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RED LINE

.

are

on nd

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BACK BAY

DR IV

E

.

yt Fo rs

MBTA TRACKS ABOVE GROUND

Ch

arle

42

43

MASSACHUSETTS STATE HOUSE

44 46

EMERSON COLLEGE

LIN E

.75 Mile

nt St. Tremo

BOYLSTON

45

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY

PARK STREET CHURCH

PARK ST.

1 Mile

ORAN

GE LINE

NEW ENGLAND MEDICAL CENTER

Ave.

CHINATOWN

C H INATOWN

D OR CH EST E R

GOV’T CENTER

DOWNTOWN CROSSING LINE

Blue Hill

CHARLES /MGH

BE AC O N HI L L

BOSTON COMMON

41

Regulations: Please see posted regulations because they vary from park to park. In most of the parks, dogs must be on leash. .5 Mile

. s St

S OUT H EN D

PARKING

TOT LOT PLAYGROUND PICNIC AREA

PUBLIC GARDEN

40 39

St.

FE NW AY

St.

VISTA RESTROOMS

.25 Mile

ARLINGTON

MBTA STATION

GE

St.

V

ARTHUR FIEDLER FOOTBRIDGE

. St

38 37

AN OR

0

FISHER COLLEGE

on ingt Arl

36

EMERGENCY CALL BOX (www.mbta.com)

CAFE

(Franklin Park & Arnold Arboretum only)

. St

LINE

LINE

St.

SUGGESTED BIKE ROUTE ON STREET

PEDESTRIAN ENTRANCE

CAUTION – UNPROTECTED CROSSWALK

ESPLANADE

St.

Cl

Park

St. Sch ool

Glen Rd.

Robeson St.

Montebel

Iffley Rd.

Peter Parley Rd

Park La ne

St

RED

St. ms

llia Wi

lo Rd.

!

SUGGESTED WALKING ROUTE Elm Hil l Ave.

Seaver

th ou tm

on ac Be

OP

ar D

COPLEY

n St.

LO

35

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY NGE

to yls Bo

G

.

PRUDENTIAL

E LIN

W A

Ruggles St.

s rpas ey Ove Cas

Tow er St.

rto n St.

St

EEN

Mo

er

GR

Wa

34 et Ex

MAP DATA MARCH, 2010 SIGNAL-PROTECTED CROSSWALK

PAVED PATHWAYS

(Assuming travel from Arlington Street towards Franklin Park)

4

COMMONWEALTH AVENUE MALL

. St

ORA

LEGEND

Maple St.

5

d

TRINITY CHURCH

ew St.

ldt Ave.

GOLF COURSE

ve. Blue Hill A

iel

LINE

MASS AVE.

SUGGESTED BIKE ROUTE IN PARK

FRANKLIN PARK ZOO

IN

E

LK

LIN

FRANKLIN PARK

EEN

OP

irf Fa

B ACK B AY GREE NE

.

. Dr

IN

LO

te

SYMPHONY

St.

UNPAVED PATHWAYS

Highway

BOSTON SYMPHONY HALL

SOUTH BAY HARBOR TRAIL

V

LK

n Legion

GR

WA

America

es

33

e. h Av

t.

. St

e. Av

alt

yS

. St n to

uc Glo

we

way

ain tM

igh

G

or M

HYNES

r St

on

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H

es W

n gio Le

BOSTON NATURE CENTER

var d St.

ss Ma

ts)

LINE

St

rd fo re He

mm Co

n ica er Am

9

Park Vi Humbo

6

ay

.

w rro to J. S

3

V SCARBORO POND

th e Ar

NORTHEASTERN ORA

NGE

Franklin Park Walking Loop: 2.5 miles

.

es Jam

Harold St.

!

PARK VEHICLES ONLY

(A ve nu e of

Ave

LINE

2

n Av e.

Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Bldg. 13 to Peter’s Hill Summit 10 : roundtrip 3.5 miles

ass M

GREEN

.

Wa shingt on

ing to

LIN

E

St. RUGGLES

Wa lnut Ave.

1

nt

Hemenw

ROX BU RY CROS SI N G

ROXB URY

7

Ci rcu it D WA L K I N G L r O O ive P

mo

E

Jamaica Pond Circumference: 1.5 miles

St.

Can terb ury St

.

EEN

32

on

8

LEMUEL SHATTUCK HOSPITAL

Ave

GR

E

ac Be

umbus Col

MUDDY RIVER

Ave. Westland

.

31

. St

St

rles

Cha

30

gate

n

ey

29

Leverett Pond Loop (Good for families with small children): roundtrip .7 mile

W

ylsto Bo

Sig ou rn

Hu nt

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

Tre

Washingt on St.

lls S Forest Hi t.

FOREST HILLS CEMETERY

WENTSWORTH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

26 28 27

W AY

ORANGE LINE

ROXBURY CROSSING

Riverway Loop (Fenway T Station to Netherlands Road): roundtrip 1.5 miles

gate rles

Rd.

SHEA CIRCLE

FE N MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

ssiz

M T. H OP E

Back Bay Fens Loop (Endpoints: Boylston Bridge 31 & Ave Louis Pasteur): roundtrip 1.6 miles

CHARLESGATE Cha

Aga

LIN

E

JACKSON SQUARE

Public Garden, at Charles St., to Charlesgate East: roundtrip 2.5 miles

CHARLES RIVER KENMORE

E IV R

E

STONY BROOK

E

BACK BAY FENS 25

MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

GREEN

LIN

Ave.

D

EEN

SOUTHWEST CORRIDOR PARK

Washingt on St.

EEN

FENWAY PARK

K

GR

ORANGE LINE

ORANGE LINE

GR

Broo kline

R PA

LONGWOOD MEDICAL AREA

St.

FOREST HILLS

If you would like to add physical activity to your daily life, the Emerald Necklace offers beautiful paths that are convenient to different neighborhoods. Here are a few suggestions. Distances are approximate.

D

!

ISABELLA STEWART GARDNER MUSEUM

MASSART

ORANGE LINE

Ave.

LANDMARK CENTER

FE N WAY

r

SIMMONS COLLEGE

EVANS WAY PARK

h Av e.

LIN

E

ntre

Boylston St

Long woo d Ave

Po nd

Heath St.

E

EMMANUEL COLLEGE

Ave Louis Pasteu

MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND HEALTH SERVICES

EEN

M IS SI ON H ILL

parks

WALKING AND RUNNING DISTANCES

E

FENWAY

WHEELOCK COLLEGE

LO N GWOOD

HARVARD SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

GR

RIV

RK PA

RI VER WAY Pilgrim Rd.

PA RK

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

FENWOOD ROAD

D

RED

all Ave .

Aspinw

GREEN E LINE

LIN

E

Louis Prang

Lochstead Ave.

s St. Burro ugh

.

D

Ave.

Pond St.

HEATH

BRIGHAM CIRCLE

Green St.

Ave

Fran cis St.

t St. snu Che

Pr inc e St .

Ma y St.

ste Dun

Eli ot

kline

LONGWOOD MEDICAL & ACADEMIC AREA INCLUDING BRIGHAM AND WOMEN’S HOSPITAL, BETH ISRAEL DEACONESS MEDICAL CENTER, CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL BOSTON

Ce

St.

Broo

RW AY

EEN

24

. St

W AY

S. Huntington

OLMSTED PARK

e. n Av ngto unti S. H

ng ton

MISSION PARK

BACK OF THE HILL

GR

23

on ylst Bo

OR

St.

ARB

RIVERWAY

AY AICAW

EMERALD N E C K L AC E

C AM BR I DGE

N O RTH

LONGWOOD

TEMPLE ISRAEL

nwealth Commo

St.

ne St.

South

Hu nti

19 JA M

VE

re St. Cent

St.

St .

FO R E S T H I LL S

ill S t.

ill

RIVERWAY

Netherlands Rd. . y Rd 22 wa Park RI

Washington St.

Hyde Park

lk H

21 LEVERETT POND

Centre St.

r St.

seph St. Jo

Jamaica St.

Sou th

RO S L I N DA L E

Har

W

GREEN D LINE

Brook line Av e.

20

.

JAMAICA PLAIN

ARNOLD ARBORETUM

M AT TA PA N

ns rki

AICAWAY

ste Cu

St.

V

14

JA M

Pe

. re St Cent

ey Buss

11

18

St.

Morai

13

V

WARD’S POND

Bynner

hard

17

V

.

Rambler Rd.

St.

r Rd

ince Pr

St.

Ave.

Whit comb

Westch ester R d.

B R

16

JAMAICA POND

!

Pond Ave

ow

Allandale S

t.

A

Orc

10

9)

MURRAY CIRCLE

Centre St.

12

OLMSTED HISTORIC SITE 3/4 MILE

ute

S t.

AY ORW

BROOK LI N E

BROOKLINE VILLAGE

Ro t.( nS to yls Bo

FAULKNER HOSPITAL

KELLY CIRCLE

e. d Av

Cen tre

ay

St.

Pon

.

. St

St er

Perkins

nd

alt W

ma

Po

WALTER STREET BURYING GROUND

ssw Cro

nt Sarge

15 n Dr.

Park

This map was conceived and produced by the Emerald Necklace Conservancy in partnership with the National Park Service (Challenge Cost Share Program).

STATE

PA R K F E AT U R E S 6 Schoolmaster Hill: Named for Ralph Waldo Emerson

White Stadium Overlook Shelter Ruins: Originally a field house, it was one of the few structures Olmsted ever designed.The site was the home to Elma Lewis’ Playhouse in the Park in the ’60s and ’70s, and jazz greats, including Duke Ellington, performed here. The Playstead: A large, active sports area that accommodates basketball, tennis and many field sports. Franklin Park Zoo: Founded in 1912, the zoo’s 72 acres are home to lions, tigers, giraffes, and more. Visitors to the signature Tropical Forest can stand face-to-face with the Zoo’s seven gorillas at one of five glass viewing stations. Heroic statues by Daniel Chester French flank the north entrance. $ www.franklinparkzoo.org William J. Devine Golf Course: Originally a sheep meadow in Olmsted’s design, this 18-hole facility is the second oldest public golf course in the country. Open year round, weather permitting. $ 617.265.4084

who lived near this site in the 1820s when he was a schoolteacher in Roxbury. This hidden spot has picnic tables, century-old white pines, and offers a spectacular view across the park and to the Blue Hills beyond.

7 The Wilderness: A 65-acre native oak forest with

meandering paths and huge Roxbury puddingstone outcroppings, the Wilderness is a picturesque landscape and a good example of urban woodlands.

8 The 99 Steps/Ellicott Arch 9 Scarboro Pond and Hill Peters Hill: The highest point in the Emerald Necklace, 10 Peters Hill (240 feet) offers spectacular views of Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, and the Boston skyline.

11 Explorers Garden: The area around the Chinese Path

has long been used by researchers to test the hardiness of new plants gathered from around the world by plant explorers. Don’t miss rare and unusual plants like the dove tree, paperbark maple, or Franklinia.

12 Larz Anderson Bonsai Collection: See the oldest

and smallest trees at the Arboretum. Open mid-April to early November.

13 Hunnewell Building: This building houses

administrative offices, a library open to the public, and a visitor center with knowledgeable staff to help make the most of your visit. Maps, brochures, restrooms, as well as a small bookstore. Visitor center hours: Mon–Fri 9am–4pm, Sat 10am–4pm, Sun noon–4pm

14 Jamaica Pond Boathouse/Bandstand: Built in

1912, these Tudor-style structures add a rustic element to the pond. Visitors can rent sailboats or rowboats to enjoy unique views of the park or simply drift on the water (www.courageoussailing.org). The Bandstand is home to numerous recreational, educational, and cultural activities. The Boathouse is open April 1 through Veteran’s Day.

15 Parkman Memorial: Daniel Chester French, Sculptor

16 Pinebank Promontory: A peaceful spot in this

busy park, the promontory’s stunning views across the Pond and cooling breezes through tall pines made it an attractive site for three successive mansions in the 1800s. Today, a granite outline marks the footprint of the last mansion that stood here.

17 Ward’s Pond: This secluded pond is a glacial “kettle-

hole� formed at the end of the last ice age. A serene, heavily wooded area, the visitor finds a quiet wilderness, steps from the surrounding city.

18 Wildflower Meadow: Once the site of an indoor ice

skating rink, the meadow now offers unique habitat for butterflies, bees, and other pollinators.

Daisy Field: Olmsted originally designed this as a large 19 meadow surrounded by woods. Today, playing fields serve community groups for little league, softball, soccer and touch football.

20 Allerton Overlook: This semi-circular walk descends

into the park and provides scenic views of the banks and islands of Leverett Pond.

21 Leverett Pond: Leverett Pond is a fine example

of Olmsted’s skill combining landscape, water, and structure into his designs. Islands were created to provide both visual interest and waterfowl breeding area.

22 Bellevue Street Bridge 23 Chapel Street Bridge Area/Historic Bridle

Paths: Bridges played a key role in all of Olmsted’s work, not only along rivers, but everywhere that he sought to separate different modes of transportation. The Chapel Street Bridge separated walkers above from the bridle path below.

24 Round House Shelter 25 Joseph Lee Playground (Clemente Field):

This area accommodates softball, soccer, lacrosse, football, basketball and a recreational running track. One of the diamonds was named in honor of Roberto Clemente—the first Latin American elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame—who died in a plane crash while doing humanitarian work in Central America.

26 James P. Kelleher Rose Garden: Designed by

landscape architect Arthur Shurcliff in the 1920s, this garden was restored by the City of Boston and the Emerald Necklace Conservancy. Combining the best of old and new roses, today’s garden includes over 1,500 plants representing 200 different varieties.

27 War Memorials 28 Japanese Bell: Found on a scrap heap in Yokosuka, this beautiful 325-year-old temple bell was brought back by sailors on the USS Boston in 1945. In 1953, the Japanese government wished it to remain in Boston as a gesture of world peace.

29 Gatehouses: These massive, granite buildings in the Richardsonian style, were built to regulate the waters of Stony Brook flowing into the Muddy River. (Future site of Emerald Necklace Conservancy visitor center)

30 Victory Gardens: Victory Gardens were cultivated

during World Wars I and II to ease demand on the wartime food supply. Today the plots are tended by recreational gardeners who pay a small yearly fee—and grow much more than vegetables.

31 Boylston Bridge: Designed by prominent 19th-century architect H. H. Richardson, this bridge is constructed of Cape Ann granite. Projecting bays, or “tourelles,� offer sweeping views across the Fens.

32 Leif Eriksson Statue 33 Boston Women’s Memorial: Mayor Thomas M. Menino

35 William Lloyd Garrison Statue: Publisher of

“The Liberator� and founder of the New England AntiSlavery Society, Garrison was a powerful voice in the abolitionist movement. Olin Levi Warner, Sculptor

36 Alexander Hamilton Statue: Hamilton, a Founding

Father who also started the central banking system, welcomes visitors to the Mall between Arlington and Berkeley streets. Dr.William Rimmer, Sculptor

38 George Washington Statue: Thomas Ball, Sculptor

reserved the site for a women’s memorial in 1992. The Boston Women’s Commission selected Abigail Adams, Lucy Stone, and Phillis Wheatley as exemplary figures. Meredith Bergmann, Sculptor

Swan Boats: These iconic pedal boats first appeared on 39 the Lagoon in 1877. Designed by Robert Paget, they are

34 Samuel Eliot Morison Statue: This scholar, educator,

and her eight ducklings were created as a tribute to Robert McCloskey, author of a children’s book about ducks that live in the Public Garden’s Lagoon. Nancy SchÜn, Sculptor

and maritime historian was the Pulitzer-prize winning author of the “Oxford History of the United States� (1927) and “The Oxford History of the American People� (1965). Penelope Jencks, Sculptor

Central Burying Ground: Purchased in 1756 and 41 added to the Common in 1839, this is the final resting

place for Revolutionary War soldiers and many others.

and Sailors Civil War Monument: 42 Soldiers Martin Milmore, Sculptor Pond: Site of 1848’s “Water Celebration�inaugurating 43 Frog the city’s public water system, today the pond serves as a

skating rink in the winter and a supervised wading pool in the summer.The Tadpole Playground is nearby.

37 9/11 Memorial

Shaw Memorial: This honors the 54th Regiment of 44 the Massachusetts infantry. Led by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw, the 54th was the first free black regiment in the Union. Bronze relief by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Granite frame and terrace by Charles F. McKim

still owned and operated by the Paget Family. $

40 Make Way for Ducklings Sculpture: Mrs. Mallard

45 Brewer Fountain Boston Common Visitors’ Center and Park 46 Ranger Station: Maps, tourist information, and rest

rooms. This also marks the start of the Freedom Trail Ž. Hours: Monday–Saturday, 8:30 am–5pm; Sunday 10am–6pm

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XX

Profile for Southeast Greenway Campaign

25 southwest corridor park boston  

25 southwest corridor park boston