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MAY 24–30, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 31 NO. 47 | PITCH.COM

OF F

the

Fifty years

RADAR by Jonathan Bender

after a bomb downed

Continental Flight 11, crash site Unionville has become a beacon.


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Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Aaron Carnes, Kyle Eustice, April Fleming, Micah Gutweiler, Ian Hrabe, Dan Lybarger, Chris Parker, Nadia Pflaum, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Brent Shepherd, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer, Crystal K. Wiebe

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, William Lounsbury, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Jaime Albers Senior Multimedia Designer Amber Williams Multimedia Designer Christina Riddle

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Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Retail House Account Manager Eric Persson Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

O FF THE R ADAR Remembering a KC-bound plane that fell from the sky over Unionville in 1962.

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

BY J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Christina Riddle Front Desk Coordinator Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry

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Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun

FR O NTI ER DAYS Scenes from UCP’s open-studios weekend P H O T O S BY B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

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Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

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Does Westport finally have a bona fide Italian restaurant? BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

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C O P Y R I G H T

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QUESTIONNAIRE

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What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Emergency-medicine doctor. I love

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the pace and work well under pressure. Most people don’t know I was pre-med for four years of college, before choosing architecture and historic preservation.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Pot Pie Where do you drink? Chez Charlie’s is a go-to favorite for darts with friends. It’s like a time capsule. Or happy hour at Pierpont’s. Nothing is better than a classic dirty martini and oysters. Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Right now, I’m saving for a kitchen renovation. My house was built in 1919, and my kitchen is probably from the 1970s. It needs help, and I’m not even sure if my oven is safe to use. What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Power & Light District Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

That’s a very good question because I have friends coming in a few weeks! I’m planning on Loose Park, Lill’s on 17th for dinner, Kauffman Center, and the Bloch addition to the NelsonAtkins. The Mutual Musicians Foundation, too, if we can stay up long enough for their latenight jam session.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when it …” Developed the parks and boulevards system.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Neglected to build mass transit or implement smart growth initiatives. “Kansas City needs …” More young profes-

sionals who have studied or lived elsewhere, to bring new ideas and fresh perspectives.

“If I were in charge …” Kansas City would have

stronger preservation laws and public policies to encourage the reuse of old buildings.

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“People might be surprised to know that I …” Have an obsession with jigsaw puzzles. Once I start them, I can’t stop.

takes up a lot of space in my iTunes:

All of the music I inherited from my sister’s old iPod. I discovered some of my favorites: Beulah, Yo La Tengo, Elliott Smith and Daft Punk.

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Kansas City Foundation

Who or what is your sidekick? The two things that go to bed with me: my cairn terrier, Angus, and my iPad.

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What TV show do you make sure you watch? Mad Men and Girls. Friday Night Lights and Six Feet Under are all-time favorites.

What movie do you watch at least once a year? I never watch a movie twice.

What local tradition do you take part in every year? I like to go to the drive-in at least once

a year.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: I don’t like roller coasters. But if you could produce Tim Riggins, I would go.

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: People who don’t say what they mean

or mean what they say.

What subscription do you value most? Netflix. I also really value my dad’s subscription to Esquire — so much more clever and smart than girl magazines. He wonders why I keep getting it for him for Christmas every year. Last book you read: Breaking Night by Liz Murray (not to be confused with Breaking Dawn). Favorite day trip: Weston at Christmastime What is your most embarrassing dating moment? Well, my actual most embarrassing

moment cannot be explained in this amount of space, but it involved me not wearing my glasses and a zoo.

Describe a recent triumph: Successfully getting my grandmother moved from rural North Carolina to assisted living in Kansas City without any mental breakdowns from myself, my mother or my grandmother. We are both still in the will. The Historic Kansas City Foundation’s annual meeting is at Foundation Architectural Reclamation (1221 Union) Thursday, May 31, at 5:30 p.m.


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oe Kelly blindly weaves though a pitchblack Memorial Hall in Kansas City, Kansas. The trim 35-year-old CEO of the Titan Fighting Championship mixed martial arts promotion crosses the length of the floor before reaching the switch to the arena lights. Illumination reveals a couple of hundred blue plastic chairs in neat rows, set up for a high school graduation on the glossy, blond hardwood floor. Friday night, the chairs will be replaced by a hexagonal cage for Titan Fighting’s 22nd fight card. Inside the structure, young muscle-bound fighters will try to take the first brutal step toward stardom in MMA’s premier fighting league, Ultimate Fighting Championship. “We consider ourselves the NCAA to the UFC’s NFL or NBA,” Kelly says. “We’re getting the highest-level, brightest prospects before they go on to the UFC.” But Kelly, who has been promoting MMA fights full time for a couple of years, says he’s trying to avoid the mistakes that other small promoters have made trying to emulate the UFC’s LOGT billion-dollar success. P E R O M INE A “Everyone wants to ONL M / P L O G be the biggest, the best, P IT C H .C O the brightest at what they do,” Kelly says. “So all these groups have spent so much money trying to compete, to overtake and supplant the UFC. That’s not our goal. I’d rather be the successful Jones Soda to [Coca-Cola].” That doesn’t mean he plans to call Memorial Hall home forever. “We’re expanding but in a measured pace,” he says. “[We’re] trying to hit that sweet spot where we’re the No. 1 feeder program to the UFC.” Titan Fighting isn’t just a launching pad for fresh, unscarred fighters. Sometimes it’s a second chance for competitors whose MMA careers have stubbornly stalled. For fighters who have lost their grip on large purses and big crowds in international bouts, the 3,300-seat Memorial Hall can be the stage for a counterattack on forced retirement. One-t i me U FC contender A nt hony “Rumble” Johnson is Titan 22’s redemption story — fighting in the main event against fellow former UFCer David Branch. Johnson, a 28-year-old Florida native, failed to make weight a few times as a welterweight and middleweight during the end of his UFC run. Dana White, UFC’s bombastic president, fired Johnson during a post-fight press conference after Johnson missed weight and lost at a January event in Rio de Janeiro. “The question everybody wants to know is, ‘Is he gone?’ ” White said. “Yes, he is. Three strikes and you’re out.” Titan banks on gathering the UFC’s fallen quasi stars. Kelly pounces when the UFC cuts fighters for too many losses or for not being a drawing card or, really, for any other rea-

Titan is small — it tweeted in search of a 135-pound fighter available for Titan 22 the same day that Kelly spoke with The Pitch — but son. Kelly works out a desirable cash purse Kelly says it’s time to convert his operation (between $1,000 and $25,000) and slaps the from KCK-centric to a regional promotion. fighter’s name on top of the card. In a musty, windowless office across the Titan draws crowds eager to see somewhat concourse from a beer concession stand in big names up close. The fighters use Titan as Memorial Hall (which he manages for the city), a way to pick up wins on less experienced op- he discusses his plans for a June fight card in ponents and vault themselves back into the Fort Riley, Kansas. UFC’s lucrative good graces. They also relish “UFC does a fight for the troops every year, the exposure because HDNet, Mark Cuban’s and this is our first foray into that,” he says. cable channel, broadcasts the fights. Kelly expects the fight to take place on Fort “What they have in their mind is, ‘A couple Riley’s airfield. Outdoor shows can be risky, fights on national television which he has learned from against good names for attempting to run shows at Titan, and I’m back in the CommunityAmerica Ball"I'd rather be UFC,’ ” Kelly says. park that were rained out. the successful Kelly’s presence in MMA But the Army base left him promotion is a testament to few choices. Jones Soda the sport’s growth — and “There’s another [indoor] to [Coca-Cola]." to boxing’s decline. He place where we could do it speaks thoughtfully about that would have held the his business and its future. requisite number of peoIn almost every way, he is the antithesis of ple,” he says. “But they actually have a new the cartoony cliché of a practitioner of the top-secret airplane that’s going to be in that sweet science. But that’s where his career hangar, so we can’t use it.” began. Between 2004 and 2007, he promoted After the fight for the troops, Kelly wants boxing matches that appeared on Showtime to bring Titan bouts to Nebraska, St. Louis, and ESPN. Growth was limited. Colorado, and Mississippi. “There’s an old guard in boxing, kind of a “We won’t expand and go to places unless glass ceiling that’s very hard to break through, they really fit for us,” Kelly says. “We’re not unless you can spend an exorbitant amount of just going to say, ‘Hey, California is neat. Let’s money,” Kelly, the father of a 3-year-old, says. go do California.’ ” “MMA was kind of virgin ground.” Kelly credits Titan’s think-small business Kelly also does promotion for Bellator Fightmodel for the company’s last year and a half ing, a Viacom-owned fight group that’s bigger of stability. than Titan but smaller than UFC. The three en“We wanted to make sure that the Titan tities share a mutually beneficial relationship. brand had a year’s worth of exposure on “They need people fighting. They need national television, so when we came to a other avenues for these fighters to become market, people would know what it is,” he famous and to become the stars of tomorrow,” adds. “I think we’ve done that.” Kelly explains. “Someone can’t make their pro debut or have their first five or 10 fights for the E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com UFC. There has to be a place for them to go.” or call 816-218-6783.

Former UFC fighter Anthony "Rumble" Johnson makes his Titan debut Friday.

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OF F the

R A DA R by Jo n atha n

Fifty years ago this week, Continental Flight 11

Bender

Unionville, Missouri. People there remember what aviation history has forgotten.

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ontinental Airlines Flight 11 was f lying into a storm, but Capt. Fred R. Gray was calm. The ride had been free of turbulence for five minutes, and, after a slight course correction, the pilot had begun the aircraft’s descent into Kansas City. The night sky ahead was clear. The 23-year veteran and his crew of seven had left Chicago's O’Hare International Airport at 8:35 p.m. May 22, 1962. It was the carrier’s last flight of the evening, scheduled to touch down in Kansas City at 9:36 p.m. before heading on to Los Angeles. With 37 passengers aboard, the Boeing 707 — able to seat 120 — was two-thirds empty. Passengers like Dale Horn probably had home on their minds. Horn was speeding back to Independence to tell his wife, Joanne, that he’d been hired to manage the Emery freight office in Chicago. Others among the commuting businessmen bantered with the four Continental hostesses, dressed in red berets and sharp, A-line skirts. The only other woman aboard was Geneva Fraley of Independence, who was traveling with her business partner, Thomas Doty of Merriam. Forty-six minutes into the 61minute fl ight, Doty got up to use the 707’s rear lavatory.

A minute later, Flight 11 disappeared off the radar.

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eople heard a boom and a swish,” says Duane Crawford. The newspaper columnist and retired schoolteacher extends his left arm, palm flat to the ground, and traces the plane’s flight path east to west across the horizon. Flight 11 came apart at 36,800 feet — 38 feet of the tail section broke away from the main fuselage. Crawford, 77, falls silent, struck by what he felt when he first visited the crash site, more than a decade ago. He rests his arms again on a locked gate, with chipped orange paint, outside this alfalfa field in Unionville, Missouri. “They thought it was thunder. Then they smelled the fuel.” Deer and turkey hunters lease this land now, unaware that this is where Continental Flight 11 fell to Earth 50 years ago. The shattered jet came to rest in a copse of trees a half-mile from the road where Crawford has driven today. He can still point to ruts in the field left in 1962 by Putnam County coroner Dr. Charles Judd’s four-wheel-drive truck. “A chill went up my spine, knowing what those people went through. I knew that I had to tell their story, those that died. Their death cast a shadow and caused all these ripples.” Crawford has become Unionville’s care-

taker for the legacy of Flight 11. But the story was unknown to him when he moved to the rural town in 1979, after a 26-year stint in the Marines. The 707 he knew in 1962 was the one that flew him to Vietnam. A few times a year, Crawford makes the drive to the crash site in his black Chevy truck, on his way to what he calls “moose country.” Trim and gray-haired, he lives in a low-slung brick house slightly north of Unionville, a little less from five miles from where the fuselage came to a stop. Behind wire-rim glasses, his blue eyes water slightly, maybe from the sun’s glare, as he points out where two bodies were found, near the farm of Ilajean and Cleo Weber. According to the 2010 Census, 3,805 people call Unionville home. Most residents either farm or drive a truck for a living. The “moose,” in this case, are spring calves and the occasional turkey that wanders too close to the road. Crawford makes a left onto the pitted pavement of Highway UU — once a dirt road, this is where onlookers and journalists found their cars stranded in ruts and ditches in 1962. The farming community has recently seen an influx of Amish and Mennonites from Pennsylvania, so horse-drawn buggies share the road with pickups. Next to farmland mailboxes are wooden signs quoting Scrip-

COURTESY OF THE PUTNAM COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

fell out of the sky over

ture. Crawford’s truck bounces past one that asks: “Is Thy Heart Right With God?” The alfalfa field is less than a mile from the Iowa border. Debris from the plane dropped on both sides of the state line, with one 8-foot section of the tail ending up in Cincinnati, Iowa, 15 miles northeast of the main crash site. The wind carried napkins and insulation and other light detritus as far as 120 miles away. Authorities knew that a commercial jet had disappeared from radar, but they didn’t know why and couldn’t immediately pinpoint where contact was lost. On the ground, drivers began to report seeing debris in roadways, and local law enforcement started hearing from aviation authorities and the media. The impact rattled the windows of Terry Bunnell’s house, but he thought — as many others, who had heard Flight 11 go down, would say later — the storm had simply lingered. By dawn, though, he wondered if the sound was something else. As the sun rose, the Unionville resident walked south and arrived at the crash site around the same time as Lester Cook and his son, Ron. Cook would later find one of the jet engines cratered in his yard, but the wings remained attached to the fuselage, wires dangling from the damaged plane. The cockpit was intact, though the nose had crashed into the earth continued on page 8

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homas Doty arrived at O’Hare International Airport that Tuesday night with Geneva Fraley, a former co-worker at Luzier Cosmetics, with whom he was planning to open a home-furnishings business in June. The two had both stayed the previous evening at the Hotel Sherman in Chicago. Inside Terminal 2, Doty and Fraley purchased life insurance from one of the two circular counters across from the check-in area. A last-minute insurance purchase was nothing unusual for travelers, but the amounts that Doty and Fraley purchased were. Doty paid for a policy worth $250,000, one that covered accidental death in flight. Fraley picked up $75,000 worth of the same coverage. Doty, like Fraley, was married. He named his wife as the beneficiary of his new policy; she was pregnant with the couple’s second child. Doty was 34, a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia who had moved to Kansas City expecting greatness. But his

D AV I D H U N T

continued from page 7 at a 20-degree angle. The three men in the cockpit were still strapped in, smoke masks attached to their faces. Reports indicated that the crew’s emergency checklist was found between the captain and his instrument panel. The plane’s landing gear was down. Bunnell and Cook heard moaning coming from a nearby tangle of clothing and luggage. Takehiko Nakano was alive, lying on his back across a row of three seats. The 27-year-old Japanese engineer, the crash’s only survivor, lived another 90 minutes after he was found; he died at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital (now known as Mercy Medical Center) in Centerville, Iowa, later that morning. Early speculation was that the plane had been torn apart by the severe weather or had f low n too h ig h t r y i ng to escape it. But the morning after the plane crashed, W. Mark Felt, then the bureau chief for the FBI’s Kansas City office, was already hearing another explanation. Explosive residue had been found on one of the bodies.

COURTESY OF THE PUTNAM COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Off the Radar

ceramic-coffin business had gone into bankruptcy in 1961, and by March 1962, he’d left his next job as a salesman with Luzier. A month later, he was charged with attacking a woman at a Kansas City, Kansas, intersection; police said he struck her and took her pocketbook. When police found Doty with a gun and the woman’s purse, Doty claimed that he’d discovered the pocketbook while walking around to get fresh air. He was due in court to face first-degree robbery and concealed-weapon charges on May 25. Ralph Boerster, a 21-year-old psychology student, was working part time in Continental’s reservations department when Doty and the other 36 passengers checked in. Boerster’s manager had gone home for the night, leaving the young man to oversee the passenger list. The airline managed passenger information from the 18th floor of the Precious Gems Building, at Wabash and Madison in downtown Chicago. There, Boerster handled seat assignments and relayed information on the number of passengers and baggage to the operations side. After Flight 11 pushed away from the gate, he sent those records on to Kansas City Municipal Airport via teletype. This particular Boeing 707 had been in the news the previous August, when authorities

Authorities respond at the crash site. shot out its tires on a runway at the El Paso International Airport to foil a skyjacking attempt. Leon and Carl Bearden were trying to divert the plane to Cuba. The plane returned to Continental’s rotation after that, and Gray prepared the fl ight plan this night to account for the severe weather expected west of Chicago. He decided to fly at an altitude of 39,000 feet, rather than the 28,000 proposed by the dispatcher. “If you were on an airplane, and there was bad weather, and you still wanted to get there, you wanted Freddie Gray up in that cockpit,” Boerster tells The Pitch. Flight 11’s progress was steady once the plane was airborne. Gray checked in over Bradford, Illinois. At 9:01 p.m., just after the fl ight was east of the Mississippi River, he asked for an update on the storms ahead of him. Thunderstorms, some capable of producing tornadoes, were expected near Kirksville, Missouri. The radar was functioning normally, and the fl ight control operator in Waverly, Iowa, recommended that Flight 11 fly south of the storm. Gray instead went north and, after clearing the storm clouds, requested clearance to turn toward

the KC airport, and the Waverly operator prepared to pass him off to a controller there. At 9:14 p.m., Waverly made the connection with Municipal Airport, but there was no further word from Flight 11. Doty got up from his seat and carried his briefcase into the rear lavatory. Inside the case were six sticks of dynamite — the charge would snap the 707 in half at 9:17 p.m. Doty brought down the $4.5 million jet with $1.54 worth of explosives. As a matter of routine when he prepared to go home, Boerster checked the status of his shift’s last takeoff: Flight 11. “I picked up the hotline … to check and I heard, ‘When was the last time you heard anything from Flight 11?’ Flight control then

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responded that it had been 15 or 20 minutes. Soon it was 30 minutes.” He woke up his manager. Continental representatives began trying to locate contact information for the families of those onboard. At 10:30 p.m., Joanne Horn was asleep, tired from ironing her husband’s shirts and watching 3-year-old Kevin and 18-monthold Jo-Ellen. “It was my husband’s boss. He called and told me the plane was down,” Horn recalls. “My husband was always the last to leave the office, and he’d call me and say, ‘Honey, I’m heading east.’ When his boss called [me], he said, ‘Well, now he’s headed west.’” Within a few days, Flight 11’s last few minutes were being uncovered at the Appanoose County Fairgrounds in Centerville. Continental employees and investigators from the Civil Aeronautics Board (the precursor to the Federal Aviation Administration) began to reassemble the plane using recovered pieces of Flight 11 and a 4-foot-tall stack of Boeing construction manuals. Felt oversaw the FBI’s investigation and directed a ground crew toward pieces of the wreckage from a helicopter. As the plane was put back together, the FBI Disaster Squad determined that the blast had originated in the used-towel bin of the rear lavatory, where they’d discovered dynamite residue. S o on , i nve s t i g ator s found that in the days before the f light, Doty had purchased six sticks of dynamite from the Pierce and Tarry Trading Post in Wyandotte County and had studied the use of explosives at the Kansas City Public Library. They also interviewed a witness who had seen brownish-red round sticks in Doty’s briefcase before his trip to Chicago but thought they were emergency road flares. (The FAA didn’t introduce airport screening of passengers and carry-on baggage until 1973.) The FBI had its man, but there was nobody to charge. The news cycle moved on to another Boeing 707. On June 3, Air France Flight 007 rolled

Unionville residents aided the search effort. off the runway during an aborted takeoff at Orly Airport in Paris, killing 130 of the 132 people aboard. Life magazine shot photos of Horn and her two children for a potential cover story that never ran. By September, Felt was in Washington, D.C., higher up in the bureau and eventually privy to secrets he would tell Bob Woodward under another name: Deep Throat. The crash has been said to be the inspiration for Airport — Arthur Hailey’s 1968 novel, made into a feature film that spawned the disaster genre. The plot: An airline passenger locks himself in a jet’s bathroom and tries to blow up the plane, forcing Dean Martin to make an emergency landing at a snowbound airport. “All that is fiction,” Crawford says. “In Airport, everybody lived. It was a love story. There’s no love story in this. Not at all.”

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ndrew Russell, 26, lives 7,914 miles from Unionville. The New Zealand man is studying to be a teacher, paying for school by working as an usher in an Auckland movie theater. Poor eyesight and an aversion to math have prevented him from learning to fly, but he has always loved aviation history. Five years ago, he was clicking through old crash reports on the FAA’s website. The Civil Aeronautics Board’s fi nal report about Continental Flight 11 caught his eye. It was the first commercialjet bombing in the United States, but a Google search yielded nothing beyond the CAB document. His curiosity led him to put up a simple blog asking why no memorial had ever been built in Unionville and if anybody had more information about what had happened. “I’d never blogged before, and I just wanted to see what happened,” Russell says. “I never even expected to hear back. I was just satisfying my own curiosity.” Nothing happened for a year. But then Crawford came across continued on page 11

“In Airport,

everybody lived.

It was a love story. There’s no love story in this. Not at all.”

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Off the Radar continued from page 9 Russell’s blog and found himself eager to share what he had uncovered. “The idea that someone of his generation would take an interest in this — it’s just incredible,” Crawford says. “And to be from so far away.” Then Russell began hearing from the families of crash victims, stories of fathers who had never made it home. The comments section came alive with people’s recollections. “They never had the luxury of being able to talk about this thing,” Russell says. “I’ve been almost like the paperweight that’s been lifted off of them. Finally, after 50 years, they can vent their frustrations and grief and anger.” As families began to connect with one another, talk shifted from why there was no memorial to how one might be built. Crawford and the Putnam County Historical Society & Foundry School Museum, which maintains a small exhibit of Flight 11 artifacts, collected donations and designed a memorial that was dedicated in 2010 in Unionville. This week, Russell is flying 28 hours to attend the memorial’s rededication, commemorating the crash’s 50th anniversary. He’ll spend nearly three days of his weeklong travel visa in the air. Crawford is picking him up in Des

Moines; the two men haven’t met in person before. For Russell, it’s the end of a journey. “I’ll be standing there and actually looking at where that plane went down,” he says. “I think that’s going to be quite hard. It’s going to hit me like a freight train.”

C

rawford pilots his truck down Main Street in Unionville. The United Methodist Church still stands at the intersection of 19th Street and Main, across from the Dairy Lane, a local burger-and-shake shack. In the park between the church and the Unionville Print Shop, Putnam County set up a temporary morgue in 1962. The print shop was the communications center for the media, members of which had taken to barging into farmhouses in an attempt to use the party lines that were the only locally available phone connections. Crawford walks up the grassy slope, in the shadow of the Putnam County Courthouse. His fi ngers wipe a little dust off the top of the simple black-granite memorial. He stands in front of a black flagpole between two granite benches, both installed in 2010 when the memorial was dedicated. “I feel like I’m part of the Flight 11 family, and I just wanted to do something for them,”

Crawford says. “We’ll never know the whole story. But I’m at peace because I know this is going to be here forever, and people can come see it.” The town of Unionville has never forgotten. Ilajean Weber still plays bingo in town. A passenger’s body was found 100 yards from the white barn on her property. And Mayor Don Fowler was one of the high school seniors guarding the perimeter of the crash against looters and gawkers. His uncle, David Fowler, was the Putnam County sheriff at the time. “That town just reached out to us,” Horn says. “Everything they’ve done to remember, the people on the plane deserved that. But I’m just so thankful.” Crawford expects several dozen family members of those lost on Flight 11 at the May 26 ceremony in Unionville. At 11 a.m. that day, they’ll see the new stone tablet, which corrects a few spelling errors. (After the initial dedication, Crawford secured a copy of the FBI report.) It also adds an inscription: “This Flight 11 tragedy occurred in Putnam County on May 22, 1962, and changed America’s air travel forever.” Joanne and her daughter, Jo-Ellen Horn, will be among those in attendance. In JoEllen’s home, in Independence, Joanne sits at the kitchen table, slowly rubbing her thumb

Crawford (left) looks out over the alfalfa field where the plane came to rest; the memorial to Flight 11 in downtown Unionville. across the face of a manila envelope. She has 19 grandchildren (she married Dale’s brother, Kenneth, in the late 1960s; he died last year), but she still thinks about the boy she met on a blind date. She remembers how nice he was, mentions the tin cans that rattled around behind their car after they were married in her parents’ house. Their future together stopped when they were 29 years old. “It makes me happy to think of how happy he would have been on that flight home,” she says. “That was his dream job. Of course, I still miss him, but he gave me two wonderful children, and that’s the main thing.” The envelope is from Life magazine. Inside are pictures taken to accompany that neverpublished article — black-and-white images of Joanne, posed with a scrapbook on her lap, her two children leaning against her and smiling at the camera from a living room couch. There’s a shot of a teenage Dale, a photo yellowed with age. And there’s a copy of the crash report. She keeps it all together. Her record of Flight 11, the plane that fell off the radar.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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WEEK OF MAY 24-30

16

PAG E

ART Charlotte Street’s open-book weekend

19

PAG E

MOND

AY

5 . 28

,000 race 3 eek to les e One w g n Los A miles to

CAFE A Boot to the meatballs in Westport

NIGHT RIDERS

26 PAG E

The Gumball 3000 celebrity race from New York to Los Angeles is on, with more than 100 exotic cars and 250 racers. It’s the 14th year of the coast-to-coast race, and this year’s batch of celebs includes Eve, Ludacris, Wiz Khalifa and David Hasselhoff. They make a pit stop tonight with a red-carpet party at … well, they’re not saying yet. Everyone’s invited to welcome the racers to KC (if they can find them). We can only hope to see the Hoff racing Kitt (please, please, please). See the Gumballers off Tuesday morning at … well, they’re not saying yet. Watch pitch.com/plog for updates and see gumball3000.com for more information. — JUSTIN KENDALL

FORECAST David Liebe Hart’s awesome show

T H U R S D AY | 5 . 2 4 |

master researcher and storyteller teaches his noted writers’ workshop Lessons From a Bestseller from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Writers Place (3607 Pennsylvania, 816-753-1090). The seminar costs $110 ($70 for Writers Place memMORE bers), but if you aren’t able to throw down the cash, there’s a $20 T A INE reception with Berry ONL .COM PITCH at 5:30 p.m. Both events benefit the Historic Kansas City Foundation, which advocates for the preservation of historic buildings in the urban core. For more information about the event, see historickansascity.org. — BERRY ANDERSON

BUILDING A BEST-SELLER

The Washington Post called international best-selling author Steve Berry’s latest novel, The Columbus Affair, “a thrill ride — and his best book to date.” Those who hope to learn some of his tricks are in luck: The

EVENTS

K E L LY C A M P B E L L

Steve Berry

IN STYLE

Why do designers want us to dress like the 1-percenters? Fashion writer Marylou Luther asks that question in a 2012 fall trend overview for Fashion continued on page 14

F R I D AY | 5 . 2 5 |

TAKIN’ A DANNY TANNER

F

ive years ago, Bob Saget taped a comedy special called Bob Saget: That Ain’t Right. Within the first three minutes, the man known to children of the 1990s as Full House dad Danny Tanner offered something like a mission statement: “I want to apologize for the way I speak. It is shock value. It is a persona from all that family shit that I did. I am fucked up and I apologize from the bottom of my cock.” OK, Bob, we hear ya. We always knew you were funnier than America’s Funniest Home Videos. Test the limits of his — and your own — tastelessness at 8 p.m., when Saget stops at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, North Kansas City, 816-889-4237). Order tickets ($30-$65) for this 21-and— B ERRY A NDERSON older show at ticketmaster.com. pitch.com

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advanced). A $35 fee covers meals, rally swag and a Harvesters donation. For more information, see madtotosc.blogspot.com. — BERRY ANDERSON

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 2 6 |

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 2 6 |

D THURS

AY

5 . 24 all back, Bling is . e world th r e v o

continued from page 13 Group International in reaction to what she calls “jewel-laden, fur-bearing, gold-gilded, paparazzi-rousing clothes.” The answer, she says, lies in the desire of women in China, Brazil, Russia and Dubai to look wealthy. Fashion Group International Kansas City presents an audiovisual display of these latest fashions in the Atkins Auditorium of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278). The event begins at 6 p.m. and includes appetizers and a cash bar. Admission is $10 for students, $20 for FGI members and $30 for nonmembers. Call 816-786-2002 for more information. — NANCY HULL RIGDON

F R I D AY | 5 . 2 5 | FUNDING, STAT!

Health insurance remains out of reach for most of the patients seen by the Kansas City Free Health Clinic. Help make basic doctors’ appointments a reality by attending the Cavalcade of Cabaret, a benefit for the clinic. “Many of us involved with the show and in the performance-art community have used KC Free’s services in the past,” says Allison Henthorn, performer and promoter. The show features Annie Cherry, Stella Blue and “some of the best drag performers in KC,” according to Henthorn. Advance tickets cost $20, and the show starts at 7 p.m. at the Metropolitan Ensemble Theater (3614 Main, 816-569-3226). Search Cavalcade of Cabaret on brownpapertickets.com. — ABBIE STUTZER

SCOOT CITY

Open to all makes and models, years and engine sizes of scooters and mopeds, the seventh annual Tornado R’Alley is “just a gathering of like-minded riders to have fun,” says organizer Chris Shields. “We get a number of folks in from Iowa, Oklahoma, St. Louis, Arkansas, and even have been known to get a few from Colorado.” Get down to Scooter World (7215 West 80th Street, Overland Park, 913-649-4900) from 4 to 8 p.m. for industry tips, for camaraderie, and to register for a weekend of rides through the city (from the leisurely to the 14

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More than 30 years ago, Gayl Bousman’s grandmother rendered lard to make lye soap. Today, Bousman incorporates goat’s milk, honey, botanicals and herbs from her family’s Osceola, Missouri, farm to craft body products. The annual Evening Shade Farms Herb Days (today and Sunday) features a slew of old-fashioned goodness: pottery and woodworking demonstrations, an heirloom plant and veggie sale, blacksmith art, root beer, lemon verbena cake, the Foot Stomping Bear Creek Band, and more. Find the farm at 12790 Southeast Highway TT in Osceola. The free festival runs 10 a.m.–5 p.m. today and 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sunday. Call 417-282-6985 or see eveningshadefarms.com for more information. — NANCY HULL RIGDON

S U N D AY | 5 . 2 7 |

ROB COLLETTI

THE SIMPLE LIFE

Kip Niven (left) as the Old Actor and Martin Buchanan as Mortimer liven up the stage in the Spinning Tree Theatre’s revival of the long-running Broadway musical The Fantasticks, at Crown Center’s Off Center Theatre (2450 Grand). The professionally mounted production also includes Peggy Friesen on harp and Jakob Wozniak on piano. The show runs Thursday-Sunday through May 27. Call 816-842-9999 or see spinningtreetheatre.com for tickets and information. — D EBORAH H IRSCH literary scene.” The show has a $3 cover and starts at 6 p.m. — BERRY ANDERSON

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BARS

P-FUNK ALL STARS

Poet and drummer Kevin Rabas is half of Poetry+Funk. He and bassist Tim Goss “do all originals — music and poetry,” Rabas says. “Tim lays down some mean, funky grooves, and I play and read over them, à la Kerouac or Baraka.” Tonight, Poetry+Funk begins an open mic at Prospero’s Books (1800 West 39th Street, 816-531-9673) with a performance that might sound like a love letter to the city. “KC is in our blood. A lot of my poems are set here. And Prospero’s is very important to the KC

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 2 6 |

SUIT UP

D

ig out your swimsuit, volleyball and cooler — it’s time for your pasty skin to greet the summer sun because Jackson County’s beaches open today. Blue Springs Lake Beach (1500 Northeast Bowlin Road, Lee’s Summit, 816-795-0822) and Longview Lake Beach (11101 Raytown Road, 816-767-0727) feature sand volleyball courts, a one-acre swimming area, restrooms and showers. They’re open 11 a.m.–7 p.m. today and Sunday, and 3–7 p.m. Monday– Friday. Admission is $5 for adults or $3 for seniors and kids under 15. For more information, see jacksoncounty.gov.

— N ANCY H ULL R IGDON

It’s been a healthy 2012 for Westport thus far. Booze sales are up, new restaurants keep rolling in, and a certain patriotically named pub has departed. Seems like cause for celebration, and the good people at Kelly’s (500 Westport Road, 816-561-5800) and McCoy’s Public House (4057 Pennsylvania, 816-960-0866) are on it. Tonight, the two bars mark their anniversaries (65 years for Kelly’s, 15 for McCoy’s) with a 21-and-older block party on Pennsylvania. Cover costs $5, and festivities begin at 5 p.m. Expect live music and cigars from Fidel’s and Xikar and, for an extra $5, a Jameson whiskey tasting between 5 and 8 p.m. — DAVID HUDNALL

M O N D AY | 5 . 2 8 | ADAM AND STEVE

Were Egyptian royal servants Khnumhotep and Niankhkhnum the first-recorded samesex couple in history? Probably not, though they were entombed together around 2400 B.C. For a slightly more recent view on the topic, look at the documentary The Right to Love: An American Family, in which director Cassie Jaye follows the Leffews, a California family made up of two gay men and their two adopted children. The film records the family’s struggles with discrimination as well as their everyday togetherness. See it for free at 7 p.m. at Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 913-383-7756). See tivolikc.com. — BERRY ANDERSON

T U E S D AY | 5 . 2 9 | BODHIS-APPY HOUR

Not under the Bodhi Tree but rather next to a chocolate shop deep within Zona Rosa is where you’ll find Buddha by Kenji Fusion

pitch.com

(8741 Northwest Prairie View Road, 816-569-0416). The pan-Asian joint braids the traditional hibachi dining atmosphere with an urban-upscale martini bar. That means no quiet contemplation or dispossession of material goods. Instead, Buddha is designed to excite the senses, especially those that respond to a good price. Buddha’s happy-hour menu features 30 small-plate items (most under $5, with nothing over $10), and the buyone-get-one-half-price drinks include the Yum Yum Punch (apple sake, berry vodka and cranberry juice). This deal zone of enlightenment runs 11 a.m.–6 p.m. today. — MICAH GUTWEILER

W E D N E S D AY | 5 . 3 0 | GREAT BALLS OF FIRE

The folks at Shawnee Town 1929 (11501 West 57th Street, Shawnee, 913-248-2360) are serving two kinds of the beverage named in their fundraising Bloody Mary Kick-Off Party: boozy and virgin. It’s generally believed that the tomato-juice-andvodka cocktail was invented in 1939, but Shawnee Town 1929 is squeezing history to promote its more sobering June 2 Tomato Roll event, which involves 1,000 red balls rolling down Nieman Road ahead of the Old Shawnee Days parade. At today’s 5 p.m. merry gathering, patrons — older than 21 only — pay $25 for drinks, tomato appetizers and two inedible entries in the “Tomato Roll.” See shawneetown.org for more information. — CHARLES FERRUZZA E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.


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ART

FRONTIER DAYS

B

efore the Sprint Center and the Power & Light District revitalized downtown, places like the now sparkling AMC Mainstreet were pigeon-filled husks of neglected architecture. Fifteen years ago, the Charlotte Street Foundation was among the first to take advantage of the area’s empty spaces, using them for artists’ studios and exhibitions. Today, you can look up at 906 Grand, the Town Pavilion at 11th Street and Walnut, and Main Street’s City Center Square and know that artists are at work. This year’s residents — seven performance groups and 30 visual artists — opened their collective doors last weekend to welcome people curious about the mythos of “where art comes from” and to put on special performances. The open studios May 18 and 19, one of two such weekends each year, marked the end of the first phase of the Urban Culture Project’s anniversary exhibition, The Frontier, at Paragraph and UCP Space. (UCP’s Studio Residency Program, which has been going on since 2004, begins its next year in September; applications are due July 2.) The Pitch was there to see what a year’s worth of free space yields. See more UCP open-studios photos at pitch.com.

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Scenes from UCP’s

PHOTOS BY

open-studios weekend

BROOK E VA NDE V ER

Clockwise from top left: Marisa MacKay’s “The Smith Project,” performed at City Center Square; members of Balinese music and dance ensemble Gamelan Genta Kasturi at City Center Square; a scene from the performance installation An Inside Job, a collaboration by Jane Gotch, Abbe Findley, Katie Ford, Laura Frank, Laura Graham Isaac and Tiffany Sisemore, at Paragraph Gallery; resident group LSR performs at City Center Square; pieces by Clinton Ricketts; Black House Improvisors’ Collective performs “The Bell Tree”; Christina Prestidge in her studio.


Clockwise from top left: Elizabeth Allen-Cannon in her studio; Katie Ford’s Partnership Place studio; Waseem Touma in his studio; Xochitl Rodriguez working in her City Center Square studio; choreographer and dancer Katrina Warren.

pitch.com 4 -3 0 pitch.com M O NMTAY H X2X–X X ,, 2200102X tThHeE pPiItTcChH 17 3


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CAFÉ

BOOTY CALL

Does Westport finally have a real Italian restaurant?

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

The Boot • 415 Westport Road, 816-931-4868. • Hours: 11 a.m.–1:30 a.m. Monday–Saturday, 10:30 a.m.–midnight Sunday. • Price: $$–$$$

as there been an Italian restaurant — one with menus and table service — in Westport since restaurateur Victor Fontana’s celebrated disco trattoria, Fanny’s, in the 1970s? I was pondering that one night while nibbling on a meatball at the Boot, the casual restaurant that Aaron Confessori and Richard Wiles opened in February. I know there hasn’t been a disco restaurant in decades, but what about a serious Italian dining room? I’m leaving out Californos (which offers pasta but bills its cuisine as “American eclectic”) and the original Mario’s (which limits itself to counter service) and the various pizzerias that have come and gone through the years. No, I think the Boot really is Westport’s first sit-down Italian restaurant in decades, since before the days when the storefront housed a retail outlet that sold things like fingerless gloves and vintage accessories to the Westport hipsters of the 1980s. (That shop’s operator was Lou Jane Temple, long before she became a restaurateur herself.) My friend Carol Ann and I were sitting next to a couple of Reagan-era Don Juans one night at a cozy two-top in the Boot. The two lean, gray-haired men probably cut quite a swath in their day, and Carol Ann thought one of them looked familiar. “I might have dated him once,” she whispered. The Boot, you see, serves Italian cuisine but attracts an American-eclectic clientele: There are customers dining here whom you might have dated, might have sort of dated, or might want to date. And the tables are so close E MOR together (especially the tightknit line of deuces on the west side of the T A E IN ONL .COM room) that even the act PITCH of eating a thick length of a Krizman’s sausage can seem practically carnal when the two people closest to you are staring at you with arched eyebrows. This isn’t the place to conduct a revealing or intimate conversation. When the Boot is in full swing and every table occupied, the sound level becomes almost operatic as voices bounce all over the hard surfaces in the room. This makes it almost impossible not to overhear snippets of conversations — one of the most tantalizing byproducts, I say, of dining out. One night, dining with two friends after a play (the Boot serves food quite late), we seemed to be surrounded by a chorus of talking heads. We just ate quietly without saying a word to one another. I enjoyed it enormously. I could focus on my meal, savoring each bite while mentally dropping in and out of nearby exchanges. And there’s much to savor here. The menu includes seven entrees, five pizza choices and five pasta dishes, and it’s easy to customize a dinner: a starter (the short-

CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

H

olives (served with fried arancini balls), for example, are on their way out. I ordered the starter three times, and it was never availrib ravioli is as satisfying as any full meal), able. “They can’t get the kind of olives they wanted,” one waitress told me. “The olives a quartet of meatballs with sauce and a slab just weren’t right,” said another. of Farm to Market bread, maybe a side dish “We finally did get the kind of olives we of spaghetti or fennel gratin. In fact, I’ve tried some of the entrees at wanted,” Confessori told me later, “but they were too salty.” The rice balls, however, are the Boot, but I prefer making up my own staying on the menu. ideal dinner. I did enjoy the Among the pasta choices slices of meaty, delicately The Boot on the menu, there’s an exseasoned, spice glazed duck Short-rib ravioli ...................$11 cellent bowl of wide papon a thick, autumn-colored Quattro-fromaggi pizza......$11 padelle ribbons smothered swirl of parsnip-pear puree, Meatballs .............................. $7 in a fresh pomodoro with but I would probably never Sausage ................................. $7 basil and chili peppers. order it again. On the other Fusili carbonara ..................$12 And I like the simple spahand, the spicy porco picSpice glazed duck ............. $20 Saffron panna cotta............ $5 ghetti dish sprinkled with cante meatballs, made with pecorino and a lot of black slow-braised pork shoulder pepper. Less satisfying is and pickled peppers and the Boot’s version of pasta carbonara. If only blanketed with a parmesan cream sauce, I its ropes of fusili pasta were flecked with could happily eat every day. Confessori and Wiles are introducing a crispy bits of pancetta instead of the pig-jowl guanciale — an unsmoked bacon that has an new summer menu soon, but they’re not making dramatic changes. The fried stuffed unlovable aftertaste.

Savory spinaci pizza (above) and the sweet pumpkin-and-olive-oil cake

The traditional Italian sausage here, swimming in a puddle of pomodoro and heavy on the fennel (which I love), is a treat. The cinnamon-scented pork sausage (made with Granny Smith apples), though, owes more to the Ozarks than Italia, smothered as it is in a rich mushroom gravy. The desserts at the Boot are considerably more upscale, including a delectably airy saffron panna cotta that practically floats, cloudlike, in a soup bowl. Confessori says he invented a gorgeously moist slab of pumpkinand-olive-oil cake, mottled with golden raisins, while cooking with his 6-year-old niece. “I tasted it and thought, ‘This has legs,’ and put it on the menu,” he says. Most of the dishes I’ve tasted at the Boot have legs — they’re going places. So I hope that Confessori doesn’t tinker too severely with his menu. It’s nearly perfect as it is. This Boot is made for walking.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FAT C I T Y

ROOT DOWN

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

Among the stars of the Waldo Farmers Market: the Scarlet Queen turnip

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hese are so fresh, they could walk up here,” jokes Rodger Kube, who co-owns Stony Crest Urban Farm with his wife, Diane Hershberger. Their Scarlet Queen turnip (a bunch costs $3.50) is slightly bigger than a golf ball and comes in miniature-golf-ready bright white and pink. (The varieties due in the fall, he says, pack more spice and are bigger.) Kube admits that he hated turnips while growing up on a farm in Nebraska, but he loves them now. He and Hershberger fry or sauté them in olive oil and garlic. This is only the second year for the market that Kube and Hershberger founded (their farm is at 87th Street and Brooklyn), but it’s already a vibrant scene. Barham Cattle Co. & Family Farm has outstanding apple bratwursts among the dozen or more cuts of meat it brings, and K Kringle & Co.’s jams and jellies feature unusual combinations, like champagne blush (Barefoot bubbly and strawberries). Farm to Market sells bread made exclusively for the market (croissants, pumpernickel, semolina). The Good You food truck is usually on-site, and Fresher Than Fresh Snow Cones and Green Dirt Farm are expected to join the vendors this summer. The Waldo Farmers Market runs 3–7:30 p.m. every Wednesday through October in the small green space adjacent to the Habitat ReStore parking lot. Stony Crest Urban Farm sells its produce at the Waldo market, as well as the Brookside Farmers Market on Saturdays (63rd Street and Wornall) 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Kube expects to offer turnips, carrots, broccoli and a mixture of greens (kale, swiss chard, mustard, collard) the next few weeks.

STOLON SUMMER Five Strawberry Dishes for the Season

T

hanks to warmer weather, strawberry season has come a bit sooner this year. Desserts and salads with fresh strawberries are popping up as a sweet red harbinger of summer. And even though NPR dampened the party a bit last week by explaining that grocery20

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Stony Crest's turnips (above) and Bloom Baking Co.'s delicate strawberry tart store strawberries, like tomatoes before them, have been bred for looks rather than taste — meaning we have beautiful but bland berries — some strawberry dishes on local menus have flavor to spare. Here are five to help you celebrate the upcoming season.

5. Pick Your Own — Schwinn Produce Farm (32263 179th Street, Leavenworth). This pro-

duce stand and pick-your-own operation has strawberries now at $2.50 a pound. The farm is open 1–6 p.m. Monday–Friday and 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

4. Strawberry Shortcake Cupcake at Mud Pie Vegan Bakery & Coffeehouse (1615 West 39th Street). It’s a tad sweet for casual dessert

eaters, but this dish makes you think: Yeah, I could eat vegan.

3. Citron crepe at Chez Elle (1713 Summit).

It’s lemon curd, strawberries and whipped cream — a dessert you have every intention of sharing, until … you don’t.

2. Strawberry-basil macaron at Bloom Baking Co. (15 East Third Street). The City Mar-

ket bakery makes good use of fresh fruit, and there’s proof in the strawberries in the pastries, macarons and tarts. This one might be the best.

1. Spinach salad at the Classic Cookie (409 West Gregory). If all salads were like this, you’d eat more salads. This meeting of spinach, green onions, walnuts, strawberries and house-made poppy-seed dressing is one of the standout treats at the popular Waldo brunch spot.

— JONATHAN BENDER

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21


MUSIC BY

Band, three dozen years in

D A N LY B A R G E R

MICHAEL WEINTROB

SWAMP PEOPLE

New Orleans’ Dirty Dozen Brass

T

hanks to David Simon, ordinary citizens Thomas and often accompanied other art— or at least the ones with premium cable ists on short notice. “We didn’t even have — are now more likely to know what a sec- rehearsals. You just showed up at the gig,” Lewis recalls. “It’s not a problem, really. You’re ond line is. Simon’s HBO show Treme shines a professional musician. You’re just supposed a light on the lives of working musicians in New to be able to do that. Sometimes you just read Orleans and gives a new kind of exposure to the music. Back at that time, they didn’t send the brassy amalgamation of jazz, bebop, blues you a CD; they just sent you a and funk associated with the 45. You’d just listen to it and Crescent City. Few bands toDirty Dozen Brass Band, learn it off the record.” day embody this sound and with Orgone and Despite the name, the lifestyle as wholly as Dirty Sierra Leone’s band has never boasted 12 Dozen Brass Band. Refugee All Stars members. Some of its first Speaking from his home Thursday, May 24, at Crossroads KC at Grinders gigs, which date back to in New Orleans, founding 1977, were accompanying member and baritone-sax long funeral processions orplayer Roger Lewis recalls, “When we started hitting the streets, of course, ganized by the Dirty Dozen Social and Pleasure Club, an organization that helped poor New we were playing all the traditional music that Orleanians pay for funerals when conventional everybody else was playing: hymns, a march. We started practicing the original music that life-insurance companies wouldn’t. Because people had and we started playing that, too. of the association, the name stuck. Three and a half decades later, the band We started playing cover tunes like Michael Jackson. We were also playing a lot of bebop has recorded with Elvis Costello, Buckwheat like Charlie Parker. We just kind of mixed it all Zydeco, the Manhattan Transfer, Dizzy in. People loved it, but we got a lot of static in Gillespie, Branford Marsalis, Widespread Panic and the Black Crowes. The group is playing the beginning. We just played what we wanted Crossroads KC at Grinders — a stone’s throw to play and had fun.” from their hero Charlie Parker’s old stomping Most brass bands at the time employed grounds — in support of two new records. clarinets, rather than the more burdensome Dirty Dozen’s latest, Twenty Dozen, is its first baritone sax. “Who but Roger Lewis would want to carry a baritone sax in a parade for four album in six years. (Somewhat surprisingly, it features the band’s first recording of New hours?” says tenor saxophonist Kevin Harris, Orleans standard “When the Saints Go Marchwho was actually making gumbo when The ing In.”) Lewis notes how different the recordPitch reached him. “I did it in high school, and ing process has become since he started out. that was more than enough. I don’t remember “Right now, you can cut a record in two the exact weight, but it’s heavy enough to give minutes. If you’ve got a repetitious part in you back problems.” the song, you don’t have to play the whole Lewis played with Fats Domino and Irma 22

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Seven is the new 12: Dirty Dozen Brass Band song. You can just cut and paste,” he says. “Back then, you had to play the whole song, man. There was no cut and paste, especially back in the ’50s. You might cut that one song 99 times! If you play a note and it’s a slight bit out of tune, you’d have to go back and do it all again. Now, you can go in Pro Tools and put that note back in tune. It’s incredible. … We try not to do those overdubs. We try to play the whole song because I think the feeling is better than all that cut-and-paste stuff.” Dirty Dozen is also rereleasing its 1984 debut album, My Feet Can’t Fail Me Now, which Harris says demonstrates how much the band has developed in the years that followed. “We don’t play music that fast anymore,” he says. “We can, but the end result would just be a bunch of tired old men. We might be more soulful than we were back then. With age comes that mellowing of different things. Back then, we played fast enough to give a person a heart attack.” But they still have the grit and hustle endemic in working New Orleans musicians. Harris, who lives in Baton Rouge, takes a $5 bus ride to play with the rest of the band in New Orleans. What is it about the city? “I can just speculate,” Harris muses. “For one, being below sea level. The people who colonized New Orleans were not the most dignified or qualified. They were people of the earth. These people tend to live life in a different kind of way. The French — they’d go into battle with brass bands.”

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MUSIC | STREETSIDE

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Sleeping over at Luna

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D AV ID HUDN A L L

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he sleaze quotient on the stretch of Grand Boulevard south of the Sprint Center was recently reduced by a small fraction when the large, porno-style, blackand-yellow Barely Legal sign atop the empty storefront at 1515 Grand was removed by the building’s owner. It’s not quite Pleasantville on the block yet, though. Next door, that same owner operates Temptations, a strip club where bright-red exterior lights boast of “Totally Nude” dancers — a moral eyesore that, given its E MOR Missouri address, also happens to be false adT vertising. Bookending A E IN ONL .COM these properties are relaPITCH tively innocuous establishments whose signage nevertheless fares poorly in the context. One could be forgiven for assuming that the now-closed Thai Paradise restaurant was some sort of exotic sex resort. Even the Cigar Box evokes a certain Clintonian bawdiness. From the outside, the sleek, modern nightclub Luna appears a tasteful alternative to all the sin happening across Grand. But when I stopped in last Friday, the scene was not far from totally nude. The male bathroom attendant was shirtless and lacked the humble countenance I have come to expect from bathroom attendants. (“I just fucked a fat girl in the booty hole,” he howled to an apparent friend; it was unclear whether he was stating a fact or making some kind of pop-culture reference.) Another guy was strutting around, sans shirt but with a black tie around his neck. A Cristiano Ronaldo look-alike made the rounds in tight European underwear. Hot female bartenders poured RBV after RBV in revealing nighties. There was exactly one person in the building wearing prescription eyeglasses. Take a wild guess.   The occasion was Sleepover 2, a sequel to what I am assuming was a very similar

M US I C

The hOMe fOr live Music NOrTh Of The river!

24

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party to the one I attended Friday. The main draw of Sleepover is that people don’t wear much in the way of clothing, and everybody dances all night. It’s almost like sex! Also sexy: appearances by Playboy Playmates Brooke Banx, Maria Lopez, Jessica Hinton and Ashley Young. I arrived at the party around 10:30 p.m., hoping to worm a creepy interview out of one of the Playmates before the crowd a r r ive d. W h ic h show s how much I know about celebrity nightclub parties: The guests of honor don’t show up until the party is in full swing. Early on, the crowd was mild, about 50 people. A bed, with rose petals strewn across it, was planted on the dance floor in front of the DJ station. On the landing upstairs, overlooking the dance floor, I asked some beefy-looking bouncers what they were expecting. “Big party, some people wear bedtime clothes, everybody gets wasted,” one of the guys said, barely looking at me. “Briana Banks is supposed to be here later.” He meant Brooke Banx — Briana Banks is more of a Penthouse/Vivid type of entertainer, popular in the early 2000s, starred in Double Air Bags 6 and the Sodomania Slop Shots series — but I elected not to quibble. Outside, I chatted up two guys who did not at all resemble the Situation, which is to say, they seemed out of place — much like myself. They were Navy men who had come in from Virginia Beach for a wedding in Topeka the next day. “How’d you fi nd your way downtown?” “We didn’t want to spend a Friday night in Kansas,” one of them said.

A crowded bedtime at Luna Let’s be best friends, I wanted to say. An SUV pulled up and unloaded two dudes, with dumb, white designs on the ass pockets of their jeans, and five women in heels and miniskirts. (Most of the women at Luna wore heels and miniskirts.) The rope in front of the door magically parted for them. I had to walk up and around and back down along the rope, like you do when waiting to order at Wendy’s. I crossed the street and had a drink at the Cigar Box, and when I returned, after midnight, a line had materialized outside. Inside, it was madness. A woman in the shortest skirt I’ve ever seen was dancing on the bed to DJ Ashton Martin’s beats. A bartender was lining up 20 Jägerbombs. From above, on the landing, I could see one of the Playmates — I don’t know which one — glad-handing and mugging for photos in the VIP area. It was a very grope-friendly environment. Everybody seemed to be having the time of their life. Eventually, that included me. At some parties, I get self-conscious about standing by myself or about existing as a human being in general. At Luna Friday night, I crossed over into some higher level of consciousness. I was so irrelevant to everybody there, so invisible, that I became totally free. Other people meditate to reach this state. But maybe going to extreme dance parties where you don’t fit in and don’t know anybody works just as well.

A woman in

the shortest skirt

I’ve ever seen was dancing on the

bed to DJ Ashton Martin’s beats.

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MONTH


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25


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, M AY 2 4 Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Orgone, Sierra Leone’s Refugee All-Stars: Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

F R I D AY, M AY 2 5 The Moombahton Massive Tour with Nadastrom, DJ Sabo, Brent Tactic, B-Stee: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Bob Saget: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Southern Culture on the Skids, Truckstop Honeymoon: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, M AY 2 6 Deborah Brown (CD release): 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Kearney Blues Festival with Levee Town, Josh Vowell & the Rumble, Nobody’s Bidnis: 6 p.m. Kearney Amphitheater at Jesse James Park, 3001 N. Missouri 33, Kearney, 816-903-4730. Mt Eden: Valentine Room at the Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, Ste. 300. Snoop Dogg: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. The Unknown Hinson, the Belairs: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

T U E S D AY, M AY 2 9

The Donkeys (left) and Best Coast

The Donkeys, with Advance Base

Everybody’s got a dark-horse band they firmly believe should be way more popular, and one of mine is the Donkeys, a San Diego act making some of the most likable folk rock I’m aware of currently. The band draws on American Beauty-era Grateful Dead and goes heavy on the Laurel Canyon beach-bum vibes — it’s all very mellow and beautiful and California, like a Toastered-out Instagram photo. Tuesday, May 29, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

David Liebe Hart Band

At South By Southwest back in March, I spotted a man who looked an awful lot like David Liebe Hart standing in a sea of people out on a main drag. “I think that’s David Liebe Hart,” I said, but the person I was with had no interest whatsoever in what I was saying, and I promptly forgot about it. But his band, the David Liebe Hart Band, played the fest this year, according to a thing I just read on the Internet. If the name doesn’t ring a bell, he’s the guy who holds a bizarro puppet and sings about aliens (“Salame,” most memorably) on Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job. He

is apparently in a touring punk-rock band, and based on these videos I just watched, it’s pretty strange. Wednesday, May 30, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

The Good Foot, with Making Movies

The Sunday before Memorial Day is always a reliable party night, and this year, Westport is making it extra easy on everyone who isn’t leaving town. In addition to the block party outside Kelly’s and McCoy’s (see Sunday in Filter), there’s a hot show at the Riot Room featuring a couple of local favorites: soul revivalists the Good Foot and Latin-inflected indie-rock act Making Movies. Sunday, May 27, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Weir, Robinson & Greene Acoustic Trio

This relatively new group cuts a wide swath in the jam-band scene, boasting not only a member of the Grateful Dead (Bob Weir) but also Chris Robinson of the Black Crowes. Rounding out the trio is lesser-known Jackie

F O R E C A S T

26

Greene, who is something of a utility player in the jam crowd, having toured with Gov’t Mule and Phil Lesh & Friends, among others. Saturday, May 26, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 816-472-5454)

Best Coast

The first Best Coast record sounded like some shitty old Hole demo and, to me, epitomized the music blogosphere’s sickening habit of hyping cool-seeming artists over talented ones. (The band’s leader, Bethany Cosentino, is pretty, has neat tattoos and dates the guy in Wavves.) Best Coast recruited Jon Brion to produce The Only Place, the band’s just released follow-up, but it doesn’t in any way resemble the loop- and string-laden soundscapes that are Brion’s trademark. It’s instead a collection of better, tighter, twangier rock songs — kind of like what Neko Case might record if she were younger and less articulate. Sunday, May 27, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

......................................... Celebrate Good Times

.............................................. Hippie Supergroup

.....................................................Weed-Friendly

.........................................................Super Weird

.............................................................Patchouli

................................................... Steal Your Face

..................................... Public-Access Celebrity

................................................... Bad at Rhyming

.................................................. Locally Sourced

................................................ Possible Puppets

..............................................Questionable Hype

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Heartless Bastards, These United States: 7 p.m., $14 advance. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Penguin Prison, Class Actress, and more: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 31 Danzig and Doyle performing the Misfits with Hammerlord: 7 p.m. Uptown Theater. JUNE FRIDAY 1 KC Music Festival featuring Wiz Khalifa, Flo Rida, 3OH!3, Matisyahu, DEV, New Boyz, Outasight, Morgan Page, and more: Berkley Riverfront Park. New Edition: Sprint Center. SATURDAY 2 Buzz Beach Ball featuring Foster the People, Sublime with Rome, the Shins, Flogging Molly, Metric, the Kooks, the Joy Formidable, the Dirty Heads, Kimbra, the Antlers: Livestrong Sporting Park. KC Music Festival featuring Wiz Khalifa, Flo Rida, 3OH!3, Matisyahu, DEV, New Boyz, Outasight, Morgan Page, and more: Berkley Riverfront Park. TUESDAY 5 Nickelback, Bush, Seether, My Darkest Days: Sprint Center. SUNDAY 10 Kenny Chesney, Tim McGraw, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals: Arrowhead Stadium. Destroyer: The Granada. SATURDAY 16 Girl Talk: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District. SUNDAY 17 Barry Manilow: Starlight Theatre. Don Williams: Uptown Theater. TUESDAY 19 Idina Menzel: The Midland. THURSDAY 21 The Flaming Lips: Liberty Hall, Lawrence. REO Speedwagon, Styx, Ted Nugent: Starlight Theatre. FRIDAY 22 The Flaming Lips: Liberty Hall, Lawrence. SATURDAY 23 Colbie Caillat and Gavin DeGraw: 4:30 p.m. Starlight Theatre.

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Y A D I R F FIRST

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Every First Friday the place to be is the Indie on Main for the First Friday Pitch Party! Become an Indie “Rock Star” and get Happy Hour drink prices all night!

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THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS

NIGHTLIFE

CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART 1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400 Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 4

F R I D AY 2 5

ROCK/POP/INDIE

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Second Signal, Seventh Day, the Devil’s Marmalade.

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Appropriate Grammar, Knifecrime, and more. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Ted Hoffman, 6 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Kahldera. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, MORE Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The M80s. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 S Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff ING LIST E AT Bergen’s Elvis Show, 7 p.m. IN ONL M The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., PITCH.CO 816-561-2821. The Patrick Lentz Band. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Kink Alfred, Hide in the Shallows, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Sluts, the Devil, Going to Hell in a Leather Jacket.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm wed 5/23 Sc gel Set,ammerS, mr. 666 th howarudr 5/24 Sara Sw BarclaY IceBerg, d enSon aV martIn, rach Id george, Fr KnIFe cIr5/25 aPProPr el PollacK Iate Ime Sat 5/26 , In the BacK ogF rammer, touch o a BlacK Fc car Sat 5/26 hImalaYa olor 5Pm n adVen the natu Sat 6/2 a ral State, theture league torna croS dead rSInthe earth, FIl doeS mon 6/4 thY 13 g e r S KararoK e - the re turn oF

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SIGHTS, SOUNDS, IMPERIAL FLAVOR 1531 GRAND, KANSAS CITY, MO (816) 421-0300 - www.czarkc.com

NOW HIRING

FOOD BY

TUE - Elkhart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco from 6-10pm & TacoTuesday w/Czar-rita specials WED - Indie Hit Makers Showcase w/Industry Q&A Panel from 6-9:30pm w/Host Mike Borgia/Gurerilla Movement Showcase 10pm-Close THUR - Philly Thursday’s/Hot Caution w/Vi Tran, Katie Gilchrist & friends FRI - Fish Taco Friday’s w/Czar-rita & craft beer specials 1ST FRIDAY EVENTS FEATURING LOCAL AND REGIONAL ARTISTS EVERY MONTH!

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B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Roland Allan Band. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Brian Ruskin Blues Jam. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. The Bluz Benderz.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Sara Swenson, Howard Iceberg, David George, Barclay Martin, Rachel Pollack. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. John Joiner Band. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Ants, Schwervon, 10 p.m.

DJ Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. DJ Modrey Hepburn. Pizza Bar: 1320 Grand, 816-221-8466. DJ Parle presents Extra Cheese, 8-11 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Gaurav.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. KC Sound Collective.

WORLD Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jose Hendrix. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live Reggae with AZ-ONE.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Ladies’ Night. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Fat Thursday. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Karaoke with Mad Mike, 9:30 p.m. Marquee Lounge: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. 4 to 7 Cocktail Hour, 4 p.m.; Thursday West Coast Retro Dance Nights. McFadden’s Sports Saloon: 1330 Grand, 816-471-1330. All In Thursdays. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne, 9 p.m.

EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One FRIDAY, MAY 25 The Patrick Lentz Band - 10 pm SATURDAY, MAY 26 Camp Harlow - 5 pm Groove Agency - 10 pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Vi Tran and Katie Gilchrist’s Jam. Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open Mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

REGGAE Afrobeat: 9922 Holmes, 816-943-6333. Reggae Rockers, 10 p.m. Park Place: 117th St. and Nall, Leawood, 913-381-2229. Soca Jukebox, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. KC Rocklahoma Launch Party with Hessler, Wild Street, Black Oxygen, Diemonds, 6 p.m.

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RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Chevy Music Showcase Launch Party with the Sons of Great Dane, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. City in Motion Burlesque, 7:30 p.m.; fashion show, 9 p.m.

CLUB

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Megan Boyer. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Filthy 13, Scottyboy Daniels Blues Band. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Klear Ambition. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. The Bus Co., the Ready Bros., 6 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Kyle Elliott.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The News Room: 3740 Broadway, 816-561-1099. The Misery Jackals, the Fall Down Drunks. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Them Damned Young Livers, Joey Henry and Brook Blanche of the Calamity Cubes, the Rackatees, Bombs Over Broadway, 9 p.m.

DJ 77 South: 5041 W. 135th St., Leawood, 913-742-7727. DJ BFame. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Acoustapalooza with Simone du Garfunk, Scott Allan Knost, Tyler Gregory, 8 p.m., $5. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Eddie Delahunt. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Tiny Horse, Akkilles, Vi Tran Band, 9:30 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward Band, 8:30 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Rich Hill, 8 p.m. Lucky Brewgrille: 5401 Johnson Dr., Mission, 913-403-8571. Ron Carlson Trio. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. The Stan Kessler Quartet, 7 p.m. Papa Lew’s Soul Delicious: 2128 E. 12th St., 816-421-3378. Maurice Hayes. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Chris Hazelton Trio (CD release), 8 p.m. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Lavell Crawford, 8 & 10:30 p.m.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913-322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Ladies’ Night, Low Dough lady specials, 10 p.m. KC Live! Block at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Downtown Is Happy, 4 p.m.


STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

ste of KC

a The Pitch’s T

The Pitch’s Tas te

of KC

The Pitch’s Taste of KC

Upcoming Events

Pitch Taste of KC @ LIVE! Power & Light

5.26 - WEIR, ROBINSON & GREEN @ KC Crossroads 5.31 - CLIPS OF FAITH NEW BELGIUM EVENT @ Theiss Park 5.31 - THE DEVIL MAKES 3 @ KC Crossroads

See more on the “promotions” link on the p pitch.com

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McFadden’s Sports Saloon: 1330 Grand, 816-471-1330. MC Luau. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. The Early Girlie Show, 8 p.m., free; Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 10 p.m. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-421-4201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Filipino Karaoke, hosted by Sundae Domingo Halog Jr., 7 p.m., $5.

SKA Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Checkered Beat, 10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Prolific, Wick and the Tricks, Ab5uRdUm, Showtyme and the Showstoppers, the Cave Girls, Wicken, transgendered benefit show, 8 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 6 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Psychostick, Goes Cube, Exotic Petting Zoo, Downtown Brown, High Rise Robots, 6 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Cloud Dog (album release), Spirit is the Spirit, Glass Masks. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Himalayan Adventure League (CD release), late show. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Brisbanes, Bonnie Franken. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Hearts of Darkness, Cowboy Indian Bear, Ad Astra Arkestra. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Bob Harvey Band. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Nervous Rex. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. After Nation, A Stranger’s Craft, Perelandre, 4 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. In the Grove (CD release), Parts of Speech, Sundiver, Radkey, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; DC Bellamy, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Brody Buster Band. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer and KC Express, 4:30 p.m.; Janet Jameson, 9 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Singer-Songwriter Showcase.

VA R I E T Y Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Art Tougeau parade afterparty with Das Furbender on the patio, 2-5 p.m.

S U N D AY 2 7 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Delorean, 49 Stones, Jessica Thompson, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Kyle Elliott.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Dollar Fox, Jesse Harris & the Gypsy Sparrows, 6 p.m.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night, beer pong, TV trivia, shot dice. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Howl at the Moon: 1334 Grand Blvd., 816-471-4695. Memorial Day Bash. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sunday Solace, 2 p.m., free. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-454-4500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Bump and Hustle with Cyrus D. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Bold with Jason Kidd, Mr. Nuro, Budded, noon. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. DJ Excel.

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Night Sermon with house band Booty Bass, and guests, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brody Buster Open Blues Jam. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Jazz Jam with Nick Rowland and Sansabelt.

HIP-HOP

REGGAE

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Camp Harlow, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Plainsmen, Backfat, 9 p.m.

DJ

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-384-5646. Yung Track. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite.

ACOUSTIC Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Chad Abernathy, 6 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Clint Martinez.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. The Stan Kessler Quartet, 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Snuff Jazz.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Hot & Ugly, Forest of Luxury, Since Nulius, 10 p.m.

Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Jah Lion.

VA R I E T Y Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Cover Wars, 8 p.m.

M O N D AY 2 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Supercrush. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Finn McCool, Deathblack Flowers, Dojo for Crooks, 9 p.m.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Liquid Lounge.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Big Band Monday with Louis Neal Big Band, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5.

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T U E S D AY 2 9

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

ROCK/POP/INDIE

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Supermassive Black Holes. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Piano time with T.J. Erhardt. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Scotty Boy Daniel Blues Band. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Brother Bagman.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Faster Than Hell, Billion Headed Bastard, Mile High Club. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Travelers Guild. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Drew6. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Morning Teleportation, Nicos Gun. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. The Bright Light Social Hour.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

JAZZ Sullivan’s Steakhouse & Saloon: 4501 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-345-0800. Candace Evans Duo, 6 p.m.

COMEDY

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart, 6 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 10 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. DJ night. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tasteless Tuesdays hosted by Kim and Candice, with DJ Charlie, rock, punk, Nintendo games, Missouri beer specials, and midnight riot, 9 p.m., free.

ACOUSTIC RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rock Paper Scissors, 6 p.m.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Max Groove.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Bingo with Alicia Solo; Scrabble Club, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. It’s Karaoke Time!. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critter’s Tye Dye Tuesday. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke.

EASY LISTENING Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 7:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

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Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends . The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Need info

Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y

? o g e h t on on your ph one!

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Club Wars. Madrigall: 1627 Oak, 816-472-4400. 2 Step Tuesday, free for ladies. Tacos available. Featuring KC Elite 2 Steppers, and Grown & Sexy Sliders. Marquee Lounge: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Clear Ten Tengo, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 3 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sona, Flying Cars, Black on Black, 9 p.m.; Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

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Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/COUNTRY Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Elizabeth Cook, Tim Carroll, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/ DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-345-9717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-4998392. Pinball tournament, cash prize E for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. R MO Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 S G IN per game. LIST E AT N I Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd ONL M St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke, Ladies’ PITCH.CO Night. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Ultimate DJ Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. Marquee Lounge: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. 4 to 7 Cocktail Hour, 4 p.m.; Live Music Wednesdays + Guys Night Out with Mark Lowrey, 7 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. Outabounds Sports Bar & Grill: 3601 Broadway, 816-2148732. Karaoke with DJ Chad, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Strikerz Entertainment Center: 18900 E. Valley View Pkwy, Independence, 816-313-5166. Ladies’ Night, DJ, ladies bowl for free in the Spare Room Party Room; live DJ, 9 p.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Pop Culture Trivia. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m. Wilde’s Chateau 24: 2412 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-856-1514. Pride Night, 8 p.m.

CLUB

EASY LISTENING Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 6 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Kingmaker, Sworn In, Tycho Brahe, Conflicts, Aerodyne Flex, Kaiju, 6 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Indie Hit Makers, 6 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Amy Farrand’s Weirdo Wednesday Social Club, 7 p.m., no cover.


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S AVA G E L O V E

FA S T T I M E S

Dear Dan: I’m a 17-year-old girl and, in most

aspects, I’m confident with myself, my identity and my body. Earlier this year, I met a girl. She had some serious drama at home and needed to get out of her house, so I let her stay at mine. Things went a LOT further than I was ready for. I had just had my first kiss the month before, and I didn’t feel like our relationship was ready for sex, but I went along with it because she never gave me a chance to slow things down or say no. My feelings for her are gone; she is attractive, but we don’t connect. But she has feelings for me. How can I get her to understand, or at least respect, how I feel if she doesn’t understand why this was a big deal for me?

Growing Older Youth Dear GOY: There’s a movement in sex-ed cir-

cles to replace the old opt-out consent mantra, “No means no,” with a new, improved opt-in consent mantra, “Yes means yes.” YMY says it’s not good enough to wait for the other person to stop the action with a “no,” which many people — particularly young people, particularly young girl people — have a hard time doing. You have to get a “yes.” But the kind of person who doesn’t give you a chance to say “no” is unlikely to solicit a “yes.” Which is why we all need to advocate for ourselves in the moment. And you failed to do that — you failed to advocate for yourself in the moment. I don’t say that to make you feel bad or to shift the blame onto your shoulders. I say it because we’ve all been there. Most confident, sexually active adults can point to an early experience that went too far, too fast, a sexual encounter that left us feeling the way you did after you had sex with this girl. And it’s possible to walk away from an experience like that — one that left you feeling shitty and powerless — feeling empowered to advocate for yourself in uncomfortable sexual situations in the future, provided you learn the right lesson. Here’s the wrong lesson: “I’m a total fuckup who can’t speak up for myself when I’m having sex, so I’d better not have sex again. Ever.” That’s bullshit, and what’s worse, that kind of thinking can make a person more vulnerable the next time she winds up in bed with an insensitive jerk. Here’s the right lesson: “I don’t have to wait for someone to give me a ‘chance’ to say no. I can and will say no whenever I want to. I’m not going to let this happen to me again because I never want to feel this way again. Ever.” As for the girl, tell her straight up that you don’t have feelings for her. And tell her why: Things went too far, too fast, and the sex ruined it for you. Don’t sugarcoat things to avoid hurting her feelings because she’s got a lesson to learn, too. Hers goes like this: “I didn’t ask the person I was with — someone I really liked — if she was cool with what we

34

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were doing, and I totally fucked myself out of what could’ve been a really great relationship. I’m not going to do that to anyone again. Ever.”

Dear Dan: I’m a 16-year-old bisexual guy. I have been in a long-distance relationship since September. My girlfriend — let’s call her “Selena” — and I have a good relationship but, both of us being bisexual, we have discussed the possibility of having relationships with same-gender partners on the side. I recently attended my city’s LGBTQ prom. There, I met a 17-year-old guy whom I found somewhat attractive. I gave him my number, and he has been texting me often, which makes me feel both uncomfortable and enthralled. Some of the texts that “Dave” has sent me are sexual in nature. He lives very close to where I do. I am a virgin — both genders considered — and the idea of sex right now makes me uneasy. But I am interested. Still, sex scares me at this point, and I don’t think I’m ready. As such, this afternoon, I told Dave that I felt we were moving too fast. He agreed. I suppose I have two questions: 1. I’m worried about the outcome if I tell Selena about my “crush.” I feel inhibited. How do I bring it up? 2. How can I have a good relationship with Dave in a nonsexual way? I like him a lot, but is friendship too much to ask since he is sexually active and I am not?

Not Agreeable Intervals P.S. My apologies if this problem is a bit juvenile. Dear NAI: 1. Openly, honestly, directly and without hesitation. It might help if you remind yourself — again and again — that while the stakes may feel high right now, they’re actually quite low. It sounds like your relationship with Selena has allowed you to explore

BY

D A N S AVA G E

the emotional and social aspects of dating without any sexual pressures or expectations. And that’s been good for you, and you’ll be bummed when your relationship with Selena ends. But you shouldn’t be too bummed: There just aren’t a lot of adults out there who are still dating — or are married to — the folks they were dating in high school. (There are some, of course, just as there are some 90-year-old pack-a-day smokers.) So your relationship with Selena is most likely destined to end at some point. And if a conversation about Dave prompts Selena to end things, well, your relationship with Selena was destined to end at some point, right? Tell her this: “I met this boy, and he’s been texting me. I don’t want to date him — I’m only somewhat attracted to him — but I’m enjoying the attention. But we should talk about that same-gender-partners-onthe-side arrangement. Not because I’m going to jump into bed with this guy. I’m not ready for sex. But we should talk about this stuff before I meet a boy I do want to have sex with.” If Selena fl ips and dumps you, then she wasn’t open to you exploring your same-sex attractions. Which means your relationship with her wasn’t just destined to end but needed to end. 2. Don’t assume that Dave couldn’t possibly be interested in a friendship because he’s sexually active. Lots of sexually active people have friends, and most of us are capable of forming new friendships. If a friendship is “too much to ask” of Dave — if he’s only interested in your dick — he’ll let you know by disappearing on you or by accepting your friendship under false pretenses. If he disappears on you, well, he wasn’t a very nice guy, and you didn’t lose much. If he accepts your friendship only so he can continue pressuring you for sex, well, then he’s not a very nice guy, and you won’t lose much when you disappear on him. But he might be up for a friendship. Lots of sexually active people are. So ask. CONFIDENTIAL TO CANADIAN HERITAGE MINISTER JAMES MOORE AND CONSERVATIVE MP DEAN DEL MASTRO: Please shut down that sex-ed exhibit (Sex: A Tell-All Exhibition) at the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa! I don’t want Canadian kids to get “reliable answers to their [sex] questions” from museums. I want Canadian kids to get drunkenly dashed-off answers to their sex questions from gay sex-advice columnists. And so, it seems, do both of you. I sure do appreciate your support, guys. Now go shut that fucker down. Thanks! Find Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH


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35


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Zone (some serviCe fees apply)

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CCAREER EDUCATION UC O

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The Pitch May 24, 2012