Page 1

 1 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

SHOW US YOUR TATTOOS PG. 10

HOOPS OF HOPE PG. 3

SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT PUBLICATION APRIL 11 - 17, 2012 Student run since 1911

The PRSSA 2012-2013 National Committee, elected at PRSSA’s 2012 National Assembly in March. Zane Riley is second from the right in the back row. - Submitted photos

Southeast student elected vice president of advocacy for national organization Andrew Tyahla Arrow Reporter

 Zane Riley, a public relations

major at Southeast Missouri State University, became the second student in the state of Missouri to be elected to the Public Relations Student Society of America National Committee. Lara Golike, also from Southeast, was elected vice president of regional activities in 2003. Riley’s position is vice president of advocacy. “It is very nerve-wracking,” Riley said. “I feel like I have a lot of responsiblilty thrust on me at once.” The election occurred at the National Assembly in March. One student from each of the 339 chapters in the U.S. and one in Argentina is chosen to run for a total of 15 positions on the National Committee.

For each position, each candidate had to give a five-minute speech about why they would be the best choice for that position. After each speech, candidates held a question and answer session. “I had a lot of questions asked because my session lasted for about an hour,” Riley said. All attendees voted for each position after all of the speeches were given. The results were announced after the assembly adjourned. As vice president of advocacy, Riley is in charge of upholding the Public Relations Society of America’s code of ethics, which ensures entry into the society regardless of race, age, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status or origin. Riley is also in charge of various ethics competitions and scholarships for public

relations majors. “For me, diversity is more than just including different races and genders,” Riley said. “I would like to see chapters include those of different socioeconomic status in their definitions of diversity.” He hopes to teach ethics, in particular, through the organization’s high school outreach program. “We’re trying to show students that PR workers are more than just spin doctors,” Riley said. “People think that we merely lie in order to generate publicity. Actually, PR is about more than just spinning news stories but rather to bring truth to people.” Riley’s experience at Southeast includes spending three months in China and Taiwan to better accept and understand other cultures. He is also the president of Southeast’s PRSSA chapter and has worked with various political parties in Cape Girardeau.

BRIEFS Check out southeastArrow.com for more stories, blogs and videos.

Entertainment Professor will have a book signing at University Press Dr. Lynn Watson, a professor in

Southeast’s Department of English, will be holding a reading and signing for her new book, “A River So Long.” The event will be at noon April 11 at the University Press building, which is located on 810 Normal Street. “It’s a book of literary fiction,” Watson said. “It started out as flash fiction, really short stories, but grew into a bigger thing.” Watson hopes that the event will help students who are interested in writing fiction or publishing a book of their own. “Short fiction has become so popular these days because of all the online magazines that are geared towards the shorter stories,” Watson said. “That and I’m just hoping that they’ll see that it is possible to do this, to write a book and get it published.”

Storytelling 5th Annual Cape Girardeau Storytelling Festival Nationally recognized

storytellers will present their tales April 13 - 15 in three tents spread around downtown Cape Girardeau and the River Campus. Tickets can be purchased and more information can be found at capestorytelling.com.

Correction Students with a parking pass can park in Commuter Lot A after 1:30 p.m. In the April 4 issue of the Arrow,

Southeast’s PRSSA chapter president Zane Riley.

the wrong times were given for when the commuter parking lots are open for students with any pass to park in. Any student with a Southeast parking pass can park in the preferred commuter lots after 1:30 p.m.

Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


COMPETE  2 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

SOFTBALL team struggling in close games SOUTHEAST AT RISK OF MISSING OVC TOURNAMENT

BRIEFS Check out southeastArrow.com/sports for more stories, blogs and videos.

Southeast Gymnastics Taylor Westrick advanced to championships Southeast gymnast Taylor

Westrick advanced to the NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Championship after tying for first place in the balance beam event at the NCAA Regional in Champaign, Ill. on Saturday. Westrick, the Midwest Independent Conference balance beam champion, shared the event title with Oklahoma’s Megan Ferguson, Stanford’s Amanda Spinner and Illinois’ Alina Weinstein. All four scored 9.900 on their routine, which tied a career-high for Westrick. The championship will be held April 20-22 in Duluth, Ga.

Southeast Track and Field Redhawks win 12 events in home meet The Southeast track and field

team won 12 events in its home meet, the Joey Haines Inivitational, on Friday and Saturday. The Southeast women sprinters won the 4x100-meter and 4x400meter relays, and Angelica Larrier and Jerika Lewis won the 100 dash and 200 dash, respectively. Other Southeast women to win events were Jessica Brown in the long jump, Cara Harbstreet in the high jump, Rebekah Lawson in the 5000 and Gloria Westlake in the 3000 steeplechase. The men had four event winners including Brent Collins in the 3000 steeplechase, Chris Loseman in the 1500, Mohamed Souleiman in the 800 and Blake Smith in the long jump.

Southeast Baseball Redhawks lose two out of three games The Southeast baseball team fell

to 9-24 after losing two out of three games to Eastern Kentucky in OVC play over the weekend. Eastern Kentucky won the first two games of the series 9-1 and 9-6. Southeast took the series finale 9-7 on Sunday, which snapped the team’s four-game losing streak. The Redhawks are last in the OVC with 2-7 conference record. The team will begin a three-game series against Morehead State at 4 p.m. Friday at Morehead, Ky.

Southeast Tennis Redhawks defeated Morehead State Saturday The Southeast tennis team got

its second OVC win by defeating Morehead State 5-2 on Saturday. The Redhawks won the singles competition 5-1 and lost all three doubles matches. Southeast is 2-5 in the OVC and will finish the regular season on the road Saturday against Eastern Illinois and Sunday against SIU Edwardsville.

Erin Neier Arrow Staff Writer

The Southeast Missouri State University softball team has struggled to win close games this season and is near the bottom of the Ohio Valley Conference standings as a result. “It’s been close games, but we’ve got to find a way to execute and pull out those close games,” Southeast coach Lana Richmond said. The Redhawks are 7-12 in conference play. In those games, Southeast has lost by two runs in three games and lost by one run in eight games. The only OVC opponent who has beaten the team by more than two runs was Tennessee Tech by a score of 6-1. “It kind of gives you hope because in those one-run games — if you lose them by an error — it’s like you’ve won the game,” senior shortstop Renee Kertz said. “You’re beating yourself sometimes in those close games.” The team has committed more errors than its opponent in three of its one-run losses. In three of the team’s one-run conference losses, it has had more errors than their opponent. In games against Eastern Illinois, Tennessee Tech and UT Martin the Redhawks had two, four and three errors, respectively. “You’ve got three phases of the game: your pitching, your hitting, your defense,” Richmond said. “We need to get them clicking all at the same time. Alora Marble has just done an outstanding job for us on the mound. She’s been sensational, and she’s just been a hard-luck loser for us out there. But, it’s just a matter of putting those three components together.” Marble leads the pitching staff with a 2.69 ERA. She has a record of 8-11 in 24 appearances in the circle and has struck out 62 batters. Kertz, who had the second best batting average on the team last year at .328, has struggled to hit this season and is batting .174 but is first on the team with 25 RBIs. “It’s all between my ears,” Kertz said, explaining that her hitting has struggled because she’s been thinking too much. “Whenever you’re below sixth place in conference, you’re going to be a little frustrated,” Kertz said. “So, right now it’s a little frustrating, but I think we just need to keep our heads up and it’ll come.” Richmond said that she has not done anything different to motivate her players because she believes motivation “comes from within.” Richmond, who is in her 30th season as Southeast’s coach, is nearing her 850th career win but wants her team to have success and has tried not to think about that achievement. “I’ve coached so many games, I’m just worried about the final score and the outcome,” Richmond said. “Right now my goal is to get this team into the OVC tournament.” The Redhawks are in eighth place in the OVC, and the top six teams make the conference tournament. The team has 10 conference games left this season. They will play at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on April 14 and 1 p.m. on April 15 against Austin Peay.

It’s been close games, but we’ve got to find a way to execute and pull out those close games. Lana Richmond

(Top) Southeast shortstop Renee Kertz bats in the third inning against Eastern Illinois on Wednesday. (Bottom) Kertz waits on the field while her team plays defense. - Photos by Nathan Hamilton

Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


PLAY

 3 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

SHOOT hoops for African children STUDENT ORGANIZATION TO HELP RAISE MONEY FOR HIV/AIDS Bradley Conway Arrow Reporter

Hoops of Hope is a foundation focused on African children who are exposed to HIV/AIDS. It sends volunteer nurses to Africa to help kids that are in need of medical attention and other volunteers who build facilities that better the living conditions in the villages. “When I was in Africa, first of all, it was a life changing moment,” national Hoops of Hope event coordinator Julie Dodd said. “I lived in a home with an orphan named Orlando. He was 8 years old, raised by his grandma because his parents died of AIDS. The orphan realized I was a part of Hoops of Hope and he said something to me that I’ll remember forever.” Four years ago Orlando said this to Dodd: “I want to thank you for giving me my life. One year ago I thought I would die, but then Hoops of Hope built a clinic within walking distance and now I’m well enough to go to school and play soccer.” “It floored me,” Dodd said. “Doing the simple things change people’s lives.” Dodd said the conditions where she stayed in Africa were like a scene from a National Geographic film. In the hills of Zambia, homes had one room and were made of mud with mud floors and grass roofs. People cooked outside on an open fire with no running water. “The striking thing is, as you look around and see the village, you see elderly and young kids, but you don’t see a lot of the middle generation,” Dodd said.

“Old people take care of their grandkids, and sometimes you’ll see 9-year-old kids being the head of their households because their parents died. But the cool thing is that the people are so full of joy and happiness, and they’re very welcoming and would sing and dance for us.” Dodd said Hoops of Hope sponsors many projects throughout the year. “One of our largest projects is building a high school in rural Zambia where there was no school for 70 miles,” Dodd said. “Kids weren’t getting education and were sleeping on floors, so we made two dormitories for male and female as well as dorms for the staff and a water well. We also partnered with Intel and we were able to build the orphans a computer lab. It’s still an ongoing project.” The national Hoops of Hope organization has been setting new goals and developing new projects for 2012. “Our new project is feeding orphans in Malawi for only $40 for an entire year,” Dodd said. “While feeding the orphans we also want to build water wells in India and Zambia. We also want to build a community center and a place to store food, and this one is very important to us.” Hoops of Hope was started by American Austin Gutwein when he was 9 years old. Gutwein was just a kid that wanted to help other people in his life and his main motivation was helping orphans in Africa. “Austin would watch videos and documentaries about

Every dollar raised from Hoops of Hope goes toward children like these in Africa. - Submitted photo children who had AIDS,” Dodd said. “He was so drawn into what was happening, so one day he held an event at his school. He shot 2,057 free throws to raise money for orphans and he [raised] close to $3,000.” Dodd said a child gets AIDS every 14 seconds. “Giving any type of donation to the organization will help a child in need and 100 percent of the proceeds go directly

to the cause,” Dodd said. Hoops of Hope fundraiser planning is a simple process requiring only participants, a basketball and a court. “Hoops of Hope is a basketball shoot-a-thon, much like a walka-thon, where you shoot free throws for children in need,” Dodd said. “Every dollar raised will go towards a project you select it to go towards to help the orphans. Every free throw

that is made helps the kids.” Southeast Missouri State University will host Hoops of Hope at the Student Recreation Center-North. It is sponsored by Towers North Hall Council and will start at 2 p.m. April 22. Teams from five to seven people can enter at a cost of $5 per person. Teams will compete with each other in a free throw contest. The top three scoring teams will receive medals and other prizes.

Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


CREATE  4 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

VANATTICA at RAGEFEST ANNUAL CAMPUS CONCERT TO FEATURE FIVE BANDS FOR FREE Jacqueline Irigoyen Online Editor

Illinois-based band Vanattica, which has been featured at the 2008 Vans Warped Tour and in the video game “Rock Band 3,” will be performed at RAGEFEST. Vanattica is made up of four musicians: Travis Leonard on lead vocals, Drake Gravely on drums, Jaron Lancaster on bass and Brendan Summers on lead guitar and backup vocals. The band formed in 2005 and recorded its first album in Leonard’s mom’s basement. It has been a part of a few record labels, including Clean State Records in Australia and Ignite Records in the United States. “Our most recent record label was Ignite Records, who we are done with now,” Leonard said. “We had Clean State Records for distribution help and we sent in CDs to them and they really liked what we had.” Appearing on the Vans Warped Tour was a big step for the band in getting its name out. “It was sick,” Leonard said. “We were just a baby band at that point and we passed out about 700 free CDs, and I just remember it being really hot and I knew at that point our band had something.” The band’s song “Ready, Set, Go!” was in the game “Rock Band 3” and music was featured in the ESPN promotional commercials for the X-Games. Vanattica’s recent album titled “The King or Me,” which consisted of four songs, was released on March 15, 2011, making it the bands third album.

Vanattica played last year as a headline band and everyone seemed to really like them, and we play their music a lot on the RAGE station. Sean Kenney

Vanattica formed in 2005 with four members. The band has released three albums, with its most recent one released March 2011. They will play at RAGEFEST on April 28. - Submitted photos The band members made a point to make sure each song had different meaning and dealt with real-life situations. “All our songs are about life experiences, but they are all different because we don’t like to just write breakup songs or songs about falling in love,” Leonard said. After building a fan base, and creating the album “The King or Me,” the band will relocate to a new label to further its success. “We are moving out to Los Angeles, Calif. to sign with a huge label and hopefully this will be a new start for us and our success,” Leonard said. Sponsored by the Southeast

Missouri State University student radio station Rage 103.7, Vanattica will be playing at a free concert called RAGEFEST. “Vanattica played last year as a headline band and everyone seemed to really like them, and we play their music a lot on the RAGE station,” station music director Sean Kenney said. RAGEFEST is a concert that showcases bands in the local spotlight. “The event is a lot of fun, and there is no excuse not to go,” Kenney said. “We try to do local bands from the Cape or St. Louis area, or anyone who is available, and we try to have a wide variety.”

Along with Vanattica, RAGEFEST will also include Josh Lynn with the Monstars, Guy Morgan and the FT crew, the Big Idea and Samuriot. “We are excited about the new songs and we plan on our set to

Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741

be a lot stronger than last year, and the audience can expect for a super high-energy show and to be entertained,” Leonard said. RAGEFEST will be from noon to 6 p.m. April 28 at the Academic Terraces.


ENTERTAIN  5 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

TOURING company to perform Don Quixote MOSCOW FESTIVAL BALLET BRINGS CLASSICAL RUSSIAN BALLET TO SOUTHEAST Whitney Law Arrow Reporter

The Moscow Festival Ballet has embarked on a four-month coast-to-coast tour of the United States. This Russian touring company takes its culture and history to the stage with classical ballet productions. On April 27 the Moscow Ballet will bring that culture to Southeast Missouri State University in its performance of “Don Quixote.” The Russian ballet group was founded in 1989 and has toured the United States, United Kingdom and other countries around the world while performing productions of classical ballet, such as “Don Quixote,” “Romeo and Juliet” and “Cinderella.” Southeast junior Keith Johnson, a musical theater major, said that the Moscow Ballet will represent the fact that ballet is more than just feminine and pretty. It is masculine for male dancers, who are known as cavaliers. “I think people will get a different outlook on dance because a lot of people think that ballet is a very feminine dance style, and ballet actually, for men is very masculine, and

they do a lot of lifts and they jump high,” Johnson said. “I think that if a lot of people, men and women, can come and see a ballet it will expand their mind. They’ll be so much more open-minded.” The River Campus hosts a wide variety of professional orchestras, acrobats and ballets, many of which are international. Dance professor Dr. Marc Strauss said that the associate director Bob Cerchio brings multiple Russian groups every year because they are connected to the 150-year long tradition of classical ballet for which Russia is famous. “The Moscow Festival Ballet is part of that tradition, and so what people will see particularly with ‘Don Quixote’, which was originally choreographed in 1869 by Marius Petipa, is a typical classical ballet that is the whole story full of beautiful costumes and a nice set that the company travels around the world with,” Strauss said. “People going to this concert will really get a taste of that tradition and feel as if they are connected to this centuries-old history.” The students can also take

this opportunity to learn from an international group. Johnson said that as a musical theater major, shows like “Don Quixote” and “Young Frankenstein” help him and others in his major. “We can see a different outlook on what it’s like to be in the professional world because all of the national tours are different, and they’re all the way from a different country, so it’s cool for us to see how they do things over there,” Johnson said. “When they come over here we can see their take on dance.” The Moscow Festival Ballet will perform “Don Quixote” at 7:30 p.m. April 27 at the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall. Tickets cost either $40 or $34 depending on the location of the seat and can be purchased at the River Campus box office or at rivercampusevents.com. Students receive a discount at the box office with their Southeast ID. “To get a chance to see part of history that is still alive is a great opportunity, not just for the Cape Girardeau community but certainly for the dance majors in our program,” Strauss said.

I think people will get a different outlook on dance because a lot of people think that ballet is a very feminine dance style, and ballet actually, for men, is very masculine, and they do a lot of lifts and they jump high. Keith Johnson

A&E Calender Upcoming events in arts and entertainment Spring Into Dance 2012

DONALD C. BEDELL PERFORMANCE HALL April 12-14 7:30 p.m. April 15 2 p.m.

Hooked on Jazz!

DONALD C. BEDELL PERFORMANCE HALL April 19 7:30 p.m.

Young Frankenstein

DONALD C. BEDELL PERFORMANCE HALL April 22 7:30 p.m.

Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey’s “Barnum Bash” SHOW ME CENTER April 27 7 p.m. April 28 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. April 29 1 p.m.

“Don Quixote” will be performed by the Russian Festival Ballet at 7:30 p.m. on April 27 at the Donald C. Bedell Performance Hall. - Submitted photo

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SEMOSTORE.COM Officially licensed Semo Redhawks Gear Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


 6 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

 7 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

RALLY

High Hill Hecklers cheer and jeer to support Southeast baseball Jordan Hale Arrow Reporter

S

everal Redhawk flags sway in the wind beyond the leftcenter field fence during each Southeast Missouri State University baseball game. Some people sit in the beds of their trucks with a cooler of beer or stand on the field’s electric box as they heckle opposing players. Others pull up picnic tables, and some stand on the fence. This group of people is known as the High Hill Hecklers. “We are fans just like the people who sit on the other side in the grass on blankets,” Rob Foeste said. “We just get a little bit more rowdy over here.” Foeste, who was born and raised in Cape Girardeau and is a former Southeast student, has been a fan of Southeast baseball all his life. Foeste became a member of the Hecklers in 2000 and once owned a bar called Hecklers on Sprigg Street. The Hecklers have been around long before Foeste joined, though. “We didn’t start it. It’s been going on for generations,” Foeste said. “It’s a community up here. It’s a symbol more than a group of people.” The group includes Southeast students, Southeast alumni and both young and old members of

the community. Everyone has a cooler of beer and some kind of Southeast gear, whether it’s a shirt, a baseball hat or a flag on their truck when they arrive on Cherry Hill, the official name of the spot the Hecklers occupy during games. “We all come from different walks of life,” Foeste said. Foeste said anyone can join him and the rest of the Hecklers to watch the baseball game as long as they follow a few rules, such as clean up after yourself, don’t stand in front of people’s cars and block their view and, most importantly, have a good time. “It’s always good to see Cherry Hill filled with people in that Heckler group,” Southeast baseball coach Mark Hogan said. Hecklers greet newcomers with an ice-cold beer and a handshake as they walk up Cherry Hill. “You walk up here and present yourself as a respectful person, you can pretty much come up here anytime you want,” said a Heckler, who asked to be identified under the alias of Stevie Johnson. While the Hecklers all enjoy each other’s jokes and have a good time, the opposing team’s outfielders might have a different opinion of them. “Center field and left field are the two worst positions to play out here,” Johnson said.

“They catch it the worst.” Foeste remembers a time when he and the Hecklers were at a game between Southeast and Missouri State when the Bears’ Ryan Mantle couldn’t handle the heat from the Hecklers’ jokes. Mantle began giving Foeste and the rest of the Hecklers information about all of his other teammates so they would move on and leave him alone. “He threw all of his teammates right under the bus,” Foeste said. The Hecklers used to have to call media departments to try to get information about some of the players and used that to get in the head of the opposing team’s players. “It’s all a mental game,” Foeste said. Foeste said the invention of Facebook and other social networks have made it a lot easier to find information about players they can use. The Hecklers look up opposing teams’ girlfriends, sisters and mothers to use their names in jokes. This is part of the reason why some sports teams are not allowed to have Facebook or use other social networks while the season is going on. “It’s just about having a good time,” Foeste said. “They’re used to it.”

The baseball teams aren’t the only ones who get attention from the Hecklers. Down the hill from where the Hecklers set up camp is a Frisbee golf course. As the Frisbee golf players step up to throw, all of the Hecklers yell “Quiet on the tee” and laugh. It is all in good fun, and some of the Frisbee golfers will even have a beer or two with the Hecklers. They aren’t just out there to heckle the other team and bother the Frisbee golfers. They do a little entertaining, too, as Foeste calls it. “Beach day and meat day are two of our most fun days out here,” Foeste said. On beach day the Hecklers lay out a tarp, pour sand down, set up a Slip ‘n Slide with water and sit out in flip flops and shorts like they are actually on the beach. Meat day is when everyone brings hot dogs, burgers or steaks to put on the grill to celebrate their biggest grilling day of the season. “Tell him about the tiki torches and the bar,” another Heckler said. In addition to beach day and meat day, an older Heckler reminded Foeste of the time they lit tiki torches when it got cold and also when they set up a bar on Cherry Hill during a game. “Now that we don’t have doubleheaders, which is a sad

state of affairs, we come out here and play wiffle ball,” Foeste said. “This gives us enough time to get a few beers in before the game, so it’s kind of like a doubleheader.” Some of the Hecklers who attend every Southeast baseball game don’t know each other outside of Cherry Hill, but while they are at a game one would think they have known each other all their life. “I don’t even have these guys’ numbers,” Johnson said. “They have never been to my house, I have never been to theirs, but I know I’m going to see them up here at these games and have a good time.” Southeast baseball is the reason they all come together and hang out. “It’s about the game, not about us,” Foeste said. “We are just people who love the game.” Hogan and the Southeast baseball team notice and appreciate all of the support they receive from the Hecklers each game. “They’re unbelievable,” Hogan said. “I think they are some of the best fans in the OVC, if not the best.” Foeste doesn’t believe the tradition will ever end. “It’ll keep on as long as baseball is played,” he said.

Catcher Shane Blair hits a single on Saturday. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton

High Hill Hecklers watch Southeast’s baseball game from beneath their tent on the parking lot on Cherry Hill on Saturday. - Photo by Jordan Hale Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741

Shane Blair behind the plate during Southeast’s game on Saturday. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton

The High Hill Hecklers spread out across Cherry Hill to cheer for the Redhawks during Saturday’s game. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


 6 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

 7 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

RALLY

High Hill Hecklers cheer and jeer to support Southeast baseball Jordan Hale Arrow Reporter

S

everal Redhawk flags sway in the wind beyond the leftcenter field fence during each Southeast Missouri State University baseball game. Some people sit in the beds of their trucks with a cooler of beer or stand on the field’s electric box as they heckle opposing players. Others pull up picnic tables, and some stand on the fence. This group of people is known as the High Hill Hecklers. “We are fans just like the people who sit on the other side in the grass on blankets,” Rob Foeste said. “We just get a little bit more rowdy over here.” Foeste, who was born and raised in Cape Girardeau and is a former Southeast student, has been a fan of Southeast baseball all his life. Foeste became a member of the Hecklers in 2000 and once owned a bar called Hecklers on Sprigg Street. The Hecklers have been around long before Foeste joined, though. “We didn’t start it. It’s been going on for generations,” Foeste said. “It’s a community up here. It’s a symbol more than a group of people.” The group includes Southeast students, Southeast alumni and both young and old members of

the community. Everyone has a cooler of beer and some kind of Southeast gear, whether it’s a shirt, a baseball hat or a flag on their truck when they arrive on Cherry Hill, the official name of the spot the Hecklers occupy during games. “We all come from different walks of life,” Foeste said. Foeste said anyone can join him and the rest of the Hecklers to watch the baseball game as long as they follow a few rules, such as clean up after yourself, don’t stand in front of people’s cars and block their view and, most importantly, have a good time. “It’s always good to see Cherry Hill filled with people in that Heckler group,” Southeast baseball coach Mark Hogan said. Hecklers greet newcomers with an ice-cold beer and a handshake as they walk up Cherry Hill. “You walk up here and present yourself as a respectful person, you can pretty much come up here anytime you want,” said a Heckler, who asked to be identified under the alias of Stevie Johnson. While the Hecklers all enjoy each other’s jokes and have a good time, the opposing team’s outfielders might have a different opinion of them. “Center field and left field are the two worst positions to play out here,” Johnson said.

“They catch it the worst.” Foeste remembers a time when he and the Hecklers were at a game between Southeast and Missouri State when the Bears’ Ryan Mantle couldn’t handle the heat from the Hecklers’ jokes. Mantle began giving Foeste and the rest of the Hecklers information about all of his other teammates so they would move on and leave him alone. “He threw all of his teammates right under the bus,” Foeste said. The Hecklers used to have to call media departments to try to get information about some of the players and used that to get in the head of the opposing team’s players. “It’s all a mental game,” Foeste said. Foeste said the invention of Facebook and other social networks have made it a lot easier to find information about players they can use. The Hecklers look up opposing teams’ girlfriends, sisters and mothers to use their names in jokes. This is part of the reason why some sports teams are not allowed to have Facebook or use other social networks while the season is going on. “It’s just about having a good time,” Foeste said. “They’re used to it.”

The baseball teams aren’t the only ones who get attention from the Hecklers. Down the hill from where the Hecklers set up camp is a Frisbee golf course. As the Frisbee golf players step up to throw, all of the Hecklers yell “Quiet on the tee” and laugh. It is all in good fun, and some of the Frisbee golfers will even have a beer or two with the Hecklers. They aren’t just out there to heckle the other team and bother the Frisbee golfers. They do a little entertaining, too, as Foeste calls it. “Beach day and meat day are two of our most fun days out here,” Foeste said. On beach day the Hecklers lay out a tarp, pour sand down, set up a Slip ‘n Slide with water and sit out in flip flops and shorts like they are actually on the beach. Meat day is when everyone brings hot dogs, burgers or steaks to put on the grill to celebrate their biggest grilling day of the season. “Tell him about the tiki torches and the bar,” another Heckler said. In addition to beach day and meat day, an older Heckler reminded Foeste of the time they lit tiki torches when it got cold and also when they set up a bar on Cherry Hill during a game. “Now that we don’t have doubleheaders, which is a sad

state of affairs, we come out here and play wiffle ball,” Foeste said. “This gives us enough time to get a few beers in before the game, so it’s kind of like a doubleheader.” Some of the Hecklers who attend every Southeast baseball game don’t know each other outside of Cherry Hill, but while they are at a game one would think they have known each other all their life. “I don’t even have these guys’ numbers,” Johnson said. “They have never been to my house, I have never been to theirs, but I know I’m going to see them up here at these games and have a good time.” Southeast baseball is the reason they all come together and hang out. “It’s about the game, not about us,” Foeste said. “We are just people who love the game.” Hogan and the Southeast baseball team notice and appreciate all of the support they receive from the Hecklers each game. “They’re unbelievable,” Hogan said. “I think they are some of the best fans in the OVC, if not the best.” Foeste doesn’t believe the tradition will ever end. “It’ll keep on as long as baseball is played,” he said.

Catcher Shane Blair hits a single on Saturday. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton

High Hill Hecklers watch Southeast’s baseball game from beneath their tent on the parking lot on Cherry Hill on Saturday. - Photo by Jordan Hale Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741

Shane Blair behind the plate during Southeast’s game on Saturday. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton

The High Hill Hecklers spread out across Cherry Hill to cheer for the Redhawks during Saturday’s game. - Photo by Nathan Hamilton Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741


ďƒ‚ 8 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

ASK

GRADUATE student served year in Iraq LEVI BOLLINGER IS WORKING ON COMPLETING HIS MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH Tina Eaton

Humanities Festival about?

Managing Editor

L

evi Bollinger is a teacher, student, poet, donator and veteran. The Jackson, Mo., native is studying for his Master of Arts in English at Southeast Missouri State University when he isn’t teaching high school English at Oak Ridge High School. Bollinger served a year-long tour of duty in Iraq in 2003 and now uses that experience as material for his poetry. He will be featured at the St. Louis Humanities Festival on April 13 and in Southeast professor Dr. Swartwout’s anthology of creative work done by veterans.

How did you begin writing poetry? Bollinger: To be honest, I haven’t written a whole lot of poetry. I’m taking a creative writing course this spring, and the ďŹ rst poem that I submitted to the class there was one about my experiences in the war in Iraq and the class liked it and, Dr. Swartwout, she encouraged me to submit it to some other publications. She’s actually the editor for an anthology that’s being published by veterans and she recommended me to this humanities festival in St. Louis. And they invited me to present a couple poems up there and that’s what I’ll do. But other than that it’s not like I have a full-time writing program or exhaustive regime of writing. Just a happy circumstance I guess that got the poem noticed.

What is the poem that you will read at the St. Louis

Bollinger: The one I submitted that Dr. Swartwout passed on, it was about [how] we used to sit up at night in Iraq in lawn chairs, and there was a logistical base nearby and it was attacked pretty frequently by mortars. And we could sit there in relative safety and hear the mortars exploding and just imagine what was going on over there with everyone else. We’d just sit around and talk and could just imagine what was happening for everyone else.

How long were you in the military? Bollinger: I was in the Army Reserves when I was going to college for my undergrad. And in 2003, I guess it was February, I was mobilized to active duty and I spent a couple months mobilizing in the states with the unit, and then I was sent overseas in May. Spent a month or so in Kuwait and then it was on to the Baghdad Airport where I spent the next year or so. I came back in May 2004.

What did you experience in Iraq? Bollinger: Well mostly I saw the Baghdad Airport. Our unit was an engineer battalion, and we were responsible for building a lot of structures on the base itself. So we had electricians and plumbers and carpenters and earthmovers and things like that so we were pretty much getting the facilities in place for the troops to stay there for a longer time. Some of the big camps that are around Baghdad

Airport now are some of the ones we worked on while we were there.

You are also involved with the Operation Christmas Child program through your church. Can you tell me more about that? Bollinger: Operation Christmas Child is a remarkable program. It’s through Samaritan’s Purse, which is a Christian organization, and every year we collect shoeboxes full of gifts —everything from hygiene supplies to school items to stuffed animals — and we send those around the world to children who are less fortunate than here in the states. It’s been a growing program ever since they started. Last year they sent over 8.5 million shoeboxes to over 90 countries around the world. It has a tremendous impact. A lot of the kids who receive these boxes really would have no means to go to school if it weren’t for the school supplies they get. They have very few opportunities. And so it’s a wonderful program that my wife and I are very blessed to be a part of. Actually, the past few years have been very special because my wife Andy is in the states now, and she is from Romania. She used to receive these shoeboxes when she was a little girl in Romania. And now that she’s here in the states and she found out that our church is involved with the program she’s been very excited to be a part of that.

Levi Bollinger and his wife Andy are active in Operation Christmas Child. - Submitted photo

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INFORM  9 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

TOSSING lemons for charity GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA PLANS EVENT TO BENEFIT CANCER RESEARCH

Carnival will take place at the Academic Terraces Josh Hartwig Arrow Reporter

Members of the Gamma Sigma Sigma sorority at Southeast Missouri State University are hoping to turn lemons into lemonade — and cash that will help fight pediatric cancer. The Lemon Carnival, the first of what the sorority hopes will be an annual fundraising event, will take place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 13 on the Academic Terraces at Southeast. Money raised from the event will benefit Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. “We have planned a lemon carnival for Alex’s Lemonade Stand to educate our fellow students on childhood cancer,” said Gamma Sigma Sigma service vice president Alexandra Kaufman.

The foundation began as a simple lemonade stand in Alexandra “Alex” Scott’s front yard in Manchester, Conn. Scott was born Jan. 18, 1996, and was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a cancer that usually occurs in children and infants and develops from nerve tissue, shortly after. According to the foundation’s website, in 2000, 4-year-old Scott received a stem cell transplant and told her mother she wanted to set up a lemonade stand when she left the hospital. Scott wanted to give the money to doctors to allow them to help other kids like her. Later that year, with the help of her older brother, her lemonade stand raised $2,000. During Scott’s battle with cancer, her family held yearly front-yard lemonade stands to benefit childhood cancer research.

News spread, and people from all around the world held lemonade stands and donated the proceeds to Alex’s Lemonade Stand. Scott passed away at age 8 in 2004, and the organization since has become a national fundraising movement. The foundation has raised more than $50 million, funding more than 200 pediatric cancer research projects nationwide. The April 13 event at Southeast will include games and organizational questionnaires for participants to complete for the opportunity to win prizes. Donations will be collected. “There will be various booths, including a free lemonade stand, lemon-tossing contest, lemon-eating/squeezing contest and a seek-and-find for lemons,” Gamma Sigma Sigma

event chair Jenny Pearl said. There will also be booths with informational pamphlets about Alex’s Lemonade Stand, pediatric cancer and a donation center. “If students answer questions at this booth, they will gain chips to advance them in the games and give them special additives for their lemonade,” Pearl said. Pearl said the goals of the Lemon Carnival are to increase students’ awareness of Alex’s Lemonade Stand, to educate students on the foundation and the people it benefits and to promote one of Gamma Sigma Sigma’s five national service partners—Alex’s Lemonade Stand.

Alex’s Lemonade Stand has raised over $50 million since 2000.

To learn more about Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, visit alexslemonade.org.

Web series aims to stop bike thievery

“To Catch a Bike Thief” premiered on April 5. It is available online at tocatchabikethief.com. - Submitted photo

“We’d actually do a stakeout, so there were a few nights or a couple of weekends where we’d lock it up, just kind of leave it there, and wait for someone to steal it,” Lou said. Lou hopes that his new web series will help raise awareness about bike thefts everywhere. “We want to basically get people talking about the problem and showcase some tools, technology and solutions that cyclists in communities can use to protect themselves against bike theft,” Lou said.

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tracker on my bike,’” Lou said. Eventually Lou found a GPS tracking system that was wellsuited for attaching to a bicycle. “In the process of researching trackers we found a reasonably good one from a site that, believe it or not, specializes in selling devices for catching cheating spouses,” Lou said. Lou hid the GPS on the bike by creating a compartment within the frame. All that was left to do was to lock up the bike and wait for it to be stolen.

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“There’s several things that we can do, it’s just what the circumstances are surrounding the theft,” Hickey said. Lou began the process to catch bike thieves by building a bait bicycle and researching different types of GPS tracking systems. He had a difficult time finding GPS tracking systems specifically made for bikes. “That kind of surprised us a little bit because I think that we’re definitely not the first to say ‘Man, I wish I could put a GPS

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”To Catch a Bike Thief” is a new web series about how to combat bike theft, which is a problem at Southeast Missouri State University and Cape Girardeau. Every year cyclists are subjected to the constant threat of bike theft. It wasn’t until Canadian web producer Ingo Lou had his bike stolen that he found a way to combat bike theft with the show “To Catch a Bike Thief.” The pilot episode aired on April 5 and is available online at tocatchabikethief.com. Bike theft is also an issue in Cape Girardeau and on the Southeast campus. According to officer Darin Hickey, a spokesman for the Cape Girardeau Police Department, there are an estimated 50 to 70 bike thefts a year. “I think that any time there is a theft and it’s continuous theft, then that’s something that we have to take a look at, see what’s going on and if there is something we can try to do to curb that,” Hickey said. “Any crime is an issue.” Lou, a producer with Sweet Currant Productions, said that the idea for the show came to him after having his fourth bike stolen

on Jan. 13, 2011. He called a friend enraged about the situation, and they began discussing ways to combat bike theft. “We then sort of naturally evolved to say ‘Well, couldn’t we just set it up so we could talk to bike thieves?’ and explore the issue of bike theft in a lot more depth,” Lou said. “That’s sort of how ‘To Catch a Bike Thief’ was born.” Police officers also have their own way to combat bike theft. The Cape Girardeau Police Department began a new bike registration program in December 2011 to make catching bike thieves easier. Anyone can register their bike by bringing it to the police station. Upon registration, owners are given a tamper-proof sticker to identify the bike, a picture is taken of it and owner information is documented. “We’re hoping this can be of assistance to our officers as well as members of the community,” Hickey said. When a bike is stolen the owner can report it to the police department and provide the serial number, and then the officer reports it to the National Crime Information Center for officers to keep a lookout for the stolen bike.

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 10 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

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Like us and submit your comments on FACEBOOK at Southeast Arrow and on TWITTER @southeastArrow

UPLOAD YOUR PHOTOS AT SOUTHEASTARROW.COM, AND YOU MAY SEE YOURSELF HERE

Look for our tattoo issue coming out next week. Submit a photo of your tattoo for a chance to win two free movie tickets to Cape West 14 Cine. Submit your photos to:

What is the coolest or worst tattoo you’ve ever seen? Jacqueline I knew this girl once who had a picture of Tinkerbell and the word “believe” on her leg. The Tinkerbell looked like a little kid drew it, and “believe” was spelled wrong.

southeastArrow.com/share

Dan Some chick in high school got a dragon tattoo on her mid back. But that’s not the bad part. The only reason she got the tattoo was to make her dad angry.

Submit your photos online @ southeastArrow.com/share.

Rachel A guy got a huge rose tattoo on his side in remembrance of his grandma. It was super awesome. It had to have hurt, though! I think he said it took hours.

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 11 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

THINK

Save a life

The benefits of blood drives

Q: What motivates you to give blood? The Red Cross will have a blood drive at Southeast on April 20 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dempster Hall. Ellen Foley Communication Disorders Major

A:

Every 56 days I have the opportunity to save a life. It’s even possible to save more than that. Every 56 days I have the opportunity to save three lives. Many people set out in life to be something; whether it is to change the world, walk on the moon or simply to succeed, everybody has a goal. One of my personal goals has always been to be bigger. I have always tried to find the right way to be the bigger person or be a better role model or something of the like. The most challenging way to be bigger, though, was to be bigger than something bigger than me. When I was 16, I donated blood for the first time. I sat in my school gymnasium reading the pamphlet and trying not to be too nervous. It took about 10 minutes for me to donate my entire pint of blood. I ate my snack and went back to class. I never thought much of it until a few weeks later when my phone rang. “Ellen? This the Red Cross. We wanted to thank you for your donation

and let you know that your blood saved two lives this week.” That’s all it took to make me a regular donor. Donating blood is a way to be bigger. It only requires me to be healthy, make sure my iron is high enough and about an hour of my time. With that little duty, how could it be a hassle? When you donate blood, it is used to save up to three people’s lives. But that’s only the physical part. Each time a person dies, the people that love them feel a part of them die as well. A pint of blood not only saves one person’s life, it can save an entire family. Without donated blood, my mother would be dead. She required three blood transfusions in the childbirth of my oldest brother. Without someone’s selfless donation, my mother would be gone, my brother would have no siblings, my dad would have no wife and I would be nonexistent. I understand the many reasons why people choose not to donate blood, but I know what an impact someone’s gift made in my life. Even though they are people I will never meet, it is pretty neat to know that someone, somewhere, is alive because of me.

Dan Fox, editor • editor@southeastArrow.com Tina Eaton, managing editor • news@southeastArrow.com Elizabeth Fritch, arts & entertainment editor Visit the Arrow Travis Wibbenmeyer, sports editor • office at 5 p.m. sports@southeastArrow.com on Wednesday in Kelso Hope, photo editor Grauel 117 if you are interested in Rachel Weatherford, design editor joining our team. Jacqueline Irigoyen, online editor Mike O’Neal, advertising manager • advertising@southeastArrow.com Rick Sovanski, marketing manager Tyler Oberlander, awareness manager Dr. Tamara Zellars Buck, adviser Rachel Crader, content adviser

To submit ideas for our point and counterpoint page, please email editor@southeastArrow.com. Submit your group or individual photos to southeastArrow.com for possible Publication in the print edition. Submit your events for coverage at semoevents.com. Submit your story ideas to news@southeastArrow.com.

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 12 ARROW • week of April 11 - 17, 2012

SUPPORT STUDENTS raise awareness for global issues CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS RAISE FUNDS FOR AUTISM SPEAKS AND KONY 2012

Cover the Night planned for Cape Girardeau Free the Slaves will cover Cape with posters to promote Cover the Night Roxie Meyer Arrow Staff Writer

Students at Southeast Missouri State University are preparing for Cover the Night, a project designed to make Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army household names. Cover the Night, sponsored by Invisible Children, Inc., is a nationwide event where participants cover their cities with posters in one night to urge citizens and the government to stop Kony’s murderous army. Invisible Children is selling “action kits” on their website that consist of two serial numbered bracelets, posters, button pins and fliers. The organization’s ultimate goal is for Americans to contact their policy-makers and push President Barack Obama to send troops to Africa to stop Kony. Invisible Children helps African communities affected by the LRA by providing education and mentoring, rebuilding schools, rehabilitating kidnapped children and protecting civilians. “We want to go to St. Louis, because we have more friends there, and cover the city with posters from the website,” Southeast international student Orphee Ondo said. Ondo is participating with a group for friends not affiliated with a student organization. Ondo’s group bought an action kit for Cover the Night from the Invisible Children website in January. “Kony murdered, tortured and kidnapped people,” Ondo said. “It is not about the present, it’s about the future. It doesn’t matter if it is 10, 15 or even 20

years after the fact, he should still pay for his crimes.” By the time Southeast student organization Free the Slaves was prepared to purchase their kit in early April they were sold out. “There are 20 students right now that are going to participate in the event,” Free the Slaves adviser and student Amy Brinkley said. “They are going to make their own posters a mimic of the Kony posters.” According to Brinkley, students will put up posters and chalk about the movement around Cape Girardeau. “I think for our club we are all about raising awareness on campus about global injustices, especially one that has garnered the interest of the community,” Brinkley said. While some students have answered the call to action, some Southeast professors are still reserving judgment on Kony 2012. “The push is coming more from those groups than the nations themselves, pushing their own agendas,” political science professor Dr. Debra Holzhauer said. “Social media has really popularized the issue, but this is nothing new. I look at it with a jaundiced eye and ask why now?” Ten days after the KONY 2012 video went viral, its director Jason Russell was found pacing naked on a street corner in San Diego. The CEO of Invisible Children said Russell’s breakdown was due to “exhaustion, dehydration and malnutrition.” “I thought Kony 2012 would be [this generation’s] opportunity,” Southeast student Katie Herring said. “But given the controversy, maybe I was wrong.”

This poster will be used in the Cover the Night campaign. People can download this and others at Kony2012.com.

Alpha Xi Delta will host a run/walk for Autism Speaks Daniel Ruble Arrow Reporter

According to a recent study, the number of people affected by autism is on the rise. A Southeast Missouri State University sorority is seeking to raise awareness and money for the disorder. The Alpha Xi Delta sorority at Southeast will host a 5K run and walk for Autism Speaks, a national autism advocacy organization. According to St. Louis Children’s Hospital, autism is a “neurological and developmental disorder that usually appears during the first three years of life.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a study that showed an increase in the number of people with autism. The 2008 study showed that one in every 88 U.S. children

has autism, a 23 percent increase since 2006 and a 78 percent increase since 2002. According to Autism Speaks, one in every 54 boys and one in every 252 girls have been diagnosed with autism in the United States. The number of cases is higher than diabetes, AIDS, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and Down syndrome combined. Lunch will be provided for participants after the race. Baskets of products and coupons from restaurants will also be raffled off. Bubbles, chalk, bags, hula hoops and face painting will be available for children and their families following the event. Members of SEMO Alliance for Disability Independence, an organization that provides services to persons with disabilities to enable them

to remain in their own homes and communities, will be available to answer questions and provide people with information about autism. Kelsey Bierman, a Southeast sophomore and philanthropy chair for Alpha Xi Delta, said she hopes everyone can come out and support the cause. “I hope that the race helps make people aware of the [rising] cases of autism,” Bierman said. “We need to help make a difference.” The race will begin at 10 a.m. April 15 at Pavilion 1 at Arena Park. Registration is open until race day. The cost to participate is $20.

I hope that the race helps make people aware of the [rising] cases of autism. We need to help make a difference. Kelsey Bierman

For more information about autism, visit the Autism Speaks website at www.autismspeaks.org.

Vol 102, No. 12 • © A partnership with Southeast Missouri State University and Rust Communications • To advertise, call 573-388-2741

Southeast ARrow April 11, 2012  

Student publication for Southeast Missouri State