to go faster - NOW! Or it may be after adjusting to cycling to commute or for enjoying the community around you. You may not want to go faster for the sake of thrills, but more for the ability to cover distance. As an example, a rider with an average pace of 19 mph will travel 30% farther than a similar rider traveling at an average of 13 mph. It’s not so much that riding 19 mph is more enjoyable than 13 mph, it’s that you’re able to cover more ground in the same amount of time, go farther, see more. The next questions to follow may be; how do you get there? Is it just simply riding as much as possible? Is there a more systematic way to improve your efficiency, and get more out of your time spent in the saddle? The first edition of the Cyclist’s Training Bible The Cyclist's Training Bible, 5th Edition by Joe Friel was released more than 20 years ago, By Joe Friel | Velopress 2018 and sought to answer these questions. The book has gone on to be a best-selling guide to training for cycling, and has been fundamental in changing how athletes train and prepare for competition. The 4th edition was released in 2009 and continued to communicate the lessons Friel learned while coaching and training some of the best athletes in the sport. This fall, Friel will be releasing the 5th edition of his guide to cycling excellence, as well as the 2nd edition of the companion book, The Cyclist’s Training Diary. Both have been substantially revised, most notably the 5th edition undergoing an entire rewrite.

Expo September 18-20, 2018 Reno Tahoe Booth 2268

Conditions apply. Limited to in-person entries only.

Visit booth 2268 and enter to win FREE promotion for your organization We will award a company or organization with a design of 3 illustrated advertising posters and ONE YEAR (10 issues) of full-page placements in BICYCLIST magazine.

Previous Editions

The Cyclist Training Bible continues the exploration of the systematic approach to training. Since the 4th edition was published, much of the methodology and approach to training has changed. The price of power meters, advanced cycling computers and trainers have greatly changed how cyclists train in these years. The 5th edition addresses these topics with useful information to take advantage of the overwhelming amounts of data these wonder-tools provide. Beyond just explaining how to use the data, Friel provides guided plans that fit a wide variety of athletic endeavors. And this is the greatest departure from the previous edition. Beyond how technology has changed training, the methodology of training has also shifted. Friel highlights this with more emphasis on periodized training, the idea of scheduling your training and races in periods of training intensity, as well as interval training, the methodology around short in length, but high-output training sessions that have risen in popularity in our time-crunched society. Where the 4th and earlier editions provided a singular plan with addenda offering adjustments depending on the athletic goals, the 5th edition provides multiple individualized plans. This is hugely beneficial and takes into the account that a one-size-fits-all training plan may leave a lot on the table if the training doesn't fit the event. The humble confidence of Friel comes through his writing with an encouraging tone of discipline and perseverance. The differences between the 4th and 5th editions is substantive, and Friel himself in the Prologue relents “What I've written here sometimes disagrees with what I said earlier. That brings us back to where we started: Things change. The sport has changed. Sports science has changed. And I have changed." Only for the better. The Cyclist's Training Diary, 2nd Edition For the self-motivated person looking to systematically By Joe Friel | Velopress 2018 improve their cycling, look no further than the Cyclist Training Bible, 5th Edition (bible $27, diary $16). ▲ BICYCLIST.xyz

Copies of the 2019 BICYCLIST Media Kit will also be available with information and insight valuable to anyone in the industry. Get your copy! 15


Nevada

California

challenge

40 35 Kings Beach, CA

Photo by John Carter

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Sand HarboR, NV

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Secret Harbor Beach, NV

55 20 Emerald Bay, CA

Zephyr Cove, NV

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BICYCLIST Magazine


Photo by Mariusz Blach

#152

Bike Shops?

Lake Tahoe has many ski and snowboard outfitters that don their cycling caps during the summer. Many will have bike repair services, bike rentals, MTB shuttles and tours.

The grandeur of Lake Tahoe makes for a wondrous setting for turning pedals. The clean, mountain air will refresh the senses while the elevation challenges the legs. The 72 miles around the Lake makes for a day trip that offers rewarding views, with private sandy beaches offering multiple choices for a ride intermission. Well-appointed bike shops mark both ends of the lake, and both spring and fall events offer a less daunting way to scratch this off the challenge list.

For the full service, year-round bike shop experience, look no further than our recommendations:

RIDE NAME REGION LOCATION DISTANCE CLIMBS / ELEVATION RANGE CLIMBING GRADE DIFFICULTY TYPE PREFERRED DIRECTION START/FINISH HIGHLIGHTS

Olympic Bike Shop

620 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 Daily, 9-6 olympicbikeshop.com

South Shore Bikes

871 Emerald Bay Rd. S. Lake Tahoe, CA 96150 (530) 544-7433 M-Sa 9-6 / Su 10-5 southshorebikeandsnow.com

Sierra ski & Cycle Works

Elevation (ft.) 7000 6800 6600 6400 6200 5 0 BICYCLIST.xyz

Bike the West leads spring and fall events to join fellow cyclists on SAG supported rides with full-service rest stops and community cooperation - a great way to experience a trip around Big Blue.

Tour de Tahoe

The Big Blue, BC#152 Lake Tahoe (California/Nevada) 72 miles | 4159' gain 4 / min. 6272' | max. 7063' ~4%, max. 9% @ mile 6.6 Intermediate Loop Clockwise South Lake Tahoe, California Emerald Bay, Lake Tahoe Dam Kings Beach

(September 9, 2018) bikethewest.com

America's Most Beautiful Bike Ride - Lake Tahoe (Early June) bikethewest.com

Coffee? Many opportunities along the route, but the coffee is always better when the sound of bike wrenches is in the background.

Finished the Challenge?

3430 Lake Tahoe Blvd S. Lake Tahoe, CA 96150 (530) 541-7505 Daily, 9-6 sierraskiandcycleworks.com

events?

Over the edge bikes and coffee 3665 Tamarack Ave S. Lake Tahoe, CA 96150 (530) 600-3633 otesports.com Daily, 8-6

Tell us about it! We're always interested in hearing your experiences and sharing your stories from the road and trail. Share a link to your GPS upload to be mentioned in future issues of the magazine, challenge@bicyclist.xyz

Route Profile

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BICYCLIST profile

Denise Mueller-Korenek & Coach John Howard

The duo working together to break the paced land speed record are back after setting the woman's record in 2016. This September, they return to the salt flats of Bonneville, Utah to take on the overall record of 166.6 mph set by Fred Rompelberg in 1995. By Chris Reynolds | Photos By Richard Lee

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ears in the making, Project Speed is the collective effort of a small group of individuals. They have one singular purpose, getting Denise Mueller-Korenek to 167 miles per hour riding a purpose-build bicycle at the Bonneville Salt Flats International Speedway in Utah. The speed run is paced, meaning she will be towed by an ethanol-fueled dragster up to a rate of speed that allows her to turn pedals of the massive 403 gear-inch drivetrain. This allows her to maintain speed under her own power when the tow connection is released from the dragster. The pacing vehicle continues to encourage her speed with a low-pressure envelope that is created behind the moving vehicle. The width of this envelope is approximately 48 inches, and Mueller-Korenek must remain within that space to benefit from the draft created by the vehicle.

There is no "I" in Team

A symbiotic relationship exists with the driver during a paced speed run. The safety of the cyclist is entirely dependent on the abilities of the vehicle driver. For Mueller-Korenek, that role is filled by Shea Holbrook who will pilot the dragster on loan from Fred Rompelberg, the current holder of the record. Rompelberg posted a mark of 166.9mph in 1995. If this sounds vaguely familiar, that is because Mueller-Korenek attempted a run previously. In 2016, she made her first attempt and in doing so set the women’s record for 147mph. Unfortunately, that first attempt wasn’t able to push through the existing record because of conditions on the salt flats. Due to rains previously in the year, the available stretch of salt was limited to 4 miles, only enough to reach the 147 mph speed. With the continued help and guidance of Coach John Howard, Mueller-Korenek returns to the salt on September 14-16, where she will look to push through the existing 166.6 mile per hour marker and break the record. Conditions on the salt-fingers crossed-will provide a full 5 miles of runway, enough room to get up to the 167 mark. During the run itself, Mueller-Korenek must rely on visual signals from Holbrook to count off the miles. As they pass each mile, Holbrook clicks off a switch notifying MuellerKorenek of their position on the runway. Because of the airfoil surrounding the paced cyclist, there is no way for Mueller-Korenek see where she is, how fast she is going or how much room she has left. Just a series of blinking lights and full trust in her driver.

Denise Mueller-Korenek poses with her custom bike designed and built by KHS Bicycle ahead of her first attempt in 2016 where she recorded the first ever women's paced land speed record of 147 mph. The native of Southern California returns to the salt of Bonneville, Utah this September to make an attempt on the men's record, currently held by Fred Rompelberg.

A Legendary Coach

John Howard himself holds his own part of the paced-record legacy. The three time Olympian and Ironman triathlon winner, reset the record to 152 mph also at Bonneville on 20 July 1985. As a coach to Mueller-Korenek, he occupies a role that few can fill. The training is unique, in that there isn't a feasible way to recreate the experience, without

"Mile-A-Minute" Murphy And The Inaugural Paced Landspeed-Record

T

he paced land-speed record is an authentic reminder of the long development of our sport. In 1899, Charles Minthorn Murphy had an argument with friends in his hometown of Brooklyn, New York. He is quoted in the Farmingdale Post, a Long Island newspaper saying “I was asked to give an opinion of the quality and relative speed of various prominent riders of the time. My answer was that there is no limit to the speed of a bicycle rider, that speed depended largely upon the bicycle, gears, tracks and pacemaker. I declared there was not a locomotive built which could get away from me. The more people laughed, the more determined I became to accomplish the feat. I figured that the fast-moving locomotive would expel the air to such an extent that I could follow in the vacuum behind." With this as the motivation, Murphy would then work to convince the Long Island Rail Road to let him lay plywood over the ties between tracks for a two mile stretch between Farmingdale and Babylon in Long Island, New York. Recalling the negations with the rail company, Murphy says “I pointed out that an exhibition of that kind would prove to the world that the Long Island Railroad had just as good rolling stock, roadbeds and employees as any other road in the world.” The special agent for the railway, Hal Fullerton, signed the contract within 48 hours and the event was scheduled for June 21, 1899. Taking into account the quality of the bicycles available at the time, the insanity of the

18

challenge cannot be understated. The weight of the train caused the plywood sheets to sink and then rise after passing by, creating a violent wave to contend with. Murphy clocked a half-mile in 29 seconds, then three-quarter miles in 43 seconds, and the full mile in 57.45 seconds. After the train slowed down, he lost his balance and fell on the tracks, with the train conductor and Fullerton pulling him onto the train platform at the last moment. In 1995 he would write in Sports Illustrated about the immediate aftermath: After I lay motionless, face down, on the platform. I was all in. I was half-carried to a cot at the end of the car; the roar of the train was challenged by hysterical yells. Grown men hugged and kissed each other. One man fainted and another went into hysterics, while I remained speechless on my back, ashen in colour and sore all over. From then on, Charles Minthorn Murphy was known as “Mile-A-Minute Murphy” and his feat would begin a long tradition of pacing bicycles behind moving vehicles to achieve speed records - though never again behind a train. James Edward Sullivan, the referee, said he would never again take part in such an event. Murphy would go on to be a police officer for New York City, where he boasted of being the first police officer to fly an airplane and the first to ride a motorcycle in uniform. ▲

BICYCLIST Magazine


Listen to the interview

We sit down with Denise Mueller-Korenek and John Howard during Episode 125.5 of the BICYCLIST Experience, a weekly cycling podcast. Visit www.bicyclist.fm to listen to the full episode.

Three-time Olympian John Howard, and coach to Denise Mueller-Korenek, is himself a holder of the paced record of 152 mph, until Fred Rompelberg raised the stakes to 166.9 mph in 1995. The custom KHS carbon frame, double crown fork and the intermediate gearing setup are all part of maintaining control and outputting efficient power during the pass. actually getting up to speed at Bonneville. To this end, downhill mountain biking helps develop high-speed stability, crucial when traveling at 167 mph, even on flat ground in a straight line. The other component to the training is exhaustive interval training, with base endurance training to allow for recovery and enable Mueller-Korenek to make multiple runs over the three day window in September. Another element that only a few individuals can speak to is the forward-backward oscillations experienced during a paced attempt. Because of the pressure dynamics created by the paced vehicle, there is a disconcerting push and pull experienced with the rider. This wave of air is a unique phenomenon, almost like speed wobbles, but in the fore-aft direction. There aren't many

people who have experienced this, let alone people who can guide you to use these harmonics to their advantage. That's where John Howard fits in. A crucial member of Project Speed. This is a unique opportunity for an American woman to recapture the record originally conceived by the New Yorker, Charles Murphy (see inset). Not only will it be a source of pride for American fans, but seeing a woman prove the physicality of gender is not a limitation is truly inspiring for all fans of cycling. â–˛

Fred Rompelberg tucks in behind the cowling of the methanol fuelled dragster that paced him up to his record speed of 166.9 mph in 1995. Denise Mueller-Korenek will be pacing the same vehicle driven by Shea Holbrook, with some safety and performance upgrades, this September where she will attempt a 167 mph run on the Bonneville Speedway in Utah. BICYCLIST.xyz

Follow along at TheProjectSpeed.com for new, updates and video from the event.

The legendary Bonneville Salt Flats International Speedway is a historic 10 mile long barren salt flat leftover from when Lake Bonneville evaporated. It has been used for most vehicular speed records, though due to a multitude of factors, only 5 miles remain useable. 19


Events Calendar September 2018 Orcutt

GUIDE TO THE CALENDAR

2018

We do our best to comb the wild west of cycling event websites to get the information you need to make the most of your time in the saddle. We provide this comprehensive listing, without endorsement, but we ask that you support the events that support the Date Day Event Name magazine. To submit your event and view City, theState full Organizer calendar, visit www.BICYCLIST.events. TYPE: length

SIGNS & SYMBOLS

14-16 Multi

Beginning Racer Program USA Cycling ROAD: Clinic

15 Saturday

Tehachapi Gran Fondo City of Tehachapi ROAD: 18-104 miles

Lone Tree

Co

R

Lone Tree Recreation Center ___________________________________________________________________

1 Saturday

Tour and Taste of the Valley BGCSMV ROAD: 100k, 50k

1-2 Multi

L'Etape California Folsom Le Tour de France ROAD: 60,90 miles NCa 608 Sutter St.

2 Sunday

Specialized Monthly Donut Ride Specialized Costa Mesa ROAD: 35 miles Specialized Costa Mesa

Amtrak Century OC Wheelmen ROAD: 100 miles

8 Saturday

Best Buddies Challenge San Simeon Best Buddies International ROAD: 15,30,60,100 miles NCa Hearst Castle

16 Sunday

Rock the Bay Triathlon Koz Events TRI: Embarcadero Marina Park

OC MTB Limestone XC Race OC MTB Races MTB: 12.3 mile course Limestone Canyon

Pride of the Valley Open Streets Metrolink FESTIVAL: Open Streets

17-23 Multi

Tour of San Diego San Diego Gran Fondo Cycling Tours TOUR: 40-60 mi/day SCa Downtown San Diego

21-23 Multi

Kamikaze Bike Games Team Big Bear MTB MTB:DH, Enduro, etc. 1 Minaret Road

22 Saturday

Lighthouse Century Morro Bay SLO Bicycle Club ROAD: 58, 75, 100 miles NCa Morro Bay High School

SCa

R

Orcutt Union Plaza ___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

Costa Mesa

SCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Orange

SCa

MTB

____________________________________________________

Tour de Fuzz Sonoma County ROAD: 50k, 100k, and 100 miles

Santa Rosa

9 Sunday

XTERRA - Laguna Beach Generic Events TRI: Off-Road race Crystal Cove State Park

Laguna Beach

Mountains 2 the Beach Inland Empire Blue Belles ROAD: 100 miles

Twin Peaks

NCa

R

Santa Rosa ___________________________________________________________________

SCa Tri

____________________________________________________

SCa

R

Twin Peaks Building & Safety ____________________________________________________

2018 UCC - Fiesta Island TT San Diego Bicycle Club ROAD: Time Trial

12-19 Multi

Dude Girl presents Cycling in Tuscany Dude Girl MIXED: 96 miles Tuscany, Italy

14-16 Multi

The Silver State 508 Silver State 508 ROAD: 508 miles Hilton Garden Inn

San Diego

SCa

R

Fiesta Island ___________________________________________________________________

Italy

B

R

___________________________________________________________________

Reno

Nv

R

____________________________________________________

Stetina's Sierra Prospect Truckee Interbike ROAD: 44, 78 miles NCa Northstar Resort

R

____________________________________________________

Northstar Free Ride Festival

Truckee Interbike FESTIVAL: MTB, Road NCa Northstar Resort ____________________________________________________

20

Tehachapi

SCa

R

Tehachapi Centennial Plaza ____________________________________________________

Bike MS Rally Bike MS Bay to Bay ROAD: 20+ miles

Lake Forest

SCa

R

Pure Ride Cycles ____________________________________________________

Irvine

SCa

R

Irvine Transportation Center ___________________________________________________________________

San Diego

SCa Tri

____________________________________________________

Los Angeles

SCa

Baldwin Park ___________________________________________________________________

R

__________________________________________________________________

Mammoth Lakes

NCa MTB

___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Beach City Double/Century/Half NdZone Events ROAD: 50-200 miles

Irvine

22-23 Multi

Bike MS: Waves to Wine Rohnert Park National MS Society ROAD: 22-100 miles SCa SOMO Village

22-29 Multi

California Coast Classic Arthritis Foundation TOUR: 575 miles San Francisco

San Francisco

29 Saturday

Grizzly 100 Grizzly Ultra Endurance MTB: 75, or 100k

Big Bear Lake

SCa

R

Hotel Irvine ___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

NCa

R

___________________________________________________________________

FEATURES

Location

SCa

MTB

Big Bear Lake ____________________________________________________

MTB Gran Fondo Grizzly Ultra Endurance MTB: 20-100k

Big Bear Lake

SCa

MTB

Big Bear Lake ____________________________________________________

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa NCa

Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND

Or Wa

Az

B

Share the Road Ride Soaring Spirits International ROAD: 18-104 miles 3855 Alamo Street

Simi Valley

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

HUNKR HUNKR Race Series ROAD: 100 km Irvine Lake

The Jensie Gran Fondo Jensie Gran Fondo ROAD: 100, 70, 40 miles

Silverado

SCa

R

____________________________________________________

Novato

NCa

R

Stafford Lake Park ____________________________________________________

Gran Fondo Santa Clarita Santa Clarita Velo ROAD: 20-100 miles

Santa Clarita

SCa

R

Santa Clarita Valley Center ____________________________________________________

Tour of the Moon ClippedIn Events ROAD: 41 and 62 miles

Grand Junction

Co

R

Two Rivers Convention Center ____________________________________________________

Rosarito Ensenada Bike Ride Rosarito Ensenada ROAD: 50 miles

29-30 Multi

Golden State Fall Series Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, XC, Enduro

Rosarito

B

R

Rosarito Beach Hotel ___________________________________________________________________

Southridge Park

October 5-7 Multi

Outerbike Moab Western Spirit Cycling FESTIVAL: MTB

Fontana

SCa

MTB

2018 Moab

B

Moab Information Center ___________________________________________________________________

BICYCLIST Magazine


5-7 Multi

Levi's Gran Fondo Bike Monkey ROAD: 9-113 miles

5-6 Multi

The Oz Trails Off-Road Epic Rides MTB: 25, 35, 50 miles

6 Saturday

Baja Bike Race Mass Works LLC ROAD: 73 miles

Santa Rosa

NCa

R

Old Courthouse Square __________________________________________________________________

Arkansas

B

MTB

Bentonville __________________________________________________________________

Valle de Guadalupe

SCa

R

Tecate ____________________________________________________

Riverside Citrus Classic Citrus Classic ROAD: 7-100 miles

Riverside

SCa

R

Riverside Plaza ____________________________________________________

Sacramento Century Challenge Sacramento Century ROAD: 15, 37, 62, 100 miles

Sacramento

Bike MS Rally: BJ's Bike MS Bay to Bay ROAD: 20+miles

Laguna Hills

NCa

R

Capitol Mall  ____________________________________________________

SCa

R

BJ's Restaurant  ____________________________________________________

Konocti Challenge Rotary Club of Lakeport ROAD: 20-100 miles

Lakeport

6-13 Multi

UCI Masters World Championships USA Cycling TRACK: Sprint and Endurance Velo Sports Center

7-12 Multi

California Dream Ride California Bike Coalition TOUR: 5-days Fess Parker Hilton Resort

Santa Barbara

12-14 Multi

SDMBA Mt Laguna Trail Fest California Bike Coalition FESTIVAL: Camping El Prado Campground

Mount Laguna

13 Saturday

Kiwani's Tour d'Orange Kiwani's of Orange ROAD: 14-100 miles

NCa

R

Skylark Shores Resort  __________________________________________________________________

UCC – Fiesta Island Time Trials UC Cyclery/SDBC ROAD: Time Trial

San Diego

SCa

R

Fiesta Island Rd. ____________________________________________________

The TBT MTB 50-miler Total Body Fitness MTB: 25-50 miles

18-21 Multi

JDRF Ride to Cure Furnace Creek JDRF Ride to Cure Diabetes ROAD: 100 miles SCa Death Valley

19-20 Multi

Patriot Ride for our Heroes Indian Wells Patriot Ride ROAD: 10, 35, 50, 100 miles SCa Southwest Church 

20 Saturday

Solvang Autumn Double Planet Ultra ROAD: 200 miles

Folsom Lake

NCa MTB

Granite Beach ___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

R

___________________________________________________________________

SIGNS & SYMBOLS Date

Solvang

SCa

R

Santa Ynez Valley Marriot ____________________________________________________

The Hammer Road Rally Bike Monkey MIXED: 26-102 miles

Friant

NCa MX

The Hammer Tunes & Tires Bike Monkey FESTIVAL: Bikes, Music, Art

NCa

NCa

City, State

FEATURES

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa

Meadow Campground

Event Name Organizer TYPE: length Location

Meadow Campground ____________________________________________________

Friant

Day

Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

Or Wa

Az

B

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND

Carson

SCa

T

__________________________________________________________________

SCa

R

__________________________________________________________________

SCa

___________________________________________________________________

SCa

R

Orange Cycle ____________________________________________________

9th Annual Wheels for Meals Meals on Wheels of Alameda ROAD: 1-70 miles

San Ramon

Tour of the White Mountains Epic Rides MTB: 1-70 miles

Navajo County

SCa

R

2600 Camino Ramon ____________________________________________________

Az

MTB

Pinetop-Lakeside ____________________________________________________

Asti Tour de Vine Rotary Club of Cloverdale ROAD: 25k, 50k, 100k, and 100 mi

Cloverdale

NCa

R

Asti Winery ____________________________________________________

Park to Park Pedal Extreme Kershaw-Ryan State Park ROAD: 40, 60 and 100 miles

Caliente

Nv

R

Kershaw-Ryan State Park ____________________________________________________

Lost Coast Gravel Adventure Hopper Adventures MIXED: 32, 43, 60 miles

14 Sunday

Los Angeles Tour de Cure Americans Diabetes Association ROAD: 20,40,100 kms

Whitethorn

NCa MX

Usal Campground ___________________________________________________________________

BICYCLIST.xyz

Los Angeles

SCa

R

Santa Fe Dam ____________________________________________________

www.bicyclist.events

Orange

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Events Calendar October

2018

20-21 Multi

Bike MS: Bay to Bay National MS Society ROAD: 50,70,100 miles Irvine Transportation Center

Irvine

20-21 Multi

Golden State Fall Series Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, XC, Enduro

21 Sunday

Solvang's Finest Century Planet Ultra ROAD: 100 miles

26-27 Multi

6-12-24 Hr Time Trials Worlds Time Trial ROAD: TT Christmas Circle

26-28 Multi

YSC Tour de Pink West Santa Barbara Young Survival Coalition ROAD: 100 miles SCa 17 Sutton Rd.

SCa

R

___________________________________________________

Fontana

SCa

MTB

Southridge Park ___________________________________________________________________

Solvang

SCa

R

Santa Ynez Valley Marriot ___________________________________________________________________

Borrego Springs

SCa

R

__________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Level 2 Coaching Clinic USA Cycling ROAD: Clinic

27 Saturday

Spooktacular! Kern Wheelmen ROAD: 40-100 miles

Phoenix

Az

R

Courtyard Phoenix Chandler ___________________________________________________________________

Bakersfield

SCa

R

Pyle's Boys Camp ____________________________________________________

OC Ride for AIDS Radiant Health Centers ROAD: 10, 30, 62, 100 miles

Irvine

SCa

R

Bill Barber Memorial Park ____________________________________________________

Victor Valley Bicycle Tour Victor Valley Bicycle Tour ROAD: 10,25,62 miles

Apple Valley

SCa

R

Apple Valley Civic Center ____________________________________________________

Oceanside Double Century Mtn. High Cycling ROAD: 200 miles

Oceanside

27-28 Multi

Phil's Cookie Fondo Camarillo Agent of Change ROAD: 32-113 miles SCa Camarillo Airport

SCa

R

Oceanside Days Inn ___________________________________________________________________

R

____________________________________________________

Grapes of Wrath & Raisin Ride Richgrove Sam Barn MIXED: 77-135 miles NCa MX Richgrove

28 Sunday

Giro di San Diego Giro di San Diego ROAD: 26-113 miles

___________________________________________________________________

22

Escondido

SCa

R

Kit Carson Park ____________________________________________________

GUIDE TO THE CALENDAR

2018

28 Sunday

We do our best to comb the wild west of cycling event websites to get the information you need to make the most of your time in the saddle. We provide this comprehensive listing, without endorsement, but we ask that you support the events that support the magazine. To submit your event and view the full calendar, visit www.BICYCLIST.events.

SIGNS & SYMBOLS

Date

Filthy 50+ MTB Ride with Benefits Quick n Dirty MTB: 30,50 miles San Pasquel Staging Area

Escondido

SCa

MTB

November2018 1-3 Multi

Sagan Fondo: ROAD Windsor Bike Monkey ROAD: 22, 62, 80.5 miles NCa Windsor Road

3-4 Multi

Golden State Fall Series Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, XC, Enduro

R

___________________________________________________________________

Fontana

SCa

MTB

Southridge Park ____________________________________________________

24 Hours of SoCal SoCal Endurance MTB: Endurance

3 Saturday

Bike/Taste the Coast Spectrum Sports ROAD: 7-100 miles

Temecula

SCa

MTB

38000 CA-79 ___________________________________________________________________

Oceanside

SCa

R

Oceanside Pier ____________________________________________________

Cycle of Hope Palo Alto Habitat for Humanity East Bay/Silicon Valley ROAD: 17, 32, 62, and 100 miles

4 Sunday

Dinosaur Dash XXVIII Tustin Public Schools Foundation ROAD: 5, 15, and 50k

9-11 Multi

Revolution Bike Fest Revolution FESTIVAL: MTB Castaic Lake

NCa

R

Hewlett Packard HQ __________________________________________________________________

Tustin

SCa

R

The Marketplace ___________________________________________________________________

Los Angeles

SCa

MTB

____________________________________________________

Santa Rosa Cup CX Bike Monkey CX: Competitive

Santa Rosa

10 Saturday

Tour de Foothills Spectrum Sports ROAD: 20-100 miles

Upland

NCa MX

Sonoma County Fairgrounds ___________________________________________________________________

Event Name Organizer TYPE: length

City, State

FEATURES

Location

Day

SCa

R

210 E. A Street ____________________________________________________

Palm Desert Century Shadow Tour ROAD: 20-130 miles

Palm Desert

SCa

R

University Park ____________________________________________________

Ride the Point Point Loma Rotary Club ROAD: 10, 25, 62 miles

San Diego

CTS Figueroa Mountain GF CTS ROAD: 31, 44, 96 miles

Santa Ynez

SCa

R

Liberty Station ____________________________________________________

NCa

R

MAGAZINE SUPPORTERS support the sponsors COMPETITION events with posted participants and results R ROAD events with 90% or more paved route MTB MOUNTAIN events with 90% or more dirt trail MX MIXED events containing both road and dirt FX FIXED events requiring fixed geared bicycles T TRACK events on a closed oval track CX CYCLOCROSS closed course road/mtb hybrid GX GRAVEL fire roads, grinders and adventure rides Tri TRIATHLON running, swimming, and biking BICYCLISM arts, entertainment and BIKES! SCa NCa Nv Co

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA NEVADA COLORADO

OREGON WASHINGTON ARIZONA AND BEYOND

Or Wa

Az

B

Honor Ride Las Vegas Project Hero ROAD: 20, 40, 60 miles Clark County Gov't Center

Las Vegas

Nv

R

___________________________________________________________________

17 Saturday

Death Valley Century Planet Ultra ROAD: 50 and 100 miles

Death Valley

SCa

R

The Oasis at Death Valley ____________________________________________________

El Tour de Tucson Perimeter Bicycling Association ROAD: 28-106 miles

Tucson

Az

R

Armory Park ____________________________________________________

Padres Pedal the Cause Pedal the Cause ROAD: 25-100 miles

17-18 Multi

27th Annual Challenge Southridge Racing Family MTB: DH, XC, Enduro

San Diego

SCa

R

Petco Park ___________________________________________________________________

Fontana

SCa

Southridge Park

MTB

December2018 8 Saturday

Dirty 30(ish) Quick n Dirty MTB: 30 miles 13920 CA-67

Lakeside

SCa

MTB

___________________________________________________________________

9 Sunday CA Fat Bike Championships Rim Nordic Racing MTB: XC and DH Rim Nordic Ski Park

Running Springs

SCa

MTB

Gainey Vineyard ____________________________________________________

BICYCLIST Magazine


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Making recovery Delicious with Floyd's of Leadville

Floyd's of Leadville CBD Recovery Protein takes post-workout fuel to another level. Inspired by the taste and ingredients of the vanilla powder, we've included two recovery recipes utilizing Floyd’s of Leadville beyond “just add water”.

By Kelley O'Toole

M

y first question when it comes to protein powder usually is, “but does it taste good?” There is nothing worse then chugging down a chalky, chemically-tasting concoction after a long day in the saddle. Honestly part of my motivation in staying on the bike during a particularly grueling segment, is the promise of a deliciously creamy smoothie when I finish. In my years of enduring (or dry swallowing) tacky protein powder, none have compared to the deliciousness of Floyd’s of Leadville CBD Recovery Protein Powder in vanilla. This innovative new protein powder brought to you by former pro cyclist Floyd Landis is one of my new favorites to consume after a workout. The nutritious ingredients, the unique taste, versatility of the product, and the connection to cycling really make this product a stand-out.

CBD

Floyd’s of Leadville Recovery Protein boasts claims of pain relief from the 25mg of CBD (Cannabinoid) contained in the product; it’s one of the main ingredient in their entire product line-up. CBD is defined as a non-psychoactive chemical found in the hemp and cannabis plant. It is taken without the side effects and highs that come from the psychoactive, cannabis flower (aka marijuana). In recent studies on CBD, it has been found to be highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, and shown promising results on the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. CBD is loaded with antioxidants and omega 3’s, which are commonly considered to be the soldiers you want fighting at the front lines against inflammation. Pro cyclists will tell you reducing inflammation is essential to the recovery process, especially Floyd Landis who has had many experiences treating pain and injury. For Landis, he describes discovering CBD as a way to tailor his pain management, “Soon I was no longer dependent on habit forming pills with their negative effects on my health. In fact, there were many, positive effects from CBD: I was pain free and for the first time in a long time. I started to feel happy.” Landis was one of - if not the first - former pro cyclist to share his experience using the plant for pain relief and recovery. As a resident of Colorado, Landis began to introduce this super nutrient to the cycling masses, starting with CBD capsules as a replacement to pain medication, such as Ibuprofen. With the popularity of the capsules, Floyd’s of Leadville developed and expanded their product line to include more ways for cyclists to manage recovery naturally, including the Floyd's of Leadville Recovery Protein in vanilla and chocolate flavors.

Observations

It’s hard to quantify the effectiveness the protein powder had on my recovery, but I did feel consistently good after my rides without experiencing any muscle pain or fatigue. The product also contains nutrients and ingredients that are particularly attractive with 27g of protein per serving from whey protein isolate, 8.5g of BCAAs (Branched Chain Amino Acids) per serving, no artificial flavors, and organic materials only. It's filled with ingredients essential for muscle repair and recovery, and it is easy on the digestive system - two important qualifications of an effective recovery protein for cyclists. The vanilla flavor contains real organic vanilla beans, which really shines through in taste and adds complexity to every concoction. I tried to utilize it in all sorts of ways beyond “just add water”, and I’ve actually found that the protein powder can be a great replacement for sweetener. I tested Floyd’s of Leadville in all the different forms including delicious smoothies and protein powered recovery bites. These are a great snack after a workout, or paired with a smoothie after a long ride. You can also crumble the bites and add them as a topping to your smoothie for a cookie dough-like flavor. You can even make these before your ride and then take them along with you in your jersey pocket - they are very portable. I have made these recovery snacks with other protein powders, but highly recommend Floyd’s of Leadville vanilla flavor. It tastes like dessert and makes recovery a piece-of-cake. (floydsofleadville.com, $39.95) ▲ BICYCLIST.xyz

BICYCLIST protein Bites (BPB) The size of these bites make for a convenient carry-on snack for long rides. 1 cup of chopped walnuts (cashews and almonds also work) 1 cup of pitted dates (OR 1/2 cup of dates, 1/2 cup of raisins) 2 scoops of Floyd's Of Leadville vanilla protein powder 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes Optional: ¼ cup of semi sweet chocolate chips, 1 tbsp of coconut oil (to moisten) 1. Pulse walnuts separately in food processor or blender. Place aside in bowl. 2. Add dates to food processor or blender and pulse to a paste-like consistency. 3. Add date paste, along with the rest of the ingredients, to bowl of walnuts. 4. Knead with your hands to combine. 6. Roll into bite-sized balls, about 1" in diameter. 7. Place bites in the refrigerator or freezer for at least 20 minutes to firm. 8. Enjoy!

Socal Recovery Smoothie (SRS)

Tropical and refreshing

2 scoops of Floyd's of Leadville vanilla 2 cups of almond milk (or liquid of choice) 1 whole frozen banana 1/2 cup of frozen mango 1/2 cup of frozen pineapple 1 tablespoon of unsweetened coconut flakes Optional add-in: 1 tsp of matcha powder for extra antioxidants 1. Blend until smooth 2. Top with coconut flakes 23


BICYCLIST Magazine #152 - Early Fall 2018  

#152 | Project Speed, A Ride Around Lake Tahoe, Electric Folders, Gear Patrol: Bike to Work, Cycling Event and Festival Calendar for Califor...

BICYCLIST Magazine #152 - Early Fall 2018  

#152 | Project Speed, A Ride Around Lake Tahoe, Electric Folders, Gear Patrol: Bike to Work, Cycling Event and Festival Calendar for Califor...